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Sample records for crp-fnr type transcriptional

  1. Modulation of global low-frequency motions underlies allosteric regulation: demonstration in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

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    Thomas L Rodgers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein "design space" that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have

  2. Roles of a novel Crp/Fnr family transcription factor Lmo0753 in soil survival, biofilm production and surface attachment to fresh produce of Listeria monocytogenes.

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    Joelle K Salazar

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of an infectious disease, listeriosis. L. monocytogenes is ubiquitous in nature and has the ability to persist in food processing environments for extended periods of time by forming biofilms and resisting industrial sanitization. Human listeriosis outbreaks are commonly linked to contaminated dairy products, ready-to-eat meats, and in recent years, fresh produce such as lettuce and cantaloupes. We identified a putative Crp/Fnr family transcription factor Lmo0753 that is highly specific to human-associated genetic lineages of L. monocytogenes. Lmo0753 possesses two conserved functional domains similar to the major virulence regulator PrfA in L. monocytogenes. To determine if Lmo0753 is involved in environmental persistence-related mechanisms, we compared lmo0753 deletion mutants with respective wild type and complementation mutants of two fully sequenced L. monocytogenes genetic lineage II strains 10403S and EGDe for the relative ability of growth under different nutrient availability and temperatures, soil survival, biofilm productivity and attachment to select fresh produce surfaces including romaine lettuce leaves and cantaloupe rinds. Our results collectively suggested that Lmo0753 plays an important role in L. monocytogenes biofilm production and attachment to fresh produce, which may contribute to the environmental persistence and recent emergence of this pathogen in human listeriosis outbreaks linked to fresh produce.

  3. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

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    Philip D Townsend

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  4. The CRP/FNR family protein Bcam1349 is a c-di-GMP effector that regulates biofilm formation in the respiratory pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; O'Connell, Aileen; Nilsson, Martin

    2011-01-01

    to control a wide range of functions in bacteria, but little is known about these regulatory mechanisms in B. cenocepacia. Here we investigated the role that c-di-GMP plays in the regulation of biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Elevated intracellular levels of c-di-GMP promoted wrinkly...... colony, pellicle and biofilm formation in B. cenocepacia. A screen for transposon mutants unable to respond to elevated levels of c-di-GMP led to the identification of the mutant bcam1349 that did not display increased biofilm and pellicle formation with excessive c-di-GMP levels, and displayed a biofilm...... larvae infection model. Taken together, these findings suggest that the Bcam1349 protein is a transcriptional regulator that binds c-di-GMP and regulates biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia in response to the level of c-di-GMP....

  5. Reconstruction of the core and extended regulons of global transcription factors.

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    Yann S Dufour

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The processes underlying the evolution of regulatory networks are unclear. To address this question, we used a comparative genomics approach that takes advantage of the large number of sequenced bacterial genomes to predict conserved and variable members of transcriptional regulatory networks across phylogenetically related organisms. Specifically, we developed a computational method to predict the conserved regulons of transcription factors across alpha-proteobacteria. We focused on the CRP/FNR super-family of transcription factors because it contains several well-characterized members, such as FNR, FixK, and DNR. While FNR, FixK, and DNR are each proposed to regulate different aspects of anaerobic metabolism, they are predicted to recognize very similar DNA target sequences, and they occur in various combinations among individual alpha-proteobacterial species. In this study, the composition of the respective FNR, FixK, or DNR conserved regulons across 87 alpha-proteobacterial species was predicted by comparing the phylogenetic profiles of the regulators with the profiles of putative target genes. The utility of our predictions was evaluated by experimentally characterizing the FnrL regulon (a FNR-type regulator in the alpha-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Our results show that this approach correctly predicted many regulon members, provided new insights into the biological functions of the respective regulons for these regulators, and suggested models for the evolution of the corresponding transcriptional networks. Our findings also predict that, at least for the FNR-type regulators, there is a core set of target genes conserved across many species. In addition, the members of the so-called extended regulons for the FNR-type regulators vary even among closely related species, possibly reflecting species-specific adaptation to environmental and other factors. The comparative genomics approach we developed is readily applicable to other

  6. Molecular misreading. A new type of transcript mutation in gerontology.

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    van Leeuwen, F W; Fischer, D F; Benne, R; Hol, E M

    2000-06-01

    Molecular misreading is a novel process that causes mutations in neuronal transcripts. It is defined as the inaccurate conversion of genomic information from DNA into nonsense transcripts and the subsequent translation into mutant proteins. As a result of dinucleotide deletions (delta GA, delta GU, delta CU) in and around GAGAG motifs in mRNA the reading frame shifts to the +1 frame, and subsequently the so-called +1 proteins are synthetized. +1 Proteins have a wild-type NH2 terminus and from the site of the dinucleotide deletion onwards an aberrant, nonfunctional COOH terminus. Molecular misreading was found in the rat vasopressin gene associated with diabetes insipidus and in the human genes linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD), that is, beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) and ubiquitin-B (UBB). Moreover, beta APP+1 and UBB+1 proteins accumulate in the neuropathological hallmarks of AD. Inasmuch as these +1 proteins were also found in elderly, nondemented control patients, but not in younger ones (< 72 years), molecular misreading may act as a factor that becomes manifest in aged people. A hotspot for dinucleotide deletions is GAGAG motifs. Because statistically an average of 2.1 GAGAG motifs per gene can be expected, other genes expressed in other tissues may undergo molecular misreading as well. Indeed, we recently detected +1 proteins in proliferating cells present in tissues such as the liver, epididymis, parotid gland, and neuroblastoma cell lines. Therefore, molecular misreading can be regarded as a general biological source of transcript errors that may be involved in cellular derangements in numerous age-related pathologic conditions apart from Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

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    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  8. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

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    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  9. A new type of NtrC transcriptional activator.

    OpenAIRE

    Foster-Hartnett, D; Cullen, P. J.; Monika, E M; Kranz, R G

    1994-01-01

    The enteric NtrC (NRI) protein has been the paradigm for a class of bacterial enhancer-binding proteins (EBPs) that activate transcription of RNA polymerase containing the sigma 54 factor. Activators in the NtrC class are characterized by essentially three properties: (i) they bind to sites distant from the promoters that they activate (> 100 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site), (ii) they contain a conserved nucleotide-binding fold and exhibit ATPase activity that is required for a...

  10. Sucrose-induced translational repression of plant bZIP-type transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiese, A.; Elzinga, N.; Wobbes, B.; Smeekens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Sugars as signalling molecules exert control on the transcription of many plant genes. Sugar signals also alter mRNA and protein stability. Increased sucrose concentrations specifically repress translation of the S-class basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) type transcription factor AtbZIP11/ATB2. Thi

  11. Frequency of BCR-ABL Transcript Types in Syrian CML Patients

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    Sulaf Farhat-Maghribi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Syria, CML patients are started on tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs and monitored until complete molecular response is achieved. BCR-ABL mRNA transcript type is not routinely identified, contrary to the recommendations. In this study we aimed to identify the frequency of different BCR-ABL transcripts in Syrian CML patients and highlight their significance on monitoring and treatment protocols. Methods. CML patients positive for BCR-ABL transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR were enrolled. BCR-ABL transcript types were investigated using a home-made PCR method that was adapted from published protocols and optimized. The transcript types were then confirmed using a commercially available research kit. Results. Twenty-four transcripts were found in 21 patients. The most common was b2a2, followed by b3a2, b3a3, and e1a3 present solely in 12 (57.1%, 3 (14.3%, 2 (9.5%, and 1 (4.8%, respectively. Three samples (14.3% contained dual transcripts. While b3a2 transcript was apparently associated with warning molecular response to imatinib treatment, b2a2, b3a3, and e1a3 transcripts collectively proved otherwise (P=0.047. Conclusion. It might be advisable to identify the BCR-ABL transcript type in CML patients at diagnosis, using an empirically verified method, in order to link the detected transcript with the clinical findings, possible resistance to treatment, and appropriate monitoring methods.

  12. Enterovirus type 71 2A protease functions as a transcriptional activator in yeast

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    Lai Meng-Jiun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus type 71 (EV71 2A protease exhibited strong transcriptional activity in yeast cells. The transcriptional activity of 2A protease was independent of its protease activity. EV71 2A protease retained its transcriptional activity after truncation of 40 amino acids at the N-terminus but lost this activity after truncation of 60 amino acids at the N-terminus or deletion of 20 amino acids at the C-terminus. Thus, the acidic domain at the C-terminus of this protein is essential for its transcriptional activity. Indeed, deletion of amino acids from 146 to 149 (EAME in this acidic domain lost the transcriptional activity of EV71 2A protein though still retained its protease activity. EV71 2A protease was detected both in the cytoplasm and nucleus using confocal microscopy analysis. Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease also exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. As expected, an acidic domain in the C-terminus of Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease was also identified. Truncation of this acidic domain resulted in the loss of transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this acidic region of poliovirus 2A protease is critical for viral RNA replication. The transcriptional activity of the EV71 or Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease should play a role in viral replication and/or pathogenesis.

  13. Latency-associated transcripts of equine herpesvirus type 4 in trigeminal ganglia of naturally infected horses.

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    Borchers, K; Wolfinger, U; Ludwig, H

    1999-08-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) is a major respiratory pathogen of horses. Unlike most other members of the Alphaherpesvirinae, EHV-4 was regarded as non-neurotropic. Here, neural and lymphoid tissues of 17 horses have been analysed post-mortem. EHV-4 DNA was detected in 11 cases (65%) by PCR, exclusively in the trigeminal ganglia. In order to define the transcriptional activity, RNA preparations of 10 EHV-4 DNA-positive ganglia were investigated by nested RT-PCR. EHV-4-specific transcripts derived from genes 63 [herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ICPO gene homologue] and 64 (HSV-1 ICP4 gene homologue) were detected in six trigeminal ganglia. In one other case, only gene 64-specific transcripts were present. All of the transcripts proved to be antisense orientated when a strand-specific RT-PCR was applied. Type-specific primers for gene 33 (encoding glycoprotein B) served to detect transcripts of an acute EHV-4-infection, which were found in only one of the six ganglia positive for gene 63- and gene 64-specific transcripts. Overall, these studies clearly demonstrate that EHV-4 is latent in trigeminal ganglia.

  14. Functional analysis of transcriptional regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xian; LI WeiZhong; LIU LongDing; CHE YanChun; CUN Wei; WU Wen Juan; HE ChunYan; SHAO CongWen; LI QiHan

    2008-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) tegument proteins have important functions in the viral repli-cation process. In order to investigate the role of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 in viral replication, its transcriptional regulation of viral promoters was investigated using the chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assay. The results indicate that VP22 exerts a dose-dependent transcriptional in-hibitory effect on the HSV-1 α4, TK, and gC gene promoters. VP22 had the capacity to repress tran-scriptional activation of promoters via different viral transcription regulatory factors such as VP16 and ICP0, as evidenced by the specific repression of the TK and gC gene promoters by ICP0. In addition, VP22 was capable of inhibiting the promotion of ICP0 transcriptional activation in the presence of HAT PCAF, which is even more remarkable than the VP22 repression of ICP0 transcriptional activation. Fi-nally, the transcriptional inhibitory effect of VP22 on other viral promoters was demonstrated by the analysis of β-galactosidase activities in internal controls.

  15. Transcriptional heterogeneity in the lactase gene within cell-type is linked to the epigenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Edward; Jeremian, Richie; Oh, Gabriel; Groot, Daniel; Susic, Miki; Lee, KwangHo; Foy, Kelly; Laird, Peter W.; Petronis, Arturas; Labrie, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional variation in histologically- and genetically- identical cells is a widespread phenomenon in tissues, yet the processes conferring this heterogeneity are not well understood. To identify contributing factors, we analyzed epigenetic profiles associated with the in vivo transcriptional gradient of the mouse lactase gene (Lct), which occurs in enterocytes along the proximal-to-distal axis of the small intestine. We found that epigenetic signatures at enhancer and promoter elements aligns with transcriptional variation of Lct in enterocytes. Age and phenotype-specific environmental cues (lactose exposure after weaning) induced changes to epigenetic modifications and CTCF binding at select regulatory elements, which corresponded to the alterations in the intestinal Lct mRNA gradient. Thus, epigenetic modifications in combination with CTCF binding at regulatory elements account for the transcriptional gradient in Lct in cells of the same type. Epigenetic divergence within enterocytes may contribute to the functional specialization of intestinal subregions. PMID:28139744

  16. Regulation of selected genome loci using de novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-type transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbitzer, Robert; Römer, Patrick; Boch, Jens; Lahaye, Thomas

    2010-12-14

    Proteins that can be tailored to bind desired DNA sequences are key tools for molecular biology. Previous studies suggested that DNA-binding specificity of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from the bacterial genus Xanthomonas is defined by repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs) of tandem-arranged 34/35-amino acid repeat units. We have studied chimeras of two TALEs differing in RVDs and non-RVDs and found that, in contrast to the critical contributions by RVDs, non-RVDs had no major effect on the DNA-binding specificity of the chimeras. This finding suggests that one needs only to modify the RVDs to generate designer TALEs (dTALEs) to activate transcription of user-defined target genes. We used the scaffold of the TALE AvrBs3 and changed its RVDs to match either the tomato Bs4, the Arabidopsis EGL3, or the Arabidopsis KNAT1 promoter. All three dTALEs transcriptionally activated the desired promoters in a sequence-specific manner as mutations within the targeted DNA sequences abolished promoter activation. This study is unique in showing that chromosomal loci can be targeted specifically by dTALEs. We also engineered two AvrBs3 derivatives with four additional repeat units activating specifically either the pepper Bs3 or UPA20 promoter. Because AvrBs3 activates both promoters, our data show that addition of repeat units facilitates TALE-specificity fine-tuning. Finally, we demonstrate that the RVD NK mediates specific interaction with G nucleotides that thus far could not be targeted specifically by any known RVD type. In summary, our data demonstrate that the TALE scaffold can be tailored to target user-defined DNA sequences in whole genomes.

  17. Promoter and transcription of type X collagen gene in broiler chickens with tibial dyschondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; McDaniel, G R; Giambrone, J J; Smith, E

    1996-06-01

    Type X collagen is produced exclusively in hypertrophic chondrocytes of the growth plate of the proximal tibiotarsus and is believed to play an important role during normal development from chondrogenesis to osteogenesis. Chondrocytes of chickens with tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) fail to attain full hypertrophy and the amount of type X collagen, being a marker of hypertrophy, is likely to be reduced. It is not clear whether transcriptional regulation is functional for expression of the type X collagen gene in TD birds. Nucleotide sequence of the type X collagen gene promoter was determined by sequencing PCR-based DNA clones. Nucleotide identity of this fragment between the normal and TD carriers was 97.6%. Both normal and TD birds were similar in a putative transcription start site, the site of TATAA box, and neither had a CCAAT box. However, there were two gaps in TD carriers, four gaps in normals, and five nucleotide substitution sites. By rapid amplification of cDNA ends by PCR (RACE-PCR), transcription of the gene was assessed using total RNA and mRNA from both normal chondrocytes and TD lesions at 3 and 4 wk of age. The RACE-PCR product for type X collagen mRNA was detectable in both normal and TD birds at two stages. No difference was found between them. This result does not support the hypothesis that transcriptional regulation of type X collagen gene is important in TD development of chickens. Variations in the promoter region did not affect transcription of type X collagen gene in TD carrier chickens.

  18. Functional analysis of transcriptional regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) tegument proteins have important functions in the viral repli- cation process. In order to investigate the role of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 in viral replication, its transcriptional regulation of viral promoters was investigated using the chloramphenicol acetyl- transferase (CAT) assay. The results indicate that VP22 exerts a dose-dependent transcriptional in- hibitory effect on the HSV-1 α4, TK, and gC gene promoters. VP22 had the capacity to repress tran- scriptional activation of promoters via different viral transcription regulatory factors such as VP16 and ICP0, as evidenced by the specific repression of the TK and gC gene promoters by ICP0. In addition, VP22 was capable of inhibiting the promotion of ICP0 transcriptional activation in the presence of HAT PCAF, which is even more remarkable than the VP22 repression of ICP0 transcriptional activation. Fi- nally, the transcriptional inhibitory effect of VP22 on other viral promoters was demonstrated by the analysis of β-galactosidase activities in internal controls.

  19. Non coding extremities of the seven influenza virus type C vRNA segments: effect on transcription and replication by the type C and type A polymerase complexes

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    van der Werf Sylvie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription/replication of the influenza viruses implicate the terminal nucleotide sequences of viral RNA, which comprise sequences at the extremities conserved among the genomic segments as well as variable 3' and 5' non-coding (NC regions. The plasmid-based system for the in vivo reconstitution of functional ribonucleoproteins, upon expression of viral-like RNAs together with the nucleoprotein and polymerase proteins has been widely used to analyze transcription/replication of influenza viruses. It was thus shown that the type A polymerase could transcribe and replicate type A, B, or C vRNA templates whereas neither type B nor type C polymerases were able to transcribe and replicate type A templates efficiently. Here we studied the importance of the NC regions from the seven segments of type C influenza virus for efficient transcription/replication by the type A and C polymerases. Results The NC sequences of the seven genomic segments of the type C influenza virus C/Johannesburg/1/66 strain were found to be more variable in length than those of the type A and B viruses. The levels of transcription/replication of viral-like vRNAs harboring the NC sequences of the respective type C virus segments flanking the CAT reporter gene were comparable in the presence of either type C or type A polymerase complexes except for the NS and PB2-like vRNAs. For the NS-like vRNA, the transcription/replication level was higher after introduction of a U residue at position 6 in the 5' NC region as for all other segments. For the PB2-like vRNA the CAT expression level was particularly reduced with the type C polymerase. Analysis of mutants of the 5' NC sequence in the PB2-like vRNA, the shortest 5' NC sequence among the seven segments, showed that additional sequences within the PB2 ORF were essential for the efficiency of transcription but not replication by the type C polymerase complex. Conclusion In the context of a PB2-like reporter

  20. OPA3, mutated in 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III, encodes two transcripts targeted primarily to mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huizing, Marjan; Dorward, Heidi; Ly, Lien;

    2010-01-01

    3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type III (3-MGCA type III), caused by recessive mutations in the 2-exon gene OPA3, is characterized by early-onset bilateral optic atrophy, later-onset extrapyramidal dysfunction, and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid. Her...... we report the identification of a novel third OPA3 coding exon, the apparent product of a segmental duplication event, resulting in two gene transcripts, OPA3A and OPA3B. OPA3A deficiency (as in optic atrophy type 3) causes up-regulation of OPA3B. OPA3 protein function remains unknown...

  1. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  2. Typing of Poultry Influenza Virus (H5 and H7 by Reverse Transcription- Polymerase Chain Reaction

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    Cesare Bonacina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the influenza Orthomixovirus to undergo to continually antigenically changes that can affect its pathogenicity and its diffusion, explains the growing seriousness of this disease and the recent epizoozies in various parts of the world. There have been 15 HA and 9 NA type A sub-types of the influenza virus identified all of which are present in birds. Until now the very virulent avian influenza viruses identified were all included to the H5 and H7 sub-types. We here show that is possible to identify the H5 and H7 sub-types with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR by using a set of specific primers for each HA sub-type. The RT-PCR is a quick and sensitive method of identifying the HA sub-types of the influenza virus directly from homogenised organs.

  3. Silencing of human T-cell leukemia virus type I gene transcription by epigenetic mechanisms

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    Mueller Nancy

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL after a long latent period. Among accessory genes encoded by HTLV-I, the tax gene is thought to play a central role in oncogenesis. However, Tax expression is disrupted by several mechanims including genetic changes of the tax gene, deletion/hypermethylation of 5'-LTR. To clarify the role of epigenetic changes, we analyzed DNA methylation and histone modification in the whole HTLV-I provirus genome. Results The gag, pol and env genes of HTLV-I provirus were more methylated than pX region, whereas methylation of 5'-LTR was variable and 3'-LTR was not methylated at all. In ATL cell lines, complete DNA methylation of 5'-LTR was associated with transcriptional silencing of viral genes. HTLV-I provirus was more methylated in primary ATL cells than in carrier state, indicating the association with disease progression. In seroconvertors, DNA methylation was already observed in internal sequences of provirus just after seroconversion. Taken together, it is speculated that DNA methylation first occurs in the gag, pol and env regions and then extends in the 5' and 3' directions in vivo, and when 5'-LTR becomes methylated, viral transcription is silenced. Analysis of histone modification in the HTLV-I provirus showed that the methylated provirus was associated with hypoacetylation. However, the tax gene transcript could not be detected in fresh ATL cells regardless of hyperacetylated histone H3 in 5'-LTR. The transcription rapidly recovered after in vitro culture in such ATL cells. Conclusion These results showed that epigenetic changes of provirus facilitated ATL cells to evade host immune system by suppressing viral gene transcription. In addition, this study shows the presence of another reversible mechanism that suppresses the tax gene transcription without DNA methylation and hypoacetylated histone.

  4. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianwei, E-mail: XWang2@UAMS.edu; Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L., E-mail: MehtaJL@UAMS.edu

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac

  5. T-helper Cell Type-1 Transcription Factor T-Bet Is Down-regulated in Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Vaseghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available T cells have been identified as key players in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. However, the exact role of T-cell subpopulations in this pathway is presently unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression pattern of two lineage-specifying transcription factors GATA-3 and T-bet, which are important in T helper type 1 (Th1 and Th2 cell development, respectively. Gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was performed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Plasma levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 were also determined by ELISA. T-bet and IFN-γ gene expression was significantly lower in patients group compared with healthy controls (p<0.05. The expression of GATA-3 was relatively similar in patients and controls; however, IL-4 mRNAs were significantly increased in the PBMCs from patients as compared with normal controls (p<0.05. In addition, a marked increase in plasma IL-4 levels were observed in patient group compared with controls (p<0.001. To the contrary, IFN-γ protein levels were decreased in patients in comparison with controls (p<0.001. These data suggest additional implications of the role of Th1/Th2 imbalance for the immunopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. 

  6. Metabolic Network Topology Reveals Transcriptional Regulatory Signatures of Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zelezniak, Aleksej; Pers, Tune Hannes; Pinho Soares, Simao Pedro;

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a disorder characterized by both insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion. Recent transcriptomics studies related to T2DM have revealed changes in expression of a large number of metabolic genes in a variety of tissues. Identification of the molecular...... with human metabolic network reconstructions to identify key metabolic regulatory features of T2DM. These features include reporter metabolites—metabolites with significant collective transcriptional response in the associated enzyme-coding genes, and transcription factors with significant enrichment...... of binding sites in the promoter regions of these genes. In addition to metabolites from TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and lipid metabolism (known to be associated with T2DM), we identified several reporter metabolites representing novel biomarker candidates. For example, the highly connected...

  7. Transcriptional analyses of the region of the equine herpesvirus type 4 genome encoding glycoproteins I and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, A M; Jang, H K; Matsumura, T; Yokoyama, N; Miyazawa, T; Mikami, T

    1999-01-01

    To map the transcripts encoding the equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) glycoproteins I (gI) and E (gE), transcriptional analyses were performed at the right part of the unique short segment of EHV-4 genome. The results revealed that the gI gene is encoded by a 1.6-kb transcript which is 3' coterminal with a 3.0-kb gD mRNA while the gE gene is encoded by two transcripts of 3.5- and 2.4-kb in size. The transcriptional patterns described in this study for the EHV-4 gI and gE are similar to those found in the equivalent region of herpes simplex virus type 1 and feline herpesvirus type 1. Characterization of EHV-4 gI and gE glycoprotein genes may facilitate future studies to define their roles in the EHV-4 infection.

  8. Soybean GmPHD-type transcription regulators improve stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] is one of the most important crops for oil and protein resource. Improvement of stress tolerance will be beneficial for soybean seed production. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six GmPHD genes encoding Alfin1-type PHD finger protein were identified and their expressions differentially responded to drought, salt, cold and ABA treatments. The six GmPHDs were nuclear proteins and showed ability to bind the cis-element "GTGGAG". The N-terminal domain of GmPHD played a major role in DNA binding. Using a protoplast assay system, we find that GmPHD1 to GmPHD5 had transcriptional suppression activity whereas GmPHD6 did not have. In yeast assay, the GmPHD6 can form homodimer and heterodimer with the other GmPHDs except GmPHD2. The N-terminal plus the variable regions but not the PHD-finger is required for the dimerization. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the GmPHD2 showed salt tolerance when compared with the wild type plants. This tolerance was likely achieved by diminishing the oxidative stress through regulation of downstream genes. SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide important clues for soybean stress tolerance through manipulation of PHD-type transcription regulator.

  9. Analysis of DNA binding and transcriptional activation by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR of Xanthobacter flavus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, G; Ridder, ANJA; Dijkhuizen, L; Meijer, WG; Meijer, Wim G.

    2003-01-01

    The LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR controls the expression of the cbb and gap-pgk operons in Xanthobacter flavus, which encode the majority of the enzymes of the Calvin cycle required for autotrophic CO2 fixation. The cbb operon promoter of this chemoautotrophic bacterium contains three po

  10. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick M Stanley

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter.

  11. Intronic T-DNA insertion in Arabidopsis NBR1 conditionally affects wild-type transcript level

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Milagros Collados; Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The SALK_135513 line of Arabidopsis thaliana is annotated by GenBank to have the T-DNA insertion in the fourth exon of NBR1 (At4g24690). Careful molecular analyses of the homozygous plants of SALK_135513 line indicated the place of T-DNA insertion in the fourth intron. Unexpectedly, 2 kinds of NBR1 transcripts, the wild-type and the mutated, resulting from alternative splicing events, were detected in those plants. Our findings explain the problems encountered by us with phenotypic e...

  12. Type 2 diabetes and obesity induce similar transcriptional reprogramming in human myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väremo, Leif; Henriksen, Tora Ida; Scheele, Camilla; Broholm, Christa; Pedersen, Maria; Uhlén, Mathias; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-05-25

    Skeletal muscle is one of the primary tissues involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The close association between obesity and T2D makes it difficult to isolate specific effects attributed to the disease alone. Therefore, here we set out to identify and characterize intrinsic properties of myocytes, associated independently with T2D or obesity. We generated and analyzed RNA-seq data from primary differentiated myotubes from 24 human subjects, using a factorial design (healthy/T2D and non-obese/obese), to determine the influence of each specific factor on genome-wide transcription. This setup enabled us to identify intrinsic properties, originating from muscle precursor cells and retained in the corresponding myocytes. Bioinformatic and statistical methods, including differential expression analysis, gene-set analysis, and metabolic network analysis, were used to characterize the different myocytes. We found that the transcriptional program associated with obesity alone was strikingly similar to that induced specifically by T2D. We identified a candidate epigenetic mechanism, H3K27me3 histone methylation, mediating these transcriptional signatures. T2D and obesity were independently associated with dysregulated myogenesis, down-regulated muscle function, and up-regulation of inflammation and extracellular matrix components. Metabolic network analysis identified that in T2D but not obesity a specific metabolite subnetwork involved in sphingolipid metabolism was transcriptionally regulated. Our findings identify inherent characteristics in myocytes, as a memory of the in vivo phenotype, without the influence from a diabetic or obese extracellular environment, highlighting their importance in the development of T2D.

  13. Delayed polarization of mononuclear phagocyte transcriptional program by type I interferon isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon (IFN-α is considered a key modulator of immunopathological processes through a signature-specific activation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs. This study utilized global transcript analysis to characterize the effects of the entire type I IFN family in comparison to a broad panel of other cytokines on MP previously exposed to Lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation in vitro. Results Immature peripheral blood CD14+ MPs were stimulated with LPS and 1 hour later with 42 separate soluble factors including cytokines, chemokines, interleukins, growth factors and IFNs. Gene expression profiling of MPs was analyzed 4 and 9 hours after cytokine stimulation. Four hours after stimulation, the transcriptional analysis of MPs revealed two main classes of cytokines: one associated with the alternative and the other with the classical pathway of MP activation without a clear polarization of type I IFNs effects. In contrast, after 9 hours of stimulation most type I IFN isoforms induced a characteristic and unique transcriptional pattern separate from other cytokines. These "signature" IFNs included; IFN-β, IFN-α2b/α2, IFN-αI, IFN-α2, IFN-αC, IFN-αJ1, IFN-αH2, and INF-α4B and induced the over-expression of 44 genes, all of which had known functional relationships with IFN such as myxovirus resistance (Mx-1, Mx-2, and interferon-induced hepatitis C-associated microtubular aggregation protein. A second group of type I IFNs segregated separately and in closer association with the type II IFN-γ. The phylogenetic relationship of amino acid sequences among type I IFNs did not explain their sub-classification, although differences at positions 94 through 109 and 175 through 189 were present between the signature and other IFNs. Conclusion Seven IFN-α isoforms and IFN-β participate in the late phase polarization of MPs conditioned by LPS. This information broadens the previous view of the central role played by IFN-α in

  14. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  15. Two bHLH-type transcription factors, JA-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE2 and JAM3, are transcriptional repressors and affect male fertility

    OpenAIRE

    Nakata, Masaru; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    The jasmonate (JA) plant hormones regulate responses to biotic and abiotic stress and aspects of plant development, including male fertility in Arabidopsis thaliana. The bHLH-type transcription factor JA-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1) negatively regulates JA signaling and gain-of-function JAM1 transgenic plants have impaired JA-mediated male fertility. Here we report that JAM2 and JAM3, 2 bHLHs closely related to JAM1, also act as transcriptional repressors. Moreover, overexpression of JAM2 and...

  16. SIRT1 Suppresses Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Gao, Wei-Wei; Chan, Chi-Ping; Cheng, Yun; Deng, Jian-Jun; Yuen, Kit-San; Iha, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated diseases are poorly treatable, and HTLV-1 vaccines are not available. High proviral load is one major risk factor for disease development. HTLV-1 encodes Tax oncoprotein, which activates transcription from viral long terminal repeats (LTR) and various types of cellular promoters. Counteracting Tax function might have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits. In this work, we report on the suppression of Tax activation of HTLV-1 LTR by SIRT1 deacetylase. The transcriptional activity of Tax on the LTR was largely ablated when SIRT1 was overexpressed, but Tax activation of NF-κB was unaffected. On the contrary, the activation of the LTR by Tax was boosted when SIRT1 was depleted. Treatment of cells with resveratrol shunted Tax activity in a SIRT1-dependent manner. The activation of SIRT1 in HTLV-1-transformed T cells by resveratrol potently inhibited HTLV-1 proviral transcription and Tax expression, whereas compromising SIRT1 by specific inhibitors augmented HTLV-1 mRNA expression. The administration of resveratrol also decreased the production of cell-free HTLV-1 virions from MT2 cells and the transmission of HTLV-1 from MT2 cells to uninfected Jurkat cells in coculture. SIRT1 associated with Tax in HTLV-1-transformed T cells. Treatment with resveratrol prevented the interaction of Tax with CREB and the recruitment of CREB, CRTC1, and p300 to Tax-responsive elements in the LTR. Our work demonstrates the negative regulatory function of SIRT1 in Tax activation of HTLV-1 transcription. Small-molecule activators of SIRT1 such as resveratrol might be considered new prophylactic and therapeutic agents in HTLV-1-associated diseases. IMPORTANCE Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes a highly lethal blood cancer or a chronic debilitating disease of the spinal cord. Treatments are unsatisfactory, and vaccines are not available. Disease progression is associated with robust expression of HTLV-1 genes

  17. Microchimeric fetal cells are recruited to maternal kidney following injury and activate collagen type I transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Gharios, George; Amin, Farhana; Hill, Peter; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Maxwell, Patrick; Fisk, Nicholas M

    2011-01-01

    Fetal cells enter the maternal circulation from the early first trimester of pregnancy, where they persist in tissue decades later. We investigated in mice whether fetal microchimeric cells (FMCs) can be detected in maternal kidney, and whether they play a role in kidney homeostasis. FMCs were identified in vivo in two models: one an adaptive model following unilateral nephrectomy, the other an injury via unilateral renal ischaemia reperfusion. Both models were carried out in mothers that had been mated with transgenic mice expressing luciferase transgene under the control of collagen type I, and had given birth to either 1 or 3 litters. FMCs were detected by Y-probe fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and bioluminescence, and the cell number quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the adaptive model, the remaining kidney showed more cells by all 3 parameters compared with the nephrectomized kidney, while ischaemia reperfusion resulted in higher levels of FMC participation in injured compared to contralateral kidneys. Bioluminescence showed that FMCs switch on collagen type I transcription implicating mesenchymal lineage cells. After injury, Y-probe in situ hydridization was found mainly in the tubular epithelial network. Finally, we compared FMCs with bone marrow cells and found similar dynamics but altered distribution within the kidney. We conclude that FMCs (1) are long-term sequelae of pregnancy and (2) are recruited to the kidney as a result of injury or adaptation, where they activate the transcriptional machinery of matrix proteins.

  18. Molecular diversity of L-type Ca2+ channel transcripts in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, N M

    1992-05-15

    The nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding the human fibroblast Ca2+ channel of L type (HFCC) has been determined. It is highly homologous to L-type channels previously cloned from rabbit lung and heart as well as from rat brain. At least four sites of molecular diversity were identified in the nucleotide sequence of HFCC. Three of these include regions encoding the transmembrane segments IIS6, IIIS2, and IVS3, which are known to be important for channel gating properties. The positions of these sites correlate with RNA splice sites, indicating that the molecular diversity of the transcripts is a result of alternative splicing. The fourth diversity region is located at the C-terminal region and comprises insertions and deletions. It is suggested that these variations may give rise to multiple subforms of HFCC with altered electrophysiological properties.

  19. Differential co-expression of long and short form type IX collagen transcripts during avian limb chondrogenesis in ovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1992-05-01

    Using RNA blot analysis of developmentally staged avian limb buds, we demonstrate that transcripts of several cartilage marker genes appear in limb tissue prior to overt chondrogenesis. Type II collagen mRNA, cartilage proteoglycan core protein mRNA, alpha 2(IX) collagen mRNA, and transcripts of the short form alpha 1(IX) collagen chain derived from the downstream promoter are co-expressed in limb tissue approximately 24-36 hours before the appearance of the respective polypeptides in differentiating cartilagenous tissue. Transcripts of the long form alpha 1(IX) collagen chain derived from the upstream promoter appear somewhat later in development; nearly coincident with the immunolocalization of type IX collagen in the cartilage elements of the limb. The spatial distribution of type II and type IX collagen transcripts was analyzed by in situ hybridization. Type II collagen and the long form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts co-localized in the chondrogenic elements of the developing forelimb. In contrast, short form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts which lack the 5' region encoding the NC4 globular amino-terminal domain were distributed throughout the non-chondrogenic, non-myogenic mesenchymal regions of the limb and were not detectable above background levels in the limb chondrogenic elements. The precocious appearance of several cartilage marker gene transcripts prior to chondrogenesis suggests that multiple levels of gene regulation including alternative promoter use, alternative RNA splicing, alternative polyadenylation, and other post-transcriptional as well as translational mechanisms are active prior to, and during avian limb chondrogenesis.

  20. Differential transcription patterns in wild-type and glycoprotein G-deleted infectious laryngotracheitis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Markham, Philip F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Devlin, Joanne M; Browning, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) causes severe respiratory disease in poultry throughout the world. Recently the role of glycoprotein G (gG) in ILTV pathogenesis has been investigated and it has been shown to have chemokine-binding activity. An ILTV vaccine candidate deficient in gG has been developed and the deletion has been shown to alter the host's immune response to the virus. To understand the effect of the gG gene on transcription of other viral genes, the global expression profile of 72 ILTV genes in gG-deleted and wild-type ILTVs were investigated both in vivo and in vitro using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Several genes were differentially expressed in the different viruses in LMH cell cultures or in the tracheas of infected birds, and the expression of a number of genes, including ICP27, gC, gJ, Ul7 and UL40, differed significantly both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that they had direct or indirect roles in virulence. This study has provided insights into the interactions between gG and other ILTV genes that may have a role in virulence.

