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Sample records for cryocooler stabilized cryogenic

  1. Ultra-low vibration pulse-tube cryocooler stabilized cryogenic sapphire oscillator with 10^-16 fractional frequency stability

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett, John G

    2010-01-01

    A low maintenance long-term operational cryogenic sapphire oscillator has been implemented at 11.2 GHz using an ultra-low-vibration cryostat and pulse-tube cryocooler. It is currently the world's most stable microwave oscillator employing a cryocooler. Its performance is explained in terms of temperature and frequency stability. The phase noise and the Allan deviation of frequency fluctuations have been evaluated by comparing it to an ultra-stable liquid-helium cooled cryogenic sapphire oscillator in the same laboratory. Assuming both contribute equally, the Allan deviation evaluated for the cryocooled oscillator is sigma_y = 1 x 10^-15 tau^-1/2 for integration times 1 < tau < 10 s with a minimum sigma_y = 3.9 x 10^-16 at tau = 20 s. The long term frequency drift is less than 5 x 10^-14/day. From the measured power spectral density of phase fluctuations the single side band phase noise can be represented by L_phi(f) = 10^-14.0/f^4+10^-11.6/f^3+10^-10.0/f^2+10^-10.2/f+ 10^-11.0 for Fourier frequencies 10...

  2. Cryogenic infrared mission “JAXA/SPICA” with advanced cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spica Working Group; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Takao; Murakami, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Nagai, Hiroki; Murakami, Masahide; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Hirabayashi, Masayuki; SPICA Working Group

    2006-02-01

    Since the next cryogenic infrared mission "JAXA/SPICA" employs advanced mechanical cryocoolers with effective radiant cooling in place of cryogen, the primary mirror, 3.5 m in diameter, and the optical bench can be maintained at 4.5 K for at least 5 years. First, the feasibility of the thermal design of the cryogenic system is presented. A 20 K-class Stirling cryocooler was then improved in cooling capacity and reliability for the mission, and the effects of contaminated working gas or new regenerator materials on cooling performance were investigated. Development of a new 3He-JT (Joule-Thomson) cryocooler for use at 1.7 K is also described, along with the successful results of a cooling capacity higher than the required 10 mW. A 4 K-class cryocooler was modified and developed for higher reliability over a five-year operational life and a higher cooling capacity exceeding the current 30 mW. Finally, we discuss a system for heat rejection from cryocoolers using thermal control devices.

  3. Cryogenic cooling with cryocooler on a rotating system

    CERN Document Server

    Oguri, Shugo; Kawai, Masanori; Tajima, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    We developed a system that continuously maintains a cryocooler for long periods on a rotating table. A cryostat that holds the cryocooler is set on the table. A compressor is located on the ground and supplies high-purity (> 99.999%) and high-pressure (1.7 MPa) helium gas and electricity to the cryocooler. The operation of the cryocooler and other instruments requires the development of interface components between the ground and rotating table. A combination of access holes at the center of the table and two rotary joints allows simultaneous circulation of electricity and helium gas. The developed system provides two innovative functions under the rotating condition; cooling from room temperature and the maintenance of a cold condition for long periods. We have confirmed these abilities as well as temperature stability under a condition of continuous rotation at 20 revolutions per minute. The developed system can be applied in various fields; e.g., in tests of Lorentz invariance, searches for axion, radio as...

  4. Cryogenic cooling with cryocooler on a rotating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, S; Choi, J; Kawai, M; Tajima, O

    2013-05-01

    We developed a system that continuously maintains a cryocooler for long periods on a rotating table. A cryostat that holds the cryocooler is set on the table. A compressor is located on the ground and supplies high-purity (>99.999%) and high-pressure (1.7 MPa) helium gas and electricity to the cryocooler. The operation of the cryocooler and other instruments requires the development of interface components between the ground and rotating table. A combination of access holes at the center of the table and two rotary joints allows simultaneous circulation of electricity and helium gas. The developed system provides two innovative functions under the rotating condition, cooling from room temperature and the maintenance of a cold condition for long periods. We have confirmed these abilities as well as temperature stability under a condition of continuous rotation at 20 rpm. The developed system can be applied in various fields, e.g., in tests of Lorentz invariance, searches for axion, radio astronomy, and cosmology, and application of radar systems. In particular, there is a plan to use this system for a radio telescope observing cosmic microwave background radiation.

  5. Cryogenic cooling with cryocooler on a rotating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, S.; Choi, J.; Kawai, M.; Tajima, O.

    2013-05-01

    We developed a system that continuously maintains a cryocooler for long periods on a rotating table. A cryostat that holds the cryocooler is set on the table. A compressor is located on the ground and supplies high-purity (>99.999%) and high-pressure (1.7 MPa) helium gas and electricity to the cryocooler. The operation of the cryocooler and other instruments requires the development of interface components between the ground and rotating table. A combination of access holes at the center of the table and two rotary joints allows simultaneous circulation of electricity and helium gas. The developed system provides two innovative functions under the rotating condition, cooling from room temperature and the maintenance of a cold condition for long periods. We have confirmed these abilities as well as temperature stability under a condition of continuous rotation at 20 rpm. The developed system can be applied in various fields, e.g., in tests of Lorentz invariance, searches for axion, radio astronomy, and cosmology, and application of radar systems. In particular, there is a plan to use this system for a radio telescope observing cosmic microwave background radiation.

  6. Advanced, Long-Life Cryocooler Technology for Zero-Boil-Off Cryogen Storage Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-life, high-capacity cryocoolers are a critical need for future space systems utilizing stored cryogens. The cooling requirements for planetary and...

  7. ELISA: a cryocooled 10 GHz oscillator with 10-15 frequency stability

    CERN Document Server

    Grop, S; Bazin, N; Kersale, Y; Rubiola, E; Langham, C; Oxborrow, M; Clapton, D; Walker, S; De Vicente, J; Giordano, V

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the design, the breadboarding and the validation of an ultra-stable Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator operated in an autonomous cryocooler. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of a frequency stability of 3x10-15 between 1 s and 1,000 s for the European Space Agency deep space stations. This represents the lowest fractional frequency instability ever achieved with cryocoolers. The preliminary results presented in this paper validate the design we adopted for the sapphire resonator, the cold source and the oscillator loop.

  8. ELISA: a cryocooled 10 GHz oscillator with 10(-15) frequency stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grop, S; Bourgeois, P Y; Bazin, N; Kersalé, Y; Rubiola, E; Langham, C; Oxborrow, M; Clapton, D; Walker, S; De Vicente, J; Giordano, V

    2010-02-01

    This article reports the design, the breadboarding, and the validation of an ultrastable cryogenic sapphire oscillator operated in an autonomous cryocooler. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of a frequency stability of 3x10(-15) between 1 and 1000 s for the European Space Agency deep space stations. This represents the lowest fractional frequency instability ever achieved with cryocoolers. The preliminary results presented in this paper validate the design we adopted for the sapphire resonator, the cold source, and the oscillator loop.

  9. Miniature Stirling cryocoolers at Thales Cryogenics: qualification results and integration solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, R.; Martin, J.-Y.; Willems, D.; Seguineau, C.; de Jonge, G.; Van Acker, S.; Mullié, J.; Le Bordays, J.; Benschop, T.

    2016-05-01

    During the 2015 SPIE-DSS conference, Thales Cryogenics presented new miniature cryocoolers for high operating temperatures. In this paper, an update is given regarding the qualification programme performed on these new products. Integration aspects are discussed, including an in-depth examination of the influence of the dewar cold finger on sizing and performance of the cryocooler. The UP8197 will be placed in the reference frame of the Thales product range of high-reliability linear cryocoolers, while the rotary solution will be considered as the most compact solution in the Thales portfolio. Compatibility of the cryocoolers design with new and existing 1/4" dewar designs is examined, and potential future developments are presented.

  10. Cryogenic performance of a cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerst, J. D.; Doose, C.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator has been installed and operated with beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The device consists of a dual-core 42-pole magnet structure that is cooled to 4.2 K with a system of four cryocoolers operating in a zero-boil-off configuration. This effort represents the culmination of a development program to establish concept feasibility and evaluate cryostat design and cryocooler-based refrigeration. Cryostat performance is described including cool-down/warm-up, steady-state operation, cooling margin, and the impact of beam during operation in the APS storage ring. Plans for future devices with longer magnets, which will incorporate lessons learned from the development program, are also discussed.

  11. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 201800 (China); Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D. [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2014-01-29

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  12. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, M. M.; Zhang, D. X.; Xu, D.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H2 from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H2 in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  13. Cryogenic mechanical property testing system directly cooled by G-M cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R. J.; Liu, Q.; Li, L. F.; Gong, L. H.; Liu, H. M.; Xu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic mechanical properties are generally considered to be some of the most important parameters in cryogenic engineering. Therefore, it is very important to test and investigate mechanical properties at low temperatures. Most systems for cryogenic mechanical property testing are cooled using liquid nitrogen (300 K-77 K) or liquid helium (77 K-4.2 K). As we know, liquid helium is relatively rare and thus expensive. In this study, to attain accurate and stable intermediate temperatures and reduce testing cost, a cryogenic mechanical property testing system cooled by a G-M cryocooler was studied and developed. In this system, the sample can be cooled down to 10.5 K after about 10 hours of running. The tension, bending and compression testing (load range up to 50 kN) can be carried out.

  14. High-precision temperature control and stabilization using a cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Daiki; Murata, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Hiroya; Komine, Takashi

    2010-09-01

    We describe a method for precisely controlling temperature using a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler that involves inserting fiber-reinforced-plastic dampers into a conventional cryosystem. Temperature fluctuations in a GM cryocooler without a large heat bath or a stainless-steel damper at 4.2 K are typically of the order of 200 mK. It is particularly difficult to control the temperature of a GM cryocooler at low temperatures. The fiber-reinforced-plastic dampers enabled us to dramatically reduce temperature fluctuations at low temperatures. A standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations of 0.21 mK could be achieved when the temperature was controlled at 4.200 0 K using a feedback temperature control system with two heaters. Adding the dampers increased the minimum achievable temperature from 3.2 to 3.3 K. Precise temperature control between 4.200 0 and 300.000 K was attained using the GM cryocooler, and the standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations was less than 1.2 mK even at 300 K. This technique makes it possible to control and stabilize the temperature using a GM cryocooler.

  15. Sub-millikelvin stabilization of a closed cycle cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuis, Guy; He, Xi; Božović, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    Intrinsic temperature oscillations (with the amplitude up to 1 K) of a closed cycle cryocooler are stabilized by a simple thermal damping system. It employs three different materials with different thermal conductivity and specific heat at various temperatures. The amplitude of oscillations of the sample temperature is reduced to less than 1 mK, in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, while the cooling power is virtually undiminished. The damping system is small, inexpensive, can be retrofitted to most existing closed cycle cryocoolers, and may improve measurements of any temperature-sensitive physics properties.

  16. A cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by miniature pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. B.; Liu, S. X.; Gu, K. X.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by a miniature pulse tube cryocooler. At present, tensile tests are widely applied to measure the mechanical properties of materials; most of the cryogenic tensile testing apparatus are designed for samples with standard sizes, while for non-standard size samples, especially for microsamples, the tensile testing cannot be conducted. The general approach to cool down the specimens for tensile testing is by using of liquid nitrogen or liquid helium, which is not convenient: it is difficult to keep the temperature of the specimens at an arbitrary set point precisely, besides, in some occasions, liquid nitrogen, especially liquid helium, is not easily available. To overcome these limitations, a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus cooled by a high frequency pulse tube cryocooler has been designed, built and tested. The operating temperatures of the developed tensile testing apparatus cover from 20 K to room temperature with a controlling precision of ±10 mK. The apparatus configurations, the methods of operation and some cooling performance will be described in this paper.

  17. Miniature cryocooler developments for high operating temperatures at Thales Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, R.; Martin, J.-Y.; Willems, D.; Seguineau, C.; Van Acker, S.; Mullié, J. C.; Göbel, A.; Tops, M.; Le Bordays, J.; Etchanchu, T.; Benschop, A. A. J.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years there has been a drive towards miniaturized cooled IDCA solutions for low-power, low-mass, low-size products (SWaP). To support this drive, coolers are developed optimized for high-temperature, low heat load dewar-detector assemblies. In this paper, Thales Cryogenics development activities supporting SWaP are presented. Design choices are discussed and compared to various key requirements. Trade-off analysis results are presented on drive voltage, cold finger definition (length, material, diameter and sealing concept), and other interface considerations, including cold finger definition. In parallel with linear and rotary cooler options, designs for small-size high-efficiency drive electronics based on state-of-the-art architectures are presented.

  18. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber.

  19. A Cryogen Recycler with Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Recondensing Helium and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Lichtenwalter, B.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a cryogen recycler using a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler for recondensing helium and nitrogen in a NMR magnet. The liquid helium cooled NMR magnet has a liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield. The magnet boils off 0.84 L/day of liquid helium and 6 L/day of liquid nitrogen. The recycler is designed with both a liquid helium return tube and a liquid nitrogen return tube, which are inserted into the fill ports of liquid helium and nitrogen. Therefore the recycler forms closed loops for helium and nitrogen. A two-stage 4 K pulse tube cryocooler, Cryomech model PT407 (0.7W at 4.2 K), is selected for the recycler. The recycler was first tested with a Cryomech's test cryostat and resulted in the capacities of recondensing 8.2 L/day of nitrogen and liquefying 4 L/day of helium from room temperature gas. The recycler has been installed in the NMR magnet at University of Sydney since August, 2014 and continuously maintains a zero boil off for helium and nitrogen.

  20. Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator using a low-vibration design pulse-tube cryocooler: First results

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett, John G; Wang, Chao; Floch, Jean-Michel Le

    2010-01-01

    A Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator has been implemented at 11.2 GHz using a low-vibration design pulse-tube cryocooler. Compared with a state-of-the-art liquid helium cooled CSO in the same laboratory, the square root Allan variance of their combined fractional frequency instability is $\\sigma_y = 1.4 \\times 10^{-15}\\tau^{-1/2}$ for integration times $1 < \\tau < 10$ s, dominated by white frequency noise. The minimum $\\sigma_y = 5.3 \\times 10^{-16}$ for the two oscillators was reached at $\\tau = 20$ s. Assuming equal contributions from both CSOs, the single oscillator phase noise $S_{\\phi} \\approx -96 \\; dB \\; rad^2/Hz$ at 1 Hz offset from the carrier.

  1. Cryogenic sapphire oscillator using a low-vibration design pulse-tube cryocooler: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, John; Nand, Nitin; Wang, Chao; Floch, Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    A cryogenic sapphire oscillator (CSO) has been implemented at 11.2 GHz using a low-vibration design pulsetube cryocooler. Compared with a state-of-the-art liquid helium cooled CSO in the same laboratory, the square root Allan variance of their combined fractional frequency instability is sigma(y) = 1.4 x 10(-15)tau(-1/2) for integration times 1 < tau < 10 s, dominated by white frequency noise. The minimum sigmay = 5.3 x 10(-16) for the two oscillators was reached at tau = 20 s. Assuming equal contributions from both CSOs, the single oscillator phase noise S(phi) approximately -96 dB x rad(2)/Hz at 1 Hz set from the carrier.

  2. Vibrational stability of a cryocooled horizontal double-crystal monochromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Paw; Johansson, Ulf; Ursby, Thomas; Jensen, Brian Norsk

    2016-01-01

    The vibrational stability of a horizontally deflecting double-crystal monochromator (HDCM) is investigated. Inherently a HDCM will preserve the vertical beam stability better than a ‘normal’ vertical double-crystal monochromator as the vibrations of a HDCM will almost exclusively affect the horizontal stability. Here both the relative pitch vibration between the first and second crystal and the absolute pitch vibration of the second crystal are measured. All reported measurements are obtained under active cooling by means of flowing liquid nitrogen (LN2). It is found that it is favorable to circulate the LN2 at high pressures and low flow rates (up to 5.9 bar and down to 3 l min−1 is tested) to attain low vibrations. An absolute pitch stability of the second crystal of 18 nrad RMS, 2–2500 Hz, and a relative pitch stability between the two crystals of 25 nrad RMS, 1–2500 Hz, is obtained under cryocooling conditions that allow for 1516 W to be adsorbed by the LN2 before it vaporizes. PMID:27577758

  3. The Autonomous Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator: A Reference for Frequency Stability and Phase Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, V.; Grop, S.; Fluhr, C.; Dubois, B.; Kersalé, Y.; Rubiola, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) is the microwave oscillator which feature the highest short-term stability. Our best units exhibit Allan deviation σy (τ) of 4.5x10-16 at 1s, ≈ 1.5x10-16 at 100 s ≤ t ≤ 5,000 s (floor), and ≤ 5x10-15 at one day. The use of a Pulse-Tube cryocooler enables full two year operation with virtually no maintenance. Starting with a short history of the CSO in our lab, we go through the architecture and we provide more details about the resonator, the cryostat, the oscillator loop, and the servo electronics. We implemented three similar oscillators, which enable the evaluation of each with the three- cornered hat method, and provide the potential for Allan deviation measurements at parts of 10-17 level. One of our CSOs (ULISS) is transportable, and goes with a small customized truck. The unique feature of ULISS is that its σy (τ) can be validated at destination by measuring before and after the roundtrip. To this extent, ULISS can be regarded as a traveling standard of frequency stability. The CSOs are a part of the Oscillator IMP project, a platform dedicated to the measurement of noise and short-term stability of oscillators and devices in the whole radio spectrum (from MHz to THz), including microwave photonics. The scope spans from routine measurements to the research on new oscillators, components, and measurement methods.

  4. Stability and Phase Noise Tests of Two Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi T.

    1998-01-01

    A cryocooled Compensated Sapphire Oscillator (CSO), developed for the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment, and operating in the 8K - 10K temperature range was previously demonstrated to show ultra-high stability of sigma(sub y) = 2.5 x 10 (exp -15) for measuring times 200 seconds less than or equal to tau less than or equal to 600 seconds using a hydrogen maser as reference. We present here test results for a second unit which allows CSO short-term stability and phase noise to be measured for the first time. Also included are design details of a new RF receiver and an intercomparison with the first CSO unit. Cryogenic oscillators operating below about 10K offer the highest possible short term stability of any frequency sources. However, their use has so far been restricted to research environments due to the limited operating periods associated with liquid helium consumption. The cryocooled CSO is being built in support of the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment and is designed to operate continuously for periods of a year or more. Performance targets are a stability of 3-4 x 10 (exp -15) (1 second less than or equal to tau less than or equal to 100 seconds) and phase noise of -73dB/Hz @ 1Hz measured at 34 GHz. Installation in 5 stations of NASA's deep space network (DSN) is planned in the years 2000 - 2002. In the previous tests, actual stability of the CSO for measuring times tau less than or equal to 200 seconds could not be directly measured, being masked by short-term fluctuations of the H-maser reference. Excellent short-term performance, however, could be inferred by the success of an application of the CSO as local oscillator (L.O.) to the JPL LITS passive atomic standard, where medium-term stability showed no degradation due to L.O. instabilities at a level of (sigma)y = 3 x 10 (exp -14)/square root of tau. A second CSO has now been constructed, and all cryogenic aspects have been verified, including a resonator turn-over temperature of 7.907 K

  5. Passive Capillary Pumped Cryocooling System for Zero-Boil-Off Cryogen Storage Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Significant cost and weight savings of a space mission can be achieved by improving the cryogenic storage technology. Added cryogen mass due to the cryogen boil-off,...

  6. 1 K cryostat with sub-millikelvin stability based on a pulse-tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMann, A.; Mueller, Sara; Field, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic system has been designed and tested that reaches a temperature below 1.1 K, with an rms temperature stability of 25 μ K. In this system a commercial pulse-tube cryocooler is used to liquify helium gas supplied from an external source. This liquid helium enters a 1 K pot through a large-impedance capillary tube, similar to a conventional 1 K system operated from a liquid helium bath. Unlike a conventional system, however, the molar flow rate of the system can be varied by changing the pressure of the incoming helium. This allows for a trade-off between helium usage and cooling power, which has a maximum value of 27 mW. The measured cooling power and fraction of helium exiting the capillary as liquid agree well with predictions based on an isenthalpic model of helium flow through the capillary. The system is simple to use and inexpensive to operate: The system can be cooled to base temperature in about 3 h and, with a flow rate giving a cooling power of 13 mW, the helium cost is around 6 per day.

  7. Advances on a cryogen-free Vuilleumier type pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Zhao, Yuejing; Zhang, Yibing; Wang, Xiaotao; Vanapalli, Srinivas; Dai, Wei; Li, Haibing; Luo, Ercang

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents experimental results and numerical evaluation of a Vuilleumier (VM) type pulse tube cryocooler. The cryocooler consists of three main subsystems: a thermal compressor, a low temperature pulse tube cryocooler, and a Stirling type precooler. The thermal compressor, similar to that in a Vuilleumier cryocooler, is used to drive the low temperature stage pulse tube cryocooler. The Stirling type precooler is used to establish a temperature difference for the thermal compressor to generate pressure wave. A lowest no-load temperature of 15.1 K is obtained with a pressure ratio of 1.18, a working frequency of 3 Hz and an average pressure of 2.45 MPa. Numerical simulations have been performed to help the understanding of the system performance. With given experimental conditions, the simulation predicts a lowest temperature in reasonable agreement with the experimental result. Analyses show that there is a large discrepancy in the pre-cooling power between experiments and calculation, which requires further investigation.

  8. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-05-22

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping.

  9. 10th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Cryocoolers 10 is the premier archival publication of the latest advances and performance of small cryogenic refrigerators designed to provide localized cooling for military, space, semi-conductor, medical, computing, and high-temperature superconductor cryogenic applications in the 2-200 K temperature range. Composed of papers written by leading engineers and scientists in the field, Cryocoolers 10 reports the most recent advances in cryocooler development, contains extensive performance test results and comparisons, and relates the latest experience in integrating cryocoolers into advanced applications.

  10. Autonomous cryogenic sapphire oscillators employing low vibration pulse-tube cryocoolers at NMIJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Takeshi; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Takamizawa, Akifumi; Hartnett, John G.

    2016-06-01

    Two liquid-helium-cooled cryogenic sapphire-resonator oscillators (CSOs), have been modified to operate using cryo-refrigerators and low-vibration cryostats. The Allan deviation of the first CSO was evaluated to be better than 2 x 10-15 for averaging times of 1 s to 30 000 s, which is better than that of the original liquid helium cooled CSO. The Allan deviation of the second CSO is better than 4 x 10-15 from 1 s to 6 000 s averaging time.

  11. High Pressure Cryocooling of Protein Crystals: The Enigma of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Sol M.

    2010-03-01

    A novel high-pressure cryocooling technique for preparation biological samples for x-ray analysis is described. The method, high-pressure cryocooling, involves cooling samples to cryogenic temperatures (e.g., 100 K) in high-pressure Helium gas (up to 200 MPa). It bears both similarities and differences to high-pressure cooling methods that have been used to prepare samples for electron microscopy, and has been especially useful for cryocooling of macromolecular crystals for x-ray diffraction. Examples will be given where the method has been effective in providing high quality crystallographic data for difficult samples, such as cases where ligands needed to be stabilized in binding sites to be visualized, or where very high resolution data were required. The talk concludes with a discussion of data obtained by high-pressure cryocooling that pertains to two of the most important problems in modern science: the enigma of water and how water affects the activity of proteins.

  12. Recent cryocooler progress in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Y.

    1985-05-01

    The progress of cryocoolers and related devices in Japan is reviewed. The Japanese National Railways has developed the light weight 4 K on-board refrigerators since 1977 as part of the MAGLEV train program. Superconducting and cryogenic fundamental technology was examined which included high performance cryocooler, magnetic refrigerator and superfluid refrigeration. Space cryogenics such as the cooling systems of IR-detectors was studied. Cryocooler for special applications such as cryopump, NMR-CT and JJ devices was investigated. Compact heat exchangers, high performance regenerators and reliable compressors are investigated as a critical component technology.

  13. Stabilizing stainless steel components for cryogenic service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, C. F.

    1967-01-01

    Warpage and creep in stainless steel valve components are decreased by a procedure in which components are machined to a semifinish and then cold soaked in a bath of cryogenic liquid. After the treatment they are returned to ambient temperature and machine finished to the final drawing dimensions.

  14. Thermal Systems (TS): High Capacity Cryocooler Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 20 Watt, 20 Kelvin cryocooler utilizes the reverse turbo-Brayton thermodynamic cycle to cool helium working gas at cryogenic temperatures, circulated through a...

  15. Helium POT System for Maintaining Sample Temperature after Cryocooler Deactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haid, B. J.

    2006-04-01

    A system for maintaining a sample at a constant temperature below 10 K after deactivating the cooling source is demonstrated. In this system, the cooling source is a 4 K GM cryocooler that is joined with the sample through an extension that consists of a helium pot and a thermal resistance. Upon stopping the cryocooler, the power applied to a heater located on the sample side of the thermal resistance is decreased gradually to maintain an appropriate temperature rise across the thermal resistance as the helium pot warms. The sample temperature is held constant in this manner without the use of solid or liquid cryogens and without mechanically disconnecting the sample from the cooler. Shutting off the cryocooler significantly reduces sample motion that results from vibration and expansion/contraction of the cold-head housing. The reduction in motion permits certain procedures that are very sensitive to sample position stability, but are performed with limited duration. A proof-of-concept system was built and operated with the helium pot pressurized to the cryocooler's charge pressure. A sample with 200 mW of continuous heat dissipation was maintained at 7 K while the cryocooler operated intermittently with a duty cycle of 9.5 minutes off and 20 minutes on.

  16. Development of linear Stirling cryocoolers at Thales Cryogenics%泰勒斯低温技术公司线性斯特林制冷机发展现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高瑶; 张永清

    2011-01-01

    The development of linear Stirling cryocoolers at Thales Cryogenics company was introduced. In this paper the technologies of linear compressor and Striling cryocooler cold finger and the main important criteria in the design of the flexure bearing and reliability were summarized.%对泰勒斯低温技术公司线性斯特林制冷机的发展现状进行总结.分别对其线性斯特林制冷机压缩机技术发展、膨胀机技术发展、膜片弹簧设计原则和可靠性增长等方面进行了总结.

  17. The thermal stability of nanocrystalline copper cryogenically milled with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwater, Mark A., E-mail: maatwat2@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partner' s Way, EB I, Room 3002 Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, RDRL-WMM-F, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Roy, Debdas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partner' s Way, EB I, Room 3002 Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Department, NIFFT, Ranchi 834003 (India); Darling, Kristopher A.; Butler, Brady G. [US Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, RDRL-WMM-F, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Scattergood, Ronald O.; Koch, Carl C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partner' s Way, EB I, Room 3002 Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Copper (Cu) was cryogenically milled with tungsten (W) in a high-energy ball mill. The process created W particles dispersed in a nanocrystalline Cu matrix. These 'alloys' were then annealed to a maximum temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C. The addition of W stabilized the Cu at{approx}40 nm during annealing to 400 Degree-Sign C for a 1 at% W composition and to 600 Degree-Sign C for 10 at% W. As evidenced through hardness measurement, the W provided a significant increase in strength over pure Cu, and the 10 at% W material maintained a 2.6 GPa hardness after annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C. The stabilization and strengthening mechanisms are compared against theoretical prediction and found to be in good agreement. Although the strength and stability are significantly improved over pure Cu, the maximum benefit was hindered by an extremely broad W particle size distribution ({approx}5-5000 nm). For the 10 at% W alloy, only half of the added W was reduced to nanoscale where kinetic pinning and strengthening become most effective.

  18. Novel diaphragm based Stirling cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughley, Alan; Tucker, Alan; Gschwendtner, Michael; Sellier, Mathieu

    2012-06-01

    Industrial Research Ltd has developed a unique diaphragm-based pressure wave generator technology for employment in pulse tube and Stirling cryocoolers. The system uses a pair of metal diaphragms to separate the clean cryocooler gas circuit from a conventionally lubricated mechanical driver, thus producing a clean pressure wave with a long-life drive. We have now extended the same diaphragm concept to support and seal the displacer in a free piston Stirling expander. The diaphragms allow displacer movement without rubbing or clearance gap seals, hence allowing for the development of costeffective long-life and efficient Stirling cryocoolers. Initial modeling, operating in conjunction with a 200 cc swept volume pressure wave generator, predicted in excess of 300 W cooling at 77 K with a Carnot efficiency of over 25%. A proof-of-concept prototype has achieved cryogenic temperatures. Details of the concept, modeling, and testing will be presented.

  19. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  20. Electromechanical cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Kenneth W.

    1996-01-01

    An electromechanical cryocooler is disclosed for substantially reducing vibrations caused by the cooler. The direction of the force of the vibrations is measured and a counterforce sufficient to substantially reduce this vibration is calculated and generated. The counterforce is 180.degree. out of phase with the direction of the force of the vibrations.

  1. Acoustic cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  2. Cryocoolers: the state of the art and recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebaugh, Ray

    2009-04-22

    Cryocooler performance and reliability are continually improving. Consequently, they are more and more frequently implemented by physicists in their laboratory experiments or for commercial and space applications. The five kinds of cryocoolers most commonly used to provide cryogenic temperatures for various applications are the Joule-Thomson, Brayton, Stirling, Gifford-McMahon, and pulse tube cryocoolers. Many advances in all types have occurred in the past 20 years that have allowed all of them to be used for a wide variety of applications. The present state of the art and on-going developments of these cryocoolers are reviewed in this paper. In the past five years new research on these cryocoolers has offered the potential to significantly improve them and make them suitable for even more applications. The general trend of this new cryocooler research is also presented.

  3. Design of a Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, G. J.; Wang, R. T.

    1998-04-01

    We present design aspects of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator that is being developed for ultra-high short-term stability and low phase noise in support of the Cassini Ka-band (32-GHz) radio science experiment. With cooling provided by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid helium, this standard is designed to operate continuously for periods of a year or more. Performance targets are a stability of 3 x 10^(-15) (1 second ≤ τ ≤ 100 seconds) and a phase noise of -73 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz measured at 34 GHz. Test results are reported for several subsystems, including the cryocooler, vibration isolation system, and ruby compensating element.

  4. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 35A & 35B - Proceedings of the 1989 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, University of California, Los Angeles, July 24-28, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, R. W.

    The book presents a review of literature on superfluid helium, together with papers under the topics on heat and mass transfer in He II; applications of He II for cooling superconducting devices in space; heat transfer to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen; multilayer insulation; applications of superconductivity, including topics on magnets and other devices, magnet stability and coil protection, and cryogenic techniques; and refrigeration for electronics. Other topics discussed include refrigeration of superconducting systems; the expanders, cold compressors, and pumps for liquid helium; dilution refrigerators; magnetic refrigerators; pulse tube refrigerators; cryocoolers for space applications; properties of cryogenic fluids; cryogenic instrumentation; hyperconducting devices (cryogenic magnets); cryogenic applications in space science and technology and in transportation; and miscellaneous cryogenic techniques and applications.

  5. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  6. An introduction to closed cycle cryogenic coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellis, F. F.

    1980-01-01

    Closed cycle cryogenic coolers are used extensively for cooling infrared detectors and other specialized electronic devices. Because of the special requirements of each electro-optical system it is generally necessary to custom design the cryocooler to fit the requirements. Early and close cooperation between the electro-optical systems designer and the cryocooler manufacturer is important to the successful marriage of the cryocooler with the total electro-optical system. Limitations of various cryocooling techniques are presented, and consideration for cryocooling integration are addressed.

  7. Design of a scanning gate microscope in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Sciambi, Adam; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2011-03-01

    We report on our design of an ultra-low temperature scanning gate microscope housed in a system with no liquid helium bath. The recent increase in efficiency of pulse-tube cryocoolers and pending scarcity of liquid helium have made ``cryogen-free'' dewars popular in recent years. However, this new style of dewar presents challenges for performing scanning measurements, most notably the increased vibrations introduced by the cryocooler. We will highlight the tradeoffs made in choosing such a system to house a scanner, and describe our efforts to achieve a stability suitable for measurements on mesoscopic systems.

  8. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems cryocooler overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, J.; Tward, E.

    2010-09-01

    Mechanical long life cryocoolers are an enabling technology used to cool a wide variety of detectors in space applications. These coolers provide cooling over a range of temperatures from 2 K to 200 K, cooling powers from tens of mW to tens of watts. Typical applications are missile warning, Earth and climate sciences, astronomy and cryogenic propellant management. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) has delivered many of the US flight cooler systems and has 12 long life pulse tube and Stirling coolers on orbit with two having over 11 years of continuous operation. This paper will provide an overview of the NGAS cryocooler capabilities.

  9. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  10. NASA Space Cryocooler Programs: A 2003 Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.; Boyle, R. F.; Kittel, P.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical cryocoolers represent a significant enabling technology for NASA's Earth and Space Science missions. An overview is presented of ongoing cryocooler activities within NASA in support of current flight projects, near-term flight instruments, and long-term technology development. NASA programs in Earth and space science observe a wide range of phenomena, from crop dynamics to stellar birth. Many of the instruments require cryogenic refrigeration to improve dynamic range, extend wavelength coverage, and enable the use of advanced detectors. Although, the largest utilization of coolers over the last decade has been for instruments operating at medium to high cryogenic temperatures (55 to 150 K), reflecting the relative maturity of the technology at these temperatures, important new developments are now focusing at the lower temperature range from 4 to 20 K in support of studies of the origin of the universe and the search for planets around distant stars. NASA's development of a 20K cryocooler for the European Planck spacecraft and its new Advanced Cryocooler Technology Development Program (ACTDP) for 6-18 K coolers are examples of the thrust to provide low temperature cooling for this class of missions.

  11. A vibration free cryostat using pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Hartnett, John G.

    2010-05-01

    This paper introduces a new vibration free cryostat cooled by liquid helium and a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler. The cryogenic device mounts on the sample cooling station which is cooled by liquid helium. The boil off helium is recondensed by the pulse tube cryocooler, thus the cryostat maintains zero boil off. There is no mechanical contact between the cryogenic part of the cryocooler and the sample cooling station. A bellows is used to isolate the vibration which could transfer from the cryocooler flange to the cryostat flange at the room temperature. Any vibrations generated by the operation of the cryocooler are almost entirely isolated from the cryogenic device. The cryostat provides a cooling capacity of 0.65 W at 4.21 K on the sample cooling station while maintaining a vapor pressure of 102 kPa. The sample cooling station has a very stable temperature with oscillations of less than ±3 mK during all the operations. A cryogenic microwave oscillator has been successfully cooled and operated with the cryostat.

  12. Critical current and cryogenic stability modelling of filamentary MgB2 conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glowacki, B.A.; Majoros, M.; Tanaka, K.

    2006-01-01

    (c) in range of electric fields E % 10 mu V/cm. The isothermal modelling with J(c) independent on magnetic field, case b), gave the results more close to the experimental ones. From the modelling of the heating effects we conclude that the cryogenic stability of the used Cu/SUS316/MgB(2), Fe/MgB(2) and Cu...

  13. Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1997-01-01

    We present features for an ultra-stable sapphire cryogenic oscillator which has been designed to support the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment. The design of this standard is new in several respects. It is cooled by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid cryogens to increase operating time, and it uses a technology to adjust the temperature turn-over point to extend the upper operating temperature limit and to enable construction of multiple units with uniform operating characteristics. Objectives are 3 x 10(exp -15) stability for measuring times 1 second less than or equal to (tau) less than or equal to 100 seconds, phase noise of -85 dBc/Hz from offset frequencies of 1 Hz to 1000 Hz at 10 GHz carrier frequency, and a one year continuous operating period.

  14. Impact of injection distribution on cryogenic rocket engine stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeken, J.; Suslov, D.; Schlechtriem, S.; Haidn, O.

    2013-03-01

    The present publication addresses the actions taken to stabilize the combustion chamber assembly using a porous injector head described in a former publication and the test campaign during which the success of these measures was demonstrated. The first part deals with the nature of the reported combustion instability. A phenomenological explanation for its occurrence is presented and supported by experimental data. As a measure to counter this instability, two approaches were taken. First, a hydrogen cooled baffe segment, and second, a modification of the injection distribution of the injector head with respect to the presumed cause of the instability. While the baffe segment did not prove to be successful, the test runs with the modified injection pattern demonstrated the stable operation of the 80-millimeter porous injector head over the whole range of operating conditions from 50 to 90 bar at hydrogen injection temperatures as low as 45 K.

  15. Space Flight Qualification Program for the AMS-2 Commercial Cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, K. A.; Banks, I. S.; Breon, S. R.; Boyle, R. F.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector containing a large superfluid helium-cooled superconducting magnet. Highly sensitive detector plates inside the magnet measure a particle's speed, momentum, charge, and path. The AMS-02 experiment will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS-02 will be installed on the International Space Station on Utilization Flight-4. The experiment will be run for at least three years. To extend the life of the stored cryogen and minimize temperature gradients around the magnet, four Stirling-cycle Sunpower M87N cryocoolers will be integrated with AMS-02. The cryocooler cold tip will be connected via a flexible strap to the outer vapor cooled shield of the dewar. Initial thermal analysis shows the lifetime of the experiment is increased by a factor of 2.8 with the use of the cryocooler. The AMS-02 project selected the Sunpower M87 cryocoolers and has asked NASA Goddard to qualify the cryocoolers for space flight use. This paper describes the interfaces with the cryocoolers and presents data collected during testing of the two engineering model cryocoolers. Tests include thermal performance characterization and launch vibration testing. Magnetic field compatibility testing will be presented in a separate paper at the conference.

  16. A high pressure ratio DC compressor for tactical cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weibo; Cameron, Benjamin H.; Zagarola, Mark V.; Narayanan, Sri R.

    2016-05-01

    A high pressure ratio DC compressor is a critical component for many cryocooler cycles. Prior research has focused on the adaptation of commercial compressor technology (scroll, screw, linear with rectification valves, and regenerative) for use in cryogenic applications where long-life and oil-free (i.e., volatile contamination free) are unique requirements. In addition, many cryocooler applications are for cooling imaging instruments making low vibration an additional requirement. Another candidate compressor technology has emerged from the fuel cell industry. Proton Exchange Membranes (PEMs) are used in fuel cells to separate reactants and transport protons, and these capabilities may be used in cryocoolers to compress hydrogen from low to high pressure. A particular type of PEM utilizing an anhydrous membrane forms the basis of a solid-state cryocooler. Creare has been investigating the use of PEM compressors for low temperature Joule-Thomson and dilution cryocoolers. These cryocoolers have no moving parts, can operate at temperatures down to nominally 23 K, produce no vibration, and are low cost. Our work on the cycle optimization, cryocooler design, and development and demonstration of the compressor technology is the subject of this paper.

  17. Optimization of a Brayton cryocooler for ZBO liquid hydrogen storage in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserranno, D.; Zagarola, M.; Li, X.; Mustafi, S.

    2014-11-01

    NASA is evaluating and developing technology for long-term storage of cryogenic propellant in space. A key technology is a cryogenic refrigerator which intercepts heat loads to the storage tank, resulting in a reduced- or zero-boil-off condition. Turbo-Brayton cryocoolers are particularly well suited for cryogen storage applications because the technology scales well to high capacities and low temperatures. In addition, the continuous-flow nature of the cycle allows direct cooling of the cryogen storage tank without mass and power penalties associated with a cryogenic heat transport system. To quantify the benefits and mature the cryocooler technology, Creare Inc. performed a design study and technology demonstration effort for NASA on a 20 W, 20 K cryocooler for liquid hydrogen storage. During the design study, we optimized these key components: three centrifugal compressors, a modular high-capacity plate-fin recuperator, and a single-stage turboalternator. The optimization of the compressors and turboalternator were supported by component testing. The optimized cryocooler has an overall flight mass of 88 kg and a specific power of 61 W/W. The coefficient of performance of the cryocooler is 23% of the Carnot cycle. This is significantly better performance than any 20 K space cryocooler existing or under development.

  18. Structure and stabilization of cryogenic spray flames; Structure et stabilisation des flammes cryotechniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juniper, M.

    2001-11-01

    Cryogenic rocket motors are fueled by liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. The development of design methods is based on reliable numerical simulations, which rely on detailed knowledge of the flame structure and well-defined entry conditions. This research project concerns the region near the fuel injectors. We examine here: (1) The flame structure and injector geometry, (2) The flame stabilization. Tests have been performed on an injector which is similar to those in real motors. Models are developed and their results compared with experimental results in order to study the effect of the injector geometry. A new result of scientific interest is that a wake is more unstable when the outer flow is confined. This mechanism might explain the effect of recess on a cryogenic spray flame. The base of the flame is divided into two parts and a counter-flow flame analysis is applied to the first part. The second part is considered first as a flame in a corner (cross-flow flame). The flame above a porous plate with fuel injection is considered next and we envisage then a flame above a vaporizing fuel. Finally, the flame behind a step over a vaporizing fuel is envisaged. With this progression, the dimensionless parameters which control flame stabilization are identified. (author)

  19. 8th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed a substantial maturing of long life Stirling-cycle cryocoolers built upon the heritage of the flexure-bearing cryocoolers from Oxford University, and have seen the emergence of mature pulse tube cryocoolers competing head-to-head with the Stirling cryocoolers. Hydrogen sorption cryocoolers, Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers with rare earth regenerators, and helium Joule-Thomson cryocoolers have also made tremendous progress in opening up applications in the 4 K to 10 K temperature range. Tactical Stirling cryocoolers, now commonplace in the defense industry, are finding application in a number of cost­ constrained commercial applications and space missions, and are achieving ever longer lives as they move to linear-drive, clearance-seal compressors. Building on this expanding availability of commercially viable cryocoolers, numerous new applications are being enabled; many of these involve infrared imaging systems, and high­ temperature superconductors in the medical and ...

  20. 制冷机传导冷却的超导磁体冷却系统研究进展%Advance in cryogenic system of cryocooled superconducting magnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张楷浩; 邱利民; 甘智华; 周晓晓

    2012-01-01

    A review of recent advances and research of cryocooled superconducting magnetic system was given. Cryocooled superconducting magnet coils are cooled by thermal conduction between solids in low temperature, compared to the convective heat transfer in liquid helium bath. The research of conduction cooling system in superconducting magnet was discussed based on the development of cryocooler. Typical designs of conduction cooling systems were illustrated and compared. Key technical issues about cryocool-ers, heat transfer in conduction cooled coils and cool down time reduction were discussed. The development tendencies of the cryocooled superconducting magnetic technology were forecasted.%回顾并总结了低温制冷机传导冷却的超导磁体系统的发展历程和最新研究进展.与传统的液氦浸泡冷却方式不同,低温制冷机传导冷却系统主要依靠低温下固体之间的热传导对超导磁体线圈进行冷却.基于小型低温制冷机的研究进展,集中讨论超导磁体中的制冷机传导冷却系统;结合传导冷却的超导磁体应用,讨论传导冷却中低温制冷机性能、低温恒温器传热以及加速冷却等技术要点,对低温制冷机传导冷却磁体系统的发展进行了展望.

  1. Miniature Joule-Thomson cryocooling principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Maytal, Ben-Zion

    2013-01-01

    This book is the first in English being entirely dedicated to Miniature Joule-Thomson Cryocooling. The category of Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers takes us back to the roots of cryogenics, in 1895, with figures like Linde and Hampson. The "cold finger" of these cryocoolers is compact, lacks moving parts, and sustains a large heat flux extraction at a steady temperature. Potentially, they cool down unbeatably fast. For example, cooling to below 100 K (minus 173 Celsius) might be accomplished within only a few seconds by liquefying argon. A level of about 120 K can be reached almost instantly with krypton. Indeed, the species of coolant plays a central role dictating the size, the intensity and the level of cryocooling. It is the JT effect that drives these cryocoolers and reflects the deviation of the "real" gas from the ideal gas properties. The nine chapters of the book are arranged in five parts. • The Common Principle of Cyrocoolers shared across the broad variety of cryocooler types • Theoretical Aspec...

  2. 记忆合金在节流制冷器中的应用%Application of shape memory alloy in J-T cryocoolers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐庆松; 崔戈

    2014-01-01

    介绍了一种红外探测器上所应用的新型节流制冷器,该制冷器采用形状记忆合金(Shape Memory Alloy)作为自调机构的调节元件;与传统波纹管型自调式制冷器相比,具有结构简单、装调方便、寿命长、稳定性好等优点;文中还对记忆合金工作原理、制冷器结构及低温记忆合金现状和前景等进行了简要的介绍和分析。%A novel self-regulated J-T cryocooler for infrared detector is introduced,shape memory alloy is used as regu-lated elements.Compared with the bellows self-regulated cryocooler,the cryocooler has the advantages of simple struc-ture,easy adjustment,long life and good stability.Working principle of shape memory alloy and the cryocoolers struc-ture are discussed.The current status and prospect of cryogenic shape memory alloy are introduced.

  3. 大口径低温泵之制冷机R65的研制%Development of R65 cryocooler used in large caliber cryogenic pumps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊鹰; 杜建伟; 徐海波; 王为民

    2015-01-01

    介绍了用于大口径低温泵的 R65制冷机的结构设计,回热器的设计及材料的选择,以及制冷功率及可靠性测试的试验结果。%The mechanical structure design of R65 cryocooler was described. The design and material selection of heat displacer were introduced. And the test results of R65 cryocooler refrigerating capacity and reliability were listed.

  4. 3rd Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Louie, Berverly; McCarthy, Sandy

    1985-01-01

    Cryocoolers 3 documents the output of the Third Cryocooler Conference, held at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado, on September 17-18, 1984. About 140 people from 10 countries attended the conference representing industry, government, and academia. A total of 26 papers were presented orally at the conference and all appear in written form in the proceedings. The focus of this conference was on small cryocoolers in the temperature range of 4 - 80 K. Mechanical and nonmechanical types are discussed in the various papers. Applications of these small cryocoolers include the cooling of infrared detectors, cryopumps, small superconducting devices and magnets, and electronic devices. The conference proceedings reproduced here was published by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado as NBS Special Publication #698.

  5. International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Cryocoolers 13

    2005-01-01

    This is the 13th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature super-capacitor applications.

  6. Stability criterion for cryocooler-cooled HTS coils; Reitoki dendo reikyaku koon chodendo koiru no anteisei hyoka kijun ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, A.; Shimizu, S.; Asai, H. [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    In the refrigerating machine conduction cooling LTS coil, the design based on 'the critical current marging stabilization' is mainly carried out the coil as stability criterion for evaluation, since it becomes an operation in non-refrigerant. Here, the consideration was tried on stability evaluation of the refrigerating machine conduction cooling HTS coil in which the development is advancing recently. (NEDO)

  7. Cryogenic regenerative heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, Robert A

    1997-01-01

    An in-depth survey of regenerative heat exchangers, this book chronicles the development and recent commercialization of regenerative devices for cryogenic applications. Chapters cover historical background, concepts, practical applications, design data, and numerical solutions, providing the latest information for engineers to develop advanced cryogenic machines. The discussions include insights into the operation of a regenerator; descriptions of the cyclic and fluid temperature distributions in a regenerator; data for various matrix geometries and materials, including coarse and fine bronze, stainless steel-woven wire mesh screens, and lead spheres; and unique operating features of cryocoolers that produce deviations from ideal regenerator theory.

  8. Calculation of the Critical Speed and Stability Analysis of Cryogenic Turboexpanders with Different Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈双涛; 赵红利; 马斌; 侯予

    2012-01-01

    A modularized code based on the Finite Element QZ (FEQZ) method is developed, for a better estimate of the critical speed and a more convenient method of rotor-dynamic stability analysis for a gas bearing high speed turboexpander rotor system with actual structure and application of a cryogenic turboexpander. This code is then validated by the experimental data of a gas bearing turboexpander, with a rotor diameter of 25 mm and a rated speed of 106,400 rpm. With this code, four rotors with different structures, available to the turboexpander, are parametrically analyzed by the available speed range, vibration modes and logarithmic attenuation rate. The results suggest that the rotor with a structure of two thrust collars on the system exhibits a better performance in the designed conditions.

  9. Absolute calibration of an ultraviolet spectrometer using a stabilized laser and a cryogenic cavity radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauniskis, L.; Foukal, P.; Kochling, H.

    1992-01-01

    We carry out the calibration of an ultraviolet spectrometer by using a cryogenic electrical-substitution radiometer and intensity-stabilized laser sources. A comparison of the error budgets for the laser-based calibration described here and for a calibration using a type-FEL tungsten spectral-irradiance standard indicates that this technique could provide an improvement of a factor of about three in the uncertainty of the spectrometer calibration, resulting in an absolute accuracy (standard deviation of three) of about 1 percent at 257 nm. The technique described here might significantly improve the accuracy of calibrations on NASA ozone-monitoring and solar ultraviolet-monitoring spectrophotometers when used to complement present procedures that employ lamps and the SURF II synchrotron ultraviolet radiation facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  10. Unprecedented High Long Term Frequency Stability with a Macroscopic Resonator Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Grop, Serge; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Bazin, Nicolas; Kersalé, Yann; Oxborrow, Mark; Rubiola, Enrico; Giordano, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the long-term frequency stabilty characterisation of a new type of cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an autonomous pulse-tube cryocooler as its cold source. This new design enables a relative frequency stability of better than 4.5e-15 over one day of integration. This represents to our knowledge the best long-term frequency stability ever obtained with a signal source based on a macroscopic resonator.

  11. Thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a HTS NMR magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Se Hwan; Hong, Yong Jun; Yeom, Han Kil; Ko, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The superconducting NMR magnets have used cryogen such as liquid helium for their cooling. The conduction cooling method using cryocoolers, however, makes the cryogenic cooling system for NMR magnets more compact and user-friendly than the cryogen cooling method. This paper describes the thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a 400 MHz HTS NMR magnet, focusing on the magnet assembly. The highly thermo-conductive cooling plates between HTS double pancake coils are used to transfer the heat generated in coils, namely Joule heating at lap splice joints, to thermal link blocks and finally the cryocooler. The conduction cooling structure of the HTS magnet assembly preliminarily designed is verified by thermal and structural analysis. The orthotropic thermal properties of the HTS coil, thermal contact resistance and radiation heat load are considered in the thermal analysis. The thermal analysis confirms the uniform temperature distribution for the present thermal design of the NMR magnet within 0.2 K. The mechanical stress and the displacement by the electromagnetic force and the thermal contraction are checked to verify structural stability. The structural analysis indicates that the mechanical stress on each component of the magnet is less than its material yield strength and the displacement is acceptable in comparison with the magnet dimension.

  12. A 63 K phase change unit integrating with pulse tube cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunhui, Kong; Liubiao, Chen; Sixue, Liu; Yuan, Zhou; Junjie, Wang

    2017-02-01

    This article presents the design and computer model results of an integrated cooler system which consists of a single stage pulse tube cryocooler integrated with a small amount of a phase change material. A cryogenic thermal switch was used to thermally connect the phase change unit to the cold end of the cryocooler. During heat load operation, the cryogenic thermal switch is turned off to avoid vibrations. The phase change unit absorbs heat loads by melting a substance in a constant pressure-temperature-volume process. Once the substance has been melted, the cryogenic thermal turned on, the cryocooler can then refreeze the material. Advantages of this type of cooler are no vibrations during sensor operations; the ability to absorb increased heat loads; potentially longer system lifetime; and a lower mass, volume and cost. A numerical model was constructed from derived thermodynamic relationships for the cooling/heating and freezing/melting processes.

  13. 17th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    Cryocoolers 17 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 17th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Los Angeles, California, on July 9-12, 2012. The program of this conference consisted of 94 papers; of these, 71 are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  14. 16th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2011-01-01

    Cryocoolers 16 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 16th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 17-20, 2010. The program of this conference consisted of 116 papers; of these, 89 are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  15. Diaphragm Stirling cryocooler developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the status of several ongoing development programs aimed at the demonstration of diaphragm Stirling cycle cryocooler performance. Key attributes of this technology focus on long reliable operating life and excellent efficiency, making it a candidate for cooling of satellite-borne long wavelength sensors for astrophysics and earth observing missions. Three programs are described, each leading to system or component test hardware: a 2 W 65 K single-stage Standard Spacecraft Cryocooler, a 300 mW 30 K two-stage cooler and a 200 mW 4-20 K single-stage cooler. Design features are described, and breadboard experimental data are presented.

  16. Theoretical study on a Miniature Joule-Thomson & Bernoulli Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, L. Y.; Kaiser, G.; Binneberg, A.

    2004-11-01

    In this paper, a microchannel-based cryocooler consisting of a compressor, a recuperator and a cold heat exchanger has been developed to study the feasibility of cryogenic cooling by the use of Joule-Thomson effect and Bernoulli effect. A set of governing equations including Bernoulli equations and energy equations are introduced and the performance of the cooler is calculated. The influences of some working conditions and structure parameters on the performance of coolers are discussed in details.

  17. Cryogenic engineering fifty years of progress

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic Engineering: Fifty Years of Progress is a benchmark reference work which chronicles the major developments in the field. Starting with an historical background dating to the 1850s, this book reviews the development of data resources now available for cryogenic fields and properties of materials. The advances in cryogenic fundamentals are covered by reviews of cryogenic principles, cryogenic insulation, low-loss storage systems, modern liquefaction processes, helium cryogenics and low-temperature thermometry. Several well-established applications resulting from cryogenic advances include aerospace cryocoolers and refrigerators, use of LTS and HTS systems in electrical applications, and recent changes in cryopreservation. Extensive references are provided for the readers interested in the details of these cryogenic engineering advances.

  18. Prediction of the intermittent functioning Stirling cryocooler' s duration of cryogen%间歇工作的空间斯特林制冷机制冷时长预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琪; 郭丽丽; 段江永; 周冰

    2015-01-01

    A new method combining autoregressive integrated moving average ( ARIMA) model and artificial neural network ( ANN) model is presented for the duration prediction of the Stirling cryocooler applied in space remote sensing missions. The stirling cryocooler is equipped with electrophotonic detector. A classic model based on time series is used to decompose the time series into trend item and oscillation item. For prediction, ARIMA model is used to predict the trend item and ANN model is used to predict the oscillation item, while ARIMA model is im-proved based on the intermittent working mode of the Stirling cryocooler. Finally, the validity of this method is veri-fied by applying to the real data and comparing the results with other methods.%针对空间遥感任务中,光电探测器配载的斯特林制冷机制冷时长的预测问题,提出了一种使用自回归积分滑动平均模型( ARIMA)与人工神经网络( ANN)模型相结合的预测方法. 该方法采用时间序列的经典模型,将时间序列分解为趋势项与波动项的加和,采用ARIMA和ANN模型分别进行趋势项预测和波动项预测,并根据斯特林制冷机的间歇性工作模式特点对ARIMA模型进行改进. 最后,通过在真实数据上与其他方法的对比实验,验证了本文提出方法的有效性.

  19. 18th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Cryocoolers 18 Cryocoolers 18 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 18th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Syracuse, New York, on June 9-12, 2014. The program of this conference lead to the 76 peer-reviewed papers that are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  20. CFD analysis of a diaphragm free-piston Stirling cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughley, Alan; Sellier, Mathieu; Gschwendtner, Michael; Tucker, Alan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a novel free-piston Stirling cryocooler that uses a pair of metal diaphragms to seal and suspend the displacer. The diaphragms allow the displacer to move without rubbing or moving seals. When coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator, the system produces a complete Stirling cryocooler with no rubbing parts in the working gas space. Initial modelling of this concept using the Sage modelling tool indicated the potential for a useful cryocooler. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and achieved cryogenic temperatures. A second prototype was designed and constructed using the experience gained from the first. The prototype produced 29 W of cooling at 77 K and reached a no-load temperature of 56 K. The diaphragm's large diameter and short stroke produces a significant radial component to the oscillating flow fields inside the cryocooler which were not modelled in the one-dimensional analysis tool Sage that was used to design the prototypes. Compared with standard pistons, the diaphragm geometry increases the gas-to-wall heat transfer due to the higher velocities and smaller hydraulic diameters. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the cryocooler was constructed to understand the underlying fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms with the aim of further improving performance. The CFD modelling of the heat transfer in the radial flow fields created by the diaphragms shows the possibility of utilizing the flat geometry for heat transfer, reducing the need for, and the size of, expensive heat exchangers. This paper presents details of a CFD analysis used to model the flow and gas-to-wall heat transfer inside the second prototype cryocooler, including experimental validation of the CFD to produce a robust analysis.

  1. A high-efficiency coaxial pulse tube cryocooler with 500 W cooling capacity at 80 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J. Y.; Zhang, L. M.; Zhu, J.; Chen, S.; Luo, E. C.; Dai, W.; Li, H. B.

    2014-07-01

    High-temperature superconductivity power-grid technologies require a highly reliable and efficient cryocooler with cooling power of 100 W to kilowatt level at liquid-nitrogen temperatures to produce cryogenic environments. This paper describes the design of a coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler to meet this need. In the designed cryocooler, the regenerator and pulse tube are lengthened to avoid possible temperature inhomogeneity. In an experiment, the azimuthal temperature difference at the middle of the regenerator was less than 30 K. With 7.6 kW electric power input, the cryocooler offers more than 520 W cooling power at 80 K corresponding to a relative Carnot efficiency of 18.2%. When the cooling power was less than 370 W, the efficiency is higher than 20%.

  2. Study on a pulse tube cryocooler using gas mixture as its working fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, C. M.; He, Y. L.; Chen, Z. Q.

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a one-stage pulse tube cryocooler, gas mixtures are used for comparison, which have been used in other cryocoolers. A mixture of hydrogen and helium was investigated in this study. When the structure of the pulse tube is the same as mentioned in [C. Wang, P.Y. Wu, Zh.Q. Chen, Numerical modeling of an orifice pulse tube cryocooler, Cryogenics 32 (1992) 785] and the working conditions are: frequency 15 Hz, average pressure 1.1 MPa, hot end temperature 300 K and cold end temperature 80 K, it has been found that there are optimal molar percentage for the maximal cooling power and the maximal-coefficient of performance (COP) of this cryocooler.

  3. Optical cryocooling of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, M.; Jeske, J.; Lau, D. W. M.; Greentree, A. D.; Jelezko, F.; Twamley, J.

    2017-06-01

    The cooling of solids by optical means only using anti-Stokes emission has a long history of research and achievements. Such cooling methods have many advantages ranging from no moving parts or fluids through to operation in vacuum and may have applications to cryosurgery. However, achieving large optical cryocooling powers has been difficult to manage except in certain rare-earth crystals but these are mostly toxic and not biocompatible. Through study of the emission and absorption cross sections we find that diamond, containing either nitrogen vacancy (NV) or silicon vacancy defects, shows potential for optical cryocooling and, in particular, NV doping shows promise for optical refrigeration. We study the optical cooling of doped diamond microcrystals ranging 10-250 μ m in diameter trapped either in vacuum or in water. For the vacuum case we find NV-doped microdiamond optical cooling below room temperature could exceed |Δ T |>10 K for irradiation powers of Pin<100 mW. We predict that such temperature changes should be easily observed via large alterations in the diffusion constant for optically cryocooled microdiamonds trapped in water in an optical tweezer or via spectroscopic signatures such as the zero-phonon line width or Raman line.

  4. Low-power cryocooler survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, ter H.J.M.; Wiegerinck, G.F.M.

    2002-01-01

    A cryocooler survey has been performed on data of 235 cryocoolers, with cooling powers below some tens of watts and operating between 4 and 120 K. The state-of-the-art is discussed and trends are investigated on cooling performance, mass and size, cost, lifetime and reliability. The data were compar

  5. A free-piston Stirling cryocooler using metal diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughley, Alan; Sellier, Mathieu; Gschwendtner, Michael; Tucker, Alan

    2016-12-01

    A novel concept for a free-piston Stirling cryocooler has been proposed. The concept uses a pair of metal diaphragms to seal and suspend the displacer of a free-piston Stirling cryocooler. The diaphragms allow the displacer to move without rubbing or moving seals, potentially resulting in a long-life mechanism. When coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator, the system produces a complete Stirling cryocooler with no rubbing parts in the working gas space. Initial modelling of this concept using the Sage modelling tool indicates the potential for a useful cryocooler. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and achieved cryogenic temperatures. A second prototype was designed and constructed using the experience gained from the first. The prototype produced 29 W of cooling at 77 K and reached a no-load temperature of 56 K. Sage predicted the macroscopic behaviour of the prototype well but did not provide sufficient insights to improve performance significantly. This paper presents details of the development, modelling and testing of the proof-of-concept prototype and a second, improved prototype.

  6. Advances in cryogenic engineering, Volume 39, Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, P. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    This book provides a review of the latest work in cryogenic engineering and technology as related to a number of differing disciplines. It should serve as a valuable reference to researchers and engineers in cryogenics, materials science, low-temperature physics, polymer science, and solid-state physics. This volume contains articles under the following general areas: instrumentation and control; cryocoolers; heat exchangers and cryopumps; heat and mass transfer; cryogenic properties. Separate articles have been indexed into the database.

  7. Jitter suppression techniques for mechanical cryocooler-induced disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, D. W.; Kirkconnell, C. S.; Fleischman, G. L.; Sunada, W. H.

    2008-08-01

    Closed-cycle mechanical cryogenic refrigerators, or cryocoolers, are an enabling technology for next generation infrared (IR) sensors. Passive cryoradiators and stored cryogen systems have been used successfully in the past, but the increased cooling requirements for emerging systems cannot practically be met with these passive techniques. Modern systems are employing much larger focal plane arrays that dissipate more energy and have higher parasitic thermal loads than in the past. Additional "on chip" FPA data processing capability, such as time delay and integration (TDI) and analog-to-digital conversion (ADC), is further driving up the heat loads. While loads are going up, temperatures are going down. The desire to operate at long wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths (>9 microns) for a broader range of remote sensing missions is driving the need for 35-40 K refrigeration, significantly colder than past systems that operated at shorter wavelengths. Unfortunately, the use of a mechanical rather than passive cryocooler introduces an additional jitter source that must be properly mitigated. Techniques include the use of inherently low vibration cryocoolers, closedloop active vibration cancellation servo systems, damping struts, soft mounts, or a combination of these techniques. Implementation of these techniques within a proper system engineering context is presented.

  8. Effects Of The Combined Heat And Cryogenic Treatment On The Stability Of Austenite In A High Co-Ni Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The stability of austenite is one of the most dominant factors affecting the toughness properties of high Co-Ni steels such as Aermet 100 and AF1410. Thus, the aim of this work was to get a deeper understanding on the impact of combined heat and cryogenic treatment on the stability of retained and reverted austenite. In order to characterize the evolution of the phase fraction of austenite during tempering at different temperatures and times, X-ray diffraction analyses were carried out. The stability of austenite, which was formed during tempering, was analyzed with dilatometric investigations by studying the transformation behavior of the austenite during cooling from tempering temperature down to −100°C. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy investigations were performed to characterize the chemical composition and phase distribution of austenite and martensite before and after tempering.

  9. In-situ formation of solidified hydrogen thin-membrane targets using a pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astbury, S.; Bedacht, S.; Brummitt, P.; Carroll, D.; Clarke, R.; Crisp, S.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Holligan, P.; Hook, S.; Merchan, J. S.; Neely, D.; Ortner, A.; Rathbone, D.; Rice, P.; Schaumann, G.; Scott, G.; Spindloe, C.; Spurdle, S.; Tebartz, A.; Tomlinson, S.; Wagner, F.; Borghesi, M.; Roth, M.; Tolley, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    An account is given of the Central Laser Facility's work to produce a cryogenic hydrogen targetry system using a pulse tube cryocooler. Due to the increasing demand for low Z thin laser targets, CLF (in collaboration with TUD) have been developing a system which allows the production of solid hydrogen membranes by engineering a design which can achieve this remotely; enabling the gas injection, condensation and solidification of hydrogen without compromising the vacuum of the target chamber. A dynamic sealing mechanism was integrated which allows targets to be grown and then remotely exposed to open vacuum for laser interaction. Further research was conducted on the survivability of the cryogenic targets which concluded that a warm gas effect causes temperature spiking when exposing the solidified hydrogen to the outer vacuum. This effect was shown to be mitigated by improving the pumping capacity of the environment and reducing the minimum temperature obtainable on the target mount. This was achieved by developing a two-stage radiation shield encased with superinsulating blanketing; reducing the base temperature from 14 ± 0.5 K to 7.2 ± 0.2 K about the coldhead as well as improving temperature control stability following the installation of a high-performance temperature controller and sensor apparatus. The system was delivered experimentally and in July 2014 the first laser shots were taken upon hydrogen targets in the Vulcan TAP facility.

  10. Development of SNSPD System with Gifford-McMahon Cryocooler

    CERN Document Server

    Miki, Shigehito; Sasaki, Masahide; Wang, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    A superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) system for telecommunication wavelength using a GM cryocooler was developed and its performance was verified. The cryocooler based SNSPD system can operate continuously with a 100 V AC power supply without any cryogen. The packaged SNSPD device was cooled to 2.96 K within a thermal fluctuation range of 10 mK. An SNSPD with an area of 20 x 20 $\\mu m^2$ showed good system detection efficiency (DE) at 100 Hz dark count rate of 2.6% and 4.5% at wavelengths of 1550 and 1310 nm, respectively. An SNSPD with an area of 10 x 10 $\\mu m^2$ and kinetic inductance lower than that of the large area device showed good system DE of 2.6% at a wavelength of 1550 nm. The SNSPD system could be operated for over 10 h with constant system DE and dark count rate.

  11. Evaluation of cryogenic liquids ZBO storage with different solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yangyang; Li, Jianguo; Luo, Baojun; Wang, Juan; Hong, Guotong

    2014-01-01

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) storage of cryogenic liquids can be used both for an integrated cold source combined with mechanical cryocoolers, and long-term lossless storage of cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen and oxygen. A ZBO system for space application should be less weight and high efficiency. Pulse tube cryocoolers with linear compressors for space application are used as the cold source to compensate heat inputs to the ZBO dewar which have a variety of new insulation technologies. This paper describes an evaluation method for evaluating the systematic characteristics of the ZBO system. For different cryogenic liquids, different solutions comprised of the cryocooler with different cooling capacity and the dewar with different adiabatic means, are analyzed and evaluated from feasibility, average power consumption, working mode and fluctuations of the temperature and pressure. The results show that the solution of the ZBO dewar matched with a single-stage cryocooler is preferred for liquid oxygen and nitrogen storage, and the intermittent working mode is more power efficient than the continuous working mode, while its temperature and pressure fluctuations are a little larger. The solution of the ZBO dewar with a cryocooler cooled screen matched with a multi-stage cryocooler is preferred for liquid neon, hydrogen and helium storage, and the continuous working mode is more feasible.

  12. Dynamic simulation of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Chan Woo [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si Dole [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29

    Dynamic simulation of a Brayton cryocooler is presented as a partial effort of a Korean governmental project to develop 1∼3 km HTS cable systems at transmission level in Jeju Island. Thermodynamic design of a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler was completed, and a prototype construction is underway with a basis of steady-state operation. This study is the next step to investigate the transient behavior of cryocooler for two purposes. The first is to simulate and design the cool-down process after scheduled or unscheduled stoppage. The second is to predict the transient behavior following the variation of external conditions such as cryogenic load or outdoor temperature. The detailed specifications of key components, including plate-fin heat exchangers and cryogenic turbo-expanders are incorporated into a commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) to estimate the temporal change of temperature and flow rate over the cryocooler. An initial cool-down scenario and some examples on daily variation of cryocooler are presented and discussed, aiming at stable control schemes of a long cable system.

  13. 6th International Cryocoolers Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Knox, Margaret

    1991-01-01

    Cryocoolers 6 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 6th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Plymouth, Massachusetts, on October 25-26, 1990. This year's conference consisted of 54 papers and was sponsored by the David Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center of Annapolis, Maryland. The conference proceedings containing 49 submitted manuscripts was published by the David Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center in the report reproduced here.

  14. 7th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    Cryocoolers 7 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 7th International Cryocooler Conference which was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 17-19, 1992. This year's conference consisted of over 100 papers and was hosted by the Nichols Research Corp. and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory of Albuquerque, New Mexico. The conference proceedings were published by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory in the four-volume set reproduced here.

  15. 4th International Cryocoolers Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, George; Knox, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    The Cryocoolers 4 proceedings archives the contributions of leading international experts at the 4th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Easton, Maryland on September 25-26, 1986. About 170 people attended the conference representing 11 countries, 14 universities, 21 government laboratories and 60 industrial companies. Thirty-one papers were presented describing advancements and applications of cryocoolers in the temperature range below 80K. This year's conference was sponsored by the David Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center of Annapolis, Maryland, and the conference proceedings reproduced here was published by them.

  16. Calibration system for cryogenic temperature sensors based on G-M cryocooler%基于G-M低温制冷机的低温温度计标定系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁捷敏; 黄永华

    2013-01-01

    设计和搭建了一套5.2-300K温区的温度计标定系统,以G-M制冷机为冷源,进口已标定温度计为定标源,对Cernox负温度系数温度计、硅二极管温度计、PT100铂电阻温度计等进行了标定,获得了其温度特性曲线并进行对比,分析了标定误差,发现该系统具有较高的标定精度,所标定的温度计在其有效温区内能达到±15mK以内的不确定度,与定标源温度计处于同等量级.%A calibration system for temperature sensors between 5. 2K and 300K was established. A G - M cryocooler was used as the cold source and a commercial calibrated temperature sensor was used as the reference. One Cernox NTC temperature sensor, two silicon diode temperature sensors and five PT100 platinum resistance temperature sensors were calibrated. The response curves of these sensors were acquired. The uncertainty of the calibration system for all the above sample sensors was estimated to be within ± 15mK in their working range, which is on the same magnitude as the reference sensor.

  17. The integrated cryogenic system for the atmospheric vertical interferometric detector on FY-4 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinong; Liu, EnGuang; Jiang, Zhenhua; Yang, Baoyu; Mu, Yongbin

    2016-05-01

    The cryogenic system for the atmospheric vertical interferometric detector on FY-4 satellite includes a Stirling cryocooler, a radiant cooler, a cryogenic heat pipe and some flexible thermal links as well. These cryogenic elements were integrated together in order to decrease the background radiation and maximize the sensitivity with high efficiency and high reliability. This paper summarizes the cryogenic integration design, technical challenges, and the results of thermal and performance testing.

  18. 14th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2007-01-01

    This is the 14th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  19. 15th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    This is the 15th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocooler Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  20. Performance analysis of a miniature Joule-Thomson cryocooler with and without the distributed J-T effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Rashmin; Atrey, Milind

    2015-12-01

    Cryogenic temperatures are obtained with Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocoolers in an easier way as compared to other cooling techniques. Miniature J-T cryocoolers are often employed for cooling of infrared sensors, cryoprobes, biological samples, etc. A typical miniature J-T cryocooler consists of a storage reservoir/compressor providing the high pressure gas, a finned tube recuperative heat exchanger, an expansion valve/orifice, and the cold end. The recuperative heat exchanger is indispensable for attaining cryogenic temperatures. The geometrical parameters and the operating conditions of the heat exchanger drastically affect the cryocooler performance in terms of cool down time and cooling effect. In the literature, the numerical models for the finned recuperative heat exchanger have neglected the distributed J-T effect. The distributed J-T effect accounts for the changes in enthalpy of the fluid due to changes of pressure in addition to those due to changes of temperature. The objective of this work is to explore the distributed J-T effect and study the performance of a miniature J-T cryocooler with and without the distributed J-T effect. A one dimensional transient model is employed for the numerical analysis of the cryocooler. Cases with different operating conditions are worked out with argon and nitrogen as working fluids.

  1. Cryogenic Propellant Boil-Off Reduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, D. W.; Christie, R. J.; Carlberg, E.; Feller, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    Lunar missions under consideration would benefit from incorporation of high specific impulse propellants such as LH2 and LO2, even with their accompanying boil-off losses necessary to maintain a steady tank pressure. This paper addresses a cryogenic propellant boil-off reduction system to minimize or eliminate boil-off. Concepts to do so were considered under the In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot Project. Specific to that was an investigation of cryocooler integration concepts for relatively large depot sized propellant tanks. One concept proved promising—it served to efficiently move heat to the cryocooler even over long distances via a compressed helium loop. The analyses and designs for this were incorporated into NASA Glenn Research Center's Cryogenic Analysis Tool. That design approach is explained and shown herein. Analysis shows that, when compared to passive only cryogenic storage, the boil-off reduction system begins to reduce system mass if durations are as low as 40 days for LH2, and 14 days for LO2. In addition, a method of cooling LH2 tanks is presented that precludes development issues associated with LH2 temperature cryocoolers.

  2. Attenuation of cryocooler induced vibration in spaceborne infrared payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, A.; Twitto, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of operational responsive space programs calls for a development of compact, reliable, low power and vibration free cryogenic cooling for sophisticated infrared payloads. The refrigeration in a typical closed cycle split Stirling linear cryocooler is achieved by a cyclic compression and expansion of a gaseous working agent due to a synchronized reciprocation of electro-dynamically and pneumatically actuated compressor and expander pistons. Attenuation of the cryocooler induced vibration usually relies on the concept of actively assisted momentum cancellation. In a typical dual-piston compressor this objective is achieved by actively synchronizing the motion of oppositely moving piston assemblies; a typical single-piston expander may be counterbalanced by a motorized counter-balancer. The above approach produces complexity, weight, size, high incurred costs and affects reliability. The authors analyze the case of passive attenuation the vibration export induced by the split Stirling linear cryocooler comprised of inline mounted single-piston compressor and expander. Placement of all the moving components onto a common axis results in a single axis consolidation of vibration export and enables use of single tuned dynamic absorber and low frequency vibration mount. From theoretical analysis and full-scale testing, the performance of such vibration protection arrangement is similar to known systems of active vibration cancellation.

  3. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Volume 41, Part A & B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, P. [ed.

    1996-12-31

    This proceedings is of the 1995 Cryogenic Engineering Conference. It consists of 252 published papers covering the latest developments in all aspects of cryogenic engineering research. Contributions touch on fields including: cryobiology; heat and mass transfer (including data on boiling and superfluid helium); magnet technology; large-scale cryogenic systems, such as the large hadron collider and the TeV Electron Superconducting Linear Accelerator; cryofuels; minesweeping applications; space cryocooler applications; research on miscellaneous cryogenic machinery, techniques, and safety concerns. Separate abstracts have been submitted for contributions from this proceedings.

  4. Application of Cryocoolers to a Vintage Dilution Refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Richard; Smith, Gary; Ruschman, Mark; /Fermilab; Beaty, Jim; /Minnesota U.

    2011-06-06

    A dilution refrigerator is required for 50mK detector operation of CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search). Besides shielding the dilution refrigerator itself, the liquid nitrogen shield and liquid helium bath in the refrigerator cool the detector cryostat heat shields and cool electronics, resulting in significant external heat loads at 80K and at 4K. An Oxford Instruments Kelvinox 400 has served this role for ten years but required daily transfers of liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Complicating the cryogen supply is the location 800 meters below ground in an RF shielded, class 10000 clean room at Soudan, MN. Nitrogen and helium re-liquefiers using cryocoolers were installed outside the clean room and continuously condense room temperature gas and return the liquids to the dilution refrigerator through a transfer line. This paper will describe the design, installation, controls and performance of liquefaction systems.

  5. Application of cryocoolers to a vintage dilution refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Richard L.; Smith, Gary; Ruschman, Mark; Beaty, Jim

    2012-06-01

    A dilution refrigerator is required for 50 mK detector operation of CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search). Besides shielding the dilution refrigerator itself, the liquid nitrogen shield and liquid helium bath in the refrigerator cool the detector cryostat heat shields and cool electronics, resulting in significant external heat loads at 80 K and at 4 K. An Oxford Instruments Kelvinox 400 has served this role for ten years but required daily transfers of liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Complicating the cryogen supply is the location 800 meters below ground in an RF shielded, class 10000 clean room at Soudan, MN. Nitrogen and helium re-liquefiers using cryocoolers were installed outside the clean room and continuously condense room temperature gas and return the liquids to the dilution refrigerator through a transfer line. This paper will describe the design, installation, controls and performance of liquefaction systems.

  6. Vibration-free stirling cryocooler for high definition microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabzev, S. V.; Veprik, A. M.; Vilenchik, H. S.; Pundak, N.; Castiel, E.

    2009-12-01

    The normal operation of high definition Scanning Electronic and Helium Ion microscope tools often relies on maintaining particular components at cryogenic temperatures. This has traditionally been accomplished by using liquid coolants such as liquid Nitrogen. This inherently limits the useful temperature range to above 77 K, produces various operational hazards and typically involves elevated ownership costs, inconvenient logistics and maintenance. Mechanical coolers, over-performing the above traditional method and capable of delivering required (even below 77 K) cooling to the above cooled components, have been well-known elsewhere for many years, but their typical drawbacks, such as high purchasing cost, cooler size, low reliability and high power consumption have so far prevented their wide-spreading. Additional critical drawback is inevitable degradation of imagery performance originated from the wideband vibration export as typical for the operation of the mechanical cooler incorporating numerous movable components. Recent advances in the development of reliable, compact, reasonably priced and dynamically quiet linear cryogenic coolers gave rise to so-called "dry cooling" technologies aimed at eventually replacing the traditional use of outdated liquid Nitrogen cooling facilities. Although much improved these newer cryogenic coolers still produce relatively high vibration export which makes them incompatible with modern high definition microscopy tools. This has motivated further research activity towards developing a vibration free closed-cycle mechanical cryocooler. The authors have successfully adapted the standard low vibration Stirling cryogenic refrigerator (Ricor model K535-LV) delivering 5 W@40 K heat lift for use in vibration-sensitive high definition microscopy. This has been achieved by using passive mechanical counterbalancing of the main portion of the low frequency vibration export in combination with an active feed-forward multi

  7. Microminiature rotary Stirling cryocooler for compact, lightweight, and low-power thermal imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filis, Avishai; Bar Haim, Zvi; Pundak, Nachman; Broyde, Ramon

    2009-05-01

    Novel compact and low power consuming cooled infrared thermal imagers as used in gyro-stabilized payloads of miniature unmanned aerial vehicles, Thermal small arms sights and tactical night vision goggles often rely on integral rotary micro-miniature closed cycle Stirling cryogenic engines. Development of EPI Antimonides technology and optimization of MCT technology allowed decreasing in order of magnitudes the level of dark current in infrared detectors thus enabling an increase in the optimal focal plane temperature in excess of 95K while keeping the same radiometric performances as achieved at 77K using regular technologies. Maintaining focal plane temperature in the range of 95K to 110K instead of 77K improves the efficiency of Stirling thermodynamic cycle thus enlarging cooling power and enabling the development of a mini micro cooler similar to RICOR's K562S model which is three times smaller, lighter and more compact than a standard tactical cryocooler like RICOR's K508 model. This cooler also features a new type of ball bearings and internal components which were optimized to fit tight bulk constraints and maintain the required life span, while keeping a low level of vibration and noise signature. Further, the functions of management the brushless DC motor and temperature stabilization are delivered by the newly developed high performance sensorless digital controller. By reducing Dewar Detector thermal losses and increasing the focal plane temperature, longer life time operation is expected as was proved with RICOR's K508 model. Resulting from this development, the RICOR K562S model cryogenic engine consumes 1.2 - 3.0 WDC while operating in the closed loop mode and maintaining the typical focal plane arrays at 200-100K. This makes it compatible with very compact battery packages allowing further reduction of the overall thermal imager weight thus making it comparable with the compatible uncooled infrared thermal imager relying on a microbolometer detector

  8. Advances in Helium Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciver, S. W. Van

    This review provides a survey of major advances that have occurred in recent years in the area of helium cryogenics. Helium-temperature cryogenics is the enabling technology for a substantial and growing number of low-temperature systems from superconducting magnets to space-based experimental facilities. In recent years there have been many advances in the technology of low-temperature helium, driven mostly by new applications. However, to keep the review from being too broad, this presentation focuses mainly on three of the most significant advances. These are: (1) the development of large-scale recuperative refrigeration systems mainly for superconducting magnet applications in accelerators and other research facilities; (2) the use of stored superfluid helium (He II) as a coolant for spacebased astrophysics experiments; and (3) the application of regenerative cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperatures primarily for cooling superconducting devices. In each case, the reader should observe that critical technologies were developed to facilitate these applications. In addition to these three primary advances, other significant helium cryogenic technologies are briefly reviewed at the end of this chapter, along with some vision for future developments in these areas.

  9. Development of 1 kW Stirling cryocooler using a linear compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J.; Kim, H.; Hong, Y. J.; Yeom, H.; In, S.; Park, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cryogenic cooling systems for HTS electric power devices require a reliable and efficient high-capacity cryocooler. A Striling cryocooler with a linear compressor can be a good candidate. It has advantages of low vibration and long maintenance cycle compared with a kinematic-driven Stirling cryocooler. In this study, we developed a dual-opposed linear compressor of 12 kW electric input power with two 6 kW linear motors. Electrical performance of the fabricated linear compressor is verified by experimental measurement of thrust constant. The developed Stirling cryocooler has a gamma-type configuration. The piston and displacer are supported with a flexure spring. A slit-type heat exchanger is adopted for the cold and warm-end, and the generated heat is rejected by cooling water. In the cooling performance test, waveforms of voltage, current, displacement and pressure are obtained and their amplitude and phase difference are analysed. The developed cryocooler reaches 47.8 K within 23.4 min. with no-load. Heat load tests shows a cooling capacity of 440 W at 78.1 K with 6.45 kW of electric input power and 19.4 of % Carnot COP.

  10. Ultra-low-phase-noise cryocooled microwave dielectric-sapphire-resonator oscillators with frequency instability below 1 x 10^-16

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett, John G; Lu, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Two nominally identical ultra-stable cryogenic microwave oscillators are compared. Each incorporates a dielectric-sapphire resonator cooled to near 6 K in an ultra-low vibration cryostat using a low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler. The phase noise for a single oscillator is measured at -105 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz offset on the 11.2 GHz carrier. The oscillator fractional frequency stability is characterized in terms of Allan deviation by 5.3 x 10^-16 tau^-1/2 + 9 x 10^-17 for integration times 0.1 s < tau < 100 s and is limited by a flicker frequency noise floor below 1 x 10^-16.

  11. A magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy system using a microfluidically cryo-cooled planar coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Chiwan; Godley, Richard F; Park, Jaewon; McDougall, Mary P; Wright, Steven M; Han, Arum

    2011-07-07

    We present the development of a microfluidically cryo-cooled planar coil for magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy. Cryogenically cooling radiofrequency (RF) coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the experiment. Conventional cryostats typically use a vacuum gap to keep samples to be imaged, especially biological samples, at or near room temperature during cryo-cooling. This limits how close a cryo-cooled coil can be placed to the sample. At the same time, a small coil-to-sample distance significantly improves the MR imaging capability due to the limited imaging depth of planar MR microcoils. These two conflicting requirements pose challenges to the use of cryo-cooling in MR microcoils. The use of a microfluidic based cryostat for localized cryo-cooling of MR microcoils is a step towards eliminating these constraints. The system presented here consists of planar receive-only coils with integrated cryo-cooling microfluidic channels underneath, and an imaging surface on top of the planar coils separated by a thin nitrogen gas gap. Polymer microfluidic channel structures fabricated through soft lithography processes were used to flow liquid nitrogen under the coils in order to cryo-cool the planar coils to liquid nitrogen temperature (-196 °C). Two unique features of the cryo-cooling system minimize the distance between the coil and the sample: (1) the small dimension of the polymer microfluidic channel enables localized cooling of the planar coils, while minimizing thermal effects on the nearby imaging surface. (2) The imaging surface is separated from the cryo-cooled planar coil by a thin gap through which nitrogen gas flows to thermally insulate the imaging surface, keeping it above 0 °C and preventing potential damage to biological samples. The localized cooling effect was validated by simulations, bench testing, and MR imaging experiments. Using this cryo-cooled planar coil system inside a 4.7 Tesla MR system

  12. Hydrodynamic parameters for ErPr cryocooler regenerator fillers under steady and periodic flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, M. G.; Patel, V. C.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.; Mulcahey, T. I.; Helvensteijn, B. P.; Kashani, A.; Feller, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The regenerator, typically a microporous structure that is subject to periodic flow of a cryogenic fluid, is the most critical component of Pulse Tube or Stirling cryocoolers, which are widely used for high-demand defense and aerospace applications. Despite the critical impact of hydrodynamic irreversibilities in the regenerator on the overall cycle efficiency, the impact of the parameters that influence these losses are poorly understood.

  13. A brief overview of cryogenics in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.-M.

    In this paper general aspects of cryogenics in China are introduced, and applications of cryogenics in the space programme are described briefly, such as its application to the Long March 3 rocket vehicles with LH2/LO2 engines, the development of a 750 dm 3 hr -1 liquid hydrogen plant and railway tank cars with 60 and 70 m 3 capacities. In addition, the progress of various cryogenic techniques in China is presented, such as the FY-1 radiation refrigerator loaded on a meteorology satellite, regenerative cryocoolers of the Gifford-McMahon, Solvay, Vuilleumier, Stirling and pulse tube types, and the KM-3 and KM-4 space simulation facilities. Finally, the paper discusses current education about refrigeration and cryogenics for undergraduates and graduates.

  14. Fluorescence Efficiency and Stability of Radio-Pure Tetraphenyl-butadiene Based Coatings for VUV Light Detection in Cryogenic Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Baudis, Laura; Dressler, Rugard; Piastra, Francesco; Usoltsev, Ilya; Walter, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The detection of VUV scintillation light, e.g. in (liquid) argon detectors, commonly includes a reflector with a fluorescent coating, converting UV photons to visible light. The light yield of these detectors depends directly on the conversion efficiency. Several coating/reflector combinations were produced using VM2000, a specular reflecting multi layer polymer, and Tetratex, a diffuse reflecting PTFE fabric, as reflector foils. The efficiency of these coatings was optimised and has been measured in a dedicated liquid argon setup built at the University of Zurich. It employs a small, 1.3 kg LAr cell viewed by a 3-inch, low radioactivity PMT of type R11065-10 from Hamamatsu. The cryogenic stability of these coatings was additionally studied. The optimum reflector/coating combination was found to be Tetratex dip coated with Tetraphenyl-butadiene with a thickness of 0.9 mg/cm$^2$ resulting in a 3.6 times higher light yield compared to uncoated VM2000. Its performance was stable in long term measurements, ran up...

  15. 5th International Conference on Cryocoolers

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    The Cryocoolers 5 proceedings archives the contributions of leading international experts at the 5th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Monterey, California on August 18-19, 1988. The authors submitted twenty six papers describing advancements and applications of cryocoolers in the temperature range below 80K. This year's conference was hosted by the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and the conference proceedings reproduced here were published by the Wright-Patterson AFB in Ohio.

  16. Concept of a Cryogenic System for a Cryogen-Free 25 T Superconducting Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Sadanori; Takahashi, Masahiko; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Tosaka, Taizo; Tasaki, Kenji; Hanai, Satoshi; Ioka, Shigeru; Watanabe, Kazuo; Awaji, Satoshi; Oguro, Hidetoshi

    A cryogen-free 25 T superconducting magnet using a ReBCO insert coil that generates 11.5 T in a 14 T background field of outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils is currently under development. The AC loss of the insert coil during field ramping is approximately 8.8 W, which is difficult to dissipate at the operating temperature of the LTS coils (4 K). However, since a ReBCO coil can operate at a temperature above 4 K, the ReBCO insert coil is cooled to about 10 K by two GM cryocoolers, and the LTS coils are independently cooled by two GM/JT cryocoolers. Two GM cryocoolers cool a circulating helium gas through heat exchangers, and the gas is transported over a long distance to the cold stage located on the ReBCO insert coil, in order to protect the cryocoolers from the leakage field of high magnetic fields. The temperature difference of the 2nd cold stage of the GM cryocoolers and the insert coil can be reduced by increasing the gas flow rate. However, at the same time, the heat loss of the heat exchangers increases, and the temperature of the second cold stage is raised. Therefore, the gas flow rate is optimized to minimize the operating temperature of the ReBCO insert coil by using a flow controller and a bypass circuit connected to a buffer tank.

  17. Regenerators for Liquid Hydrogen Cryocoolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA exloration, planetary and astrophysics missions will require various enhancements in multi-stage cryocoolers. These include increased efficiency, reduced...

  18. Regenerators for Liquid Hydrogen Cryocoolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA exloration, planetary and astrophysics missions will require various enhancements in multi-stage cryocoolers. These include increased efficiency, reduced...

  19. Ricor's anniversary of 50 innovative years in cryogenic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filis, Avishai; Segal, Victor; Pundak, Nachman; Bar Haim, Zvi; Danziger, Menachem

    2017-05-01

    Ricor cryogenics was founded in 1967 and since then it has focused on innovative technologies in the cryogenic field. The paper reviews the initial research and development efforts invested in various technologies that have yielded products such as Cryostats for Mossbauer Effect measurement, Liquid gas Dewar containers, Liquid helium vacuum transfer tubes, Cryosurgery and other innovative products. The major registered patents that matured to products such as a magnetic vacuum valve operator, pumped out safety valve and other innovations are reviewed here. As a result of continuous R and D investment, over the years a new generation of innovative Stirling cryogenic products has developed. This development began with massive split slip-on coolers and has progressed as far as miniature IDDCA coolers mainly for IR applications. The accumulated experience in Stirling technology is used also as a platform for developing self-contained water vapor pumps known as MicroStar and NanoStar. These products are also used in collaboration with a research institute in the field of High Temperature Superconductors. The continuous growth in the cryogenic products range and the need to meet market demands have motivated the expansion, of Ricor's manufacturing facility enabling it to become a world leader in the cryocooler field. To date Ricor has manufactured more than 120,000 cryocoolers. The actual cryogenic development efforts and challenges are also reviewed, mainly in the field of long life cryocoolers, ruggedized products, miniaturization and products for space applications.

  20. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Volume 29 - Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Colorado Springs, CO, August 15-17, 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, R. W.

    Applications of superconductivity are discussed, taking into account the thermal performance of the MFTF magnets, the design and testing of a large bore superconducting magnet test facility, the development of a 12-tesla multifilamentary Nb3Sn magnet, a superconducting magnet for solid NMR studies, advanced applications of superconductors, transition and recovery of a cryogenically stable superconductor, and finite-difference modeling of the cryostability of helium II cooled conductor packs. Other topics explored are related to resource availability, heat exchangers, heat transfer to He I, liquid nitrogen, heat transfer in He II, refrigeration for superconducting and cryopump systems, refrigeration of cryogenic systems, refrigeration and liquefaction, dilution and magnetic refrigeration, cryocoolers, refrigeration for space applications, cryogenic applications, cryogenic instrumentation and data acquisition, and properties of fluids. Attention is given to biomedical applications of cryogenics in China, long-term cryogen storage in space, and a passive orbital disconnect strut.

  1. Seals For Cryogenic Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Tam, L. T.; Braun, M. J.; Vlcek, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis considers effects of seals on stability. Report presents method of calculation of flows of cryogenic fluids through shaft seals. Key to stability is local average velocity in seal. Local average velocity strongly influenced by effects of inlet and outlet and injection of fluid.

  2. Numerical Study of a 10 K Two Stage Pulse Tube Cryocooler with Precooling Inside the Pulse Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaomin, Pang; Xiaotao, Wang; Wei, Dai; Jianyin, Hu; Ercang, Luo

    2017-02-01

    High efficiency cryocoolers working below 10 K have many applications such as cryo-pump, superconductor cooling and cryogenic electronics. This paper presents a thermally coupled two-stage pulse tube cryocooler system and its numeric analysis. The simulation results indicate that temperature distribution in the pulse tube has a significant impact on the system performance. So a precooling heat exchanger is put inside the second stage pulse tube for a deep investigation on its influence on the system performance. The influences of operating parameters such as precooling temperature, location of the precooling heat exchanger are discussed. Comparison of energy losses apparently show the advantages of the configuration which leads to an improvement on the efficiency. Finally, the cryocooler is predicted to be able to reach a relative Carnot efficiency of 10.7% at 10 K temperature.

  3. Design of a scanning gate microscope in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Bartel, John; Keller, Andrew; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2012-01-01

    We report on our design of a scanning gate microscope housed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 15 mK. The recent increase in efficiency of pulse tube cryocoolers has made cryogen-free systems popular in recent years. However, this new style of cryostat presents challenges for performing scanning probe measurements, mainly as a result of the vibrations introduced by the cryocooler. We demonstrate scanning with root-mean-square vibrations of 0.8 nm at 3 K and 2.1 nm at 15 mK in a 1 kHz bandwidth with our design.

  4. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, MS 400 076 India and S. S. G. M. College of Engineering Shegaon, MS 444 203 (India); Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, MS 400 076 (India)

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  5. Raytheon advanced pulse-tube cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Ted; Yates, Ryan; Kuo, Daniel; Schaefer, Brian; Arnoult, Matt

    2016-05-01

    Since the 1970s, Raytheon has developed, built, tested and integrated high performance cryocoolers. Our versatile designs for single and multi-stage cryocoolers provide reliable operation for temperatures from 10 to 200 Kelvin with power levels ranging from 50 W to nearly 600 W. These cryocoolers incorporate clearance seals, flexure suspensions, hermetic housings and dynamic balancing to provide long service life and reliable operation in all relevant environments. Recently, Raytheon has developed an advanced regenerator technology capable of operating efficiently at high frequencies and outperforming traditional screen regenerators. The Raytheon Advanced Miniature (RAM-100) cryocooler, a flight packaged, high frequency, single stage pulse tube cooler with an integrated surge volume and inertance tube, has been designed for use with this regenerator. Design details and experimentally measured performance of two iterations of the RAM cryocooler are presented in this paper.

  6. Experimental study of a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler using a commercial air-conditioning scroll compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisung; Lee, Kyungsoo; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2013-05-01

    Mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers have been used to create cryogenic temperatures and are simple, efficient, cheap, and durable. However, compressors for MR J-T cryocoolers still require optimization. As the MR J-T cryocooler uses a commercial scroll compressor developed for air-conditioning systems, compressor overheating due to the use of less optimized refrigerants may not be negligible, and could cause compressor malfunction due to burn-out of scroll tip seals. Therefore, in the present study, the authors propose procedures to optimize compressor operation to avoid the overheating issue when the MR J-T cryocooler is used with a commercial oil lubricated scroll compressor, and the present experimental results obtained for a MR J-T cryocooler. A single stage 1.49 kW (2 HP) scroll compressor designed for R22 utilizing a mixture of nitrogen and hydrocarbons was used in the present study. As was expected, compressor overheating and irreversible high temperatures at a compressor discharge port were found at the beginning of compressor operation, which is critical, and hence, the authors used a water injection cooling system for the compressor to alleviate temperature overshooting. In addition, a portion of refrigerant in the high-pressure stream was by-passed into the compressor suction port. This allowed an adequate compression ratio, prevented excessive temperature increases at the compressor discharge, and eventually enabled the MR J-T cryocooler to operate stably at 121 K. The study shows that commercial oil lubricated scroll compressors can be used for MR J-T cryocooling systems if care is exercised to avoid compressor overheating.

  7. Cryogenic Thermal Management Advances during the CRYOTOOL Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, D.; Stouffer, C.; Garzon, J.; Beres, M.; Gilchrist, A.; Roberts, T.; Davis, T.

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic thermal management advances made during the AFRL-sponsored CRYOTOOL program. Advances occurred as a result of conducting four technology development tasks: (1) development of a differential thermal expansion cryogenic thermal switch (DTE-CTSW) made with high purity Al end-pieces and an Ultem support rod; (2) carrying out of a dual DTE-CTSW/dual cryocooler performance test to quantify CTSW benefits in a redundant cryocooler system; (3) development of a miniaturized cryogenic loop heat pipe (mini-CLHP) that combines flex link, conduction bar, and CTSW functionalities; and (4) development of an across-gimbal cryogenic thermal transport system (GCTTS) with large diameter transport line coils for optics cooling. The results are as follows. The DTE-CTSW achieved an ON conductance of 2-3.6 W/K (from 35-90 K) and an OFF resistance of 1100-2300 K/W (300-230 K warm end). The redundant cryocooler test showed modest parasitic heat leak savings when dual DTE-CTSWs were used versus when they were not used. The mini-CLHP, using neon as the working fluid, transported 2.5 W at 35 K, achieved an OFF resistance of 1555 K/W, and had cross/axial flexibilities of 100-450 N/m. Lastly, GCTTS, using nitrogen as the working fluid, transported 20 W at 100 K in a flat configuration. Additional work is needed to verify GCTTS operation in an elevated orientation.

  8. Cryogenic Adsorption of Nitrogen and Carbon Dioxide in Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fuzhi; Liu, Huiming; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Hengcheng; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Laifeng

    2017-09-01

    Activated carbon have been used for a long time at low temperature for cryogenic applications. The knowledge of adsorption characteristics of activated carbon at cryogenic temperature is essential for some specific applications. However, such experimental data are very scare in the literature. In order to measure the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon under variable cryogenic temperatures, an adsorption measurement device was presented. The experiment system is based on the commercially available PCT-pro adsorption analyzer coupled to a two-stage Gifford McMahon refrigerator, which allows the sample to be cooled to 4.2K. Cryogenic environment can be maintained steadily without the cryogenic liquid through the cryocooler and temperature can be controlled precisely between 5K and 300K by the temperature controller. Adsorption measurements were performed in activated carbon for carbon dioxide and nitrogen and the adsorption isotherm were obtained.

  9. Micro cryogenic coolers for IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ryan; Wang, Yunda; Cooper, Jill; Lin, Martin M.; Bright, Victor M.; Lee, Y. C.; Bradley, Peter E.; Radebaugh, Ray; Huber, Marcia L.

    2011-06-01

    Joule-Thomson micro cryogenic coolers (MCCs) are a preferred approach for small and low power cryocoolers. With the same heat lift, MCC's power input can be only 1/10 of a thermoelectric cooler's input, and MCC's size can be only 1/10 of a Stirling cooler's size. With futuristic planar MCC and with high frequency MEMS compressors to be developed, its size can be reduced another order of magnitude. Such "invisible" cryocoolers may revolutionize future IR imaging systems. We will review our studies on the feasibility of MCC with an emphasis on: 1) high thermal isolation levels reaching 89,000 K/W; 2) custom-designed gas mixtures with refrigeration capabilities increased by 10X and pressure ratio reduced to only 4:1; 3) compressors with low pressure ratios; and 4) excellent scalability for further size reduction.

  10. Closed cycle cryocooler for low temperature electronics circuits: Cold end test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirtle, F. W.

    1983-08-01

    A fabricated MACOR cold end including a metallic coating to prevent helium permeation and a fabricated die post displacer support bearing were combined with a compressor and motor which are standard CTI-CRYOGENICS products. A mechanical test was performed on the test cryocooler to determine that the mechanical test was performed on the test cryocooler to determine that the MACOR displacer was successfully guided by the die post bearing. Thermodynamic tests were conducted to determine the lowest temperature of the 4th (coldest) stage as a function of operating speed, helium charge pressure, 4th stage electrical heat load, and transfer tube diameter. Cooldown and steady state results are reported. Results indicate a low temperature limit of approximately 95K with the current test hardware. Although this represents an improvement from 122K during the program, a resizing will be necessary to reach 10K. The die post displacer support bearing and the MACOR cold finger construction are mechanically satisfactory.