  1. Decreased HIV type 1 transcription in CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes during suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P=.035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P=.013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2-long terminal repeat circular DNA (P=.013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2=0.136; P=.002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5.

  2. Type 2 diabetes and obesity induce similar transcriptional reprogramming in human myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Väremo, Leif; Henriksen, Tora Ida; Scheele, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle is one of the primary tissues involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The close association between obesity and T2D makes it difficult to isolate specific effects attributed to the disease alone. Therefore, here we set out to identify and characterize...... intrinsic properties of myocytes, associated independently with T2D or obesity. METHODS: We generated and analyzed RNA-seq data from primary differentiated myotubes from 24 human subjects, using a factorial design (healthy/T2D and non-obese/obese), to determine the influence of each specific factor...... on genome-wide transcription. This setup enabled us to identify intrinsic properties, originating from muscle precursor cells and retained in the corresponding myocytes. Bioinformatic and statistical methods, including differential expression analysis, gene-set analysis, and metabolic network analysis, were...

  3. A conserved TATA-less proximal promoter drives basal transcription from the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soravia, E; Grebe, A; De Luca, P

    1995-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) focuses at the cell surface the activation of pro-uPA and, hence, the formation of plasmin, thus enhancing directional extracellular proteolysis. To characterize the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control receptor expression, we...... have cloned an uPAR DNA segment containing upstream regulatory sequences from both the human and murine genomes. We report that a proximal promoter, contained within 180 bp from the major transcription start sites of the human uPAR gene, drives basal transcription. This region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes...

  4. Transcriptional Dysregulation of Upstream Signaling of IFN Pathway in Chronic HCV Type 4 Induced Liver Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marwa K.; Salum, Ghada Maher; Bader El Din, Noha G.; Dawood, Reham M.; Barakat, Ahmed; Khairy, Ahmed; El Awady, Mostafa K.

    2016-01-01

    IFN orchestrates the expression of various genes to halt hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication with the possibility of either reduced or increased liver fibrosis; due to controlled viral replication or overproduction of inflammatory mediators, repectively. In this study, we examined the transcriptional profiling of type I IFN related genes in HCV-chronically infected patients with varying degrees of liver fibrosis. PCR array was used to examine the expression of 84 type I IFN related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) RNA from 12 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (5 F0-F1 and 7 F2-F4) and 5 healthy subjects. We further validated our results by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) in 103 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (43 F0-F1 and 60 F2-F4) and 15 controls. PCR array data revealed dysregulation in TLR7 pathway. The expression of TLR7 was decreased by 4 folds and MyD88 was increased by 3 folds in PBMCs of F2-F4 patients when compared to the healthy volunteers (p = 0.03 and 0.002, respectively). In addition, IRF7 and TLR7 showed dramatic downregulation (6 and 8 folds, respectively) in F2-F4 patients when compared to F0-F1 ones. qRT-PCR confirmed the altered expression patterns of TLR7 and MyD88 in F2-F4 patients when compared to either controls or F0-F1 patients. However, by qRT-PCR, IRF7 and NF-κB1 (TLR7 pathway transcription factors) exhibited similar mRNA abundance among F2-F4 and F0-F1 patients. These results suggest that TLR7 and MyD88 are possible candidates as biomarkers for the progression of HCV-induced liver fibrosis and/ or targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27135246

  5. Transcriptional Dysregulation of Upstream Signaling of IFN Pathway in Chronic HCV Type 4 Induced Liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marwa K; Salum, Ghada Maher; Bader El Din, Noha G; Dawood, Reham M; Barakat, Ahmed; Khairy, Ahmed; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2016-01-01

    IFN orchestrates the expression of various genes to halt hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication with the possibility of either reduced or increased liver fibrosis; due to controlled viral replication or overproduction of inflammatory mediators, repectively. In this study, we examined the transcriptional profiling of type I IFN related genes in HCV-chronically infected patients with varying degrees of liver fibrosis. PCR array was used to examine the expression of 84 type I IFN related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) RNA from 12 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (5 F0-F1 and 7 F2-F4) and 5 healthy subjects. We further validated our results by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) in 103 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (43 F0-F1 and 60 F2-F4) and 15 controls. PCR array data revealed dysregulation in TLR7 pathway. The expression of TLR7 was decreased by 4 folds and MyD88 was increased by 3 folds in PBMCs of F2-F4 patients when compared to the healthy volunteers (p = 0.03 and 0.002, respectively). In addition, IRF7 and TLR7 showed dramatic downregulation (6 and 8 folds, respectively) in F2-F4 patients when compared to F0-F1 ones. qRT-PCR confirmed the altered expression patterns of TLR7 and MyD88 in F2-F4 patients when compared to either controls or F0-F1 patients. However, by qRT-PCR, IRF7 and NF-κB1 (TLR7 pathway transcription factors) exhibited similar mRNA abundance among F2-F4 and F0-F1 patients. These results suggest that TLR7 and MyD88 are possible candidates as biomarkers for the progression of HCV-induced liver fibrosis and/ or targets for therapeutic intervention.

  6. Noncytotoxic Suppression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transcription by Exosomes Secreted from CD8+ T Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    CD8+ T cells display a noncytotoxic activity that suppresses transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in an antigen-independent and major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted manner. To date, the precise cellular and molecular factors mediating this CD8+ T-cell effector function remain unsolved. Despite evidence indicating the dependence of the activity on cell-cell contact, the possibility of a membrane-mediated activity that represses transcription from the viral prom...

  7. Functional domains of wild-type and mutant p53 proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, transdominant inhibition, and transformation suppression.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The wild-type (wt) p53 protein has transcriptional activation functions which may be linked to its tumor suppressor activity. Many mutant p53 proteins expressed in cancers have lost the ability to function as transcriptional activators and furthermore may inhibit wt p53 function. To study the mechanisms by which mutant forms of p53 have lost their transactivation function and can act in a dominant negative manner, a structure-function analysis of both mutant and engineered truncated forms of ...

  8. Genome-wide analysis of differential transcriptional and epigenetic variability across human immune cell types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ecker, Simone; Chen, Lu; Pancaldi, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Background: A healthy immune system requires immune cells that adapt rapidly to environmental challenges. This phenotypic plasticity can be mediated by transcriptional and epigenetic variability. Results: We apply a novel analytical approach to measure and compare transcriptional and epigenetic v...

  9. DMPD: Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979567 Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...orrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. Authors Honda K

  10. Fur-type transcriptional repressors and metal homeostasis in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal homeostasis is a crucial cellular function for nearly all organisms. Some heavy metals (e.g. Fe, Zn, Co, Mo are essential because they serve as cofactors for enzymes or metalloproteins, and chlorophototrophs such as cyanobacteria have an especially high demand for iron. At excessive levels, however, metals become toxic to cyanobacteria. Therefore, a tight control mechanism is essential for metal homeostasis. Metal homeostasis in microorganisms comprises two elements: metal acquisition from the environment and detoxification or excretion of excess metal ions. Different families of metal-sensing regulators exist in cyanobacteria and each addresses a more or less specific set of target genes. In this study the regulons of three Fur-type and two ArsR-SmtB-type regulators were investigated in a comparative approach in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. One Fur-type regulator controls genes for iron acquisition (Fur; one controls genes for zinc acquisition (Zur; and the third controls two genes involved in oxidative stress (Per. Compared to other well-investigated cyanobacterial strains, however, the set of target genes for each regulator is relatively small. Target genes for the two ArsR-SmtB transcriptional repressors (SmtB (SYNPCC7002_A2564 and SYNPCC7002_A0590; ArsR are involved in zinc homeostasis in addition to Zur. Their target genes, however, are less specific for zinc and point to roles in a broader heavy metal detoxification response.

  11. A Simple Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction for Dengue Type 2 Virus Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo Luiz Tadeu M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We show here a simplified reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for identification of dengue type 2 virus. Three dengue type 2 virus strains, isolated from Brazilian patients, and yellow fever vaccine 17DD, as a negative control, were used in this study. C6/36 cells were infected with the virus, and tissue culture fluids were collected after 7 days of infection period. The RT-PCR, a combination of RT and PCR done after a single addition of reagents in a single reaction vessel was carried out following a digestion of virus with 1% Nonidet P-40. The 50ml assay reaction mixture included 50 pmol of a dengue type 2 specific primer pair amplifying a 210 base pair sequence of the envelope protein gene, 0.1 mM of the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, 7.5U of reverse transcriptase, and 1U of thermostable Taq DNA polymerase. The reagent mixture was incubated for 15 min at 37oC for RT followed by a variable amount of cycles of two-step PCR amplification (92oC for 60 sec, 53oC for 60 sec with slow temperature increment. The PCR products were subjected to 1.7% agarose gel electrophoresis and visualized with UV light after gel incubation in ethidium bromide solution. DNA bands were observed after 25 and 30 cycles of PCR. Virus amount as low as 102.8 TCID50/ml was detected by RT-PCR. Specific DNA amplification was observed with the three dengue type 2 strains. This assay has advantages compared to other RT-PCRs: it avoids laborious extraction of virus RNA; the combination of RT and PCR reduces assay time, facilitates the performance and reduces risk of contamination; the two-step PCR cycle produces a clear DNA amplification, saves assay time and simplifies the technique

  12. Transcriptional enhancers induce insertional gene deregulation independently from the vector type and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruggi, Giulietta; Porcellini, Simona; Facchini, Giulia; Perna, Serena K; Cattoglio, Claudia; Sartori, Daniela; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Bonini, Chiara; Bovolenta, Chiara; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2009-05-01

    The integration characteristics of retroviral (RV) vectors increase the probability of interfering with the regulation of cellular genes, and account for a tangible risk of insertional mutagenesis in treated patients. To assess the potential genotoxic risk of conventional or self-inactivating (SIN) gamma-RV and lentiviral (LV) vectors independently from the biological consequences of the insertion event, we developed a quantitative assay based on real-time reverse transcriptase--PCR on low-density arrays to evaluate alterations of gene expression in individual primary T-cell clones. We show that the Moloney leukemia virus long terminal repeat (LTR) enhancer has the strongest activity in both a gamma-RV and a LV vector context, while an internal cellular promoter induces deregulation of gene expression less frequently, at a shorter range and to a lower extent in both vector types. Downregulation of gene expression was observed only in the context of LV vectors. This study indicates that insertional gene activation is determined by the characteristics of the transcriptional regulatory elements carried by the vector, and is largely independent from the vector type or design.

  13. Laser Microdissection Unravels Cell-Type-Specific Transcription in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Roots, Including CAAT-Box Transcription Factor Gene Expression Correlating with Fungal Contact and Spread1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogekamp, Claudia; Arndt, Damaris; Pereira, Patrícia A.; Becker, Jörg D.; Hohnjec, Natalija; Küster, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) are the most widespread symbioses on Earth, promoting nutrient supply of most terrestrial plant species. To unravel gene expression in defined stages of Medicago truncatula root colonization by AM fungi, we here combined genome-wide transcriptome profiling based on whole mycorrhizal roots with real-time reverse transcription-PCR experiments that relied on characteristic cell types obtained via laser microdissection. Our genome-wide approach delivered a core set of 512 genes significantly activated by the two mycorrhizal fungi Glomus intraradices and Glomus mossae. Focusing on 62 of these genes being related to membrane transport, signaling, and transcriptional regulation, we distinguished whether they are activated in arbuscule-containing or the neighboring cortical cells harboring fungal hyphae. In addition, cortical cells from nonmycorrhizal roots served as a reference for gene expression under noncolonized conditions. Our analysis identified 25 novel arbuscule-specific genes and 37 genes expressed both in the arbuscule-containing and the adjacent cortical cells colonized by fungal hyphae. Among the AM-induced genes specifying transcriptional regulators were two members encoding CAAT-box binding transcription factors (CBFs), designated MtCbf1 and MtCbf2. Promoter analyses demonstrated that both genes were already activated by the first physical contact between the symbionts. Subsequently, and corresponding to our cell-type expression patterns, they were progressively up-regulated in those cortical areas colonized by fungal hyphae, including the arbuscule-containing cells. The encoded CBFs thus represent excellent candidates for regulators that mediate a sequential reprogramming of root tissues during the establishment of an AM symbiosis. PMID:22034628

  14. Multiparametric analysis, sorting, and transcriptional profiling of plant protoplasts and nuclei according to cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, David W; Janda, Jaroslav; Lambert, Georgina M

    2011-01-01

    Flow cytometry has been employed for the analysis of higher plants for approximately the last 30 years. For the angiosperms, ∼500,000 species, itself a daunting number, parametric measurements enabled through the use of flow cytometers started with basic descriptors of the individual cells and their contents, and have both inspired the development of novel cytometric methods that subsequently have been applied to organisms within other kingdoms of life, and adopted cytometric methods devised for other species, particularly mammals. Higher plants offer unique challenges in terms of flow cytometric analysis, notably the facts that their organs and tissues are complex three-dimensional assemblies of different cell types, and that their individual cells are, in general, larger than those of mammals.This chapter provides an overview of the general types of parametric measurement that have been applied to plants, and provides detailed methods for selected examples based on the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. These illustrate the use of flow cytometry for the analysis of protoplasts and nuclear DNA contents (genome size and the cell cycle). These are further integrated with measurements focusing on specific cell types, based on transgenic expression of Fluorescent Proteins (FPs), and on analysis of the spectrum of transcripts found within protoplasts and nuclei. These measurements were chosen in particular to illustrate, respectively, the issues encountered in the flow analysis and sorting of large biological cells, typified by protoplasts; how to handle flow analyses under conditions that require processing of large numbers of samples in which the individual samples contain only a very small minority of objects of interest; and how to deal with exceptionally small amounts of RNA within the sorted samples.

  15. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakim-Weber, Robab; Krogsdam, Anne-M; Jørgensen, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs...... of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1.To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs) for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis......Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate...

  16. Molecular misreading: a new type of transcript mutation expressed during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, F W; Fischer, D F; Kamel, D; Sluijs, J A; Sonnemans, M A; Benne, R; Swaab, D F; Salehi, A; Hol, E M

    2000-01-01

    Dinucleotide deletions (e.g. DeltaGA, DeltaGU) are created by molecular misreading in or adjacent to GAGAG motifs of neuronal mRNAs. As a result, the reading frame shifts to the +1 frame, and so-called "+1 proteins" are subsequently synthesized. +1 Proteins have a wild-type N-terminus, but an aberrant C-terminus downstream from the site of the dinucleotide deletion. Molecular misreading was discovered in the rat vasopressin gene associated with diabetes insipidus and subsequently in human genes linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD), e.g. beta amyloid precursor protein (betaAPP) and ubiquitin-B (UBB). Furthermore, betaAPP(+1) and UBB(+1) proteins accumulate in the neuropathological hallmarks (i.e. in the tangles, neuritic plaques, and neuropil threads) of AD. As these +1 proteins were also found in elderly nondemented controls, but not in younger ones (<51 years), molecular misreading in nondividing cells might act as a factor that only becomes manifest at an advanced age. Frameshift mutations (UBB(+1)) and pretangle staining (Alz-50 and MC1) seem to occur independently of each other during early stages of AD. We recently detected +1 proteins, not only in proliferating cells present in non-neuronal tissues such as the liver and epididymis, but also in neuroblastoma cell lines. These observations suggest that molecular misreading is a general source of transcript errors that are involved in cellular derangements in various age-related pathologies.

  17. Transcriptional Signatures as a Disease-Specific and Predictive Inflammatory Biomarker for Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Hara; Wang, Xujing; Kaldunski, Mary; Jia, Shuang; Kramer, Joanna; Pavletich, Scott J.; Reske, Melissa; Gessel, Trevor; Yassai, Maryam; Quasney, Michael W.; Dahmer, Mary K.; Gorski, Jack; Hessner, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The complex milieu of inflammatory mediators associated with many diseases is often too dilute to directly measure in the periphery, necessitating development of more sensitive measurements suitable for mechanistic studies, earlier diagnosis, guiding therapeutic decisions, and monitoring interventions. We previously demonstrated that plasma samples from recent-onset Type 1 diabetes (RO T1D) patients induce a proinflammatory transcriptional signature in freshly drawn peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) relative to that of unrelated healthy controls (HC). Here, using cryopreserved PBMC, we analyzed larger RO T1D and HC cohorts, examined T1D progression in pre-onset samples, and compared the RO T1D signature to those associated with three disorders characterized by airway infection and inflammation. The RO T1D signature, consisting of interleukin-1 cytokine family members, chemokines involved in immunocyte chemotaxis, immune receptors, and signaling molecules, was detected during early pre-diabetes and found to resolve post-onset. The signatures associated with cystic fibrosis patients chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, patients with confirmed bacterial pneumonia, and subjects with H1N1 influenza all reflected immunological activation, yet each were distinct from one another and negatively correlated with that of T1D. This study highlights the remarkable capacity of cells to serve as biosensors capable of sensitively and comprehensively differentiating immunological states. PMID:22972474

  18. Transcriptional profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicating in type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle B Ryndak

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb infection is initiated by the few bacilli inhaled into the alveolus. Studies in lungs of aerosol-infected mice provided evidence for extensive replication of M. tb in non-migrating, non-antigen-presenting cells in the alveoli during the first 2-3 weeks post-infection. Alveoli are lined by type II and type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC which outnumber alveolar macrophages by several hundred-fold. M. tb DNA and viable M. tb have been demonstrated in AEC and other non-macrophage cells of the kidney, liver, and spleen in autopsied tissues from latently-infected subjects from TB-endemic regions indicating systemic bacterial dissemination during primary infection. M. tb have also been demonstrated to replicate rapidly in A549 cells (type II AEC line and acquire increased invasiveness for endothelial cells. Together, these results suggest that AEC could provide an important niche for bacterial expansion and development of a phenotype that promotes dissemination during primary infection. In the current studies, we have compared the transcriptional profile of M. tb replicating intracellularly in A549 cells to that of M. tb replicating in laboratory broth, by microarray analysis. Genes significantly upregulated during intracellular residence were consistent with an active, replicative, metabolic, and aerobic state, as were genes for tryptophan synthesis and for increased virulence (ESAT-6, and ESAT-6-like genes, esxH, esxJ, esxK, esxP, and esxW. In contrast, significant downregulation of the DevR (DosR regulon and several hypoxia-induced genes was observed. Stress response genes were either not differentially expressed or were downregulated with the exception of the heat shock response and those induced by low pH. The intra-type II AEC M. tb transcriptome strongly suggests that AEC could provide a safe haven in which M. tb can expand dramatically and disseminate from the lung prior to the elicitation of adaptive immune

  19. Identification and characterization of a cluster of transcription start sites located in the E6 ORF of human papillomavirus type 16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken W; Vinther, Jeppe; Hansen, Christina N

    2003-01-01

    -transformed cells. In contrast to malignant HPV types, non-malignant HPV types have separate promoters driving the expression of E6 and E7. Experiments have shown that the translation of E7 is more efficient from monocistronic than bicistronic transcripts encoding both E6 and E7. Here, identification...... is consistent with the finding of multiple transcription start sites. Furthermore, it is shown that proteins from HeLa and SiHa nuclear cell extracts bind to the two regions at nt 291-314 and 388-411, and that these two regions influence transcription activity in a cell type-dependent manner....... of a cluster of transcription start sites located in the E6 ORF of HPV-16 is presented. Transcripts from this region contain the E7 ORF as the first reading frame. The cluster consists of multiple transcription start sites located around nt 441. Additional transcription start sites were identified in a cluster...

  20. The transcription factor Rbf1 is the master regulator for b-mating type controlled pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Heimel

    Full Text Available In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development.

  1. The transcription factor Rbf1 is the master regulator for b-mating type controlled pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimel, Kai; Scherer, Mario; Vranes, Miroslav; Wahl, Ramon; Pothiratana, Chetsada; Schuler, David; Vincon, Volker; Finkernagel, Florian; Flor-Parra, Ignacio; Kämper, Jörg

    2010-08-05

    In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development.

  2. Nuclear sequestration of COL1A1 mRNA transcript associated with type I osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primorac, D.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.B. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified an OI type I patient with a splice donor mutation that resulted in intron 26 retention instead of exon skipping and sequestration of normal levels of the mutant transcript in the nuclear compartment. Intron retention was consistent with the exon definition hypothesis for splice site selection since the size of the exon-intron-exon unit was less than 300 bp. Furthermore, the retained intron contained in-frame stop codons which is thought to cause the mutant RNA to remain within the nucleus rather than appearing in the cytoplasm. To test these hypotheses, genomic fragments containing the normal sequence or the donor mutation were cloned into a collagen minigene and expressed in stably tansfected NIH 3T3 cells. None of the modifications to the normal intron altered the level of RNA that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as expected. However none of the modifications to the mutant intron allowed accumulation of normal levels of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in contrast to our findings in the patient`s cells only low levels of mutant transcript were found in the nucleus; a fraction of the transcript did appear in the cytoplasm which had spliced the mutant donor site correctly. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated equal levels of transcription from each transgene. Expression of another donor mutation known to cause in-frame exon skipping in OI type IV was accurately reproduced in the minigene in transfected 3T3 cells. Our experience suggests that either mechanism can lead to formation of a null allele possibly related to the type of splicing events surrounding the potential stop codons. Understanding the rules governing inactivation of a collagen RNA transcript may be important in designing a strategy to inactivate a dominate negative mutation associated with the more severe forms of OI.

  3. MicroRNA as type I interferon-regulated transcripts and modulators of the innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel C Forster

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are an important family of cytokines that regulate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens, in cancer and inflammatory diseases. While the regulation and role of protein-coding genes involved in these responses are well characterized, the role of non-coding microRNAs in the IFN responses is less developed. We review the emerging picture of microRNA regulation of the IFN response at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This response forms an important regulatory loop, several microRNAs target transcripts encoding components at many steps of the type I IFN response, both production and action, at the receptor, signaling, transcription factor and regulated gene level. Not only do IFNs regulate positive signaling molecules, but also negative regulators such as SOCS1. In total, 36 microRNA are reported as IFN regulated. Given this apparent multipronged targeting of the IFN response by microRNAs and their well characterized capacity to buffer responses in other situations, the prospects of improved sequencing and microRNA targeting technologies will facilitate the elucidation of the broader regulatory networks of microRNA in this important biological context, and their therapeutic and diagnostic potential.

  4. Um, er: How meaning varies between speech and its typed transcript

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Harry; O'Mahoney, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    We use an extract from an interview concerning gravitational wave physics to show that the meaning of hesitancies within speech are different when spoken and when read from the corresponding transcript. When used in speech, hesitancies can indicate a pause for thought, when read in a transcript they indicate uncertainty. In a series of experiments the perceived uncertainty of the transcript was shown to be higher than the perceived uncertainty of the spoken version with almost no overlap for any respondent. We propose that finding and the method could be the beginning of a new subject we call 'Language Code Analysis' which would systematically examine how meanings change when the 'same' words are communicated via different media and symbol systems.

  5. Transcriptional profiling of myotubes from patients with type 2 diabetes: no evidence for a primary defect in oxidative phosphorylation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C M; Højlund, K; Hansen, L;

    2008-01-01

    . It is unknown whether reduced mitochondrial biogenesis or other transcriptional alterations co-exist with impaired insulin responsiveness in primary human muscle cells from patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Using cDNA microarray technology and global pathway analysis with the Gene Map Annotator...... and Pathway Profiler (GenMapp 2.1) and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA 2.0.1), we examined transcript levels in myotubes established from obese patients with type 2 diabetes and matched obese healthy participants, who had been extensively metabolically characterised both in vivo and in vitro. We have...... previously reported reduced basal lipid oxidation and impaired insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation in these diabetic myotubes. RESULTS: No single gene was differently expressed after correction for multiple testing, and no biological pathway was differently expressed using either...

  6. HuR interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, and modulates reverse transcription in infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennifar Eric

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reverse transcription of the genetic material of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a critical step in the replication cycle of this virus. This process, catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT, is well characterized at the biochemical level. However, in infected cells, reverse transcription occurs in a multiprotein complex – the reverse transcription complex (RTC – consisting of viral genomic RNA associated with viral proteins (including RT and, presumably, as yet uncharacterized cellular proteins. Very little is known about the cellular proteins interacting with the RTC, and with reverse transcriptase in particular. We report here that HIV-1 reverse transcription is affected by the levels of a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein – the RNA-binding protein HuR. A direct protein-protein interaction between RT and HuR was observed in a yeast two-hybrid screen and confirmed in vitro by homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF. We mapped the domain interacting with HuR to the RNAse H domain of RT, and the binding domain for RT to the C-terminus of HuR, partially overlapping the third RRM RNA-binding domain of HuR. HuR silencing with specific siRNAs greatly impaired early and late steps of reverse transcription, significantly inhibiting HIV-1 infection. Moreover, by mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation studies, we could not detect the binding of HuR to the viral RNA. These results suggest that HuR may be involved in and may modulate the reverse transcription reaction of HIV-1, by an as yet unknown mechanism involving a protein-protein interaction with HIV-1 RT.

  7. Cell-type-selective induction of c-jun by TAF4b directs ovarian-specific transcription networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geles, Kenneth G; Freiman, Richard N; Liu, Wei-Li; Zheng, Shuang; Voronina, Ekaterina; Tjian, Robert

    2006-02-21

    Cell-type-selective expression of the TFIID subunit TAF(II)105 (renamed TAF4b) in the ovary is essential for proper follicle development. Although a multitude of signaling pathways required for folliculogenesis have been identified, downstream transcriptional integrators of these signals remain largely unknown. Here, we show that TAF4b controls the granulosa-cell-specific expression of the proto-oncogene c-jun, and together they regulate transcription of ovary-selective promoters. Instead of using cell-type-specific activators, our findings suggest that the coactivator TAF4b regulates the expression of tissue-specific genes, at least in part, through the cell-type-specific induction of c-jun, a ubiquitous activator. Importantly, the loss of TAF4b in ovarian granulosa cells disrupts cellular morphologies and interactions during follicle growth that likely contribute to the infertility observed in TAF4b-null female mice. These data highlight a mechanism for potentiating tissue-selective functions of the basal transcription machinery and reveal intricate networks of gene expression that orchestrate ovarian-specific functions and cell morphology.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional profile of the Mediator complex across human cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syring, Isabella; Klümper, Niklas; Offermann, Anne; Braun, Martin; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Queisser, Angela; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Brägelmann, Johannes; Vogel, Wenzel; Schmidt, Doris; Majores, Michael; Schindler, Anne; Kristiansen, Glen; Müller, Stefan C; Ellinger, Jörg; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Perner, Sven

    2016-04-26

    The Mediator complex is a key regulator of gene transcription and several studies demonstrated altered expressions of particular subunits in diverse human diseases, especially cancer. However a systematic study deciphering the transcriptional expression of the Mediator across different cancer entities is still lacking.We therefore performed a comprehensive in silico cancer vs. benign analysis of the Mediator complex subunits (MEDs) for 20 tumor entities using Oncomine datasets. The transcriptional expression profiles across almost all cancer entities showed differentially expressed MEDs as compared to benign tissue. Differential expression of MED8 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and MED12 in lung cancer (LCa) were validated and further investigated by immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays containing large numbers of specimen. MED8 in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) associated with shorter survival and advanced TNM stage and showed higher expression in metastatic than primary tumors. In vitro, siRNA mediated MED8 knockdown significantly impaired proliferation and motility in ccRCC cell lines, hinting at a role for MED8 to serve as a novel therapeutic target in ccRCC. Taken together, our Mediator complex transcriptome proved to be a valid tool for identifying cancer-related shifts in Mediator complex composition, revealing that MEDs do exhibit cancer specific transcriptional expression profiles.

  9. E2F1-mediated transcriptional inhibition of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziczak, M; Müller, H; Helin, K;

    2001-01-01

    -sensitive retinoblastoma protein (pRB), a shift to a permissive temperature induced PAI-1 mRNA expression. In U2OS cells stably expressing an E2F1-estrogen receptor chimeric protein that could be activated by tamoxifen, PAI-1 gene transcription was markedly reduced by tamoxifen even in the presence of cycloheximide...

  10. Noncytotoxic suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription by exosomes secreted from CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumne, Ashwin; Prasad, Varsha Shridhar; Chen, Yue; Stolz, Donna B; Saha, Kunal; Ratner, Deena M; Ding, Ming; Watkins, Simon C; Gupta, Phalguni

    2009-05-01

    CD8(+) T cells display a noncytotoxic activity that suppresses transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in an antigen-independent and major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted manner. To date, the precise cellular and molecular factors mediating this CD8(+) T-cell effector function remain unsolved. Despite evidence indicating the dependence of the activity on cell-cell contact, the possibility of a membrane-mediated activity that represses transcription from the viral promoter remains unexplored. We therefore investigated whether this inhibition of HIV-1 transcription might be elicited by a membrane-bound determinant. Using a CD8(+) T-cell line displaying potent noncytotoxic HIV-1 suppression activity, we have identified a membrane-localized HIV-1-suppressing activity that is concomitantly secreted as 30- to 100-nm endosome-derived tetraspanin-rich vesicles known as exosomes. Purified exosomes from CD8(+) T-cell culture supernatant noncytotoxically suppressed CCR5-tropic (R5) and CXCR4-tropic (X4) replication of HIV-1 in vitro through a protein moiety. Similar antiviral activity was also found in exosomes isolated from two HIV-1-infected subjects. The antiviral exosomes specifically inhibited HIV-1 transcription in both acute and chronic models of infection. Our results, for the first time, indicate the existence of an antiviral membrane-bound factor consistent with the hallmarks defining noncytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell suppression of HIV-1.

  11. A new PKLR gene mutation in the R-type promoter region affects the gene transcription causing pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, L; Ribeiro, M L; Máximo, V; Almeida, H; Costa, A; Freitas, O; Barbot, J; Abade, A; Tamagnini, G

    2000-09-01

    Mutations in the PKLR gene responsible for pyruvate kinase (PK)-deficient anaemia are mainly located in the coding regions: 11 are in the splicing sites and, recently, three mutations have been described in the promoter region. We now report a novel point mutation A-->G on nucleotide 72, upstream from the initiation codon of the PKLR gene, in four Portuguese PK-deficient patients. This new regulatory mutation occurs within the most proximal of the four GATA motifs (GATA-A element) in the R-type promoter region. In two patients who were homozygous for this mutation, a semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure was used to evaluate the amount of R-PK mRNA transcript in the reticulocytes. The mRNA level was about five times lower than in normal controls, demonstrating that the PKLR gene transcription is severely affected, most probably because the -72A-->G point mutation disables the binding of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 to the GATA-A element. Supporting these data, the two patients homozygous for the -72A-->G mutation had severe haemolytic anaemia and were transfusion dependent until splenectomy. Two other patients who were compound heterozygous for this mutation and the previously described missense mutation 1456C-->T had a mild condition.

  12. Inducer responses of BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator from Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craven, Sarah H.; Ezezika, Obidimma C.; Haddad, Sandra; Hall, Ruth A.; Momany, Cory; Neidle, Ellen L.; Georgia

    2009-06-25

    BenM and CatM control transcription of a complex regulon for aromatic compound degradation. These Acinetobacter baylyi paralogues belong to the largest family of prokaryotic transcriptional regulators, the LysR-type proteins. Whereas BenM activates transcription synergistically in response to two effectors, benzoate and cis,cis-muconate, CatM responds only to cis,cis-muconate. Here, site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the physiological significance of an unexpected benzoate-binding pocket in BenM discovered during structural studies. Residues in BenM were changed to match those of CatM in this hydrophobic pocket. Two BenM residues, R160 and Y293, were found to mediate the response to benzoate. Additionally, alteration of these residues caused benzoate to inhibit activation by cis,cis-muconate, positioned in a separate primary effector-binding site of BenM. The location of the primary site, in an interdomain cleft, is conserved in diverse LysR-type regulators. To improve understanding of this important family, additional regulatory mutants were analysed. The atomic-level structures were characterized of the effector-binding domains of variants that do not require inducers for activation, CatM(R156H) and BenM(R156H,T157S). These structures clearly resemble those of the wild-type proteins in their activated muconate-bound complexes. Amino acid replacements that enable activation without effectors reside at protein interfaces that may impact transcription through effects on oligomerization.

  13. Ubiquitin Ligase, MuRF-1 regulates myosin heavy chain type IIa transcripts during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Sachiko

    Skeletal muscles are vulnerable to marked atrophy under microgravity conditions. We previously reported that gastrocnemius muscle atrophy by spaceflight was specifically sensitive to the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. We also screened more over 26,000 skeletal muscle genes in rats exposed to real weightlessness and found that the expression of Ubiquitin Ligase, Muscle specific Ring Finger-1 (MuRF-1) upregulated under microgravity. In the present study, we examined the role of MuRF-1 in microgravity-induced muscle atrophy. The amounts of MuRF-1 transcripts significantly increased in skeletal muscle after denervation, an in vivo model of microgravity-induced unloading. MuRF-1 deficient (MuRF-1-/-) mice significantly inhibited reduction of muscle weight for muscle atrophy, compared with wild type mice. Interestingly, MuRF-1-/- mice significantly inhibited upregulation of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) type IIa transcrips, while wild type mice significantly increased expression of MyHC type IIa transcripts in denervated skeletal muscle. Our present results suggest that MuRF-1 may play an important role in regulation of MyHC type IIa during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions.

  14. Localization of type II collagen, long form alpha 1(IX) collagen, and short form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts in the developing chick notochord and axial skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1992-06-01

    In this study we compare, by in situ hybridization, the spatial and temporal expression patterns of transcripts of avian type II collagen and the long and short forms of the (alpha 1) chain of type IX collagen during the development of the notochord and axial skeleton. We observed type II collagen and short form type IX collagen transcripts in the developing (stage 25-28) nonchondrogenic notochord. Conversely, long form type IX transcripts were not detectable in the notochord or perinotochordal sheath. Interestingly, all three transcripts colocalized in the developing chondrogenic vertebrae of the axial skeleton as well as in the chondrocranium and Meckel's cartilage. The expression of the short form of type IX collagen in these regions was more restricted than that of the long form. This report provides additional support for a complex regulatory pathway of cartilage marker gene expression in chondrogenic vs. nonchondrogenic tissues during avian embryogenesis.

  15. Deregulation of sucrose-controlled translation of a bZIP-type transcription factor results in sucrose accumulation in leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Thalor

    Full Text Available Sucrose is known to repress the translation of Arabidopsis thaliana AtbZIP11 transcript which encodes a protein belonging to the group of S (S--stands for small basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP-type transcription factor. This repression is called sucrose-induced repression of translation (SIRT. It is mediated through the sucrose-controlled upstream open reading frame (SC-uORF found in the AtbZIP11 transcript. The SIRT is reported for 4 other genes belonging to the group of S bZIP in Arabidopsis. Tobacco tbz17 is phylogenetically closely related to AtbZIP11 and carries a putative SC-uORF in its 5'-leader region. Here we demonstrate that tbz17 exhibits SIRT mediated by its SC-uORF in a manner similar to genes belonging to the S bZIP group of the Arabidopsis genus. Furthermore, constitutive transgenic expression of tbz17 lacking its 5'-leader region containing the SC-uORF leads to production of tobacco plants with thicker leaves composed of enlarged cells with 3-4 times higher sucrose content compared to wild type plants. Our finding provides a novel strategy to generate plants with high sucrose content.