  11. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  12. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  13. Reducing the Liquid Helium Consumption of Superconducting Rock Magnetometers (SRMs) used in Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic studies: Gallium Lubrication of Gifford-McMahon Cryocoolers Leads to a Dramatic Increase in Cool-down Efficiency, and a Drop in Liquid Helium Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschvink, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Two-stage Gifford-McMahon helium-gas cryocoolers have been used for the past 40+ years in a wide variety of cryogenic applications, including reducing the liquid helium consumption of SRMs. However, the cooling efficiency depends greatly on the friction of the displacement pistons, which need to be replaced every few years. This and the rising cost of liquid helium are major headaches in the operation of modern paleomagnetic laboratories. Although the development of efficient pulse-tube cryocoolers has eliminated the need for liquid helium in new superconducting magnetometers, there are still nearly 100 older SRMs around the globe that use liquid helium. In a failed attempt to replace the Gifford-McMahon unit on one of Caltech's SRMs with a pulse-tube, we irreversibly contaminated the cylindrical surfaces of the stainless-steel heat exchanger with a thin film of gallium, a non-toxic metal that has a melting temperature of ~ 30˚C. Liquid gallium will diffuse into other metals, altering their surface properties. We noticed that the next cryocooler-assisted cool down of the SRM went nearly twice as fast as in previous cycles, and the helium boiloff rate for the past 2 years has stabilized at less than half of its average over the past 30 years. It seems that the thin layer of gallium may be reducing the sliding friction of the Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers. We recently tested this on a second SRM, with similar results. We found that the inner cryocooler surface reached its equilibrium temperature in about 1/3 of the time that it took in previous cool-down cycles. WSGI also confirmed that this cool-down was unusually efficient compared to other instruments they have built. Subsequent records of the helium gas boiloff show that this system is also running at about half of its former loss rate. Based on these two results, we tentatively recommend this simple procedure any time cold-head swaps are performed on these cryocoolers.

  14. Testing of a Helium Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA space telescopes and exploration missions require cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks. One device that can potentially be used to provide closed-loop cryocooling is the cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP). A CLHP has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A helium CLHP has been tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryocooler as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components in the 3K temperature range. A copper plate with attached electrical heaters was used to simulate the heat source, and heat was collected by the CLHP evaporator and transferred to the cryocooler for ultimate heat rejection. The helium CLHP thermal performance test included cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, capillary limit, heat removal capability, rapid power changes, and long duration steady state operation. The helium CLHP demonstrated robust operation under steady state and transient conditions. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully without pre-conditioning by simply applying power to both the capillary pump and the evaporator plate. It could adapt to rapid changes in the heat load, and reach a new steady state very quickly. Heat removal between 10mW and 140mW was demonstrated, yielding a power turn down ratio of 14. When the CLHP capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the power to the capillary pump. Steady state operations up to 17 hours at several heat loads were demonstrated. The ability of the helium CLHP to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  15. Optimal performance of regenerative cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, P. C. T.

    2011-02-01

    The key component of a regenerative cryocooler is its regenerative heat exchanger. This device is subject to losses due to imperfect heat transfer between the regenerator material and the gas, as well as due to viscous dissipation. The relative magnitudes of these losses can be characterized by the ratio of the Stanton number St to the Fanning friction factor f. Using available data for the ratio St/ f, results are developed for the optimal cooling rate and Carnot efficiency. The variations of pressure and temperature are taken to be sinusoidal in time, and to have small amplitudes. The results are applied to the case of the Stirling cryocooler, with flow being generated by pistons at both sides of the regenerator. The performance is found to be close to optimal at large ratio of the warm space volume to the regenerator void volume. The results are also applied to the Orifice Pulse Tube Refrigerator. In this case, optimal performance additionally requires a large ratio of the regenerator void volume to the cold space volume.

  16. Cryogenic Cooling System for 5 kA, 200 μH Class HTS DC Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Heecheol; Kim, Seokho; Kim, Kwangmin; Park, Minwon; Park, Taejun; Kim, A.-rong; Lee, Sangjin

    DC reactors, made by aluminum busbar, are used to stabilize the arc of an electric furnace. In the conventional arc furnace, the transport current is several tens of kilo-amperes and enormous resistive loss is generated. To reduce the resistive loss at the DC reactor, a HTS DC reactor can be considered. It can dramatically improve the electric efficiency as well as reduce the installation space. Similar with other superconducting devices, the HTS DC reactor requires current leads from a power source in room temperature to the HTS coil in cryogenic environment. The heat loss at the metal current leads can be minimized through optimization process considering the geometry and the transport current. However, the transport current of the HTS DC reactor for the arc furnace is much larger than most of HTS magnets and the enormous heat penetration through the current lead should be effectively removed to keep the temperature around 70∼77 K. Current leads are cooled down by circulation of liquid nitrogen from the cooling system with a stirling cryocooler. The operating temperature of HTS coil is 30∼40 K and circulation of gaseous helium is used to remove the heat generation at the HTS coil. Gaseous helium is transported through the cryogenic helium blower and a single stage GM cryocooler. This paper describes design and experimental results on the cooling system for current leads and the HTS coil of 5 kA, 200 μH class DC reactor as a prototype. The results are used to verify the design values of the cooling systems and it will be applied to the design of scale-up cooling system for 50 kA, 200 μH class DC reactor.

  17. Harmonic frequency mixing using high Tc superconductor Josephson junction mounted on pulse tube cryocooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency mixing system including microwave coupling and intermediate frequency (IF) measurement arrangements is esigned. In lieu of liquid nitrogen, a pulse tube cryocooler is used to cool the whole system. With YBa2Cu3O7/Yttrium stabilized irconia (YBCO/YSZ) bicrystal Josephson junction as the mixing element, 36th harmonic frequency mixing at the 8 mm waveband is obtained.

  18. Towards cryogenic liquid –vapor energy storage units for space applications

    OpenAIRE

    Afonso, Josiana Prado

    2013-01-01

    Dissertation to obtain the Doctoral degree in Physics Engineering With the development of mechanical coolers and very sensitive cryogenic sensors, it could be interesting to use Energy Storage Units (ESU) and turn off the cryocooler to operate in a free micro vibration environment. An ESU would also avoid cryogenic systems oversized to attenuate temperature fluctuations due to thermal load variations which is useful particularly for space applications. In both cases, the temperature dri...

  19. Nitrogen heat pipe for cryocooler thermal shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Green, G.F.; Roth, E.W. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A nitrogen heat pipe was designed, built and tested for the purpose of providing a thermal shunt between the two stages of a Gifford-McMahan (GM) cryocooler during cooldown. The nitrogen heat pipe has an operating temperature range between 63 and 123 K. While the heat pipe is in the temperature range during the system cooldown, it acts as a thermal shunt between the first and second stage of the cryocooler. The heat pipe increases the heat transfer to the first stage of the cryocooler, thereby reducing the cooldown time of the system. When the heat pipe temperature drops below the triple point, the nitrogen working fluid freezes, effectively stopping the heat pipe operation. A small heat leak between cryocooler stages remains because of axial conduction along the heat pipe wall. As long as the heat pipe remains below 63 K, the heat pipe remains inactive. Heat pipe performance limits were measured and the optimum fluid charge was determined.

  20. An Overview of NASA Efforts on Zero Boiloff Storage of Cryogenic Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Leon J.; Plachta, D. W.; Salerno, L.; Kittel, P.; Haynes, Davy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Future mission planning within NASA has increasingly motivated consideration of cryogenic propellant storage durations on the order of years as opposed to a few weeks or months. Furthermore, the advancement of cryocooler and passive insulation technologies in recent years has substantially improved the prospects for zero boiloff storage of cryogenics. Accordingly, a cooperative effort by NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Glenn Research Center (GRC), and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been implemented to develop and demonstrate "zero boiloff" concepts for in-space storage of cryogenic propellants, particularly liquid hydrogen and oxygen. ARC is leading the development of flight-type cryocoolers, GRC the subsystem development and small scale testing, and MSFC the large scale and integrated system level testing. Thermal and fluid modeling involves a combined effort by the three Centers. Recent accomplishments include: 1) development of "zero boiloff" analytical modeling techniques for sizing the storage tankage, passive insulation, cryocooler, power source mass, and radiators; 2) an early subscale demonstration with liquid hydrogen 3) procurement of a flight-type 10 watt, 95 K pulse tube cryocooler for liquid oxygen storage and 4) assembly of a large-scale test article for an early demonstration of the integrated operation of passive insulation, destratification/pressure control, and cryocooler (commercial unit) subsystems to achieve zero boiloff storage of liquid hydrogen. Near term plans include the large-scale integrated system demonstration testing this summer, subsystem testing of the flight-type pulse-tube cryocooler with liquid nitrogen (oxygen simulant), and continued development of a flight-type liquid hydrogen pulse tube cryocooler.

  1. Prototype Low Temperature Low Power Cryocooler,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    4 t CO-other superconducting devices. lLEb In 1977 Dr. Jim Zimmerman of National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, CO described a stirling cycle...Zimmerman successfully operated a point-Contact Nb SQUID on a four- stage stirling cycle cryocooler with a mechanical drive power of approxi- mately 15...allow a complete pressure change in the Cryocooler cylinder (plus expan- ion volume and regenerator ). Since this is not easily accomplished in a

  2. Ultimate Temperature of Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, P.

    2010-04-01

    An ideal pulse tube cryocooler using an ideal gas can operate at any temperature. This is not true for real gasses. The enthalpy flow resulting from the real gas effects of 3He, 4He, and their mixtures in ideal pulse tube cryocoolers puts limits on the operating temperature of pulse tube cryocoolers. The discussion of these effects follows a previous description of the real gas effects in ideal pulse tube cryocoolers and makes use of models of the thermophysical properties of 3He and 4He. Published data is used to extend the analysis to mixtures of 3He and 4He. The analysis was done for pressures below 2 MPa and temperatures below 2.5 K. Both gasses and their mixtures show low temperature limits for pulse tube cryocoolers. These limits are in the 0.5-2.2 K range and depend on pressure and mixture. In some circumstances, even lower temperatures may be possible. Pulse tube cryocoolers using the two-fluid properties of dilute 3He in superfluid 4He appear to have no limit.

  3. Cryogenic Active Magnetic Regenerator Test Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tura, A.; Roszmann, J.; Dikeos, J.; Rowe, A.

    2006-04-01

    An AMR Test Apparatus (AMRTA) used in experiments near room-temperature required a number of modifications to allow for testing at cryogenic temperatures and with a 5 T magnetic field. The impacts of parasitic heat leaks, frictional heat generation, and eddy current heating in the AMRTA are analyzed. A low temperature gas circulation (LTGC) system to control the operating temperature was developed. The LTGC consists of a GM cryocooler coupled to a compressor and helium circuit which circulates fluid through a set of heat exchangers and flexible transfer lines connected to the AMRTA. Design features are discussed as is some initial test data.

  4. Comparative study of oscillating flow characteristics of cryocooler regenerator at low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonglin JU; Qingqing SHEN

    2009-01-01

    A brief review is presented on previous experimental results and correlations on the friction factor of cryocooler regenerators operating at oscillating flow and pulsating pressure conditions, for different mesh sizes of packed woven screens, focusing on the effects of different operating frequencies ranging from 20 to 80 Hz, at room and cryogenic temperatures. A comparison of the friction factor data with those of other studies is presented to clarify the reason for the difference. Finally, a new oscillating flow correlation of regenerators, in terms of several non-dimensional parameters, is discussed and compared.

  5. Advanced Devices for Cryogenic Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, D.; Stouffer, C.; Garzon, J.; Beres, M.; Gilchrist, A.

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes six advanced cryogenic thermal management devices/subsystems developed by Swales Aerospace for ground/space-based applications of interest to NASA, DoD, and the commercial sector. The devices/subsystems described herein include the following: (a) a differential thermal expansion cryogenic thermal switch (DTE-CTSW) constructed with high purity aluminum end-pieces and an Ultem support rod for the 6 K Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) (b) a quad-redundant DTE-CTSW assembly for the 35 K science instruments (NIRCam, NIRSpec, and FGS) mounted on the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) (c) a cryogenic diode heat pipe (CDHP) thermal switching system using methane as the working fluid for the 100 K CRISM hyperspectral mapping instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and (d) three additional devices/subsystems developed during the AFRL-sponsored CRYOTOOL program, which include a dual DTE-CTSW/dual cryocooler test bed, a miniaturized neon cryogenic loop heat pipe (mini-CLHP), and an across gimbal cryogenic thermal transport system (GCTTS). For the first three devices/subsystems mentioned above, this paper describes key aspects of the development efforts including concept definition, design, fabrication, and testing. For the latter three, this paper provides brief overview descriptions as key details are provided in a related paper.

  6. 330 W Cryocooler Developments and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, N.; Caughley, A.; Nation, M.; Kimber, A.; Allpress, N.; Reynolds, H.; Boyle, C.; Meier, J.; Tanchon, J.

    2015-12-01

    Fabrum Solutions in association with Callaghan Innovation and Absolut System has developed a 330 W pulse tube cryocooler based on Callaghan Innovation's novel diaphragm pressure wave generators (DPWG). A cost-effective, long life and robust cryocooler has been achieved due to the pulse tube's lack of moving parts and the DPWG's metal diaphragms separating the working gas from the oil lubricated drive mechanism. A 330 cc DPWG was designed and manufactured to run with an inline pulse tube. Absolut System carried out the pulse tube design; manufacture was by Fabrum Solutions, with integration and testing by Callaghan Innovation. The 330 W pulse tubes were run as cryocoolers mounted to 330 cc DPWG's. 480 W of cooling power at 77 K was achieved (target was 330 W at 77 K) from 7kW PV power and 12 kW of electrical input power. An endurance cryocooler was assembled with the left over parts from the optimization exercise. The endurance cryocooler was assembled to run as a liquefier. Calculation showed that 1 litre per hour of liquid nitrogen production was possible from 91 W of cooling power at 83 K. 1 litre per hour of liquid nitrogen was successfully produced for every 100 W of cooling power at 83 K, in a commercial application. Three more 330 W pulse tubes have been mounted to a single 1000 cc DPWG to produce > 1 kW of cooling power at 77 K. The commercialisation of the 1000 W cryocooler is the topic of another paper presented at this conference. Details of the design, development, testing and integration of the 330 W cryocooler are presented in this paper.

  7. Experimental investigation and optimization of small-scale helium liquefaction with multi-cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Gong, Linghui; Li, Laifeng; Xu, Xiangdong; Liu, Huiming; Huang, Rongjin

    2015-07-01

    Small-scale helium liquefiers using regenerative cryocoolers with cooling power up to 1.5 W at 4.2 K could be used to re-liquefy evaporated helium gas of small- and medium-sized cryogenic devices such as MEG and PPMS. A serial-parallel-path helium liquefier with a liquefaction rate of 83 Litres per day (L/d) using five 4 K G-M cryocoolers is developed, and has been applied to the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center (WHMFC) in China. Different from parallel-path helium liquefier, the helium gas is effectively, stepwise precooled by heat exchangers on multi-cold flanges, and thus the additional purifier and precooling coil heat exchangers on the thinner part of the cold head cylinder containing the 2nd stage displacer could be removed to simplify the construction. Through theoretical calculation and conclusive analysis, an optimum configuration is proposed and makes a reference to the design of serial-parallel-path helium liquefier with multi-cryocoolers.

  8. Linear Resonance Compressor for Stirling-Type Cryocoolers Activated by Piezoelectric Stack-Type Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, S.; Grossman, G.

    2015-12-01

    A novel type of a PZT- based compressor operating at mechanical resonance, suitable for pneumatically-driven Stirling-type cryocoolers was developed theoretically and built practically during this research. A resonance operation at relatively low frequency was achieved by incorporating the piezo ceramics into the moving part, and by reducing the effective piezo stiffness using hydraulic amplification. The detailed concept, analytical model and the test results of the preliminary prototype were reported earlier and presented at ICC17 [2]. A fine agreement between the simulations and experiments spurred development of the current actual compressor designed to drive a miniature Pulse Tube cryocooler, particularly our MTSa model, which operates at 103 Hz and requires an average PV power of 11 W, filling pressure of 40 Bar and a pressure ratio of 1.3. The paper concentrates on design aspects and optimization of the governing parameters. The small stroke to diameter ratio (about 1:10) allows for the use of a composite diaphragm instead of a clearance-seal piston. The motivation is to create an adequate separation between the working fluid and the buffer gas of the compressor, thus preventing possible contamination in the cryocooler. Providing efficiency and power density similar to those of conventional linear compressors, the piezo compressor may serve as a good alternative for cryogenic applications requiring extreme reliability and absence of magnetic field interference.

  9. Linear-drive cryocoolers for the Department of Defense standard advanced dewar assembly (SADA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Garin S.

    2005-05-01

    The Standard Advanced Dewar Assembly (SADA) is the critical module in the Department of Defense (DoD) standardization of scanning second-generation thermal imaging systems. The DoD has established a family of SADAs to fulfill a range of performance requirements for various platforms. The SADA consists of the Infrared Focal Plane Array (IRFPA), Dewar, Command & Control Electronics (C&CE), and the cryogenic cooler, and is used in platforms such as the Apache helicopter, the M1A2 Abrams main battle tank, the M2 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle, and the Javelin Command Launch Unit (CLU). In support of the family of SADAs, the DoD defined a complementary family of tactical linear drive cryocoolers. The Stirling cycle linear drive cryocoolers are utilized to cool the Infrared Focal Plane Arrays (IRFPAs) in the SADAs. These coolers are required to have low input power, a quick cool-down time, low vibration output, low audible noise, and a higher reliability than currently fielded rotary coolers. These coolers must also operate in a military environment with its inherent high vibration level and temperature extremes. This paper will (1) outline the characteristics of each cryocooler, (2) present the status and results of qualification tests, (3) present the status of production efforts, and (4) present the status of efforts to increase linear drive cooler reliability.

  10. Performance of the helium dewar and cryocoolers of ASTRO-H SXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Takei, Yoh; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Koyama, Shu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yoichi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Okamoto, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Shunji; Hoshino, Akio; Sato, Kosuke; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Shinya; Seta, Hiromi; Ohashi, Takaya; Tamagawa, Toru; Noda, Hirofumi; Sawada, Makoto; Tashiro, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Kanao, Kenichi; Yoshida, Seiji; Miyaoka, Mikio; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Otsuka, Kiyomi; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; DiPirro, Michael J.; Shirron, Peter J.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, F. Scott; Chiao, Meng P.; Eckart, Megan E.; Kelley, Richard L.

    2016-07-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a cryogenic high-resolution X-ray spectrometer onboard the ASTRO-H satellite, that achieves energy resolution better than 7 eV at 6 keV, by operating the detector array at 50 mK using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The cooling chain from room temperature to the ADR heat sink is composed of 2-stage Stirling cryocoolers, a 4He Joule-Thomson cryocooler, and super uid liquid He, and is installed in a dewar. It is designed to achieve a helium lifetime of more than 3 years with a minimum of 30 liters. The satellite was launched on 2016 February 17, and the SXS worked perfectly in orbit, until March 26 when the satellite lost its function. It was demonstrated that the heat load on the He tank was about 0.7 mW, which would have satisfied the lifetime requirement. This paper describes the design, results of ground performance tests, prelaunch operations, and initial operation and performance in orbit of the flight dewar and cryocoolers.

  11. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, David W.; Guzik, Monica C.

    2014-03-01

    A computational model of the cryogenic boil-off reduction system being developed by NASA as part of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer technology maturation project has been applied to a range of propellant storage tanks sizes for high-performing in-space cryogenic propulsion applications. This effort focuses on the scaling of multi-layer insulation (MLI), cryocoolers, broad area cooling shields, radiators, solar arrays, and tanks for liquid hydrogen propellant storage tanks ranging from 2 to 10 m in diameter. Component scaling equations were incorporated into the Cryogenic Analysis Tool, a spreadsheet-based tool used to perform system-level parametric studies. The primary addition to the evolution of this updated tool is the integration of a scaling method for reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocoolers, as well as the development and inclusion of Self-Supporting Multi-Layer Insulation. Mass, power, and sizing relationships are traded parametrically to establish the appropriate loiter period beyond which this boil-off reduction system application reduces mass. The projected benefit compares passive thermal control to active thermal control, where active thermal control is evaluated for reduced boil-off with a 90 K shield, zero boil-off with a single heat interception stage at the tank wall, and zero boil-off with a second interception stage at a 90 K shield. Parametric studies show a benefit over passive storage at loiter durations under one month, in addition to showing a benefit for two-stage zero boil-off in terms of reducing power and mass as compared to single stage zero boil-off. Furthermore, active cooling reduces the effect of varied multi-layer insulation performance, which, historically, has been shown to be significant.

  12. 900-L liquid xenon cryogenic system operation for the MEG experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, T; Mihara, S; Hisamatsu, Y; Iawamoto, W; Mori, T; Nishiguchi, H; Otani, W; Sawada, R; Uchiyama, Y; Nishitani, T

    2009-01-01

    A cryogenic system for the MEG (muon rare decay) experiment has started operation at the Paul Sherrer Institute in Zurich. The main part of the MEG detector is the 900-L liquid xenon calorimeter for gamma ray detection, equipped with 850 photo multipliers directly immersed in liquid xenon. A 200 W pulse tube cryocooler enabled LN2-free operation of this calorimeter. A liquid purification system; using a liquid pump and a zero boil-off 1000-L cryogenic buffer dewar is also included in the system. The first entire engineering run was carried out in November-December 2007 and satisfactory cryogenic performances were confirmed.

  13. A Novel Pre-cooling System for a Cryogenic Pulsating Heat Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Liu, Huiming; Gong, Linghui; Xu, Xiangdong; Li, Laifeng

    To reduce the influence of the pipe material on the measurement of effective thermal conductivity, the pipe of a cryogenic pulsating heat pipe is generally made of stainless steel. Because of the low thermal conductivity of stainless steel, the pre-cooling of the evaporator in cryogenic pulsating heat pipe using helium as working fluid at 4.2 K is a problem. We designed a mechanical-thermal switch between the cryocooler and the evaporator, which was on during the pre-cooling process and off during the test process. By using the pre-cooling system, the cool down time of the cryogenic pulsating heat pipe was reduced significantly.

  14. Design, Construction and Test of Cryogen-Free HTS Coil Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocker, H.; Anerella, M.; Gupta, R.; Plate, S.; Sampson, W.; Schmalzle, J.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2011-03-28

    This paper will describe design, construction and test results of a cryo-mechanical structure to study coils made with the second generation High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). A magnet comprised of HTS coils mounted in a vacuum vessel and conduction-cooled with Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocoolers is used to develop and refine design and construction techniques. The study of these techniques and their effect on operations provides a better understanding of the use of cryogen free magnets in future accelerator projects. A cryogen-free, superconducting HTS magnet possesses certain operational advantages over cryogenically cooled, low temperature superconducting magnets.

  15. Cryogenic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoyama, Kenji

    2002-02-01

    In this lecture we discuss the principle of method of cooling to a very low temperature, i.e. cryogenic. The "gas molecular model" will be introduced to explain the mechanism cooling by the expansion engine and the Joule-Thomson expansion valve. These two expansion processes are normally used in helium refrigeration systems to cool the process gas to cryogenic temperature. The reverse Carnot cycle will be discussed in detail as an ideal refrigeration cycle. First the fundamental process of liquefaction and refrigeration cycles will be discussed, and then the practical helium refrigeration system. The process flow of the system and the key components; -compressor, expander, and heat exchanger- will be discussed. As an example of an actual refrigeration system, we will use the cryogenic system for the KEKB superconducting RF cavity. We will also discuss the liquid helium distribution system, which is very important, especially for the cryogenic systems used in accelerator applications. 1 Principles of Cooling and Fundamental Cooling Cycle 2 Expansion engine, Joule-Thomson expansion, kinetic molecular theory, and enthalpy 3 Liquefaction Systems 4 Refrigeration Systems 5 Practical helium liquefier/refrigeration system 6 Cryogenic System for TRISTAN Superconducting RF Cavity

  16. Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Helium Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA space telescopes and exploration missions require cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks. One device that can potentially be used to provide closed-loop cryocooling is the cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP). A CLHP has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A helium CLHP has been tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryocooler as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and to verify its ability to cool large areas or components in the 3 degrees Kelvin temperature range. The helium CLHP thermal performance test included cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, capillary limit, heat removal capability, rapid power changes, and long duration steady state operation. The helium CLHP demonstrated robust operation under steady state and transient conditions. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully by simply applying power to both the capillary pump and the evaporator plate without pre-conditioning. It could adapt to a rapid heat load change and quickly reach a new steady state. Heat removal between 10 megawatts and 140 megawatts was demonstrated, yielding a power turn down ratio of 14. When the CLHP capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the power to the capillary pump. Steady state operations up to 17 hours at several heat loads were demonstrated. The ability of the helium CLHP to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  17. Qualification test results for the TIRS cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Eric; Gully, Wilfred; Marquardt, Jennifer; Boyle, Robert; Hale, Taylor

    2012-06-01

    Ball Aerospace has completed qualification testing of its flight Stirling-cycle mechanical cryocooler for the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), an instrument slated to fly on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) platform. The TIRS cooler, developed under subcontract to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, consists of a sophisticated and highly reliable, two-stage, fixed regenerator Stirling cryocooler and its drive electronics. The TIRS cooler provides 2 W of 38 K cooling to the TIRS detectors and 9.8 W shield cooling to 85 K for less than 225 W total input power. Performance test results are reported.

  18. Modelling heating effects in cryocooled protein crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J; Fayz, K; Fell, B; Garman, E

    2001-01-01

    With the application of intense X-ray beams from third generation synchrotron sources, damage to cryocooled macromolecular crystals is being observed more commonly . In order to fully utilize synchrotron facilities now available for studying biological crystals, it is essential to understand the processes involved in radiation damage and beam heating so that, if possible, action can be taken to slow the rate of damage. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been applied to model the heating effects of X-rays on cryocooled protein crystals, and to compare the relative cooling efficiencies of nitrogen and helium.

  19. Development status of the mechanical cryocoolers for the Soft X-ray Spectrometer on board Astro-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoichi; Sawada, Kenichiro; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Sato, Ryota; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh; Goto, Ken; Nakagawa, Takao; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Murakami, Masahide; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Ootsuka, Kiyomi; Kanao, Kenichi; Narasaki, Katsuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Astro-H is the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite to be launched in 2015. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on board Astro-H is a high energy resolution spectrometer utilizing an X-ray micro-calorimeter array, which is operated at 50 mK by the ADR with the 30 liter superfluid liquid helium. The mechanical cryocoolers, 4 K-class Joule Thomson (JT) cooler and 20 K-class double-staged Stirling (2ST) cooler, are key components of the SXS cooling system to extend the lifetime of LHe cryogen beyond 3 years as required. Higher reliability was therefore investigated with higher cooling capability based on the heritage of existing cryocoolers. As the task of assessing further reliability dealt with the pipe-choking phenomena by contaminant solidification of the on-orbit SMILES JT cryocooler, outgassing from materials and component parts used in the cryocoolers was measured quantitatively to verify the suppression of carbon dioxide gas by their storage process and predict the total accumulated carbon dioxide for long-term operation. A continuous running test to verify lifetime using the engineering model (EM) of the 4 K-JT cooler is underway, having operated for a total of 720 days as of June 2013 and showing no remarkable change in cooling performance. During the current development phase, prototype models (PM) of the cryocoolers were installed to the test SXS dewar (EM) to verify the overall cooling performance from room temperature to 50 mK. During the EM dewar test, the requirement to reduce the transmitted vibration from the 2ST cooler compressor was recognized as mitigating the thermal instability of the SXS microcalorimeter at 50 mK.

  20. The 4 K Stirling cryocooler demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, W. Dodd

    1992-01-01

    This report briefly summarizes the results and conclusions from an SBIR program intended to demonstrate an innovative Stirling cycle cryocooler concept for efficiently lifting heat from 4 K. Refrigeration at 4 K, a temperature useful for superconductors and sensitive instruments, is beyond the reach of conventional regenerative thermodynamic cycles due to the rapid loss of regenerator matrix heat capacity at temperatures below about 20 K. To overcome this fundamental limit, the cryocooler developed under this program integrated three unique features: recuperative regeneration between the displacement gas flow streams of two independent Stirling cycles operating at a 180 degree phase angle, tailored distortion of the two expander volume waveforms from sinusoidal to perfectly match the instantaneous regenerator heat flux from the two cycles and thereby unload the regenerator, and metal diaphragm working volumes to promote near isothermal expansion and compression processes. Use of diaphragms also provides unlimited operating life potential and eliminates bearings and high precision running seals. A phase 1 proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that counterflow regenerator operation between 77 K and 4 K increases regenerator effectiveness by minimizing metal temperature transient cycling. In phase 2, a detailed design package for a breadboard cryocooler was completed. Fabrication techniques were successfully developed for manufacturing high precision miniature parallel plate recuperators, and samples were produced and inspected. Process development for fabricating suitably flat diaphragms proved more difficult and expensive than anticipated, and construction of the cryocooler was suspended at a completion level of approximately 75%. Subsequent development efforts on other projects have successfully overcome diaphragm fabrication difficulties, and alternate funding is currently being sought for completion and demonstration testing of the 4 K Stirling cryocooler.

  1. A cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Di; Wu, Shiwei

    2016-06-01

    The design and performance of a cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) housed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are reported. The cryogen-free design was done by directly integrating a Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocooler to a Besocke-type STM, and the vibration isolation was achieved by using a two-stage rubber bellow between the cryocooler and a UHV-STM interface with helium exchange gas cooling. A base temperature of 15 K at the STM was achieved, with a possibility to further decrease by using a cryocooler with higher cooling power and adding additional low temperature stage under the exchange gas interface. Atomically sharp STM images and high resolution dI/dV spectra on various samples were demonstrated. Furthermore, we reported the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy on a single carbon monoxide molecule adsorbed on Ag(110) surface with a cryogen-free STM for the first time. Being totally cryogen-free, the system not only saves the running cost significantly but also enables uninterrupted data acquisitions and variable temperature measurements with much ease. In addition, the system is capable of coupling light to the STM junction by a pair of lens inside the UHV chamber. We expect that these enhanced capabilities could further broaden our views to the atomic-scale world.

  2. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  3. Cryogenics; Criogenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  4. Scanning SQUID microscopy in a cryogen-free refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Brian T.; Low, David; Prawiroatmodjo, Guenevere E. D. K.; Nangoi, J. Kevin; Kim, Jihoon; Nowack, Katja C.

    With helium prices rising and supply becoming increasingly uncertain, it has become attractive to use dry cryostats with cryocoolers rather than liquid helium to reach low temperatures. However, a cryocooler introduces vibrations at the sample stage, making scanning probe experiments more challenging. Here, we report our progress on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope implemented for the first time in a compact, cryogen-free 5 K system. Our microscope is designed to reach submicron spatial resolution and a flux sensitivity of approximately 1 μΦ0 /√{ Hz} , where Φ0 is the magnetic flux quantum. To enable height feedback while approaching and scanning samples, we mount the SQUID on a quartz tuning fork. Our system promises to meet the capabilities of similar systems implemented in helium cryostats.

  5. Facile formation of co-amorphous atenolol and hydrochlorothiazide mixtures via cryogenic-milling: Enhanced physical stability, dissolution and pharmacokinetic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinuddin, Sakib M; Ruan, Sida; Huang, Yuting; Gao, Qin; Shi, Qin; Cai, Baochang; Cai, Ting

    2017-09-08

    The development of poorly water-soluble drugs faces the risk of low bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy. The co-amorphous drug delivery system has recently gained considerable interest because it offers an alternative approach to modify properties of poorly water-soluble drugs. Herein, we developed a co-amorphous system of atenolol (ATE) and poorly water-soluble hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) by means of cryogenic milling. The co-administration of ATE and HCT has been reported to show therapeutic advantages for patients with uncomplicated hypertension. The co-amorphous ATE-HCT sample with 1:1 molar ratio showed excellent physical stability, which could be attributed to the formation of strong molecular interactions between ATE and HCT as evidenced by FT-IR spectra. Compared to the pure crystalline form, amorphous form and physical mixture, HCT in the co-amorphous form exhibited the significantly increased intrinsic dissolution rate, as well as the enhanced bioavailability in the pharmacokinetic study. It was found that the enhanced bioavailability of HCT in the co-amorphous formulation was achieved by the synergistic effect of amorphized HCT and the water-soluble coformer ATE. The present study provides an improved approach to implement the combination therapy of ATE and HCT for potential clinical treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Integrated Circulator for Regenerative Cryocoolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future instruments and platforms for NASA space applications will require increasingly sophisticated thermal control technology, and cryogenic applications will...

  7. High-Efficiency, Low-Temperature Regenerators for Cryocoolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA planetary and astrophysics missions will require various enhancements in multi-stage cryocoolers. These include increased efficiency, reduced vibration...

  8. Thermodynamic performance of a laser cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng; Chen, Lingen; Wu, Shuang; Sun, Fengrui

    2007-05-28

    The quantum dynamic action of a laser cooling system is analyzed by means of a simplified luminescence center model with ground state and excited state in this paper. The thermodynamic performance of a laser cryocooler is described by solving quantum master equation. The cooling load and the coefficient of performance of the cooler are obtained by using finite time thermodynamics. Some features of the system under the weak coupling and under the intense coupling conditions are discussed.

  9. Development of Compact 2K GM Cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingyao; Bao, Qian; Tsuchiya, Akihiro; Li, Rui

    A compact 2K Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler has been developed for cooling electronic devices, such as Superconducting Single Photo Detectors (SSPD). The heat exchangers, regenerators are optimized with the numerical simulation method developed for 4K GM cryocoolers. After optimizing, the cylinder length is reduced by 85 mm compared with a commercial 0.1W 4K GM cryocooler. With no load on the second stage, a temperature of about 2.1 K has been achieved. With 1 W and 20 mW heat load, the temperature is 44.4 K at the first stage and 2.23 K at the second stage with an input power of about 1.1 kW. And also, it is found that the temperature oscillation decreases as the average temperature decreases. A temperature oscillation of about ±20 mK has been achieved. The object of the project, target specification, and a summary of experiment results will also be introduced in this paper.

  10. Measurement of cryogenic regenerator characteristics under oscillating flow and pulsating pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwanwoo Nam; Sangkwon Jeong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon (Korea). Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes an experimental apparatus developed to investigate detailed thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of a regenerator at cryogenic temperature under oscillating flow and pulsating pressure conditions. Cold-end of the regenerator is maintained at approximately 85 K for G-M cryocooler type and 100 K for Stirling cryocooler type operations by means of two cryogenic heat exchangers. At both ends of the regenerator, fine hot wire probes are installed to measure the fast oscillating gas temperature and mass flow rate. The gas temperature sensors installed very close to the ends of the regenerator matrix assure precise gas temperature measurement in the regenerator. In this study, thermal and hydrodynamic behaviors of the well-defined wire-screen regenerator are fully characterized. First, pressure drop characteristics are discussed for different frequencies under room temperature. Second, ineffectiveness of the regenerator is obtained for different cold-end temperatures. (author)

  11. Measurement of cryogenic regenerator characteristics under oscillating flow and pulsating pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes an experimental apparatus developed to investigate detailed thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of a regenerator at cryogenic temperature under oscillating flow and pulsating pressure conditions. Cold-end of the regenerator is maintained at approximately 85 K for G-M cryocooler type and 100 K for Stirling cryocooler type operations by means of two cryogenic heat exchangers. At both ends of the regenerator, fine hot wire probes are installed to measure the fast oscillating gas temperature and mass flow rate. The gas temperature sensors installed very close to the ends of the regenerator matrix assure precise gas temperature measurement in the regenerator. In this study, thermal and hydrodynamic behaviors of the well-defined wire-screen regenerator are fully characterized. First, pressure drop characteristics are discussed for different frequencies under room temperature. Second, ineffectiveness of the regenerator is obtained for different cold-end temperatures.

  12. Magnetic bearings for cryogenic turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannello, Victor; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic bearings offer a number of advantages over gas bearings for the support of rotors in cryogenic turboexpanders and compressors. Their performance is relatively independent of the temperature or pressure of the process gas for a large range of conditions. Active magnetic bearing systems that use capacitive sensors have been developed for high speed compressors for use in cryogenic refrigerators. Here, the development of a magnetic bearing system for a miniature ultra high speed compressor is discussed. The magnetic bearing has demonstrated stability at rotational speeds exceeding 250,000 rpm. This paper describes the important features of the magnetic bearing and presents test results demonstrating its performance characteristics.

  13. Closed-cycle cryocooled SQUID system with superconductive shield for biomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lee, Yong Ho; Lee, Seong Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Hwang, Seong min; Kim, Jin Mok; Kwon, Hyuckchan; Kim, Kiwoong

    2014-10-01

    We developed a cryocooled SQUID system with which human magnetocardiogram (MCG) and possibly magnetoenceparogram (MEG) can be measured. To reduce cyclic magnetic noises originating from the regenerator of the cold heads of the cryocooler, a superconductive shield (99.5% Pb) was used to protect the SQUID sensors, and a ferromagnetic shield (78% Ni alloy) was used to screen the cold head. In addition, the SQUID sensors’ chamber was placed at a distance of 1.8 m from the cold head chamber to install the cold-head chamber outside the magnetically shielded room (MSR) for future development. The loss in cooling power due to the increased distance was compensated by increasing the number of thermal rods, and thus the SQUID sensor and superconductive shield could be refrigerated to 4.8 K and 5 K, respectively. The superconductive shield successfully rejected thermal noise emitted from metallic blocks used to improve thermal conduction. The noise of the SQUID system was 3 fT/Hz1/2, and the cyclic magnetic noise could be reduced to 1.7 pT. We could obtain a clear MCG signal while the entire cryogenics was in operation without any special digital processing.

  14. Validation of accelerated ageing of Thales rotary Stirling cryocoolers for the estimation of MTTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguineau, C.,; Cauquil, J.-M.; Martin, J.-Y.; Benschop, T.

    2016-05-01

    The cooled IR detectors are used in a wide range of applications. Most of the time, the cryocoolers are one of the components dimensioning the lifetime of the system. The current market needs tend to reliability figures higher than 15,000hrs in "standard conditions". Field returns are hardly useable mostly because of the uncertain environmental conditions of use, or the differences in user profiles. A previous paper explains how Thales Cryogenics has developed an approach based on accelerated ageing and statistical analysis [1]. The aim of the current paper is to compare results obtained on accelerated ageing on one side, and on the other side, specific field returns where the conditions of use are well known. The comparison between prediction and effective failure rate is discussed. Moreover, a specific focus is done on how some new applications of cryocoolers (continuous operation at a specific temperature) can increase the MTTF. Some assumptions are also exposed on how the failure modes, effects and criticality analysis evolves for continuous operation at a specific temperature and compared to experimental data.

  15. Integrated Cryogenic Satellite Communications Cross-Link Receiver Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Bhasin, K. B.; Downey, A. N.; Jackson, C. J.; Silver, A. H.; Javadi, H. H. S.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment has been devised which will validate, in space, a miniature, high-performance receiver. The receiver blends three complementary technologies; high temperature superconductivity (HTS), pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (PHEMT) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), and a miniature pulse tube cryogenic cooler. Specifically, an HTS band pass filter, InP MMIC low noise amplifier, HTS-sapphire resonator stabilized local oscillator (LO), and a miniature pulse tube cooler will be integrated into a complete 20 GHz receiver downconverter. This cooled downconverter will be interfaced with customized signal processing electronics and integrated onto the space shuttle's 'HitchHiker' carrier. A pseudorandom data sequence will be transmitted to the receiver, which is in low Earth orbit (LEO), via the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) on a 20 GHz carrier. The modulation format is QPSK and the data rate is 2.048 Mbps. The bit error rate (BER) will be measured in situ. The receiver is also equipped with a radiometer mode so that experiment success is not totally contingent upon the BER measurement. In this mode, the receiver uses the Earth and deep space as a hot and cold calibration source, respectively. The experiment closely simulates an actual cross-link scenario. Since the receiver performance depends on channel conditions, its true characteristics would be masked in a terrestrial measurement by atmospheric absorption and background radiation. Furthermore, the receiver's performance depends on its physical temperature, which is a sensitive function of platform environment, thermal design, and cryocooler performance. This empirical data is important for building confidence in the technology.

  16. Design and Implementation of a 4K Cryocooler-Based Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnubhotla, Ramya; Harrington, Neal; Dusch, Bill; Geng, Carrie; Bannerjee, Riju; Pabbi, Lavish; Hudson, Eric W.

    2013-03-01

    Low temperature, ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have proved to be excellent tools for the study of electronic properties of complex materials. Unfortunately, with the continuing increase in liquid helium prices, already a dominant cost for operating these systems, their use is becoming exceedingly expensive. Here we describe the design and implementation of a STM cooled by a Cryomech PT407 Remote Motor Cryorefrigerator, allowing us to reach helium temperatures using a closed thermodynamic cycle with zero cryogen waste. Unfortunately, this refrigeration technique is not ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible and introduces vibrations. To tackle these problems, we separately house the cryocooler in a high-vacuum (HV) chamber. This provides both a UHV environment for the STM and mechanical isolation to minimize vibrations reaching the instrument. However, it makes for more challenging thermal connections. This last difficulty we solve by introducing a novel coaxial thermal feedthrough between the HV and UHV chambers. Supported by NSF DMR-0904400

  17. Multipurpose closed-cycle cryocooler for liquefying hydrogen, helium-4 or helium-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Calvin

    1990-08-01

    A cryogenic refrigerator utilizing helium-4 gas in closed-cycle Gifford-McMahon and Joule-Thomson cooling loops was built and achieves continuous operating temperatures of 2.8R. The object cooled is a thin walled (0.1mm) seamless electroformed nickel target sample cell with a volume of 160m1. Room temperature hydrogen, helium-4 or helium-3 gas, supplied at a pressure slightly above atmospheric, is liquefied by the cryocooler and fills the cell. Unusual features include: horizontal operation; a long narrow extension on the vacuum shroud (900mm long, 76mm diameter) and special valves to select an operating temperature appropriate to the sample gas and maximize the cooling power available at that temperature.

  18. Optimum operating conditions for an adsorption cryocooler: a case of activated carbon + nitrogen system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhika Rani Rao [Don Bosco Institute of Technology, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Physics; Madhu Prasad [ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore (India). Thermal Systems Group; Kandadai Srinivasan [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-03-01

    Adsorption cryocoolers are among the possible options for obtaining cryogenic temperatures, in particular for small cooling capacity applications such as cooling of infra red detectors. They need to be optimized for liquid yield. The performance of thermal compressors therein pivots around the adsorption characteristics of the adsorbent + adsorbate combination and how effectively one could pack requisite amounts of adsorbent into a given volume of the compressor housing. In addition, the overall performance of the cooler is a function of limits of operating temperatures and pressures across the compressor. This paper proposes a performance indicator-the product of liquid yield and the uptake efficiency of the compressor - and evaluates its values for various possible operating conditions for one specimen of activated carbon. It is shown that there is a limited domain of operation and that there is a condition of best performance within that domain. (author)

  19. Investigation of gravitational effects in pulse tube cryocoolers using 3-D CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahey, T. I.; Conrad, T. J.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.; Pathak, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers (PTC) are often selected for cryogenic cooling applications for their robustness and mechanical simplicity, having no moving parts at the cold end of the cooler. Originally designed for space applications, increased terrestrial use in tactical applications as well as ground testing of space systems has revealed that some PTCs exhibit sensitivity to gravitational orientation, often losing significant cooling performance unless situated with the cold end pointing downward. Previous investigations have indicated that some coolers exhibit sensitivity while others do not; however, a reliable method of predicting the level of sensitivity during the design process has not been developed. We have utilized 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to predict the percent of cooling capacity lost as a result of off-axis operation. The computational model has been validated experimentally on a number of coolers to enhance confidence in the method used.

  20. CRYOGENIC DEWAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, W.H.; Maseck, H.E.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a dewar for storing cryogenic gase and is of the type having aii inner flask surrounded by a vacuum jacket and having a vent spout through which evaporating gas escapes. Heretofore substantial gas loss has resulted from the radiation of heat towards the flask from the warmer outer elements of the dewar. In this invention, the mask is surrounded by a thermally conducting shield which is disposed in the vacuum space between the flask and the outer elements of the dewar. The shield contacts only the vent spout, which is cooled by the evaporating gas, and thus is maintained at a temperature very close to that of the flask itself. Accordingly, heat radiated toward the flask is intercepted and conducted to the evaporating gas rather than being re-radiated towards the hask. In a liquid helium dewar of typical configniration the mention reduces the boil-off rate by approximately one-half.(AEC)

  1. Versatile experimental low power 4 K cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, N.; Barbanera, S.; Zimmerman, J. E.

    The construction of a low power cryocooler consisting of a five-stage plastic Stirling cooler with an additional Joule-Thomson stage is described. Among its novel features are a contamination-free, pneumatic helium compressor and displacer drive. Valve timing is under computer control. Titanium foil embedded in the cylinder wall reduces helium diffusion through the plastic. The Joule-Thomson stage uses the same low pressure helium as the Stirling stages. The Stirling system cools down below 9 K. The Joule-Thomson stage delivers a few mW cooling at 4.2 K.

  2. AIM cryocooler developments for HOT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühlich, I.; Mai, M.; Withopf, A.; Rosenhagen, C.

    2014-06-01

    Significantly increased FPA temperatures for both Mid Wave and Long Wave IR detectors, i.e. HOT detectors, which have been developed in recent years are now leaving the development phase and are entering real application. HOT detectors allowing to push size weight and power (SWaP) of Integrated Detectors Cooler Assemblies (IDCA's) to a new level. Key component mainly driving achievable weight, volume and power consumption is the cryocooler. AIM cryocooler developments are focused on compact, lightweight linear cryocoolers driven by compact and high efficient digital cooler drive electronics (DCE) to also achieve highest MTTF targets. This technology is using moving magnet driving mechanisms and dual or single piston compressors. Whereas SX030 which was presented at SPIE in 2012 consuming less 3 WDC to operate a typical IDCA at 140K, next smaller cooler SX020 is designed to provide sufficient cooling power at detector temperature above 160K. The cooler weight of less than 200g and a total compressor length of 60mm makes it an ideal solution for all applications with limited weight and power budget, like in handheld applications. For operating a typical 640x512, 15μm MW IR detector the power consumption will be less than 1.5WDC. MTTF for the cooler will be in excess of 30,000h and thus achieving low maintenance cost also in 24/7 applications. The SX020 compressor is based on a single piston design with integrated passive balancer in a new design achieves very low exported vibration in the order of 100mN in the compressor axis. AIM is using a modular approach, allowing the chose between 5 different compressor types for one common Stirling expander. The 6mm expander with a total length of 74mm is now available in a new design that fits into standard dewar bores originally designed for rotary coolers. Also available is a 9mm coldfinger in both versions. In development is an ultra-short expander with around 35mm total length to achieve highest compactness. Technical

  3. SBIR Grant:No-Vibration Agile Cryogenic Optical Refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Richard

    2013-04-09

    Optical refrigeration is currently the only all-solid-state cryocooling technology that has been demonstrated. Optical cryocoolers are devices that use laser light to cool small crystal or glass cooling elements. The cooling element absorbs the laser light and reradiates it at higher energy, an example of anti-Stokes fluorescence. The dif-ference between the energy of the outgoing and incoming light comes from the thermal energy of the cooling element, which in turn becomes colder. Entitled No-Vibration Agile Cryocoolers using Optical Refrigeration, this Phase I proposal directly addressed the continued development of the optical refrigerator components necessary to transition this scientific breakthrough into National Nu-clear Security Administration (NNSA) sensor applications in line with the objectives of topic 50b. ThermoDynamic Films LLC (TDF), in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), cooled an optical-refrigerator cooling element comprised of an ytterbium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (Yb:YLF) crystal from room tempera-ture to 123 K with about 2% efficiency. This is the world record in optical refrigera-tion and an important step toward revolutionizing cryogenic systems for sensor ap-plications. During this period, they also designed and analyzed the crucial elements of a prototype optical refrigerator including the thermal link that connects the cool-ing element with the load.

  4. Conference on Refrigeration for Cryogenic Sensors and Electronic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, D B; McCarthy, S E; Cryogenic Refrigeration Conference; International Cryocooler Conference; Cryocoolers 1

    1981-01-01

    This proceedings documents the output of a meeting of refrigeration specialists held at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, CO, on October 6 and 7, 1980. Building on an earlier invitation-only meeting in 1977, the purpose of this first open meeting was to discuss progress in the development of refrigeration systems to cool cryogenic sensors and electronic systems in the temperature range below 20 K and with required cooling capacities below 10 W. The meeting was jointly sponsored by the International Institute of Refrigeration - Commission A1/2, the Office of Naval Research, the Naval Research Laboratory, the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, and the National Bureau of Standards. This first open cryocooler conference consisted of 23 papers presented by representatives of industry, government, and academia. The conference proceedings reproduced here was published by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado as NBS Special Publication #607. Subsequent meetings would become known as the Intern...

  5. RICOR development of the next generation highly reliable rotary cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Itai; Nachman, Ilan; Livni, Dorit; Riabzev, Sergey; Filis, Avishai; Segal, Victor

    2016-05-01

    Early rotary cryocoolers were designed for the lifetime of a few thousands operating hours. Ricor K506 model's life expectancy was only 5,000 hours, then the next generation K508 model was designed to achieve 10,000 operating hours in basic conditions, while the modern K508N was designed for 20,000 operating hours. Nowadays, the new challenges in the field of rotary cryocoolers require development of a new generation cooler that could compete with the linear cryocooler reliability, achieving the lifetime goal of 30,000 operating hours, and even more. Such new advanced cryocooler can be used for upgrade existing systems, or to serve the new generation of high-temperature detectors that are currently under development, enabling the cryocooler to work more efficiently in the field. The improvement of the rotary cryocooler reliability is based on a deep analysis and understating of the root failure causes, finding solutions to reduce bearings wear, using modern materials and lubricants. All of those were taken into consideration during the development of the new generation rotary coolers. As a part of reliability challenges, new digital controller was also developed, which allows new options, such as discrete control of the operating frequency, and can extend the cooler operating hours due to new controlling technique. In addition, the digital controller will be able to collect data during cryocooler operation, aiming end of life prediction.