  16. A low absolute number of expanded transcripts is involved in myotonic dystrophy type 1 manifestation in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudde, Anke E E G; González-Barriga, Anchel; van den Broek, Walther J A A; Wieringa, Bé; Wansink, Derick G

    2016-04-15

    Muscular manifestation of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a common inheritable degenerative multisystem disorder, is mainly caused by expression of RNA from a (CTG·CAG)n-expanded DM1 locus. Here, we report on comparative profiling of expression of normal and expanded endogenous or transgenic transcripts in skeletal muscle cells and biopsies from DM1 mouse models and patients in order to help us in understanding the role of this RNA-mediated toxicity. In tissue of HSA(LR) mice, the most intensely used 'muscle-only' model in the DM1 field, RNA from the α-actin (CTG)250 transgene was at least 1000-fold more abundant than that from the Dmpk gene, or the DMPK gene in humans. Conversely, the DMPK transgene in another line, DM500/DMSXL mice, was expressed ∼10-fold lower than the endogenous gene. Temporal regulation of expanded RNA expression differed between models. Onset of expression occurred remarkably late in HSA(LR) myoblasts during in vitro myogenesis whereas Dmpk or DMPK (trans)genes were expressed throughout proliferation and differentiation phases. Importantly, quantification of absolute transcript numbers revealed that normal and expanded Dmpk/DMPK transcripts in mouse models and DM1 patients are low-abundance RNA species. Northern blotting, reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses showed that they occur at an absolute number between one and a few dozen molecules per cell. Our findings refine the current RNA dominance theory for DM1 pathophysiology, as anomalous factor binding to expanded transcripts and formation of soluble or insoluble ribonucleoprotein aggregates must be nucleated by only few expanded DMPK transcripts and therefore be a small numbers game.

  17. Evidence that PrfA, the pleiotropic activator of virulence genes in Listeria monocytogenes, can be present but inactive.

    OpenAIRE

    Renzoni, A; Klarsfeld, A; Dramsi, S.; Cossart, P

    1997-01-01

    All virulence genes of Listeria monocytogenes identified to date are positively regulated by PrfA, a transcriptional activator belonging to the Crp-Fnr family. Low temperature and cellobiose are two environmental signals known to repress expression of virulence genes in L. monocytogenes. In the present work, we analyzed the effect of temperature and cellobiose on the expression of the PrfA protein. At low temperature, PrfA was undetected, although prfA monocistronic transcripts are present. I...

  18. Transcriptional activation of immediate-early gene ETR101 by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I Tax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Ma, Shiliang; Li, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax regulates viral and cellular gene expression through interactions with multiple cellular transcription pathways. This study describes the finding of immediate-early gene ETR101 expression in HTLV-I-infected cells and its regulation by Tax. ETR101...... was persistently expressed in HTLV-I-infected cells but not in HTLV-I uninfected cells. Expression of ETR101 was dependent upon Tax expression in the inducible Tax-expressing cell line JPX-9 and also in Jurkat cells transiently transfected with Tax-expressing vectors. Tax transactivated the ETR101 gene promoter......-DNA complex in HTLV-I-infected cell lines. EMSA with specific antibodies confirmed that the CREB transcription factor was responsible for formation of this specific protein-DNA complex. These results suggested that Tax directly transactivated ETR101 gene expression, mainly through a CRE sequence via the CREB...

  19. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also.

  20. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Jacob B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs, and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs (Rb-/- MEFs. Findings Comparative analysis of the expression profiles of 3T3-L1 cells and wild-type MEFs revealed genes involved specifically in early regulation of the adipocyte differentiation as well as secreted factors and signaling molecules regulating the later phase of differentiation. In an attempt to identify transcription factors regulating adipogenesis, bioinformatics analysis of the promoters of coordinately and highly expressed genes was performed. We were able to identify a number of high-confidence target genes for follow-up experimental studies. Additionally, combination of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1. To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis of 64 deregulated genes showed that the Rb-/- MEF model exhibits a brown(-like adipocyte phenotype. Additionally, the analysis results indicate a different or additional role for pRb family member involvement in the lineage commitment. Conclusion In this study a number of commonly modulated genes during adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells and MEFs, potential transcriptional regulation mechanisms, and differentially regulated targets during adipocyte

  1. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Flu shot helps type 2 diabetes patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... within the 'start here' section of MedlinePlus.gov's diabetes type 2 health topic page . The National Center for Farmworker ... the 'treatment and therapies' section of MedlinePlus.gov's diabetes type 2 health topic page. MedlinePlus.gov's diabetes type 2 ...

  2. Association of variants of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in the Dutch Breda cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Shiri-Sverdlov, R.; Zhernakova, A.; Strengman, E.; van Haeften, T.W.; Hofker, M.H.; Wijmenga, C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim/hypothesis A strong association between susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and common variants of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), encoding an enteroendocrine transcription factor involved in glucose homeostasis, has been reported in three different populations (Iceland, Denmark and USA) b

  3. Legionella pneumophila type IV effectors hijack the transcription and translation machinery of the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, Monica; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens modulate the host response to persist and replicate inside a eukaryotic cell and cause disease. Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is present in freshwater environments and represents one of these pathogens. During coevolution with protozoan cells, L. pneumophila has acquired highly sophisticated and diverse strategies to hijack host cell processes. It secretes hundreds of effectors into the host cell, and these manipulate host signaling pathways and key cellular processes. Recently it has been shown that L. pneumophila is also able to alter the transcription and translation machinery of the host and to exploit epigenetic mechanisms in the cells it resides in to counteract host responses.

  4. Type 2 diabetes alters metabolic and transcriptional signatures of glucose and amino acid metabolism during exercise and recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob S; Zhao, Xinjie; Irmler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The therapeutic benefit of physical activity to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes is commonly accepted. However, the impact of the disease on the acute metabolic response is less clear. To this end, we investigated the effect of type 2 diabetes on exercise-induced plasma metabolite...... changes and the muscular transcriptional response using a complementary metabolomics/transcriptomics approach. METHODS: We analysed 139 plasma metabolites and hormones at nine time points, and whole genome expression in skeletal muscle at three time points, during a 60 min bicycle ergometer exercise...... and a 180 min recovery phase in type 2 diabetic patients and healthy controls matched for age, percentage body fat and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2). RESULTS: Pathway analysis of differentially regulated genes upon exercise revealed upregulation of regulators of GLUT4 (SLC2A4RG, FLOT1, EXOC7, RAB13...

  5. Type I Interferon Transcriptional Signature in Neutrophils and Low-Density Granulocytes Are Associated with Tissue Damage in Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Coelho Rocha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte population in the bloodstream, the primary compartment of Plasmodium sp. infection. However, the role of these polymorphonuclear cells in mediating either the resistance or the pathogenesis of malaria is poorly understood. We report that circulating neutrophils from malaria patients are highly activated, as indicated by a strong type I interferon transcriptional signature, increased expression of surface activation markers, enhanced release of reactive oxygen species and myeloperoxidase, and a high frequency of low-density granulocytes. The activation of neutrophils was associated with increased levels of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, indicating liver damage. In a rodent malaria model, we observed intense recruitment of neutrophils to liver sinusoids. Neutrophil migration and IL-1β and chemokine expression as well as liver damage were all dependent on type I interferon signaling. The data suggest that type I interferon signaling has a central role in neutrophil activation and malaria pathogenesis.

  6. The maize OST1 kinase homolog phosphorylates and regulates the maize SNAC1-type transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmiro Vilela

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis kinase OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1 plays a key role in regulating drought stress signalling, particularly stomatal closure. We have identified and investigated the functions of the OST1 ortholog in Z. mays (ZmOST1. Ectopic expression of ZmOST1 in the Arabidopsis ost1 mutant restores the stomatal closure phenotype in response to drought. Furthermore, we have identified the transcription factor, ZmSNAC1, which is directly phosphorylated by ZmOST1 with implications on its localization and protein stability. Interestingly, ZmSNAC1 binds to the ABA-box of ZmOST1, which is conserved in SnRK2s activated by ABA and is part of the contact site for the negative-regulating clade A PP2C phosphatases. Taken together, our results indicate that ZmSNAC1 is a substrate of ZmOST1 and delineate a novel osmotic stress transcriptional pathway in maize.

  7. The LysR-type transcription factor PacR is a global regulator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in Anabaena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picossi, Silvia; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-09-01

    Cyanobacteria perform water-splitting photosynthesis and are important primary producers impacting the carbon and nitrogen cycles at global scale. They fix CO2 through ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCo) and have evolved a distinct CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) that builds high CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCo favouring its carboxylase activity. Filamentous cyanobacteria such as Anabaena fix CO2 in photosynthetic vegetative cells, which donate photosynthate to heterocysts that rely on a heterotrophic metabolism to fix N2 . CCM elements are induced in response to inorganic carbon limitation, a cue that exposes the photosynthetic apparatus to photodamage by over-reduction. An Anabaena mutant lacking the LysR-type transcription factor All3953 grew poorly and dies under high light. The rbcL operon encoding RuBisCo was induced upon carbon limitation in the wild type but not in the mutant. ChIP-Seq analysis was used to globally identify All3953 targets under carbon limitation. Targets include, besides rbcL, genes encoding CCM elements, photorespiratory pathway- photosystem- and electron transport-related components, and factors, including flavodiiron proteins, with a demonstrated or putative function in photoprotection. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of selected All3953 targets showed regulation in the wild type but not in the mutant. All3953 (PacR) is a global regulator of carbon assimilation in an oxygenic photoautotroph.

  8. Arabidopsis MALE STERILITY1 encodes a PHD-type transcription factor and regulates pollen and tapetum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takuya; Nagata, Noriko; Yoshiba, Yoshu; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Ma, Hong; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2007-11-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana MALE STERILITY1 (MS1) gene encodes a nuclear protein with Leu zipper-like and PHD-finger motifs and is important for postmeiotic pollen development. Here, we examined MS1 function using both cell biological and molecular biological approaches. We introduced a fusion construct of MS1 and a transcriptional repression domain (MS1-SRDX) into wild-type Arabidopsis, and the transgenic plants showed a semisterile phenotype similar to that of ms1. Since the repression domain can convert various kinds of transcriptional activators to dominant repressors, this suggested that MS1 functioned as a transcriptional activator. The Leu zipper-like region and the PHD motif were required for the MS1 function. Phenotypic analysis of the ms1 mutant and the MS1-SRDX transgenic Arabidopsis indicated that MS1 was involved in formation of pollen exine and pollen cytosolic components as well as tapetum development. Next, we searched for MS1 downstream genes by analyzing publicly available microarray data and identified 95 genes affected by MS1. Using a transgenic ms1 plant showing dexamethasone-inducible recovery of fertility, we further examined whether these genes were immediately downstream of MS1. From these results, we discuss a role of MS1 in pollen and tapetum development and the conservation of MS1 function in flowering plants.

  9. A low absolute number of expanded transcripts is involved in myotonic dystrophy type 1 manifestation in muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Gudde, Anke E. E. G.; González-Barriga, Anchel; van den Broek, Walther J. A. A.; Wieringa, Bé; Wansink, Derick G

    2016-01-01

    Muscular manifestation of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a common inheritable degenerative multisystem disorder, is mainly caused by expression of RNA from a (CTG·CAG) n -expanded DM1 locus. Here, we report on comparative profiling of expression of normal and expanded endogenous or transgenic transcripts in skeletal muscle cells and biopsies from DM1 mouse models and patients in order to help us in understanding the role of this RNA-mediated toxicity. In tissue of HSA LR mice, the most inte...

  10. Characterization and transcriptional analysis of two gene clusters for type IV secretion machinery in Wolbachia of Armadillidium vulgare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Félix, Christine; Pichon, Samuel; Braquart-Varnier, Christine;

    2008-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited alpha-proteobacteria that induce feminization of genetic males in most terrestrial crustacean isopods. Two clusters of vir genes for a type IV secretion machinery have been identified at two separate loci and characterized for the first time in a feminizing...... Wolbachia. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these operons are transcriptionally active in ovaries and in all other tissues tested, suggesting that T4SS has a significant role in Wolbachia biology. These observations and the identification of homologous vir genes in Wolbachia strains infecting insects...... or nematodes show that vir genes are conserved among Wolbachia strains whatever the phenotype induced by the bacteria....

  11. Notch maintains Drosophila type II neuroblasts by suppressing expression of the Fez transcription factor Earmuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaosu; Xie, Yonggang; Zhu, Sijun

    2016-07-15

    Notch signaling is crucial for maintaining neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and heterogeneity; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In Drosophila, loss of Notch prematurely terminates the self-renewal of larval type II neuroblasts (NBs, the Drosophila NSCs) and transforms type II NBs into type I NBs. Here, we demonstrate that Notch maintains type II NBs by suppressing the activation of earmuff (erm) by Pointed P1 (PntP1). We show that loss of Notch or components of its canonical pathway leads to PntP1-dependent ectopic Erm expression in type II NBs. Knockdown of Erm significantly rescues the loss-of-Notch phenotypes, and misexpression of Erm phenocopies the loss of Notch. Ectopically expressed Erm promotes the transformation of type II NBs into type I NBs by inhibiting PntP1 function and expression in type II NBs. Our work not only elucidates a key mechanism of Notch-mediated maintenance of type II NB self-renewal and identity, but also reveals a novel function of Erm.

  12. OPA3, mutated in 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III, encodes two transcripts targeted primarily to mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huizing, Marjan; Dorward, Heidi; Ly, Lien

    2010-01-01

    3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type III (3-MGCA type III), caused by recessive mutations in the 2-exon gene OPA3, is characterized by early-onset bilateral optic atrophy, later-onset extrapyramidal dysfunction, and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid. Her...

  13. A powerful method for transcriptional profiling of specific cell types in eukaryotes: laser-assisted microdissection and RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc W Schmid

    Full Text Available The acquisition of distinct cell fates is central to the development of multicellular organisms and is largely mediated by gene expression patterns specific to individual cells and tissues. A spatially and temporally resolved analysis of gene expression facilitates the elucidation of transcriptional networks linked to cellular identity and function. We present an approach that allows cell type-specific transcriptional profiling of distinct target cells, which are rare and difficult to access, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. We combined laser-assisted microdissection (LAM, linear amplification starting from <1 ng of total RNA, and RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq. As a model we used the central cell of the Arabidopsis thaliana female gametophyte, one of the female gametes harbored in the reproductive organs of the flower. We estimated the number of expressed genes to be more than twice the number reported previously in a study using LAM and ATH1 microarrays, and identified several classes of genes that were systematically underrepresented in the transcriptome measured with the ATH1 microarray. Among them are many genes that are likely to be important for developmental processes and specific cellular functions. In addition, we identified several intergenic regions, which are likely to be transcribed, and describe a considerable fraction of reads mapping to introns and regions flanking annotated loci, which may represent alternative transcript isoforms. Finally, we performed a de novo assembly of the transcriptome and show that the method is suitable for studying individual cell types of organisms lacking reference sequence information, demonstrating that this approach can be applied to most eukaryotic organisms.

  14. Mutation of senataxin alters disease-specific transcriptional networks in patients with ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Brent L; Cho, Ellen; Wahnich, Amanda; Gao, Fuying; Becherel, Olivier J; Wang, Xizhe; Fike, Francesca; Chen, Leslie; Criscuolo, Chiara; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Collins, Abigail; Hahn, Angelika F; Gatti, Richard A; Konopka, Genevieve; Perlman, Susan; Lavin, Martin F; Geschwind, Daniel H; Coppola, Giovanni

    2014-09-15

    Senataxin, encoded by the SETX gene, contributes to multiple aspects of gene expression, including transcription and RNA processing. Mutations in SETX cause the recessive disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) and a dominant juvenile form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4). To assess the functional role of senataxin in disease, we examined differential gene expression in AOA2 patient fibroblasts, identifying a core set of genes showing altered expression by microarray and RNA-sequencing. To determine whether AOA2 and ALS4 mutations differentially affect gene expression, we overexpressed disease-specific SETX mutations in senataxin-haploinsufficient fibroblasts and observed changes in distinct sets of genes. This implicates mutation-specific alterations of senataxin function in disease pathogenesis and provides a novel example of allelic neurogenetic disorders with differing gene expression profiles. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) demonstrated these senataxin-associated genes to be involved in both mutation-specific and shared functional gene networks. To assess this in vivo, we performed gene expression analysis on peripheral blood from members of 12 different AOA2 families and identified an AOA2-specific transcriptional signature. WGCNA identified two gene modules highly enriched for this transcriptional signature in the peripheral blood of all AOA2 patients studied. These modules were disease-specific and preserved in patient fibroblasts and in the cerebellum of Setx knockout mice demonstrating conservation across species and cell types, including neurons. These results identify novel genes and cellular pathways related to senataxin function in normal and disease states, and implicate alterations in gene expression as underlying the phenotypic differences between AOA2 and ALS4.

  15. Zebrafish Plzf transcription factors enhance early type I IFN response induced by two non-enveloped RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksejeva, E; Houel, A; Briolat, V; Levraud, J-P; Langevin, C; Boudinot, P

    2016-04-01

    The BTB-POZ transcription factor Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger (PLZF, or ZBTB16) has been recently identified as a major factor regulating the induction of a subset of Interferon stimulated genes in human and mouse. We show that the two co-orthologues of PLZF found in zebrafish show distinct expression patterns, especially in larvae. Although zbtb16a/plzfa and zbtb16b/plzfb are not modulated by IFN produced during viral infection, their over-expression increases the level of the early type I IFN response, at a critical phase in the race between the virus and the host response. The effect of Plzfb on IFN induction was also detectable after cell infection by different non-enveloped RNA viruses, but not after infection by the rhabdovirus SVCV. Our findings indicate that plzf implication in the regulation of type I IFN responses is conserved across vertebrates, but at multiple levels of the pathway and through different mechanisms.

  16. The gene locus encoding iodothyronine deiodinase type 3 (Dio3) is imprinted in the fetus and expresses antisense transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Arturo; Fiering, Steven; Martinez, Elena; Galton, Valerie Anne; St Germain, Donald

    2002-11-01

    The mouse Dio3 gene codes for the type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (D3), a conserved selenocysteine-containing enzyme that inactivates thyroid hormones and is highly expressed during early development. The mouse Dio3 gene and its human homolog map to chromosomal regions that are known to contain imprinted genes. We assessed the allelic expression of the Dio3 using a mouse model in which the gene had been inactivated by the introduction of a critical mutation in the selenocysteine codon. We compared Dio3 gene expression in fetuses that were either wild type or heterozygous (+/-Dio3) for the mutation. D3 enzymatic activities in the head, limbs, liver and body of heterozygous fetuses (E14 to E18) that inherited the mutation from the mother were no different from those found in their wild type littermates. However, D3 activities in heterozygous animals that inherited the mutation from the father were only 18 to 28% of the activities of their wild type littermates in these same tissues. No detectable activity was found in fetuses homozygous for the mutation indicating full inactivation of the enzyme. Northern analysis of mRNA from E15 fetuses showed that the Dio3 mRNA transcripts generated from the paternal allele were at least 5 times more abundant than the transcripts originated from the maternal allele. We conclude that the Dio3 gene is subject to genomic imprinting and preferentially expressed from the paternal allele in the mouse fetus. We also identified a gene that is transcribed antisense from the Dio3 locus. The Dio3 gene likely belongs to the same cluster of imprinted genes detected in mouse chromosome 12 and human chromosome 14 and should be considered as a candidate gene that might play a role in the phenotypic abnormalities associated with uniparental disomy of those chromosomes, a condition in which gene expression is altered due to abnormal genomic imprinting.

  17. Amino-terminal extension of 146 residues of L-type GATA-6 is required for transcriptional activation but not for self-association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kayoko; Obayashi, Kanako; Ohashi, Kazuaki; Ohashi-Kobayashi, Ayako; Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Maeda, Masatomo

    2014-10-01

    Transcription factor GATA-6 plays essential roles in developmental processes and tissue specific functions through regulation of gene expression. GATA-6 mRNA utilizes two Met-codons in frame as translational initiation codons. Deletion of the nucleotide sequence encoding the PEST sequence (Glu(31)-Cys(46)) between the two initiation codons unusually reduced the protein molecular size on SDS-polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis, and re-introduction of this sequence reversed this change. The long-type (L-type) GATA-6 containing this PEST sequence self-associated similarly to the short-type (S-type) GATA-6, as determined on co-immunoprecipitation of Myc-tagged GATA-6 with HA-tagged GATA-6. The L-type and S-type GATA-6 also interacted mutually. The L-type GATA-6 without the PEST sequence also self-associated and interacted with the S-type GATA-6. The transcriptional activation potential of L-type GATA-6 is higher than that of S-type GATA-6. When the PEST sequence (Glu(31)-Cys(46)) was inserted into the L-type GATA-6 without Arg(13)-Gly(101), the resultant recombinant protein showed significantly higher transcriptional activity, while the construct with an unrelated sequence exhibited lower activity. These results suggest that the Glu(31)-Cys(46) segment plays an important role in the transcriptional activation, although it does not participate in the self-association.

  18. ID4 regulates transcriptional activity of wild type and mutant p53 via K373 acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Derrick J; Patel, Divya; Joshi, Jugal; Hunt, Aisha; Knowell, Ashley E; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2017-01-10

    Given that mutated p53 (50% of all human cancers) is over-expressed in many cancers, restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function has been sought after as cancer therapy. The conformational flexibility has allowed to restore the normal biological function of mutant p53 by short peptides and small molecule compounds. Recently, studies have focused on physiological mechanisms such as acetylation of lysine residues to rescue the wild type activity of mutant p53. Using p53 null prostate cancer cell line we show that ID4 dependent acetylation promotes mutant p53 DNA-binding capabilities to its wild type consensus sequence, thus regulating p53-dependent target genes leading to subsequent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Specifically, by using wild type, mutant (P223L, V274F, R175H, R273H), acetylation mimics (K320Q and K373Q) and non-acetylation mimics (K320R and K373R) of p53, we identify that ID4 promotes acetylation of K373 and to a lesser extent K320, in turn restoring p53-dependent biological activities. Together, our data provides a molecular understanding of ID4 dependent acetylation that suggests a strategy of enhancing p53 acetylation at sites K373 and K320 that may serve as a viable mechanism of physiological restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function.

  19. Molecular diversity of L-type Ca2+ channel transcripts in human fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Soldatov, N M

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding the human fibroblast Ca2+ channel of L type (HFCC) has been determined. It is highly homologous to L-type channels previously cloned from rabbit lung and heart as well as from rat brain. At least four sites of molecular diversity were identified in the nucleotide sequence of HFCC. Three of these include regions encoding the transmembrane segments IIS6, IIIS2, and IVS3, which are known to be important for channel gating properties. The positions of thes...

  20. Host Cell Contact-Induced Transcription of the Type IV Fimbria Gene Cluster of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, B.K.H.L.; Putten, J.P.M.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Smith, H.E.

    2004-01-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) of gram-negative species share many characteristics, including a common architecture and conserved biogenesis pathway. Much less is known about the regulation of Tfp expression in response to changing environmental conditions. We investigated the diversity of Tfp regulatory system

  1. The pat1 protein kinase controls transcription of the mating-type genes in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Egel, R; Nielsen, Olaf

    1990-01-01

    The developmental programme of fission yeast brings about a transition from mitotic cell division to the dormant state of ascospores. In response to nitrogen starvation, two cells of opposite mating type conjugate to form a diploid zygote, which then undergoes meiosis and sporulation. This differ...

  2. Transcriptional activation by the E1A regions of adenovirus types 40 and 41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, A.E. van; Gilardi, P.; Perricaudet, M.; Rozijn, Th. H.; Sussenbach, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to establish whether the poor growth of the two fastidious adenoviruses types 40 and 41 (Ad40 and Ad41) in HeLa cells is due to a reduced trans-activation by the early region to (E1A), we have determined the trans-activating effect of this region on the expression of the chloramphenicol ace

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of Vibrio parahaemolyticus exsA reveals a complex activation network for type III secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C. Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp is a marine halophilic bacterium that is commonly associated with oysters and shrimp. Human consumption of contaminated shellfish can result in Vp mediated gastroenteritis and severe diarrheal disease. Vp encodes two type 3 secretion systems (T3SS-I and T3SS-II that have been functionally implicated in cytotoxicity and enterotoxicity respectively. In this study, we profiled protein secretion and temporal promoter activities associated with exsA and exsB gene expression. exsA is an AraC-like transcriptional activator that is critical for activating multiple operons that encode T3SS-1 genes, whereas exsB is thought to encode an outer membrane pilotin component for T3SS-1. The exsBA genetic locus has two predicted promoter elements. The predicted exsB and exsA promoters were individually cloned upstream of luxCDABE genes in reporter plasmid constructs allowing for in situ, real-time quantitative light emission measurements under many growth conditions. Low calcium growth conditions supported maximal exsB and exsA promoter activation. exsB promoter activity exhibited high basal activity and resulted in an exsBA co-transcript. Furthermore, a separate proximal exsA promoter showed initial low basal activity yet eventually exceeded that of exsB and reached maximal levels after 2.5 hours corresponding to an entry into early log phase. exsA promoter activity was significantly higher at 30oC than 37oC, which also coincided with increased secretion levels of specific T3SS-1 effector proteins. Lastly, bioinformatic analyses identified a putative expanded ExsA binding motif for multiple transcriptional operons. These findings suggest a two wave model of Vp T3SS-I induction that integrates two distinct promoter elements and environmental signals into a complex ExsA activation framework.

  4. Transcriptional expression of type I interferon response genes and stability of housekeeping genes in the human endometrium and endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna L; Knudsen, Ulla B; Munk, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a painful chronic female disease defined by the presence of endometrial tissue implants in ectopic locations. The pathogenesis is much debated, and type I interferons could be involved. The expression of genes of the type I interferon response were profiled by a specific PCR Array...... was suitable for normalization of qRT-PCR studies of eutopic vs. ectopic endometrium. In the endometrial cell lines HEC1A, HEC1B, Ishikawa, and RL95-2, HMBS and HPRT1 were most stably expressed. The interferon-specific PCR Array indicated significantly different expression of the genes BST2, COL16A1, HOXB2......, and ISG20 between the endometrial tissue types. However, by correctly normalized qRT-PCR, levels of BST2, COL16A1, and the highly type I IFN-stimulated genes ISG12A and 6-16 displayed insignificant variations. Conversely, HOXB2 and ISG20 transcriptions were significantly reduced in endometriosis lesions...

  5. The dynamic nature of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) gene transcription

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is an integral component of the endocannabinoid system that modulates several functions in the CNS and periphery. The majority of our knowledge of the endocannabinoid system involves ligand–receptor binding, mechanisms of signal transduction, and protein–protein interactions. In contrast, comparatively little is known about regulation of CB1 gene expression. The levels and anatomical distribution of CB1 mRNA and protein are developmental stage-specific an...

  6. Simultaneous Transcriptional and Epigenomic Profiling from Specific Cell Types within Heterogeneous Tissues In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Cheol Roh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenomic mechanisms direct distinct gene expression programs for different cell types. Various in vivo tissues have been subjected to epigenomic analysis; however, these studies have been limited by cellular heterogeneity, resulting in composite gene expression and epigenomic profiles. Here, we introduce “NuTRAP,” a transgenic mouse that allows simultaneous isolation of cell-type-specific translating mRNA and chromatin from complex tissues. Using NuTRAP, we successfully characterize gene expression and epigenomic states of various adipocyte populations in vivo, revealing significant differences compared to either whole adipose tissue or in vitro adipocyte cell lines. We find that chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq using NuTRAP is highly efficient, scalable, and robust with even limited cell input. We further demonstrate the general utility of NuTRAP by analyzing hepatocyte-specific epigenomic states. The NuTRAP mouse is a resource that provides a powerful system for cell-type-specific gene expression and epigenomic profiling.

  7. Soybean GmPHD-Type Transcription Regulators Improve Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wei; Jian Huang; Yu-Jun Hao; Hong-Feng Zou; Hui-Wen Wang; Jing-Yun Zhao; Xue-Yi Liu; Wan-Ke Zhang; Biao Ma; Jin-Song Zhang; Shou-Yi Chen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is one of the most important crops for oil and protein resource. Improvement of stress tolerance will be beneficial for soybean seed production. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six GmPHD genes encoding Alfin1-type PHD finger protein were identified and their expressions differentially responded to drought, salt, cold and ABA treatments. The six GmPHDs were nuclear proteins and showed ability to bind the cis-element "GTGGAG". The N-terminal domain of GmPHD play...

  8. Transcriptional activation of immediate-early gene ETR101 by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I Tax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Ma, Shiliang; Li, Bo;

    2003-01-01

    Human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax regulates viral and cellular gene expression through interactions with multiple cellular transcription pathways. This study describes the finding of immediate-early gene ETR101 expression in HTLV-I-infected cells and its regulation by Tax. ETR101...... was persistently expressed in HTLV-I-infected cells but not in HTLV-I uninfected cells. Expression of ETR101 was dependent upon Tax expression in the inducible Tax-expressing cell line JPX-9 and also in Jurkat cells transiently transfected with Tax-expressing vectors. Tax transactivated the ETR101 gene promoter...... in a transient transfection assay. A series of deletion and mutation analyses of the ETR101 gene promoter indicated that a 35 bp region immediately upstream of the TATA-box sequence, which contains a consensus cAMP response element (CRE) and a G+C-rich sequence, is the critical responsive element for Tax...

  9. A novel splicing mutation alters DSPP transcription and leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI type II is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a serious disorders in teeth. Mutations of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP gene were revealed to be the causation of DGI type II (DGI-II. In this study, we identified a novel mutation (NG_011595.1:g.8662T>C, c.135+2T>C lying in the splice donor site of intron 3 of DSPP gene in a Chinese Han DGI-II pedigree. It was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected ones or other unrelated healthy controls. The function of the mutant DSPP gene, which was predicted online and subsequently confirmed by in vitro splicing analysis, was the loss of splicing of intron 3, leading to the extended length of DSPP mRNA. For the first time, the functional non-splicing of intron was revealed in a novel DSPP mutation and was considered as the causation of DGI-II. It was also indicated that splicing was of key importance to the function of DSPP and this splice donor site might be a sensitive mutation hot spot. Our findings combined with other reports would facilitate the genetic diagnosis of DGI-II, shed light on its gene therapy and help to finally conquer human diseases.

  10. A novel splicing mutation alters DSPP transcription and leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jiucun; Ma, Yanyun; Du, Wenqi; Zhao, Siyang; Zhang, Zuowei; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Liu, Yue; Xiao, Huasheng; Wang, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Liu, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a serious disorders in teeth. Mutations of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene were revealed to be the causation of DGI type II (DGI-II). In this study, we identified a novel mutation (NG_011595.1:g.8662T>C, c.135+2T>C) lying in the splice donor site of intron 3 of DSPP gene in a Chinese Han DGI-II pedigree. It was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected ones or other unrelated healthy controls. The function of the mutant DSPP gene, which was predicted online and subsequently confirmed by in vitro splicing analysis, was the loss of splicing of intron 3, leading to the extended length of DSPP mRNA. For the first time, the functional non-splicing of intron was revealed in a novel DSPP mutation and was considered as the causation of DGI-II. It was also indicated that splicing was of key importance to the function of DSPP and this splice donor site might be a sensitive mutation hot spot. Our findings combined with other reports would facilitate the genetic diagnosis of DGI-II, shed light on its gene therapy and help to finally conquer human diseases.

  11. Fibronectin upregulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase type Iβ through C/EBP transcription factor activation in contractile cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; Calleros, Laura; Griera, Mercedes; Saura, Marta; Luengo, Alicia; Rodriguez-Puyol, D; Rodriguez-Puyol, M

    2011-03-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) pathway exerts most of its cellular actions through the activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Accumulation of extracellular matrix is one of the main structural changes in pathological conditions characterized by a decreased activity of this pathway, such as hypertension, diabetes, or aging, and it is a well-known fact that extracellular matrix proteins modulate cell phenotype through the interaction with membrane receptors such as integrins. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate whether extracellular matrix proteins, particularly fibronectin (FN), modulate PKG expression in contractile cells, 2) to analyze the mechanisms involved, and 3) to evaluate the functional consequences. FN increased type I PKG (PKG-I) protein content in human mesangial cells, an effect dependent on the interaction with β(1)-integrin. The FN upregulation of PKG-I protein content was due to increased mRNA expression, determined by augmented transcriptional activity of the PKG-I promoter region. Akt and the transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) mediated the genesis of these changes. FN also increased PKG-I in another type of contractile cell, rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMC). Tirofiban, a pharmacological analog of FN, increased PKG-I protein content in RVSMC and rat aortic walls and magnified the hypotensive effect of dibutyryl cGMP in conscious Wistar rats. The present results provide evidence of a mechanism able to increase PKG-I protein content in contractile cells. Elucidation of this novel mechanism provides a rationale for future pharmacotherapy in certain vascular diseases.

  12. Global transcriptional profiling of Burkholderia pseudomallei under salt stress reveals differential effects on the Bsa type III secretion system

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    Singsuksawat Ekapot

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis where the highest reported incidence world wide is in the Northeast of Thailand, where saline soil and water are prevalent. Moreover, recent reports indicate a potential pathogenic role for B. pseudomallei in cystic fibrosis lung disease, where an increased sodium chloride (NaCl concentration in airway surface liquid has been proposed. These observations raise the possibility that high salinity may represent a favorable niche for B. pseudomallei. We therefore investigated the global transcriptional response of B. pseudomallei to increased salinity using microarray analysis. Results Transcriptome analysis of B. pseudomallei under salt stress revealed several genes significantly up-regulated in the presence of 320 mM NaCl including genes associated with the bsa-derived Type III secretion system (T3SS. Microarray data were verified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR. Western blot analysis confirmed the increased expression and secretion of the invasion-associated type III secreted proteins BipD and BopE in B. pseudomallei cultures at 170 and 320 mM NaCl relative to salt-free medium. Furthermore, salt-treated B. pseudomallei exhibited greater invasion efficiency into the lung epithelial cell line A549 in a manner partly dependent on a functional Bsa system. Conclusions B. pseudomallei responds to salt stress by modulating the transcription of a relatively small set of genes, among which is the bsa locus associated with invasion and virulence. Expression and secretion of Bsa-secreted proteins was elevated in the presence of exogenous salt and the invasion efficiency was enhanced. Our data indicate that salinity has the potential to influence the virulence of B. pseudomallei.

  13. Transcriptional profiling of gastric epithelial cells infected with wild type or arginase-deficient Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Songhee H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori causes acute and chronic gastric inflammation induced by proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines secreted by cells of the gastric mucosa, including gastric epithelial cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that the bacterial arginase, RocF, is involved in inhibiting T cell proliferation and CD3ζ expression, suggesting that arginase could be involved in a more general dampening of the immune response, perhaps by down-regulation of certain pro-inflammatory mediators. Results Global transcriptome analysis was performed on AGS gastric epithelial cells infected for 16 hours with a wild type Helicobacter pylori strain 26695, an arginase mutant (rocF- or a rocF+ complemented strain. H. pylori infection triggered altered host gene expression in genes involved in cell movement, death/growth/proliferation, and cellular function and maintenance. While the wild type strain stimulates host inflammatory pathways, the rocF- mutant induced significantly more expression of IL-8. The results of the microarray were verified using real-time PCR, and the differential levels of protein expression were confirmed by ELISA and Bioplex analysis. MIP-1B was also significantly secreted by AGS cells after H. pylori rocF- mutant infection, as determined by Bioplex. Even though not explored in this manuscript, the impact that the results presented here may have on the development of gastritis, warrant further research to understand the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between H. pylori RocF and IL-8 induction. Conclusions We conclude that H. pylori arginase modulates multiple host signaling and metabolic pathways of infected gastric epithelial cells. Arginase may play a critical role in anti-inflammatory host responses that could contribute to the ability of H. pylori to establish chronic infections.

  14. Psychedelics Recruit Multiple Cellular Types and Produce Complex Transcriptional Responses Within the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David A; Nichols, Charles D

    2016-09-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in psychedelics, substances that profoundly alter perception and cognition and have recently demonstrated therapeutic efficacy to treat anxiety, depression, and addiction in the clinic. The receptor mechanisms that drive their molecular and behavioral effects involve activation of cortical serotonin 5-HT2A receptors, but the responses of specific cellular populations remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that a small subset of 5-HT2A-expressing excitatory neurons is directly activated by psychedelics and subsequently recruits other select cell types including subpopulations of inhibitory somatostatin and parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons, as well as astrocytes, to produce distinct and regional responses. To gather data regarding the response of specific neuronal populations, we developed methodology for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to segregate and enrich specific cellular subtypes in the brain. These methods allow for robust neuronal sorting based on cytoplasmic epitopes followed by downstream nucleic acid analysis, expanding the utility of FACS in neuroscience research.

  15. Psychedelics Recruit Multiple Cellular Types and Produce Complex Transcriptional Responses Within the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Martin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There has recently been a resurgence of interest in psychedelics, substances that profoundly alter perception and cognition and have recently demonstrated therapeutic efficacy to treat anxiety, depression, and addiction in the clinic. The receptor mechanisms that drive their molecular and behavioral effects involve activation of cortical serotonin 5-HT2A receptors, but the responses of specific cellular populations remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that a small subset of 5-HT2A-expressing excitatory neurons is directly activated by psychedelics and subsequently recruits other select cell types including subpopulations of inhibitory somatostatin and parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons, as well as astrocytes, to produce distinct and regional responses. To gather data regarding the response of specific neuronal populations, we developed methodology for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS to segregate and enrich specific cellular subtypes in the brain. These methods allow for robust neuronal sorting based on cytoplasmic epitopes followed by downstream nucleic acid analysis, expanding the utility of FACS in neuroscience research.

  16. Thrombospondin-1 type 1 repeats in a model of inflammatory bowel disease: transcript profile and therapeutic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaida P Lopez-Dee

    Full Text Available Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is a matricellular protein with regulatory functions in inflammation and cancer. The type 1 repeats (TSR domains of TSP-1 have been shown to interact with a wide range of proteins that result in the anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor properties of TSP-1. To ascertain possible functions and evaluate potential therapeutic effects of TSRs in inflammatory bowel disease, we conducted clinical, histological and microarray analyses on a mouse model of induced colitis. We used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS to induce colitis in wild-type (WT mice for 7 days. Simultaneously, mice were injected with either saline or one form of TSP-1 derived recombinant proteins, containing either (1 the three type 1 repeats of the TSP-1 (3TSR, (2 the second type 1 repeat (TSR2, or (3 TSR2 with the RFK sequence (TSR2+RFK. Total RNA isolated from the mice colons were processed and hybridized to mouse arrays. Array data were validated by real-time qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Histological and disease indices reveal that the mice treated with the TSRs show different patterns of leukocytic infiltration and that 3TSR treatment was the most effective in decreasing inflammation in DSS-induced colitis. Transcriptional profiling revealed differentially expressed (DE genes, with the 3TSR-treated mice showing the least deviation from the WT-water controls. In conclusion, this study shows that 3TSR treatment is effective in attenuating the inflammatory response to DSS injury. In addition, the transcriptomics work unveils novel genetic data that suggest beneficial application of the TSR domains in inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. Role of transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha in human fetal liver cell types in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Foka, Hubert G; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2015-08-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) has been shown to play an important role in liver development, cell proliferation and differentiation. It is, however, largely unknown if C/EBPα regulates cell differentiation and proliferation differently in the diverse cell types of the human liver. We investigated the role of C/EBPα in primary human fetal liver cells and liver cell subpopulations in vitro using a 3-D perfusion bioreactor as an advanced in vivo-like human organ culture model. Human fetal liver cells were investigated in vitro. C/EBPα gene expression was knocked down using siRNA or overexpressed by plasmid transfection. Cell type-specific gene expression was studied, cell populations and their proliferation were investigated, and metabolic parameters were analyzed. When C/EBPα gene expression was knocked down, we observed a significantly reduced expression of typical endothelial, hematopoietic and mesenchymal genes such as CD31, vWF, CD90, CD45 and α-smooth muscle actin in fetal cells. The intracellular expression of hepatic proteins and genes for liver-specific serum proteins α-fetoprotein and albumin were reduced, their protein secretion was increased. Fetal endothelial cell numbers were reduced and hepatoblast numbers were increased. C/EBPα overexpression in fetal cells resulted in increased endothelial numbers, but did not affect mesenchymal cell types or hepatoblasts. We demonstrated that the effects of C/EBPα are specific for the different human fetal liver cell types, using an advanced 3-D perfusion bioreactor as a human in vivo-like model. © 2014 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  18. In vitro evaluation of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, C.-H. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University Medical School and National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Deng, W.-P. [Institute of Biomedical Material, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-C. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, F.-D. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China) and Institute of Radiological Sciences, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology Taichung 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: d49220009@ym.edu.tw

    2006-07-15

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) reporter system is being used to directly and indirectly monitor therapeutic gene expression, immune cell trafficking and protein-protein interactions in various living animals. However, the issues of HSV1-TK enzyme stability in living cells and whether this reporter system is optimal for dynamic studies of gene expression events in genetic imaging have not be addressed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the application of this reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation. To achieve this purpose, we established two tetracycline-inducible murine sarcoma cell lines, tetracycline-turn-off HSV1-tk-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-HSV1-tk) and tetracycline-turn-off Luc-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-Luc), to create an artificially regulated gene expression model in vitro. The dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of doxycycline (Dox) inductions were monitored by HSV1-TK or by the firefly luciferase reporter gene using HSV1-TK enzyme activity assay and luciferase assay, respectively. The results of dynamic gene expression studies showed that the luciferase gene is an optimal reporter gene for monitoring short-timescale, dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of Dox inductions, whereas the HSV1-tk is not optimal to achieve this purpose. Furthermore, the enzyme half-life of HSV1-TK in NG4TL4 cells is about 35 h after cycloheximide-induced protein inhibition. On the other hand, the results of an efflux assay of [{sup 131}I] FIAU and [{sup 3}H] GCV revealed that the molecular probe phosphorylated by HSV1-TK can be trapped long term within HSV1-TK stably transformed cells. Therefore, a long half-life radionuclide is not suitable for dynamic gene expression studies. Based on these results, we suggest that the HSV1-TK reporter system is not optimal for monitoring short-timescale dynamic processes such as kinetic gene expression controlled by

  19. Cell-type-specific expression of STAT transcription factors in tissue samples from patients with lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Julia; Barth, Peter J; Meyer, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Expression of cytokine-regulated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins was histochemically assessed in patients diagnosed as having Hashimoto's disease or focal lymphocytic thyroiditis (n = 10). All surgical specimens showed histological features of lymphocytic thyroiditis, including a diffuse infiltration with mononuclear cells and an incomplete loss of thyroid follicles, resulting in the destruction of glandular tissue architecture. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated differential expression patterns of the various members of the STAT transcription factors examined, indicating that each member of this conserved protein family has its distinct functions in the development of the disease. Using an antibody that specifically recognized the phosphorylated tyrosine residue in position 701, we detected activated STAT1 dimers in numerous germinal macrophages and infiltrating lymphocytes as well as in oncocytes. In contrast, STAT3 expression was restricted to epithelial cells and showed a clear colocalization with the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Moreover, expression of phospho-STAT3 was associated with low levels of stromal fibrosis, suggesting that STAT3 serves as a protective factor in the remodeling of the inflamed thyroid gland. Phospho-STAT5 immunoreactivity was detected in numerous infiltrating cells of hematopoietic origin and, additionally, in hyperplastic follicular epithelia. This tissue distribution demonstrated that activated STAT5 molecules participate in both lymphocytopoiesis and possibly also in the buildup of regenerating thyroid follicles. Taken together, the cell-type-specific expression patterns of STAT proteins in human lymphocytic thyroiditis reflect their distinct and partially antagonistic roles in orchestrating the balance between degenerating and regenerating processes within a changing cytokine environment.

  20. The flagellar-specific transcription factor, sigma28, is the Type III secretion chaperone for the flagellar-specific anti-sigma28 factor FlgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Phillip D; Karlinsey, Joyce E; Aldridge, Christine; Birchall, Christopher; Thompson, Danielle; Yagasaki, Jin; Hughes, Kelly T

    2006-08-15

    The sigma(28) protein is a member of the bacterial sigma(70)-family of transcription factors that directs RNA polymerase to flagellar late (class 3) promoters. The sigma(28) protein is regulated in response to flagellar assembly by the anti-sigma(28) factor FlgM. FlgM inhibits sigma(28)-dependent transcription of genes whose products are needed late in assembly until the flagellar basal motor structure, the hook-basal body (HBB), is constructed. A second function for the sigma(28) transcription factor has been discovered: sigma(28) facilitates the secretion of FlgM through the HBB, acting as the FlgM Type III secretion chaperone. Transcription-specific mutants in sigma(28) were isolated that remained competent for FlgM-facilitated secretion separating the transcription and secretion-facilitation activities of sigma (28). Conversely, we also describe the isolation of mutants in sigma(28) that are specific for FlgM-facilitated secretion. The data demonstrate that sigma(28) is the Type III secretion chaperone for its own anti-sigma factor FlgM. Thus, a novel role for a sigma(70)-family transcription factor is described.

  1. Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): molecular characterization and transcriptional response upon immune stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Whang, Ilson; Wan, Qiang; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-01

    Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are involved in several biological and physiological processes in all multicellular organisms. Proteinase inhibitors play a key role in regulating the activity of the respective proteinases. Among serine proteinase inhibitors, kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs) are widely found in mammals, avians, and a variety of invertebrates. In this study, we describe the identification of a kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor (Ab-KPI) from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus, which is presumably involved in innate immunity. The full-length cDNA of Ab-KPI includes 600 bp nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 143 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ab-KPI contains a putative 17-amino acid signal peptide and two tandem kazal domains with high similarity to other kazal-type SPIs. Each kazal domain consists of reactive site (P1) residue containing a leucine (L), and a threonine (T) located in the second amino acid position after the second conserved cysteine of each domain. Temporal expression of Ab-KPI was assessed by real time quantitative PCR in hemocytes and mantle tissue following bacterial and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) challenge, and tissue injury. At 6 h post-bacterial and -VHSV challenge, Ab-KPI expression in hemocytes was increased 14-fold and 4-fold, respectively, compared to control samples. The highest up-regulations upon tissue injury were shown at 9 h and 12 h in hemocytes and mantle, respectively. The transcriptional modulation of Ab-KPI following bacterial and viral challenges and tissue injury indicates that it might be involved in immune defense as well as wound healing process in abalone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Engineered zinc-finger proteins can compensate genetic haploinsufficiency by transcriptional activation of the wild-type allele: application to Willams-Beuren syndrome and supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Huang, Angela; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Starcher, Barry C; Huang, Yan; Sessa, William C; Niklason, Laura E; Giordano, Frank J

    2012-11-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) are genetic syndromes marked by the propensity to develop severe vascular stenoses. Vascular lesions in both syndromes are caused by haploinsufficiency of the elastin gene. We used these distinct genetic syndromes as models to evaluate the feasibility of using engineered zinc-finger protein transcription factors (ZFPs) to achieve compensatory expression of haploinsufficient genes by inducing augmented expression from the remaining wild-type allele. For complex genes with multiple splice variants, this approach could have distinct advantages over cDNA-based gene replacement strategies. Targeting the elastin gene, we show that transcriptional activation by engineered ZFPs can induce compensatory expression from the wild-type allele in the setting of classic WBS and SVAS genetic mutations, increase elastin expression in wild-type cells, induce expression of the major elastin splice variants, and recapitulate their natural stoichiometry. Further, we establish that transcriptional activation of the mutant allele in SVAS does not overcome nonsense-mediated decay, and thus ZFP-mediated transcriptional activation is not likely to induce production of a mutant protein, a crucial consideration. Finally, we show in bioengineered blood vessels that ZFP-mediated induction of elastin expression is capable of stimulating functional elastogenesis. Haploinsufficiency is a common mechanism of genetic disease. These findings have significant implications for WBS and SVAS, and establish that haploinsufficiency can be overcome by targeted transcriptional activation without inducing protein expression from the mutant allele.

  3. Expression of two nonallelic type II procollagen genes during Xenopus laevis embryogenesis is characterized by stage-specific production of alternatively spliced transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, M W; Suzuki, H R; Bieker, J J; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1991-10-01

    The pattern of type II collagen expression during Xenopus laevis embryogenesis has been established after isolating specific cDNA and genomic clones. Evidence is presented suggesting that in X. laevis there are two transcriptionally active copies of the type II procollagen gene. Both genes are activated at the beginning of neurula stage and steady-state mRNA levels progressively increase thereafter. Initially, the transcripts are localized to notochord, somites, and the dorsal region of the lateral plate mesoderm. At later stages of development and parallel to increased mRNA accumulation, collagen expression becomes progressively more confined to chondrogenic regions of the tadpole. During the early period of mRNA accumulation, there is also a transient pattern of expression in localized sites that will later not undergo chondrogenesis, such as the floor plate in the ventral neural tube. At later times and coincident with the appearance of chondrogenic tissues in the developing embryo, expression of the procollagen genes is characterized by the production of an additional, alternatively spliced transcript. The alternatively spliced sequences encode the cysteine-rich globular domain in the NH2-propeptide of the type II procollagen chain. Immunohistochemical analyses with a type II collagen monoclonal antibody documented the deposition of the protein in the extracellular matrix of the developing embryo. Type II collagen expression is therefore temporally regulated by tissue-specific transcription and splicing factors directing the synthesis of distinct molecular forms of the precursor protein in the developing Xenopus embryo.

  4. [Regulations of berberine on gene expression of BMP4 transcriptional pathways to improve visceral white adipose tissues insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic hamsters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Sheng; Liu, Xu-Han; Li, Xin-Yu; Gao, Zheng-Nan; Huang, Lan; Liu, Ya-Li

    2016-02-01

    To study the effects of berberine on the gene mRNA expressions of BMP4 transcriptional pathways and brown/white adipose tissue conversion transcriptional pathways in visceral white adipose tissues(VWAT) in type 2 diabetic hamsters and explore the relevant mechanisms. The obese insulin-resistant hamster model were induced by using high-fat diet, and then the type 2 diabetic hamster model was created through injection with low-dose streptozotocin in the obese insulin-resistant hamster model. After the modeling, the hamsters were randomly divided into normal control, obese insulin-resistant, type 2 diabetic and berberine-treated diabetic groups. After the nine-week treatment, real-time quantitative PCR was used to measure the changes in gene mRNA expressions of VWAT BMP4 transcriptional pathways, brown/white adipose tissue conversion transcriptional pathways and their target genes in different groups. The results showed that the gene mRNA expressions of BMP4, BMPRⅡ, BMPRlA, Smad1, Smad5, Smad8, p38/MAPK, ATF2, PRDM16, C/EBPβ, PGC1α, PPARγ and brown adipose tissue-specific genes was decreased and that of Smad6, Smurf1 and white adipose tissue-specific genes was increased in VWAT of model hamsters. Treatment with berberine regulated BMP4 transcriptional pathways and brown adipose tissue transcriptional pathways and induced the gene mRNA expression of brown adipose tissue-specific genes in VWAT to develop browning gene phenotype of white adipose tissues, and then improved fat-induced insulin resistance. These findings indicated that BMP4 transcriptional pathways involved in the formation of fat-induced visceral white adipose tissues insulin resistance (FIVWATIR) and the browning molecular mechanism of white adipose tissues induced by berberine. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  5. Trm1p, a Zn(II)₂Cys₆-type transcription factor, is essential for the transcriptional activation of genes of methanol utilization pathway, in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Umakant; Krishna Rao, Kamisetty; Rangarajan, Pundi N

    2014-08-15

    The zinc finger transcription factors Mxr1p and Rop are key regulators of methanol metabolism in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, while Trm1p and Trm2p regulate methanol metabolism in Candida boidinii. Here, we demonstrate that Trm1p is essential for the expression of genes of methanol utilization (mut) pathway in P. pastoris as well. Expression of AOXI and other genes of mut pathway is severely compromised in P. pastoris ΔTrm1 strain resulting in impaired growth on media containing methanol as the sole source of carbon. Trm1p localizes to the nucleus of cells cultured on glucose or methanol. The zinc finger domain of Mxr1p but not Trm1p binds to AOXI promoter sequences in vitro, indicating that these two positive regulators act by different mechanisms. We conclude that both Trm1p and Mxr1p are essential for the expression of genes of mut pathway in P. pastoris and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of mut pathway may be similar in P. pastoris and C. boidinii.

  6. A global role for Fis in the transcriptional control of metabolism and type III secretion in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Arlene; Goldberg, Martin D; Carroll, Ronan K; Danino, Vittoria; Hinton, Jay C D; Dorman, Charles J

    2004-07-01

    Fis is a key DNA-binding protein involved in nucleoid organization and modulation of many DNA transactions, including transcription in enteric bacteria. The regulon of genes whose expression is influenced by Fis in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been defined by DNA microarray analysis. These data suggest that Fis plays a central role in coordinating the expression of both metabolic and type III secretion factors. The genes that were most strongly up-regulated by Fis were those involved in virulence and located in the pathogenicity islands SPI-1, SPI-2, SPI-3 and SPI-5. Similarly, motility and flagellar genes required Fis for full expression. This was shown to be a direct effect as purified Fis protein bound to the promoter regions of representative flagella and SPI-2 genes. Genes contributing to aspects of metabolism known to assist the bacterium during survival in the mammalian gut were also Fis-regulated, usually negatively. This category included components of metabolic pathways for propanediol utilization, biotin synthesis, vitamin B(12) transport, fatty acids and acetate metabolism, as well as genes for the glyoxylate bypass of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Genes found to be positively regulated by Fis included those for ethanolamine utilization. The data reported reveal the central role played by Fis in coordinating the expression of both housekeeping and virulence factors required by S. typhimurium during life in the gut lumen or during systemic infection of host cells.

  7. MULTIPASS, a rice R2R3-type MYB transcription factor, regulates adaptive growth by integrating multiple hormonal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Romy; Schippers, Jos H M; Mieulet, Delphine; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Growth regulation is an important aspect of plant adaptation during environmental perturbations. Here, the role of MULTIPASS (OsMPS), an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor of rice, was explored. OsMPS is induced by salt stress and expressed in vegetative and reproductive tissues. Over-expression of OsMPS reduces growth under non-stress conditions, while knockdown plants display increased biomass. OsMPS expression is induced by abscisic acid and cytokinin, but is repressed by auxin, gibberellin and brassinolide. Growth retardation caused by OsMPS over-expression is partially restored by auxin application. Expression profiling revealed that OsMPS negatively regulates the expression of EXPANSIN (EXP) and cell-wall biosynthesis as well as phytohormone signaling genes. Furthermore, the expression of OsMPS-dependent genes is regulated by auxin, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Moreover, we show that OsMPS is a direct upstream regulator of OsEXPA4, OsEXPA8, OsEXPB2, OsEXPB3, OsEXPB6 and the endoglucanase genes OsGLU5 and OsGLU14. The multiple responses of OsMPS and its target genes to various hormones suggest an integrative function of OsMPS in the cross-talk between phytohormones and the environment to regulate adaptive growth.

  8. Transcriptional profiling of Bordetella pertussis reveals requirement of RNA chaperone Hfq for Type III secretion system functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibova, Ilona; Hot, David; Keidel, Kristina; Amman, Fabian; Slupek, Stephanie; Cerny, Ondrej; Gross, Roy; Vecerek, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of human whooping cough (pertussis) produces a complex array of virulence factors in order to establish efficient infection in the host. The RNA chaperone Hfq and small regulatory RNAs are key players in posttranscriptional regulation in bacteria and have been shown to play an essential role in virulence of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. This study represents the first attempt to characterize the Hfq regulon of the human pathogen B. pertussis under laboratory conditions as well as upon passage in the host and indicates that loss of Hfq has a profound effect on gene expression in B. pertussis. Comparative transcriptional profiling revealed that Hfq is required for expression of several virulence factors in B. pertussis cells including the Type III secretion system (T3SS). In striking contrast to the wt strain, T3SS did not become operational in the hfq mutant passaged either through mice or macrophages thereby proving that Hfq is required for the functionality of the B. pertussis T3SS. Likewise, expression of virulence factors vag8 and tcfA encoding autotransporter and tracheal colonization factor, respectively, was strongly reduced in the hfq mutant. Importantly, for the first time we demonstrate that B. pertussis T3SS can be activated upon contact with macrophage cells in vitro.

  9. NtcA represses transcription of gifA and gifB, genes that encode inhibitors of glutamine synthetase type I from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Domínguez, M; Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    2000-03-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 glutamine synthetase type I (GS) activity is controlled by direct interaction with two inactivating factors (IF7 and IF17). IF7 and IF17 are homologous polypeptides encoded by the gifA and gifB genes respectively. We investigated the transcriptional regulation of these genes. Expression of both genes is maximum in the presence of ammonium, when GS is inactivated. Nitrogen starvation attenuates the ammonium-mediated induction of gifA and gifB as well as the ammonium-mediated inactivation of GS. Putative binding sites for the transcription factor NtcA were identified at -7.5 and -30.5 bp upstream of gifB and gifA transcription start points respectively. Synechocystis NtcA protein binding to both promoters was demonstrated by gel electrophoresis mobility shift assays. Constitutive high expression levels of both genes were found in a Synechocystis NtcA non-segregated mutant (SNC1), which showed a fourfold reduction in the ntcA expression. These experiments indicate a repressive role for NtcA on the transcription of gifA and gifB genes. Our results demonstrate that NtcA plays a central role in GS regulation in cyanobacteria, stimulating transcription of the glnA gene (GS structural gene) and suppressing transcription of the GS inactivating factor genes gifA and gifB.

  10. Characterization of the bZip-type transcription factor NapA with reference to oxidative stress response in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Yamashino, Takafumi; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2007-07-01

    Microorganisms growing in natural habitats are constantly confronted with a wide variety of external stresses. Here we provide several lines of experimental evidence for the thesis that the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans has a homolog of the AP-1-like bZip transcription factor, which is known to play general roles in oxidative responses in many types of yeast.

  11. Activating transcription factor 6 poly morphisms and haplotypes ars associated with impaired glucose homeostasis ans type 2 diabetis in dutch Caucasians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meex, S.J.; Greevenbroek, van M.M.J.; Ayoubi, T.A.; Vlietinck, R.; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Hofker, M.H.; Vermeulen, V.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Kallen, van der C.J.H.; Bruin, de T.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) is critical for initiation and full activation of the unfolded protein response. An association between genetic variation in ATF6 and type 2 diabetes (DM2) was recently reported in Pima Indians. Objectives: To investigate the broader significance of

  12. Functional variants of human papillomavirus type 16 demonstrate host genome integration and transcriptional alterations corresponding to their unique cancer epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert; Rosa, Bruce A; Lameiras, Sonia; Cuninghame, Sean; Bernard, Josee; Floriano, Wely B; Lambert, Paul F; Nicolas, Alain; Zehbe, Ingeborg

    2016-11-02

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a worldwide burden as they are a widespread group of tumour viruses in humans. Having a tropism for mucosal tissues, high-risk HPVs are detected in nearly all cervical cancers. HPV16 is the most common high-risk type but not all women infected with high-risk HPV develop a malignant tumour. Likely relevant, HPV genomes are polymorphic and some HPV16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are under evolutionary constraint instigating variable oncogenicity and immunogenicity in the infected host. To investigate the tumourigenicity of two common HPV16 variants, we used our recently developed, three-dimensional organotypic model reminiscent of the natural HPV infectious cycle and conducted various "omics" and bioinformatics approaches. Based on epidemiological studies we chose to examine the HPV16 Asian-American (AA) and HPV16 European Prototype (EP) variants. They differ by three non-synonymous SNPs in the transforming and virus-encoded E6 oncogene where AAE6 is classified as a high- and EPE6 as a low-risk variant. Remarkably, the high-risk AAE6 variant genome integrated into the host DNA, while the low-risk EPE6 variant genome remained episomal as evidenced by highly sensitive Capt-HPV sequencing. RNA-seq experiments showed that the truncated form of AAE6, integrated in chromosome 5q32, produced a local gene over-expression and a large variety of viral-human fusion transcripts, including long distance spliced transcripts. In addition, differential enrichment of host cell pathways was observed between both HPV16 E6 variant-containing epithelia. Finally, in the high-risk variant, we detected a molecular signature of host chromosomal instability, a common property of cancer cells. We show how naturally occurring SNPs in the HPV16 E6 oncogene cause significant changes in the outcome of HPV infections and subsequent viral and host transcriptome alterations prone to drive carcinogenesis. Host genome instability is closely linked to viral

  13. Detection, differentiation, and VP1 sequencing of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and type 3 by a 1-step duplex reverse-transcription PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, X J; Cheng, A C; Wang, M S; Jia, R Y; Zhu, D K; Chen, S; Liu, M F; Liu, F; Chen, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is an infectious pathogen causing fatal duck viral hepatitis in ducklings. Although both the inactivated vaccines and live attenuated vaccines have been used to protect ducklings, DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 still cause significant serious damage to the duck industry in China and South Korea. For rapid detection, differentiation, and epidemic investigation of DHAV in China, a genotype-specific 1-step duplex reverse-transcription (RT) PCR assay was established in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of the developed RT-PCR assay was evaluated with nucleic acids extracted from 2 DHAV reference strains, and 9 other infectious viruses and bacteria. The genotype-specific primers amplified different size DNA fragments encompassing the complete VP1 gene of the DHAV-1 or DHAV-3. The assay detected the liver samples collected from experimentally infected ducklings and dead ducklings collected from different regions of China. Sequence analysis of these DNA fragments indicated that VP1 sequences of DHAV-1 can be used to distinguish wild type and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis of VP1 sequences indicated that the developed RT-PCR assay can be used for epidemic investigation of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. The developed RT-PCR assay can be used as a specific molecular tool for simultaneous detection, differentiation, and sequencing the VP1 gene of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which can be used for understanding the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  14. Transcription of mouse Sp2 yields alternatively spliced and sub-genomic mRNAs in a tissue- and cell type-specific fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haifeng; Nichols, Teresa D.; Horowitz, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    The Sp-family of transcription factors is comprised by nine members, Sp1-9, that share a highly-conserved DNA-binding domain. Sp2 is a poorly characterized member of this transcription factor family that is widely expressed in murine and human cell lines yet exhibits little DNA-binding or trans-activation activity in these settings. As a prelude to the generation of a “knock-out” mouse strain, we isolated a mouse Sp2 cDNA and performed a detailed analysis of Sp2 transcription in embryonic and adult mouse tissues. We report that (1) the 5′ untranslated region of Sp2 is subject to alternative splicing, (2) Sp2 transcription is regulated by at least two promoters that differ in their cell-type specificity, (3) one Sp2 promoter is highly active in nine mammalian cell lines and strains and is regulated by at least five discrete stimulatory and inhibitory elements, (4) a variety of sub-genomic messages are synthesized from the Sp2 locus in a tissue- and cell type-specific fashion and these transcripts have the capacity to encode a novel partial-Sp2 protein, and (5) RNA in situ hybridization assays indicate that Sp2 is widely expressed during mouse embryogenesis, particularly in the embryonic brain, and robust Sp2 expression occurs in neurogenic regions of the post-natal and adult brain. PMID:20353838

  15. Both viral E2 protein and the cellular factor PEBP2 regulate transcription via E2 consensus sites within the bovine papillomavirus type 4 long control region.

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, M E; Campo, M S

    1995-01-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV4) long control region (LCR) contains three consensus binding sites, E2(1), E2(2), and E2(3) (ACCN6GGT), for the viral E2 transcription factor and a fourth degenerate site, dE2 (ATCN6GGT), which lies 3 bp upstream of E2(3). The E2(2) site was found to bind the cellular transcription factor PEBP2, and mutations at this site reduced basal promoter activity by as much as 60%, indicating an important role for PEBP2 in LCR function. Mutation of the E2(3) or dE2...

  16. Interaction of human dipeptidyl peptidase IV and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 transcription transactivator in Sf9 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reutter Werner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV also known as the T cell activation marker CD26 is a multifunctional protein which is involved in various biological processes. The association of human-DPPIV with components of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV1 is well documented and raised some discussions. Several reports implicated the interaction of human-DPPIV with the HIV1 transcription transactivator protein (HIV1-Tat and the inhibition of the dipeptidyl peptidase activity of DPPIV by the HIV1-Tat protein. Furthermore, enzyme kinetic data implied another binding site for the HIV1-Tat other than the active centre of DPPIV. However, the biological significance of this interaction of the HIV1-Tat protein and human-DPPIV has not been studied, yet. Therefore, we focused on the interaction of HIV1-Tat protein with DPPIV and investigated the subsequent biological consequences of this interaction in Spodoptera frugiperda cells, using the BAC-TO-BAC baculovirus system. Results The HIV1-Tat protein (Tat-BRU co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with human-DPPIV protein, following co-expression in the baculovirus-driven Sf9 cell expression system. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of DPPIV protein was up-regulated in Tat/DPPIV-co-expressing cells after 72 h culturing and also in DPPIV-expressing Sf9 cells after application of purified recombinant Tat protein. As opposed to the expression of Tat alone, serine phosphorylation of the Tat protein was decreased when co-expressed with human-DPPIV protein. Conclusions We show for the first time that human-DPPIV and HIV1-Tat co-immunoprecipitate. Furthermore, our findings indicate that the interaction of HIV1-Tat and human-DPPIV may be involved in signalling platforms that regulate the biological function of both human-DPPIV and HIV1-Tat.

  17. Egr-1 Mediates SiO2-driven Transcription of Membrane Type Ⅰ Matrix Metalloproteinase in Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Fei; BAI Ming; JIN Yang; MA Wanli; XIN Jianbao

    2007-01-01

    The up-regulation mechanism of membrane type Ⅰ matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) in macrophages stimulated by silica in vitro and the contribution of early growth response 1 (Egr-1) transcription factor in the gene expression pathway were investigated. Macrophages stimulated by silica were treated with Egr-1 antibody or Egr-1 decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN). The levels of MT1-MMP proteins were determined by Western blot and the expression of MT1-MMP mRNAs was detected by RT-PCR. The results showed as compared with control macrophages, silica-stimulated group showed up-regulated gene expression of MT1-MMP via Egr-1 (P<0.01). Compared with silica-stimulated macrophages untreated with antibody, the cells treated with 5 μg/mL Egr-1 antibody were associated with reduced expression of MTI-MMP protein (P<0.01) and mRNA (P<0.01). Compared with silica-stimulated untransfected group, the Egr-1 "decoy" ODN group was associated with reduction in the expression of MT1-MMP protein and mRNA (P<0.01). It was concluded gene expression of MT1-MMP which may play a critical role in silicosis was up-regulated by silica in macrophages. Egr-1 participated in the expression of MT1-MMP and positively regulated the expression. Both Egr-1 antibody and Egr-1 decoy ODN suppressed the expression of MT1-MMP through the Egr-1 pathway and may become a potential therapeutic tool in the management of silicosis in the future.

  18. Neural expression and post-transcriptional dosage compensation of the steroid metabolic enzyme 17β-HSD type 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wise Petra M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, the estrogenic steroid estradiol (E2 is especially effective at promoting growth of the neural circuit specialized for song. In this species, only the males sing and they have a much larger and more interconnected song circuit than females. Thus, it was surprising that the gene for 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4, an enzyme that converts E2 to a less potent estrogen, had been mapped to the Z sex chromosome. As a consequence, it was likely that HSD17B4 was differentially expressed in males (ZZ and females (ZW because dosage compensation of Z chromosome genes is incomplete in birds. If a higher abundance of HSD17B4 mRNA in males than females was translated into functional enzyme in the brain, then contrary to expectation, males could produce less E2 in their brains than females. Results Here, we used molecular and biochemical techniques to confirm the HSD17B4 Z chromosome location in the zebra finch and to determine that HSD17B4 mRNA and activity were detectable in the early developing and adult brain. As expected, HSD17B4 mRNA expression levels were higher in males compared to females. This provides further evidence of the incomplete Z chromosome inactivation mechanisms in birds. We detected HSD17B4 mRNA in regions that suggested a role for this enzyme in the early organization and adult function of song nuclei. We did not, however, detect significant sex differences in HSD17B4 activity levels in the adult brain. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the HSD17B4 gene is expressed and active in the zebra finch brain as an E2 metabolizing enzyme, but that dosage compensation of this Z-linked gene may occur via post-transcriptional mechanisms.

  19. A transcriptional signature of “exercise resistance” in skeletal muscle of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Natalie A.; Xie, Hui; Johannsen, Neil M.; Church, Timothy S.; Smith, Steven R.; Sparks, Lauren M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Exercise benefits most, but not all, individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to determine whether a proportion of individuals with T2DM would fail to demonstrate exercise-induced metabolic improvements. We hypothesized that this lack of response would be related to their skeletal muscle transcriptional profile. Methods 42 participants with T2DM from the previously reported HART-D study underwent a 9-month supervised exercise intervention. We performed a principal components analysis to distinguish Responders from Non-Responders (n = 9 each) based on: decreases in (1) HbA1c, (2) %fat (3) BMI and (4) increase in skeletal muscle mtDNA. mRNA expression patterns in muscle tissue at baseline were assessed by microarray and qRT-PCR analysis in both groups. Results Of 186 genes identified by microarray analysis, 70% were up-regulated in Responders and down-regulated in Non-Responders. Several genes involved in substrate metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis were significantly different (fold-change > 1.5, p < 0.05) between the groups at baseline, indicating a blunted oxidative capacity at baseline in Non-Responders. Conclusions/Interpretations These data suggest that a unique baseline expression pattern of genes involved in muscle fuel metabolism may predict an individual’s lack of exercise response in metabolic outcomes, thus allowing exercise interventions to be targeted to these individuals and aid in the identification of novel approaches to treat Non-Responders in the future. PMID:26163877

  20. Neural expression and post-transcriptional dosage compensation of the steroid metabolic enzyme 17beta-HSD type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Sarah E; Itoh, Yuichiro; Lance, Valentin A; Wise, Petra M; Ekanayake, Preethika S; Oyama, Randi K; Arnold, Arthur P; Schlinger, Barney A

    2010-04-01

    Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, the estrogenic steroid estradiol (E2) is especially effective at promoting growth of the neural circuit specialized for song. In this species, only the males sing and they have a much larger and more interconnected song circuit than females. Thus, it was surprising that the gene for 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4), an enzyme that converts E2 to a less potent estrogen, had been mapped to the Z sex chromosome. As a consequence, it was likely that HSD17B4 was differentially expressed in males (ZZ) and females (ZW) because dosage compensation of Z chromosome genes is incomplete in birds. If a higher abundance of HSD17B4 mRNA in males than females was translated into functional enzyme in the brain, then contrary to expectation, males could produce less E2 in their brains than females. Here, we used molecular and biochemical techniques to confirm the HSD17B4 Z chromosome location in the zebra finch and to determine that HSD17B4 mRNA and activity were detectable in the early developing and adult brain. As expected, HSD17B4 mRNA expression levels were higher in males compared to females. This provides further evidence of the incomplete Z chromosome inactivation mechanisms in birds. We detected HSD17B4 mRNA in regions that suggested a role for this enzyme in the early organization and adult function of song nuclei. We did not, however, detect significant sex differences in HSD17B4 activity levels in the adult brain. Our results demonstrate that the HSD17B4 gene is expressed and active in the zebra finch brain as an E2 metabolizing enzyme, but that dosage compensation of this Z-linked gene may occur via post-transcriptional mechanisms.