  6. Cryogenic cooling of x-ray crystals using porous matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    It is well established that Si and SiC have very desirable thermophysical properties at cryogenic temperatures. This feature makes cryo-cooled optics potentially a good candidate for the first optical crystal of the presently built third generation synchrotron machines with very high heat flux levels. Currently, there is a great deal of interest in such cryo-cooled crystals pursued both experimentally and analytically. The analytical studies involve cut micro or capillary channel crystals. As opposed to the machined channels, porous matrices provide significant advantages. They operate very quietly. Such matrices are known to affect superior heat transfer enhancement. Data available in open literature suggest that surface heat flux levels up to {approximately}8 kW/cm{sup 2} are possible. For cryogens for which the boiling heat transfer heat flux is rather a low value in conventional geometries, the enhancement available with such matrices is a very significant characteristic. Cryogens are poor thermal conductors themselves. The fact that at the cryogenic temperatures the Si and/or SiC matrix itself becomes highly conductive, the matrix distributes the surface heat flux into the full volume effectively offsetting the poor conductivity of the coolant. In addition the tortuous path of the coolant through the matrix increases the dwell time for better heat transfer, however, at the expense of increased pressure drop. In this study, thermal conductivity of such composite matrices and the effective heat transfer coefficient obtainable using them are investigated. A first optics crystal model of Si with Si and/or Sic porous matrix as its heat exchanger and subject to prototype synchrotron level heat flux is analyzed and limits of the cooling possible with liquid nitrogen in single phase and subcooled boiling heat transfer modes are delineated.

  7. Cryocooled Josephson standards for AC voltage metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandetto, P.; Sosso, A.; Monticone, E.; Trinchera, B.; Fretto, M.; Lacquaniti, V.

    2017-05-01

    The Josephson effect is worldwide used as a basis for constant reference voltages in national metrological institutes and in calibration laboratories of industry. Research on Josephson voltage standards is aiming at a fundamental change also in the metrology of the volt for AC and arbitrary waveforms: programmable Josephson voltage standards converting a digital code into a quantum-accurate stepwise waveform are already available in primary laboratories and even more advanced standards for converting sub-nanosecond binary coded pulses into any arbitrary signal with quantum accuracy are now actively developed and tested. A new experimental setup based on a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler has been developed at INRiM for the operation of AC-Josephson voltage standards. Among its distinct features, the possibility of employing both the aforementioned techniques (programmable and pulsed Josephson voltage standards) is particularly interesting. Quantum-based AC voltage sine waves have been synthesized with both programmable and pulse-driven arrays, although their accuracy is still limited by thermal oscillations due to the cryocooler piston motion.

  8. Application concepts of small regenerative cryocoolers in superconducting magnet systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, M. T. G.; Tax, R. B.; ten Kate, H. H. J.

    Superconducting magnets are in growing use outside laboratories for example MRI scanners in hospitals. Other applications under development are magnet systems for separation, levitated trains and ship propulsion. The application of cryocoolers can make these systems more practical. Interfacing these cryocoolers to the magnets can be designed in several different ways. The four basic methods will be dealt with. Test results of a realized GM cryocooler-SC magnet system will be shown. It handles about a 1:3 scale MRI magnet of which one of the six coils has been successfully tested at temperatures between 10 and 14 K.

  9. Cryogenic Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The storage of cryogenic propellants is challenging because heat leaks into the cryogenic storage tanks no matter how good the insulation, resulting in a necessity...

  10. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  11. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  12. How to manage MTTF larger than 30,000hr on rotary cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauquil, Jean-Marc; Seguineau, Cédric; Martin, Jean-Yves; Van-Acker, Sébastien; Benschop, Tonny

    2017-05-01

    The cooled IR detectors are used in a wide range of applications. Most of the time, the cryocoolers are one of the components dimensioning the lifetime of the system. Indeed, Stirling coolers are mechanical systems where wear occurs on millimetric mechanisms. The exponential law classically used in electronics for Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) calculation cannot be directly used for mechanical devices. With new applications for thermal sensor like border surveillance, an increasing reliability has become mandatory for rotary cooler. The current needs are above several tens of thousands of continuous hour of cooling. Thales Cryogenics made specific development on that topic, for both linear and rotary applications. The time needed for validating changes in processes through suited experimental design is hardly affordable by following a robust and rigorous standard scientific approach. The targeted Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) led us to adopt an innovative approach to keep development phases in line with expected time to market. This innovative approach is today widespread on all of Thales Cryogenics rotary products and results in a proven increase of MTTF for RM2, RM3 and recently RM1. This paper will then focused on the current MTTF figures measured on RM1, RM2 and RM3. After explaining the limit of a conventional approach, the paper will then describe the current method. At last, the authors will explain how these principles are taken into account for the new SWaP rotary cooler of Thales Cryogénie SAS.

  13. Testing of a Neon Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks is required for future NASA missions. A cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP) can provide a closed-loop cooling system for this purpose and has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A neon CLHP was tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryopump as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components. Tests conducted included loop cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, power cycle, heat removal capability, loop capillary limit and recovery from a dry-out, low power operation, and long duration steady state operation. The neon CLHP demonstrated robust operation. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully by applying power to both the pump and evaporator without any pre-conditioning. It could adapt to changes in the pump power andor evaporator power, and reach a new steady state very quickly. The evaporator could remove heat loads between 0.25W and 4W. When the pump capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the pump power. Steady state operations were demonstrated for up to 6 hours. The ability of the neon loop to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  14. Propellant Conditioning Using Improved Pulse Tube Cryocooler Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Application of the proposed technology (an affordable, large-scale, high-efficiency, low-temperature pulse tube cryocooler system), serves two NASA needs: an...

  15. Highly Effective Thermal Regenerator for Low Temperature Cryocoolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, low-temperature cryocoolers for low-noise detector systems. We...

  16. A Low Input Power Cryocooler for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions will require cryocoolers providing cooling capacities upwards of 0.3W at 35K with heat rejection capability to temperature sinks as low as 150K...

  17. Cryocooler With Cold Compressor for Deep Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The unique built-in design features of the proposed mini pulse tube cryocooler avoid all thermal expansion issues enabling it to operate within a cold, 150 K...

  18. A Compact Remote Heat Transfer Device for Space Cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, T.; Zhao, Y.; Liang, T.

    In this paper a compact remote heat transfer device (CRHD) for cryocoolers is proposed. This device is especially attractive in cases where cryocoolers are not easy to set near the heat source, generally the infrared sensor. The CRHD is designed on basis of the concept of loop heat pipes, while the primary evaporator is located near the cryocooler cold head and a simple tube-in-tube secondary evaporator is remotely located and thermally connected with the heat source for cooling. With such a device a cooling power of 1 W is achieved across a heat transfer distance of about 2 m. The major problem of this device is the low heat transfer efficiency (1 W of net cooling power at the cost of about 7 W of cooling power from the cryocooler), and in the future a secondary wicked evaporator will be used instead of the tube-in-tube evaporator in order to improve the efficiency.

  19. The third type DC flow in pulse tube cryocooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    New phenomena discovered in the experimental research of the ultra-high frequency pulse tube cryocooler were presented.The cause of the new phenomena was analyzed and the third type DC flow was discovered in the pulse tube cryocooler.The third type DC flow not only deteriorated cooling capacity but also led to temperature instability of the pulse tube cryocooler.From the fluid network theory and the simple regenerator model,the root of the third type DC flow was concisely investigated in theory. The asymmetric resistance of oscillating flow in pulse tube cryocooler was the key mechanism of the third type DC flow.Some suppression methods were briefly discussed.

  20. Second Generation Low Cost Cryocooler Electronics (LCCE-2) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The LCCE-2 Program builds off the successes of the USAF "Low Cost Cryocooler Electronics for Space Missions" Program, extending the performance of the developed LCCE...

  1. Applications concepts of small regenerative cryocoolers in superconducitng magnet systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, van der M.T.G.; Tax, R.B.; Kate, ten H.H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Superconducting magnets are in growing use outside laboratories for example MRI scanners in hospitals. Other applications under development are magnet systems for separation, levitated trains and ship propulsion. The application of cryocoolers can make these systems more practical. Interfacing these

  2. Cryocooler With Cold Compressor for Deep Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a high-frequency single-stage pulse tube cryocooler (PTC) that operates at a heat rejection temperature of 150 K. It employs a flexure-bearing...

  3. Second Generation Low Cost Cryocooler Electronics (LCCE-2) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The LCCE-2 Program builds off the successes of the USAF "Low Cost Cryocooler Electronics for Space Missions" Program, extending the performance of the developed LCCE...

  4. Quartz resonator instabilities under cryogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Galliou, Serge; Abbe, Philippe; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Grop, Serge; Dubois, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    The phase noise of a quartz crystal resonator working at liquid helium temperatures is studied. Measurement methods and the device environment are explained. The phase noise is measured for different resonance modes, excitation levels, amount of operating time, device orientations in relation to the cryocooler vibration axis, and temperatures. Stability limits of a frequency source based on such devices are evaluated in the present measurement conditions. The sources of phase flicker and white noises are identified. Finally, the results are compared with previous works.

  5. Remote actuated cryocooler for superconducting generator and method of assembling the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stautner, Ernst Wolfgang; Haran, Kiruba Sivasubramaniam; Fair, Ruben Jeevanasan

    2017-02-14

    In one embodiment, a cryocooler assembly for cooling a heat load is provided. The cryocooler assembly includes a vacuum vessel surrounding the heat load and a cryocooler at least partially inserted into the vacuum vessel, the cryocooler including a coldhead. The assembly further includes an actuator coupled to the cryocooler. The actuator is configured to translate the cryocooler coldhead into thermal engagement with the heat load and to maintain constant pressure of the coldhead against the heat load to facilitate maintaining thermal engagement with the heat load as the heat load shrinks during a cool down process.

  6. An Investigation of Certain Thermodynamic Losses in Minature Cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Background A Stirling cycle cryocooler can be considered as undergoing an ideal cycle (with Carnot efficiency), with loss processes degrading the...causes no amplitude or start-up distortion (unlike synthesised ‘ reverse time’ inverse filters). 2. Calculate RMS and DC values (from full cycles ). 3...unlimited. 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Stirling cycle cryocoolers developed at Oxford have typically been

  7. On-Orbit Performance of the RHESSI Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft was launched on February 5,2002. With more than a year of operation on-orbit, its Sunpower M77 cryocooler continues to maintain the array of nine germanium detectors at 7% Trends have begun to emerge in cryocooler power and vibration, suggesting that the cooler's operating point is slowly changing. Possible causes are identified and discussed.

  8. An approach to optimization of low-power Stirling cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Radebaugh, R.; Daney, D. E.; Zimmerman, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A method for optimizing the design (shape of the displacer) of low power Stirling cryocoolers relative to the power required to operate the systems is described. A variational calculation which includes static conduction, shuttle and radiation losses, as well as regenerator inefficiency, was completed for coolers operating in the 300 K to 10 K range. While the calculations apply to tapered displacer machines, comparison of the results with stepped displacer cryocoolers indicates reasonable agreement.

  9. A cryogen-free variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable for inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Di; Wu, Shiwei

    While low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has become an indispensable research tool in surface science, its versatility is yet limited by the shortage or high cost of liquid helium. The makeshifts include the use of alternative cryogen (such as liquid nitrogen) at higher temperature or the development of helium liquefier system usually at departmental or campus wide. The ultimate solution would be the direct integration of a cryogen-free cryocooler based on GM or pulse tube closed cycle in the STM itself. However, the nasty mechanical vibration at low frequency intrinsic to cryocoolers has set the biggest obstacle because of the known challenges in vibration isolation required to high performance of STM. In this talk, we will present the design and performance of our home-built cryogen-free variable temperature STM at Fudan University. This system can obtain atomically sharp STM images and high resolution dI/dV spectra comparable to state-of-the-art low temperature STMs, but with no limitation on running hours. Moreover, we demonstrated the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy (STM-IETS) on a single CO molecule with a cryogen-free STM for the first time.

  10. Experimental investigation of the heat transfer characteristics of a helium cryogenic thermosyphon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Z. Q.; Zhang, P.

    2013-10-01

    The heat transfer performance of a cryogenic thermosyphon filled with helium as the working fluid is investigated experimentally with a G-M cryocooler as the heat sink in this study. The cryogenic thermosyphon acts as a thermal link between the cryocooler and the cooled target (the copper evaporator with a large mass). Helium is charged in different filling ratios, and the cooling down process and the heat transfer characteristics of the cryogenic thermosyphon are investigated. The cooling down process of the cooled target can be significantly accelerated by the presence of helium in the cryogenic thermosyphon and the cooling down period can be further shortened by the increase of filling ratio. The heat transfer mode changes from the liquid-vapor phase change to natural convection as the increase of the heating power applied on the evaporator. The heat transfer limit and thermal resistance are discussed for the liquid-vapor phase change heat transfer, and they can be estimated by empirical correlations. For the natural convection heat transfer, it can be enhanced by increasing the filling ratio, and the natural convection of supercritical helium is much stronger than that of gaseous helium.

  11. (abstract) JPL Cryocooler Development and Test Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Many near-term and future space-instrument programs within NASA and the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) depend on the successful development of long-life, low-vibration space cryocoolers. The most demanding near-term programs include a number of science instruments selected for NASA's Earth Observing System (Eos) program, and a number of space reconnaissance instruments associated with the BMDO's Brilliant Eyes program; both of these programs require delivery of similar types of flight coolers in the next few years. To help ensure the success of these cooler commitments, JPL has implemented an extensive cryocooler program in support of the NASA/JPL AIRS project, the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL), and the Air Force Space and Missiles Systems Division (SMC). This program is directed at assisting industry in developing advanced cryocoolers that successfully address the broad array of complex performance requirements needed for NASA and BMDO long-life space instruments. The JPL cryocooler program includes extensive characterization and life testing of industry-developed cryocoolers, development and flight testing of advanced sorption cooler systems for detector cooling to 10 K , development of mechanical cryocooler enhancement technologies, and flight tests of advanced low-vibration Stirling-cooler systems.

  12. First concept for the E-ELT cryogenic infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizon, J. L.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Monroe, C.; Bryson, I.; Montgomery, D.

    2010-07-01

    The start of the new generation of giant telescopes opens a good opportunity to re-assess the cryogenic cooling of the instruments and detectors. An analysis has been carried out comparing three different technologies: Mechanical cryocoolers, helium forced flow and open liquid nitrogen cooling. The most different aspects from the running cost to the reliability and technology readiness have been compared in order to establish a fair ranking. The first part of the paper will present in detail the result of this analysis. Based on this study and the various experiences collected over more than 25 years and a large number of cryogenic instruments, a strategy is elaborated for the cryogenic cooling of the E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope) instrument suite. The challenge consists in providing various cryogenic temperatures (from 10 K to 240 K) at various locations. This should be done in the most efficient way with the minimum of disturbances (low vibration, low thermal dissipation...). A discussion presents the advantages of the selected solution.

  13. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  14. Cryogen Safety Course 8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cryogenics (from the Greek word κρvoζ, meaning frost or icy cold) is the study of the behavior of matter at very cold temperatures. The purpose of this course is to provide trainees with an introduction to cryogen use, the hazards and potential accidents related to cryogen systems, cryogen safety components, and the requirements that govern the design and use of cryogen systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The knowledge you gain will help you keep your workplace safe for yourself and your coworkers.

  15. Ultra stable and very low noise signal source using a cryocooled sapphire oscillator for VLBI

    CERN Document Server

    Nand, Nitin R; Ivanov, Eugene N; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the design and implementation of a novel frequency synthesizer based on low phase noise digital dividers and a direct digital synthesizer. The synthesis produces two low noise accurate and tunable signals at 10 MHz and 100 MHz. We report on the measured residual phase noise and frequency stability of the synthesizer, and estimate the total frequency stability, which can be expected from the synthesizer seeded with a signal near 11.2 GHz from an ultra-stable cryocooled sapphire oscillator. The synthesizer residual single sideband phase noise, at 1 Hz offset, on 10 MHz and 100 MHz signals, respectively, were measured to be -135 dBc/Hz and -130 dBc/Hz. Their intrinsic frequency stability contributions, on the 10 MHz and 100 MHz signals, respectively, were measured as sigma_y = 9 x 10^-15 and sigma_y = 2.2 x 10^-15, at 1 s integration time. The Allan Deviation of the total fractional frequency noise on the 10 MHz and 100 MHz signals derived from the synthesizer with the cryocooled sapphire oscilla...

  16. Proceedings of the 26th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference - International Cryogenic Material Conference 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, T. S.; Sharma, R. G.; Kar, S.

    2017-02-01

    International Conference ICEC 26 - ICMC 2016 was organized at New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016. Previous conference ICEC25-ICMC 2014 was held at the University of Twente, The Netherlands in July 2014. Next Conference ICEC 27- ICMC 2018 will be held at Oxford, UK during September 3-7, 2018 1. Introduction This is a biennial international conference on cryogenic engineering and cryogenics materials organized by the International Cryogenic Engineering Committee and the International Cryogenic Material Committee. For some years, the host country has been alternating between Europe and Asia. The present conference was held at the Manekshaw Convention Centre, New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016 and hosted jointly by the Indian Cryogenics Council (ICC) and the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. Put all together as many as 547 persons participated in the conference. Out of these 218 were foreign delegates coming from 25 countries and the rest from India. 2. Inaugural Session & Course Lectures The pre conference short course lectures on “Cryocoolers” and “Superconducting Materials for Power Applications” were organized on 7th March. Cryocooler course was given jointly by Dr. Chao Wang from M/s. Cryomech, USA and Prof. Milind Atrey from IIT Bombay, India. The Course on Superconducting Materials was given by Prof. Venkat Selvamanickam from the University of Houston, USA. The conference was inaugurated in the morning of March 8th in a typical Indian tradition and in the presence of the Chief Guest, Dr. R Chidambaram (Principle Scientific Adviser to Govt. of India), Guest of Honour, Prof. H Devaraj (Vice Chairman University Grant Commission), Prof Marcel ter Brake ( Chair, ICEC Board), Prof. Wilfried Goldacker (Chair, ICMC board), Dr. D Kanjilal (Director IUAC), Dr R K Bhandari, (President, Indian Cryogenic Council ). Dr. T S Datta, Chair Local Organizing Committee coordinated the proceedings of the inaugural function. 3. Technical

  17. Cryogenic helium gas circulation system for advanced characterization of superconducting cables and other devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamidi, Sastry; Kim, Chul Han; Kim, Jae-Ho; Crook, Danny; Dale, Steinar

    2012-04-01

    A versatile cryogenic test bed, based on circulating cryogenic helium gas, has been designed, fabricated, and installed at the Florida State University Center for Advanced Power Systems (FSU-CAPS). The test bed is being used to understand the benefits of integrating the cryogenic systems of multiple superconducting power devices. The helium circulation system operates with four sets of cryocooler and heat exchanger combinations. The maximum operating pressure of the system is 2.1 MPa. The efficacy of helium circulation systems in cooling superconducting power devices is evaluated using a 30-m-long simulated superconducting cable in a flexible cryostat. Experiments were conducted at various mass flow rates and a variety of heat load profiles. A 1-D thermal model was developed to understand the effect of the gas flow parameters on the thermal gradients along the cable. Experimental results are in close agreement with the results from the thermal model.

  18. New cryogenic system of the next-generation infrared astronomy mission SPICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Matsuhara, H.; Shinozaki, K.; Goto, K.; Isobe, N.; Kawada, M.; Mizutani, T.; Sato, Y.; Sugita, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Yamawaki, T.; Shibai, H.

    2016-07-01

    We present the new design of the cryogenic system of the next-generation infrared astronomy mission SPICA under the new framework. The new design employs the V-groove design for radiators, making the best use of the Planck heritage. The new design is based on the ESA-JAXA CDF study (NG-CryoIRTel, CDF-152(A)) with a 2 m telescope, and we modified the CDF design to accommodate the 2.5 m telescope to meet the science requirements of SPICA. The basic design concept of the SPICA cryogenic system is to cool the Science Instrument Assembly (SIA, which is the combination of the telescope and focal-plane instruments) below 8K by the combination of the radiative cooling system and mechanical cryocoolers without any cryogen.

  19. Cryogenic optical tests of a lightweight HIP beryllium mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melugin, Ramsey K.; Miller, Jacob H.; Young, J. A.; Howard, Steven D.; Pryor, G. Mark

    Five interferometric tests were conducted at cryogenic temperatures on a lightweight, 50 cm diameter, hot isostatic pressed (HIP) beryllium mirror in the Ames Research Center (ARC) Cryogenic Optics Test Facility. The purpose of the tests was to determine the stability of the mirror's figure when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Test temperatures ranged from room ambient to 8 K. One cycle to 8 K and five cycles to 80 K were performed. Optical and thermal test methods are described. Data is presented to show the amount of cryogenic distortion and hysteresis present in the mirror when measured with an earlier, Shack interferometer, and with a newly-acquired, phase-measuring interferometer.

  20. Demonstration of active vibration control on a stirling-cycle cryocooler testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Gaffney, Monique S.; Johnson, Dean L.; Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation has demonstrated excellent vibration reduction performance using active control on the JPL Stirling-cycle cryocooler testbed. The authors address the use of classical narrowband feedback control to meet the cryocooler vibration specifications using one cryocooler in a self-cancellation configuration. Similar vibration reduction performance was obtained using a cryocooler back-to-back configuration by actively controlling a reaction mass actuator that was used to mimic the second cooler.

  1. Concepts for a low-vibration and cryogen-free tabletop dilution refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Kurt

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe several concepts of how to cool a modern tabletop dilution refrigerator (DR) with a cryogen-free pulse tube cryocooler (PTC). Tabletop DRs have come more and more into the focus of scientists, recently, because they offer easy access to the mixing chamber mounting plate from all directions and because of their very short cooldown times. However, these milli-Kelvin coolers are precooled with LHe which makes their handling inconvenient and often expensive. In the paper it is explained how a cryocooler can be directly coupled to a DR unit making the use of LHe superfluous. Furthermore, concepts are discussed where a tabletop DR is cooled by a remote PTC; PTC and DR are mounted in separate vacuum containers which are connected by a stainless steel bellows tube. This kind of apparatus would offer an extremely low level of vibration at the mixing chamber mounting plate.

  2. A cryogenic test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, Ian

    The next generation, space-borne instruments for far infrared spectroscopy will utilize large diameter, cryogenically cooled telescopes in order to achieve unprecedented sensitivities. Low background, ground-based cryogenic facilities are required for the cryogenic testing of materials, components and subsystems. The Test Facility Cryostat (TFC) at the University of Lethbridge is a large volume, closed cycle, 4K cryogenic facility, developed for this purpose. This thesis discusses the design and performance of the facility and associated external instrumentation. An apparatus for measuring the thermal properties of materials is presented, and measurements of the thermal expansion and conductivity of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) at cryogenic temperatures are reported. Finally, I discuss the progress towards the design and fabrication of a demonstrator cryogenic, far infrared Fourier transform spectrometer.

  3. Raytheon's next generation compact inline cryocooler architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. [Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems, 2000 E. El Segundo Blvd., El Segundo, CA 90245 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Since the 1970s, Raytheon has developed, built, tested and integrated high performance cryocoolers. Our versatile designs for single and multi-stage cryocoolers provide reliable operation for temperatures from 10 to 200 Kelvin with power levels ranging from 50 W to nearly 600 W. These advanced cryocoolers incorporate clearance seals, flexure suspensions, hermetic housings and dynamic balancing to provide long service life and reliable operation in all relevant environments. Today, sensors face a multitude of cryocooler integration challenges such as exported disturbance, efficiency, scalability, maturity, and cost. As a result, cryocooler selection is application dependent, oftentimes requiring extensive trade studies to determine the most suitable architecture. To optimally meet the needs of next generation passive IR sensors, the Compact Inline Raytheon Stirling 1-Stage (CI-RS1), Compact Inline Raytheon Single Stage Pulse Tube (CI-RP1) and Compact Inline Raytheon Hybrid Stirling/Pulse Tube 2-Stage (CI-RSP2) cryocoolers are being developed to satisfy this suite of requirements. This lightweight, compact, efficient, low vibration cryocooler combines proven 1-stage (RS1 or RP1) and 2-stage (RSP2) cold-head architectures with an inventive set of warm-end mechanisms into a single cooler module, allowing the moving mechanisms for the compressor and the Stirling displacer to be consolidated onto a common axis and in a common working volume. The CI cryocooler is a significant departure from the current Stirling cryocoolers in which the compressor mechanisms are remote from the Stirling displacer mechanism. Placing all of the mechanisms in a single volume and on a single axis provides benefits in terms of package size (30% reduction), mass (30% reduction), thermodynamic efficiency (>20% improvement) and exported vibration performance (≤25 mN peak in all three orthogonal axes at frequencies from 1 to 500 Hz). The main benefit of axial symmetry is that proven balancing

  4. Prediction of two-phase pressure drop in heat exchanger for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The overall efficiency of a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocooler is governed by the performance of the recuperative heat exchanger. In the heat exchanger, the hot stream of the mixed refrigerant undergoes condensation at high pressure while the cold stream gets evaporated at low pressure. The pressure drop in the low pressure stream is crucial since it directly influences the achievable refrigeration temperature. However, experimental and theoretical studies related to two-phase pressure drop in mixtures at cryogenic temperatures, are limited. Therefore, the design of an efficient MR J-T cryocooler is a challenging task due to the lack of predictive tools. In the present work, the existing empirical correlations, which are commonly used for the prediction of pressure drop in the case of pure refrigerants, evaporating at near ambient conditions, are assessed for the mixed refrigerants. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop in the evaporating cold stream of the tube-in-tube helically coiled heat exchanger. The predicted frictional pressure drop in the heat exchanger is compared with the experimental data. The suggested empirical correlations can be used to predict the hydraulic performance of the heat exchanger.

  5. A high efficiency hybrid stirling-pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotao; Zhang, Yibing; Li, Haibing; Dai, Wei; Chen, Shuai; Lei, Gang; Luo, Ercang

    2015-03-01

    This article presented a hybrid cryocooler which combines the room temperature displacers and the pulse tube in one system. Compared with a traditional pulse tube cryocooler, the system uses the rod-less ambient displacer to recover the expansion work from the pulse tube cold end to improve the efficiency while still keeps the advantage of the pulse tube cryocooler with no moving parts at the cold region. In the meantime, dual-opposed configurations for both the compression pistons and displacers reduce the cooler vibration to a very low level. In the experiments, a lowest no-load temperature of 38.5 K has been obtained and the cooling power at 80K was 26.4 W with an input electric power of 290 W. This leads to an efficiency of 24.2% of Carnot, marginally higher than that of an ordinary pulse tube cryocooler. The hybrid configuration herein provides a very competitive option when a high efficiency, high-reliability and robust cryocooler is desired.

  6. A high efficiency hybrid stirling-pulse tube cryocooler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotao Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presented a hybrid cryocooler which combines the room temperature displacers and the pulse tube in one system. Compared with a traditional pulse tube cryocooler, the system uses the rod-less ambient displacer to recover the expansion work from the pulse tube cold end to improve the efficiency while still keeps the advantage of the pulse tube cryocooler with no moving parts at the cold region. In the meantime, dual-opposed configurations for both the compression pistons and displacers reduce the cooler vibration to a very low level. In the experiments, a lowest no-load temperature of 38.5 K has been obtained and the cooling power at 80K was 26.4 W with an input electric power of 290 W. This leads to an efficiency of 24.2% of Carnot, marginally higher than that of an ordinary pulse tube cryocooler. The hybrid configuration herein provides a very competitive option when a high efficiency, high-reliability and robust cryocooler is desired.

  7. Plate-fin Heat-exchangers for a 10 kW Brayton Cryocooler and a 1 km HTS Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Gwak, Kyung Hyun; Jung, Seyong; Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si-Dole

    Plate-fin heat exchangers (PFHX) are designed and fabricated for a cryogenic cooling system, serving for a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler and a 1 km HTS transmission cable under development in Korea. To achieve compactness and thermal efficiency at the same time, a recuperative HX for Brayton cycle and a sub-cooling HX of liquid nitrogen for HTS cable are designed as integrated parts. A key design feature is focused on the coldest part of sub-cooling HX, where the streams of liquid nitrogen and refrigerant (helium gas) are arranged as two-pass cross-flow so that the risk of freeze-out of liquid nitrogen can be reduced. Details of hardware PFHX design are presented and discussed towards its immediate application to the HTS cable system.

  8. Introduction to cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Vandoni, Giovanna; Niinikoski, Tapio O

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning.

  9. Size effects on miniature Stirling cycle cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoqin; Chung, J. N.

    2005-08-01

    Size effects on the performance of Stirling cycle cryocoolers were investigated by examining each individual loss associated with the regenerator and combining these effects. For the fixed cycle parameters and given regenerator length scale, it was found that only for a specific range of the hydrodynamic diameter the system can produce net refrigeration and there is an optimum hydraulic diameter at which the maximum net refrigeration is achieved. When the hydraulic diameter is less than the optimum value, the regenerator performance is controlled by the pressure drop loss; when the hydraulic diameter is greater than the optimum value, the system performance is controlled by the thermal losses. It was also found that there exists an optimum ratio between the hydraulic diameter and the length of the regenerator that offers the maximum net refrigeration. As the regenerator length is decreased, the optimum hydraulic diameter-to-length ratio increases; and the system performance is increased that is controlled by the pressure drop loss and heat conduction loss. Choosing appropriate regenerator characteristic sizes in small-scale systems are more critical than in large-scale ones.

  10. Size effects on miniature Stirling cycle cryocoolers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoqin Yang; Chung, J.N. [Florida Univ., Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Size effects on the performance of Stirling cycle cryocoolers were investigated by examining each individual loss associated with the regenerator and combining these effects. For the fixed cycle parameters and given regenerator length scale, it was found that only for a specific range of the hydrodynamic diameter the system can produce net refrigeration and there is an optimum hydraulic diameter at which the maximum net refrigeration is achieved. When the hydraulic diameter is less than the optimum value, the regenerator performance is controlled by the pressure drop loss; when the hydraulic diameter is greater than the optimum value, the system performance is controlled by the thermal losses. It was also found that there exists an optimum ratio between the hydraulic diameter and the length of the regenerator that offers the maximum net refrigeration. As the regenerator length is decreased, the optimum hydraulic diameter-to-length ratio increases; and the system performance is increased that is controlled by the pressure drop loss and heat conduction loss. Choosing appropriate regenerator characteristic sizes in small-scale systems are more critical than in large-scale ones. (Author)

  11. Colouring cryo-cooled crystals: online microspectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeehan, John [EMBL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Biophysics Laboratories, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom); Ravelli, Raimond B. G., E-mail: ravelli@lumc.nl [EMBL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Section Electron Microscopy, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), PO Box 9600, 2300RC Leiden (Netherlands); Murray, James W. [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Imperial College, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Owen, Robin Leslie [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Cipriani, Florent [EMBL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); McSweeney, Sean [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); Weik, Martin [Laboratoire de Biophysique Moléculaire, Institut de Biologie Structurale, Jean Pierre EBEL, 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Garman, Elspeth F., E-mail: ravelli@lumc.nl [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-01

    A portable and readily aligned online microspectrophotometer that can be easily installed on macromolecular crystallography beamlines is described. It allows measurement of the spectral characteristics of macromolecular crystals prior, during, and after the X-ray diffraction experiment. X-rays can produce a high concentration of radicals within cryo-cooled macromolecular crystals. Some radicals have large extinction coefficients in the visible (VIS) range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and can be observed optically and spectrally. An online microspectrophotometer with high temporal resolution has been constructed that is capable of measuring UV/VIS absorption spectra (200–1100 nm) during X-ray data collection. The typical X-ray-induced blue colour that is characteristic of a wide range of cryo-conditions has been identified as trapped solvated electrons. Disulphide-containing proteins are shown to form disulphide radicals at millimolar concentrations, with absorption maxima around 400 nm. The solvated electrons and the disulphide radicals seem to have a lifetime in the range of seconds up to minutes at 100 K. The temperature dependence of the kinetics of X-ray-induced radical formation is different for the solvated electrons compared with the disulphide radicals. The online microspectrophotometer provides a technique complementary to X-ray diffraction for analysing and characterizing intermediates and redox states of proteins and enzymes.

  12. Zero Boil Off Cryogen Storage for Future Launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentian, D.; Plachta, D.; Kittel, P.; Hastings, L. J.; Salerno, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Zero boil off (ZBO) cryogen storage using both cryocoolers and passive insulation technologies will enable long-term exploration missions by allowing designers to optimize tankage without the need for excess cryogen storage to account for boil off. Studies of ZBO (zero boil off) have been on-going in the USA for several years. More recently, a review of the needs of advanced space propulsion took place in Europe. This showed the interest of the European community in cryogenic propulsion for planetary missions as well as the use of liquid hydrogen for large power electric propulsion (manned Mars missions). Although natural boiling could be acceptable for single leg missions, passive insulation techniques yield roughly a I% per month cryogen loss and this would not be cost effective for robotic planetary missions involving storage times greater than one year. To make economic sense, long-term exploration missions require lower tank capacity and longer storage times. Recent advances in cryocooler technology, resulting in vast improvements in both cooler efficiency and reliability, make ZBO is a clear choice for planetary exploration missions. Other, more near term applications of ZBO include boil-off reduction or elimination applied to first and upper stages of future earth-to-orbit (ETO) launchers. This would extend launch windows and reduce infrastructure costs. Successors to vehicles like Ariane 5 could greatly benefit by implementing ZBO. Zero Boil Off will only be successful in ETO launcher applications if it makes economic sense to implement. The energy cost is only a fraction of the total cost of buying liquid cryogen, the rest being transportation and other overhead. Because of this, higher boiling point cryogens will benefit more from on-board liquefaction, thus reducing the infrastructure costs. Since hydrogen requires a liquefier with at least a 17% efficiency just to break even from a cost standpoint, one approach for implementing ZBO in upper stages would

  13. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of cryogens in spacecraft propellant...

  14. Multimodal tuned dynamic absorber for split Stirling linear cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, Alexander; Tuito, Avi

    2016-05-01

    Low size, weight, power and price split Stirling linear cryocooler usually comprises electro-dynamically driven compressor and pneumatically driven expander which are side-by-side fixedly mounted upon the common frame and interconnected by the configurable transfer line. Vibration export produced by such a cryocooler comprises of a pair of tonal forces, the frequency of which essentially equals fixed driving frequency. In vibration sensitive applications, this may result in excessive angular line of sight jitter and translational defocusing affecting the image quality. The authors present Multimodal Tuned Dynamic Absorber, having one translational and two tilting modes essentially tuned to the driving frequency. Dynamic analysis shows that the dynamic reactions (force and moment) produced by such a dynamic absorber are capable of simultaneous attenuation of translational and tilting components of cryocooler induced vibration. The authors reveal the preferable design, the method of fine tuning and outcomes of numerical simulation on attainable performance.

  15. The third type DC flow in pulse tube cryocooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yuan; GU Chao; CAI HuiKun

    2009-01-01

    New phenomena discovered in the experimental research of the ultra-high frequency pulse tube cryo cooler were presented.The cause of the new phenomena was analyzed and the third type DC flow was discovered in the pulse tube cryocooler.The third type DC flow not only deteriorated cooling capacity but also led to temperature instability of the pulse tube cryocooler.From the fluid network theory and the simple regenerator model,the root of the third type DC flow was concisely investigated in theory.The asymmetric resistance of oscillating flow in pulse tube cryocooler was the key mechanism of the third type DC flow.Some suppression methods were briefly discussed.

  16. Study of the minimum refrigeration temperature of regenerative cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangming; Chen, Guobang; Yu, Jianping

    Based on the principles of thermodynamics, the relation between the isentropic expansion coefficient μs and the isobaric specific heat Cp has been found. The values of μs at different temperatures and pressures are calculated. From theoretical and experimental values of Cp of helium in the supercritical area, the minimum refrigeration temperature which may be reached by traditional regenerative cryocoolers is theoretically demonstrated. It is pointed out that this boundary is just the lambda line of helium. In order to obtain temperatures lower than the lambda line, a new type of regenerative cryocooler which can work in the helium II region is proposed. The working principle, schematic diagram and theoretical refrigeration temperature of this new cryocooler are discussed.

  17. Raytheon RSP2 Cryocooler Low Temperature Testing and Design Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, R. C.; Kirkconnell, C. S.; Shrago, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    The High Capacity Raytheon Stirling/Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage cryocooler (HC-RSP2) was originally developed to provide simultaneous cooling at temperatures of 85 K and 35 K. During testing performed in 2008 it was demonstrated that this stock-configuration cryocooler is capable of providing significant amounts of heat lift at 2nd stage temperatures as low as 12 K, and modeling indicated that minor changes to the 2nd stage inertance tube/surge volume setup could yield improved performance. These changes were implemented and the cooler was successfully retested, producing >350 mW of heat lift at 12 K. A comprehensive redesign of the system has been performed, the result of which is a robust 2-stage cryocooler system that is intended to efficiently produce relatively large amounts of cooling at 2nd stage temperatures system redesign. Expected performance, mass and packaging volume are addressed.

  18. The cryogenic storage ring project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Robert von; Blaum, Klaus; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; George, Sebastian; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Herwig, Philipp; Krantz, Claude; Kreckel, Holger; Lange, Michael; Menk, Sebastian; Repnow, Roland; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Spruck, Kaija [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    At MPIK the electrostatic cryogenic storage ring CSR is nearing completion. At beam energies of 20 to 300 keV per charge unit and 35 m circumference the CSR will allow experiments in a cryogenic environment providing conditions of extremely low vacuum and heat radiation. By using liquid helium at 2 K for cryopumping, the projected vacuum (confirmed at a prototype) lies at 1E-13 mbar or below, ensuring long storage times for slow singly charged and highly charged ions, molecules and clusters. Moreover, phase space cooling by electrons will be implemented. The internal quantum states of molecular and cluster ions can be cooled to low temperature, yielding well defined vibrational and for smaller systems also rotational structures. In the CSR construction, the cryogenic ion beam vacuum system has been set up. Extensive tests confirming the criteria on heat flow, alignment and high-voltage stability were successfully completed on the first quadrant. In addition beam diagnostic units for electric pickup signals and spatial profiles, detectors for neutral and charged fragments, the injection beam line, and an electron cooling device are under construction.

  19. Gas gap heat switch for a cryogen-free magnet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, J.; Borges de Sousa, P.; Martins, D.; Kar, S.; Bonfait, G.; Catarino, I.

    2015-12-01

    Cryogen-free superconducting magnet systems (CFMS) have become popular over the last two decades for the simple reason that the use of liquid helium is rather cumbersome and that helium is a scarce resource. Some available CFMS use a mechanical cryocooler as the magnet's cold source. However, the variable temperature insert (VTI) for some existing CFMS are not strictly cryogen-free as they are still based on helium gas circulation through the sample space. We designed a prototype of a gas gap heat switch (GGHS) that allows a thermal management of a completely cryogen-free magnet system, with no helium losses. The idea relies on a parallel cooling path to a variable temperature insert (VTI) of a magnetic properties measurement system under development at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. A Gifford-McMahon cryocooler (1.5 W @ 4.2 K) would serve primarily as the cold source of the superconducting magnet, dedicating 1 W to this cooling, under quite conservative safety factors. The remaining cooling power (0.5 W) is to be diverted towards a VTI through a controlled GGHS that was designed and built with a 80 μm gap width. The built GGHS thermal performance was measured at 4 K, using helium as the exchange gas, and its conductance is compared both with a previously developed analytical model and a finite element method. Lessons learned lead to a new and more functional prototype yet to be reported.

  20. Cryogen-free operation of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneiderman, Gary A.; Shirron, Peter J.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Bialas, Thomas G.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Chiao, Meng P.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Eckart, Megan E.; Hartz, Leslie; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Masters, Candace; McCammon, Dan; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Noda, Hirofumi; Porter, Frederick S.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Takei, Yoh; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Yoshida, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is the first space-based instrument to implement redundancy in the operation of a sub-Kelvin refrigerator. The SXS cryogenic system consists of a superfluid helium tank and a combination of Stirling and Joule-Thompson (JT) cryocoolers that support the operation of a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). When liquid helium is present, the x-ray microcalorimeter detectors are cooled to their 50 mK operating temperature by two ADR stages, which reject their heat directly to the liquid at 1.1 K. When the helium is depleted, all three ADR stages are used to accomplish detector cooling while rejecting heat to the JT cooler operating at 4.5 K. Compared to the simpler helium mode operation, the cryogen-free mode achieves the same instrument performance by controlling the active cooling devices within the cooling system differently. These include the three ADR stages and four active heat switches, provided by NASA, and five cryocoolers, provided by JAXA. Development and verification details of this capability are presented within this paper and offer valuable insights into the challenges, successes, and lessons that can benefit other missions, particularly those employing cryogen-free cooling systems.

  1. Development of a 6-W high-reliability cryogenic cooler at Thales Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benschop, Tonny; Mullie, Jeroen C.; Bruins, Peter; Martin, Jean-Yves

    2003-01-01

    The demand for more cooling power for infrared imagers, which may require up to 3 W of cooling power at 77 K, is nowadays surpassed as other industries are getting interested in cryogenic cooling as well. These potential markets require robust, efficient and affordable coolers with cooling capacities in excess of 6 W. As announced at the previous SPIE conference in 2000, Thales Cryogenics has been working on the development of a cryocooler based on the LSF 918x series consisting of a flexure bearing compressor in combination with a 20 mm Stirling cold finger in order to meet the demands of this emerging markets. Based on the proven principles of Thales LSF 91xx flexure bearing compressors, a moving magnet compressor was designed that delivers the required pressure wave for this larger cold finger. The compressor has been successfully tested in combination with the 20 mm cold finger resulting in the LSF 93xx cooler. For the second half of 2002, tests are planned for the combination of a version of this compressor with a 5 W pulse tube cold finger. At present, the European Space Agency is funding the space qualification of a modification the LSF 93xx cooler, in order to use it to provide the cryogenic cooling required for future manned missions. A test program for the specific requirements for the CRYOSYSTEM program is under progress. This paper describes the trade-offs that have been considered in the design phase, and gives a detailed overview of the test results and the resulting specification of the LSF 93xx coolers.

  2. Recent development status of compact 2 K GM cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Q.; Xu, M. Y.; Tsuchiya, A.; Li, R.

    2015-12-01

    To meet the growing demand for a compact cooling solution for superconducting electronic devices, we developed a two-stage 2 K GM cryocooler and a cryostat system, which can reach 46.3 K / 2.2 K on the first and second stages under no-load conditions. Nevertheless, with several innovative technologies applied, the total length of the expander cylinder is reduced to under 70% of the smallest conventional 4 K GM cryocooler. In this paper we will present the design method, including material selection and structure design with detailed explanation, which has been confirmed by both simulation and experiment.

  3. On the possible cycles via the unified perspective of cryocoolers. Part A: The Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion [Rafael, Ltd., P.O. Box 2250, Haifa 3102102 (Israel); Pfotenhauer, John M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers possess a self adjusting effect, which preserves the state of the returning stream from the evaporator as a saturated vapor. The heat load can be entirely absorbed at constant temperature by evaporation even for different sized heat exchangers. It is not possible for the steady state flow resulting from a gradual cool down to penetrate 'deeper' into the two-phase dome, and produce a two phase return flow even with a heat exchanger of unlimited size. Such behavior was implicitly taken for granted in the literature but never clearly stated nor questioned and therefore never systematically proven. The discussion provided below provides such a proof via the unified model of cryocoolers. This model portrays all cryocoolers as magnifiers of their respective elementary temperature reducing mechanism through the process of 'interchanging'.

  4. Design and performance of a cryogenic apparatus for magnetically trapping ultracold neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, P. R.; Coakley, K. J.; Doyle, J. M.; Huffer, C. R.; Mumm, H. P.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.; Schelhammer, K. W.; Seo, P.-N.; Yang, L.

    2014-11-01

    The cryogenic design and performance of an apparatus used to magnetically confine ultracold neutrons (UCN) is presented. The apparatus is part of an effort to measure the beta-decay lifetime of the free neutron and is comprised of a high-current superconducting magnetic trap that surrounds ∼21 l of isotopically pure 4He cooled to approximately 250 mK. A 0.89 nm neutron beam can enter the apparatus from one end of the magnetic trap and a light collection system allows visible light generated within the helium by decays to be transported to detectors at room temperature. Two cryocoolers are incorporated to reduce liquid helium consumption.

  5. Top loading cryogen-free apparatus for low temperature thermophysical properties measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiming; Gong, Linghui; Xu, Dong; Huang, Chuanjun; Zhang, Meimei; Xu, Peng; Li, Laifeng

    2014-07-01

    The thermophysical properties of matter, especially properties at low temperature, are extremely important for engineering and materials science. Traditional liquid helium based cryostats are in many cases no longer affordable to operate due to the high liquid helium cost. This paper describes the design and test results of a cryogen-free cryostat, based on a GM cryocooler, with 50 mm diameter top loading sample facilities for thermophysical properties measurement at low temperature. The sample temperature range is tuned between 2.6 K and 300 K and it can be continuously controlled with a high resolution. Moreover, the modular sample holder can be adapted to multiple properties measurement.

  6. The Conduction of Heat through Cryogenic Regenerative Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superczynski, W. F.; Green, G. F.

    2006-04-01

    The need for improved regenerative cryocooler efficiency may require the replacement of conventional matrices with ducts. The ducts can not be continuous in the direction of temperature gradient when using conventional materials to prevent unacceptable conduction losses. However, this discontinuity creates a complex geometry to model and determine conduction losses. Chesapeake Cryogenics, Inc. has designed, fabricated and tested an apparatus for measuring the heat conduction through regenerative heat exchangers implementing different matrices. Data is presented for stainless steel photo etched disk, phophorus-bronze embossed ribbon coils and screens made of both stainless steel and phosphorus-bronze. The heat conduction was measured with the regenerators evacuated and pressurized with helium gas. In this test apparatus, helium gas presence increased the heat leak significantly. A description of the test apparatus, instrumentation, experimental methods and data analysis are presented.

  7. Cryogenics on the stratospheric terahertz observatory (STO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, G.; Young, A.; Dominguez, R.; Duffy, B.; Kulesa, C.; Walker, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Stratospheric TeraHertz Observatory (STO) is a NASA funded, Long Duration Balloon experiment designed to address a key problem in modern astrophysics: understanding the Life Cycle of the Interstellar Medium. STO surveys a section of the Galactic plane in the dominant interstellar cooling line at 1.9 THz and the important star formation tracer at 1.46 THz, at ∼1 arc minute angular resolution, sufficient to spatially resolve atomic, ionic, and molecular clouds at 10 kpc. The STO instrument package uses a liquid helium cryostat to maintain the THz receiver at < 9 K and to cool the low noise amplifiers to < 20 K. The first STO mission (STO-1) flew in January of 2012 and the second mission (STO-2) is planned for December 2015. For the STO-2 flight a cryocooler will be added to extend the mission lifetime. This paper discusses the integration of the STO instrument into an existing cryostat and the cryogenic aspects of the launch and operation of the STO balloon mission in the challenging Antarctic environment.

  8. AC loss evaluation of an HTS insert for high field magnet cooled by cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Kazuhiro; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-12-01

    AC losses in a high temperature superconducting (HTS) insert coil for 25-T cryogen-free superconducting magnet during its initial energization are numerically calculated under the assumption of slab approximation. The HTS insert consisting of 68 single pancakes wound using coated conductors generates a central magnetic field of 11.5 T in addition to the contribution of 14.0 T from a set of low temperature superconducting (LTS) outsert coils. Both the HTS insert and the LTS coils are cooled using cryocoolers, and energized simultaneously up to the central field of 25.5 T with a constant ramp rate for 60 min. The influences of the magnitudes and orientations of locally applied magnetic fields, magnetic interactions between turns and transport currents flowing in the windings are taken into account in the calculations of AC losses. The locally applied fields are separated into axial and radial components, and the individual contributions of these field components to the AC losses are simply summed up to obtain the total losses. The AC losses due to the axial fields become major in the beginning of energization, whereas the total losses monotonically increase with time after the AC losses due to the radial fields become major.

  9. Performance test of current lead cooled by a cryocooler in low temperature superconducting magnet system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeon Suk, E-mail: ychoi@kbsi.re.kr; Kim, Myung Su

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The current lead with multi-contact connector in the joint was fabricated for performance test. •The electrical contact resistance in the joint was measured during magnet charging. •The resistances of the joint were 0.4–0.9 mΩ for 40–80 K. •The heat generation due to electrical contact resistance was reduced below 1 W by multiple spring louvers. -- Abstract: In a low temperature superconducting magnet system, heat leakage through current leads is one of the major factors in cryogenic load. The semi-retractable current lead is a good option because the conductive heat leakage can be eliminated after the excitation of the magnet. It is composed of a normal metal element, conducting the current from room temperature to intermediate temperature, and an HTS element, conducting the current down to liquid helium temperature. The normal metal element is disengaged from the HTS element through the multi-contact connector without disturbance to the insulating vacuum space and without requiring complete removal of the normal metal element. The intermediate block with a lockable set point is thermally connected to the first stage of cryocooler and carries current through a strip of louvered material. The electrical contact resistance of multi-contact connector in the intermediate block is measured during magnet charging process. The effects of current level as well as operating temperature on the heat generation in the joint block are also discussed.

  10. Study on Deformation of Miniature Metal Bellows in Cryocooler Following Temperature Change of Internal Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Ha [LIGNex1 Co. Ltd., Gumi (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae Won [Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A bellows is an important temperature control component in a Joule-Thomson micro-cryocooler. It is designed using a very thin shell, and the inside of the bellows is filled with nitrogen gas. The bellows is made of a nickel-cobalt alloy that maintains its strength and elastic properties in a wide range of temperatures from cryogenic to 300℃. The pressure of the gas and the volume within the bellows vary according to the temperature of the gas. As a result, the bellows contracts or expands in the axial direction like a spring. To explore this phenomenon, the deformation of the bellows and its internal volume must be calculated iteratively under a modified pressure until the state equation of the gas is satisfied at a given temperature. In this paper, the modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin state equation is adopted to describe the temperature-volume-pressure relations of the gas. Experiments were performed to validate the proposed method. The results of a numerical analysis and the experiments showed good agreement.