  1. Neural expression and post-transcriptional dosage compensation of the steroid metabolic enzyme 17β-HSD type 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, the estrogenic steroid estradiol (E2) is especially effective at promoting growth of the neural circuit specialized for song. In this species, only the males sing and they have a much larger and more interconnected song circuit than females. Thus, it was surprising that the gene for 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4), an enzyme that converts E2 to a less potent estrogen, had been mapped to the Z sex chromosome. As a consequence, it was likely that HSD17B4 was differentially expressed in males (ZZ) and females (ZW) because dosage compensation of Z chromosome genes is incomplete in birds. If a higher abundance of HSD17B4 mRNA in males than females was translated into functional enzyme in the brain, then contrary to expectation, males could produce less E2 in their brains than females. Results Here, we used molecular and biochemical techniques to confirm the HSD17B4 Z chromosome location in the zebra finch and to determine that HSD17B4 mRNA and activity were detectable in the early developing and adult brain. As expected, HSD17B4 mRNA expression levels were higher in males compared to females. This provides further evidence of the incomplete Z chromosome inactivation mechanisms in birds. We detected HSD17B4 mRNA in regions that suggested a role for this enzyme in the early organization and adult function of song nuclei. We did not, however, detect significant sex differences in HSD17B4 activity levels in the adult brain. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the HSD17B4 gene is expressed and active in the zebra finch brain as an E2 metabolizing enzyme, but that dosage compensation of this Z-linked gene may occur via post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:20359329

  2. Transcriptional activation of the mrkA promoter of the Klebsiella pneumoniae type 3 fimbrial operon by the c-di-GMP-dependent MrkH protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yang

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae forms biofilms to facilitate colonization of biotic and abiotic surfaces. The formation of biofilms by K. pneumoniae requires the expression of type 3 fimbriae: elongate proteinaceous filaments extruded by a chaperone-usher system in the bacterial outer membrane. The expression of the mrkABCDF cluster that encodes this fimbrial system is strongly positively regulated by MrkH, a transcriptional activator that responds to the second messenger, c-di-GMP. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism by which the MrkH protein activates transcriptional initiation from the mrkA promoter. A mutational analysis supported by electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that a 12-bp palindromic sequence (the MrkH box centered at -78.5 is the binding site of MrkH. Deletion of half a turn, but not a full turn, of DNA located between the MrkH box and the mrkA promoter destroyed the ability of MrkH to activate mrkA transcription. In addition, a 10-bp AT-rich sequence (the UP element centered at -63.5 contributed significantly to MrkH-dependent mrkA transcription. In vivo analysis of rpoA mutants showed that the R265 and E273 determinants in the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase α subunit are needed for MrkH-mediated activation of mrkA transcription. Furthermore, results from mutagenesis of the mrkH gene suggest that the N-terminal region of the protein is involved in transcriptional activation. Taken together, our results suggest that MrkH activates mrkA expression by interacting directly with RNA polymerase, to overcome the inefficient transcriptional initiation caused by the presence of defective core promoter elements.

  3. The DeoR-type transcriptional regulator SugR acts as a repressor for genes encoding the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmann Michelle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major uptake system responsible for the transport of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS. The genes encoding PTS components, namely ptsI, ptsH, and ptsF belong to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, whereas ptsG and ptsS are located in two separate regions of the C. glutamicum genome. Due to the localization within and adjacent to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, two genes coding for DeoR-type transcriptional regulators, cg2118 and sugR, are putative candidates involved in the transcriptional regulation of the fructose-PTS cluster genes. Results Four transcripts of the extended fructose-PTS gene cluster that comprise the genes sugR-cg2116, ptsI, cg2118-fruK-ptsF, and ptsH, respectively, were characterized. In addition, it was shown that transcription of the fructose-PTS gene cluster is enhanced during growth on glucose or fructose when compared to acetate. Subsequently, the two genes sugR and cg2118 encoding for DeoR-type regulators were mutated and PTS gene transcription was found to be strongly enhanced in the presence of acetate only in the sugR deletion mutant. The SugR regulon was further characterized by microarray hybridizations using the sugR mutant and its parental strain, revealing that also the PTS genes ptsG and ptsS belong to this regulon. Binding of purified SugR repressor protein to a 21 bp sequence identified the SugR binding site as an AC-rich motif. The two experimentally identified SugR binding sites in the fructose-PTS gene cluster are located within or downstream of the mapped promoters, typical for transcriptional repressors. Effector studies using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA revealed the fructose PTS-specific metabolite fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P as a highly efficient, negative effector of the SugR repressor, acting in the micromolar range. Beside F-1-P, other sugar-phosphates like fructose

  4. Global transcriptional programs in peripheral nerve endoneurium and DRG are resistant to the onset of type 1 diabetic neuropathy in Ins2 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie de Preux Charles

    Full Text Available While the morphological and electrophysiological changes underlying diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN are relatively well described, the involved molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether phenotypic changes associated with early DPN are correlated with transcriptional alterations in the neuronal (dorsal root ganglia [DRG] or the glial (endoneurium compartments of the peripheral nerve. We used Ins2(Akita/+ mice to study transcriptional changes underlying the onset of DPN in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. Weight, blood glucose and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV were measured in Ins2(Akita/+ and control mice during the first three months of life in order to determine the onset of DPN. Based on this phenotypic characterization, we performed gene expression profiling using sciatic nerve endoneurium and DRG isolated from pre-symptomatic and early symptomatic Ins2(Akita/+ mice and sex-matched littermate controls. Our phenotypic analysis of Ins2(Akita/+ mice revealed that DPN, as measured by reduced MNCV, is detectable in affected animals already one week after the onset of hyperglycemia. Surprisingly, the onset of DPN was not associated with any major persistent changes in gene expression profiles in either sciatic nerve endoneurium or DRG. Our data thus demonstrated that the transcriptional programs in both endoneurial and neuronal compartments of the peripheral nerve are relatively resistant to the onset of hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia suggesting that either minor transcriptional alterations or changes on the proteomic level are responsible for the functional deficits associated with the onset of DPN in type 1 DM.

  5. Transcription factor 7-like 2 polymorphism and context-specific risk of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia

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    Abbasali Palizban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transcription factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2 is an element of the Wnt signaling pathway. There is lack of evidence if TCF7L2 has a functional role in lipid metabolism and regulation of the components constitutes the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the risk allele of TCF7L2 gene polymorphism is associated with dyslipidemia and MetSyn. Materials and Methods: The MetSyn subjects were participated only based on the National Cholesterol Education Program – Third Adult Treatment Panel criteria. In this case–control study, the DNA from MetSyn patients without (n = 90 and with type 2 diabetes (T2D (n = 94 were genotyped. Results: The results show that the genotype-phenotype for CC, CT/TT of TCF7L2 gene polymorphism correlated with body mass index and waist circumference in MetSyn and MetSyn + T2D subjects (r = −0.949 and r = −0.963, respectively. The subjects that only possess MetSyn but are not diabetics show the 2 h postprandial glucose and fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin significantly lower (P < 0.05 than those subjects have both abnormality. The level of triglyceride in CT/TT carriers in MetSyn was higher than CC carriers (P = 0.025. A comparison with the controls subjects, the frequencies of the T allele in the groups of MetSyn (46.66% and MetSyn + T2D (47.34% show significantly different (P < 0.05. The odds ratios for T allele in (MetSyn/(normal, (MetSyn + T2D/(normal, and in (MetSyn + T2D/(MetSyn were 3.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33–9.67, P = 0.0093, 3.76 (95% CI, 1.40–10.07, P = 0.0068, and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.55– 2.11, P = 0.834, respectively. Conclusion: The results revealed the important insights essential for the role of TCF7L2 that the T allele of TCF7L2 plays a significant role in the susceptibility to dyslipidemia, MetSyn, and T2D.

  6. Intracytoplasmic maturation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcription complexes determines their capacity to integrate into chromatin

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    Kashanchi Fatah

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early events of the HIV-1 life cycle include entry of the viral core into target cell, assembly of the reverse transcription complex (RTCs performing reverse transcription, its transformation into integration-competent complexes called pre-integration complexes (PICs, trafficking of complexes into the nucleus, and finally integration of the viral DNA into chromatin. Molecular details and temporal organization of these processes remain among the least investigated and most controversial problems in the biology of HIV. Results To quantitatively evaluate maturation and nuclear translocation of the HIV-1 RTCs, nucleoprotein complexes isolated from the nucleus (nRTC and cytoplasm (cRTC of HeLa cells infected with MLV Env-pseudotyped HIV-1 were analyzed by real-time PCR. While most complexes completed reverse transcription in the cytoplasm, some got into the nucleus before completing DNA synthesis. The HIV-specific RNA complexes could get into the nucleus when reverse transcription was blocked by reverse transcriptase inhibitor, although nuclear import of RNA complexes was less efficient than of DNA-containing RTCs. Analysis of the RTC nuclear import in synchronized cells infected in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle showed enrichment in the nuclei of RTCs containing incomplete HIV-1 DNA compared to non-synchronized cells, where RTCs with complete reverse transcripts prevailed. Immunoprecipitation assays identified viral proteins IN, Vpr, MA, and cellular Ini1 and PML associated with both cRTCs and nRTCs, whereas CA was detected only in cRTCs and RT was diminished in nRTCs. Cytoplasmic maturation of the complexes was associated with increased immunoreactivity with anti-Vpr and anti-IN antibodies, and decreased reactivity with antibodies to RT. Both cRTCs and nRTCs carried out endogenous reverse transcription reaction in vitro. In contrast to cRTCs, in vitro completion of reverse transcription in nRTCs did not increase their

  7. Transcriptional profiling of type II toxin-antitoxin genes of Helicobacter pylori under different environmental conditions: identification of HP0967-HP0968 system

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    MIGUEL A DE LA CRUZ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is responsible for causing peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. The expression of virulence factors allows the persistence of H. pylori in the stomach, which results in a chronic, sometimes uncontrolled inflammatory response. Type II toxin-antitoxin systems have emerged as important virulence factors in many pathogenic bacteria. Three type II toxin-antitoxin (TA systems have previously been identified in the genome of H. pylori 26695: HP0315-HP0316, HP0892-HP0893, and HP0894-HP0895. Here we characterized a heretofore undescribed type II TA system in H. pylori, HP0967-HP0968, which is encoded by the bicistronic operon hp0968-hp0967 and belongs to the Vap family. The predicted HP0967 protein is a toxin with ribonuclease activity whereas HP0968 is an antitoxin that binds to its own regulatory region. We found that all type II TA systems were expressed in H. pylori during early stationary growth phase, and differentially expressed in the presence of urea, nickel, and iron, although the hp0968-hp0967 pair was the most affected under these environmental conditions. Transcription of hp0968-hp0967 was strongly induced in a mature H. pylori biofilm and when the bacteria interacted with AGS epithelial cells. Kanamycin and chloramphenicol considerably boosted transcription levels of all the four type II TA systems. The hp0968-hp0967 TA system was the most frequent among 317 H. pylori strains isolated from all over the world. This study is the first report on the transcription of type II TA genes in H. pylori under different environmental conditions. Our data show that the HP0967 and HP0968 proteins constitute a bona fide type II TA system in H. pylori, whose expression is regulated by environmental cues, which are relevant in the context of infection of the human gastric mucosa.

  8. Over-expression of a subgroup 4 R2R3 type MYB transcription factor gene from Leucaena leucocephala reduces lignin content in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Sumita; Kumar, Santosh; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : LlMYB1 , a subgroup 4 R2R3-type MYB transcription factor gene from Leucaena leucocephala appears to be a repressor of lignin biosynthesis pathway by regulating the transcription of general phenylpropanoid pathway genes. R2R3MYB transcription factors are known to play a wide role in regulating the phenylpropanoid pathway in plants. In this study, we report isolation, cloning and characterization of an R2R3MYB transcription factor gene (LlMYB1) from an economically important tree species, Leucaena leucocephala. LlMYB1 consists of 705 bp coding sequence corresponding to 235 amino acids. Sequence alignment revealed that the N-terminal (MYB) domain of the gene shares up to 95 % similarity with subgroup 4 (Sg4) members of R2R3Myb gene family functionally known to be lignin repressors. Highly divergent C-terminal region of the gene carried an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, another characteristic of the Sg4. The gene was phylogenetically grouped closest with AmMYB308, a known repressor of monolignol biosynthetic pathway genes. Spatio-temporal expression studies at different ages of seedlings using quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) showed highest transcript level of the gene in 10 day old stem tissues. Over-expression of the gene in transgenic tobacco showed statistically significant decline in the transcript levels of the general phenylpropanoid pathway genes and reduction in lignin content. Our study suggests that LlMYB1 might be playing the role of a repressor of lignin biosynthesis in L. leucocephala.

  9. Developmentally programmed 3' CpG island methylation confers tissue- and cell-type-specific transcriptional activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    During development, a small but significant number of CpG islands (CGIs) becomes methylated. The timing of developmentally programmed CGI methylation and associated mechanisms of transcriptional regulation during cellular differentiation, however, remain poorly characterized. Here we used genome-wid...

  10. Two type XVII collagen (BP180) mRNA transcripts in human keratinocytes : a long and a short form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molnar, K; van der Steege, G; Jonkman, MF; Nijenhuis, Albertine; Husz, S; van der Meer, JB; Pas, HH

    We have analysed BP180 mRNA expression in normal human keratinocytes. Here we report the presence in normal keratinocytes of two COL17A1 transcripts which differ by 0.6 kb in length. Both mRNAs hybridized on Northern blot with probes directed to sequences encoding intracellular and extracellular

  11. Diverse expression of delayed rectifier K+ channel subtype transcripts in several types of smooth muscles of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, S; Tanaka, M; Watanabe, M; Maizumi, Y

    2000-06-01

    Diverse expression of voltage dependent K+ (Kv) channels was examined in smooth muscles (SMs); carotid artery (CA), mesenteric artery (MA), urinary bladder (UB), and vas deferens (VD) of the rat, using RT-PCR based analyses. Among eight Kv channel subtypes examined (Kv 1.1, Kv 1.2, Kv 1.5, Kv 1.6, Kv 2.1, Kv 2.2, Kv 3.1, and Kv 3.2), expression of three delayed rectifier Kv (KD) channel (Kv 1.2, Kv 1.5, and Kv 2.1) transcripts was observed in these SMs. To determine precisely the expression levels of the transcripts encoding K(D) subtypes, those of three K(D) subtypes (Kv 1.2, Kv 1.5, and Kv 2.1) were determined by competitive PCR. In vascular SM tissues, CA and MA, Kv 1.2 and Kv 1.5 transcripts were expressed at relatively high levels, whereas in visceral SM tissues, UB and VD, Kv 2.1 transcripts were expressed at the relatively high levels. These results suggest that the diverse expression of K(D) subtypes is, at least in part, responsible for differences in electrical excitability and also for the variation of the electrophysiological and pharmacological phenotypes as tonic and phasic SMs.

  12. Fetal growth restriction alters transcription factor binding and epigenetic mechanisms of renal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 in a sex-specific manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajwinderjit; Hale, Merica A.; Bares, Allyson; Yu, Xing; Callaway, Christopher W.; McKnight, Robert A.; Lane, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk of serious adult morbidities such as hypertension. In an IUGR rat model of hypertension, we reported a persistent decrease in kidney 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) mRNA and protein levels from birth through postnatal (P) day 21. This enzyme deficiency can lead to hypertension by limiting renal glucocorticoid deactivation. In the present study, we hypothesized that IUGR affects renal 11β-HSD2 epigenetic determinants of chromatin structure and alters key transcription factor binding to the 11β-HSD2 promoter in association with persistent downregulation of its mRNA expression. To test this hypothesis, we performed bilateral uterine artery ligation on embryonic day 19.5 pregnant rats and harvested kidneys at day 0 (P0) and P21. Key transcription factors that can affect 11β-HSD2 expression include transcriptional enhancers specificity protein 1 (SP1) and NF-κB p65 and transcriptional repressors early growth response factor (Egr-1) and NF-κB p50. Our most important findings were as follows: 1) IUGR significantly decreased SP1 and NF-κB (p65) binding to the 11β-HSD2 promoter in males, while it increased Egr-1 binding in females and NF-κB (p50) binding in males; 2) IUGR increased CpG methylation status, as well as modified the pattern of methylation in several CpG sites of 11β-HSD2 promoter at P0 also in a sex-specific manner; and 3) IUGR decreased trimethylation of H3K36 in exon 5 of 11β-HSD2 at P0 and P21 in both genders. We conclude that IUGR is associated with altered transcriptional repressor/activator binding in connection with increased methylation in the 11β-HSD2 promoter region in a sex-specific manner, possibly leading to decreased transcriptional activity. Furthermore, IUGR decreased trimethylation of H3K36 of the 11β-HSD2 gene in both genders, which is associated with decreased transcriptional elongation. We speculate that alterations in transcription factor binding and

  13. Mapping mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptional regulatory networks using KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data in the TC-YIK cell line.

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    Marina eLizio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mammals are composed of hundreds of different cell types with specialized functions. Each of these cellular phenotypes are controlled by different combinations of transcription factors. Using a human non islet cell insulinoma cell line (TC-YIK which expresses insulin and the majority of known pancreatic beta cell specific genes as an example, we describe a general approach to identify key cell-type-specific transcription factors (TFs and their direct and indirect targets. By ranking all human TFs by their level of enriched expression in TC-YIK relative to a broad collection of samples (FANTOM5, we confirmed known key regulators of pancreatic function and development. Systematic siRNA mediated perturbation of these TFs followed by qRT-PCR revealed their interconnections with NEUROD1 at the top of the regulation hierarchy and its depletion drastically reducing insulin levels. For 15 of the TF knock-downs (KD, we then used Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE to identify thousands of their targets genome-wide (KD-CAGE. The data confirm NEUROD1 as a key positive regulator in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN, and ISL1 and PROX1 as antagonists. As a complimentary approach we used ChIP-seq on four of these factors to identify NEUROD1, LMX1A, PAX6 and RFX6 binding sites in the human genome. Examining the overlap between genes perturbed in the KD-CAGE experiments and genes with a ChIP-seq peak within 1kb of their promoter, we identified direct transcriptional targets of these TFs. Integration of KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data shows that both NEUROD1 and LMX1A work as the main transcriptional activators. In the core TRN (i.e. TF-TF only, NEUROD1 directly transcriptionally activates the pancreatic TFs HSF4, INSM1, MLXIPL, MYT1, NKX6-3, ONECUT2, PAX4, PROX1, RFX6, ST18, DACH1 and SHOX2, while LMX1A directly transcriptionally activates DACH1, SHOX2, PAX6 and PDX1. Analysis of these complementary datasets suggests the need for caution in interpreting

  14. Mapping Mammalian Cell-type-specific Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Using KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq Data in the TC-YIK Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizio, Marina; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Hasegawa, Akira; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Severin, Jessica; Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Yukio; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are composed of hundreds of different cell types with specialized functions. Each of these cellular phenotypes are controlled by different combinations of transcription factors. Using a human non islet cell insulinoma cell line (TC-YIK) which expresses insulin and the majority of known pancreatic beta cell specific genes as an example, we describe a general approach to identify key cell-type-specific transcription factors (TFs) and their direct and indirect targets. By ranking all human TFs by their level of enriched expression in TC-YIK relative to a broad collection of samples (FANTOM5), we confirmed known key regulators of pancreatic function and development. Systematic siRNA mediated perturbation of these TFs followed by qRT-PCR revealed their interconnections with NEUROD1 at the top of the regulation hierarchy and its depletion drastically reducing insulin levels. For 15 of the TF knock-downs (KD), we then used Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) to identify thousands of their targets genome-wide (KD-CAGE). The data confirm NEUROD1 as a key positive regulator in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN), and ISL1, and PROX1 as antagonists. As a complimentary approach we used ChIP-seq on four of these factors to identify NEUROD1, LMX1A, PAX6, and RFX6 binding sites in the human genome. Examining the overlap between genes perturbed in the KD-CAGE experiments and genes with a ChIP-seq peak within 50 kb of their promoter, we identified direct transcriptional targets of these TFs. Integration of KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data shows that both NEUROD1 and LMX1A work as the main transcriptional activators. In the core TRN (i.e., TF-TF only), NEUROD1 directly transcriptionally activates the pancreatic TFs HSF4, INSM1, MLXIPL, MYT1, NKX6-3, ONECUT2, PAX4, PROX1, RFX6, ST18, DACH1, and SHOX2, while LMX1A directly transcriptionally activates DACH1, SHOX2, PAX6, and PDX1. Analysis of these complementary datasets suggests the need for caution in interpreting Ch

  15. Repression of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 Long Terminal Repeat sense transcription by Sp1 recruitment to novel Sp1 binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Robette, Gwenaëlle; Kula, Anna; Vanhulle, Caroline; Bouchat, Sophie; Delacourt, Nadège; Rodari, Anthony; Marban, Céline; Schwartz, Christian; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Driessche, Benoit; Van Lint, Carine

    2017-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is characterized by viral latency in the majority of infected cells and by the absence of viremia. These features are thought to be due to the repression of viral sense transcription in vivo. Here, our in silico analysis of the HTLV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) promoter nucleotide sequence revealed, in addition to the four Sp1 binding sites previously identified, the presence of two additional potential Sp1 sites within the R region. We demonstrated that the Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors bound in vitro to these two sites and compared the binding affinity for Sp1 of all six different HTLV-1 Sp1 sites. By chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we showed Sp1 recruitment in vivo to the newly identified Sp1 sites. We demonstrated in the nucleosomal context of an episomal reporter vector that the Sp1 sites interfered with both the sense and antisense LTR promoter activities. Interestingly, the Sp1 sites exhibited together a repressor effect on the LTR sense transcriptional activity but had no effect on the LTR antisense activity. Thus, our results demonstrate the presence of two new functional Sp1 binding sites in the HTLV-1 LTR, which act as negative cis-regulatory elements of sense viral transcription. PMID:28256531

  16. Identification of a Small Molecule Activator for AphB, a LysR-Type Virulence Transcriptional Regulator in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privett, Britney R; Pellegrini, Maria; Kovacikova, Gabriela; Taylor, Ronald K; Skorupski, Karen; Mierke, Dale; Kull, F Jon

    2017-07-25

    AphB is a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) that cooperates with a second transcriptional activator, AphA, at the tcpPH promoter to initiate expression of the virulence cascade in Vibrio cholerae. Because it is not yet known whether AphB responds to a natural ligand in V. cholerae that influences its ability to activate transcription, we used a computational approach to identify small molecules that influence its activity. In silico docking was used to identify potential ligands for AphB, and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance was subsequently employed to access the validity of promising targets. We identified a small molecule, BP-15, that specifically binds the C-terminal regulatory domain of AphB and increases its activity. Interestingly, molecular docking predicts that BP-15 does not bind in the putative primary effector-binding pocket located at the interface of RD-I and RD-II as in other LTTRs, but rather at the dimerization interface. The information gained in this study helps us to further understand the mechanism by which transcriptional activation by AphB is regulated by suggesting that AphB has a secondary ligand binding site, as observed in other LTTRs. This study also lays the groundwork for the future design of inhibitory molecules to block the V. cholerae virulence cascade, thereby preventing the devastating symptoms of cholera infection.

  17. Roles of Candida albicans Gat2, a GATA-type zinc finger transcription factor, in biofilm formation, filamentous growth and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Han; Guan, Guobo; Xie, Jing; Sun, Yuan; Tong, Yaojun; Zhang, Lixin; Huang, Guanghua

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen, causing not only superficial infections, but also life-threatening systemic disease. C. albicans can grow in several morphological forms including unicellular yeast-form, elongated hyphae and pseudohyphae. In certain natural environments, C. albicans also exists as biofilms, which are structured and surface-attached microbial communities. Transcription factors play a critical role in morphogenesis and biofilm development. In this study, we identified four adhesion-promoting transcription factors (Tec1, Cph1, Ume6 and Gat2) by screening a transcription factor overexpression library. Sequence analysis indicates that Gat2 is a GATA-type zinc finger transcription factor. Here we showed that the gat2/gat2 mutant failed to form biofilms on the plastic and silicone surfaces. Overexpression of GAT2 gene promoted filamentous and invasive growth on agar containing Lee's medium, while deletion of this gene had an opposite effect. However, inactivation of Gat2 had no obvious effect on N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) induced hyphal development. In a mouse model of systemic infection, the gat2/gat2 mutant showed strongly attenuated virulence. Our results suggest that Gat2 plays a critical role in C. albicans biofilm formation, filamentous growth and virulence.

  18. PrhN, a putative marR family transcriptional regulator, is involved in positive regulation of type III secretion system and full virulence of Ralstonia solanacearum

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    Zhang eYong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The MarR-family of transcriptional regulators are involved in various cellular processes, including resistance to multiple antibiotics and other toxic chemicals, adaptation to different environments and pathogenesis in many plant and animal pathogens. Here, we reported a new MarR regulator PrhN, which was involved in the pathogenesis of Ralstonia solanacearum. prhN mutant exhibited significantly reduced virulence and stem colonization compared to that of wild type in tomato plants. prhN mutant caused identical hypersensitive response (HR on resistant plants to the wild type. Deletion of prhN gene substantially reduced the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS in vitro and in planta (mainly in tomato plants, which is essential for pathogenicity of R. solanacearum, and the complemented PrhN could restore its virulence and T3SS expression to that of wild type. T3SS is directly controlled by AraC-type transcriptional regulator HrpB, and the transcription of hrpB is activated by HrpG and PrhG. HrpG and PrhG are homologues but are regulated by the PhcA positively and negatively respectively. Deletion of prhN gene also abolished the expression of hrpB and prhG, but didn't change the expression of hrpG and phcA. Together, these results indicated that PrhN positively regulates T3SS expression through PrhG and HrpB. PrhN and PhcA should regulate prhG expression in a parallel way. This is the first report on the pathogenesis of MarR regulator in R. solanacearum, and this new finding will improve our understanding on the various biological functions of MarR regulator and the complex regulatory network on hrp regulon in R. solanacearum.

  19. Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-17

    The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

  20. MrkH, a novel c-di-GMP-dependent transcriptional activator, controls Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm formation by regulating type 3 fimbriae expression.

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    Jonathan J Wilksch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly amongst hospitalized individuals. The principle mechanism for pathogenesis in hospital environments involves the formation of biofilms, primarily on implanted medical devices. In this study, we constructed a transposon mutant library in a clinical isolate, K. pneumoniae AJ218, to identify the genes and pathways implicated in biofilm formation. Three mutants severely defective in biofilm formation contained insertions within the mrkABCDF genes encoding the main structural subunit and assembly machinery for type 3 fimbriae. Two other mutants carried insertions within the yfiN and mrkJ genes, which encode GGDEF domain- and EAL domain-containing c-di-GMP turnover enzymes, respectively. The remaining two isolates contained insertions that inactivated the mrkH and mrkI genes, which encode for novel proteins with a c-di-GMP-binding PilZ domain and a LuxR-type transcriptional regulator, respectively. Biochemical and functional assays indicated that the effects of these factors on biofilm formation accompany concomitant changes in type 3 fimbriae expression. We mapped the transcriptional start site of mrkA, demonstrated that MrkH directly activates transcription of the mrkA promoter and showed that MrkH binds strongly to the mrkA regulatory region only in the presence of c-di-GMP. Furthermore, a point mutation in the putative c-di-GMP-binding domain of MrkH completely abolished its function as a transcriptional activator. In vivo analysis of the yfiN and mrkJ genes strongly indicated their c-di-GMP-specific function as diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase, respectively. In addition, in vitro assays showed that purified MrkJ protein has strong c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. These results demonstrate for the first time that c-di-GMP can function as an effector to stimulate the activity of a transcriptional activator, and explain how type 3 fimbriae

  1. Catabolite control protein E (CcpE) is a LysR-type transcriptional regulator of tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Torsten; Zhang, Bo; Baronian, Grégory; Schulthess, Bettina; Homerova, Dagmar; Grubmüller, Stephanie; Kutzner, Erika; Gaupp, Rosmarie; Bertram, Ralph; Powers, Robert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Kormanec, Jan; Herrmann, Mathias; Molle, Virginie; Somerville, Greg A; Bischoff, Markus

    2013-12-13

    The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is a central metabolic pathway that provides energy, reducing potential, and biosynthetic intermediates. In Staphylococcus aureus, TCA cycle activity is controlled by several regulators (e.g. CcpA, CodY, and RpiRc) in response to the availability of sugars, amino acids, and environmental stress. Developing a bioinformatic search for additional carbon catabolite-responsive regulators in S. aureus, we identified a LysR-type regulator, catabolite control protein E (CcpE), with homology to the Bacillus subtilis CcpC regulator. Inactivation of ccpE in S. aureus strain Newman revealed that CcpE is a positive transcriptional effector of the first two enzymes of the TCA cycle, aconitase (citB) and to a lesser extent citrate synthase (citZ). Consistent with the transcriptional data, aconitase activity dramatically decreased in the ccpE mutant relative to the wild-type strain. The effect of ccpE inactivation on citB transcription and the lesser effect on citZ transcription were also reflected in electrophoretic mobility shift assays where CcpE bound to the citB promoter but not the citZ promoter. Metabolomic studies showed that inactivation of ccpE resulted in increased intracellular concentrations of acetate, citrate, lactate, and alanine, consistent with a redirection of carbon away from the TCA cycle. Taken together, our data suggest that CcpE is a major direct positive regulator of the TCA cycle gene citB.

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Receptor by Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Is Crucial for Invasion of Pancreatic and Liver Cancer

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    Peter Büchler

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Angioinvasion is critical for metastasis with urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR and tumor hypoxia-activated hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 as key players. Transcriptional control of uPAR expression by HIF has never been reported. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to test whether tumor hypoxia-induced HIF expression may be linked to transcriptional activation of uPAR and dependent angioinvasion. We used human pancreatic cancer cells and a model of parental and derived HIF-1β-deficient mouse liver cancer cell lines and performed Northern blot analysis, nuclear runoff assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, polymerase chain reaction-generated deletion mutants, luciferase assays, Matrigel invasion assays, and in vivo angioinvasion assays in the chorioallantoic membrane of fertilized chicken eggs. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor promoter analysis resulted in four putative HIF binding sites. Hypoxia strongly induced de novo transcription of uPAR mRNA. With sequential deletion mutants of the uPAR promoter, it was possible to identify one HIF binding site causing a nearly 200-fold increase in luciferase activity. Hypoxia enhanced the number of invading tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, HIF-1β-deficient cells failed to upregulate uPAR expression, to activate luciferase activity, and to invade on hypoxia. Taken together, we show for the first time that uPAR is under transcriptional control of HIF and that this is important for hypoxia-induced metastasis.

  3. A LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulator, RovM, Senses Nutritional Cues Suggesting that It Is Involved in Metabolic Adaptation of Yersinia pestis to the Flea Gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Vadyvaloo

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis has evolved as a clonal variant of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to cause flea-borne biofilm-mediated transmission of the bubonic plague. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator, RovM, is highly induced only during Y. pestis infection of the flea host. RovM homologs in other pathogens regulate biofilm formation, nutrient sensing, and virulence; including in Y. pseudotuberculosis, where RovM represses the major virulence factor, RovA. Here the role that RovM plays during flea infection was investigated using a Y. pestis KIM6+ strain deleted of rovM, ΔrovM. The ΔrovM mutant strain was not affected in characteristic biofilm gut blockage, growth, or survival during single infection of fleas. Nonetheless, during a co-infection of fleas, the ΔrovM mutant exhibited a significant competitive fitness defect relative to the wild type strain. This competitive fitness defect was restored as a fitness advantage relative to the wild type in a ΔrovM mutant complemented in trans to over-express rovM. Consistent with this, Y. pestis strains, producing elevated transcriptional levels of rovM, displayed higher growth rates, and differential ability to form biofilm in response to specific nutrients in comparison to the wild type. In addition, we demonstrated that rovA was not repressed by RovM in fleas, but that elevated transcriptional levels of rovM in vitro correlated with repression of rovA under specific nutritional conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that RovM likely senses specific nutrient cues in the flea gut environment, and accordingly directs metabolic adaptation to enhance flea gut colonization by Y. pestis.

  4. Transcription factor TCF7L2 genetic study in the French population: expression in human beta-cells and adipose tissue and strong association with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Stéphane; Meyre, David; Dina, Christian; Choquet, Hélène; Samson, Chantal; Gallina, Sophie; Balkau, Beverley; Charpentier, Guillaume; Pattou, François; Stetsyuk, Volodymyr; Scharfmann, Raphaël; Staels, Bart; Frühbeck, Gema; Froguel, Philippe

    2006-10-01

    Recently, the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene has been associated with type 2 diabetes in subjects of European origin in the DeCode study. We genotyped the two most associated variants (rs7903146 and rs12255372) in 2,367 French type 2 diabetic subjects and in 2,499 control subjects. Both the T-allele of rs7903146 and the T-allele of rs12255372 significantly increase type 2 diabetes risk with an allelic odds ratio (OR) of 1.69 (95% CI 1.55-1.83) (P = 6.0 x 10(-35)) and 1.60 (1.47-1.74) (P = 7.6 x 10(-28)), respectively. In nonobese type 2 diabetic subjects (BMI risk allele associates with decreased BMI and earlier age at diagnosis in the type 2 diabetic subjects (P = 8.0 x 10(-3) and P = 3.8 x 10(-4), respectively), which is supported by quantitative family-based association tests. TCF7L2 is expressed in most human tissues, including mature pancreatic beta-cells, with the exception of the skeletal muscle. In the subcutaneous and omental fat from obese type 2 diabetic subjects, TCF7L2 expression significantly decreased compared with obese normoglycemic individuals. During rat fetal beta-cell differentiation, TCF7L2 expression pattern mimics the key marker NGN3 (neurogenin 3), suggesting a role in islet development. These data provide evidence that TCF7L2 is a major determinant of type 2 diabetes risk in European populations and suggests that this transcription factor plays a key role in glucose homeostasis.

  5. Molecular mechanism of Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6: glutamine repeat disorder, channelopathy or transcriptional dysregulation. The multifaceted aspects of a single mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eGiunti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by late onset, slowly progressive, mostly pure cerebellar ataxia. It is one of three allelic disorders associated to CACNA1A gene, coding for the Alpha1 A subunit of P/Q type calcium channel Cav2.1 expressed in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum. The other two disorders are Episodic Ataxia type 2, and Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 1. These disorders show distinct phenotypes that often overlap but have different pathogenic mechanisms. Episodic Ataxia type 2 and Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 1 are due to mutations causing, respectively, a loss and a gain of channel function. Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6, instead, is associated with short expansions of a polyglutamine stretch located in the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of the protein. This domain has a relevant role in channel regulation, as well as in transcription regulation of other neuronal genes; thus the SCA6 CAG repeat expansion results in complex pathogenic molecular mechanisms reflecting the complex Cav2.1 C-terminus activity. We will provide a short review for an update on the Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 molecular mechanism.

  6. Type I interferon transcriptional signature in neutrophils and high frequency of low-density granulocytes are associated with tissue damage in malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Bruno Coelho; Marques, Pedro Elias; Leoratti, Fabiana Maria de Souza; Junqueira, Caroline; Pereira, Dhelio Batista; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Valle; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte population in the bloodstream, the primary compartment of Plasmodium sp. infection. Yet, the role of these polymorphonuclear cells in mediating either resistance or pathogenesis of malaria is poorly understood. We report that circulating neutrophils from malaria patients are highly activated, as indicated by a strong type I interferon transcriptional signature, increased expression of surface activation markers, the enhanced release of reactive oxygen species and myeloperoxidase, as well as the high frequency of low-density granulocytes. The activation of neutrophils was associated with increased levels of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, indicating liver damage. In a rodent malaria model, we observed an intense recruitment of neutrophils to liver sinusoids. Neutrophil migration, IL-1β and chemokine expression as well as liver damage were all dependent on type I interferon signaling. The data suggests that type I interferon signaling have a central role in neutrophil activation and malaria pathogenesis. PMID:26711347

  7. Identification of new and unusual rev and nef transcripts expressed by an HIV type 1 primary isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; Carrera, Cristina; Nebreda, Paloma; Fernández-García, Aurora; Cuevas, María Teresa; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Thomson, Michael M

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed RNA splice site usage in three HIV-1 subtype B primary isolates through reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of spliced RNAs using a fluorescently labeled primer, with computerized size determination and quantification of PCR products, which were also identified by clone sequencing. In one isolate, P2149-3, unusual and unreported spliced transcripts were detected. This isolate preferentially used for rev RNA generation a 3' splice site (3'ss) located five nucleotides upstream of A4a, previously identified only in a T cell line-adapted virus and in a group O isolate, and designated A4d. P2149-3 also used an unreported 3'ss for rev RNA generation, designated A4h, located 20 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4c. Additionally, unusual nef RNAs using 3'ss A5a and A7a and with exon composition 1.3.7 were identified. The identification of several unusual and unreported spliced transcripts in an HIV-1 primary isolate suggests a greater diversity of splice site usage in HIV-1 than previously appreciated.

  8. Identification of concomitant infection with Chlamydia trachomatis IncA-negative mutant and wild-type strains by genomic, transcriptional, and biological characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchland, Robert J; Jeffrey, Brendan M; Xia, Minsheng; Bhatia, Ajay; Chu, Hencelyn G; Rockey, Daniel D; Stamm, Walter E

    2008-12-01

    Clinical isolates of Chlamydia trachomatis that lack IncA on their inclusion membrane form nonfusogenic inclusions and have been associated with milder, subclinical infections in patients. The molecular events associated with the generation of IncA-negative strains and their roles in chlamydial sexually transmitted infections are not clear. We explored the biology of the IncA-negative strains by analyzing their genomic structure, transcription, and growth characteristics in vitro and in vivo in comparison with IncA-positive C. trachomatis strains. Three clinical samples were identified that contained a mixture of IncA-positive and -negative same-serovar C. trachomatis populations, and two more such pairs were found in serial isolates from persistently infected individuals. Genomic sequence analysis of individual strains from each of two serovar-matched pairs showed that these pairs were very similar genetically. In contrast, the genome sequence of an unmatched IncA-negative strain contained over 5,000 nucleotide polymorphisms relative to the genome sequence of a serovar-matched but otherwise unlinked strain. Transcriptional analysis, in vitro culture kinetics, and animal modeling demonstrated that IncA-negative strains isolated in the presence of a serovar-matched wild-type strain are phenotypically more similar to the wild-type strain than are IncA-negative strains isolated in the absence of a serovar-matched wild-type strain. These studies support a model suggesting that a change from an IncA-positive strain to the previously described IncA-negative phenotype may involve multiple steps, the first of which involves a translational inactivation of incA, associated with subsequent unidentified steps that lead to the observed decrease in transcript level, differences in growth rate, and differences in mouse infectivity.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification of the Transcription Factors Involved in Citrus Fruit Ripening from the Transcriptomes of a Late-Ripening Sweet Orange Mutant and Its Wild Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juxun; Fu, Lili; Yi, Hualin

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening is a genetically programmed process. Transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in plant development and ripening by temporarily and spatially regulating the transcription of their target genes. In this study, a total of 159 TFs were identified from a spontaneous late-ripening mutant 'Fengwan' (C. sinensis L. Osbeck) sweet orange (MT) and its wild-type counterpart ('Fengjie 72-1', WT) along the ripening period via the Transcription Factor Prediction of PlantTFDB 3.0. Fifty-two differentially expressed TFs were identified between MT and WT; 92 and 120 differentially expressed TFs were identified in WT and MT, respectively. The Venn diagram analysis showed that 16 differentially expressed TFs were identified between MT and WT and during the ripening of WT and MT. These TFs were primarily assigned to the families of C2H2, Dof, bHLH, ERF, MYB, NAC and LBD. Particularly, the number of TFs of the ERF family was the greatest between MT and WT. According to the results of the WGCNA analysis, a weighted correlation network analysis tool, several important TFs correlated to abscisic acid (ABA), citric acid, fructose, glucose and sucrose were identified, such as RD26, NTT, GATA7 and MYB21/62/77. Hierarchical cluster analysis and the expression analysis conducted at five fruit ripening stages further validated the pivotal TFs that potentially function during orange fruit development and ripening.

  10. Transcriptional Profiling of Type II Toxin–Antitoxin Genes of Helicobacter pylori under Different Environmental Conditions: Identification of HP0967–HP0968 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G.; Ares, Miguel A.; Panunzi, Leonardo G.; Pacheco, Sabino; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Girón, Jorge A.; Torres, Javier; De la Cruz, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is responsible for causing peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. The expression of virulence factors allows the persistence of H. pylori in the stomach, which results in a chronic, sometimes uncontrolled inflammatory response. Type II toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems have emerged as important virulence factors in many pathogenic bacteria. Three type II TA systems have previously been identified in the genome of H. pylori 26695: HP0315–HP0316, HP0892–HP0893, and HP0894–HP0895. Here we characterized a heretofore undescribed type II TA system in H. pylori, HP0967–HP0968, which is encoded by the bicistronic operon hp0968–hp0967 and belongs to the Vap family. The predicted HP0967 protein is a toxin with ribonuclease activity whereas HP0968 is an antitoxin that binds to its own regulatory region. We found that all type II TA systems were expressed in H. pylori during early stationary growth phase, and differentially expressed in the presence of urea, nickel, and iron, although, the hp0968–hp0967 pair was the most affected under these environmental conditions. Transcription of hp0968–hp0967 was strongly induced in a mature H. pylori biofilm and when the bacteria interacted with AGS epithelial cells. Kanamycin and chloramphenicol considerably boosted transcription levels of all the four type II TA systems. The hp0968–hp0967 TA system was the most frequent among 317 H. pylori strains isolated from all over the world. This study is the first report on the transcription of type II TA genes in H. pylori under different environmental conditions. Our data show that the HP0967 and HP0968 proteins constitute a bona fide type II TA system in H. pylori, whose expression is regulated by environmental cues, which are relevant in the context of infection of the human gastric mucosa. PMID:27920769

  11. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xiao, Shaobo, E-mail: shaoboxiao@yahoo.com [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  12. Full-Length Structures of BenM and Two Variants Reveal Different Oligomerization Schemes for LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruangprasert, Ajchareeya; Craven, Sarah H.; Neidle, Ellen L.; Momany, Cory (Georgia)

    2010-11-30

    BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) from the bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi, responds synergistically to benzoate and cis,cis-muconate. With these effectors, BenM activates gene expression during benzoate consumption. Without effectors, BenM represses transcription. Here, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the full-length structures of BenM and two variants that activate transcription without benzoate or cis,cis-muconate: BenM(R156H) and BenM(E226K). Previous studies indicate that these regulators function as tetramers. Here, interconnections between subunits in the crystals prevented the formation of a closed oligomer and highlighted the inherent flexibility of this multidomain regulator. Nevertheless, analysis of subunit interfaces suggested the functional significance of key interactions. The structures of BenM and its variants were nearly identical, implying that transcriptional differences rely on factors beyond major conformational changes defined solely by sequence. Comparisons of BenM with other LTTRs, including unpublished structures in the Protein Data Bank, revealed extensive variation in the relative orientations of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector-binding domains (EBDs). To form dimers, different LTTRs used similar interfaces between two EBDs, each containing two subdomains: EBD-I and EBD-II. Surprisingly, the dimers used three substantially different schemes to form higher-order oligomers. In one scheme used by BenM, oligomer assembly involved contacts between the EBD-II regions and the DBD regions of adjacent subunits. In another scheme, there were no contacts between the EBDs; only the DBDs were involved in tetramer formation. In the third scheme, the oligomer interface involved DBD and EBD-I/EBD-II contacts. These diverse schemes demonstrate novel variation in the oligomeric structures of individual LTTRs within this large and important family.

  13. NECK LEAF 1, a GATA type transcription factor, modulates organogenesis by regulating the expression of multiple regulatory genes during reproductive development in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Wang; Hengfu Yin; Qian Qian; Jun Yang; Chaofeng Huang; Xiaohe Hu; Da Luo

    2009-01-01

    In the monocot rice species Oryza sativa L., one of the most striking morphological processes during reproductive development is the concurrence of panicle development with the sequential elongation of upper internodes (UPIs). To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms, we cloned the rice gene NECK LEAF 1 (NL1), which when mutated results in delays in flowering time, smaller panicles with overgrown bracts and abnormal UPI elongation patterns. The NL1 gene encodes a GATA-type transcription factor with a single zinc finger domain, and its transcripts are de-tected predominantly in the bract primordia, which normally degenerate in the wild-type plants. Overexpression of NL1 in transgenic plants often gives rise to severe growth retardation, less vegetative phytomers and smaller leaves, suggesting that NL1 plays an important role in organ differentiation. A novel mutant allele of PLASTOCHRON1 (PLA1), a gene known to play a key role in regulating leaf initiation, was identified in this study. Genetic analysis demonstrated an interaction between nll and plal, with NL1 acting upstream of PLA1. The expression level and spatial pattern of PLA1 were found to be altered in the nll mutant. Furthermore, the expression of two regulators of flowering, Hd3a and OsMADS1, was also affected in the nll mutant. On the basis of these findings, we propose that NL1 is an intrinsic factor that modulates and coordinates organogenesis through regulating the expression of PLA1 and other regulatory genes during reproductive development in rice.

  14. Regulation of the type II secretion structural gene xpsE in Xanthomonas campestris Pathovar campestris by the global transcription regulator Clp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chao; He, Chaozu

    2008-02-01

    GspE is an important component of the type II secretion system (T2SS) in Gram-negative bacteria that supplies energy for the process of protein secretion. The role of GspE and its interactions with other components have been intensively studied. However, regulation of the gspE gene is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the transcription of xpsE, a homologue of gspE in Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc), is upregulated by Clp, a homologue of the cyclic AMP-receptor protein, by directly binding to the xpsE promoter region. Overexpression of the clp gene in Xcc wild-type strain 8004 enhanced the production of XpsE as well as endoglucanase and extracellular polysaccharide (EPS).

  15. Sample type is vital for diagnosing infection with peste des petits ruminants virus by reverse transcription PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luka, Pam Dachung; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Shamaki, David; Mwiine, Frank Norbert; Erume, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) diagnosis from suspected samples from sheep and goats was carried out. Buffy coat, tissues, and oculo-nasal swabs were analyzed using nucleoprotein (NP3/NP4) and fusion protein (F1/F2) gene primers, respectively. Analysis of the sample types and primer set revealed that buffy coat are the best type of samples for PPR diagnosis and the use of two set of primers will increase the number of positives.

  16. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis reveals stable and prolonged neurotoxin cluster gene activity in a Clostridium botulinum type E strain at refrigeration temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindén, Jere; Lindström, Miia

    2008-10-01

    The relative expression levels of six botulinum neurotoxin cluster genes in a group II Clostridium botulinum type E strain grown at 10 or 30 degrees C were investigated using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to confirm neurotoxin expression. Distinct mRNA and toxin production patterns were observed at the two temperatures. The average relative mRNA levels at 10 degrees C were higher than (ntnh and p47), similar to (botE), or lower than (orfx1, orfx2, orfx3) those at 30 degrees C. The maximum botE expression levels and average neurotoxin levels at 10 degrees C were 45 to 65% of those at 30 degrees C. The relative mRNA levels at 10 degrees C declined generally slowly within 8 days, as opposed to the rapid decline observed at 30 degrees C within 24 h. Distinct expression patterns of the six genes at the two temperatures suggest that the type E neurotoxin cluster genes are transcribed as two tricistronic operons at 30 degrees C, whereas at 10 degrees C monocistronic (botE or orfx1 alone) and bicistronic (ntnh-p47 and orfx2-orfx3) transcription may dominate. Thus, type E botulinum neurotoxin production may be involved with various temperature-dependent regulatory events. In light of group II C. botulinum type E being a dangerous food-borne pathogen, these findings may be important in terms of the safety of refrigerated packaged foods of extended durability.

  17. TetR-type transcriptional regulator VtpR functions as a global regulator in Vibrio tubiashii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Häse, Claudia C

    2009-12-01

    Vibrio tubiashii, a causative agent of severe shellfish larval disease, produces multiple extracellular proteins, including a metalloprotease (VtpA), as potential virulence factors. We previously reported that VtpA is toxic for Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae. In this study, we show that extracellular protease production by V. tubiashii was much reduced by elevated salt concentrations, as well as by elevated temperatures. In addition, V. tubiashii produced dramatically less protease in minimal salts medium supplemented with glucose or sucrose as the sole carbon source than with succinate. We identified a protein that belongs to the TetR family of transcriptional regulators, VtpR, which showed high homology with V. cholerae HapR. We conclude that VtpR activates VtpA production based on the following: (i) a VtpR-deficient V. tubiashii mutant did not produce extracellular proteases, (ii) the mutant showed reduced expression of a vtpA-lacZ fusion, and (iii) VtpR activated vtpA-lacZ in a V. cholerae heterologous background. Moreover, we show that VtpR activated the expression of an additional metalloprotease gene (vtpB). The deduced VtpB sequence showed high homology with a metalloprotease, VhpA, from V. harveyi. Furthermore, the vtpR mutant strain produced reduced levels of extracellular hemolysin, which is attributed to the lower expression of the V. tubiashii hemolysin genes (vthAB). The VtpR-deficient mutant also had negative effects on bacterial motility and did not demonstrate toxicity to oyster larvae. Together, these findings establish that the V. tubiashii VtpR protein functions as a global regulator controlling an array of potential virulence factors.

  18. Overexpression of the soybean GmERF3 gene, an AP2/ERF type transcription factor for increased tolerances to salt, drought, and diseases in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Chen, Ming; Li, Liancheng; Xu, Zhaoshi; Chen, Xueping; Guo, Jiaming; Ma, Youzhi

    2009-01-01

    A new member of the AP2/ERF transcription factor family, GmERF3, was isolated from soybean. Sequence analysis showed that GmERF3 contained an AP2/ERF domain of 58 amino acids and two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) domains. It belonged to a group IV protein in the ERF (ethylene response factor) subfamily as typified by a conserved N-terminal motif [MCGGAI(I/L)]. Expression of GmERF3 was induced by treatments with high salinity, drought, abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET), and soybean mosaic virus (SMV), whereas there was no significant GmERF3 mRNA accumulation under cold stress treatment. GmERF3 could bind to the GCC box and DRE/CRT element, and was targeted to the nucleus when transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. The GmERF3 protein fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain to activate transcription of reporter genes in yeast. Ectopic expression of the GmERF3 gene in transgenic tobacco plants induced the expression of some PR genes and enhanced resistance against infection by Ralstonia solanacearum, Alternaria alternata, and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and gave tolerance to high salinity and dehydration stresses. Furthermore, overexpression of GmERF3 in transgenic tobacco led to higher levels of free proline and soluble carbohydrates compared to wild-type plants under drought conditions. The overall results suggested that GmERF3 as an AP2/ERF transcription factor may play dual roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  19. Soybean DREB1/CBF-type transcription factors function in heat and drought as well as cold stress-responsive gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidokoro, Satoshi; Watanabe, Keitaro; Ohori, Teppei; Moriwaki, Takashi; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Mizoi, Junya; Myint Phyu Sin Htwe, Nang; Fujita, Yasunari; Sekita, Sachiko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2015-02-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is a globally important crop, and its growth and yield are severely reduced by abiotic stresses, such as drought, heat, and cold. The cis-acting element DRE (dehydration-responsive element)/CRT plays an important role in activating gene expression in response to these stresses. The Arabidopsis DREB1/CBF genes that encode DRE-binding proteins function as transcriptional activators in the cold stress responsive gene expression. In this study, we identified 14 DREB1-type transcription factors (GmDREB1s) from a soybean genome database. The expression of most GmDREB1 genes in soybean was strongly induced by a variety of abiotic stresses, such as cold, drought, high salt, and heat. The GmDREB1 proteins activated transcription via DREs (dehydration-responsive element) in Arabidopsis and soybean protoplasts. Transcriptome analyses using transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GmDREB1s indicated that many of the downstream genes are cold-inducible and overlap with those of Arabidopsis DREB1A. We then comprehensively analyzed the downstream genes of GmDREB1B;1, which is closely related to DREB1A, using a transient expression system in soybean protoplasts. The expression of numerous genes induced by various abiotic stresses were increased by overexpressing GmDREB1B;1 in soybean, and DREs were the most conserved element in the promoters of these genes. The downstream genes of GmDREB1B;1 included numerous soybean-specific stress-inducible genes that encode an ABA receptor family protein, GmPYL21, and translation-related genes, such as ribosomal proteins. We confirmed that GmDREB1B;1 directly activates GmPYL21 expression and enhances ABRE-mediated gene expression in an ABA-independent manner. These results suggest that GmDREB1 proteins activate the expression of numerous soybean-specific stress-responsive genes under diverse abiotic stress conditions.

  20. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Shang-jin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV. A pair of primers (P1 and P4 specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV, canine parvovirus (CPV, canine coronavirus (CCV, rabies virus (RV, or canine adenovirus (CAV. The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance.

  1. Cell type specific repression of the varicella zoster virus immediate early gene 62 promoter by the cellular Oct-2 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Y; Gough, G; Coffin, R S; Thomas, S; Cohen, J I; Latchman, D S

    1998-05-11

    The cellular transcription factor Oct-2.1 has previously been shown to repress the transactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV) immediate early gene promoter by viral transactivators but not to inhibit its basal activity. In the case of the related virus herpes simplex virus (HSV), the effect of Oct-2 on the IE promoters has been shown to be cell type specific and to differ between the different alternatively spliced forms of Oct-2. Here we show that as well as Oct-2.1, the Oct-2.4 and 2.5 isoforms which are expressed in neuronal cells can inhibit transactivation of the VZV immediate early promoter regardless of the cell type used. In contrast, all the isoforms of Oct-2 can inhibit basal activity of the VZV promoter in neuronal cells but not in other cell types indicating that this effect is cell type specific. These effects are discussed in terms of the differential regulation of latent infections with HSV or VZV in dorsal root ganglia.

  2. Identifying Cell Type-Specific Transcription Factors by Integrating ChIP-seq and eQTL Data-Application to Monocyte Gene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Mudra; Ramsey, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel computational approach to identify transcription factors (TFs) that are candidate regulators in a human cell type of interest. Our approach involves integrating cell type-specific expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data and TF data from chromatin immunoprecipitation-to-tag-sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments in cell lines. To test the method, we used eQTL data from human monocytes in order to screen for TFs. Using a list of known monocyte-regulating TFs, we tested the hypothesis that the binding sites of cell type-specific TF regulators would be concentrated in the vicinity of monocyte eQTLs. For each of 397 ChIP-seq data sets, we obtained an enrichment ratio for the number of ChIP-seq peaks that are located within monocyte eQTLs. We ranked ChIP-seq data sets according to their statistical significances for eQTL overlap, and from this ranking, we observed that monocyte-regulating TFs are more highly ranked than would be expected by chance. We identified 27 TFs that had significant monocyte enrichment scores and mapped them into a protein interaction network. Our analysis uncovered two novel candidate monocyte-regulating TFs, BCLAF1 and SIN3A. Our approach is an efficient method to identify candidate TFs that can be used for any cell/tissue type for which eQTL data are available.

  3. APOE genotype-function relationship: evidence of -491 A/T promoter polymorphism modifying transcription control but not type 2 diabetes risk.

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    Hua Geng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The apolipoprotein E gene (APOE coding polymorphism modifies the risks of Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Aside from the coding variants, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP of the APOE promoter has also been shown to modify the risk of Alzheimer's disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigate the genotype-function relationship of APOE promoter polymorphism at molecular level and at physiological level: i.e., in transcription control of the gene and in the risk of type 2 diabetes. In molecular studies, the effect of the APOE -491A/T (rs449647 polymorphism on gene transcription was accessed by dual-luciferase reporter gene assays. The -491 A to T substitution decreased the activity (p<0.05 of the cloned APOE promoter (-1017 to +406. Using the -501 to -481 nucleotide sequence of the APOE promoter as a 'bait' to screen the human brain cDNA library by yeast one-hybrid system yielded ATF4, an endoplasmic reticulum stress response gene, as one of the interacting factors. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays (EMSA and chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP analyses further substantiated the physical interaction between ATF4 and the APOE promoter. Over-expression of ATF4 stimulated APOE expression whereas siRNA against ATF4 suppressed the expression of the gene. However, interaction between APOE promoter and ATF4 was not -491A/T-specific. At physiological level, the genotype-function relationship of APOE promoter polymorphism was studied in type 2 diabetes. In 630 cases and 595 controls, three APOE promoter SNPs -491A/T, -219G/T (rs405509, and +113G/C (rs440446 were genotyped and tested for association with type 2 diabetes in Hong Kong Chinese. No SNP or haplotype association with type 2 diabetes was detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: At molecular level, polymorphism -491A/T and ATF4 elicit independent control of APOE gene expression. At physiological level, no genotype

  4. Transcription Profiles of Marker Genes Predict The Transdifferentiation Relationship between Eight Types of Liver Cell during Rat Liver Regeneration

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    Xiaguang Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the transdifferentiation relationship between eight types of liver cell during rat liver regeneration (LR. Materials and Methods: 114 healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were used in this experimental study. Eight types of liver cell were isolated and purified with percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagentic bead methods. Marker genes for eight types of cell were obtained by retrieving the relevant references and databases. Expression changes of markers for each cell of the eight cell types were measured using microarray. The relationships between the expression profiles of marker genes and transdifferentiation among liver cells were analyzed using bioinformatics. Liver cell transdifferentiation was predicted by comparing expression profiles of marker genes in different liver cells. Results: During LR hepatocytes (HCs not only express hepatic oval cells (HOC markers (including PROM1, KRT14 and LY6E, but also express biliary epithelial cell (BEC markers (including KRT7 and KRT19; BECs express both HOC markers (including GABRP, PCNA and THY1 and HC markers such as CPS1, TAT, KRT8 and KRT18; both HC markers (KRT18, KRT8 and WT1 and BEC markers (KRT7 and KRT19 were detected in HOCs. Additionally, some HC markers were also significantly upregulated in hepatic stellate cells ( HSCs, sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs , Kupffer cells (KCs and dendritic cells (DCs, mainly at 6-72 hours post partial hepatectomy (PH. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that there is a mutual transdifferentiation relationship between HC, BEC and HOC during LR, and a tendency for HSCs, SECs, KCs and DCs to transdifferentiate into HCs.

  5. Transcriptional activation of pyoluteorin operon mediated by the LysR-type regulator PltR bound at a 22 bp lys box in Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18.

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    Sainan Li

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18, a rhizosphere-isolated bacterial strain showing strong antifungal activity, can produce secondary metabolites such as phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyoluteorin (Plt. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator PltR activates the Plt biosynthesis operon pltLABCDEFG, the expression of which is induced by Plt. Here, we identified and characterized the non-conserved pltL promoter (pltLp specifically activated by PltR and its upstream neighboring lys box from the complicated pltR-pltL intergenic sequence. The 22 bp palindromic lys box, which consists of two 9 bp complementary inverted repeats interrupted by 4 bp, was found to contain the conserved, GC-rich LysR-binding motif (T-N(11-A. Evidence obtained in vivo from mutational and lacZ report analyses and in vitro from electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveals that the PltR protein directly bound to the pltLp region as the indispensable binding motif "lys box", thereby transcriptionally activating the pltLp-driven plt operon expression. Plt, as a potential non-essential coinducer of PltR, specifically induced the pltLp expression and thus strengthened its biosynthetic plt operon expression.

  6. Transcriptional frameshifting rescues Citrobacter rodentium type VI secretion by the production of two length variants from the prematurely interrupted tssM gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Erwan; Wills, Norma M; Atkins, John F; Cascales, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) mediates toxin delivery into both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. It is composed of a cytoplasmic structure resembling the tail of contractile bacteriophages anchored to the cell envelope through a membrane complex composed of the TssL and TssM inner membrane proteins and of the TssJ outer membrane lipoprotein. The C-terminal domain of TssM is required for its interaction with TssJ, and for the function of the T6SS. In Citrobacter rodentium, the tssM1 gene does not encode the C-terminal domain. However, the stop codon is preceded by a run of 11 consecutive adenosines. In this study, we demonstrate that this poly-A tract is a transcriptional slippery site that induces the incorporation of additional adenosines, leading to frameshifting, and hence the production of two TssM1 variants, including a full-length canonical protein. We show that both forms of TssM1, and the ratio between these two forms, are required for the function of the T6SS in C. rodentium. Finally, we demonstrate that the tssM gene associated with the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis T6SS-3 gene cluster is also subjected to transcriptional frameshifting.

  7. Long-term habituation of the gill-withdrawal reflex in Aplysia requires gene transcription, calcineurin and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels

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    Joseph eEsdin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Although habituation is possibly the simplest form of learning, we still do not fully understand the neurobiological basis of habituation in any organism. To advance the goal of a comprehensive understanding of habituation, we have studied long-term habituation (LTH of the gill-withdrawal reflex (GWR in the marine snail Aplysia californica. Previously, we showed that habituation of the GWR in a reduced preparation lasts for up to 12 hr, and depends on protein synthesis, as well as activation of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A and postsynaptic glutamate receptors. Here, we have used the reduced preparation to further analyze the mechanisms of LTH in Aplysia. We found that LTH of the GWR depends on RNA synthesis because it was blocked by both the irreversible transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin-D and the reversible transcriptional inhibitor, 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside (DRB. In addition, LTH requires activation of protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin, because it was disrupted by ascomycin. Finally, LTH was blocked by nitrendipine, which indicates that activation of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels is required for this form of learning. Together with our previous results, the present results indicate that exclusively presynaptic mechanisms, although possibly sufficient for short-term habituation, are insufficient for LTH. Rather, LTH must involve postsynaptic, as well as presynaptic, mechanisms.

  8. Comparative Analyses of Transcriptional Profiles in Mouse Organs Using a Pneumonic Plague Model after Infection with Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant

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    Cristi L. Galindo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We employed Murine GeneChips to delineate the global transcriptional profiles of the livers, lungs, and spleens in a mouse pneumonic plague infection model with wild-type (WT Y. pestis CO92 and its Braun lipoprotein (Δlpp mutant with reduced virulence. These organs showed differential transcriptional responses to infection with WT Y. pestis, but the overall host functional processes affected were similar across all three tissues. Gene expression alterations were found in inflammation, cytokine signaling, and apoptotic cell death-associated genes. Comparison of WT and Δlpp mutant-infected mice indicated significant overlap in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- associated gene expression, but the absence of Lpp perturbed host cell signaling at critical regulatory junctions resulting in altered immune response and possibly host cell apoptosis. We generated a putative signaling pathway including major inflammatory components that could account for the synergistic action of LPS and Lpp and provided the mechanistic basis of attenuation caused by deletion of the lpp gene from Y. pestis in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

  9. Role of Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog in the transcription activation of type I collagen gene mediated by transforming growth factor beta

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    Lim, Mi-Sun; Jeong, Kwang Won, E-mail: kwjeong@gachon.ac.kr

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FLII activates TGFβ-mediated expression of COL1A2 gene. • TGFβ induces the association of FLII with SMAD3 and BRG1 in A549 cells. • FLII is required for the recruitment of SWI/SNF complex and chromatin accessibility to COL1A2 promoter. - Abstract: Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII) is a nuclear receptor coactivator that is known to interact with other transcriptional regulators such as the SWI/SNF complex, an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, at the promoter or enhancer region of estrogen receptor (ER)-α target genes. However, little is known about the role of FLII during transcription initiation in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that FLII functions as a coactivator in the expression of type I collagen gene induced by TGFβ in A549 cells. FLII activates the reporter gene driven by COL1A2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Co-expression of GRIP1, CARM1, or p300 did not show any synergistic activation of transcription. Furthermore, the level of COL1A2 expression correlated with the endogenous level of FLII mRNA level. Depletion of FLII resulted in a reduction of TGFβ-induced expression of COL1A2 gene. In contrast, over-expression of FLII caused an increase in the endogenous expression of COL1A2. We also showed that FLII is associated with Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) as well as SMAD in A549 cells. Notably, the recruitment of BRG1 to the COL1A2 promoter region was decreased in FLII-depleted A549 cells, suggesting that FLII is required for TGFβ-induced chromatin remodeling, which is carried out by the SWI/SNF complex. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments revealed that depletion of FLII caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the COL1A2 promoter. These results suggest that FLII plays a critical role in TGFβ/SMAD-mediated transcription of the COL1A2 gene

  10. SIRT1 deacetylates RFX5 and antagonizes repression of collagen type I (COL1A2) transcription in smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Jun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jiangsu Provincial Hospital of Chinese Traditional Medicine (China); Wu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yuyu; Zhao, Yuhao [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China); Fang, Mingming [Jiangsu Jiankang Vocational Institute (China); Xie, Weiping, E-mail: wpxienjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Wang, Hong, E-mail: hwangnjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Xu, Yong [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 interacts with and deacetylates RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation attenuates whereas SIRT1 inhibition enhances collagen repression by RFX5 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 promotes cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation of RFX5 and cripples promoter recruitment of RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IFN-{gamma} represses SIRT1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 agonist alleviates collagen repression by IFN-{gamma} in vascular smooth muscle cells. -- Abstract: Decreased expression of collagen by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) within the atherosclerotic plaque contributes to the thinning of the fibrous cap and poses a great threat to plaque rupture. Elucidation of the mechanism underlying repressed collagen type I (COL1A2) gene would potentially provide novel solutions that can prevent rupture-induced complications. We have previously shown that regulatory factor for X-box (RFX5) binds to the COL1A2 transcription start site and represses its transcription. Here we report that SIRT1, an NAD-dependent, class III deacetylase, forms a complex with RFX5. Over-expression of SIRT1 or NAMPT, which synthesizes NAD+ to activate SIRT1, or treatment with the SIRT1 agonist resveratrol decreases RFX5 acetylation and disrupts repression of the COL1A2 promoter activity by RFX5. On the contrary, knockdown of SIRT1 or treatment with SIRT1 inhibitors induces RFX5 acetylation and enhances the repression of collagen transcription. SIRT1 antagonizes RFX5 activity by promoting its nuclear expulsion and proteasomal degradation hence dampening its binding to the COL1A2 promoter. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-{gamma} represses COL1A2 transcription by down-regulating SIRT1 expression in SMCs. Therefore, our data have identified as novel pathway whereby SIRT1 maintains collagen synthesis in SMCs by modulating RFX5 activity.

  11. Gene transcription and splicing of T-type channels are evolutionarily-conserved strategies for regulating channel expression and gating.

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    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels operate within tightly regulated biophysical constraints for supporting rhythmic firing in the brain, heart and secretory organs of invertebrates and vertebrates. The snail T-type gene, LCa(v3 from Lymnaea stagnalis, possesses alternative, tandem donor splice sites enabling a choice of a large exon 8b (201 aa or a short exon 25c (9 aa in cytoplasmic linkers, similar to mammalian homologs. Inclusion of optional 25c exons in the III-IV linker of T-type channels speeds up kinetics and causes hyperpolarizing shifts in both activation and steady-state inactivation of macroscopic currents. The abundant variant lacking exon 25c is the workhorse of embryonic Ca(v3 channels, whose high density and right-shifted activation and availability curves are expected to increase pace-making and allow the channels to contribute more significantly to cellular excitation in prenatal tissue. Presence of brain-enriched, optional exon 8b conserved with mammalian Ca(v3.1 and encompassing the proximal half of the I-II linker, imparts a ~50% reduction in total and surface-expressed LCa(v3 channel protein, which accounts for reduced whole-cell calcium currents of +8b variants in HEK cells. Evolutionarily conserved optional exons in cytoplasmic linkers of Ca(v3 channels regulate expression (exon 8b and a battery of biophysical properties (exon 25c for tuning specialized firing patterns in different tissues and throughout development.

  12. Neural expression and post-transcriptional dosage compensation of the steroid metabolic enzyme 17β-HSD type 4

    OpenAIRE

    Wise Petra M; Lance Valentin A; Itoh Yuichiro; London Sarah E; Ekanayake Preethika S; Oyama Randi K; Arnold Arthur P; Schlinger Barney A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, the estrogenic steroid estradiol (E2) is especially effective at promoting growth of the neural circuit specialized for song. In this species, only the males sing and they have a much larger and more interconnected song circuit than females. Thus, it was surprising that the gene for 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4), an enzyme that converts E2 to a less potent estrogen, had been mapped t...

  13. Recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 to viral immediate-early promoters during initiation of reactivation from latency of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Zackary; Kristie, Thomas M

    2009-09-01

    The transcriptional coactivator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) is critical for the expression of immediate-early (IE) genes of the alphaherpesviruses herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and varicella-zoster virus. HCF-1 may also be involved in the reactivation of these viruses from latency as it is sequestered in the cytoplasm of sensory neurons but is rapidly relocalized to the nucleus upon stimulation that results in reactivation. Here, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that HCF-1 is recruited to IE promoters of viral genomes during the initiation of reactivation, correlating with RNA polymerase II occupancy and IE expression. The data support the model whereby HCF-1 plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of HSV-1 from latency.

  14. In vivo D-serine deaminase transcription start sites in wild-type Escherichia coli and in dsdA promoter mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein-Forst, S M; McFall, E; Palchaudhuri, S

    1987-03-01

    The D-serine deaminase structural (dsdA) and regulatory (dsdC) genes are transcribed with opposite polarity from an intergenic region comprising more than 600 base pairs. The order of genes in the dsd region is supN-dsdA-dsdC-aroC---his. The DNA sequence of the intergenic region has been slightly revised from a previously published version (E. McFall and L. Runkel, J. Bacteriol. 154:1508-1512, 1983). The dsdA gene is preceded by a long open reading frame. The dsdA in vivo transcription start sites for the wild type (base pair +1) and for three phenotypically distinct promoter constitutive mutants were determined by the S1 nuclease method. They are identical and are located about 81 base pairs upstream of the translation start site. D-Serine deaminase regulation is normal in rho mutants. Possible mechanisms for dsdA activation are discussed.

  15. Transcriptional profiling of type 1 diabetes genes on chromosome 21 in a rat beta-cell line and human pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Karlsen, A.E.; Hagedorn, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    We recently finemapped a type 1 diabetes (T1D)-linked region on chromosome 21, indicating that one or more T1D-linked genes exist in this region with 33 annotated genes. In the current study, we have taken a novel approach using transcriptional profiling in predicting and prioritizing the most...... likely candidate genes influencing beta-cell function in this region. Two array-based approaches were used, a rat insulinoma cell line (INS-1alphabeta) overexpressing pancreatic duodenum homeobox 1 (pdx-1) and treated with interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) as well as human pancreatic islets stimulated...... with a mixture of cytokines. Several candidate genes with likely functional significance in T1D were identified. Genes showing differential expression in the two approaches were highly similar, supporting the role of these specific gene products in cytokine-induced beta-cell damage. These were genes involved...

  16. Identification of an IMPDH1 mutation in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP10) revealed following comparative microarray analysis of transcripts derived from retinas of wild-type and Rho(-/-) mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennan, Avril; Aherne, Aileen; Palfi, Arpad

    2002-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the transcriptional profiles of approximately 6000 genes in the retinas of wild-type mice with those carrying a targeted disruption of the rhodopsin gene was undertaken by microarray analysis. This revealed a series of transcripts, of which some were derived from genes known...... is not present in healthy, unrelated individuals of European origin. These data provide strong evidence that mutations within the IMPDH1 gene cause adRP, and validate approaches to mutation detection involving comparative analysis of global transcription profiles in normal and degenerating retinal tissues. Other...