  11. Wave-shaping of pulse tube cryocooler components for improved performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antao, Dion Savio; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2014-11-01

    The method of wave-shaping acoustic resonators is applied to an inertance type cryogenic pulse tube refrigerator (IPTR) to improve its performance. A detailed time-dependent axisymmetric experimentally validated computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model of the PTR is used to predict its performance. The continuity, momentum and energy equations are solved for both the refrigerant gas (helium) and the porous media regions (the regenerator and the three heat-exchangers) in the PTR. An improved representation of heat transfer in the porous media is achieved by employing a thermal non-equilibrium model to couple the gas and solid (porous media) energy equations. The wave-shaped regenerator and pulse tube studied have cone geometries and the effects of different cone angles and the orientation (nozzle v/s diffuser mode) on the system performance are investigated. The resultant spatio-temporal pressure, temperature and velocity fields in the regenerator and pulse tube components are evaluated. The performance of these wave-shaped PTRs is compared to the performance of a non wave-shaped system with cylindrical components. Better cooling is predicted for the cryocooler using wave-shaped components oriented in the diffuser mode.

  12. Performance test of current lead cooled by a cryocooler in low temperature superconducting magnet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeon Suk; Kim, Myung Su

    2013-11-01

    In a low temperature superconducting magnet system, heat leakage through current leads is one of the major factors in cryogenic load. The semi-retractable current lead is a good option because the conductive heat leakage can be eliminated after the excitation of the magnet. It is composed of a normal metal element, conducting the current from room temperature to intermediate temperature, and an HTS element, conducting the current down to liquid helium temperature. The normal metal element is disengaged from the HTS element through the multi-contact connector without disturbance to the insulating vacuum space and without requiring complete removal of the normal metal element. The intermediate block with a lockable set point is thermally connected to the first stage of cryocooler and carries current through a strip of louvered material. The electrical contact resistance of multi-contact connector in the intermediate block is measured during magnet charging process. The effects of current level as well as operating temperature on the heat generation in the joint block are also discussed.

  13. Development of a hermetically sealed brushless DC motor for a J-T cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joscelyn, Edwin; Hochler, Irwin; Ferri, Andrew; Rott, Heinz; Soukaris, Ted

    1996-01-01

    This development was sponsored by Ball Aerospace for the Cryogenic On-Orbit LongLife Active Refrigerator (COOLLAR) program. The cryocooler is designed to cool objects to 65 K and operate in space for at least 7 years. The system also imports minimal impact to the spacecraft in terms of vibration and heat. The basic Joule-Thompson cycle involves compressing a working fluid, nitrogen in this case, at near-constant temperature from 17.2 KPa to 6.89 MPa. The nitrogen is then expanded through a Joule-Thompson valve. The pure nitrogen gas must be kept clean; therefore, any contamination from motor organic materials must be eliminated. This requirement drove the design towards sealing of the motor within a titanium housing without sacrificing motor performance. It is estimated that an unsealed motor would have contributed 1.65 g of contaminants, due to the organic insulation and potting materials, over the 7-year life. This paper describes the motor electrical and mechanical design, as well as the sealing difficulties encountered, along with their solutions.

  14. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T., E-mail: tobias.heindel@tu-berlin.de; Reitzenstein, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g{sup (2)}(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  15. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlehahn, A; Krüger, L; Gschrey, M; Schulze, J-H; Rodt, S; Strittmatter, A; Heindel, T; Reitzenstein, S

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g((2))(0) Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g((2))(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  16. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g(2)(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g(2)(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  17. Polymers at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Shao-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Kalia and Fu's novel monograph covers cryogenic treatment, properties and applications of cryo-treated polymer materials. Written by numerous international experts, the twelve chapters in this book offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the latest findings and developments, as well as an outlook on the field. Cryogenic technology has seen remarkable progress in the past few years and especially cryogenic properties of polymers are attracting attention through new breakthroughs in space, superconducting, magnetic and electronic techniques. This book is a valuable resource for researchers, educators, engineers and graduate students in the field and at technical institutions.

  18. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, D.; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Gurd, P.; Howell, M.; Stout, D.; Strong, H.; Arenius, D.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2006-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  19. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  20. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Hatfield; F. Casagrande; I. Campisi; P. Gurd; M. Howell; D. Stout; H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; and P. Knudsen

    2005-08-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  1. Fundamentals of cryogenic engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Mamata

    2014-01-01

    The author, with her vast and varied experience in teaching and allied fields, clearly enunciates the behaviour and various properties of common cryogenic fluids, methods of liquefaction, and separation and applications of cryogens with thermodynamic analysis for process selection. This profusely illustrated study with clear-cut diagrams and process charts, should serve not only as a textbook for students but also as an excellent reference for researchers and practising engineers on design of cryogenic refrigeration, and liquefaction and separation process plants for various applications.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental verfication on a novel looped pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotao; Luo, Ercang; Dai, Wei; Hu, Jianying; Zhou, Yuan

    2012-06-01

    Compared with the Stirling cryocooler, the pulse tube cryocooler has obvious advantage in reliability. The reservoir is usually needed to help the inertance tube to obtain larger phase shifting ability, which makes the pulse tube cryocooler not to be as compact as the Stirling cryocoolers. To improve compactness, a looped pulse tube cryocooler without the reservoir was proposed in the paper. The inertance-tube is directly connected to the backside of a linear compressor and the reservoir is removed. To compare its cooling performance with that of the inertance-tube pulse tube cryocooler with a reservoir, the theoretical model including a linear compressor, main hot-end exchanger, regenerator, cold-end exchanger, pulse tube, and secondary hot-end exchanger are described for the both cryocoolers. The simulation results show that the looped cryocooler can achieve a similar or even better cooling performance, comparing with the traditional inertance-tube cryocooler. In the experiment, the performances of both cryocoolers driven by a same linear compressor were extensively tested. A lowest cold-head temperature of 40 K is acquired and the maximum cooling power reached 9.4 W at 77 K for the novel looped pulse tube cooler, corresponding to about 15% relative Carnot efficiency

  3. Elevated-pressure mixed-coolants Joule Thomson cryocooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytal, B.-Z.; Nellis, G. F.; Klein, S. A.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of mixed coolants at elevated pressures for Joule-Thomson cryocooling. A numerical model of a Joule-Thomson cryocooler is developed that is capable of simulating operation with mixtures of up to 9 components consisting of hydrocarbons, non-flammable halogenated refrigerants, and inert gases. The numerical model is integrated with a genetic optimization algorithm, which has a high capability for convergence in an environment of discontinuities, constraints and local optima. The genetic optimization algorithm is used to select the optimal mixture compositions that separately maximizes following two objective functions at each elevated pressure for 80, 90 and 95 K cryocooling: the molar specific cooling capacity (the highest attainable is 3200 J/mol) and the produced cooling capacity per thermal conductance which is a measure of the compactness of the recuperator. The optimized cooling capacity for a non-flammable halogenated refrigerant mixture is smaller than for a hydrocarbon mixture; however, the cooling capacity of the two types of mixtures approach one another as pressure becomes higher. The coefficient of performance, the required heat transfer area and the effect of the number of components in the mixture is investigated as a function of the pressure. It is shown that mixtures with more components provide a higher cooling capacity but require larger recuperative heat exchangers. Optimized mixtures for 90 K cryocooling have similar cooling capacity as those for 80 K. Optimized compactness for 80 K is about 50% higher than can be achieved by pure nitrogen. For 90 K, no mixture provides a more compact recuperator than can be achieved using pure argon. The results are discussed in the context of potential applications for closed and open cycle cryocoolers.

  4. Theory on single molecule_photon cryocooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN; Weiping

    2001-01-01

    [1]Pringsheim, P., Zwei Bemerkungen über den Unterschied von Lumineszenz_ und Temperaturstrahlung, Z. Phys., 929, 57(8): 739.[2]Djeu, N., Whitney, W. T., Laser cooling by spontaneous anti_Stokes scattering, Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, 46(4): 236.[3]Epstein, I., Buchwald, M. I., Edwards, B. C. et al., Observation of laser_induced fluorescent cooling of a solid, Nature, 995, 377(2): 500.[4]Clark, J. L., Rumbles, G., Laser cooling in the condensed phase by frequency up_conversion, Phys. Rev. Lett., 996, 76(2): 2037.[5]Mungan, C. E., Buchwald, M. I., Edwards, B. C. et al., Laser cooling of a solid by 6 K starting from room temperature, Phys. Rev. Lett., 997, 78(6): 030.[6]Luo, X., Eisaman, M. D., Gosnell, T. R., Laser cooling of a solid by 2K starting from room temperature, Opt. Lett., 998, 23(8): 639.[7]Gosnell, T. R., Laser cooling of a solid by 2K starting from room temperature, Optics Let., 999, 24(5): 04.[8]Epstein, I., Buchwald, M. I., Edwards, B. C. et al., The Los Alamos solid_state optical refrigerator, Cryocoolers 9, New York: Plenum, 997, 68—686.[9]Qin Weiping, Zhang Jiahua, Huang Shihua, Laser_induced anti_Stokes fluorescent cooling, Physics (in Chinese), 998, 27(6): 323.[10]Christiansen, W. H., Hertzberg, A., Gasdynamic lasers and photon machines, Proc. IEEE, 973, 6(8): 060.[11]Qin Weiping, Zhang Jiahua, Huang Shihua, Study on the fluorescent cooling by energy transfer within in homogenous line shape in solids, Acta Physica Sinica (in Chinese), 998, 47(8): 397.[12]Qin Weiping, Zhang Jiahua, Chen Baojiu et al., Two basic mechanism in anti_Stokes fluorescent cooling of solids, Chinese Journal of Luminescence, 999, 20(2): 26.[13]Fournier, J. T., Bartram, R. H., Inhomogeneous broadening of the optical spectra of Yb3+in phosphate glass, J. Phys. Chem. Solids, 970, 3(2): 265.

  5. Structural Design and Analysis of a 150 kJ HTS SMES Cryogenic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peng; Wu, Yu; Liu, Huajun; Li, Laifeng; Yang, Huihui

    A 150 kJ high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage (HTS-SMES) system is under manufacturing in China. This paper focuses on the structural design and analysis of the SMES cryogenic system. The cryogenic system is designed and fabricated to maintain the working temperature. The system includes a vacuum vessel, its thermal radiation shield, its supporting devices, conduction plates, and current leads. Two G-M cryocoolers are used for the system cooling, the main one is connected to the HTS coils and the other is connected to the thermal shield and the lower ends of the current leads. In this study, the 3D models of the SMES cryogenic system were created with CATIA, a 3D model design software, and the analysis of the SMES cryogenic system was done by ANSYS. The mechanical analysis results on the vacuum vessel, suspension devices and supporting devices are presented, particularly the analyses on suspenders and shelf supports are of vital importance since the finished SMES system should meet vehicle-mounted requirements in long time transport. The heat load and the temperature distribution of the thermal shield were analyzed. A cooling experiment of the cryogenic system was made and the thermal shield was cooled down to about 50 K.

  6. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  7. Advances in Cryogenic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R. F.

    During the past 50 years, the use of digital computers has significantly influenced the design and analysis of cryogenic systems. At the time when the first Cryogenic Engineering Conference was held, thermodynamic data were presented in graphical or tabular form (the "steam table" format), whereas thermodynamic data for cryogenic system design is computer generated today. The thermal analysis of cryogenic systems in the 1950s involved analytical solutions, graphical solutions, and relatively simple finite-difference approaches. These approaches have been supplanted by finite-element numerical programs which readily solve complicated thermal problems that could not be solved easily using the methods of the 1950s. In distillation column design, the use of the McCabe-Thiele graphical method for determination of the number of theoretical plates has been replaced by numerical methods that allow consideration of several different components in the feed and product streams.

  8. Thermal study of a cryogen-less MgB{sub 2} cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzbauer, J.P., E-mail: jeremiah@fnal.gov; Nassiri, A.

    2014-12-11

    Recent efforts towards production of high-quality magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) coatings have raised the possibility of producing usable accelerating cavities. Work continues to reliably produce films of sufficient quality over the large, complex surface area of an accelerating cavity, but this technology would open many interesting technical opportunities. One of these is to replace the traditionally required liquid helium cryogenic systems with a dry system based on cryocoolers. This is made possible by the much higher T{sub c} of MgB{sub 2}, allowing operation closer to 30 K where cryocooler efficiency becomes competitive with alternative systems. This removes the need for pressure vessels in the cryomodule as well as internal distribution systems, greatly simplifying cryomodule design and fabrication. The lack of uniform cooling over the cavity surface, however, complicates behavior by coupling RF losses, heat leak, and cooling design in a way not seen in traditional SRF cavities. In this paper, these complexities are explored, including realistic cryocooler performance, temperature dependant RF losses, and standard thermal management challenges.

  9. Thermal study of a cryogen-less MgB2 cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzbauer, J. P.; Nassiri, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent efforts towards production of high-quality magnesium diboride (MgB2) coatings have raised the possibility of producing usable accelerating cavities. Work continues to reliably produce films of sufficient quality over the large, complex surface area of an accelerating cavity, but this technology would open many interesting technical opportunities. One of these is to replace the traditionally required liquid helium cryogenic systems with a dry system based on cryocoolers. This is made possible by the much higher Tc of MgB2, allowing operation closer to 30 K where cryocooler efficiency becomes competitive with alternative systems. This removes the need for pressure vessels in the cryomodule as well as internal distribution systems, greatly simplifying cryomodule design and fabrication. The lack of uniform cooling over the cavity surface, however, complicates behavior by coupling RF losses, heat leak, and cooling design in a way not seen in traditional SRF cavities. In this paper, these complexities are explored, including realistic cryocooler performance, temperature dependant RF losses, and standard thermal management challenges.

  10. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Brian D.; Caffrey, Jarvis; Hedayat, Ali; Stephens, Jonathan; Polsgrove, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic fluid management (CFM) is critical to the success of future nuclear thermal propulsion powered vehicles. While this is an issue for any propulsion system utilizing cryogenic propellants, this is made more challenging by the radiation flux produced by the reactor in a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Managing the cryogenic fuel to prevent propellant loss to boil off and leakage is needed to limit the required quantity of propellant to a reasonable level. Analysis shows deposition of energy into liquid hydrogen fuel tanks in the vicinity of the nuclear thermal engine. This is on top of ambient environment sources of heat. Investments in cryogenic/thermal management systems (some of which are ongoing at various organizations) are needed in parallel to nuclear thermal engine development in order to one day see the successful operation of an entire stage. High durability, low thermal conductivity insulation is one developmental need. Light weight cryocoolers capable of removing heat from large fluid volumes at temperatures as low as approx. 20 K are needed to remove heat leak from the propellant of an NTR. Valve leakage is an additional CFM issue of great importance. Leakage rates of state of the art, launch vehicle size valves (which is approximately the size valves needed for a Mars transfer vehicle) are quite high and would result in large quantities of lost propellant over a long duration mission. Additionally, the liquid acquisition system inside the propellant tank must deliver properly conditioned propellant to the feed line for successful engine operation and avoid intake of warm or gaseous propellant. Analysis of the thermal environment and the CFM technology development are discussed in the accompanying presentation.

  11. Development and optimization progress with RICOR cryocoolers for HOT IR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Amiram; Bar Haim, Zvi; Riabzev, Sergey; Segal, Victor; Filis, Avishai; Gover, Dan

    2016-05-01

    The world growth in research and development of High Operating Temperature (HOT) IR detectors impels the development and optimization of suitable cryocoolers. The current developments at RICOR, which include three different cryocooler models and two new controllers, are focused on the - oriented design process, meaning small Size, low Weight, low Power consumption, improved performance and lower production cost, providing proper cryocoolers for future hand held thermal imagers. This paper shows the progress made during development of "HOT" cryocooler prototypes, engineering pre-production series and qualified production series cryocoolers working at the FPA temperature range of 130 - 200K. The progress with development of electronic control modules providing minimized regulated power consumption is also shown. The progress in development of cryocoolers reliability is also reported in the paper.

  12. Development and testing of a passive check valve for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B. D.; Maddocks, J. R.; Miller, F. K.

    2014-11-01

    Several cryogenic technologies use check valves, such as the Cold Cycle Dilution Refrigerator (CCDR) and the Hybrid Pulse-Tube/Reverse-Brayton Cryocooler. This paper details the development of a reed-style passive check valve with a PTFE seat for cryogenic applications. The experimental results of tests on the valve using helium gas at temperatures from 293 K down to 5.2 K, verify a scaling argument based on fundamental fluid dynamics that allows results from 78 K to be used in predicting valve performance at much lower temperatures. The scaling argument is then applied to a test conducted at the normal boiling point of Nitrogen to examine the results of improved fabrication methods.

  13. Development of miniature Stirling cryocooler technology for Infrared Focal Plane array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manmohan Singh; Mukesh Sadana; Sunil Sachdev; Gaurav Pratap

    2013-01-01

    .... The paper presents the progress of the development activities in Stirling cryocooler technology at SSPL, which evolved through essential milestones like the development of single and dual piston...

  14. The LHC cryogenic operation for first collisions and physics run

    CERN Document Server

    Brodzinski, K; Benda, V; Bremer, J; Casas-Cubillos, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Ferlin, G; Fernandez Penacoba, G; Perin, A; Pirotte, O; Soubiran, M; Tavian, L; van Weelderen, R; Wagner, U

    2011-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryogenic system was progressively and successfully run for the LHC accelerator operation period starting from autumn 2009. The paper recalls the cryogenic system architecture and main operation principles. The system stability during magnets powering and availability periods for high energy beams with first collisions at 3.5 TeV are presented. Treatment of typical problems, weak points of the system and foreseen future consolidations will be discussed.

  15. Active Co-Storage of Cryogenic Propellants for Lunar Explortation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafi, S.; Canavan, E. R.; Boyle, R. F.; Panek, J. S.; Riall, S. M.; Miller, F. K.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term storage of cryogenic propellants is a critical requirement for NASA's effort to return to the moon. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen provide the highest specific impulse of any practical chemical propulsion system, and thus provides the greatest payload mass per unit of launch mass. Future manned missions will require vehicles with the flexibility to remain in orbit for months, necessitating long-term storage of these cryogenic liquids. For decades cryogenic scientific satellites have used dual cryogens with different temperatures to cool instruments. This technology utilizes a higher temperature cryogen to provide a stage that efficiently intercepts a large fraction of the heat that would otherwise be incident on the lower temperature cryogen. This interception reduces the boil-off of the lower temperature cryogen and increasing the overall life-time of the mission. The Active Co-Storage concept is implemented similarly; the 101 K liquid oxygen thermally shields the 24 K liquid hydrogen. A thermal radiation shield that is linked to the liquid oxygen tank shrouds the liquid hydrogen tank, thereby preventing the liquid hydrogen tank from being directly exposed to the 300 K external environment. Modern cryocooler technology can eliminate the liquid oxygen boil-off and also cool the thermal radiation shield thereby reducing the liquid hydrogen boil-off to a small fraction of the unshielded rate. The thermal radiation shield can be a simple conductive shroud or a more sophisticated but lighter Broad Area Cooling (BAC) shroud. The paper describes the design impact of an active co-storage system for the Altair Descent Vehicle. This paper also compares the spacecraft-level impacts of the conductive shroud and the BAC shroud active co-storage concepts with a passive storage option in the context of the different scales of spacecraft that will be used for the lunar exploration effort - the Altair Ascent and Descent Vehicles, the Orion, and the Ares V Earth

  16. Development of high capacity Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imura, J. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 7-24-1, Narashinodai, Funabashi-shi, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: junnosuke_imura@yahoo.co.jp; Shinoki, S.; Sato, T.; Iwata, N.; Yamamoto, H.; Yasohama, K. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 7-24-1, Narashinodai, Funabashi-shi, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan); Ohashi, Y.; Nomachi, H.; Okumura, N. [Aisin Seiki Co., Ltd., 2-1, Asahi-machi, Kariya, Aichi 448-8650 (Japan); Nagaya, S.; Tamada, T.; Hirano, N. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 1, Toshin-cho, Higashi-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 261-8680 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    We have been developing a Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler, aiming for a cooling capacity of 200 W at 80 K for a superconducting magnetic energy storage system. In this work, we adopted stainless steel meshes for the regenerator of the cryocooler, and studied the influences of the mesh number on the cooling capacity. The prepared mesh numbers were 150, 200, 250, 350 and 400. Using 250 mesh, and at a frequency of 45 Hz and power consumption of 3.1 kW, the achievable lowest temperature and cooling capacity at 80 K was 46.2 K and 123 W, respectively. Furthermore, in order to optimize the performance, some regenerators were made by stacking several kinds of meshes with different stacking orders. Using these regenerators, we have obtained a high cooling capacity of 169 W at 80 K with power consumption of 4 kW.

  17. Development of high capacity Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, J.; Shinoki, S.; Sato, T.; Iwata, N.; Yamamoto, H.; Yasohama, K.; Ohashi, Y.; Nomachi, H.; Okumura, N.; Nagaya, S.; Tamada, T.; Hirano, N.

    2007-10-01

    We have been developing a Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler, aiming for a cooling capacity of 200 W at 80 K for a superconducting magnetic energy storage system. In this work, we adopted stainless steel meshes for the regenerator of the cryocooler, and studied the influences of the mesh number on the cooling capacity. The prepared mesh numbers were #150, 200, 250, 350 and 400. Using #250 mesh, and at a frequency of 45 Hz and power consumption of 3.1 kW, the achievable lowest temperature and cooling capacity at 80 K was 46.2 K and 123 W, respectively. Furthermore, in order to optimize the performance, some regenerators were made by stacking several kinds of meshes with different stacking orders. Using these regenerators, we have obtained a high cooling capacity of 169 W at 80 K with power consumption of 4 kW.

  18. A GM cryocooler with cold helium circulation for remote cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Brown, Ethan

    2014-01-01

    A GM cryocooler with new cold helium circulation system has been developed at Cryomech. A set of check valves connects to the cold heat exchanger to convert a small portion of AC oscillating flow in the cold head to a DC gas flow for circulating cold helium in the remote loop. A cold finger, which is used for remote cooling, is connected to the check valves through a pair of 5 m long vacuum insulated flexible lines. The GM cryocooler, Cryomech model AL125 having 120 W at 80 K, is employed in the testing. The cold finger can provide 50 W at 81 K for the power input of 4.1 kW and 70.5 W at 81.8 K for the power input of 6 kW. This simple and low cost design is very attractive for some applications in the near future.

  19. Helium liquefaction with a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao

    2001-07-01

    Helium liquefaction with a two-stage 4 K pulse tube cryocooler is introduced in this paper. The helium liquefier has a feature of precooling helium gas to be liquefied by using inefficiency of the second stage regenerator in the pulse tube cryocooler. This process reduces enthalpy of the incoming helium gas when entering the condenser and significantly increases the condensation rate. Numerical analysis predicts the precooling heat load on the second stage regenerator, decreases the PTC second stage cooling capacity by only 11% of the heat actually absorbed into the regenerator. A prototype pulse tube helium liquefier was built, which has two precooling heat exchangers on the first stage cold head and the second stage regenerator. It continuously liquefies helium with a rate of 4.8 l/day under normal pressure while consumes 4.6 kW power input.

  20. High pressure ratio cryocooler with integral expander and heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crunkleton, J. A.; Smith, J. L., Jr.; Iwasa, Y.

    A new 1 W, 4.2 K cryocooler is under development that is intended to miniaturize helium temperature refrigeration systems using a high-pressure-ratio Collins-type cycle. The configuration resulted from optimization studies of a saturated vapor compression (SCV) cycle that employs miniature parallel-plate heat exchangers. The basic configuration is a long displacer in a close-fitting, thin-walled cylinder. The displacer-to-cylinder gap is the high-pressure passage of the heat exchanger, and the low-pressure passage is formed by a thin tube over the OD of the cylinder. A solenoid-operated inlet valve admits 40 atm helium to the displacer-to-cylinder gap at room temperature, while the solenoid-operated exhaust valve operates at 4 atm. The single-stage cryocooler produces 1 W of refrigeration at 40 K without precooling and at 20 K with liquid nitrogen precooling.

  1. Performance Limits of Pulse Tube Cryocoolers Using 3HE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, P.

    2008-03-01

    The enthalpy, entropy, and exergy flows resulting from the real gas effects of 3He in ideal pulse tube cryocoolers are described. The discussion follows a previous description of the real gas effects of 4He in ideal pulse tube cryocoolers and makes use of a recently developed model of the thermophysical properties of 3He. This model is used to describe how the thermodynamic flows are affected by real gas phenomena of 3He and compares these effects to similar effects for 4He. The analysis was done over the pressure range 0.3-2 MPa and temperatures down to 1 K. At 2 MPa there is almost no difference in the cooling power between 3He and 4He. At lower pressures, using 3He is advantageous. There is a 1-2 K reduction in the 3He cooling power vs. temperature curves compared to those for 4He in the 0.3-1 MPa range.

  2. Basic Operation of Cryocoolers and Related Thermal Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with the basics of cryocoolers and related thermodynamic systems. The treatment is based on the first and second law of thermodynamics for inhomogeneous, open systems using enthalpy flow, entropy flow, and entropy production. Various types of machines, which use an oscillating gas flow, are discussed such as: Stirling refrigerators, GM coolers, pulse-tube refrigerators, and thermoacoustic coolers and engines. Furthermore the paper deals with Joule-Thomson and dilution refrigerators which use a constant flow of the working medium.

  3. 10 K high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sixue; Chen, Liubiao; Wu, Xianlin; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    A high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling (HPTCP) has been developed and tested to meet the requirement of weak magnetic signals measurement, and the performance characteristics are presented in this article. The HPTCP is a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler with the precooling-stage replaced by liquid nitrogen. Two regenerators completely filled with stainless steel (SS) meshes are used in the cooler. Together with cold inertance tubes and cold gas reservoir, a cold double-inlet configuration is used to control the phase relationship of the HPTCP. The experimental result shows that the cold double-inlet configuration has improved the performance of the cooler obviously. The effects of operation parameters on the performance of the cooler are also studied. With a precooling temperature of 78.5 K, the maximum refrigeration capacity is 0.26 W at 15 K and 0.92 W at 20 K when the input electric power are 174 W and 248 W respectively, and the minimum no-load temperature obtained is 10.3 K, which is a new record on refrigeration temperature for high frequency pulse tube cryocooler reported with SS completely used as regenerative matrix.

  4. Numerical analysis of stirling type pulse tube cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, A. A.; Ashrafizadeh, A.; Mousavi Naeenian, S. M.

    2011-09-01

    A one-dimensional finite volume discretization method is proposed and is implemented as a computer program for the modeling of a family of stirling type Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTC). The set of unsteady, one-dimensional, viscous compressible flow equations are written in a general form such that all, porous and non-porous, sections of the PTC can be modeled with these governing equations. In present work, temperature dependency of thermo-physical properties are taken into account as well as the heat transfer between the working fluid and the solid parts, and heat conductions of the gas and solid. The simulation tool can be used to model both the inertance tube type and the orifice type cryocoolers equipped with regenerators made up of different matrix constructions. The PTC might have an arbitrary orientation with respect to the gravitational field. By using the computer program, an orifice type and an inertance tube type pulse tube cryocooler are simulated. Diameter of the orifice and length of the inertance tube are optimized in order to maximize the coefficient of performance. Furthermore, the cooling power of the two types is obtained as a function of the cooling temperature. The behavior of thermodynamic parameters of the inertance tube PTC is investigated. Mean cyclic values of the parameters are presented.

  5. Real gas features on the performance of pulse tube cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Y. L.

    2002-05-01

    The working helium gas in a pulse tube cryocooler operating at temperatures down to 80 K is mainly assumed to be an ideal gas. Therefore, the time-variations of the temperature profiles and the position of the gas element traveling with pressure oscillations inside the pulse tube can be readily determined by the law of Poisson function. However, this is certainly invalid for the pulse tube cryocooler operating at temperature range of liquid helium, in which the thermal properties of the helium gas change drastically. The temperature profiles in the regenerator and the pulse tube are strongly affected by the real thermal properties of the helium gas. We derive in this paper, the respective expressions to follow the tracks of the gas elements as they move in the pulse tube, and to reveal the time dependence of the temperature profiles and the position of gas elements traveling with the pressure oscillations inside the pulse tube. The approach is based on the thermodynamic equations for the real gas. We will show that contrary to the ideal gas case there is another term which determines the dynamic behaviors of the temperature distributions and the position of the gas elements. A typical calculation is presented for visualizing the time dependence of the cooling-down processes of the temperature profiles in the pulse tube of a 4K two-stage pulse tube cryocooler from room temperature down to low temperature.

  6. Space Stirling Cryocooler Contamination Lessons Learned and Recommended Control Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, D. S.; Price, K.; Gully, W.; Castles, S.; Reilly, J.

    The most important characteristic of a space cryocooler is its reliability over a lifetime typically in excess of 7 years. While design improvements have reduced the probability of mechanical failure, the risk of internal contamination is still significant and has not been addressed in a consistent approach across the industry. A significant fraction of the endurance test and flight units have experienced some performance degradation related to internal contamination. The purpose of this paper is to describe and assess the contamination issues inside long life, space cryocoolers and to recommend procedures to minimize the probability of encountering contamination related failures and degradation. The paper covers the sources of contamination, the degradation and failure mechanisms, the theoretical and observed cryocooler sensitivity, and the recommended prevention procedures and their impact. We begin with a discussion of the contamination sources, both artificial and intrinsic. Next, the degradation and failure mechanisms are discussed in an attempt to arrive at a contaminant susceptibility, from which we can derive a contamination budget for the machine. This theoretical sensitivity is then compared with the observed sensitivity to illustrate the conservative nature of the assumed scenarios. A number of lessons learned on Raytheon, Ball, Air Force Research Laboratory, and NASA GSFC programs are shared to convey the practical aspects of the contamination problem. Then, the materials and processes required to meet the proposed budget are outlined. An attempt is made to present a survey of processes across industry.

  7. An Advanced Loop Heat Pipe for Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Hoang, Triem

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe (LHP) is a very versatile heat transfer device which can transport a large heat load over a long distance with a small temperature difference. All LHPs currently servicing orbiting spacecraft are designed to operate in the room temperature range. Future space telescopes and space-based Earth resource imaging satellites require passive cryogenic heat transport devices that can thermally couple remote cryocoolers to sensor or instrument of interest while providing the capability of payload vibration/jitter isolation, implementation of redundant coolers, and coupling of multiple sensors to a common heat sink. All of these requirements can be satisfied by using a cryogenic LHP (CLHP). Although the development of CLHPs faces several technical challenges, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has devoted extensive efforts in developing CLHP technology over the past decade and has made significant progress. In particular, the combination of the innovative ideas of using a secondary capillary pump to manage the parasitic heat gain and using a hot reservoir to reduce the system pressure under the ambient condition has led to the successful development of the CLHP. Several CLHPs charged with nitrogen and hydrogen were built and tested in thermal vacuum chambers. These CLHPs demonstrated reliable start-up and robust operation during power cycle and sink temperature cycle tests.

  8. An Advanced Loop Heat Pipe for Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Hoang, Triem

    2017-01-01

    A loop heat pipe (LHP) is a very versatile heat transfer device that can transport a large heat load over a long distance with a small temperature difference. All LHPs currently servicing orbiting spacecraft are designed to operate in the room temperature range. Future space telescopes and space-based Earth resource imaging satellites require passive cryogenic heat transport devices that can thermally couple remote cryocoolers to sensor or instrument of interest while providing the capability of payload vibration jitter isolation, implementation of redundant coolers, and coupling of multiple sensors to a common heat sink. All of these requirements can be satisfied by using a cryogenic LHP (CLHP). Although the development of CLHPs faces several technical challenges, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has devoted extensive efforts in developing CLHP technology over the past decade and has made significant progress. In particular, the combination of the innovative ideas of using a secondary capillary pump to manage the parasitic heat gain and using a hot reservoir to reduce the system pressure under the ambient condition has led to the successful development of the CLHP. Several CLHPs charged with nitrogen and hydrogen were built and tested in thermal vacuum chambers. These CLHPs demonstrated reliable start-up and robust operation during power cycle and sink temperature cycle tests.

  9. Reliable, Practical Kilowatt-class Cryogenics for Superconducting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoor, Philip [Clever Fellows Innovation Consortium, Inc., Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Following the successful development of a Flexibly-Attached Remote cryocooler for ~200W at 80K under a Phase II DOE grant, Clever Fellows Innovation Consortium, Inc. (dba CFIC-Qdrive; acquired by Chart Industries in 2012) was invited by the DOE to scale up this technology to ~1000W/80K in a Phase III program. This target is responsive to the “Cryogenics Roadmap” developed by the DOE to accelerate the development of cryogenic cooling necessary to support the emerging superconducting power applications. Mirroring the Roadmap, our proposal included a capacity target (1000W at 80K) and a cost target (<$40/watt, at 80K), but unlike the Roadmap, we did not formally propose to meet a specific efficiency target. We achieved 75% of the capacity target, with a record-size coaxial “pulse-tube” coldfinger, but only by working on the project well beyond the original “period of performance” on unfunded extension. We believe 100% of the capacity target was within reach, but our own budget and time constraints forbade additional effort. We were less successful in meeting the cost targets. Ultimately, the specific configuration that was the subject of Phase III was not commercialized, largely because the market for superconducting devices has not been nearly as robust as was expected at the advent of the Roadmap.

  10. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  11. PREFACE: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering - Materials: Proceedings of the International Cryogenic Materials Conference (ICMC) 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter; Sumption, Michael

    2015-12-01

    , Jennifer Marquardt from Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. The Exhibit chair was Richard Dausman of Cryomech, Inc. who also served as Publicity Chair. Finally, Awards Chairs were Ray Radebaugh from the National Institute of Standards and Technology for CEC and David Cardwell from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, for ICMC. On June 28, the Cryogenic Society of America presented three short courses: Cryocooler Fundamentals and Space Applications, a full day course given by Dr. Ray Radebaugh and Dr. Ron Ross, Superconducting Radio Frequency Systems, a half-day course by Dr. Rong-Li Geng; and Practical Thermometry and Instrumentation, a half-day course by Dr. Scott Courts. The courses were well attended and catered to both seasoned professionals and newcomers to cryogenics. The able leadership of Paula Pair with the hardworking staff from Centennial Conferences provided outstanding conference management and operations. Thank you Paula and staff for a truly outstanding and memorable conference experience! Finally, to the attendees, authors, editors, and reviewers whose combined efforts have contributed to these proceedings, thanks very much to you all. We look forward to the next CEC/ICMC in Madison, Wisconsin, July 9 - 13, 2017.

  12. PREFACE: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering: Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference (CEC) 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter; Sumption, Michael

    2015-12-01

    , Jennifer Marquardt from Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. The Exhibit chair was Richard Dausman of Cryomech, Inc. who also served as Publicity Chair. Finally, Awards Chairs were Ray Radebaugh from the National Institute of Standards and Technology for CEC and David Cardwell from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, for ICMC. On June 28, the Cryogenic Society of America presented three short courses: Cryocooler Fundamentals and Space Applications, a full day course given by Dr. Ray Radebaugh and Dr. Ron Ross, Superconducting Radio Frequency Systems, a half-day course by Dr. Rong-Li Geng; and Practical Thermometry and Instrumentation, a half-day course by Dr. Scott Courts. The courses were well attended and catered to both seasoned professionals and newcomers to cryogenics. The able leadership of Paula Pair with the hardworking staff from Centennial Conferences provided outstanding conference management and operations. Thank you Paula and staff for a truly outstanding and memorable conference experience! Finally, to the attendees, authors, editors, and reviewers whose combined efforts have contributed to these proceedings, thanks very much to you all. We look forward to the next CEC/ICMC in Madison, Wisconsin, July 9 - 13, 2017.

  13. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  14. Characteristics of the magnetic field distribution on compact NMR magnets using cryocooled HTS bulks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@elec.okayama-u.ac.j [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Takano, R.; Nakano, T.; Imai, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Hahn, S.Y. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, MIT, NW14-3117, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Recently, the performance of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks such as critical current density, size, and mechanical strength has been improved rapidly. So, various applications using HTS bulks such as motors, bearings and flywheels have been investigated by many research groups. A compact nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet is one of the new applications after a technique to enhance maximum trapped field of the HTS bulk more than 11.7 T (500 MHz {sup 1}H NMR frequency) has been developed. This new compact NMR magnet out of HTS bulks is cost-effective compared with conventional NMR magnets and then expected to be widely used in food and drug industry. In design and manufacture of the compact NMR magnets, spatial field homogeneity of the large trapped magnetic field in HTS bulk annuli is a crucial issue because the behavior of a trapped field is highly non-linear and, as a result, a technique to improve the field homogeneity such as active/passive shimming now becomes more challenging compared with that of the conventional counterparts. This paper presents the magnetic field distributions in single and three assembled HTS bulk annuli measured by a 3-axis and multi-arrayed Hall sensor under two different cryogenic environments: (1) in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) and (2) dry cooling by a cryocooler. The spatial homogeneity changes with various operating temperatures were investigated and the effect of critical current density enhancement by lowering the operating temperature on the field homogeneity improvement was discussed in detail.

  15. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  16. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  17. Facilitating protein crystal cryoprotection in thick-walled plastic capillaries by high-pressure cryocooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Tate, Mark W; Gruner, Sol M

    2009-06-01

    Many steps in the X-ray crystallographic solution of protein structures have been automated. However, the harvesting and cryocooling of crystals still rely primarily on manual handling, frequently with consequent mechanical damage. An attractive alternative is to grow crystals directly inside robust plastic capillaries that may be cryocooled and mounted on the beamline goniometer. In this case, it is still desirable to devise a way to cryoprotect the crystals, which is difficult owing to the poor thermal conductivity of thick plastic capillary walls and the large thermal mass of the capillary and internal mother liquor. A method is described to circumvent these difficulties. It is shown that high-pressure cryocooling substantially reduced the minimal concentrations of cryoprotectants required to cryocool water inside capillaries without formation of ice crystals. The minimal concentrations of PEG 200, PEG 400 and glycerol necessary for complete vitrification under pressure cryocooling were determined.

  18. Active thermal feedback for massive cryogenic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, O. E-mail: meier@mppmu.mpg.de; Bravin, M.; Bruckmayer, M.; Di Stefano, P.; Frank, T.; Loidl, M.; Meunier, P.; Proebst, F.; Safran, G.; Seidel, W.; Sergeyev, I.; Sisti, M.; Stodolsky, L.; Uchaikin, S.; Zerle, L

    2000-04-07

    A method to stabilize cryogenic detectors with superconducting phase transition thermometers in their operating point is presented. Measurements of X-ray lines emitted by an {sup 55}Fe X-ray fluorescence source showed an improvement in energy resolution from 230 to 133 eV on the 1.5 keV aluminium line with this technique. Furthermore the required set-up allows to simulate real events by injecting heat pulses into the thermometer and in this way to calibrate the detector and to monitor its long-term stability.

  19. Influence of Thermal Cycling on Cryogenic Thermometers

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Suraci, A; Togny, F; Vauthier, N

    1999-01-01

    The stringent requirements on temperature control of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), impose that the cryogenic temperature sensors meet compelling demands such as long-term stability, radiation hardness, readout accuracy better than 5 mK at 1.8 K and compatibility with industrial control equipment. This paper presents the results concerning long-term stability of resistance temperature sensors submitted to cryogenic thermal cycles. For this task a simple test facility has been designed, constructed and put into operation for cycling simultaneously 115 cryogenic thermometers between 300 K and 4.2 K. A thermal cycle is set to last 71/4 hours: 3 hours for either cooling down or warming up the sensors and 1 respectively 1/4 hour at steady temperature conditions at each end of the temperature cycle. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) drives automatically this operation by reading 2 thermometers and actuating on 3 valves and 1 heater. The first thermal cycle was accomplished in a...

  20. Wide Variety of Experiments Using a Cryogen-Free 27.5 T Hybrid Magnet and a Cryogen-Free 18.1 T Superconducting Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Awaji, S.; Oguro, H.

    2013-03-01

    A cryogen-free hybrid magnet without liquid helium for operation, generating 27.5 T in a 32 mm room temperature bore of an 8 MW water-cooled resistive insert magnet in an 8.5 T background field of a cryogen-free superconducting outsert magnet, is being operated for basic research at low temperatures down to 17 mK in combination with a dilution refrigerator. In addition, we are developing functional materials using a differential thermal analysis DTA at high temperatures up to 1473 K in high fields up to 27 T. This cryogen-free hybrid magnet will be upgraded to generate 29 T by improving the outer superconducting magnet. A cryogen-free 18.1 T superconducting magnet with a 52 mm room temperature experimental bore, consisting of a Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 (Bi2223) insert coil, has been developed using a GM-JT cryocooler. Recently, bronze-tape-laminated Bi2223 has revealed excellent irreversible stress tolerance of 250 MPa at 77 K. In addition, the critical current properties for recent Bi2223 tapes are largely improved from 200 to 400 A/cm-width at 77 K in a self-field. Therefore, the stainless steel reinforcement tape incorporated for the previous Bi2223 insert coil is no longer needed for a new Bi2223 one. A new Bi2223 insert coil with almost the same size as the existing insert coil can generate two times higher fields at the elevated operation current from 162 to 191 A. An upgraded cryogen-free superconducting magnet can offer a long-term experiment at the constant magnetic field of 20 T for an in-field heat-treatment investigation.

  1. Design of a cryogenic system for a 20m direct current superconducting MgB2 and YBCO power cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Michael J.; Bromberg, Leslie; Jiang, Xiaohua; Glowacki, Bartek; Zeng, Rong; Minervini, Joseph; Brisson, John

    2014-01-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, are collaborating to design, construct, and test a 20 m, direct current, superconducting MgB2 and YBCO power cable. The cable will be installed in the State Key Laboratory of Power Systems at Tsinghua University in Beijing beginning in 2013. In a previous paper [1], the cryogenic system was briefly discussed, focusing on the cryogenic issues for the superconducting cable. The current paper provides a detailed discussion of the design, construction, and assembly of the cryogenic system and its components. The two-stage system operates at nominally 80 K and 20 K with the primary cryogen being helium gas. The secondary cryogen, liquid nitrogen, is used to cool the warm stage of binary current leads. The helium gas provides cooling to both warm and cold stages of the rigid cryostat housing the MgB2 and YBCO conductors, as well as the terminations of the superconductors at the end of the current leads. A single cryofan drives the helium gas in both stages, which are thermally isolated with a high effectiveness recuperator. Refrigeration for the helium circuit is provided by a Sumitomo RDK415 cryocooler. This paper focuses on the design, construction, and assembly of the cryostat, the recuperator, and the current leads with associated superconducting cable terminations.

  2. Modified Collins Cryocooler for Cryo-Propellant Thermal Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future lunar and planetary explorations will require the storage of cryogenic propellants, particularly liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2), in low earth...

  3. Modified Collins Cryocooler for Cryo-Propellant Thermal Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future lunar and planetary explorations will require the storage of cryogenic propellants, particularly liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2), in low earth...

  4. Design, development and testing twin pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gour, Abhay Singh; Sagar, Pankaj; Karunanithi, R.

    2017-09-01

    The design and development of Twin Pulse Tube Cryocooler (TPTC) is presented. Both the coolers are driven by a single Linear Moving Magnet Synchronous Motor (LMMSM) with piston heads at both ends of the mover shaft. Magnetostatic analysis for flux line distribution was carried-out during design and development of LMMSM based pressure wave generator. Based on the performance of PWG, design of TPTC was carried out using Sage and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. Detailed design, fabrication and testing of LMMSM, TPTC and their integration tests are presented in this paper.

  5. Erbium-based magnetic refrigerant (regenerator) for passive cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1996-07-23

    A two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler having a low temperature stage for reaching approximately 10K, wherein the low temperature stage includes a passive magnetic heat regenerator selected from the group consisting of Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Sn, Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Pb, Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 (Sn.sub.0.75 Ga.sub.0.25), and Er.sub.9 Ni.sub.3 Sn comprising a mixture of Er.sub.3 Ni and Er.sub.6 Ni.sub.2 Sn in the microstructure.

  6. Cool Down Analysis of a Cryocooler Based Quadrupole Magnet Cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, A.; Kar, S.; Chacko, J.; Kumar, M.; Babu, S.; Sahu, S.; Kumar, R.; Antony, J.; Datta, T. S.

    A superconducting quadrupole doublet magnet with cold superferric iron cover for the Hybrid Recoil Mass Analyzer (HYRA) beam line has been commissioned. The total cold mass of the helium vessel with iron yoke and pole is 2 ton. A set of two Sumitomo cryocoolers take care of various heat loads to the cryostat. The first successful cool down of the cryostat has been completed recently, magnets have been powered and magnetic field profiling has been done inside theroom temperature beam tube. This paper will highlight the cryostat details along with the cool down and operational test results obtained from the first cool down.

  7. Multi-axis analog adaptive feedforward cancellation of cryocooler vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Simon Andrew

    1994-01-01

    The vibration produced by Stirling cryocoolers is incompatible with spacecraft-borne precision-pointing imaging instruments. Thermal considerations prevent the addition of sufficient mechanical isolation to eliminate the effects of this vibration. The objective of this research is the design, analysis, and experimental verification of a multi-axis vibration cancellation system for the expander of a split Stirling cryocooler. Cancellation of the periodic cryocooler vibration is achieved with a set of load cells, a custom three-axis electrodynamic actuator, and a narrowband adaptive feedforward controller. In order to size the actuator, a simple model of the cryocooler's vibration is combined with a first-order analysis of a four-magnet two-return-plate forcing element. While the resulting actuator has sufficient force capability, it exhibits significant nonlinearity. A nonlinear actuator model is developed that accounts for in-plane flexure restraint due to both large-amplitude static deflections and large-amplitude vibrations. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear model accurately reflect jump phenomena and higher harmonics observed in the actuator's response. The adaptive feedforward controller employs the filtered-x least-mean-square (FXLMS) algorithm to update an adaptive filter. Rather than implementing this filter with a digital signal processor (DSP), for which there is little flight heritage, a continuous-time analog realization of the FXLMS filter is selected. Theoretically, the FXLMS filter may be represented by an equivalent linear transfer function. However a comprehensive treatment of factors associated with the actual implementation reveals the limitations of the transfer function representation. Factors such as harmonic distortion of the reference signal and imperfect quadrature are shown to result in frequency-shifted terms in the filter's output. The presence of these output components is confirmed experimentally, and their effect on performance is

  8. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  9. Cryogenic Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goloborod' ko, S.; /Fermilab

    1989-02-27

    The control system (CS) for the cryogenic arrangement of the DO Liquid Argon Calorimeter consists of a Texas instruments 560/565 Programmable Logical Controller (PLC), two remote bases with Remote Base Controllers and a corresponding set of input/output (I/O) modules, and a PC AST Premium 286 (IBM AT Compatible). The PLC scans a set of inputs and provides a set of outputs based on a ladder logic program and PID control loops. The inputs are logic or analog (current, voltage) signals from equipment status switches or transducers. The outputs are logic or analog (current or voltage) signals for switching solenoids and positioning pneumatic actuators. Programming of the PLC is preformed by using the TISOFT2/560/565 package, which is installed in the PC. The PC communicates to the PLC through a serial RS232 port and provides operator interface to the cryogenic process using Xpresslink software.

  10. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, Jose Luis [Houston, TX; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  11. Cryogenic Selective Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Nurge, Mark; Gibson, Tracy; Johnson, Wesley

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) program has been funding work at KSC on a novel coating that should allow cryogenic materials to be stored in deep space. The NIAC Symposium will be the last week of September and it is a requirement that the funded material be presented both orally and at a poster session. This DAA submission is requesting approval to go public with both the presentation and the poster.

  12. Cryogenic Test Technology 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    aircraft configuration Pathfinder II (Figure 16) made of Vascomax 200, a set of six bodies of revolution (Figure 17) made from 6061 aluminium alloy, a...iron and aluminium alloys appear to be viable candidates. AS loads increase the number of avail- able alloys is severely constrained by toughness...using A-286 screws in four steels and one aluminium alloy. In the absence of loads cryogenic cycling gene- rally produced decreases in breakaway

  13. Development of a cryogenic load frame for the neutron diffractometer at Takumi in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sugano, Michinaka [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Harjo, Stefanus; Aizawa, Kazuya; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hemmi, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Umeno, Takahiro [Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 306-2611 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    To prepare for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider upgrade, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Demonstration reactor, it is important to form a clear understanding of stress-strain properties of the materials that make up superconducting magnets. Thus, we have been studying the mechanical properties of superconducting wires using neutron diffraction measurements. To simulate operational conditions such as temperature, stress, and strain, we developed a cryogenic load frame for stress-strain measurements of materials using a neutron diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Takumi beam line. The maximum load that can be applied to a sample using an external driving machine is 50 kN. Using a Gifford-MacMahon cryocooler, samples can be measured down to temperatures below 10 K when loaded. In the present paper, we describe the details of the cryogenic load frame with its test results by using type-304 stainless steel wire.

  14. Development of a cryogenic load frame for the neutron diffractometer at Takumi in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Harjo, Stefanus; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Umeno, Takahiro; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sugano, Michinaka; Aizawa, Kazuya; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki

    2013-06-01

    To prepare for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider upgrade, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Demonstration reactor, it is important to form a clear understanding of stress-strain properties of the materials that make up superconducting magnets. Thus, we have been studying the mechanical properties of superconducting wires using neutron diffraction measurements. To simulate operational conditions such as temperature, stress, and strain, we developed a cryogenic load frame for stress-strain measurements of materials using a neutron diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Takumi beam line. The maximum load that can be applied to a sample using an external driving machine is 50 kN. Using a Gifford-MacMahon cryocooler, samples can be measured down to temperatures below 10 K when loaded. In the present paper, we describe the details of the cryogenic load frame with its test results by using type-304 stainless steel wire.

  15. Effects of cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performance of integral crank driven stirling cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Ko, Jun Seok; Kim, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    An integral crank driven Stirling cryocooler is solidly based on concepts of direct IR detector mounting on the cryocooler's cold finger, and the integral construction of the cryocooler and Dewar envelope. Performance factors of the cryocooler depend on operating conditions of the cryocooler such as a cyclic mean pressure of the working fluid, a rotational speed of driving mechanism, a thermal environment, a targeted operation temperature and etc.. At given charging condition of helium gas, the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas in the cryocooler changes with temperatures of the cold end and the environment. In this study, effects of the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performances of the Stirling cryocooler were investigated by numerical analyses using the Sage software. The simulation model takes into account thermodynamic losses due to an inefficiency of regenerator, a pressure drop, a shuttle heat transfer and solid conductions. Simulations are performed for the performance variation according to the cyclic mean pressure induced by the temperature of the cold end and the environment. This paper presents P-V works in the compression and expansion space, cooling capacity, contribution of losses in the expansion space.

  16. Air Force Research Laboratory Spacecraft Cryocooler Endurance Evaluation Facility Closing Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J.; Martin, K. W.; Fraser, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Spacecraft Component Thermal Research Group has been devoted to evaluating lifetime performance of space cryocooler technology for over twenty years. Long-life data is essential for confirming design lifetimes for space cryocoolers. Continuous operation in a simulated space environment is the only accepted method to test for degradation. AFRL has provided raw data and detailed evaluations to cryocooler developers for advancing the technology, correcting discovered deficiencies, and improving cryocooler designs. At AFRL, units of varying design and refrigeration cycles were instrumented in state-of-the-art experiment stands to provide spacelike conditions and were equipped with software data acquisition to track critical cryocooler operating parameters. This data allowed an assessment of the technology's ability to meet the desired lifetime and documented any long-term changes in performance. This paper will outline a final report of the various flight cryocoolers tested in our laboratory. The data summarized includes the seven cryocoolers tested during 2014-2015. These seven coolers have a combined total of 433,326 hours (49.5 years) of operation.

  17. Cryocooled Facilities for Superconducting Coils Testing in Gaseous Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, A. V.; Keilin, V. E.; Kovalev, I. A.; Surin, M. I.; Shcherbakov, V. I.; Shevchenko, S. A.; Ilin, A. A.

    Two superconducting coil test facilities equipped by Sumitomo SRDK-415D cryocoolers were developed, manufactured and tested. The motivation for their constructing was to make cheaper the testing (and especially training of LTS magnets) by liquid helium (LHe) saving. It is well known that the helium price increases rapidly and this tendency most probably will continue for a long time, as the demand of helium grows faster than its production. The utilization of heat-exchange gas considerably reduces many problems, that arise in the design of completely dry LTS magnets. The goal was to decrease or even completely avoid the consumption of rather expensive liquid helium for testing the laboratory size Nb-Ti and Nb3Sn coils including their training process. Several superconducting magnets were tested by using these facilities. For example, the first facility was successfully used for testing of 13 T, 60 kg coil cooled by cryocooler in helium gas (several torr pressure) heat exchange atmosphere. The precooling time was about 45 hours. The quench current (240 A at 4.2 K) was equal to that reached in the pool boiling LHe cryostat. The second facility with 420 mm wide access bore can be used for testing of corresponding size superconducting coils with very modest consumption of liquid helium with its level well below the lower flange of the coil. Each test facility is equipped by 2 pairs of HTS current leads. Design and operational experience of one of them is described.

  18. Cryocooler operation of SNIS Josephson arrays for AC Voltage standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosso, A.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Monticone, E.; Roncaglione, L.; Rocci, R.; Lacquaniti, V.

    2014-05-01

    Avoiding liquid helium is now a worldwide issue, thus cryocooler operation is becoming mandatory for a wider use of superconductive electronics. Josephson voltage standards hold a peculiar position among superconducting devices, as they are in use in high precision voltage metrology since decades. Higher temperature operation would reduce the refrigerator size and complexity, however, arrays of Josephson junctions made with high temperature superconductors for voltage standard applications are not to date available. The SNIS (Superconductor-Normal metal-Insulator-Superconductor) junction technology developed at INRIM, based on low temperature superconductors, but capable of operation well above liquid helium temperature, is interesting for application to a compact cryocooled standard, allowing to set a compromise between device and refrigerator requirements. In this work, the behavior of SNIS devices cooled with a closed-cycle refrigerator has been investigated, both in DC and under RF irradiation. Issues related to thermal design of the apparatus to solve specific problems not faced with liquid coolants, like reduced cooling power and minimization of thermal gradients for uniform operation of the chip are discussed in detail.

  19. Performance and reliability characteristic of Stirling cryocoolers in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. G.; Wu, Y. N.; He, L.

    2008-03-01

    With extensive application of infrared detective techniques, Stirling cryocoolers, used as an active cooling source, have been developed vigorously in China. An overview of the status and performance for some Stirling cryocoolers having been developed is presented. To analyze the cooler's reliability characteristic, failure analysis has been done, and the four crucial failure modes affecting cooler's long-life running are wear, gaseous contamination, Helium leakage and fatigue. According to each failure mechanism, the measures taken to control or minimize its damage were discussed, and some experiments were designed and carried to quantitatively analyze the relationship between failure and performance in detail. To the wear, an ageing test, which was thermal cycle and for about 500 h, was used to improve the internal frication status and eliminate the defective products. To the gaseous contamination, an accelerated experiment was carried by adding contaminants to the cooler by a 3-way valve to get the relationship between performance degradation and amount of contaminants. The chance of a fatigue related failure is very small now because of the FEM analysis and screening test. Based on charge pressure experiment results, the criteria to judge the sealing procedure was given by the ratio of leak rate to cooler volume.

  20. Study of Random Wire Type Regenerators for Stirling Cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sangkwon; Nam, Kwanwoo; Choi, Sungryel

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes the performance evaluation for the random wire type regenerator used in Stirling cryocoolers. Metallic and non-metallic regenerators are tested and analyzed. Non-metallic regenerator we test is made of high-temperature resistant polymer. First, the ineffectiveness is determined by measuring the instantaneous pressure, the flow rate and the gas temperature at both ends of the regenerator. The cold-end temperature is maintained around 100 K and the operating frequency is fixed at 60 Hz. It is found that the non-metallic regenerator with high heat transfer area has a low ineffectiveness even though its volumetric heat capacity is lower than the metallic regenerator. Second, dynamic analysis is performed for the displacer of Stirling cryocooler containing the above regenerators. Oscillating flow model is proposed to accurately predict the pressure drop through the regenerator. Amplitude and phase angle of the displacer are calculated both from the oscillating flow model and the steady flow model. Superiority of the proposed oscillating flow model is demonstrated by the comparison between the analysis result and the experimental measurements.

  1. Scaling STI's sapphire cryocooler for applications requiring higher heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandikar, Abhijit; Fiedler, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Superconductor Technologies Inc. (STI) developed the Sapphire cryocooler specifically for the SuperLink® product; a high performance superconducting Radio Frequency (RF) front-end receiver used by wireless carriers such as Verizon Wireless and AT&T to improve network cell coverage and data speeds. STI has built and deployed over 6,000 systems operating 24 hours a day (24/7), 7 days a week in the field since 1999. Sapphire is an integrated free piston Stirling cycle cryocooler with a cooling capacity of 5 Watts at 77 Kelvin (K) with less than 100 Watts (W) input power. It has a field-proven Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) of well over 1 million hours, requires zero maintenance and has logged over 250 million cumulative runtime hours. The Sapphire cooler is built on a scalable technology platform, enabling the design of machines with cooling capacities greater than 1 kilowatt (kW). This scalable platform also extends the same outstanding attributes as the Sapphire cooler, namely high reliability, zero maintenance, and compact size - all at a competitive cost. This paper will discuss emerging applications requiring higher heat loads and these attributes, describe Sapphire, and show a preliminary concept of a scaled machine with a 100 W cooling capacity.

  2. Design of an improved high cooling power 4 K GM cryocooler and helium compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, X. H.

    2015-12-01

    High cooling power 4 K cryocoolers are in high demand given their broad applications in such fields as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and low temperature superconductors. ARS has recently designed and developed a high cooling power 4 K pneumatic-drive GM cryocooler which achieves a typical cooling power of 1.75 W/4.2 K. Steady input power of our newly developed helium compressor supplied to the cold head is 11.8 kW at 60 Hz. The operational speed of the cold head is 30 RPM. The effects of geometries and operational conditions on the cooling performance of this 4 K GM cryocooler are also experimentally tested.

  3. Development of a linear compressor for two-stage pulse tube cryocoolers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-da YAN; Wei-li GAO; Guo-bang CHEN

    2009-01-01

    A valveless linear compressor was built up to drive a self-made two-stage pulse tube cryocooler. With a designed maximum swept volume of 60 cm~3, the compressor can provide the cryocooler with a pressure volume (PV) power of 400 W.Preliminary measurements of the compressor indicated that both an efficiency of 35%~55% and a pressure ratio of 1.3~1.4 could be obtained. The two-stage pulse tube cryocooler driven by this compressor achieved the lowest temperature of 14.2 K.

  4. A critical review of liquid helium temperature high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Gan, Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The importance of liquid helium temperature cooling technology in the aerospace field is discussed, and the results indicate that improving the efficiency of liquid helium cooling technologies, especially the liquid helium high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers, is the principal difficulty to be solved. The state of the art and recent developments of liquid helium high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers are summarized. The main scientific challenges for high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers to efficiently reach liquid helium temperatures are outlined, and the research progress addressing those challenges are reviewed. Additionally some possible solutions to the challenges are pointed out and discussed.

  5. Development of a Novel Brayton-Cycle Cryocooler and Key Component Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieczkoski, S. J.; Mohling, R. A.

    2004-06-01

    Brayton-cycle cryocoolers are being developed to provide efficient cooling in the 6 K to 70 K temperature range. The cryocoolers are being developed for use in space and in terrestrial applications where combinations of long lifetime, high efficiency, compactness, low mass, low vibration, flexible interfacing, load variability, and reliability are essential. The key enabling technologies for these systems are a mesoscale expander and an advanced oil-free scroll compressor. Both these components are nearing completion of their prototype development phase. The emphasis on the component and system development has been on invoking fabrication processes and techniques that can be evolved to further reduction in scale tending toward cryocooler miniaturization.

  6. Aerogel Insulation to Support Cryogenic Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking a high performance thermal insulation material for cryogenic applications in space launch development. Many of the components in cryogenic...

  7. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer project will demonstrate the capability to safely and efficiently store, transfer and measure cryogenic propellants,...

  8. Cryogenic Design of a Large Superconducting Magnet for Astro-particle Shielding on Deep Space Travel Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Romain; Baudouy, Bertrand

    The Space Radiation Superconducting Shield (SR2S) European project aims at studying a large superconducting toroid magnet to protect the human habitat from the ionizing radiations coming from Galactic Cosmic Ray during long term missions in deep space. Titanium clad MgB2 conductor is used to afford a bending power greater than 5 T.m at 10 K. A specific cryogenic design is needed to cool down this 10 m long and 12.8 m in diameter magnet. A passive cooling system, using a V-groove sunshield, is considered to reduce the heat flux coming from the Sun or Mars. An active configuration, using pulse tube cryocoolers, will be linked to the 80 K thermal screen intercepting most of the heat fluxes coming from the human habitat. The toroid magnet will be connected also to cryocoolers to absorb the few watts reaching its surface. Two kinds of thermal link are being considered to absorb the heat on the 80 K thermal screen. The first one is active, with a pump circulating helium gas in a network of exchange tubes. The second one is passive using long cryogenic pulse heat pipe (PHP) with the evaporator on the surface of the thermal screen and the condenser attached to the pulse tube.

  9. Novel design of an all-cryogenic RF pound circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basu, Ronni; Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the design, construction and test of a new all-cryogenic RF Pound circuit used to stabilize a 100 MHz VCXO. Here, all active and passive RF components used to accomplish the phase modulation and detect a PM to AM conversion have been installed into the cryogenic environment. In conju......We report on the design, construction and test of a new all-cryogenic RF Pound circuit used to stabilize a 100 MHz VCXO. Here, all active and passive RF components used to accomplish the phase modulation and detect a PM to AM conversion have been installed into the cryogenic environment....... In conjunction with a high-Q cryogenic sapphire resonator a Pound discriminator sensitivity of 0.1 mV/Hz was seen experimentally. Based on this sensitivity and the noise properties of the pre-amplifier of the Pound signal, we calculate a limit of the oscillator's Allan deviation as low as 4middot10-16/radictau...

  10. Liquid Cryogenic Target Development for Fast Ignition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, D. L.; Russell, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Schroen, D. G.; Taylor, J. L.; Back, C. A.; Steinman, D.; Nikroo, A.; Kaae, J. L.; Giraldez, E.; Johnston, R. R.; Youngman, K.

    2007-11-01

    As an alternative to foam-stabilized cryogenic solid D-T fuel layers for indirect-drive fast ignitor targets, which will tend to β-layer to a nonuniform distribution in a reentrant cone geometry [1], we are investigating hemispherical cryogenic fast ignition capsules with a liquid fuel layer confined between a thick outer ablator shell and a thin inner shell [2]. The shape and surface quality of the fuel layer is determined entirely by the characteristics of the bounding shells. In the present design, structural support for the thin (4.5 um) hemispherical GDP inner shell is provided by a mounting ring. Fabrication of stronger thin Be hemi-shells is also being investigated. Technology issues for liquid cryogenic fuel capsule development and progress toward demonstration of a working target will be presented. [1] J.K. Hoffer et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 50, 15 (2006). [2] D.L. Hanson et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 49, 500 (2006). *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. First performance test of a 25 T cryogen-free superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Oguro, Hidetoshi; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Hanai, Satoshi; Tosaka, Taizo; Ioka, Shigeru

    2017-06-01

    A 25 T cryogen-free superconducting magnet (25T-CSM) was developed and installed at the High Field Laboratory for Superconducting Materials (HFLSM), IMR, Tohoku University. The 25T-CSM consists of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil and a low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coil. A high-strength CuNb/Nb3Sn Rutherford cable with a reinforcing stabilizer CuNb composite is adopted for the middle LTS section coil. All the coils were impregnated using an epoxy resin for conduction cooling. Initially, a GdBa2Cu3O y (Gd123) coil was designed as the HTS insert coil, and then a Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O y (Bi2223) coil was also developed. The HTS insert and the LTS (CuNb/Nb3Sn and NbTi) outsert coils are cooled by two 4K GM and two GM/JT cryocoolers, respectively. The LTS coils successfully generated a central magnetic field of 14 T at an operating current of 854 A without any training quench. The Gd123 coil generated 10.15 T at an operating current of 132.6 A in the absence of a background field. Subsequently, the operating current of the Gd123 insert was increased in a step-by-step manner under a background field of 14 T. The Gd123 coil could be operated up to 124.0 A stably, which corresponds to 23.55 T, but quenched at around 124.6 A (23.61 T). The Bi2223 insert coil using a Ni-alloy reinforced Bi2223 tape successfully generated 11.48 T at an operation current of 204.7A in a stand-alone test and 24.57 T in a background field of 14 T. The differences between the calculated and the measured values of the central magnetic fields are about 0.4 T for the Gd123 insert and 0.1 T for the Bi2223 insert around 24 T.

  12. A Mueller bridge set for cryogenic temperature measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J.M.

    1966-01-01

    An a.c. Mueller bridge set for resistance thermometry at cryogenic temperature is described. A commercial tuned null detector is used at an operating frequency of 1025 c/s. The set includes a high stability oscillator, line reject filter, phase shifter, Q multiplier and selector box. The latter p...

  13. Split Stirling linear cryogenic cooler for a new generation of high temperature infrared imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, A.; Zechtzer, S.; Pundak, N.

    2010-04-01

    Split linear cryocoolers find use in a variety of infrared equipment installed in airborne, heliborne, marine and vehicular platforms along with hand held and ground fixed applications. An upcoming generation of portable, high-definition night vision imagers will rely on the high-temperature infrared detectors, operating at elevated temperatures, ranging from 95K to 200K, while being able to show the performance indices comparable with these of their traditional 77K competitors. Recent technological advances in industrial development of such high-temperature detectors initialized attempts for developing compact split Stirling linear cryogenic coolers. Their known advantages, as compared to the rotary integral coolers, are superior flexibility in the system packaging, constant and relatively high driving frequency, lower wideband vibration export, unsurpassed reliability and aural stealth. Unfortunately, such off-the-shelf available linear cryogenic coolers still cannot compete with rotary integral rivals in terms of size, weight and power consumption. Ricor developed the smallest in the range, 1W@95K, linear split Stirling cryogenic cooler for demanding infrared applications, where power consumption, compactness, vibration, aural noise and ownership costs are of concern.

  14. Superconducting Current Leads for Cryogenic Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space flight cryocoolers will be able to handle limited heat loads at their expected operating temperatures and the current leads may be the dominant contributor to...

  15. Development of Thermoelectric Power Generation and Peltier Cooling Properties of Materials for Thermoelectric Cryocooling Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Development of Thermoelectric Power Generation and Peltier Cooling Properties of Materials for Thermoelectric...Thermoelectric Power Generation and Peltier Cooling Properties of Materials for Thermoelectric Cryocooling Devices Report Title The research

  16. Development of a 77K Reverse-Brayton Cryocooler with Multiple Coldheads Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RTI will design and optimize an 80 W, 77K cryocooler based on the reverse turbo Brayton cycle (RTBC) with four identical coldheads for distributed cooling. Based on...

  17. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF A MINIATURE STIRLING CRYOCOOLER WITH A MULTI MESH REGENERATOR DESIGN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KISHOR KUMAR V. V; BIJU T. KUZHIVELI

    2017-01-01

    A parametric study has been carried out using the software REGEN 3.3 to optimize the regenerator of a miniature Stirling cryocooler operating with a warm end temperature of 300 K and cold end temperature of 80 K...

  18. High efficiency linear compressor driven pulse tube cryocooler operating in liquid nitrogen temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU JianYing; WANG XiaoTao; DAI Wei; LUO ErCang; HUANG Yu

    2009-01-01

    The inertance tube is one of the key components of a pulse tube cryocooler. It has great influence not only on the efficiency of the pulse tube cryocooler, but also on the efficiency of the linear compressor. Meanwhile, it is very difficult to predict the impedance of an inertance tube because of the turbulent flow. In this paper, using a quasi-turbulent model, the inertance tube is optimized to match a linear compressor driven pulse tube cryocooler. Experimental results show that this model can predict the impedance quite well. With 127 W input electric power, the pulse tube cryocooler obtains 9.4 W cooling power at a temperature of 77 K. The relative Carnot efficiency of the whole system reaches 19.8%.

  19. A three-stage Stirling pulse tube cryocooler operating below the critical point of helium-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L. M.; Cao, Q.; Zhi, X. Q.; Gan, Z. H.; Yu, Y. B.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Precooled phase shifters can significantly enhance the phase shift effect and further improve the performance of pulse tube cryocoolers. A separate three-stage Stirling pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) with a cold inertance tube was designed and fabricated. Helium-4 instead of the rare helium-3 was used as the working fluid. The cryocooler reached a bottom temperature of 4.97 K with a net cooling power of 25 mW at 6.0 K. The operating frequency was 29.9 Hz and the charging pressure was 0.91 MPa. It is the first time a refrigeration temperature below the critical point of helium-4 was obtained in a three-stage Stirling pulse tube cryocooler.

  20. Transient analysis of single stage GM type double inlet pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujarati, P. B.; Desai, K. P.; Naik, H. B.; Atrey, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Transient analysis of single stage GM type double inlet pulse tube cryocooler is carried out using a one dimensional numerical model based on real gas properties of helium. The model solves continuity, momentum and energy equation for gas and solid to analyse the physical process occurring inside of the pulse tube cryocooler. Finite volume method is applied to discretize the governing equations with realistic initial and boundary conditions. Input data required for solving the model are the design data and operating parameters viz. pressure waveform from the compressor, regenerator matrix data, and system geometry including pulse tube, regenerator size and operating frequency for pulse tube cryocooler. The model investigates the effect of orifice opening, double inlet opening, pressure ratio, system geometry on no load temperature and refrigeration power at various temperatures for different charging pressure. The results are compared with experimental data and reasonable agreement is observed. The model can further be extended for designing two stage pulse tube cryocooler.

  1. Loss Analysis of High Power Stirling-Type Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Hiratsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For the purpose of cooling high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, such as superconductor motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and current fault limiters, cryocoolers should be compact in size, light-weight, and have high efficiency and reliability. In order to meet the demand of HTS devices world-wide, the cryocooler needs to have COP efficiency >0.1. We have developed a high power Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) with an in-line expander. The experimental results were reported in June 2012[1]. The cooling capacity was 210 W at 77 K and the minimum temperature was 37 K when the compressor input power was 3.8 kW. Accordingly, the COP was about 0.055. To further improve the efficiency, the energy losses in the cryocooler were analyzed. The experimental results and the numerical calculation results are reported in this paper.

  2. 4 Kelvin Cooling with Innovative Final Stage of Multistage Cryocooler Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed for development is a proof-of-concept prototype for the final stage of a multistage cryocooler. This final stage comprises a high frequency pulse tube cold...

  3. Thermal analysis of Josephson junctions array in cryocooler

    CERN Document Server

    Durandetto, P; Trinchera, B; Lolli, L; Serazio, D; Fretto, M; Sosso, A

    2016-01-01

    Complex cryogenics is still a strong limitation to the spread of quantum voltage standards and cryogen-free operation is then particularly interesting for Josephson standards. The main difficulties in He-free refrigeration are related to chip thermalization. We tested different solutions and interface materials between the chip and the cooling surface, to improve thermal conduction. Some junctions were chosen as elements to dissipate electrical power, while some others were operated as on-chip temperature sensors. Indium foil between chip and Cu support was demonstrated to provide a good thermal interface suitable for programmable voltage standard operation. However, thermal conduction can be further increased by thermal contacting the chip at the top. Finally, general physical constraints in vacuum thermal contacts are analyzed in terms of known properties of thermal interfaces at cryogenics temperatures.

  4. Development of miniature moving magnet cryocooler SX040

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühlich, I.; Mai, M.; Rosenhagen, C.; Schreiter, A.; Möhl, C.

    2011-06-01

    State of the art high performance cooled IR systems need to have more than just excellent E/O performance. Minimum size weight and power (SWaP) are the design goals to meet our forces' mission requirements. Key enabler for minimum SWaP of IR imagers is the operation temperature of the focal plane array (FPA) employed. State of the art MCT or InAsSb nBn technology has the potential to rise the FPA temperature from 77 K to 130-150 K (high operation temperature HOT) depending on the specific cut-off wavelength. Using a HOT FPA will significantly lower SWaP and keep those parameters finally dominated by the employed cryocooler. Therefore compact high performance cryocoolers are mandatory. For highest MTTF life AIM developed its Flexure Bearing Moving Magnet product family "SF". Such coolers achieve more than 20000 h MTTF with Stirling type expander and more than 5 years MTTF life with Pulse Tube coldfinger (like for Space applications). To keep the high lifetime potential but to significantly improve SWaP AIM is developing its "SX" type cooler family. The new SX040 cooler incorporates a highly efficient dual piston Moving Magnet driving mechanism resulting in very compact compressor of less than 100mm length. The cooler's high lifetime is also achieved by placing the coils outside the helium vessel as usual for moving magnet motors. The mating ¼" expander is extremely compact with less than 63 mm length. This allows a total dewar length from optical window to expander warm end of less than 100 mm even for large cold shields. The cooler is optimized for HOT detectors with operating temperatures exceeding 95 K. While this kind of cooler is the perfect match for many applications, handheld sights or targeting devices for the dismounted soldier are even more challenging with respect to SWaP. AIM therefore started to develop an even smaller cooler type with single piston and balancer. This paper gives an overview on the development of this new compact cryocooler. Technical

  5. Development of a dry linear compressor for GM and pulse tube cryocoolers

    CERN Document Server

    Höhne, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Pressure Wave Systems GmbH has developed a dry compressor for GM and pulse tube cryocoolers. The concept is based on hydraulically driven metal bellows in which the Helium working gas is compressed. The system is operated in the region of 1 kW of electrical input power and has been successfully tested with a SHI RDK-101D GM cryocooler cold head. Set-up, performance and reliability of the compressor system will be discussed.

  6. Development of a dry linear compressor for GM and pulse tube cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure Wave Systems GmbH has developed a dry compressor for GM and pulse tube cryocoolers. The concept is based on hydraulically driven metal bellows in which the Helium working gas is compressed. The system is operated in the region of 1 kW of electrical input power and has been successfully tested with a SHI RDK-101D GM cryocooler cold head. Set-up, performance and reliability of the compressor system will be discussed.

  7. Physical and Structural Studies on the Cryo-cooling of Insulin Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, J.; Bellamy, H.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2003-01-01

    Reflection profiles were analyzed from microgravity-(mg) and earth-grown insulin crystals to measure mosaicity (h) and to reveal mosaic domain structure and composition. The effects of cryocooling on single and multi-domain crystals were compared. The effects of cryocooling on insulin structure were also re-examined. Microgravity crystals were larger, more homogeneous, and more perfect than earth crystals. Several mg crystals contained primarily a single mosaic domain with havg of 0.005deg. The earth crystals varied in quality and all contained multiple domains with havg of 0.031deg. Cryocooling caused a 43-fold increase in h for mg crystals (havg=0.217deg) and an %fold increase for earth crystals (havg=0.246deg). These results indicate that very well-ordered crystals are not completely protected from the stresses associated with cryocooling, especially when structural perturbations occur. However, there were differences in the reflection profiles. For multi-mosaic domain crystals, each domain individually broadened and separated from the other domains upon cryo-cooling. Cryo-cooling did not cause an increase in the number of domains. A crystal composed of a single domain retained this domain structure and the reflection profiles simply broadened. Therefore, an improved signal-to-noise ratio for each reflection was measured from cryo-cooled single domain crystals relative to cryo-cooled multi-domain crystals. This improved signal, along with the increase in crystal size, facilitated the measurement of the weaker high- resolution reflections. The observed broadening of reflection profiles indicates increased variation in unit cell dimensions which may be linked to cryo-cooling-associated structural changes and disorder.

  8. Helium liquefaction with a commercial 4 K Gifford-McMahon cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zimmer, O.

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes helium liquefaction using a commercial cryocooler with 1.5 W cooling power at 4.2 K (Sumitomo model RDK415D with compressor CSW-71D, consuming 6.5 kW electrical power), equipped with heat exchangers for precooling the incoming gas. No additional cooling power of cryoliquids or additional Joule-Thomson stages were utilized. Measurements of the pressure dependence of the liquefaction rate were performed. A maximum value of 83.9 g/h was obtained for 2.25 bar stabilized input pressure. Including the time needed to cool the liquefied helium to 4.2 K at 1 bar after filling the bottle connected to the cold head, and correcting for heat screen influences, this results in a net liquefaction rate of 67.7 g/h. Maintaining a pressure close to 1 bar above the bath during liquefaction, a rate of 55.7 g/h was obtained. The simple design enables many applications of the apparatus.

  9. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  10. Cryogenic environment and performance for testing the Planck radiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Terenzi, L; Laaninen, M; Battaglia, P; Cavaliere, F; De Rosa, A; Hughes, N; Jukkala, P; Kilpiä, V -H; Morgante, G; Tomasi, M; Varis, J; Bersanelli, M; Butler, R C; Ferrari, F; Franceschet, C; Leutenegger, P; Mandolesi, N; Mennella, A; Silvestri, R; Stringhetti, L; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Villa, F; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12015

    2010-01-01

    This paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/jinst The Planck LFI Radiometer Chain Assemblies (RCAs) have been calibrated in two dedicated cryogenic facilities. In this paper the facilities and the related instrumentation are described. The main satellite thermal interfaces for the single chains have to be reproduced and stability requirements have to be satisfied. Setup design, problems occurred and improving solutions implemented are discussed. Performance of the cryogenic setup are reported.

  11. Cryogen-Free Ultra-Low Temperature Cooling using a Continuous ADR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter; DiPirro, Michael; Jirmanus, Munir; Zhao, Zu-Yu; Shields, Bill

    2003-01-01

    The development of a continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (CADR) has progressed to the point where we have demonstrated a 4-stage system that provides continuous cooling at 50 mK and below, while rejecting heat to a 4.2 K helium bath. Since temperature control and cycling of the ADR is fully automated, the system is simple to operate and stable. Temperature fluctuations of the cold tip are typically less than 10 microKelvin rms (at 100 mK). The ADR s cooling power of 2 1 microwatts at 100 mK is comparable to that of small dilution refrigerators, but because its efficiency is so much higher (50% of Carnot), the peak heat rejection rate is less than 10 mW. This is significant in allowing the ADR to be cooled by relatively low-power cryocoolers. In addition to commercial pulse-tube and Gifford McMahon (GM) coolers, this potentially includes small GM systems that run on 120 V power and do not need water cooling. The present focus is to design and fabricate a small dewar to house the CADR and a cryocooler, in anticipation of making a cryogen-free, low cost CADR commercially available. Performance of the prototype CADR and the complete system will be discussed.

  12. Characteristics of a liquid-helium-free calibration apparatus for cryogenic thermometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazaki, T. [National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan)

    2013-09-11

    Closed-cycle Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers have been developed at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ)/National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) with the aim of realizing a liquid-helium-free calibration apparatus for cryogenic thermometers between 0.65 K and 25 K. The latest JT cryocooler at NMIJ/AIST consists of a {sup 3}He JT cooling circuit and a pulse tube mechanical refrigerator. The characteristics of the apparatus including a residual gas analysis of the JT cooling circuit are presented in this paper. Currently the initial cool-down is performed using a heat-exchange gas. It normally takes about 30 h to reduce the temperature from room temperature to 5 K at the thermometer comparison block of the apparatus. The correct timing of the removal of the heatexchange gas is important for the efficient operation of the apparatus. Incomplete removal of the heat-exchange gas induces excess heat load on the apparatus and thermal disturbances. Some examples of abrupt temperature bursts are discussed in this paper. Mechanical refrigerators generate cyclic mechanical vibrations, and precision resistance thermometers are usually very sensitive to a mechanical vibration. The measured vibration level of the developed apparatus is reported. The damage to the apparatus due to the magnitude 9.0 earthquake on March 11, 2011, and possible countermeasures in the case of future earthquakes are also discussed.

  13. Performance test of the cryogenic cooling system for the superconducting fault current limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong-Ju; In, Sehwan; Yeom, Han-Kil; Kim, Heesun; Kim, Hye-Rim

    2015-12-01

    A Superconducting Fault Current Limiter is an electric power device which limits the fault current immediately in a power grid. The SFCL must be cooled to below the critical temperature of high temperature superconductor modules. In general, they are submerged in sub-cooled liquid nitrogen for their stable thermal characteristics. To cool and maintain the target temperature and pressure of the sub-cooled liquid nitrogen, the cryogenic cooling system should be designed well with a cryocooler and coolant circulation devices. The pressure of the cryostat for the SFCL should be pressurized to suppress the generation of nitrogen bubbles in quench mode of the SFCL. In this study, we tested the performance of the cooling system for the prototype 154 kV SFCL, which consist of a Stirling cryocooler, a subcooling cryostat, a pressure builder and a main cryostat for the SFCL module, to verify the design of the cooling system and the electric performance of the SFCL. The normal operation condition of the main cryostat is 71 K and 500 kPa. This paper presents tests results of the overall cooling system.

  14. Characteristics of a liquid-helium-free calibration apparatus for cryogenic thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, T.

    2013-09-01

    Closed-cycle Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers have been developed at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ)/National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) with the aim of realizing a liquid-helium-free calibration apparatus for cryogenic thermometers between 0.65 K and 25 K. The latest JT cryocooler at NMIJ/AIST consists of a 3He JT cooling circuit and a pulse tube mechanical refrigerator. The characteristics of the apparatus including a residual gas analysis of the JT cooling circuit are presented in this paper. Currently the initial cool-down is performed using a heat-exchange gas. It normally takes about 30 h to reduce the temperature from room temperature to 5 K at the thermometer comparison block of the apparatus. The correct timing of the removal of the heatexchange gas is important for the efficient operation of the apparatus. Incomplete removal of the heat-exchange gas induces excess heat load on the apparatus and thermal disturbances. Some examples of abrupt temperature bursts are discussed in this paper. Mechanical refrigerators generate cyclic mechanical vibrations, and precision resistance thermometers are usually very sensitive to a mechanical vibration. The measured vibration level of the developed apparatus is reported. The damage to the apparatus due to the magnitude 9.0 earthquake on March 11, 2011, and possible countermeasures in the case of future earthquakes are also discussed.

  15. Development of a Space-Type 4-Stage Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Very Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, J. R.; Moore, M.; Champagne, P.; Roth, E.; Evtimov, B.; Jensen, J.; Collaço, A.; Nast, T.

    2006-04-01

    The Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center (LMATC) has built and tested a 4-stage pulse tube cryocooler, which provides simultaneous cooling at 6 K and 18 K. The cryocooler is designed to meet NASA's cryocooler needs for low temperature, with immediate application to the Terrestrial Planet Finder, Constellation-X, and other future space-science missions. The simplicity with LMATC's approach of the single compressor, coldhead, and electronic controller makes it very appealing for applications requiring high reliability. It further allows the system to be readily modified for different program requirements. The LM pulse tube is a simple 4-stage coldhead with no moving parts, driven by a long-life linear flexure-bearing clearance-seal compressor. The cryocooler is designed to provide 20 mW of cooling at 6 K and 150 mW cooling at 18 K while rejecting heat at 290 K. Performance data is presented, showing excellent cryocooler performance, meeting JPL's cooling requirements, and achieving a no-load temperature below 4 K. This work was funded by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Advanced Cryocooler Technology Development Program (ACTDP), Ron G. Ross, Contract Manager.

  16. Spinal cord evoked magnetic field measurement using a magnetospinography system equipped with a cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Jun; Kawabata, Shigenori; Uehara, Gen

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a magnetospinography (MSG) system that detects weak magnetic fields associated with spinal cord neural activity using an array of low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based magnetic flux sensors. A functional image of the spinal cord can be obtained noninvasively by using this system, and it is effective for precise lesion localization in the diagnosis of spinal cord diseases. The running cost of the developed MSG system mainly depends on liquid helium (LHe) consumption, which is required to maintain the superconducting state of the SQUID sensors. To reduce the LHe consumption, we incorporate a pulse-tube-refrigerator-based cryocooler into the MSG system. Cold gaseous helium is circulated between the cryocooler and the MSG system for cooling the thermal radiation shield of the dewar vessel. Consequently, we achieved a 46% decrease in the LHe consumption rate. Conventional biomagnetic field detection such as magnetoencephalography is often hindered by severe low-frequency band noise from the cryocooler. However, in the case of MSG measurements, such noise can be filtered out because the band of the signal is much higher than that of the cryocooler noise. We demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio of the cervical spinal cord evoked magnetic field measurement performed with a working cryocooler is comparable to that of the measurement without a cryocooler.

  17. Extended range of the Lockheed Martin coax Micro cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, D.; Champagne, P.; Will, E.; Kaldas, G.; Sanders, L.; Roth, E.; Olson, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the higher cooling capability of the Lockheed Martin coax Micro cryocooler thermal mechanical unit. The design of the previously qualified TRL6 Micro (Nast et al., 2014) [1] was modified to accommodate over twice the input power, greatly increasing the cooling capability. These Micro units are in a split configuration with the cold head separated from the compressor. This unit was optimized for cooling at 105 K and provides cooling over a wide range of temperatures. With a weight below 450 g, this small unit is ideal for compact instruments. Load lines were obtained over a range of powers, cold tip temperatures and rejection temperatures. This testing raised the Technology Readiness Level to six.

  18. A helium liquefier using three 4 k pulse tube cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Oviedo, Abner

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a helium liquefier which can be used for recondensing/reliquefying helium vapor in a helium cryostat or liquefying helium gas in a storage dewar. The helium liquefier employs three 4 K pulse tube cryocoolers, Cryomech model PT415. Each PT415 has remote motor/rotary valve assembly to minimize vibration, providing ≥ 1.5W at 4.2K. The liquefier can liquefy room temperature helium gas with a liquefaction rate of 62 Liter/day. When installing it in the cryostat, it can recondense and reliquefy helium vapor with a rate of 78 L/day. The liquefier will be installed in a gravitational wave detector in Brazil to recondense/reliquefy the helium boil off from the cryostat.

  19. Adaptation of the low-cost and low-power tactical split Stirling cryogenic cooler for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, A.; Zechtzer, S.; Pundak, N.; Kirkconnell, C.; Freeman, J.; Riabzev, S.

    2011-06-01

    Cryogenic coolers are often used in modern spacecraft in conjunction with sensitive electronics and sensors of military, commercial and scientific instrumentation. The typical space requirements are: power efficiency, low vibration export, proven reliability, ability to survive launch vibration/shock and long-term exposure to space radiation. A long-standing paradigm of exclusively using "space heritage" equipment has become the standard practice for delivering high reliability components. Unfortunately, this conservative "space heritage" practice can result in using outdated, oversized, overweight and overpriced cryogenic coolers and is becoming increasingly unacceptable for space agencies now operating within tough monetary and time constraints. The recent trend in developing mini and micro satellites for relatively inexpensive missions has prompted attempts to adapt leading-edge tactical cryogenic coolers for suitability in the space environment. The primary emphasis has been on reducing cost, weight and size. The authors are disclosing theoretical and practical aspects of a collaborative effort to develop a space qualified cryogenic refrigerator system based on the tactical cooler model Ricor K527 and the Iris Technology radiation hardened Low Cost Cryocooler Electronics (LCCE). The K27/LCCE solution is ideal for applications where cost, size, weight, power consumption, vibration export, reliability and time to spacecraft integration are of concern.

  20. The Ricor K508 cryocooler operational experience on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Dean L.; Lysek, Mark J.; Morookian, John Michael [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity) landed successfully on Mars on August 5, 2012, eight months after launch. The chosen landing site of Gale Crater, located at 4.5 degrees south latitude, 137.4 degrees east longitude, has provided a much more benign environment than was originally planned for during the critical design and integration phases of the MSL Project when all possible landing sites were still being considered. The expected near-surface atmospheric temperatures at the Gale Crater landing site during Curiosity's primary mission (1 Martian year or 687 Earth days) are from −90°C to 0°C. However, enclosed within Curiosity's thermal control fluid loops the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument is maintained at approximately +20°C. The CheMin instrument uses X-ray diffraction spectroscopy to make precise measurements of mineral constituents of Mars rocks and soil. The instrument incorporated the commercially available Ricor K508 Stirling cycle cryocooler to cool the CCD detector. After several months of brushing itself off, stretching and testing out its subsystems, Curiosity began the exploration of the Mars surface in October 2012. The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) received its first soil sample from Curiosity on October 24, and successfully analyzed its first soil sample. After a brief review of the rigorous Ricor K508 cooler qualification tests and life tests based on the original MSL environmental requirements this paper presents final pre-launch instrument integration and testing results, and details the operational data of the CheMin cryocooler, providing a snapshot of the resulting CheMin instrument analytical data.

  1. Alumina shunt for precooling a cryogen-free 4He or 3He refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Kurt

    2016-10-01

    In this technical report a cryogen-free 1 K cryostat is described where the pot of the 4He refrigeration unit is precooled by the 2nd stage of a pulse tube cryocooler (PTC) from room temperature to T ∼ 3 K via a shunt made from sintered alumina (SA); the total mass of the 1 K stage is 3.5 kg. SA has high thermal conductivity at high temperatures; but below ∼50 K the thermal conductivity drops rapidly, almost following a T3-law. This makes SA an interesting candidate for the construction of a thermal shunt, especially as the heat capacity of metals drops by several orders of magnitude in the temperature range from 300 K to 3 K. At the base temperature of the PTC, the heat conduction of the shunt is so small that the heat leak into the 1 K stage is negligible.

  2. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob, E-mail: ihahn@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  3. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  4. Low noise, 0.4-3 GHz cryogenic receiver for radio astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawande, R; Bradley, R; Langston, G

    2014-10-01

    We present the design and measurement of a radio telescope receiver front end cooled to 100 K physical temperature, and working over 400 MHz to 3 GHz frequency band. The system uses a frequency independent feed developed for operation as a feed for parabola using sinuous elements and integrated with an ultra-wideband low noise amplifier. The ambient temperature system is tested on the 43 m radio telescope in Green Bank, WV and the system verification results on the sky are presented. The cryogenic receiver is developed using a Stirling cycle, one stage cryocooler. The measured far field patterns and the system noise less than 80 K over a 5:1 bandwidth are presented.

  5. Cryogen-free lkA-class Ic measurement system featuring an 8 T HTS magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, N. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Wimbush, S. C.; Pooke, D. M.; Huang, T.; Lazic, Z.; Chamritski, V.; Talantsev, E. F.; Long, N. J.; Tallon, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a cryogen-free critical-current (Ic) measuring system comprising a conduction-cooled 8 T HTS magnet and convection-cooled sample, both cooled by commercial cryocoolers. The sample can be rotated and transport currents of up to 800 A delivered with less than 0.5 K temperature rise during the Ic measurement. The system is automated with respect to variations in temperature (30-90 K), field (0-8 T), and field angle (0-360°). We have used this system to measure HTS wire samples, concentrating on metal-organic deposited YBCO on RABiTS substrates. Particular emphasis is given to the evolution of Ic anisotropy with temperature, and the dangers of extrapolating from 77 K to 30 K.

  6. Low noise, 0.4-3 GHz cryogenic receiver for radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawande, R.; Bradley, R.; Langston, G.

    2014-10-01

    We present the design and measurement of a radio telescope receiver front end cooled to 100 K physical temperature, and working over 400 MHz to 3 GHz frequency band. The system uses a frequency independent feed developed for operation as a feed for parabola using sinuous elements and integrated with an ultra-wideband low noise amplifier. The ambient temperature system is tested on the 43 m radio telescope in Green Bank, WV and the system verification results on the sky are presented. The cryogenic receiver is developed using a Stirling cycle, one stage cryocooler. The measured far field patterns and the system noise less than 80 K over a 5:1 bandwidth are presented.

  7. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  8. Cryogenic characterization of the Planck sorption cooler system flight model

    CERN Document Server

    Morgante, G; Melot, F; Stassi, P; Terenzi, L; Wilson, P; Hernandez, B; Wade, L; Gregorio, A; Bersanelli, M; Butler, C; Mandolesi, N; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12016

    2009-01-01

    This paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/1748-0221 Two continuous closed-cycle hydrogen Joule-Thomson (J-T) sorption coolers have been fabricated and assembled by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the European Space Agency (ESA) Planck mission. Each refrigerator has been designed to provide a total of ~ 1W of cooling power at two instrument interfaces: they directly cool the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) around 20K while providing a pre-cooling stage for a 4 K J-T mechanical refrigerator for the High Frequency Instrument (HFI). After sub-system level validation at JPL, the cryocoolers have been delivered to ESA in 2005. In this paper we present the results of the cryogenic qualification and test campaigns of the Nominal Unit on the flight model spacecraft performed at the CSL (Centre Spatial de Liege) facilities in 2008. Test results in terms of input power, cooling power, temperature, and temperature fluctuations o...

  9. Cryogenic characterization of the Planck sorption cooler system flight model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgante, G; Terenzi, L; Butler, C; Mandolesi, N [INAF - IASF Bologna, via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Pearson, D; Wilson, P; Hernandez, B; Wade, L [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena California 91109 (United States); Melot, F; Stassi, P [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie 53 Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Gregorio, A [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, via Valerio 2 - I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bersanelli, M, E-mail: morgante@iasfbo.inaf.i [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, - I20133 Milano (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Two continuous closed-cycle hydrogen Joule-Thomson (J-T) sorption coolers have been fabricated and assembled by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the European Space Agency (ESA) Planck mission. Each refrigerator has been designed to provide a total of {approx} 1W of cooling power at two instrument interfaces: they directly cool the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) around 20K while providing a pre-cooling stage for a 4 K J-T mechanical refrigerator for the High Frequency Instrument (HFI). After sub-system level validation at JPL, the cryocoolers have been delivered to ESA in 2005. In this paper we present the results of the cryogenic qualification and test campaigns of the Nominal Unit on the flight model spacecraft performed at the CSL (Centre Spatial de Liege) facilities in 2008. Test results in terms of input power, cooling power, temperature, and temperature fluctuations over the flight allowable ranges for these interfaces are reported and analyzed with respect to mission requirements.

  10. Optimized autonomous operations of a 20 K space hydrogen sorption cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borders, J.; Prina, M.; Pearson, D.; Bhandari, P. [California Inst. of Technology, Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); Morgante, G. [California Inst. of Technology, Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); IASF/CNR-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2004-08-01

    A fully redundant hydrogen sorption cryocooler is being developed for the European Space Agency Planck mission, dedicated to the measurement of the temperature anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution [Advances in Cryogenic Engineering 45A (2000) 499]. In order to achieve this ambitious scientific task, this cooler is required to provide a stable temperature reference ({approx}20 K) and appropriate cooling ({approx}1 W) to the two instruments on-board, with a flight operational lifetime of 18 months. During mission operations, communication with the spacecraft will be possible in a restricted time-window, not longer than 2 h/day. This implies the need for an operations control structure with the required robustness to safely perform autonomous procedures. The cooler performance depends on many operating parameters (such as the temperatures of the pre-cooling stages and the warm radiator), therefore the operation control system needs the capability to adapt to variations of these boundary conditions, while maintaining safe operating procedures. An engineering bread board (EBB) cooler was assembled and tested to evaluate the behavior of the system under conditions simulating flight operations and the test data were used to refine and improve the operation control software. In order to minimize scientific data loss, the cooler is required to detect all possible failure modes and to autonomously react to them by taking the appropriate action in a rapid fashion. Various procedures and schemes both general and specific in nature were developed, tested and implemented to achieve these goals. In general, the robustness to malfunctions was increased by implementing an automatic classification of anomalies in different levels relative to the seriousness of the error. The response is therefore proportional to the failure level. Specifically, the start-up sequence duration was significantly reduced, allowing a much

  11. Cryogenic ion chemistry and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Arron B; Leavitt, Christopher M; Garand, Etienne; Johnson, Mark A

    2014-01-21

    The use of mass spectrometry in macromolecular analysis is an incredibly important technique and has allowed efficient identification of secondary and tertiary protein structures. Over 20 years ago, Chemistry Nobelist John Fenn and co-workers revolutionized mass spectrometry by developing ways to non-destructively extract large molecules directly from solution into the gas phase. This advance, in turn, enabled rapid sequencing of biopolymers through tandem mass spectrometry at the heart of the burgeoning field of proteomics. In this Account, we discuss how cryogenic cooling, mass selection, and reactive processing together provide a powerful way to characterize ion structures as well as rationally synthesize labile reaction intermediates. This is accomplished by first cooling the ions close to 10 K and condensing onto them weakly bound, chemically inert small molecules or rare gas atoms. This assembly can then be used as a medium in which to quench reactive encounters by rapid evaporation of the adducts, as well as provide a universal means for acquiring highly resolved vibrational action spectra of the embedded species by photoinduced mass loss. Moreover, the spectroscopic measurements can be obtained with readily available, broadly tunable pulsed infrared lasers because absorption of a single photon is sufficient to induce evaporation. We discuss the implementation of these methods with a new type of hybrid photofragmentation mass spectrometer involving two stages of mass selection with two laser excitation regions interfaced to the cryogenic ion source. We illustrate several capabilities of the cryogenic ion spectrometer by presenting recent applications to peptides, a biomimetic catalyst, a large antibiotic molecule (vancomycin), and reaction intermediates pertinent to the chemistry of the ionosphere. First, we demonstrate how site-specific isotopic substitution can be used to identify bands due to local functional groups in a protonated tripeptide designed to

  12. Cryogenic refrigeration requirements for superconducting insertion devices in a light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.

    2003-08-15

    This report discusses cryogenic cooling superconducting insertion devices for modern light sources. The introductory part of the report discusses the difference between wiggler and undulators and how the bore temperature may affect the performance of the magnets. The steps one would take to reduce the gap between the cold magnet pole are discussed. One section of the report is devoted to showing how one would calculate the heat that enters the device. Source of heat include, heat entering through the vacuum chamber, heating due to stray electrons and synchrotron radiation, heating due to image current on the bore, heat flow by conduction and radiation, and heat transfer into the cryostat through the magnet leads. A section of the report is devoted to cooling options such as small cryo-cooler and larger conventional helium refrigerators. This section contains a discussion as to when it is appropriate to use small coolers that do not have J-T circuits. Candidate small cryo-coolers are discussed in this section of the report. Cooling circuits for cooling with a conventional refrigerator are also discussed. A section of the report is devoted to vibration isolation and how this may affect how the cooling is attached to the device. Vibration isolation using straps is compared to vibration isolation using helium heat pipes. The vibration isolation of a conventional refrigeration system is also discussed. Finally, the cool down of an insertion device is discussed. The device can either be cooled down using liquid cryogenic nitrogen and liquid helium or by using the cooler used to keep the devices cold over the long haul.