  17. Rational design of ligands targeting triplet repeating transcripts that cause RNA dominant disease: application to myotonic muscular dystrophy type 1 and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushechnikov, Alexei; Lee, Melissa M; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Sobczak, Krzysztof; French, Jonathan M; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2009-07-22

    Herein, we describe the design of high affinity ligands that bind expanded rCUG and rCAG repeat RNAs expressed in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. These ligands also inhibit, with nanomolar IC(50) values, the formation of RNA-protein complexes that are implicated in both disorders. The expanded rCUG and rCAG repeats form stable RNA hairpins with regularly repeating internal loops in the stem and have deleterious effects on cell function. The ligands that bind the repeats display a derivative of the bisbenzimidazole Hoechst 33258, which was identified by searching known RNA-ligand interactions for ligands that bind the internal loop displayed in these hairpins. A series of 13 modularly assembled ligands with defined valencies and distances between ligand modules was synthesized to target multiple motifs in these RNAs simultaneously. The most avid binder, a pentamer, binds the rCUG repeat hairpin with a K(d) of 13 nM. When compared to a series of related RNAs, the pentamer binds to rCUG repeats with 4.4- to >200-fold specificity. Furthermore, the affinity of binding to rCUG repeats shows incremental gains with increasing valency, while the background binding to genomic DNA is correspondingly reduced. Then, it was determined whether the modularly assembled ligands inhibit the recognition of RNA repeats by Muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) protein, the expanded-rCUG binding protein whose sequestration leads to splicing defects in DM1. Among several compounds with nanomolar IC(50) values, the most potent inhibitor is the pentamer, which also inhibits the formation of rCAG repeat-MBNL1 complexes. Comparison of the binding data for the designed synthetic ligands and MBNL1 to repeating RNAs shows that the synthetic ligand is 23-fold higher affinity and more specific to DM1 RNAs than MBNL1. Further studies show that the designed ligands are cell permeable to mouse myoblasts. Thus, cell permeable ligands that bind repetitive RNAs have been designed

  18. Rapid detection and differentiation of wild-type and three attenuated lapinized vaccine strains of classical swine fever virus by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chu-Hsiang; Jong, Ming-Hwa; Huang, Yu-Liang; Huang, Tien-Shine; Chao, Parn-Hwa; Lai, Shiow-Suey

    2008-07-01

    A simple one-step reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed based on T-rich insertions in the viral genome for simultaneous detection and differentiation of wild type and vaccine strains of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The CSFV-specific primers were designed to contain the sequences of the T-rich insertion sites that exist uniquely in the 3' nontranslated regions (3' NTR) of the genome of lapinized CSFV vaccine strains. By using a one-step RT-PCR or a nested PCR followed by an agarose gel electrophoresis or a multicapillary electrophoresis, the wild-type and lapinized vaccine strains of CSFV in clinical samples could be detected and accurately distinguished. These assays can be applied to at least 3 attenuated lapinized vaccine strains, lapinized Philippines Coronel (LPC), hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV), and Chinese strain (C strain). The detection limit of the wild-type virus was 6.3 TCID(50) (50% tissue culture infective dose)/ml for RT-PCR and 0.63 TCID(50)/ml for nested PCR. In previous studies, notable T-rich insertions of 12-13 nucleotides (nt) were found in the 3' NTR of the genome of lapinized vaccine strains of CSFV. However, this study discovered that 2 T-rich insertions, 42 and 36 nt in length, are present in the viral genome of lapinized vaccine strains LPC/PRK (primary rabbit kidney) and LPC/TS (Tam-Sui), respectively. These T-rich insertions of 12, 36, and 42 nt length increases the size of PCR fragments, which are favorable genetic markers for rapid detection of and differentiation between wild-type and different lapinized vaccine strains of CSFV.

  19. The transcription of MGAT4A glycosyl transferase is increased in white cells of peripheral blood of Type 2 Diabetes patients

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    Cruz Miguel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human glycosylase IV is involved in GLUT2 transporter regulation in pancreatic β cells. A KO of this gene along with a high fat diet in a mice model has been associated with the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The aims of this study were to measure and compare the MGAT4A mRNA levels in white blood cells (WBC from T2D subjects and healthy subjects (T2NB, and to measure the half-life of the MGAT4A mRNA. Results We studied a sample of 73 individuals, 40 T2D subjects and 33 T2NB subjects. Anthropometrical and biochemical profiles were registered. The MGAT4A mRNA levels in WBC and the transcript half-life in Jurkat T cells were determined by Real-Time PCR. A blood differential cell counting was made for each individual. Cell counting showed T2D subjects exhibited an increased number of WBC compared to T2NB subjects (P = 0.0001. Biochemical parameters such as fasting glucose (P = 0.0001, and triglycerides (P = 0.002 were statistically significant. T2D subjects had 4.2-fold more MGAT4A transcript compared to T2NB subjects (P = 0.002. The MGAT4A mRNA had a half-life of 2.04 h in Jurkat T cells. Conclusion The results of this work suggest that in T2D subjects, high levels of glucose and triglycerides are accompanied by an increase on MGAT4A mRNA levels and WBC count; condition that suggests a pro-inflammatory state due to a chronic metabolic stress.

  20. Transcriptional analysis of the HeT-A retrotransposon in mutant and wild type stocks reveals high sequence variability at Drosophila telomeres and other unusual features

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    Piñeyro David

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomere replication in Drosophila depends on the transposition of a domesticated retroelement, the HeT-A retrotransposon. The sequence of the HeT-A retrotransposon changes rapidly resulting in differentiated subfamilies. This pattern of sequence change contrasts with the essential function with which the HeT-A is entrusted and brings about questions concerning the extent of sequence variability, the telomere contribution of different subfamilies, and whether wild type and mutant Drosophila stocks show different HeT-A scenarios. Results A detailed study on the variability of HeT-A reveals that both the level of variability and the number of subfamilies are higher than previously reported. Comparisons between GIII, a strain with longer telomeres, and its parental strain Oregon-R indicate that both strains have the same set of HeT-A subfamilies. Finally, the presence of a highly conserved splicing pattern only in its antisense transcripts indicates a putative regulatory, functional or structural role for the HeT-A RNA. Interestingly, our results also suggest that most HeT-A copies are actively expressed regardless of which telomere and where in the telomere they are located. Conclusions Our study demonstrates how the HeT-A sequence changes much faster than previously reported resulting in at least nine different subfamilies most of which could actively contribute to telomere extension in Drosophila. Interestingly, the only significant difference observed between Oregon-R and GIII resides in the nature and proportion of the antisense transcripts, suggesting a possible mechanism that would in part explain the longer telomeres of the GIII stock.

  1. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Canine distemper virus modified live vaccine shedding for differentiation from infection with wild-type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Sanchez, Elena; Riley, Matthew C; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains a common cause of infectious disease in dogs, particularly in high-density housing situations such as shelters. Vaccination of all dogs against CDV is recommended at the time of admission to animal shelters and many use a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. From a diagnostic standpoint for dogs with suspected CDV infection, this is problematic because highly sensitive diagnostic real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests are able to detect MLV virus in clinical samples. Real-time PCR can be used to quantitate amount of virus shedding and can differentiate vaccine strains from wild-type strains when shedding is high. However, differentiation by quantitation is not possible in vaccinated animals during acute infection, when shedding is low and could be mistaken for low level vaccine virus shedding. While there are gel-based RT-PCR assays for differentiation of vaccine strains from field strains based on sequence differences, the sensitivity of these assays is unable to match that of the real-time RT-PCR assay currently used in the authors' laboratory. Therefore, a real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that detects CDV MLV vaccine strains and distinguishes them from wild-type strains based on nucleotide sequence differences, rather than the amount of viral RNA in the sample. The test is highly sensitive, with detection of as few as 5 virus genomic copies (corresponding to 10(-1) TCID(50)). Sequencing of the DNA real-time products also allows phylogenetic differentiation of the wild-type strains. This test will aid diagnosis during outbreaks of CDV in recently vaccinated animals.

  2. A vascular endothelial growth factor activating transcription factor increases the endothelial progenitor cells population and induces therapeutic angiogenesis in a type 1 diabetic mouse with hindlimb ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diao Yongpeng; Lian Lishan; Guo Lilong; Chen Houzao; Chen Yuexin; Song Xiaojun; Li Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic angiogenesis has been shown to promote blood vessel growth and improve tissue perfusion.Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in angiogenesis.However,it has side effects that limit its therapeutic utility in vivo,especially at high concentrations.This study aimed to investigate whether an intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered zinc finger VEGF-activating transcription factor modulates the endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and promotes therapeutic angiogenesis in a hindlimb ischemia model with type 1 diabetes.Methods Alloxan (intravenous injection) was used to induce type Ⅰ diabetes in C57BL/6 mice (n=58).The ischemic limb received ZFP-VEGF (125 μg ZFP-VEGF plasmid in 1% poloxamer) or placebo (1% poloxamer) intramuscularly.Mice were sacrificed 3,5,10,or 20 days post-injection.Limb blood flow was monitored using laser Doppler perfusion imaging.VEGF mRNA and protein expression were examined using real-time PCR and ELISA,respectively.Capillary density,proliferation,and apoptosis were examined using immunohistochemistry techniques.Flow cytometry was used to detect the EPC population in bone marrow.Two-tailed Student's paired t test and repeated-measures analysis of variance were used for statistical analysis.Results ZFP-VEGF increased VEGF mRNA and protein expression at 3 and 10 days post-injection,and increased EPC in bone marrow at day 5 and 20 post-injection compared with controls (P<0.05).ZFP-VEGF treatment resulted in better perfusion recovery,a higher capillary density and proliferation,and less apoptosis compared with controls (P<0.05).Conclusions Intramuscular ZFP-VEGF injection promotes therapeutic angiogenesis in an ischemic hindlimb model with type 1 diabetes.This might be due to the effects of VEGF on cell survival and EPC recruitment.

  3. KlAft, the Kluyveromyces lactis Ortholog of Aft1 and Aft2, Mediates Activation of Iron-Responsive Transcription Through the PuCACCC Aft-Type Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde e Silva, Natalia; Gonçalves, Isabelle R.; Lemaire, Marc; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Camadro, Jean Michel; Blaiseau, Pierre Louis

    2009-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in fungi is regulated at the transcriptional level by two different mechanisms. It is mediated by a conserved GATA-type repressor in most fungi except in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where it is controlled by the transcription activators Aft1 and Aft2. These activators are encoded by the paralogous genes AFT1 and AFT2, which result from the whole-genome duplication. Here, we explore regulation of iron homeostasis in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that diverged from S. cerevisiae before this event. We identify an ortholog of AFT1/AFT2, designated KlAFT, whose deletion leads to the inability to grow under iron limitation. We show with quantitative real-time PCR analysis that KlAft activates the transcription of all homologs of the Aft1-target genes involved in the iron transport at the cell surface in response to iron limitation. However, homologs of Aft2-specific target genes encoding intracellular iron transporters are regulated neither by KlAft nor by iron. Both bioinformatic and DNA binding and transcription analyses demonstrate that KlAft activates iron-responsive gene expression through the PuCACCC Aft-type sequence. Thus, K. lactis is the first documented species with a positive iron-transcriptional control mediated by only one copy of the Aft-type regulator. This indicates that this function was acquired before the whole-genome duplication and was then diversified into two regulators in S. cerevisiae. PMID:19581449

  4. Finger Movements in Transcription Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-07

    Dr. Alfred F. Smode Office of Nvel Research Dr. Richard Gibson Training Aalysis & Rvalustion Group Arlington, VA 22217Dr. ~chnd Clson(TANG) Bureau of...Personnel PAD Center 1 Dr. Lloyd Hitchcock San Diego, CA 92152 Human Factors lagineerig 1 Roger W. loinSto, bh.D Division (6022) Code L52 I Technical Dirlctor

  5. Silibinin modulates caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2), an intestine specific tumor suppressor to abrogate colon cancer in experimental rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, N; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    To authenticate the colon cancer preventive potential of silibinin, the efficacy of silibinin needs to be tested by evaluating an organ-specific biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silibinin on the colonic expression of the caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2) an intestine specific tumor suppressor gene and its downstream targets in the colon of rats challenged with 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated as control and silibinin control. Rats under groups 3 and 4 were given DMH (20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) subcutaneously) once a week for 15 consecutive weeks from the 4th week of the experimental period. In addition, group 4 rats alone were treated with silibinin (50 mg/kg b.w. per os) everyday throughout the study period of 32 weeks. Histological investigation and messenger RNA and protein expression studies were performed in the colonic tissues of experimental rats. Findings of the study revealed that DMH administration significantly decreased the expression of CDX2 and Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in the colon of experimental rats. Further the decreased levels of CDX2 protein, colonic mucin content, and increased number of mast cells in the colon of DMH alone-administered rats reflects the onset of carcinogenesis. The pathological changes caused due to CDX2 suppression were attenuated by silibinin supplementation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Arabidopsis ABA Receptor RCAR1/PYL9 Interacts with an R2R3-Type MYB Transcription Factor, AtMYB44

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekuan Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA signaling plays important roles in plant growth, development and adaptation to various stresses. RCAR1/PYL9 has been known as a cytoplasm and nuclear ABA receptor in Arabidopsis. To obtain further insight into the regulatory mechanism of RCAR1/PYL9, a yeast two-hybrid approach was performed to screen for RCAR1/PYL9-interacting proteins and an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor, AtMYB44, was identified. The interaction between RCAR1/PYL9 and AtMYB44 was further confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC assays. Gene expression analysis showed that AtMYB44 negatively regulated the expression of ABA-responsive gene RAB18, in contrast to the opposite role reported for RCAR1/PYL9. Competitive GST pull-down assay and analysis of phosphatase activity demonstrated that AtMYB44 and ABI1 competed for binding to RCAR1/PYL9 and thereby reduced the inhibitory effect of RCAR1/PYL9 on ABI1 phosphatase activity in the presence of ABA in vitro. Furthermore, transient activation assay in protoplasts revealed AtMYB44 probably also decreased RCAR1/PYL9-mediated inhibition of ABI1 activity in vivo. Taken together, our work provides a reasonable molecular mechanism of AtMYB44 in ABA signaling.

  7. Comparative transcript profiling of gene expression between seedless Ponkan mandarin and its seedy wild type during floral organ development by suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wen-Ming; Zhu, An-Dan; Wang, Yao; Chai, Li-Jun; Ge, Xiao-Xia; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2012-08-16

    Seedlessness is an important agronomic trait for citrus, and male sterility (MS) is one main cause of seedless citrus fruit. However, the molecular mechanism of citrus seedlessness remained not well explored. An integrative strategy combining suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library with cDNA microarray was employed to study the underlying mechanism of seedlessness of a Ponkan mandarin seedless mutant (Citrus reticulata Blanco). Screening with custom microarray, a total of 279 differentially expressed clones were identified, and 133 unigenes (43 contigs and 90 singletons) were obtained after sequencing. Gene Ontology (GO) distribution based on biological process suggested that the majority of differential genes are involved in metabolic process and respond to stimulus and regulation of biology process; based on molecular function they function as DNA/RNA binding or have catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity. A gene encoding male sterility-like protein was highly up-regulated in the seedless mutant compared with the wild type, while several transcription factors (TFs) such as AP2/EREBP, MYB, WRKY, NAC and C2C2-GATA zinc-finger domain TFs were down-regulated. Our research highlighted some candidate pathways that participated in the citrus male gametophyte development and could be beneficial for seedless citrus breeding in the future.

  8. Transcription factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko; McNally, James G.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that transcription does not occur homogeneously or diffusely throughout the nucleus, but rather at a number of specialized, discrete sites termed transcription factories. The factories are composed of ~4–30 RNA polymerase molecules, and are associated with many other molecules involved in transcriptional activation and mRNA processing. Some data suggest that the polymerase molecules within a factory remain stationary relative to the transcribed DNA, which is thought to be reeled through the factory site. There is also some evidence that transcription factories could help organize chromatin and nuclear structure, contributing to both the formation of chromatin loops and the clustering of active and co-regulated genes. PMID:23109938

  9. Gene transcripts encoding hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) exhibit tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent responses to hypoxia and hypercapnic hypoxia in the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Kristin M; Follett, Chandler R; Burnett, Louis E; Lema, Sean C

    2012-09-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that under low environmental oxygen regulates the expression of suites of genes involved in metabolism, angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, immune function, and growth. Here, we isolated and sequenced partial cDNAs encoding hif-α and arnt/hif-β from the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, an estuarine species that frequently encounters concurrent hypoxia (low O(2)) and hypercapnia (elevated CO(2)). We then examined the effects of acute exposure (1h) to hypoxia (H) and hypercapnic hypoxia (HH) on relative transcript abundance for hif-α and arnt/hif-β in different tissues (glycolytic muscle, oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas, gill, and gonads) using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our results indicate that hif-α and arnt/hif-β mRNAs were constitutively present under well-aerated normoxia (N) conditions in all tissues examined. Further, H and HH exposure resulted in both tissue-specific and muscle fiber type-specific effects on relative hif-α transcript abundance. In the gill and glycolytic muscle, relative hif-α mRNA levels were significantly lower under H and HH, compared to N, while no change (or a slight increase) was detected in oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas and gonadal tissues. H and HH did not affect relative transcript abundance for arnt/hif-β in any tissue or muscle fiber type. Thus, in crustaceans the HIF response to H and HH appears to involve changes in hif transcript abundance, with variation in hif-α and arnt/hif-β transcriptional dynamics occurring in both a tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 post-transcriptional control protein p28 is required for viral infectivity and persistence in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesic Matthew

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV type 1 and type 2 are related but distinct pathogenic complex retroviruses. HTLV-1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a variety of immune-mediated disorders including the chronic neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In contrast, HTLV-2 displays distinct biological differences and is much less pathogenic, with only a few reported cases of leukemia and neurological disease associated with infection. In addition to the structural and enzymatic proteins, HTLV encodes regulatory (Tax and Rex and accessory proteins. Tax and Rex positively regulate virus production and are critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. Using an over-expression system approach, we recently reported that the accessory gene product of the HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 open reading frame (ORF II (p30 and p28, respectively acts as a negative regulator of both Tax and Rex by binding to and retaining their mRNA in the nucleus, leading to reduced protein expression and virion production. Further characterization revealed that p28 was distinct from p30 in that it was devoid of major transcriptional modulating activity, suggesting potentially divergent functions that may be responsible for the distinct pathobiologies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. Results In this study, we investigated the functional significance of p28 in HTLV-2 infection, proliferation, and immortaliztion of primary T-cells in culture, and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. An HTLV-2 p28 knockout virus (HTLV-2Δp28 was generated and evaluated. Infectivity and immortalization capacity of HTLV-2Δp28 in vitro was indistinguishable from wild type HTLV-2. In contrast, we showed that viral replication was severely attenuated in rabbits inoculated with HTLV-2Δp28 and the mutant virus failed to establish persistent infection. Conclusion We provide direct evidence that p28 is dispensable for

  11. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 post-transcriptional control protein p28 is required for viral infectivity and persistence in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Kesic, Matthew; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2008-05-12

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type 1 and type 2 are related but distinct pathogenic complex retroviruses. HTLV-1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a variety of immune-mediated disorders including the chronic neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In contrast, HTLV-2 displays distinct biological differences and is much less pathogenic, with only a few reported cases of leukemia and neurological disease associated with infection. In addition to the structural and enzymatic proteins, HTLV encodes regulatory (Tax and Rex) and accessory proteins. Tax and Rex positively regulate virus production and are critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. Using an over-expression system approach, we recently reported that the accessory gene product of the HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 open reading frame (ORF) II (p30 and p28, respectively) acts as a negative regulator of both Tax and Rex by binding to and retaining their mRNA in the nucleus, leading to reduced protein expression and virion production. Further characterization revealed that p28 was distinct from p30 in that it was devoid of major transcriptional modulating activity, suggesting potentially divergent functions that may be responsible for the distinct pathobiologies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. In this study, we investigated the functional significance of p28 in HTLV-2 infection, proliferation, and immortaliztion of primary T-cells in culture, and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. An HTLV-2 p28 knockout virus (HTLV-2Deltap28) was generated and evaluated. Infectivity and immortalization capacity of HTLV-2Deltap28 in vitro was indistinguishable from wild type HTLV-2. In contrast, we showed that viral replication was severely attenuated in rabbits inoculated with HTLV-2Deltap28 and the mutant virus failed to establish persistent infection. We provide direct evidence that p28 is dispensable for viral replication and cellular immortalization of

  12. Heart and Neural Crest Derivatives Expressed Transcript 2 (HAND2): a novel biomarker for the identification of atypical hyperplasia and Type I endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell-Gutbrod, Rebecca; Cavallo, Allison; Lee, Nita; Montag, Anthony; Gwin, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Progesterone inhibits the proliferative growth effects of estrogen in the endometrium and prevents the development of endometrial hyperplasia and Type I adenocarcinoma. The exact mechanism of this action is unknown. The progesterone-induced helix-loop-helix transcription factor Heart and Neural Crest Derivatives Expressed 2 (Hand2) was recently shown to suppress production of growth factors in the endometrium. In Hand2 knockout mice, continuous proliferation of the endometrium was observed. In this study, archival paraffin-embedded tissue from 56 hysterectomy specimens was examined by immunohistochemistry for the expression and localization of Hand2, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and Ki-67. Diagnoses included disordered proliferative endometrium, simple and complex hyperplasia with or without atypia, and endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Hand2 expression is localized to endometrial stromal nuclei. In benign endometrium, Hand2 expression was moderate to strong (10/11; 91%), with weak Hand2 expression in only 1 case (1/11; 9%). Similar Hand2 expression patterns were observed in disordered proliferative endometrium and simple hyperplasia without atypia, with moderate to strong expression in 91% of cases (10/11) and weak expression in 9% of cases (1/11). In contrast, simple and complex hyperplasia with atypia exhibited moderate to strong Hand2 expression in 8% of cases (1/12) and a loss of expression or weak expression in 92% of cases (11/12). In endometrioid adenocarcinomas, Hand2 expression was absent in all cases (22/22). Hand2 is expressed in the stroma of benign endometrium, but expression is significantly reduced or lost in atypical hyperplasia and endometrioid carcinoma. Thus, the absence of Hand2 expression may be a useful biomarker for atypical hyperplasia and endometrioid carcinoma.

  13. A diagnostic one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for accurate detection of influenza virus type A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Mohammad Amin; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Influenza A is known as a public health concern worldwide. In this study, a novel one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rtRT-PCR) assay was designed and optimized for the detection of influenza A viruses. Material and methods The primers and probe were designed based on the analysis of 90 matrix nucleotide sequence data of influenza type A subtypes from the GenBank database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The influenza virus A/Tehran/5652/2010 (H1N1 pdm09) was used as a reference. The rtRT-PCR assay was optimized, compared with that of the World Health Organization (WHO), and its analytical sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility were evaluated. In total, 64 nasopharyngeal swabs from patients with influenza-like illness (ILI) and 41 samples without ILI symptoms were tested for the virus, using conventional cell culture, direct immunofluorescence antibody (DFA) methods, and one-step rtRT-PCR with the designed primer set and probe and the WHO’s. Results The optimized assay results were similar to the WHO’s. The optimized assay results were similar to WHO’s, with non-significant differences for 10–103 copies of viral RNA/reaction (p > 0.05). It detected 10 copies of viral RNA/reaction with high reproducibility and no cross reactivity with other respiratory viruses. A specific cytopathic effect was observed in 6/64 (9.37%) of the ILI group using conventional culture and DFA staining methods; however, it was not seen in non-ILI. Also, the results of our assay and the WHO’s were similar to those of viral isolation and DFA staining. Conclusions Given the high specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility of this novel assay, it can serve as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of influenza A viruses in clinical specimens and lab experiments. PMID:27904520

  14. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene (CART1) expression through CRH type 1 receptor (CRHR1) in chicken anterior pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chunheng; Cai, Guoqing; Huang, Long; Deng, Qiuyang; Lin, Dongliang; Cui, Lin; Wang, Yajun; Li, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide(s) is generally viewed as neuropeptide(s) and can control food intake in vertebrates, however, our recent study revealed that CART1 peptide is predominantly expressed in chicken anterior pituitary, suggesting that cCART1 peptide is a novel pituitary hormone in chickens and its expression is likely controlled by hypothalamic factor(s). To test this hypothesis, in this study, we examined the spatial expression of CART1 in chicken anterior pituitary and investigated the effect of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on pituitary cCART1 expression. The results showed that: 1) CART1 is expressed in both caudal and cephalic lobes of chicken anterior pituitary, revealed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), western blot and immuno-histochemical staining; 2) CRH potently stimulates cCART1 mRNA expression in cultured chick pituitary cells, as examined by qPCR, and this effect is blocked by CP154526 (and not K41498), an antagonist specific for chicken CRH type I receptor (cCRHR1), suggesting that cCRHR1 expressed on corticotrophs mediates this action; 3) the stimulatory effect of CRH on pituitary cCART1 expression is inhibited by pharmacological drugs targeting the intracellular AC/cAMP/PKA, PLC/IP3/Ca(2+), and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. This finding, together with the functional coupling of these signaling pathways to cCRHR1 expressed in CHO cells demonstrated by luciferase reporter assay systems, indicates that these intracellular signaling pathways coupled to cCRHR1 can mediate CRH action. Collectively, our present study offers the first substantial evidence that hypothalamic CRH can stimulate pituitary CART1 expression via activation of CRHR1 in a vertebrate species.

  15. Involvement of FOXO transcription factors, TRAIL-FasL/Fas, and sirtuin proteins family in canine coronavirus type II-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Marfè

    Full Text Available n our previous study, we have shown that canine coronavirus type II (CCoV-II activates both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathway in a canine fibrosarcoma cell line (A-72 cells. Herein we investigated the role of Sirtuin and Forkhead box O (FOXO families in this experimental model using Nortern Blot and Western Blot analysis. Our results demonstrated that mitochondrial SIRT3 and SIRT4 protein expression increased from 12 and 24 h post infection (p.i. onwards, respectively, whereas the nuclear SIRT1 expression increased during the first 12 h p.i. followed by a decrease after 36 h p.i., reaching the same level of control at 48 h p.i. Sirtuins interact with/and regulate the activity of FOXO family proteins, and we herein observed that FOXO3A and FOXO1 expression increased significantly and stably from 12 h p.i. onwards. In addition, CCoV-II induces a remarkable increase in the expression of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, while we observed a slight up-regulation of FasL/Fas at 36 p.i. with a decrease of both proteins at the end of infection. Furthermore, we found that virus infection increased both bax translocation into mitochondria and decreased bcl-2 expression in cytosol in a time-dependent manner.These data suggest that FOXO transcription factors mediate pro-apoptotic effects of CCoV-II, in part due to activation of extrinsic apoptosis pathway, while some Sirtuin family members (such as SIRT3 and SIRT4 may be involved in intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Moreover, these results propose that TRAIL is an important mediator of cell death induced by CCoV-II during in vitro infection.

  16. The Varicella-Zoster Virus Immediate-Early 63 protein affects chromatin controlled gene transcription in a cell-type dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bontems Sébastien

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Varicella Zoster Virus Immediate Early 63 protein (IE63 has been shown to be essential for VZV replication, and critical for latency establishment. The activity of the protein as a transcriptional regulator is not fully clear yet. Using transient transfection assays, IE63 has been shown to repress viral and cellular promoters containing typical TATA boxes by interacting with general transcription factors. Results In this paper, IE63 regulation properties on endogenous gene expression were evaluated using an oligonucleotide-based micro-array approach. We found that IE63 modulates the transcription of only a few genes in HeLa cells including genes implicated in transcription or immunity. Furthermore, we showed that this effect is mediated by a modification of RNA POL II binding on the promoters tested and that IE63 phosphorylation was essential for these effects. In MeWo cells, the number of genes whose transcription was modified by IE63 was somewhat higher, including genes implicated in signal transduction, transcription, immunity, and heat-shock signalling. While IE63 did not modify the basal expression of several NF-κB dependent genes such as IL-8, ICAM-1, and IκBα, it modulates transcription of these genes upon TNFα induction. This effect was obviously correlated with the amount of p65 binding to the promoter of these genes and with histone H3 acetylation and HDAC-3 removal. Conclusion While IE63 only affected transcription of a small number of cellular genes, it interfered with the TNF-inducibility of several NF-κB dependent genes by the accelerated resynthesis of the inhibitor IκBα.

  17. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    . Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t......RNA primer for reverse transcription may have a major influence on transcriptional silencing. Alterations of these elements of the vector backbone as well as the use of internal promoter elements from housekeeping genes may contribute to reduce transcriptional silencing. The use of cell culture and animal...

  18. Positive- and negative-acting regulatory elements contribute to the tissue-specific expression of INNER NO OUTER, a YABBY-type transcription factor gene in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Marissa K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The INNER NO OUTER (INO gene, which encodes a YABBY-type transcription factor, specifies and promotes the growth of the outer integument of the ovule in Arabidopsis. INO expression is limited to the abaxial cell layer of the developing outer integument of the ovule and is regulated by multiple regions of the INO promoter, including POS9, a positive element that when present in quadruplicate can produce low-level expression in the normal INO pattern. Results Significant redundancy in activity between different regions of the INO promoter is demonstrated. For specific regulatory elements, multimerization or the addition of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S general enhancer was able to activate expression of reporter gene constructs that were otherwise incapable of expression on their own. A new promoter element, POS6, is defined and is shown to include sufficient positive regulatory information to reproduce the endogenous pattern of expression in ovules, but other promoter regions are necessary to fully suppress expression outside of ovules. The full-length INO promoter, but not any of the INO promoter deletions tested, is able to act as an enhancer-blocking insulator to prevent the ectopic activation of expression by the 35S enhancer. Sequence conservation between the promoter regions of Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa aligns closely with the functional definition of the POS6 and POS9 regions, and with a defined INO minimal promoter. The B. oleracea INO promoter is sufficient to promote a similar pattern and level of reporter gene expression in Arabidopsis to that observed for the Arabidopsis promoter. Conclusions At least two independent regions of the INO promoter contain sufficient regulatory information to direct the specific pattern but not the level of INO gene expression. These regulatory regions act in a partially redundant manner to promote the expression in a specific pattern in the ovule and

  19. Transcription elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity. PMID:25764114

  20. Selective activation of tumor growth-promoting Ca2+ channel MS4A12 in colon cancer by caudal type homeobox transcription factor CDX2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Christoph

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colon cancer-associated MS4A12 is a novel colon-specific component of store-operated Ca2+ (SOC entry sensitizing cells for epidermal growth factor (EGF-mediated effects on proliferation and chemotaxis. In the present study, we investigated regulation of the MS4A12 promoter to understand the mechanisms responsible for strict transcriptional restriction of this gene to the colonic epithelial cell lineage. DNA-binding assays and luciferase reporter assays showed that MS4A12 promoter activity is governed by a single CDX homeobox transcription factor binding element. RNA interference (RNAi-mediated silencing of intestine-specific transcription factors CDX1 and CDX2 and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP in LoVo and SW48 colon cancer cells revealed that MS4A12 transcript and protein expression is essentially dependent on the presence of endogenous CDX2. In summary, our findings provide a rationale for colon-specific expression of MS4A12. Moreover, this is the first report establishing CDX2 as transactivator of tumor growth-promoting gene expression in colon cancer, adding to untangle the complex and conflicting biological functions of CDX2 in colon cancer and supporting MS4A12 as important factor for normal colonic development as well as for the biology and treatment of colon cancer.

  1. Biosynthesis of the antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides nunamycin and nunapeptin by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain In5 is regulated by the LuxR-type transcriptional regulator NunF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2017-01-01

    spectrometry (LC-HRMS) showed that CLP biosynthesis is regulated by nunF. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of the NRPS genes catalyzing CLP production is strongly reduced when nunF is mutated indicating that nunF is part of the nun-nup regulon. Swarming and biofilm formation...

  2. Increase in proto-oncogene mRNA transcript levels in bovine lymphoid cells infected with a cytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2008-08-01

    Infection of susceptible animals with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) can result in an array of disease symptoms that are dependent in part on the strain of infecting virus and the physiological status of the host. BVDV are lymphotrophic and exist as two biotypes. Cytopathic BVDV kill cells outright while noncytopathic strains can readily establish persistent infections. The molecular mechanisms behind these different affects are unknown. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a powerful method for global gene expression analysis, was employed to examine gene expression changes in BVDV-infected BL3 cells, a bovine B-cell lymphosarcoma cell line. SAGE libraries were constructed from mRNA derived from BL3 cells that were noninfected or infected with the cytopathic BVDV2 strain 296c. Annotation of the SAGE data showed the expression of many genes that are characteristic of B cells and integral to their function. Comparison of the SAGE databases also revealed a number of genes that were differentially expressed. Of particular interest was the increased numbers of transcripts encoding proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, junB, junD) in 296c-infected cells, all of which are constituents of the AP-1 transcriptional activation complex. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed these results and indicated that the actual increases were larger than that predicted by SAGE. In contrast, there was no corresponding increase in protein levels, but instead a significant decrease of c-jun and junB protein levels in the infected BL3 cells was observed. Rather than an increase in transcription of these genes, it appeared that these proto-oncogenes transcripts accumulated in the BVDV2-infected cells.

  3. Whole mitochondrial genome sequencing and transcriptional analysis to uncover an RT102-type cytoplasmic male sterility-associated candidate Gene Derived from Oryza rufipogon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Masayuki; Kazama, Tomohiko; Murata, Hayato; Motomura, Keiji; Toriyama, Kinya

    2013-09-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a maternally inherited trait in which plants fail to produce functional pollen and is associated with the expression of a novel open reading frame (orf) gene encoded by the mitochondrial genome. An RT102A CMS line and an RT102C fertility restorer line were obtained by successive backcrossing between Oryza rufipogon W1125 and O. sativa Taichung 65. Using next-generation pyrosequencing, we determined whole-genome sequences of the mitochondria in RT102-CMS cytoplasm. To identify candidates for the CMS-associated gene in RT102 mitochondria, we screened the mitochondrial genome for the presence of specific orf genes that were chimeric or whose products carried predicted transmembrane domains. One of these orf genes, orf352, which showed different transcript sizes depending on whether the restorer of fertility (Rf) gene was present or not, was identified. The orf352 gene was co-transcribed with the ribosomal protein gene rpl5, and the 2.8 kb rpl5-orf352 transcripts were processed into 2.6 kb transcripts with a cleavage at the inside of the orf352 coding region in the presence of the Rf gene. The orf352 gene is an excellent candidate for the CMS-associated gene for RT102-CMS.

  4. Molecular mechanism of Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6: glutamine repeat disorder, channelopathy or transcriptional dysregulation. The multifaceted aspects of a single mutation.

    OpenAIRE

    Paola eGiunti; Elide eMantuano; Marina eFrontali; Liana eVeneziano

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by late onset, slowly progressive, mostly pure cerebellar ataxia. It is one of three allelic disorders associated to CACNA1A gene, coding for the Alpha1 A subunit of P/Q type calcium channel Cav2.1 expressed in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum. The other two disorders are Episodic Ataxia type 2, and Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 1. These disorders show distinct phenotypes that often ove...

  5. Overexpression of the soybean GmERF3 gene, an AP2/ERF type transcription factor for increased tolerances to salt, drought, and diseases in transgenic tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Chen, Ming; Li, Liancheng; Xu, Zhaoshi; Chen, Xueping; Guo, Jiaming; Ma, Youzhi

    2009-01-01

    A new member of the AP2/ERF transcription factor family, GmERF3, was isolated from soybean. Sequence analysis showed that GmERF3 contained an AP2/ERF domain of 58 amino acids and two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) domains. It belonged to a group IV protein in the ERF (ethylene response factor) subfamily as typified by a conserved N-terminal motif [MCGGAI(I/L)]. Expression of GmERF3 was induced by treatments with high salinity, drought, abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA), jas...