  13. Design, construction and cooling system performance of a prototype cryogenic stopping cell for the Super-FRS at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, M. [KVI-Center for Advanced Radiation Technology, University of Groningen - Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Dendooven, P., E-mail: p.g.dendooven@rug.nl [KVI-Center for Advanced Radiation Technology, University of Groningen - Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Purushothaman, S. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research - Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Dickel, T. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research - Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen - Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Reiter, M.P. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen - Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Ayet, S. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research - Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Haettner, E. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research - Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen - Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Moore, I.D. [University of Jyväskylä - FI-40014, Jyväskylä (Finland); Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N. [KVI-Center for Advanced Radiation Technology, University of Groningen - Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); and others

    2015-01-11

    A cryogenic stopping cell for stopping energetic radioactive ions and extracting them as a low energy beam was developed. This first ever cryogenically operated stopping cell serves as prototype device for the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS at FAIR. The cell has a stopping volume that is 1 m long and 25 cm in diameter. Ions are guided by a DC field along the length of the stopping cell and by a combined RF and DC fields provided by an RF carpet at the exit-hole side. The ultra-high purity of the stopping gas required for optimum ion survival is reached by cryogenic operation. The design considerations and construction of the cryogenic stopping cell, as well as some performance characteristics, are described in detail. Special attention is given to the cryogenic aspects in the design and construction of the stopping cell and the cryocooler-based cooling system. The cooling system allows the operation of the stopping cell at any desired temperature between about 70 K and room temperature. The cooling system performance in realistic on-line conditions at the FRS Ion Catcher Facility at GSI is discussed. A temperature of 110 K at which efficient ion survival was observed is obtained after 10 h of cooling. A minimum temperature of the stopping gas of 72 K was reached. The expertise gained from the design, construction and performance of the prototype cryogenic stopping cell has allowed the development of a final version for the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS to proceed.

  14. Nanodielectrics for Cryogenic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; Pace, Marshall O [ORNL; More, Karren [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Woodward, Jonathan [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report the recent advances in nanodielectrics that were developed and tested for cryogenic dielectric applications. The systems studied are composed of nanometer size particles. Particles were produced using either an ex-situ or in-situ technique. It is observed that there are clear differences in the structural properties of materials produced using these two approaches. Either no significant degradation or improvement in the electrical insulation properties were observed for ex-situ nano-particle samples processed with an ultrasonic processor and in-situ nano-particle samples. Nanodielectrics have the potential to be tailored with better thermal and mechanical properties without losing their electrical insulation characteristics.

  15. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  16. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  17. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the success of the phase I effort, Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of...

  18. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  19. Cryogenic MEMS Pressure Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A directly immersible cryogenic MEMS pressure sensor will be developed. Each silicon die will contain a vacuum-reference and a tent-like membrane. Offsetting thermal...

  20. Lightweight Inflatable Cryogenic Tank Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of an inflatable and lightweight polymer-fabric structured pressure vessel designed for the containment of cryogenic fluids....

  1. Cryogenic Systems and Superconductive Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report defines, investigates, and experimentally evaluates the key elements of a representative crogenic turborefrigerator subsystem suitable for providing reliable long-lived cryogenic refrigeration for a superconductive ship propulsion system.

  2. An Overview of Recent Cryogenic Fluid Management Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Johnson, W. L.; Stephens, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    (GRC, MSFC, JSC, and KSC) collaborated to investigate multiple different hardware combinations, refrigeration cycles, and integration techniques to minimize power and mass of the storage and liquefaction system. Moreover, high efficiency, high capacity cryocoolers are an element of CFM which is essential for achieving NASA's future long duration missions. Currently in development is a 20W at 20K unit for use with liquid hydrogen. It is scheduled for delivery to NASA in the summer of 2017. Two Phase I SBIRS have recently concluded resulting in the preliminary design of two different 90K units, each having a refrigeration capacity of approximately 150W. Once the development efforts are complete, these high capacity 90K units will be integrated into the design of NASA's Liquid Oxygen (LOX)/Methane applications such as the Lander and Ascent Vehicles, or possibly an in-space stage. CFM technology is critical to the success of missions to Mars, Planetary Exploration, and In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) for cryogenic propellant production. NASA is focusing on the development of CFM technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of design of cryogenic systems for long term space missions. Lessons learned from the described CFM developments would lead to enhanced safety and reliability and enabling technologies which could allow NASA to meet future space exploration goals.

  3. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  4. New cryogenic temperature monitor: PLT-HPT-32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera Curbelo, Teodora Aleida; Martín-Fernández, Sergio Gonzáles; Hoyland, R.; Vega-Moreno, A.; Cozar Castellano, Juan; Gómez Reñasco, M. F.; Aguiar-González, M.; Pérez de Taoro, Angeles; Sánchez-de la Rosa, V.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Génova-Santos, R.

    2016-07-01

    The PLT-HPT-32, a new cryogenic temperature monitor, has been developed by the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC) and an external engineering company (Sergio González Martín-Fernandez). The PLT-HPT-32 temperature monitor offers precision measurement in a wide range of cryogenic and higher-temperature applications with the ability to easily monitor up to 32 sensor channels. It provides better measurement performance in applications where researchers need to ensure accuracy and precision in their low cryogenic temperature monitoring. The PLT-HPT-32 supports PTC RTDs such as platinum sensors, and diodes such as the Lake Shore DT-670 Series. Used with silicon diodes, it provides accurate measurements in cryo-cooler applications from 16 K to above room temperature. The resolution of the measurement is less than 0.1K. Measurements can be displayed in voltage units or Kelvin units. For it, two different tables can be used. One can be programmed by the user, and the other one corresponds to Lake Shore DT670 sensor that comes standard. There are two modes of measuring, the instantaneous mode and averaged mode. In this moment, all channels must work in the same mode but in the near future it expected to be used in blocks of eight channels. The instantaneous mode takes three seconds to read all channels. The averaged mode takes one minute to average twenty samples in all channels. Alarm thresholds can be configured independently for each input. The alarm events, come from the first eight channels, can activate the unit's relay outputs for hard-wired triggering of other systems or audible annunciators. Activate relays on high, low, or both alarms for any input. For local monitoring, "Stand-Alone Mode", the front panel of the PLT-HPT-32 features a bright liquid crystal display with an LED backlight that shows up to 32 readings simultaneously. Plus, monitoring can be done over a network "Remote Control Mode". Using the Ethernet port on the PLT-HPT-32, you

  5. RESEARCH OF SPACE CRYOCOOLER TEMPERATURE CONTROLLING PRECISION%空间制冷机温控精度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新玉; 金占雷; 董婷

    2016-01-01

    Upgrading space cryocooler temperature controlling precision is very important to space cryocooler work stability. By emulate analysis,this paper obtain that in different white noise intensity,a optimal value is existed between the noise intensity and the oversampling frequency,when use oversampling method to obtain a better resolution. Under the premise of the white noise intensity fixed,taking into account the execution efficiency and execution time of the software, the AD acquisition resolution can be improved significantly by properly increasing the sampling times. So the high resolu-tion AD data is input to the temperature data can get a higher accuracy of temperature control.%提高空间制冷机温度控制精度,对提高空间制冷机工作稳定性至关重要.通过仿真分析了在不同的白噪声强度下,采用过采样的方法获得更高的分辨率时,噪声强度和采样次数之间的关系.在白噪声强度固定的前提下,考虑到软件的执行效率和执行时间,通过适当增加采样次数,可以显著提高AD采集分辨率.从而在以高分辨率AD数据为温度数据输入时,达到温度控制精度更高的目的.

  6. Stability and quench development study in small HTSC magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyin, Yu. A.; Vysotski, V.S.; Kiss, T.; Takeo, M.; Okamoto, H.; Irie, F.

    2001-01-01

    Stability and quench development in a HTSC magnet have been experimentally studied with the transport current in the magnet being below or above the “thermal quench current” level. The magnet was tested at both cryocooler cooling and liquid nitrogen cooling, with and without background magnetic fiel

  7. Stability and quench development study in small HTSC magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyin, Y.; Vysotski, V.S.; Kiss, T.; Takeo, M.; Okamoto, H.; Irie, F.

    2001-01-01

    Stability and quench development in a HTSC magnet have been experimentally studied with the transport current in the magnet being below or above the “thermal quench current” level. The magnet was tested at both cryocooler cooling and liquid nitrogen cooling, with and without background magnetic

  8. Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada S. Abdelwahab

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns with the development of stability indicating the RP-HPLC method for simultaneous determination of guaifenesin (GUF and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PSH in the presence of guaifenesin related substance (Guaiacol. GUC, and in the presence of syrup excepients with minimum sample pre-treatment. In the developed RP-HPLC method efficient chromatographic separation was achieved for GUF, PSH, GUC and syrup excepients using ODS column as a stationary phase and methanol: water (50:50, v/v, pH = 4 with orthophosphoric acid as a mobile phase with a flow rate of 1 mL min−1 and UV detection at 210 nm. The chromatographic run time was approximately 10 min. Calibration curves were drawn relating the integrated area under peak to the corresponding concentrations of PSH, GUF and GUC in the range of 1–8, 1–20, 0.4–8 μg mL−1, respectively. The developed method has been validated and met the requirements delineated by ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, specificity and robustness. The validated method was successfully applied for determination of the studied drugs in triaminic chest congestion® syrup; moreover its results were statistically compared with those obtained by the official method and no significant difference was found between them.

  9. RICOR Cryocoolers for HOT IR detectors from development to optimization for industrialized production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Eli; Katz, Amiram; Bar Haim, Zvi; Nachman, Ilan; Riabzev, Sergey; Gover, Dan; Segal, Victor; Filis, Avishai

    2017-05-01

    The modern needs of the electro-optical market for small low-power and light-weight IR systems are impelling research and development of High Operating Temperature (HOT) IR detectors, requiring development of dedicated "HOT" cryocoolers. The development of cryocoolers with emphasis on the "SWAP3" configuration means small size, low weight, improved performance, low power consumption and low price, in order to optimize IDDCA for future hand held thermal sights. This paper will present the development and the progress made with the new "HOT" cryocooler, including customer data after the evaluation process, performances achieved using a common cold finger, test results update on a large series of production coolers, life and qualification test update and acoustic noise reduction. All the above mentioned information relates to the FPA temperature range of 130 - 200K for various cryocooler models based on rotary and linear design concepts. The paper will also review the progress with the latest development activities implemented in the cryocoolers and the electronic control modules in order to improve reliability and minimize regulated power consumption.

  10. Integration of a Cryocooler into a SQUID Magnetospinography System for Reduction of Liquid Helium Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Jun; Ogata, Hisanao; Uehara, Gen

    We are currently developing a magnetospinography (MSG) system for noninvasive functional imaging of the spinal cord. The MSG system is a device for observing a weak magnetic field accompanied by the neural activity of the spinal cord by using an array of low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic flux sensors. As in the case of other biomagnetic measurement systems such as the magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, the running cost of the MSG system is mainly dependent on the liquid helium (LHe) consumption of a dewar vessel. We integrated a cryocooler into the MSG system to reduce LHe consumption. A pulse tube cryocooler with a cooling power of 0.5Wat 4 K was placed adjacent to a magnetically shielded room and was directly connected to the thermal radiation shield of the dewar by an electrically isolated transfer tube. Cold helium gas was circulated between the cryocooler and the radiation shield. Consequently, the temperature of the radiation shield decreased below 40 K. Previous studies have shown that the detection of a weak magnetic field is often hindered by severe low-frequency band noise from the cryocooler. However, the band of the MSG signals is much higher than that of the cryocooler noise. Therefore, the noise can be filtered out and has a less detrimental effect on MSG measurement than on other biomagnetic field measurements such as MEG measurement. As a result, LHe consumption was reduced by 46%, with no increase in the noise floor.

  11. Cryocooled superconducting magnets for high magnetic fields at the HFLSM and future collaboration with the TML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Nishijima, G.; Awaji, S.; Koyama, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Kiyoshi, T.

    2006-11-01

    A hybrid magnet needs a large amount of liquid helium for operation. In order to make an easy-to-operate hybrid magnet system, we constructed a cryocooled 28 T hybrid magnet, consisting of an outer cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet and an inner traditional water-cooled 19 T resistive magnet. As a performance test, the cryocooled hybrid magnet generated 27.5 T in a 32 mm room temperature experimental bore. As long as Nb3Sn superconducting wires are employed, the expected maximum high field generation in the cryocooled superconducting magnet will be 17 T at 5 K. We adopted the high temperature superconducting insert coil, employing Ag-sheathed Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10superconducting tape. In combination with the low temperature 16.5 T back-up coil with a 174 mm cold bore, the cryocooled high temperature superconducting magnet successfully generated the total central field of 18.1 T in a 52 mm room temperature bore. As a next step, we start the collaboration with the National Institute for Materials Science for the new developmental works of a 30 T high temperature superconducting magnet and a 50 T-class hybrid magnet.

  12. Study on a Single-Stage 120 HZ Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y. Z.; Gan, Z. H.; Qiu, L. M.; Chen, J.; Li, Z. P.

    2010-04-01

    Miniaturization of pulse tube cryocoolers is required for some particular applications where size and mass for devices are limited. In order to pack more cooling power in a small volume, higher operating frequencies are commonly used for Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers. To maintain high efficiency of the regenerator with a higher frequency, a higher charging pressure, smaller hydraulic diameters of regenerator material and a shorter regenerator length should be applied. A rapid growth of research and development on pulse tube cryocoolers operating at a high frequency over 100 Hz in the last 3 years has occurred. In this study, a single stage pulse tube cryocooler with 120 Hz to provide 10 W of lift at 80 K has been developed by using the numerical model, known as REGEN 3.2. Experiments performed on this cryocooler driven by a CFIC linear compressor show that a no-load temperature of 49.6 K was achieved and the net refrigeration power at 78.5 K was 8.0 W. The effect of pulse tube orientation was tested, and the copper velvet as a regenerator matrix was proposed for high frequency operation.

  13. An Optical Cryostat for Use in Microscopy Cooled by Stirling-Type Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubiao, Chen; Qiang, Zhou; Xiaoshuang, Zhu; Yuan, Zhou; Junjie, Wang

    The few products of an optical cryostat for use in microscopy in commercialapplications are generally cooled by liquid nitrogen, liquid helium or cryocoolers such as G-M cryocooler or G-M type pulse tube cryocooler (PTC). Sometimes it is not convenient to use G-M cryocooler or G-M type PTC because of its noise and big size; and in some places, liquid nitrogen, especially liquid helium, is not easily available. To overcome this limitation, an optical cryostat for use in microscopy cooled by a Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) has been designed, built and tested. The refrigerator system SPTC is an important component of the optical cryostat; it has the advantages of compactness, high efficiency, and low vibration. For simplification and compactness, single-stage configuration with coaxial arrangement was employed in the developed SPTC. In order to lower the vibration, the separated configuration was adopted; its compressor and pulse tube are connected with a flexible connecting tube. At present, a lowest temperature of 20 K could be achieved. The temperature fluctuation can be controlled at ±10 mK by adjusting the input electric power to the compressor; and some considerations for further improvement will also be described in this paper.

  14. Progress Towards a 6-10 K Turbo-Brayton Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagarola, M. V.; Cragin, K. J.; Breedlove, J. J.; Davis, T. M.

    2006-04-01

    Turbomachine-based Brayton (turbo-Brayton) cryocoolers are an ideal option for long-duration space missions. Key attributes inherent to the technology are high reliability, extremely low vibration emittance, and flexible packaging and integration with instruments and spacecraft systems. The first space implementation of the technology was the NICMOS Cryocooler, which is a single-stage unit that was installed on the Hubble Space Telescope in March 2002. This cryocooler provides 7 W of cooling at 70 K and has been operating for 3.3 years (July 2005) without degradation in performance. New developments at Creare are focused on two-stage configurations with load temperatures as low as 6 K. The lower temperatures and loads have required advances in component technologies to meet aggressive targets for cryocooler mass, size and performance. The development of the electronics, compressors and intermediate turboalternator for a 6-10 K cryocooler are complete. This paper summarizes our accomplishments on the completed components, and reviews our progress towards the development of the remaining critical components, a lightweight recuperator and a high performance low temperature turboalternator.

  15. Development of miniature Stirling cryocooler technology for Infrared Focal Plane array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manmohan Singh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A reliable miniature cryocooler is one of the basic and foremost requirements for successful operation of high performance cooled infrared focal plane array (IRFPA used for defence applications. Technological complexity and requirement of long duration fail-safe operation of the cryocooler demands robust design, fabrication and assembly with tolerances and, perfection of an array of sub-technologies. The paper presents the progress of the development activities in Stirling cryocooler technology at SSPL, which evolved through essential milestones like the development of single and dual piston linear motor driven split coolers to the state-of-the-art integral Brushless DC (BLDC motor crank-driven type highly miniaturized coolers of capacities ranging from 0.25 to 0.5W at 80K. The theoretical investigations in the design of Stirling cycle cryocooler have been reported and the issues related to the design aspects are discussed in sufficient details. Experimental results of cryocooler performance tests are also presented. The paper also focuses on regenerator design optimization. The results of optimizations have been shown at the end considering a sample data.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(6, pp.571-580, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.5756

  16. Development of high-efficiency Stirling cryocoolers for high temperature superconducting motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Yumoto, K.; Hiratsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For wide spread high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, a cryocooler having COP of >0.1, with a compact size, light weight, high efficiency and high reliability is required. For practical use of superconductive devices, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) developed a high-efficiency Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler (STPC). The STPC had high reliability and low vibration. However, its efficiency was not enough to meet the demands of an HTS motor. To further improve the efficiency, we reconsidered the expander of cryocooler and developed a Stirling cryocooler (STC). Two prototype units of a compact, high-efficiency split Stirling cryocooler were designed, built and tested. With the second prototype unit, a cooling capacity of 151 W at 70 K and a minimum temperature of 33 K have been achieved with a compressor input power of 2.15 kW. Accordingly, COP of about 0.07 has been achieved. The detailed design of the prototype units and the experimental results will be reported in this paper.

  17. Long-term frequency and amplitude stability of a solid-nitrogen-cooled, continuous wave THz quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylov, Andriy A.; Waldman, Jerry; Light, Alexander R.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.; Qian, Xifeng; Chandrayan, Neelima; Goodhue, William D.; Nixon, William E.

    2012-02-01

    Operational temperature increase of CW THz QCLs to 77 K has enabled us to employ solid nitrogen (SN2) as the cryogen. A roughing pump was used to solidify liquid nitrogen and when the residual vapor pressure in the nitrogen reservoir reached the pumping system's minimum pressure the temperature equilibrated and remained constant until all the nitrogen sublimated. The hold time compared to liquid helium has thereby increased approximately 70-fold, and at a greatly reduced cost. The milliwatt CW QCL was at a temperature of approximately 60 K, dissipating 5 W of electrical power. To measure the long-term frequency, current, and temperature stability, we heterodyned the free-running 2.31 THz QCL with a CO2 pumped far-infrared gas laser line in methanol (2.314 THz) in a corner-cube Schottky diode and recorded the IF frequency, current and temperature. Under these conditions the performance characteristics of the QCL, which will be reported, exceeded that of a device mounted in a mechanical cryocooler.

  18. Cryogenic holographic distortion testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, David G.

    1994-06-01

    Hughes cryogenic holographic test facility allows for the rapid characterization of optical components and mechanical structures at elevated and reduced temperatures. The facility consists of a 1.6 meter diameter thermal vacuum chamber, vibration isolated experiment test platform, and a holographic camera assembly. Temperatures as low as 12 Kelvin and as high as 350 Kelvin have been demonstrated. Complex aspheric mirrors are tested without the need for auxiliary null lenses and may be tested in either the polished or unpolished state. Structural elements such as optical benches, solar array panels, and spacecraft antennas have been tested. Types of materials tested include beryllium, silicon carbide, aluminum, graphite epoxy, silicon/aluminum matrix material and injection molded plastics. Sizes have ranged from 7 cm X 15 cm to 825 cm X 1125 cm and have weighed as little as 0.2 Kg and as much as 130 Kg. Surface figure changes as little as (lambda) /10 peak-to-valley ((lambda) equals .514 micrometers ) are routinely measured.

  19. Dual Cryogenic Capacitive Density Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Mata, Carlos; Vokrot, Peter; Cox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A dual cryogenic capacitive density sensor has been developed. The device contains capacitive sensors that monitor two-phase cryogenic flow density to within 1% accuracy, which, if temperature were known, could be used to determine the ratio of liquid to gas in the line. Two of these density sensors, located a known distance apart, comprise the sensor, providing some information on the velocity of the flow. This sensor was constructed as a proposed mass flowmeter with high data acquisition rates. Without moving parts, this device is capable of detecting the density change within a two-phase cryogenic flow more than 100 times a second. Detection is enabled by a series of two sets of five parallel plates with stainless steel, cryogenically rated tubing. The parallel plates form the two capacitive sensors, which are measured by electrically isolated digital electronics. These capacitors monitor the dielectric of the flow essentially the density of the flow and can be used to determine (along with temperature) the ratio of cryogenic liquid to gas. Combining this information with the velocity of the flow can, with care, be used to approximate the total two-phase mass flow. The sensor can be operated at moderately high pressures and can be lowered into a cryogenic bath. The electronics have been substantially improved over the older sensors, incorporating a better microprocessor, elaborate ground loop protection and noise limiting circuitry, and reduced temperature sensitivity. At the time of this writing, this design has been bench tested at room temperature, but actual cryogenic tests are pending

  20. Fast Response Temperature Measurements in Stirling Cycle Cryocooler Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, K.; Dadd, M. W.; Bailey, P. B.; Stone, C. R.

    2008-03-01

    One reason that heat transfer processes are not well understood is the difficulty of obtaining reliable temperature measurements when gas temperatures vary rapidly. In the work described here gas temperatures have been measured using a fine wire resistance thermometer with a 3.8 micron active sensor. The equipment represented the basic elements of a cryocooler: a clearance seal linear compressor and a wire mesh regenerator. Both were operated close to ambient temperature, with gas temperatures being measured close to the regenerator. The test rig was run at different volume ratios, frequencies (8-50 Hz), gases and filling pressures (1-26 bar). The waveforms of the gas temperature were found to vary dramatically for differing flow regimes. The results suggested that the thermometer was measuring the temperatures of two distinct volumes of gas, and that the gas must remain stratified in the compression space. A flow transition was identified from the cycle-by-cycle variations in temperature. The critical Reynolds number was determined to be 9.6-11. At the critical condition, the temperature was so unstable that fluctuations up to 250 Hz were observed. A series of validation tests have confirmed that the observed temperatures were not artifacts.

  1. Hydrodynamic parameters of mesh fillers relevant to miniature regenerative cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, E. C.; Conrad, T. J.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.; Kirkconnell, Carl S.

    2010-06-01

    Directional hydrodynamic parameters of two fine-mesh porous materials that are suitable for miniature regenerative cryocoolers were studied under steady and oscillating flows of helium. These materials included stacked discs of #635 stainless steel (wire diameter of 20.3 μm) and #325 phosphor bronze (wire diameter of 35.6 μm) wire mesh screens, which are among the commercially available fillers for use in small-scale regenerators and heat exchangers, respectively. Experiments were performed in test sections in which pressure variations across these fillers, in the axial and lateral (radial) directions, were measured under steady and oscillatory flows. The directional permeability and Forchheimer's inertial coefficient were then obtained by using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-assisted method. The oscillatory flow experiments covered a frequency range of 50-200 Hz. The results confirmed the importance of anisotropy in the mesh screen fillers, and indicated differences between the directional hydrodynamic resistance parameters for steady and oscillating flow regimes.

  2. The development of a range of small mechanical cryocoolers for space and avionic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Barry

    1990-10-01

    The design features of a mechanical cryocooler, including a compressor, displacer, connecting pipe, and electronic controller are described. The complete system is filled with helium gas to a pressure of 10 bar. Long life, low exported vibration, and good refrigeration within the defined temperature range are emphasized as the main requirements. A number of improvements with regard to the reliability required for long-life space coolers are outlined, and emphasis is placed on the improved sealing for the helium gas and the outgassing properties of all components. Scaling up of the cryocooler design for increased refrigeration is reviewed as well as a space-system interface. Testing of space-rated cryocooler systems producing nominal 0.5 W and 1 W cooling at 65 K from a single system is discussed.

  3. New application of plate-fin heat exchanger with regenerative cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Gwak, Kyung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    A design idea is newly proposed and investigated for the application of plate-fin heat exchanger (PFHX) with regenerative cryocoolers. The role of this heat exchanger is to effectively absorb heat from the stream of coolant and deliver it to the cold-head of a cryocooler. While various types of tubular HX's have been developed so far, a small PFHX could be more useful for this purpose by taking advantage of compactness and design flexibility. In order to confirm the feasibility and effectiveness, a prototype of aluminum-brazed PFHX is designed, fabricated, and tested with a single-stage GM cryocooler in experiments for subcooling liquid nitrogen from 78 K to 65-70 K. The results show that the PFHX is 30-50% more effective in cooling rate than the tubular HX's. Several potential applications of PFHX are presented and discussed with specific design concepts.

  4. Mixed-refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR JT) mini-cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzabar, Nir

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the progress in our ongoing research on Mixed-Refrigerant (MR) Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers. The research begun by exploring different MRs and testing various compressors: oil-lubricated and oil-free, reciprocating and linear, custom-made and commercial. Closed-cycle JT cryocoolers benefit from the fact that the compressor might be located far from the cold-end and thus there are no moving parts, no vibrations, and no heat emission near the cold-end. As a consequence, the compressor may be located where there are no severe size limitations, its heat can be conveniently removed, and it can be easily maintained. However, in some applications there is still a demand for a small compressor to drive a JT cryocooler although it is located far from the cooled device. Recently, we have developed a miniature oil-free compressor for MR JT cryocoolers that weighs about 700 g and its volume equals about 300 cc. The cryocooler operates with a MR that contains Ne, N2, and Hydrocarbons. This MR has been widely investigated with different compressors and varying operating conditions and proved to be stable. The current research investigates the performances of MR JT mini-cryocooler operating with the MR mentioned above, driven with our miniature compressor, and a cold-finger prototype. A Dewar with heat load of about 230 mW is cooled to about 80 K at ambient temperatures between 0°C and 40°C. The experimental results obtained are stable and demonstrate the ability to control the cooling temperature by changing the rotation speed of the compressor.

  5. Cryogenics bringing the temperature down, underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first 600m of the LHC cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which will feed the accelerator's superconducting magnets, has passed initial validating tests of its mechanical design at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  6. 高温超导滤波器用斯特林制冷机温度控制算法设计%Design of temperature controlling algorithm for Stirling cryocooler used in high temperature superconducting filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏广; 马少君; 闫春杰

    2012-01-01

    In the domain of deep space communications, using of high temperature superconducting technology can significantly improve the receivers performance in sensitivity, signal noise ratio and anti -jamming. As the need for high temperature superconducting filter's low temperature working environment, a Stirling cryocooler for cooling was required. The stability of Stirling cryocoolers temperature will directly affect the performance of high temperature superconducting filter. This topic mainly focused on the temperature controlling algorithm s analysis and design for Stirling cryocooler used in high temperature superconducting filters, the temperature controlling curve based on tester of high temperature superconducting filters were proved at last.%在深空通信领域,利用高温超导滤波技术,可大幅提高接收机的灵敏度、信噪比和抗干扰能力.由于高温超导滤波器工作温度较低,需要斯特林制冷机进行制冷.斯特林制冷机温度的稳定性将直接影响高温超导滤波器的性能,文章对高温超导滤波器用斯特林制冷机温度控制算法进行了分析和设计,并给出了基于高温超导滤波器试验装置的温度控制曲线.

  7. A Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Spectrometer without Liquid Cryogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S; Hertrich, T; Drury, O B; Cherepy, N J; Hohne, J

    2008-06-15

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) are being developed as X-ray detectors because they combine the high energy resolution of cryogenic detector technologies with the high count rate capabilities of athermal devices. We have built STJ spectrometers for chemical analysis of dilute samples by high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy at the synchrotron. The instruments use 36 pixels of 200 {micro}m x 200 {micro}m Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb STJs with 165 nm thick Nb absorber films. They have achieved an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and can be operated at a total count rate of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased user-friendliness, we have built a liquid-cryogen-free refrigerator based on a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler in combination with a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization stage. It holds the STJ detector at the end of a 40-cm-long cold finger, and attains the required operating temperature of {approx}0.3 K at the push of a button. We describe the instrument performance and present speciation measurements on Eu dopant activators in the novel scintillator material SrI{sub 2} to illustrate the potential for STJ spectrometers at the synchrotron.

  8. First spectral measurements of a cryogenic high-field short-period undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Holy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Further development of synchrotron light sources and new concepts for free electron lasers require undulators with short periods and high magnetic fields. A promising approach is the cryogenic permanent magnet undulator concept based on an advanced magnet material. This new rare earth alloy (Pr,Nd_{2}Fe_{14}B, shows an increasing remanent field of up to 1.7 T without the limits of spin reorientation transition. This work presents first spectral measurements of a prototype cryogenic permanent magnet undulator, consisting of 20 periods of 9 mm in length, cooled by a closed cycle cryo-cooler to temperatures below 30 K. The K parameter of 0.837 at RT is increased by more than 15% to 0.966, and an increase of the third harmonics photon flux of up to 66% was achieved. A possible degradation of the on-axis field quality due to thermally induced magnetic field errors, deduced from the measured bandwidth of the spectrum, is below the limits of the detector resolution of 2%.

  9. Performance of the SITP 35K two-stage Stirling cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongyu; Li, Ao; Li, Shanshan; Wu, Yinong

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the design, development, optimization experiment and performance of the SITP two-stage Stirling cryocooler. The geometry size of the cooler, especially the diameter and length of the regenerator were analyzed. Operating parameters by experiments were optimized to maximize the second stage cooling performance. In the test the cooler was operated at various drive frequency, phase shift between displacer and piston, fill pressure. The experimental results indicate that the cryocooler has a higher efficiency with a performance of 0.85W at 35K with a compressor input power of 56W at a phase shift of 65°, an operating frequency of 40Hz, 1MPa fill pressure.

  10. Investigation on a Single-stage Coaxial Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Small Particle Detectors at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Essler, J; Koettig, T; Wu, J H

    2009-01-01

    A single-stage coaxial pulse tube cryocooler has been developed for cooling small particle tracking detectors needed for future luminosity upgrades of the LHC. It is designed for remote operation in high radiation areas of the tunnel with restricted space. It features novel phase-adjusting mechanisms integrated into the warm flange. This flange is cooled with ambient air to reach a simple and compact design. The dimensions of the cold-finger are 24 mm diameter and 170 mm length. The measured no-load temperature is 52 K and the pulse tube cryocooler provides a cooling capacity of 5 W at 80 K.

  11. Influence of regenerator matrix and working fluid on optimisation of design parameters of Stirling cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrey, M. D.; Bapat, S. L.; Narayankhedkar, K. G.

    The performance of Stirling cryocooler is governed by principal designparameters. The optimum combination of these design parameters gives maximum refrigeration effect and minimum desired efforts. The performance of the cryocooler depends significantly on the regenerator functioning and the working fluids. The mesh size of the regenerator affects dead space, pressure drop, regenerator effectiveness, etc. The working fluids differ in their thermal properties and therefore affect the performance significantly, The present paper aims to study the influence of regenerator matrix and working fluids on these design parameters. The matrix material considered is Phosphor Bronze while the working fluids considered are Helium and Hydrogen.

  12. Development of the mechanical cryocooler system for the Sea Land Surface Temperature Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilletti, Adam; Burgess, Christopher; Donchev, Anton; Watson, Stuart; Weatherstone Akbar, Shane; Gamo-Albero, Victoria; Romero-Largacha, Victor; Caballero-Olmo, Gema

    2014-11-01

    The Sea Land Surface Temperature Radiometer is a dual view Earth observing instrument developed as part of the European Global Monitoring for Environment and Security programme. It is scheduled for launch on two satellites, Sentinel 3A and 3B in 2014. The instrument detectors are cooled to below 85 K by two split Stirling Cryocoolers running in hot redundancy. These coolers form part of a cryocooler system that includes a support structure and drive electronics. Aspects of the system design, including control and reduction of exported vibration are discussed; and results, including thermal performance and exported vibration from the Engineering Model Cryooler System test campaign are presented.

  13. Silicon single-crystal cryogenic optical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Eugen; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Luckmann, Heiko; Rosowski, Ulrich; Nevsky, Alexander; Schiller, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    We report on the demonstration and characterization of a silicon optical resonator for laser frequency stabilization, operating in the deep cryogenic regime at temperatures as low as 1.5 K. Robust operation was achieved, with absolute frequency drift less than 20 Hz over 1 h. This stability allowed sensitive measurements of the resonator thermal expansion coefficient (α). We found that α=4.6×10(-13)  K(-1) at 1.6 K. At 16.8 K α vanishes, with a derivative equal to -6×10(-10)  K(-2). The temperature of the resonator was stabilized to a level below 10 μK for averaging times longer than 20 s. The sensitivity of the resonator frequency to a variation of the laser power was also studied. The corresponding sensitivities and the expected Brownian noise indicate that this system should enable frequency stabilization of lasers at the low-10(-17) level.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  15. Cryogenic safety organisation at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With Safety being a top priority of CERN’s general policy, the Organisation defines and implements a Policy that sets out the general principles governing Safety at CERN. To the end of the attainment of said Safety objectives, the organic units (owners/users of the equipment) are assigned the responsibility for the implementation of the CERN Safety Policy at all levels of the organization, whereas the Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE) has the role of providing assistance for the implementation of the Safety Policy, and a monitoring role related to the implementation of continuous improvement of Safety, compliance with the Safety Rules and the handling of emergency situations. This talk will elaborate on the roles, responsibilities and organisational structure of the different stakeholders within the Organization with regards to Safety, and in particular to cryogenic safety. The roles of actors of particular importance such as the Cryogenic Safety Officers (CSOs) and the Cryogenic Sa...

  16. Cryogenic needs for future tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katheder, H.

    The ITER tokamak is a machine using superconducting magnets. The windings of these magnets will be subjected to high heat loads resulting from a combination of nuclear energy absorption and AC-losses. It is estimated that about 100 kW at 4.5 K are needed. The total cooling mass flow rate will be around 10 - 15 kg/s. In addition to the large cryogenic power required for the superconducting magnets cryogenic power is also needed for refrigerated radiation shield, various cryopumps, fuel processing and test beds. A general description of the overall layout and the envisaged refrigerator cycle, necessary cold pumps and ancillary equipment is given. The basic cryogenic layout for the ITER tokakmak design, as developed during the conceptual design phase and a short overview about existing tokamak designs using superconducting magnets is given.

  17. Spiral 2 Cryogenic System for The Superconducting LINAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghribi, A.; Bernaudin, P.-E.; Bert, Y.; Commeaux, C.; Houeto, M.; Lescalié, G.

    2017-02-01

    SPIRAL 21 is a rare isotope accelerator dedicated to the production of high intensity beams (E = 40 MeV, I = 5 mA). The driver is a linear accelerator (LINAC) that uses bulk Niobium made quarter wave RF cavities. 19 cryomodules inclose one or two cavities respectively for the low and the high energy sections. To supply the 1300 W at 4.2 K required to cool down the LINAC, a cryogenic system has been set up. The heart of the latter is a 3 turbines geared HELIAL®LF (ALAT2) cold box that delivers both the liquid helium for the cavities and the 60 K Helium gaz for the thermal screens. 19 valve-boxes insure cryogenic fluid distribution and management. Key issues like cool down speed or cavity RF frequency stability are closely linked to the cryogenic system management. To overcome these issues, modelling and simulation efforts are being undertaken prior to the first cool down trials. In this paper, we present a status update of the Spiral 2 cryogenic system and the cool down strategy considered for its commissioning.

  18. Analysis of the cryogenic system behavior for pulsed heat load in EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L. B.; Zhuang, M.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H.

    2014-01-01

    EAST is the first full superconducting fusion device. The plasma is confined by the magnetic fields generated from a large set of superconducting magnets which are made of cable in-conduit conductor (CICC). In operation, these magnets suffer heat loads from thermal and nuclear radiation from the surrounding components and plasma as well as the eddy currents and the AC losses generated within the magnets, together with the heat conduction through supports and the resistive heat generated at the current lead transiting to room temperature. The cryogenic system of our EAST consists of a 2kW/4K helium refrigerator and a distribution system for the cooling of poloidal field (PF) and toroidal field (TF) coils, structures, thermal shields, buslines and current leads. Pulsed heat load is the main difference between the cryogenic system of a full superconducting Tokamak system and other large scale cryogenic systems. The cryogenic system operates in a pulsed heat loads mode requiring the helium refrigerator to remove periodically large heat loads in time. At the same time, the cryogenic system parameters such as helium cooling superconducting magnets, helium refrigerator and helium distribution system are changing. In this paper, the variation range of the parameters of superconducting magnets and refrigerator has been analyzed in the typical plasma discharge mode. The control scheme for the pulsed loads characteristics of the cryogenic system has been proposed, the implementation of which helps to smooth the pulse loads and to improve the stability of the operation of the cryogenic system.

  19. High-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein using the high-pressure cryocooling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashiura, Akifumi, E-mail: hgsur-a@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ohta, Kazunori; Masaki, Mika; Sato, Masaru [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods and Biosciences Inc., Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroaki [Confocal Science Inc., Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Nakagawa, Atsushi [Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. This is the first ultra-high-resolution structure obtained from a high-pressure cryocooled crystal. Recently, many technical improvements in macromolecular X-ray crystallography have increased the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank and improved the resolution limit of protein structures. Almost all high-resolution structures have been determined using a synchrotron radiation source in conjunction with cryocooling techniques, which are required in order to minimize radiation damage. However, optimization of cryoprotectant conditions is a time-consuming and difficult step. To overcome this problem, the high-pressure cryocooling method was developed (Kim et al., 2005 ▶) and successfully applied to many protein-structure analyses. In this report, using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. Structural comparisons between high- and ambient-pressure cryocooled crystals at ultra-high resolution illustrate the versatility of this technique. This is the first ultra-high-resolution X-ray structure obtained using the high-pressure cryocooling method.

  20. Experimental Studies on a Single Stage Stirling Type Pulse Tube Cryocooler Driven by Oil-Lubricated Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ren; Jianying, Hu; Ercang, Luo; Xiaotao, Wang

    2010-04-01

    Because lubricating oil for moving parts is not allowed to go into the pulse tube cryocooler, Stirling type pulse tube cryocoolers are generally driven by oil-free compressors although oil-lubricated compressors are much cheaper and facile. Recently, it was proposed that an acoustic transparent and oil blocking diaphragm could be employed to separate the compressor and the cryocooler. Thus, the cryocooler can be driven by oil-lubricated compressors. In this paper, a pulse tube cryocooler is designed to match a crankcase compressor. Although the efficiency of the crankcase compressor is lower compared with the oil-free linear compressor, the crankcase compressor can easily work at lower frequency which results in higher efficiency for the cryocooler. So the relative high performance of the whole system can be maintained. In this system, the cryocooler delivers 28.5 W of cooling at 80 K with 680 W of electrical input power and operates at 15 Hz. The corresponding Carnot efficiency is 11.52%.

  1. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiczek, O; Friedreich, S; Juhász, B; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for (4)He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised (3)He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the (3)He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  2. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massiczek, O., E-mail: oswald.massiczek@cern.ch [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Friedreich, S.; Juhasz, B.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J. [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for {sup 4}He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised {sup 3}He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the {sup 3}He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  3. Cryogenic technology for tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Granata, V; Watts, S; Borer, K; Janos, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Dezillie, B; Li, Z; Casagrande, L; Collins, P; Grohmann, S; Heijne, Erik H M; Lourenço, C; Niinikoski, T O; Palmieri, V G; Sonderegger, P; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, Mara; Pirollo, S; Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; Grigoriev, E; Bell, W; Devine, S R H; O'Shea, V; Ruggiero, G; Smith, K; Berglund, P; de Boer, Wim; Hauler, F; Heising, S; Jungermann, L; Abreu, M C; Rato-Mendes, P; Sousa, P; Cindro, V; Mikuz, M; Zavrtanik, M; Esposito, A P; Konorov, I; Paul, S; Buontempo, S; D'Ambrosio, D; Pagano, S; Eremin, V V; Verbitskaya, E

    2001-01-01

    A low-mass cryogenic cooling technique for silicon sensor modules has been developed in the framework of the RD39 Collaboration at CERN. A prototype low-mass beam tracker cryostat has been designed, constructed and tested for applications in fixed target experiments. We shall report here briefly the main features and results of the system. (2 refs).

  4. USAF Space Sensing Cryogenic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 095102 (2012) Compact radio-frequency resonator...enhancing when the refrigeration system is considered as part of an overall optimization problem. INTRODUCTION The use of cryogenics in space sensing

  5. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  6. Champagne for the cryogenics teams

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Christmas has come early for the LHC as a complete sector of the cryogenic distribution line has been operating at 10 degrees Kelvin (-263°C) for the past two weeks, just a few degrees above the machine's nominal operating temperature.

  7. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  8. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  9. A Magnetically Coupled Cryogenic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Walter; Jumper, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic pumps used for propellant loading at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and other NASA Centers have a bellows mechanical seal and oil bath ball bearings, both of which can be problematic and require high maintenance. Because of the extremely low temperatures, the mechanical seals are made of special materials and design, have wearing surfaces, are subject to improper installation, and commonly are a potential leak path. The ball bearings are non-precision bearings [ABEC-1 (Annular Bearing Engineering Council)] and are lubricated using LOX compatible oil. This oil is compatible with the propellant to prevent explosions, but does not have good lubricating properties. Due to the poor lubricity, it has been a goal of the KSC cryogenics community for the last 15 years to develop a magnetically coupled pump, which would eliminate these two potential issues. A number of projects have been attempted, but none of the pumps was a success. An off-the-shelf magnetically coupled pump (typically used with corrosive fluids) was procured that has been used for hypergolic service at KSC. The KSC Cryogenics Test Lab (CTL) operated the pump in cryogenic LN2 as received to determine a baseline for modifications required. The pump bushing, bearings, and thrust rings failed, and the pump would not flow liquid (this is a typical failure mode that was experienced in the previous attempts). Using the knowledge gained over the years designing and building cryogenic pumps, the CTL determined alternative materials that would be suitable for use under the pump design conditions. The CTL procured alternative materials for the bearings (bronze, aluminum bronze, and glass filled PTFE) and machined new bearing bushings, sleeves, and thrust rings. The designed clearances among the bushings, sleeves, thrust rings, case, and case cover were altered once again using experience gained from previous cryogenic pump rebuilds and designs. The alternative material parts were assembled into

  10. James Webb Space Telescope Mid Infra-Red Instrument Pulse-Tube Cryocooler Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, D.; Flowers, T.; Liu, N.; Moore, K.; Tran, D.; Valenzuela, P.; Franklin, B.; Michaels, D.

    2013-01-01

    The latest generation of long life, space pulse-tube cryocoolers require electronics capable of controlling self-induced vibration down to a fraction of a newton and coldhead temperature with high accuracy down to a few kelvin. Other functions include engineering diagnostics, heater and valve control, telemetry and safety protection of the cryocooler subsystem against extreme environments and operational anomalies. The electronics are designed to survive the thermal, vibration, shock and radiation environment of launch and orbit, while providing a design life in excess of 10 years on-orbit. A number of our current generation high reliability radiation-hardened electronics units are in various stages of integration on several space flight payloads. This paper describes the features and performance of our latest flight electronics designed for the pulse-tube cryocooler that is the pre-cooler for a closed cycle Joule-Thomson cooler providing 6K cooling for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Mid Infra-Red Instrument (MIRI). The electronics is capable of highly accurate temperature control over the temperature range from 4K to 15K. Self-induced vibration is controlled to low levels on all harmonics up to the 16th. A unique active power filter controls peak-to-peak reflected ripple current on the primary power bus to a very low level. The 9 kg unit is capable of delivering 360W continuous power to NGAS's 3-stage pulse-tube High-Capacity Cryocooler (HCC).

  11. Analysis and comparison of different phase shifters for Stirling pulse tube cryocooler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Tian; Pfotenhauer, John M.; Zhou, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of phase shifters and power recovery mechanisms are of sustainable interest for developing Stirling pulse tube cryocoolers (SPTC) with higher power density, more compact design and higher efficiency. This paper investigates the phase shifting capacity and the applications of four d...

  12. Study on a high capacity two-stage free piston Stirling cryocooler working around 30 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotao; Zhu, Jian; Chen, Shuai; Dai, Wei; Li, Ke; Pang, Xiaomin; Yu, Guoyao; Luo, Ercang

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a two-stage high-capacity free-piston Stirling cryocooler driven by a linear compressor to meet the requirement of the high temperature superconductor (HTS) motor applications. The cryocooler system comprises a single piston linear compressor, a two-stage free piston Stirling cryocooler and a passive oscillator. A single stepped displacer configuration was adopted. A numerical model based on the thermoacoustic theory was used to optimize the system operating and structure parameters. Distributions of pressure wave, phase differences between the pressure wave and the volume flow rate and different energy flows are presented for a better understanding of the system. Some characterizing experimental results are presented. Thus far, the cryocooler has reached a lowest cold-head temperature of 27.6 K and achieved a cooling power of 78 W at 40 K with an input electric power of 3.2 kW, which indicates a relative Carnot efficiency of 14.8%. When the cold-head temperature increased to 77 K, the cooling power reached 284 W with a relative Carnot efficiency of 25.9%. The influences of different parameters such as mean pressure, input electric power and cold-head temperature are also investigated.

  13. Pulse tube cryocooler with self-cancellation of cold stage vibration

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T; Ikushima, Y; Li, R; Sato, N; Shintomi, T; Tomaru, T; Yamamoto, A

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a new method for reducing the vibration of the cold stage of a cryocooler. Comparing the RMS amplitude with the case of no phase shift of the driving gas pressure between the two pairs, the longitudinal vibration of the cold stage was reduced by 96.1% at 126 K by supplying gas pressure with 180 degrees of phase shift.

  14. Construction and test of a cryocooler-cooled low-Tc SQUID gradiometer system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, A.P.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Lefevere, M.W.; Leeuwen, van E.P.; Holland, H.J.; Haken, ten B.; Brake, ter H.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A cryocooler-cooled low-Tc SQUID gradiometer system was designed and constructed. It is based on a 4 K GM-cooler that is positioned several meters from the measuring head containing the SQUID sensors. The cooling power is transported by means of a circulating helium flow. Thus, there are three main

  15. James Webb Space Telescope Mid Infra-Red Instrument Pulse-Tube Cryocooler Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, D.; Flowers, T.; Liu, N.; Moore, K.; Tran, D.; Valenzuela, P.; Franklin, B.; Michaels, D.

    2013-01-01

    The latest generation of long life, space pulse-tube cryocoolers require electronics capable of controlling self-induced vibration down to a fraction of a newton and coldhead temperature with high accuracy down to a few kelvin. Other functions include engineering diagnostics, heater and valve control, telemetry and safety protection of the cryocooler subsystem against extreme environments and operational anomalies. The electronics are designed to survive the thermal, vibration, shock and radiation environment of launch and orbit, while providing a design life in excess of 10 years on-orbit. A number of our current generation high reliability radiation-hardened electronics units are in various stages of integration on several space flight payloads. This paper describes the features and performance of our latest flight electronics designed for the pulse-tube cryocooler that is the pre-cooler for a closed cycle Joule-Thomson cooler providing 6K cooling for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Mid Infra-Red Instrument (MIRI). The electronics is capable of highly accurate temperature control over the temperature range from 4K to 15K. Self-induced vibration is controlled to low levels on all harmonics up to the 16th. A unique active power filter controls peak-to-peak reflected ripple current on the primary power bus to a very low level. The 9 kg unit is capable of delivering 360W continuous power to NGAS's 3-stage pulse-tube High-Capacity Cryocooler (HCC).

  16. A 1 T, 0.33 m bore superconducting magnet operating with cryocoolers at 12 K

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, van der M.T.G.; Tax, R.B.; Kate, ten H.H.J.; Klundert, van de L.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The application of small cryocoolers to cooling a superconducting magnet at 12 K has important advantages, especially for small and medium-size magnets. Simple construction and a helium-free magnet system were obtained. The demonstration magnet developed is a six-coil system with a volume of 75 L an

  17. High-frequency operation and miniaturization aspects of pulse-tube cryocoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas

    2008-01-01

    Cryocoolers are small refrigerators capable of achieving useful refrigeration below 120 K. Recent developments in the field of high Tc superconductors spawned a wide range of applications such as terahertz sensors, SQUIDS, low noise amplifiers, filters for microwave applications and many more. These

  18. Hampson’s type cryocoolers with distributed Joule-Thomson effect for mixed refrigerants closed cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion

    2014-05-01

    Most previous studies on Joule-Thomson cryocoolers of mixed refrigerants in a closed cycle focus on the Linde kind recuperator. The present study focuses on four constructions of Hampson’s kind miniature Joule-Thomson cryocoolers based on finned capillary tubes. The frictional pressure drop along the tubes plays the role of distributed Joule-Thomson expansion so that an additional orifice or any throttle at the cold end is eliminated. The high pressure tube is a throttle and a channel of recuperation at the same time. These coolers are tested within two closed cycle systems of different compressors and different compositions of mixed coolants. All tests were driven by the same level of discharge pressure (2.9 MPa) while the associated suction pressures and the associated reached temperatures are dependent on each particular cryocooler and on the closed cycle system. The mixture of higher specific cooling capacity cannot reach temperatures below 80 K when driven by the smaller compressor. The other mixture of lower specific cooling capacity driven by the larger compressor reaches lower temperatures. The examined parameters are the cooldown period and the reachable temperatures by each cryocooler.

  19. Adaptive periodic disturbance cancellation in a set-up of two cryocoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, A.P.; Verberne, J.F.C.; Wtbreuk, E.H.R.; Bruins, P.C.; Brake, ter H.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The work presented describes adaptive periodic disturbance cancellation as applied to the vibration of two cryocoolers. The coolers are driven by linear motors. The periodic input signal necessary to reduce the disturbance is calculated by vibration measurements using the systems frequency response.

  20. Thermal properties of a large-bore cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet for a hybrid magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, M., E-mail: Mas_Ishizuka@shi.co.j [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Research and Development Center, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., 19 Natsushima-chou, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8555 (Japan); Hamajima, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Itou, T. [Ehime Works, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., 5-2 Soubiraki-cho, Niihama, Ehime 792-8588 (Japan); Sakuraba, J. [Research and Development Center, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., 19 Natsushima-chou, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8555 (Japan); Nishijima, G.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    A cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet with a 360 mm room temperature bore has been developed for a hybrid magnet. The superconducting magnet cooled by four Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers has been designed to generate a magnetic field of 10 T. Since superconducting wires composed of coils were subjected to large hoop stress over 150 MPa and Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting wires particularly showed a low mechanical strength due to those brittle property, Nb{sub 3}Sn wires strengthened by NbTi-filaments were developed for the cryocooled superconducting magnet. We have already reported that the hybrid magnet could generate the resultant magnetic field of 27.5 T by adding 8.5 T from the superconducting magnet and 19 T from a water-cooled Bitter resistive magnet, after the water-cooled resistive magnet was inserted into the 360 mm room temperature bore of the cryocooled superconducting magnet. When the hybrid magnet generated the field of 27.5 T, it achieved the high magnetic-force field (B x {partial_derivative}Bz/{partial_derivative}z) of 4500 T{sup 2}/m, which was useful for magneto-science in high fields such as materials levitation research. In this paper, we particularly focus on the cause that the cryocooled superconducting magnet was limited to generate the designed magnetic field of 10 T in the hybrid magnet operation. As a result, it was found that there existed mainly two causes as the limitation of the magnetic field generation. One was a decrease of thermal conductive passes due to exfoliation from the coil bobbin of the cooling flange. The other was large AC loss due to both a thick Nb{sub 3}Sn layer and its large diameter formed on Nb-barrier component in Nb{sub 3}Sn wires.

  1. VIRTIS on board Rosetta: cryocoolers usage analysis in support of Comet phases observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuppi, Stefano; Politi, Romolo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Piccioni, Giuseppe; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Erard, Stéphane; Tosi, Federico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico

    Rosetta is a planetary cornerstone mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). It is devoted to the study of minor bodies of our solar system and it will be the first mission ever to land on a comet (the Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko). VIRTIS-M is a sophisticated imaging spectrometer that combines two data channels in one compact instrument, respectively for the visible and the infrared range (0.25-5.0 μm). VIRTIS-H is devoted to infrared spectroscopy (2.5-5.0 μm) with high spectral resolution. Since the satellite will be inside the tail of the comet during one of the most important phases of the mission, it would not be appropriate to use a passive cooling system, due to the high flux of contaminants on the radiator. Therefore the IR sensors are cooled by two Stirling cycle cryocoolers. This paper focuses on the usage of VIRTIS cryocoolers from the beginning of the Rosetta mission till spacecraft hibernation in order to optimize their usage. After a description of the cryocooler used in the mission, a detailed information about time usage and power consumption is provided. On the basis of previous experiences with this kind of cryocoolers it has been made an estimation of the remaining working life of the VIRTIS coolers operating in Rosetta mission. Moreover an estimation of the minimum time between a cryocooler switch off and on again has been carried out in order to preserve the coolers working life.

  2. Cryogenics and the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current plans within NASA involve extending the human exploration of space from low earth orbit into the solar system, with the first human exploration of Mars presently planned in 2011. Integral to all hum Mars mission phases is cryogenic fluid management. Cryogenic fluids will be required both as propellant and for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Without safe and efficient cryogen storage human Mars missions will not be possible. Effective control and handling of cryogenic fluids is the key to affordable Mars missions, and advancing active thermal control technology is synergistic with all of NASA's exploration initiatives and with existing and future instrument cooling programs, including MTPE and Origins. Present mission scenarios for human exploration require cryogenic propellant storage for up to 1700 days and for up to 60 metric tons. These requirements represent increases of an order of magnitude over previous storage masses and lifetimes. The key cryogenic terminology areas to be addressed in human Mars missions are long-term propellant storage, cryogenic refrigeration, cryogenic liquefaction, and zero gravity fluid management. Long-term storage for the thermal control of cryogenic propellants is best accomplished with a mix of passive and active technologies. Passive technologies such as advanced multilayer insulation (MLI) concepts will be combined with the development of active coolers (cryogenic refrigerators). Candidates for long-life active cooling applications include Reverse Turbo-Brayton, Stirling, and Pulse-Tube coolers. The integration of passive and active technologies will form a hybrid system optimized to minimize the launch mass while preserving the cryogenic propellants. Since cryogenic propellants are the largest mass that Mars missions must launch from earth, even a modest reduction in the percentage of propellant carried results in a significant weight saving. This paper will present a brief overview of cryogenic fluid management

  3. Effect of operating frequency and phase angle on performance of Alpha Stirling cryocooler driven by a novel compact mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, K. D.; Bapat, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Amongst the mechanical cryocoolers in use, Stirling cycle cryocoolers exhibit the desirable features such as high efficiency, low specific power consumption, small size and mass and large mean time before failure. Stirling cycle cryocooler of Alpha configuration exhibits better theoretical performance as compared to Gamma. However, the theory could not be put into practice due to unavailability of compatible drive mechanism for Alpha cryocooler providing large stroke to diameter ratio. The concept of novel compact drive mechanism can be made functional to operate miniature Alpha Stirling cryocoolers. It allows the use of multicylinder system while converting rotary motion to reciprocating. This permits the drive mechanism to be employed for driving different configurations of Stirling cryocooler simultaneously. This drive is capable of providing large stroke to diameter ratio compared to other drive mechanisms generally in use for the purpose. A stroke to diameter ratio of three is chosen in the present work and the drive dimensions are calculated for four piston-cylinder arrangements with 90° phase difference between adjacent arrangements providing two Alpha Stirling cryocoolers working simultaneously. It has to be noted that the coolers operate at half the frequency of the motor used. As the two coolers operate at phase difference of 180°, during compression stroke of one unit, the suction stroke occurs for the other unit. Due to power output of second unit, the combined peak torque requirement falls by 26.81% below the peak torque needed when one unit is operated separately. This allows for use of a comparatively lower torque motor. The practicability of the drive ensuring smooth operation of the system is decided based on comparison between torque availability from the motor and torque requirement of the complete unit. The second order method of cyclic (or thermodynamic) analysis provides a simple computational procedure useful for the design of Stirling

  4. Cryogenic Resonator Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshin, V. V.; Serov, E. A.; Bubnov, G. M.; Vdovin, V. F.; Koshelev, M. A.; Tretyakov, M. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a unique new-generation laboratory facility for studying dielectric parameters of gases and condensed media, as well as reflectivity of surfaces (reflection loss) in the frequency range 100-500 GHz and pressure interval from 10-3 Torr to the atmospheric pressure at temperatures of 4 to 370 K. The Fabry-Perot resonators with Q-factors of about 106, in which the studied gas, dielectric, or reflector are located, are the measuring elements of the facility. The backward-wave oscillator stabilized by the wideband phased-lock loop is the radiation source. Using this facility, we were able, in particular, to confirm the presence of water dimers in the atmosphere and study some materials for the reflectors of the "Millimetron" space observatory.

  5. 分置式斯特林制冷机可靠性增长研究%Research on the reliability growth of the split Stirling cryocooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈迎春; 何庆生

    2012-01-01

    Based on the stability, reliability and environmental adaptability of Stirling cryocooler for engineering applications, this paper discussed the elimination of the trouble and hidden danger, adopted the improved design, process, processing, assembly and debugging techniques to enhance the machine reliability.%文中针对斯特林制冷机在工程应用中存在的性能稳定性、可靠性和环境适应性问题,从排除故障和隐患人手,采用改进设计、工艺、加工、装配和调试等技术手段,以达到该机可靠性增长的目的.

  6. A cryogenic receiver for EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkowicz, R; Ogata, H; Reijerse, E; Suter, D

    2013-12-01

    Cryogenic probes have significantly increased the sensitivity of NMR. Here, we present a compact EPR receiver design capable of cryogenic operation. Compared to room temperature operation, it reduces the noise by a factor of ≈2.5. We discuss in detail the design and analyze the resulting noise performance. At low microwave power, the input noise density closely follows the emission of a cooled 50Ω resistor over the whole measurement range from 20K up to room temperature. To minimize the influence of the microwave source noise, we use high microwave efficiency (≈1.1-1.7mTW(-1/2)) planar microresonators. Their efficient conversion of microwave power to magnetic field permits EPR measurements with very low power levels, typically ranging from a few μW down to fractions of nW. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Joel

    2004-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is an experiment to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The experiment initially was deployed at a shallow underground site, and is currently deployed at a deep underground site at the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. The detectors operate at cryogenic temperature, and are capable of distinguishing nuclear recoils from WIMP interactions from various backgrounds. The detectors are shielded from background by both active and passive elements. We will describe the components of the overall experiment, and focus on the novel data acquisition system that has been develop to control and monitor the experiment via the World Wide Web. Preliminary signals from the operation at Soudan will be discussed.

  8. Cryogenic High-Sensitivity Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Peter; Chui, Talso; Goodstein, David

    2005-01-01

    A proposed magnetometer for use in a cryogenic environment would be sensitive enough to measure a magnetic-flux density as small as a picogauss (10(exp -16) Tesla). In contrast, a typical conventional flux-gate magnetometer cannot measure a magnetic-flux density smaller that about 1 microgauss (10(exp -10) Tesla). One version of this device, for operation near the low end of the cryogenic temperature range, would include a piece of a paramagnetic material on a platform, the temperature of which would be controlled with a periodic variation. The variation in temperature would be measured by use of a conventional germanium resistance thermometer. A superconducting coil would be wound around the paramagnetic material and coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer.

  9. Cryogenic Flange and Seal Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of flanges, seals, and pipes are used to carry cryogenic fluid from a storage tank to the vehicle at launch sites. However, after a certain amount of cycles these raised face flanges with glass-filled Teflon gaskets have been found to have torque relaxation and are as a result susceptible to cryogenic fluid leakage if not re-torqued. The intent of this project is to identify alternate combinations of flanges and seals which may improve thermal cycle performance and decrease re-torque requirements. The general approach is to design a test fixture to evaluate leak characteristics between spiral and concentric serrations and to test alternate flange and seal combinations. Due to insufficient time, it was not possible to evaluate these different types of combinations for the combination that improved thermal cycle performance the most. However, the necessary drawings for the test fixture were designed and assembled along with the collection of the necessary parts.

  10. Development of GM cryocooler separate type liquid-helium-free 3He-4He dilution refrigerator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Y.; Ito, T.; Umeno, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Kamioka, Y.; Maehata, K.

    2009-02-01

    We developed the new liquid-helium-free dilution refrigerator system, in which the Gifford-McMahon (GM) cycle cryocooler and dilution refrigerator (DR) unit are separated. We obtained the base temperature below 50 mK in this DR system. In usual liquid-helium-free DR systems, the DR unit directly couples with GM-cryocooler in the same vacuum chamber. Therefore the mechanical vibration of GM-cryocooler is hardly removed from DR unit. In order to eliminate the vibration problem, the separated vacuum chamber contacting the GM-cryocooler is connected with the DR unit chamber by the flexible hose with length of about 1 meter. Thin flexible tubes used for circulation of the refrigerant gas and radiation shield are installed in the connection hose. The 4He gas, cooled in the GM-cryocooler unit, transfers to the DR unit throw the thin flexible tubes. After cooling the DR unit, the gas returns to GM-cryocooler unit with cooling of the radiation shield. We expect that our separate-type dilution refrigerator becomes a useful piece of apparatus for the low temperature experiments.

  11. Development of GM cryocooler separate type liquid-helium-free {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He dilution refrigerator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Y; Ito, T; Umeno, T; Suzuki, Y; Yoshida, S; Kamioka, Y [Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation, 10 Okubo, Tsukuba-shi, 300-2611 (Japan); Maehata, K [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka-shi, 819-0395 (Japan)], E-mail: Yoshihiro.Yamanaka@tn-sanso.co.jp

    2009-02-01

    We developed the new liquid-helium-free dilution refrigerator system, in which the Gifford-McMahon (GM) cycle cryocooler and dilution refrigerator (DR) unit are separated. We obtained the base temperature below 50 mK in this DR system. In usual liquid-helium-free DR systems, the DR unit directly couples with GM-cryocooler in the same vacuum chamber. Therefore the mechanical vibration of GM-cryocooler is hardly removed from DR unit. In order to eliminate the vibration problem, the separated vacuum chamber contacting the GM-cryocooler is connected with the DR unit chamber by the flexible hose with length of about 1 meter. Thin flexible tubes used for circulation of the refrigerant gas and radiation shield are installed in the connection hose. The {sup 4}He gas, cooled in the GM-cryocooler unit, transfers to the DR unit throw the thin flexible tubes. After cooling the DR unit, the gas returns to GM-cryocooler unit with cooling of the radiation shield. We expect that our separate-type dilution refrigerator becomes a useful piece of apparatus for the low temperature experiments.

  12. Development of a 4 K Stirling-Type Pulse Tube Cryocooler for a Mobile Terahertz Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. E.; Gerecht, E.; Radebaugh, R.; Garaway, I.

    2010-04-01

    We discuss in this paper the design and development of a 4 K Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler for a mobile terahertz detection system. This system integrates new heterodyne detector technology at terahertz frequencies with advancements of Stirling-type pulse tube technology that brings the advent of cooled detector sensitivities in a mobile, compact, and long duration operation system without degradation of sensitivity. To achieve this goal we reduced overall system size, input power, and temperature fluctuations and mechanical vibrations in order to maintain the detector sensitivity. The Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler developed for this system is a hybrid design employing a He-4 pulse-tube cryocooler operating at 60 Hz and 2.5 MPa average pressure that precools a He-3 pulse tube cryocooler operating at 30 Hz and 1.0 MPa average pressure to achieve 4 K cooling for the terahertz receiver. The He-4 cryocooler employs stainless steel mesh regenerators for the first stage and ErPr spheres for the second stage, while the He-3 cryocooler employs stainless mesh for the first stage and ErPr spheres for the second stage with a layered rare-earth third stage regenerator. Design details and cooler performance goals are discussed.

  13. A silicon single-crystal cryogenic optical resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Wiens, Eugen; Ernsting, Ingo; Luckmann, Heiko; Rosowski, Ulrich; Nevsky, Alexander; Schiller, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    We report on the demonstration and characterization of a silicon optical resonator for laser frequency stabilization, operating in the deep cryogenic regime at temperatures as low as 1.5 K. Robust operation was achieved, with absolute frequency drift less than 20 Hz over 1 hour. This stability allowed sensitive measurements of the resonator thermal expansion coefficient ($\\alpha$). We found $\\alpha=4.6\\times10^{-13}$ ${\\rm K^{-1}}$ at 1.6 K. At 16.8 K $\\alpha$ vanishes, with a derivative equal to $-6\\times10^{-10}$ ${\\rm K}^{-2}$. The temperature of the resonator was stabilized to a level below 10 $\\mu$K for averaging times longer than 20 s. The sensitivity of the resonator frequency to a variation of the laser power was also studied. The corresponding sensitivities and the expected Brownian noise indicate that this system should enable frequency stabilization of lasers at the low-$10^{-17}$ level.

  14. Silicon single-crystal cryogenic optical resonator: erratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Eugen; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Luckmann, Heiko; Rosowski, Ulrich; Nevsky, Alexander; Schiller, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We report on the demonstration and characterization of a silicon optical resonator for laser frequency stabilization, operating in the deep cryogenic regime at temperatures as low as 1.5 K. Robust operation was achieved, with absolute frequency drift less than 20 Hz over 1 hour. This stability allowed sensitive measurements of the resonator thermal expansion coefficient ($\\alpha$). We found $\\alpha=4.6\\times10^{-13}$ ${\\rm K^{-1}}$ at 1.6 K. At 16.8 K $\\alpha$ vanishes, with a derivative equal to $-6\\times10^{-10}$ ${\\rm K}^{-2}$. The temperature of the resonator was stabilized to a level below 10 $\\mu$K for averaging times longer than 20 s. The sensitivity of the resonator frequency to a variation of the laser power was also studied. The corresponding sensitivities and the expected Brownian noise indicate that this system should enable frequency stabilization of lasers at the low-$10^{-17}$ level.

  15. ZERODUR TAILORED for cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, R.; Westerhoff, T.

    2014-07-01

    ZERODUR® glass ceramic from SCHOTT is known for its very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) at room temperature and its excellent CTE homogeneity. It is widely used for ground-based astronomical mirrors but also for satellite applications. Many reference application demonstrate the excellent and long lasting performance of ZERODUR® components in orbit. For space application a low CTE of the mirror material is required at cryogenic temperatures together with a good match of the thermal expansion to the supporting structure material. It is possible to optimize the coefficient of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® for cryogenic applications. This paper reports on measurements of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® down to cryogenic temperatures of 10 K performed by the PTB (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstallt, Braunschweig, Germany, the national metrology laboratory). The ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO presented in this paper has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion down to 70 K. The maximum absolute integrated thermal expansion down to 10 K is only about 20 ppm. Mirror blanks made from ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO can be light weighted to almost 90% with our modern processing technologies. With ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO, SCHOTT offers the mirror blank material for the next generation of space telescope applications.

  16. Positronium production in cryogenic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B. S.; Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Liszkay, L.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-03-01

    We report measurements of positronium (Ps) formation following positron irradiation of mesoporous SiO2 films and Ge(100) single crystals at temperatures ranging from 12-700 K. As both of these materials generate Ps atoms via nonthermal processes, they are able to function as positron-positronium converters at cryogenic temperatures. Our data show that such Ps formation is possibly provided the targets are not compromised by adsorption of residual gas. In the case of SiO2 films, we observe a strong reduction in the Ps formation efficiency following irradiation with UV laser light (λ =243.01 nm) below 250 K, in accordance with previous observations of radiation-induced surface paramagnetic centers. Conversely, Ps emission from Ge is enhanced by irradiation with visible laser light (λ =532 nm) via a photoemission process that persists at cryogenic temperatures. Both mesoporous SiO2 films and Ge crystals were found to produce Ps efficiently in cryogenic environments. Accordingly, these materials are likely to prove useful in several areas of research, including Ps mediated antihydrogen formation conducted in the cold bore of a superconducting magnet, the production of Rydberg Ps for experiments in which the effects of black-body radiation must be minimized, and the utilization of mesoporous structures that have been modified to produce cold Ps atoms.

  17. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation.

  18. Physics Based Model for Cryogenic Chilldown and Loading. Part IV: Code Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchinsky, D. G.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Brown, B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the fourth report in a series of technical reports that describe separated two-phase flow model application to the cryogenic loading operation. In this report we present the structure of the code. The code consists of five major modules: (1) geometry module; (2) solver; (3) material properties; (4) correlations; and finally (5) stability control module. The two key modules - solver and correlations - are further divided into a number of submodules. Most of the physics and knowledge databases related to the properties of cryogenic two-phase flow are included into the cryogenic correlations module. The functional form of those correlations is not well established and is a subject of extensive research. Multiple parametric forms for various correlations are currently available. Some of them are included into correlations module as will be described in details in a separate technical report. Here we describe the overall structure of the code and focus on the details of the solver and stability control modules.

  19. Real-Time Model-Based Leak-Through Detection within Cryogenic Flow Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M.; Figueroa, F.

    2015-01-01

    The timely detection of leaks within cryogenic fuel replenishment systems is of significant importance to operators on account of the safety and economic impacts associated with material loss and operational inefficiencies. Associated loss in control of pressure also effects the stability and ability to control the phase of cryogenic fluids during replenishment operations. Current research dedicated to providing Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) coverage of such cryogenic replenishment systems has focused on the detection of leaks to atmosphere involving relatively simple model-based diagnostic approaches that, while effective, are unable to isolate the fault to specific piping system components. The authors have extended this research to focus on the detection of leaks through closed valves that are intended to isolate sections of the piping system from the flow and pressurization of cryogenic fluids. The described approach employs model-based detection of leak-through conditions based on correlations of pressure changes across isolation valves and attempts to isolate the faults to specific valves. Implementation of this capability is enabled by knowledge and information embedded in the domain model of the system. The approach has been used effectively to detect such leak-through faults during cryogenic operational testing at the Cryogenic Testbed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

  20. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  1. Cryogenic MEMS Technology for Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of cryogenic microwave components, such as focal plane polarization modulators, first requires an RF MEMS switching technology that operates...

  2. All-metal, compact heat exchanger for space cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Walter L.; Valenzuela, Javier; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the development of a high performance, all metal compact heat exchanger. The device is designed for use in a reverse Brayton cryogenic cooler which provides five watts of refrigeration at 70 K. The heat exchanger consists of a stainless steel tube concentrically assembled within a second stainless steel tube. Approximately 300 pairs of slotted copper disks and matching annular slotted copper plates are positioned along the centerline axis of the concentric tubes. Each of the disks and plates has approximately 1200 precise slots machined by means of a special electric discharge process. Positioning of the disk and plate pairs is accomplished by means of dimples in the surface of the tubes. Mechanical and thermal connections between the tubes and plate/disk pairs are made by solder joints. The heat exchanger assembly is 9 cm in diameter by 50 cm in length and has a mass of 10 kg. The predicted thermal effectiveness is greater than 0.985 at design conditions. Pressure loss at design conditions is less than 5 kPa in both fluid passages. Tests were performed on a subassembly of plates integrally soldered to two end headers. The measured thermal effectiveness of the test article exceeded predicted levels. Pressure losses were negligibly higher than predictions.

  3. Thermodynamic design of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, C. W.; Yang, H. S.; Sohn, Song Ho; Lim, Ji Hyun; Oh, S. R.; Hwang, Si Dole

    2012-06-01

    Thermodynamic design of Brayton cryocooler is presented as part of an ongoing governmental project in Korea, aiming at 1 km HTS power cable in the transmission grid. The refrigeration requirement is 10 kW for continuously sub-cooling liquid nitrogen from 72 K to 65 K. An ideal Brayton cycle for this application is first investigated to examine the fundamental features. Then a practical cycle for a Brayton cryocooler is designed, taking into account the performance of compressor, expander, and heat exchangers. Commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) is used for simulating the refrigeration cycle with real fluid properties of refrigerant. Helium is selected as a refrigerant, as it is superior to neon in thermodynamic efficiency. The operating pressure and flow rate of refrigerant are decided with a constraint to avoid the freezing of liquid nitrogen

  4. Cryogenic Operation Methodology and Cryogen Management at CERN over the last 15 Years

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Claudet, S; Gayet, Ph; Passardi, Giorgio; Serio, L; Tavian, L

    2009-01-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research has progressively implemented and brought into operation an impressive number of cryogenic units (34). The paper will present the evolution of CERN’s cryogenic infrastructure and summarize results from cryogenic operation cumulating 590’000 running hours over the last fifteen years. The implemented methodology allowing reaching a high level of plant reliability will be described. CERN also becomes an intensive user of cryogens. Contracts for the delivery of 320 t of liquid helium and 70’000 t of liquid nitrogen have been adjudicated. The paper will describe the procurement strategy, the storage infrastructure and cryogen inventory.

  5. Optical Refrigeration for Dramatically Improved Cryogenic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-24

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and...cryocooling, solid-state cooling, lasers, anti-Stokes luminescence , sensor cooling, IR sensor cooling, vibration-free 16.  SECURITY  CLASSIFICATION  OF...radiatively   decaying   to   the   ground-­‐state  manifold   levels   by   emitting   photons  with   average   fluorescent   energy

  6. Multispectral optical telescope alignment testing for a cryogenic space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newswander, Trent; Hooser, Preston; Champagne, James

    2016-09-01

    Multispectral space telescopes with visible to long wave infrared spectral bands provide difficult alignment challenges. The visible channels require precision in alignment and stability to provide good image quality in short wavelengths. This is most often accomplished by choosing materials with near zero thermal expansion glass or ceramic mirrors metered with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) that are designed to have a matching thermal expansion. The IR channels are less sensitive to alignment but they often require cryogenic cooling for improved sensitivity with the reduced radiometric background. Finding efficient solutions to this difficult problem of maintaining good visible image quality at cryogenic temperatures has been explored with the building and testing of a telescope simulator. The telescope simulator is an onaxis ZERODUR® mirror, CFRP metered set of optics. Testing has been completed to accurately measure telescope optical element alignment and mirror figure changes in a cryogenic space simulated environment. Measured alignment error and mirror figure error test results are reported with a discussion of their impact on system optical performance.

  7. Polymer-Reinforced, Non-Brittle, Lightweight Cryogenic Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary application for cryogenic insulating foams will be fuel tank applications for fueling systems. It is crucial for this insulation to be incorporated into systems that survive vacuum and terrestrial environments. It is hypothesized that by forming an open-cell silica-reinforced polymer structure, the foam structures will exhibit the necessary strength to maintain shape. This will, in turn, maintain the insulating capabilities of the foam insulation. Besides mechanical stability in the form of crush resistance, it is important for these insulating materials to exhibit water penetration resistance. Hydrocarbon-terminated foam surfaces were implemented to impart hydrophobic functionality that apparently limits moisture penetration through the foam. During the freezing process, water accumulates on the surfaces of the foams. However, when hydrocarbon-terminated surfaces are present, water apparently beads and forms crystals, leading to less apparent accumulation. The object of this work is to develop inexpensive structural cryogenic insulation foam that has increased impact resistance for launch and ground-based cryogenic systems. Two parallel approaches will be pursued: a silica-polymer co-foaming technique and a post foam coating technique. Insulation characteristics, flexibility, and water uptake can be fine-tuned through the manipulation of the polyurethane foam scaffold. Silicate coatings for polyurethane foams and aerogel-impregnated polyurethane foams have been developed and tested. A highly porous aerogel-like material may be fabricated using a co-foam and coated foam techniques, and can insulate at liquid temperatures using the composite foam

  8. 120 Hz pulse tube cryocooler for fast cooldown to 50 K

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; Lewis, Michal; Gan, Zhihua; Radebaugh, Ray

    2007-01-01

    A pulse tube cryocooler operating at 120 Hz with 3.5 MPa average pressure achieved a no-load temperature of about 49.9 K and a cooldown time to 80 K of 5.5 min. The net refrigeration power at 80 K was 3.35 W with an efficiency of 19.7% of Carnot when referred to input pressure-volume (PV or a

  9. Simulation of Thermal Processes in Superconducting Pancake Coils Cooled by GM Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebioda, M.; Rymaszewski, J.; Korzeniewska, E.

    2014-04-01

    This article presents the thermal model of a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system with the closed cycle helium cryocooler. The authors propose the use of contact-cooled coils with maintaining the possibility of the system reconfiguring. The model assumes the use of the second generation superconducting tapes to make the windings in the form of flat discs (pancakes). The paper presents results for a field model of the single pancake coil and the winding system consisting of several coils.

  10. A self-circulation helium liquefaction system with five 4 K G-M cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Gong, Linghui; Li, Laifeng; Xu, Xiangdong; Xie, Zuqi; Zhao, Hongwei; Guo, Xiaohong

    2011-06-01

    A self-circulation helium liquefaction system (SCHLS) with five 4 K G-M cryocoolers is developed to supply liquid helium (LHe) for SECRAL (a superconducting ECR ion source used in Lanzhou city, China). LHe is vaporized in SECRAL and warmed up to room temperature. SCHLS will re-liquefy the helium gas at a rate of 83.2 L/day under normal atmosphere pressure. With SCHLS, SECRAL system can run online without any interruption of refilling LHe.

  11. A model of a subcritical Joule-Thomson cryocooler with condensation inside the recuperator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusser, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Maytal, B.-Z.; Grossman, G.

    2009-08-01

    To develop a tool for predicting of heat and mass transfer in Joule-Thomson cryocoolers working at subcritical pressures, we study a counter flow heat exchanger with condensation by employing the integral method. The effects of inlet pressure and working fluid are predicted. We also show that there is an optimal value of the enthalpy difference along the heat exchanger for which its length is minimal.

  12. A model of a subcritical Joule-Thomson cryocooler with condensation inside the recuperator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shusser, M.; Grossman, G. [Technion, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Haifa (Israel); Ben-Zvi, I.; Maytal, B.Z. [Rafael Ltd., Haifa (Israel)

    2009-08-15

    To develop a tool for predicting of heat and mass transfer in Joule-Thomson cryocoolers working at subcritical pressures, we study a counter flow heat exchanger with condensation by employing the integral method. The effects of inlet pressure and working fluid are predicted. We also show that there is an optimal value of the enthalpy difference along the heat exchanger for which its length is minimal. (orig.)

  13. A vibration free closed-cycle 1 K cryostat with a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Lichtenwalter, Ben

    2014-01-01

    A 1 K closed-cycle cryostat, pre-cooled by a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler, has been developed. The Cryomech PT410 pulse tube cryocooler liquefies helium in a vacuum insulated sleeve at a pressure of ˜1 atm. Liquid helium flows through a JT valve and into a 1 K pot that is evacuated by a vacuum pump. The discharged gas from the vacuum is routed to the top of the sleeve to be liquefied. This design accomplishes closed-cycle 1 K refrigeration and provides continuous cooling below 2 K. Using two XDS10 vacuum pumps and with the JT valve optimized for maximum cooling capacity, the 1 K cooling station can reach a no-load temperature of 1.51 K and provide a capacity of 225 mW at 1.76 K. The temperature oscillations on the 4 K and 1 K cooling stations are ± 3 mK. The cryostat is designed so that there is no direct mechanical contact between the pulse tube cryocooler heat exchangers and the 1 K cooling station. This design feature enables exceptionally low vibration operation at the 1 K cooling station.

  14. Operation of A Sunpower M87 Cryocooler In A Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breon, S. R.; Shirey, K. A.; Banks, I. S.; Warner, B. A.; Boyle, R. F.; Mustafi, S.; Krebs,Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) is an experiment that will be flown as an attached payload on the International Space Station to detect dark matter and antimatter. It uses large superconducting magnets cooled with superfluid helium to bend the path of cosmic particles through a series of detectors, which then measure the mass, speed, charge, and direction of the particles. Four Sunpower M87N Stirling-cycle cryocoolers are used to extend the mission life by cooling the outer vapor-cooled shield of the dewar. The main magnet coils are separated by a distance of approximately 1 m and the coolers are located approximately 1.5 m from the center line of the magnet, where the field is as high as 925 gauss perpendicular to the cryocooler axis and 400 gauss along the cryocooler axis. Interactions between the applied magnetic field and the linear motor may result in additional forces and torques on the compressor piston. Motion of the compressor arid displacer pistons through the magnetic field spatial gradients will generate eddy currents. Additional eddy currents are created during magnet charge, discharge, and quench by the time-varying magnetic field. The results of tests to determine the magnitude of the forces, torques, and heating effects, as well as the need for additional magnetic shielding, are presented.

  15. Cool-down acceleration of G-M cryocoolers with thermal oscillations passively damped by helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, R. J.; Delmas, J.

    2015-12-01

    4 K Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers suffer from inherent temperature oscillations which can be a problem for certain attached electronic instrumentation. Sumitomo Heavy Industries has exploited the high volumetric specific heat of super-critical He to quell these oscillations (approx. 10 dB) by strongly thermally linking a separate vessel of He to the second stage; no significant thermal resistance is added between the payload and the working gas of the cryocooler. A noticeable effect of the helium damper is to increase the cool-down time of the second stage below 10 K. For the operation of niobium-based superconducting electronics (NbSCE), a common practice is to warm the circuits above the critical temperature (∼9 K) and then cool to the operating point in order to redistribute trapped magnetic fluxons, so for NbSCE users, the time to cool from 10 K is important. The gas in the helium damper is shared between a room-temperature buffer tank and the 2nd stage vessel, which are connected by a capillary tube. We show that the total cool-down time below 10 K can be substantially reduced by introducing a combination of thermal linkages between the cryocooler and the capillary tube and in-line relief valves, which control the He mass distribution between the warm canister and cold vessel. The time to reach operating temperature from the superconducting transition has been reduced to <25% of the time needed without these low-cost modifications.

  16. A novel coupled VM-PT cryocooler operating at liquid helium temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Changzhao; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents experimental results on a novel two-stage gas-coupled VM-PT cryocooler, which is a one-stage VM cooler coupled a pulse tube cooler. In order to reach temperatures below the critical point of helium-4, a one-stage coaxial pulse tube cryocooler was gas-coupled on the cold end of the former VM cryocooler. The low temperature inertance tube and room temperature gas reservoir were used as phase shifters. The influence of room temperature double-inlet was first investigated, and the results showed that it added excessive heat loss. Then the inertance tube, regenerator and the length of the pulse tube were researched experimentally. Especially, the DC flow, whose function is similar to the double-orifice, was experimentally studied, and shown to contribute about 0.2 K for the no-load temperature. The minimum no-load temperature of 4.4 K was obtained with a pressure ratio near 1.5, working frequency of 2.2 Hz, and average pressure of 1.73 MPa.

  17. Reduction of temperature fluctuation within low temperature region using a cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Daiki; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Murata, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Fumiaki; Komine, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    Modeling and experiments are performed to decrease temperature fluctuation generated by the periodic motion of the displacer in a Gifford-McMahon (GM) type cryocooler within the low-temperature region. The one-dimensional heat equation allows us to show that thermal diffusivity is an essential factor to achieve much smaller temperature fluctuation, and fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) with low thermal diffusivity makes it possible to reduce the temperature fluctuation dramatically. Based on the model, experiments are performed to vary the thickness of two FRP dampers, on the cryohead of the cryocooler and on the sample stage. As a result, the FRP dampers enable us to achieve the temperature fluctuations of only 0.7 mK, corresponding to a standard deviation of 0.25 mK, when the sample stage is maintained at 4.2000 K, even if a GM cryocooler is utilized for cooling the temperature, which introduces an initial temperature fluctuation of 282 mK at the cryohead.

  18. Compact high-efficiency linear cryocooler in single-piston moving magnet design for HOT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühlich, I.; Mai, M.; Rosenhagen, C.; Withopf, A.; Zehner, S.

    2012-06-01

    State of the art Mid Wave IR-technology has the potential to rise the FPA temperature from 77K to 130-150K (High Operation Temperature, HOT). Using a HOT FPA will significantly lower SWaP and keep those parameters finally dominated by the employed cryocooler. Therefore, compact high performance cryocoolers are mandatory. AIM has developed the SX040 cooler, optimized for FPA temperatures of about 95K (presented at SPIE 2010). The SX040 cooler incorporates a high efficient dual piston driving mechanism resulting in a very compact compressor of less than 100mm length. Higher compactness - especially shorter compressors - can be achieved by change from dual to single piston design. The new SX030 compressor has such a single piston Moving Magnet driving mechanism resulting in a compressor length of about 60mm. Common for SX040 and SX030 family is a Moving Magnet driving mechanism with coils placed outside the helium vessel. In combination with high performance plastics for the piston surfaces this design enables lifetimes in excess of 20,000h MTTF. Because of the higher FPA temperature and a higher operating frequency also a new displacer needs to be developed. Based on the existing 1/4" coldfinger interface AIM developed a new displacer optimized for an FPA temperature of 140K and above. This paper gives an overview on the development of this new compact single piston cryocooler. Technical details and performance data will be shown.

  19. Joule-Thomson cryocooler with neon and nitrogen mixture using commercial air-conditioning compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisung; Oh, Haejin; Baek, Seungwhan; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-01-01

    A 2-stage mixed refrigerant (MR) Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler was designed for cooling high temperature superconducting cable below 70 K. The low temperature cycle was to operate with neon-nitrogen mixture, and the required compression ratio was approximately 24 when the suction pressure was 100 kPa. The high compression ratio of 24, the low pressure of 100 kPa at compressor suction, and the working fluid with high heat of compression were challenging issues to existing typical compression systems. We developed an innovative compression system with commercial oil-lubricated air-conditioning compressors. They were 2-stage rotary compressors originally designed for R410Aand connected in series. The compressors were modified to accommodate effective intercooling at every stage to alleviate compressor overheating problem. Additionally, fine-grade three-stage oil filters, an adsorber, and driers were installed at the discharge line to avoid a potential clogging problem from oil mist and moisture at low temperature sections. The present compression system was specifically demonstrated with a neon-nitrogen MR JT cryocooler. The operating pressure ratio was able to meet the designed specifications, and the recorded no-load mini mum temperature was 63.5 K . Commercial air-conditioning compressors were successfully applied to the high-c ompression ratio MR JT cryocooler with adequate modification using off-the-shelf components.

  20. Performance Testing of a Lightweight, High Efficiency 95 K Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Lou; Kittel, P.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Tward, E.; Arnold, Jim A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Performance data are presented for a flight-like, lightweight, high efficiency pulse tube cryogenic cooler. The cooler has a mass of less than 4.0 kg, and an efficiency of 12 W/W, which is 18% of Carnot at 95 K, nearly double the efficiency of previous cooler designs, The mass of the cooler has been reduced by approximately a factor of three. The design point cooling power is 10 watts at 95 K at a heat rejection temperature of 300 K. The no-load temperature is 45 K. The compressor is built by Hymatic Engineering, UK, and is of a horizontally opposed piston design using flexure bearings. The vertical pulse tube is built by TRW with the heat exchanger or cold block located approximately mid-way along the tube. The final assembly and integration is also performed by TRW. The inertance tube and dead volume are contained within one of the compressor end caps. The cooler was developed by TRW under a joint NASA-DOD program, and has a goal of 10 yr operating lifetime. Potential NASA applications will focus on using coolers of this type in Zero boil off (ZBO) cryogen storage topologies for next generation launch vehicles. Zero boil off systems will feature significant reductions in tank size and Initial Mass to Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO), thereby significantly reducing the cost of access to space, and enabling future missions. The coolers can be used directly in liquid oxygen (LOx) or liquid methane ZBO systems, as shield coolers in liquid hydrogen tanks, or as first stage coolers in two-stage liquid hydrogen (LH2) ZBO cooler systems. Finally, the coolers could find applications in exploration missions where either propellants or breathable oxygen are extracted from the planetary atmosphere using a Sabatier or similar process. The gases could then be liquefied for storage either directly in return vehicle propellant tanks or on the planetary surface. Data presented were taken with the cooler operating in a vacuum of 10 (exp -5) torr, at controlled rejection temperatures from

  1. Vibration-induced electrical noise in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator: Characterization, mitigation, and impact on qubit coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Rachpon; Laucht, Arne; Dehollain, Juan Pablo; Bar, Daniel; Freer, Solomon; Simmons, Stephanie; Muhonen, Juha T.; Morello, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Cryogen-free low-temperature setups are becoming more prominent in experimental science due to their convenience and reliability, and concern about the increasing scarcity of helium as a natural resource. Despite not having any moving parts at the cold end, pulse tube cryocoolers introduce vibrations that can be detrimental to the experiments. We characterize the coupling of these vibrations to the electrical signal observed on cables installed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. The dominant electrical noise is in the 5-10 kHz range and its magnitude is found to be strongly temperature dependent. We test the performance of different cables designed to diagnose and tackle the noise, and find triboelectrics to be the dominant mechanism coupling the vibrations to the electrical signal. Flattening a semi-rigid cable or jacketing a flexible cable in order to restrict movement within the cable, successfully reduces the noise level by over an order of magnitude. Furthermore, we characterize the effect of the pulse tube vibrations on an electron spin qubit device in this setup. Coherence measurements are used to map out the spectrum of the noise experienced by the qubit, revealing spectral components matching the spectral signature of the pulse tube.

  2. Vibration-induced electrical noise in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator: characterization, mitigation, and impact on qubit coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Kalra, Rachpon; Dehollain, Juan P; Bar, Daniel; Freer, Solomon; Simmons, Stephanie; Muhonen, Juha T; Morello, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cryogen-free low-temperature setups are becoming more prominent in experimental science for their convenience, reliability and the increasing scarcity of helium as a natural resource. Despite not having any moving parts at the cold end, pulse tube cryocoolers introduce vibrations that can be detrimental to the experiments. We characterize the coupling of these vibrations to the electrical signal observed on cables installed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. The dominant electrical noise is in the 5 to 10 kHz range and its magnitude is found to be strongly temperature dependent. We test the performance of different cables designed to diagnose and tackle the noise, and find triboelectrics to be the dominant mechanism coupling the vibrations to the electrical signal. Flattening a semi-rigid cable or jacketing a flexible cable in order to restrict movement within the cable, successfully reduces the noise level by over an order of magnitude. Furthermore, we characterize the effect of the pulse tube vibratio...

  3. Spray-On Foam Insulations for Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Cofman, B. E.; Menghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability with throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of from 200 to 260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the

  4. -150℃逆布雷顿空气制冷机动态温降特性研究%Study on the Dynamic Cooling Performance of a-150 ℃ Reverse Brayton Cycle Air Cryocooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡君伟; 孙皖; 李斌; 李涛; 侯予

    2013-01-01

    A turboexpander having a working wheel with a diameter of 24mm and a plate-fin heat exchanger were applied in a retrofitted -150 ℃ air cryocooler system. A vacuum cryogenic trap (absolute pressure < 10-3 Pa) was used for insulation. The dynamic cooling performance of the whole system was studied under the conditions of different brake wheel configurations. A numerical model in respect of the dynamic cooling performance of the - 150 ℃ air cryocooler system was established. The results show that the brake wheel size significantly affects the cooling performance of the cryocooler, and the lowest system temperature is under -150 ℃. Additionally, the numerical results agree well with the experimental data.%为了研究空气制冷机的动态温降特性,对采用工作轮直径为24 mm的小型透平膨胀机和板翅式换热器的逆布雷顿循环空气制冷机实验台进行了改进.采用高真空绝热冷箱对制冷机进行绝热,可使绝对压力低于10-3 Pa,得到的设计制冷温度为-150℃.对不同进口参数和采用不同直径风机轮的制冷机工况进行了实验研究,获得了透平膨胀机的实际温降曲线;以实验系统为基础建立了数学模型,得到了相应的理论温降曲线.研究结果表明:风机轮尺寸对空气制冷机动态温降过程的影响较大,实验的最低温度低于-150℃;所建理论模型能够较好地预测实际系统温降的过程.

  5. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Jonathan D [San Francisco, CA

    2011-07-05

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  6. Neutron Detection with Cryogenics and Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    bell, Z.W.; Carpenter, D.A.; Cristy, S.S.; Lamberti, V.E.

    2005-03-10

    The common methods of neutron detection are reviewed with special attention paid to the application of cryogenics and semiconductors to the problem. The authors' work with LiF- and boron-based cryogenic instruments is described as well as the use of CdTe and HgI{sub 2} for direct detection of neutrons.

  7. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  8. Continuous-Reading Cryogen Level Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F. E.; Fox, E.; Macumber, S.

    1984-01-01

    Two pressure transducers used in system for measuring amount of cryogenic liquid in tank. System provides continuous measurements accurate within 0.03 percent. Sensors determine pressure in liquid and vapor in tank. Microprocessor uses pressure difference to compute mass of cryogenic liquid in tank. New system allows continuous sensing; unaffected by localized variations in composition and density as are capacitance-sensing schemes.

  9. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  10. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  11. ISOCAM experiment cryogenic test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa, L.; Collaudin, B.

    The thermal requirements for ISOCAM, an IR camera to be mounted aboard the ISO satellite, are reviewed, and model predictions are matched with test results. The degree of model validation suggested by analytical prediction vs test results is described. Predictions of thermal conduction through mounting screws, from ball bearings, and of the heat distribution in the rotor and stator of a cryogenic stepper motor correlate well with actual test results. It is shown that ISOCAM meets the thermal requirements necessary for successful on-orbit operation. The model predicted such phenomena as 'chopped' motor function and the twofold increase in temperature resulting from continuous motor operation.

  12. Thermally-Conductive Metallic Coatings and Applications for Heat Removal on In-Space Cryogenic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, Lauren; Hervol, David; Waters, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    For large in-space cryogenic upper stages, substantial axial heat removal from a forward skirt by vapor-based heat interception may not be achieved by simple attachment methods unless sufficient thermal conductance from the skirt to the cooling fluid can be achieved. Preferable methods would allow for the addition of the cooling system to existing structure with minimal impact on the structure. Otherwise, significant modification to the basic structural design andor novel and complex attachment mechanisms with high effective thermal conductance are likely to be required. The approach being pursued by evolvable Cryogenics (eCryo) is to increase the thermal performance of a relatively simple attachment system by applying metallic or other thermally conductive material coatings to the mating surface area of the fluid channel where it is attached the skirt wall. The expectation of candidate materials is that the dramatic increase in conductivity of pure metals at temperatures close to liquid hydrogen vapor temperature will compensate for the reduced actual contact area typical of mechanical joints. Basic contact conductance data at low temperatures for candidate interface materials is required to enable the test approach. A test rig was designed at NASA Glenn Research Center to provide thermal contact resistance testing between small sample coupons coated with conductive material via electron beam evaporation, a low-temperature option that will not affect physical properties of base materials. Average coating thicknesses were 10 k. The test fixture was designed to mount directly to a cryocooler cold head within a vacuum test chamber. The purpose of this test was to determine qualitative contact conductance between various test samples. Results from this effort will be implemented in a sub-scale vapor-based heat interception test, where the applicability for increased heat removal on large structural skirts will be considered.

  13. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  14. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tavian, L; Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Wagner, U; van Weelderen, R

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system a...

  15. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  16. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  17. Development and test of a cryogenic trap system dedicated to confinement of radioactive volatile isotopes in SPIRAL2 post-accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souli, M., E-mail: souli@ganil.fr [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN CEDEX 5 (France); Dolegieviez, P.; Fadil, M.; Gallardo, P.; Levallois, R.; Munoz, H.; Ozille, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN CEDEX 5 (France); Rouille, G.; Galet, F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay (IPNO), CNRS/IN2P3, 15 rue Georges CLEMENCEAU 91406 ORSAY (France)

    2011-12-11

    A cryogenic trap system called Cryotrap has been studied and developed in the framework of nuclear safety studies for SPIRAL2 accelerator. The main objective of Cryotrap is to confine and reduce strongly the migration of radioactive volatile isotopes in beam lines. These radioactive gases are produced after interaction between a deuteron beam and a fissile target. Mainly, Cryotrap is composed by a vacuum vessel and two copper thermal screens maintained separately at two temperatures T{sub 1}=80 K and T{sub 2}=20 K. A Cryocooler with two stages at previous temperatures is used to remove static heat losses of the cryostat and ensure an efficient cooling of the system. Due to strong radiological constraints that surround Cryotrap, the coupling system between Cryocooler and thermal screens is based on aluminum thermo-mechanical contraction. The main objective of this original design is to limit direct human maintenance interventions and provide maximum automated operations. A preliminary prototype of Cryotrap has been developed and tested at GANIL laboratory to validate its design, and determine its thermal performance and trapping efficiency. In this paper, we will first introduce briefly SPIRAL2 project and discuss the main role of Cryotrap in nuclear safety of the accelerator. Then, we will describe the proposed conceptual design of Cryotrap and its main characteristics. After that, we will focus on test experiment and analyze experimental data. Finally, we will present preliminary results of gas trapping efficiency tests.

  18. A Cryogenic Target for Compton Scattering Experiments at HI γS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendellen, David; Ahmed, Mohammad; Weller, Henry; Feldman, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested a cryogenic target for use at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HI γS). The target is able to liquefy helium (LHe), hydrogen (LH2), and deuterium (LD2). It precools room-temperature gas in two stages with a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The precooled gas condenses onto a series of copper fins and drips down to fill a 0.25 L Kapton target cell. The cryotarget will be used to measure nuclear and nucleon electromagnetic polarizabilities. The electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleons, α and β, will be probed by scattering a γ-ray beam on unpolarized LD2 and LH2 targets. Scattered photons will be detected by the HI γS NaI Detector Array (HINDA). We have tested the target with LHe at 3 K and are preparing for LD2 testing and production running. Work supported by US Department of Energy Contracts DE-FG02-97ER41033, DE-FG02-06ER41422, and DE-SCOO0536.

  19. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerator with separate 1K cooling circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Kurt

    2012-06-01

    Helium-3,4 dilution refrigeration is indispensable for low temperature science and engineering as it is the only method which provides temperatures between 0.3 K and 0.005 K for unlimited working periods. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators are about to replace traditional cryostats with liquid helium precooling. The dilution circuit is always precooled by a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler; therefore, refrigeration capacities are available to the experimentalist at the temperatures of the two stages of the pulse tube cooler, and furthermore at three temperatures of the dilution circuit (~ 0.7 K - still, 0.1 K - heat exchanger, ~ 0.01 K - mixing chamber). However, there are quite a few applications (e.g. quantum information processing or astro-physics) where the cooling power of the still near ~ 1K is not sufficient to cool amplifiers and electric lines. In our work we present a dilution refrigerator where a He-4 cooling circuit has been added in the cryostat to the dilution circuit. This He-4 circuit provides up to 60 mW of refrigeration capacity in addition to the cooling capacity of ~ 30 mW of the still. The dilution circuit and the 1Kcircuit can be operated together or separately.

  20. A Cryogen-free Cryostat for Scientific Experiment in Pulsed High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoliang; Li, Liang; Zuo, Huakun; Liu, Mengyu; Peng, Tao

    Traditional cryostats for scientific experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields use liquid helium as the cooling source. To reduce the running cost and to increase the operational efficiency, a cryogen-free cryostat based on a GM cryocooler has been developed for a 60 T pulsed field measurement cell at Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. A double layer temperature-control insert was designed to obtain a stable temperature in the sample chamber of the cryostat. In order to eliminate the sample temperature fluctuation caused by the eddy current heating during the pulse, the inner layer is made from a fiberglass tubing with an epoxy coating. Different from the traditional cryostat, the sample and the temperature controller are not immerged in the 4He bath. Instead, they are separated by helium gas under sub-atmospheric pressure, which makes the heat transfer smoother. At the sample position, a resistance heater wound with antiparallel wires is mounted on the inner layer to heat the sample. Using the temperature-control insert, the temperature can be controlled with an accuracy of ±0.01 K in the range of 1.4 K-20 K, and ±0.05 K between 20 K and 300 K.