  6. In vivo D-serine deaminase transcription start sites in wild-type Escherichia coli and in dsdA promoter mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Bornstein-Forst, S M; McFall, E; Palchaudhuri, S

    1987-01-01

    The D-serine deaminase structural (dsdA) and regulatory (dsdC) genes are transcribed with opposite polarity from an intergenic region comprising more than 600 base pairs. The order of genes in the dsd region is supN-dsdA-dsdC-aroC---his. The DNA sequence of the intergenic region has been slightly revised from a previously published version (E. McFall and L. Runkel, J. Bacteriol. 154:1508-1512, 1983). The dsdA gene is preceded by a long open reading frame. The dsdA in vivo transcription start ...

  7. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousuke Imamura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (σ factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial σ factors (and RNAP core subunits are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the σ factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation.

  8. BarR, an Lrp-type transcription factor in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, regulates an aminotransferase gene in a β-alanine responsive manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Orell, Alvaro; Maes, Dominique; van Wolferen, Marleen; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Bernander, Rolf; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Charlier, Daniel; Peeters, Eveline

    2014-05-01

    In archaea, nothing is known about the β-alanine degradation pathway or its regulation. In this work, we identify and characterize BarR, a novel Lrp-like transcription factor and the first one that has a non-proteinogenic amino acid ligand. BarR is conserved in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus tokodaii and is located in a divergent operon with a gene predicted to encode β-alanine aminotransferase. Deletion of barR resulted in a reduced exponential growth rate in the presence of β-alanine. Furthermore, qRT-PCR and promoter activity assays demonstrated that BarR activates the expression of the adjacent aminotransferase gene, but only upon β-alanine supplementation. In contrast, auto-activation proved to be β-alanine independent. Heterologously produced BarR is an octamer in solution and forms a single complex by interacting with multiple sites in the 170 bp long intergenic region separating the divergently transcribed genes. In vitro, DNA binding is specifically responsive to β-alanine and site-mutant analyses indicated that β-alanine directly interacts with the ligand-binding pocket. Altogether, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence that in archaea, Lrp-like transcription factors have physiological roles that go beyond the regulation of α-amino acid metabolism.

  9. A novel Rieske-type protein derived from an apoptosis-inducing factor-like (AIFL) transcript with a retained intron 4 induces change in mitochondrial morphology and growth arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Yasuhiko, E-mail: 97318@ib.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Furuyama, Isao; Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi, E-mail: mitani@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} A novel major transcript, AIFL-I4, is found. {yields} Nuclear localization of AIFL-I4 induces mitochondrial morphology change and suppression of cell proliferation. {yields} AIFL-I4 mutant with a lesion in [2Fe-2S] cluster binding site does not induce these phenotypes. {yields} [2Fe-2S] cluster binding site is essential for these phenotypes. -- Abstract: Apoptosis-inducing factor-like (AIFL) protein contains a Rieske domain and pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductase (Pyr{sub r}edox) domain that shows 35% homology to that of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) protein. We identified a novel major transcript of the medaka (Oryzias latipes) AIFL gene that retained intron 4 (AIFL-I4) in embryos and tissues from adult fish. The product of this transcript, AIFL-I4 protein, lacked the Pyr{sub r}edox domain because of a nonsense codon in intron 4. Both AIFL-I4 and full-length AIFL (fAIFL) transcripts were highly expressed in the brain and late embryos, and relative fAIFL and AIFL-I4 expression levels differed among tissues. Transient expression of AIFL-I4 and fAIFL tagged with GFP showed that AIFL-I4 localized in the nucleus, while fAIFL localized throughout the cytoplasm. We also found that overexpression of AIFL-I4 induced a change in mitochondrial morphology and suppression of cell proliferation. AIFL-I4 mutant with a lesion in [2Fe-2S] cluster binding site of the Rieske domain did not induce these phenotypes. This report is the first to demonstrate nuclear localization of a Rieske-type protein translated from the AIFL gene. Our data suggested that the [2Fe-2S] cluster binding site was essential for the nuclear localization and involved in mitochondrial morphology and suppression of cell proliferation.

  10. Contribution of the C-terminal tri-lysine regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase for efficient reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowke Keith R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to mediating the integration process, HIV-1 integrase (IN has also been implicated in different steps during viral life cycle including reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import. Although the karyophilic property of HIV-1 IN has been well demonstrated using a variety of experimental approaches, the definition of domain(s and/or motif(s within the protein that mediate viral DNA nuclear import and its mechanism are still disputed and controversial. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses to investigate the contribution of different regions in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN to protein nuclear localization as well as their effects on virus infection. Results Our analysis showed that replacing lysine residues in two highly conserved tri-lysine regions, which are located within previously described Region C (235WKGPAKLLWKGEGAVV and sequence Q (211KELQKQITK in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN, impaired protein nuclear accumulation, while mutations for RK263,4 had no significant effect. Analysis of their effects on viral infection in a VSV-G pseudotyped RT/IN trans-complemented HIV-1 single cycle replication system revealed that all three C-terminal mutant viruses (KK215,9AA, KK240,4AE and RK263,4AA exhibited more severe defect of induction of β-Gal positive cells and luciferase activity than an IN class 1 mutant D64E in HeLa-CD4-CCR5-β-Gal cells, and in dividing as well as non-dividing C8166 T cells, suggesting that some viral defects are occurring prior to viral integration. Furthermore, by analyzing viral DNA synthesis and the nucleus-associated viral DNA level, the results clearly showed that, although all three C-terminal mutants inhibited viral reverse transcription to different extents, the KK240,4AE mutant exhibited most profound effect on this step, whereas KK215,9AA significantly impaired viral DNA nuclear import. In addition, our analysis could not detect viral DNA integration in each C

  11. Improvement and optimization of a multiplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection and typing of Vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Kate; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Velazques-Salinas, Lauro; Clavijo, Alfonso

    2010-05-01

    An improvement to a previously reported real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) assay for the detection of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is described. Results indicate that the new assay is capable of detecting a panel of genetically representative strains of VSV present in North, Central, and South America. The assay is specific for VSV and allows for simultaneous differentiation between Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus and Vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus. This real-time RT-PCR is able to detect current circulating strains of VSV and can be used for rapid diagnosis of VSV and differentiation of VSV from other vesicular diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease.

  12. Probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection and typing of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Li, Wansi May; Wernike, Kerstin; Marshall, Frank; Czub, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has tremendous impact on the pork industry in North America. The molecular diagnosis of infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV) is hampered by its considerable strain diversity. In this study, 43 previously published or newly developed primers for probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were evaluated on their sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and repeatability, using a diverse panel of 36 PRRSV strains as well as other arteriviruses and unrelated porcine viruses. Three primer pairs had excellent diagnostic and analytical sensitivity on par with a probe-based reference assay, absolute specificity to virus genotype and species, as well as over 95% reproducibility and repeatability across a wide dynamic range.

  13. Interferon γ-inducible protein (IFI) 16 transcriptionally regulates type i interferons and other interferon-stimulated genes and controls the interferon response to both DNA and RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Sharma, Shruti; Atianand, Maninjay; Jensen, Søren B; Carpenter, Susan; Knipe, David M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2014-08-22

    The interferon γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) has recently been linked to the detection of nuclear and cytosolic DNA during infection with herpes simplex virus-1 and HIV. IFI16 binds dsDNA via HIN200 domains and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), leading to TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator)-binding kinase-1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and transcription of type I interferons (IFNs) and related genes. To better understand the role of IFI16 in coordinating type I IFN gene regulation, we generated cell lines with stable knockdown of IFI16 and examined responses to DNA and RNA viruses as well as cyclic dinucleotides. As expected, stable knockdown of IFI16 led to a severely attenuated type I IFN response to DNA ligands and viruses. In contrast, expression of the NF-κB-regulated cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β was unaffected in IFI16 knockdown cells, suggesting that the role of IFI16 in sensing these triggers was unique to the type I IFN pathway. Surprisingly, we also found that knockdown of IFI16 led to a severe attenuation of IFN-α and the IFN-stimulated gene retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in response to cyclic GMP-AMP, a second messenger produced by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as well as RNA ligands and viruses. Analysis of IFI16 knockdown cells revealed compromised occupancy of RNA polymerase II on the IFN-α promoter in these cells, suggesting that transcription of IFN-stimulated genes is dependent on IFI16. These results indicate a broader role for IFI16 in the regulation of the type I IFN response to RNA and DNA viruses in antiviral immunity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Heterogeneity in ess transcriptional organization and variable contribution of the Ess/Type VII protein secretion system to virulence across closely related Staphylocccus aureus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneuper, Holger; Cao, Zhen Ping; Twomey, Kate B; Zoltner, Martin; Jäger, Franziska; Cargill, James S; Chalmers, James; van der Kooi - Pol, Magda; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Ryan, Robert P; Hunter, William N; Palmer, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    The Type VII protein secretion system, found in Gram-positive bacteria, secretes small proteins, containing a conserved W-x-G amino acid sequence motif, to the growth medium. Staphylococcus aureus has a conserved Type VII secretion system, termed Ess, which is dispensable for laboratory growth but r

  15. Heterogeneity in ess transcriptional organization and variable contribution of the Ess/Type VII protein secretion system to virulence across closely related Staphylocccus aureus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneuper, Holger; Cao, Zhen Ping; Twomey, Kate B; Zoltner, Martin; Jäger, Franziska; Cargill, James S; Chalmers, James; van der Kooi - Pol, Magda; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Ryan, Robert P; Hunter, William N; Palmer, Tracy

    The Type VII protein secretion system, found in Gram-positive bacteria, secretes small proteins, containing a conserved W-x-G amino acid sequence motif, to the growth medium. Staphylococcus aureus has a conserved Type VII secretion system, termed Ess, which is dispensable for laboratory growth but

  16. Stomagenesis versus myogenesis: Parallels in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of transcription factor mediated specialized cell-type differentiation in plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putarjunan, Aarthi; Torii, Keiko U

    2016-05-01

    Although the last common unicellular ancestor of plants and animals diverged several billion years ago, and while having developed unique developmental programs that facilitate differentiation and proliferation specific to plant and animal systems, there still exists a high degree of conservation in the logic regulating these developmental processes within these two seemingly diverse kingdoms. Stomatal differentiation in plants involves a series of orchestrated cell division events mediated by a family of closely related bHLH transcription factors (TFs) to create a pair of mature guard cells. These TFs are in turn regulated by a number of upstream signaling components that ultimately function to achieve lineage specific differentiation and organized tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. The logic involved in the specification of the myogenic differentiation program in animals is intriguingly similar to stomatal differentiation in plants: Closely-related myogenic bHLHs, known as MRFs (Myogenic Regulatory Factors) provide lineage specificity essential for cell-fate determination. These MRFs, similar to the bHLHs in plants, are regulated by several upstream signaling cascades that succinctly regulate each differentiation step, leading to the production of mature muscle fibers. This review aims at providing a perspective on the emerging parallels in the logic employed by key bHLH transcription factors and their upstream signaling components that function to precisely regulate key cell-state transition events in the stomatal as well as myogenic cell lineages. © 2016 The Authors. Development, Growth & Differentiation published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  17. Identification of new splice sites used for generation of rev transcripts in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C primary isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Delgado

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 primary transcript undergoes a complex splicing process by which more than 40 different spliced RNAs are generated. One of the factors contributing to HIV-1 splicing complexity is the multiplicity of 3' splice sites (3'ss used for generation of rev RNAs, with two 3'ss, A4a and A4b, being most commonly used, a third site, A4c, used less frequently, and two additional sites, A4d and A4e, reported in only two and one isolates, respectively. HIV-1 splicing has been analyzed mostly in subtype B isolates, and data on other group M clades are lacking. Here we examine splice site usage in three primary isolates of subtype C, the most prevalent clade in the HIV-1 pandemic, by using an in vitro infection assay of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral spliced RNAs were identified by RT-PCR amplification using a fluorescently-labeled primer and software analyses and by cloning and sequencing the amplified products. The results revealed that splice site usage for generation of rev transcripts in subtype C differs from that reported for subtype B, with most rev RNAs using two previously unreported 3'ss, one located 7 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4a, designated A4f, preferentially used by two isolates, and another located 14 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4c, designated A4g, preferentially used by the third isolate. A new 5' splice site, designated D2a, was also identified in one virus. Usage of the newly identified splice sites is consistent with sequence features commonly found in subtype C viruses. These results show that splice site usage may differ between HIV-1 subtypes.

  18. Identification of new splice sites used for generation of rev transcripts in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C primary isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Elena; Carrera, Cristina; Nebreda, Paloma; Fernández-García, Aurora; Pinilla, Milagros; García, Valentina; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Thomson, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 primary transcript undergoes a complex splicing process by which more than 40 different spliced RNAs are generated. One of the factors contributing to HIV-1 splicing complexity is the multiplicity of 3' splice sites (3'ss) used for generation of rev RNAs, with two 3'ss, A4a and A4b, being most commonly used, a third site, A4c, used less frequently, and two additional sites, A4d and A4e, reported in only two and one isolates, respectively. HIV-1 splicing has been analyzed mostly in subtype B isolates, and data on other group M clades are lacking. Here we examine splice site usage in three primary isolates of subtype C, the most prevalent clade in the HIV-1 pandemic, by using an in vitro infection assay of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral spliced RNAs were identified by RT-PCR amplification using a fluorescently-labeled primer and software analyses and by cloning and sequencing the amplified products. The results revealed that splice site usage for generation of rev transcripts in subtype C differs from that reported for subtype B, with most rev RNAs using two previously unreported 3'ss, one located 7 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4a, designated A4f, preferentially used by two isolates, and another located 14 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4c, designated A4g, preferentially used by the third isolate. A new 5' splice site, designated D2a, was also identified in one virus. Usage of the newly identified splice sites is consistent with sequence features commonly found in subtype C viruses. These results show that splice site usage may differ between HIV-1 subtypes.

  19. Transcription factories: genetic programming in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Lucas Brandon; Fraser, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Among the most intensively studied systems in molecular biology is the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus, which expresses genes in a regulated manner across hundreds of different cell types. Several studies over the past few years have added weight to the concept that transcription takes place within discrete 'transcription factories' assembled inside the cell nucleus. These studies apply innovative technical approaches to gain insights into the molecular constituents, dynamical behaviour and organizational regulators of transcription factories, providing exciting insights into the spatial dimension of transcriptional control.

  20. Evidence that levels of the dimeric cellular transcription factor CP2 play little role in the activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in vivo or following superinfection with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, F; Swendeman, S L; Popik, W; Pitha, P M; Sheffery, M

    1994-08-19

    The dimeric transcription factor CP2 binds a sequence element found near the transcription start site of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) long terminal repeat. Several groups have suggested that cellular factors binding this element might play a role in modulating HIV-1 promoter activity in vivo. For example, induction of latent HIV-1 gene expression in response to superinfection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or cytomegalovirus is thought to be mediated, in part, by factors binding the CP2 site. In this report we began to examine directly the relationship between CP2 and expression of the HIV-1 promoter. First, we tested what effect HSV-1 infection of T cells had on the cellular levels of CP2. The results showed that HSV-1 infection led to a significant reduction in the level of CP2 DNA binding activity and protein within 20 h. Next, we tested the effect of overexpressing either the wild-type factor or a dominant negative variant of CP2 on HIV-1 promoter activity in vivo. The results showed that CP2 had little effect or slightly repressed HIV-1 promoter activity in vivo. In addition, these expression constructs had little effect on the induction of HIV-1 promoter activity elicited by HSV-1 infection.

  1. The NAC-type transcription factor OsNAC2 regulates ABA-dependent genes and abiotic stress tolerance in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiabin; Lv, Bo; Luo, Liqiong; He, Jianmei; Mao, Chanjuan; Xi, Dandan; Ming, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Plants can perceive environmental changes and respond to external stressors. Here, we show that OsNAC2, a member of the NAC transcription factor family, was strongly induced by ABA and osmotic stressors such as drought and high salt. With reduced yields under drought conditions at the flowering stage, OsNAC2 overexpression lines had lower resistance to high salt and drought conditions. RNAi plants showed enhanced tolerance to high salinity and drought stress at both the vegetative and flowering stages. Furthermore, RNAi plants had improved yields after drought stress. A microarray assay indicated that many ABA-dependent stress-related genes were down-regulated in OsNAC2 overexpression lines. We further confirmed that OsNAC2 directly binds the promoters of LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT 3 (OsLEA3) and Stress-Activated Protein Kinases 1 (OsSAPK1), two marker genes in the abiotic stress and ABA response pathways, respectively. Our results suggest that in rice OsNAC2 regulates both abiotic stress responses and ABA-mediated responses, and acts at the junction between the ABA and abiotic stress pathways. PMID:28074873

  2. A gonococcal homologue of meningococcal γ-glutamyl transpeptidase gene is a new type of bacterial pseudogene that is transcriptionally active but phenotypically silent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Haruo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been speculated that the γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (ggt gene is present only in Neisseria meningitidis and not among related species such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria lactamica, because N. meningitidis is the only bacterium with GGT activity. However, nucleotide sequences highly homologous to the meningococcal ggt gene were found in the genomes of N. gonorrhoeae isolates. Results The gonococcal homologue (ggt gonococcal homologue; ggh was analyzed. The nucleotide sequence of the ggh gene was approximately 95 % identical to that of the meningococcal ggt gene. An open reading frame in the ggh gene was disrupted by an ochre mutation and frameshift mutations induced by a 7-base deletion, but the amino acid sequences deduced from the artificially corrected ggh nucleotide sequences were approximately 97 % identical to that of the meningococcal ggt gene. The analyses of the sequences flanking the ggt and ggh genes revealed that both genes were localized in a common DNA region containing the fbp-ggt (or ggh-glyA-opcA-dedA-abcZ gene cluster. The expression of the ggh RNA could be detected by dot blot, RT-PCR and primer extension analyses. Moreover, the truncated form of ggh-translational product was also found in some of the gonococcal isolates. Conclusion This study has shown that the gonococcal ggh gene is a pseudogene of the meningococcal ggt gene, which can also be designated as Ψggt. The gonococcal ggh (Ψggt gene is the first identified bacterial pseudogene that is transcriptionally active but phenotypically silent.

  3. Identification and cloning of the second type transglutaminase from Litopenaeus vannamei, and its transcription following pathogen infection and in relation to the haemolymph coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Maw-Sheng; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Cheng, Winton

    2013-11-01

    Complementary (c)DNA encoding transglutaminaseII (TGII) messenger (m)RNA of white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, was cloned from haemocytes by a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) using oligonucleotide primers based on the TG sequence of the horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus (accession no.: BAA02134), tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon (AAV49005; AAO33455), kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus (BAD36808) and Pacifastacus leniusculus (AAK69205) TG. The 2405-bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2292 bp, a 31-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and an 82-bp 3'-UTR containing a poly A tail. The molecular mass of the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence (764 aa) was 85.9 kDa with an estimated pI of 5.32. The L. vannamei TGII (abbreviated LvTGII) contains a typical TG-like homologue, two putative integrin binding motif (RGD and KGD), and five calcium-binding sites; three catalytic triad is present as in arthropod TG. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis revealed that shrimp TG can be separated into two groups, STGI and STGII, and LvTGII is more closely related to STGII than to STGI. LvTGII mRNA was detected in all tested tissues of L. vannamei, and was highly expressed in haemocytes. The haemocytes of L. vannamei injected with Vibrio alginolyticus showed a significant increase of LvTGI and LvTGII mRNA expression at 6 h followed by a notable decrease at 24 h in LvTGI and a continually increase in LvTGII indicating a complementary effect, which implied that both LvTGs involved in the immune response of shrimp, and LvTGII was more important in the later defense response. The gene silencing of LvTGII in shrimp significantly decreased LvTGII expression and TG activity of haemocytes, and significantly increased clotting time of haemolymph, suggests that the cloned LvTGII is a clotting enzyme involved in haemolymph coagulation of L. vannamei. In conclusion, the cloned LvTGII is a clotting enzyme

  4. Heterogeneity in ess transcriptional organization and variable contribution of the Ess/Type VII protein secretion system to virulence across closely related Staphylocccus aureus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneuper, Holger; Cao, Zhen Ping; Twomey, Kate B; Zoltner, Martin; Jäger, Franziska; Cargill, James S; Chalmers, James; van der Kooi-Pol, Magdalena M; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Ryan, Robert P; Hunter, William N; Palmer, Tracy

    2014-09-01

    The Type VII protein secretion system, found in Gram-positive bacteria, secretes small proteins, containing a conserved W-x-G amino acid sequence motif, to the growth medium. Staphylococcus aureus has a conserved Type VII secretion system, termed Ess, which is dispensable for laboratory growth but required for virulence. In this study we show that there are unexpected differences in the organization of the ess gene cluster between closely related strains of S. aureus. We further show that in laboratory growth medium different strains of S. aureus secrete the EsxA and EsxC substrate proteins at different growth points, and that the Ess system in strain Newman is inactive under these conditions. Systematic deletion analysis in S. aureus RN6390 is consistent with the EsaA, EsaB, EssA, EssB, EssC and EsxA proteins comprising core components of the secretion machinery in this strain. Finally we demonstrate that the Ess secretion machinery of two S. aureus strains, RN6390 and COL, is important for nasal colonization and virulence in the murine lung pneumonia model. Surprisingly, however, the secretion system plays no role in the virulence of strain SA113 under the same conditions.

  5. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer-associated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2013-12-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review, we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent enhancer RNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression.

  6. Influence of phenolic acids on indole acetic acid production and on the type III secretion system gene transcription in food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myszka, Kamila; Schmidt, Marcin T; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka K; Leja, Katarzyna; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of these investigations was to evaluate the reduction capability of phenolic acids (ferulic, chlorogenic, gallic, and p-coumaric acids) on indole acetic acid synthesis by food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05. Specific genetic primer for the type III secretion system (TTSS) in P. fluorescens KM05 was designed and the influence of phenolic acids on its expression was investigated. In the work the ferulic and chlorogenic acids at the concentration of 0.02 and 0.04 μg/ml affected on bacterial growth pattern and the signal molecules production. The phenolic acids, that were appreciable effective against P. fluorescens KM05 indole acetic acid production, significantly suppressed TTSS gene.

  7. The fission yeast ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UbcP3, Ubc15, and Rhp6 affect transcriptional silencing of the mating-type region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Inga Sig; Nielsen, Olaf; Murray, Johanne M

    2002-01-01

    in a screen for high-copy-number disruptors of silencing. Expression of cDNAs encoding the putative E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UbcP3, Ubc15 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme), or Rhp6 (Rad homolog pombe) from the strong nmt1 promoter derepressed the silent mating-type loci mat2 and mat3 and reporter genes...... was not suppressed by a mutation in the 26S proteasome, suggesting that loss of silencing is not due to an increased degradation of silencing factors but rather to the posttranslational modification of proteins by ubiquitination. We discuss the implications of these results for the possible modes of action of UbcP3...

  8. Exposure to human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus in hepatic and stellate cell lines reveals cooperative profibrotic transcriptional activation between viruses and cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Shadi; Holmes, Jacinta A; Jindal, Rohit; Bale, Shyam S; Brisac, Cynthia; Alatrakchi, Nadia; Lidofsky, Anna; Kruger, Annie J; Fusco, Dahlene N; Luther, Jay; Schaefer, Esperance A; Lin, Wenyu; Yarmush, Martin L; Chung, Raymond T

    2016-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection accelerates progressive liver fibrosis; however, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. HCV and HIV independently induce profibrogenic markers transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ1) (mediated by reactive oxygen species [ROS]) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) in hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells in monoculture; however, they do not account for cellular crosstalk that naturally occurs. We created an in vitro coculture model and investigated the contributions of HIV and HCV to hepatic fibrogenesis. Green fluorescent protein reporter cell lines driven by functional ROS (antioxidant response elements), NFκB, and mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (SMAD3) promoters were created in Huh7.5.1 and LX2 cells, using a transwell to generate cocultures. Reporter cell lines were exposed to HIV, HCV, or HIV/HCV. Activation of the 3 pathways was measured and compared according to infection status. Extracellular matrix products (collagen type 1 alpha 1 (CoL1A1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1)) were also measured. Both HCV and HIV independently activated TGFβ1 signaling through ROS (antioxidant response elements), NFκB, and SMAD3 in both cell lines in coculture. Activation of these profibrotic pathways was additive following HIV/HCV coexposure. This was confirmed when examining CoL1A1 and TIMP1, where messenger RNA and protein levels were significantly higher in LX2 cells in coculture following HIV/HCV coexposure compared with either virus alone. In addition, expression of these profibrotic genes was significantly higher in the coculture model compared to either cell type in monoculture, suggesting an interaction and feedback mechanism between Huh7.5.1 and LX2 cells.

  9. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  10. The development of a GeXP-based multiplex reverse transcription-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of sixteen human respiratory virus types/subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing standard non-molecular diagnostic methods such as viral culture and immunofluorescent (DFA are time-consuming, labor intensive or limited sensitivity. Several multiplex molecular assays are costly. Therefore, there is a need for the development of a rapid and sensitive diagnosis of respiratory viral pathogens. Methods A GeXP-based multiplex RT-PCR assay (GeXP assay was developed to detect simultaneously sixteen different respiratory virus types/subtypes. Seventeen sets of chimeric primers were used to initiate the RT-PCR, and one pair of universal primers was used for the subsequent cycles of the RT-PCR. The specificity of the GeXP assay was examined with positive controls for each virus type/subtype. The sensitivity was evaluated by performing the assay on serial ten-fold dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA of all RNA viruses and the plasmids containing the Adv and HBoV target sequence. GeXP assay was further evaluated using 126 clinical specimens and compared with Luminex xTAG RVP Fast assay. Results The GeXP assay achieved a sensitivity of 20–200 copies for a single virus and 1000 copies when all of the 16 pre-mixed viral targets were present. Analyses of 126 clinical specimens using the GeXP assay demonstrated that GeXP assay and the RVP Fast assay were in complete agreement for 109/126 (88.51% of the specimens. GeXP assay was more sensitive than the RVP Fast assay for the detection of HRV and PIV3, and slightly less sensitive for the detection of HMPV, Adv, RSVB and HBoV. The whole process of the GeXP assay for the detection of 12 samples was completed within 2.5 hours. Conclusions In conclusion, the GeXP assay is a rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, specific and high throughput method for the detection of respiratory virus infections.

  11. Transforming properties of Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in vitro and their transcriptional activity in feline squamous cell carcinoma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamura, Gennaro; Corteggio, Annunziata; Pacini, Laura; Conte, Andrea; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Tommasino, Massimo; Accardi, Rosita; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 (FcaPV2) DNA is found in feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs); however, its biological properties are still uncharacterized. In this study, we successfully expressed FcaPV2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in feline epithelial cells and demonstrated that FcaPV2 E6 binds to p53, impairing its protein level. In addition, E6 and E7 inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-triggered accumulation of p53, p21 and pro-apoptotic markers such as Cleaved Caspase3, Bax and Bak, suggesting a synergistic action of the virus with UV exposure in tumour pathogenesis. Furthermore, FcaPV2 E7 bound to feline pRb and impaired pRb levels, resulting in upregulation of the downstream pro-proliferative genes Cyclin A and Cdc2. Importantly, we demonstrated mRNA expression of FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 in feline SCC samples, strengthening the hypothesis of a causative role in the development of feline SCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reactive oxygen species and transcript analysis upon excess light treatment in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana vs a photosensitive mutant lacking zeaxanthin and lutein

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    Roncaglia Enrica

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS are unavoidable by-products of oxygenic photosynthesis, causing progressive oxidative damage and ultimately cell death. Despite their destructive activity they are also signalling molecules, priming the acclimatory response to stress stimuli. Results To investigate this role further, we exposed wild type Arabidopsis thaliana plants and the double mutant npq1lut2 to excess light. The mutant does not produce the xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin, whose key roles include ROS scavenging and prevention of ROS synthesis. Biochemical analysis revealed that singlet oxygen (1O2 accumulated to higher levels in the mutant while other ROS were unaffected, allowing to define the transcriptomic signature of the acclimatory response mediated by 1O2 which is enhanced by the lack of these xanthophylls species. The group of genes differentially regulated in npq1lut2 is enriched in sequences encoding chloroplast proteins involved in cell protection against the damaging effect of ROS. Among the early fine-tuned components, are proteins involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, chlorophyll catabolism, protein import, folding and turnover, synthesis and membrane insertion of photosynthetic subunits. Up to now, the flu mutant was the only biological system adopted to define the regulation of gene expression by 1O2. In this work, we propose the use of mutants accumulating 1O2 by mechanisms different from those activated in flu to better identify ROS signalling. Conclusions We propose that the lack of zeaxanthin and lutein leads to 1O2 accumulation and this represents a signalling pathway in the early stages of stress acclimation, beside the response to ADP/ATP ratio and to the redox state of both plastoquinone pool. Chloroplasts respond to 1O2 accumulation by undergoing a significant change in composition and function towards a fast acclimatory response. The physiological implications of this signalling specificity are

  13. Wild-type and specific mutant androgen receptor mediates transcription via 17β-estradiol in sex hormone-sensitive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susa, Takao; Ikaga, Reina; Kajitani, Takashi; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2015-07-01

    We previously encountered regulatory processes wherein dihydrotestosterone (DHT) exerted its inhibitory effect on parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) gene repression through the estrogen receptor (ER)α, but not the androgen receptor (AR), in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Here, we investigated whether such aberrant ligand-nuclear receptor (NR) interaction is present in prostate cancer LNCaP cells. First, we confirmed that LNCaP cells expressed large amounts of AR at negligible levels of ERα/β or progesterone receptor. Both suppression of PTHrP and activation of prostate-specific antigen genes were observed after independent administration of 17β-estradiol (E2), DHT, or R5020. Consistent with the notion that the LNCaP AR lost its ligand specificity due to a mutation (Thr-Ala877), experiments with siRNA targeting the respective NR revealed that the AR monopolized the role of the mediator of shared hormone-dependent regulation, which was invariably associated with nuclear translocation of this mutant AR. Microarray analysis of gene regulation by DHT, E2, or R5020 disclosed that more than half of the genes downstream of the AR (Thr-Ala877) overlapped in the LNCaP cells. Of particular interest, we realized that the AR (wild-type [wt]) and AR (Thr-Ala877) were equally responsible for the E2-AR interactions. Fluorescence microscopy experiments demonstrated that both EGFP-AR (wt) and EGFP-AR (Thr-Ala877) were exclusively localized within the nucleus after E2 or DHT treatment. Furthermore, reporter assays revealed that some other cancer cells exhibited aberrant E2-AR (wt) signaling similar to that in the LNCaP cells. We herein postulate the presence of entangled interactions between wt AR and E2 in certain hormone-sensitive cancer cells.

  14. A novel Zea mays ssp. mexicana L. MYC-type ICE-like transcription factor gene ZmmICE1, enhances freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiang; Yang, Lei; Yu, Mengyuan; Lai, Jianbin; Wang, Chao; McNeil, David; Zhou, Meixue; Yang, Chengwei

    2017-04-01

    The annual Zea mays ssp. mexicana L., a member of the teosinte group, is a close wild relative of maize and thus can be effectively used in maize improvement. In this study, an ICE-like gene, ZmmICE1, was isolated from a cDNA library of RNA-Seq from cold-treated seedling tissues of Zea mays ssp. mexicana L. The deduced protein of ZmmICE1 contains a highly conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and C-terminal region of ICE-like proteins. The ZmmICE1 protein localizes to the nucleus and shows sumoylation when expressed in an Escherichia coli reconstitution system. In addition, yeast one hybrid assays indicated that ZmmICE1 has transactivation activities. Moreover, ectopic expression of ZmmICE1 in the Arabidopsis ice1-2 mutant increased freezing tolerance. The ZmmICE1 overexpressed plants showed lower electrolyte leakage (EL), reduced contents of malondialdehyde (MDA). The expression of downstream cold related genes of Arabidopsis C-repeat-binding factors (AtCBF1, AtCBF2 and AtCBF3), cold-responsive genes (AtCOR15A and AtCOR47), kinesin-1 member gene (AtKIN1) and responsive to desiccation gene (AtRD29A) was significantly induced when compared with wild type under low temperature treatment. Taken together, these results indicated that ZmmICE1 is the homolog of Arabidopsis inducer of CBF expression genes (AtICE1/2) and plays an important role in the regulation of freezing stress response.

  15. Transforming properties of Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in vitro and their transcriptional activity in feline squamous cell carcinoma in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altamura, Gennaro, E-mail: gennaro.altamura@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Corteggio, Annunziata, E-mail: ancorteg@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Pacini, Laura, E-mail: PaciniL@students.iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Conte, Andrea, E-mail: andreaconte88@hotmail.it [Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria, E-mail: gmpieran@unina.it [Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tommasino, Massimo, E-mail: tommasinom@iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Accardi, Rosita, E-mail: accardir@iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Borzacchiello, Giuseppe, E-mail: borzacch@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 (FcaPV2) DNA is found in feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs); however, its biological properties are still uncharacterized. In this study, we successfully expressed FcaPV2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in feline epithelial cells and demonstrated that FcaPV2 E6 binds to p53, impairing its protein level. In addition, E6 and E7 inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-triggered accumulation of p53, p21 and pro-apoptotic markers such as Cleaved Caspase3, Bax and Bak, suggesting a synergistic action of the virus with UV exposure in tumour pathogenesis. Furthermore, FcaPV2 E7 bound to feline pRb and impaired pRb levels, resulting in upregulation of the downstream pro-proliferative genes Cyclin A and Cdc2. Importantly, we demonstrated mRNA expression of FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 in feline SCC samples, strengthening the hypothesis of a causative role in the development of feline SCC. - Highlights: • FcaPV2 E6 binds to and deregulates feline p53 protein. • FcaPV2 E7 binds to and deregulates feline pRb protein. • FcaPV2 oncogenes inhibit UVB-induced apoptosis. • FcaPV2 E6E7 and E7 increase the lifespan of primary cells. • FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 are expressed at the mRNA level in feline SCC in vivo.

  16. Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the most well-know bacterial model about the function of its molecular components. In this review are presented several structural and functional aspects of their transcriptional regulatory network constituted by transcription factors and target genes. The network discussed here represent to 1531 genes and 3421 regulatory interactions. This network shows a power-law distribution with a few global regulators and most of genes poorly connected. 176 of genes in the network correspond to transcription factors, which form a sub-network of seven hierarchical layers where global regulators tend to be set in superior layers while local regulators are located in the lower ones. There is a small set of proteins know as nucleoid-associated proteins, which are in a high cellular concentrations and reshape the nucleoid structure to influence the running of global transcriptional programs, to this mode of regulation is named analog regulation. Specific signal effectors assist the activity of most of transcription factors in E. coli. These effectors switch and tune the activity of transcription factors. To this type of regulation, depending of environmental signals is named the digital-precise-regulation. The integration of regulatory programs have place in the promoter region of transcription units where it is common to observe co-regulation among global and local TFs as well as of TFs sensing exogenous and endogenous conditions. The mechanistic logic to understand the harmonious operation of regulatory programs in the network should consider the globalism of TFs, their signal perceived, coregulation, genome position, and cellular concentration. Finally, duplicated TFs and their horizontal transfer influence the evolvability of members of the network. The most duplicated and transferred TFs are located in the network periphery.

  17. Detection of human cytomegalovirus pp67 late gene transcripts in cerebrospinal fluid of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Tetali, S; Wang, X P; Kaplan, M H; Cromme, F V; Ginocchio, C C

    2000-05-01

    This study examined the clinical correlation between the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) pp67 mRNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and active HCMV central nervous system (CNS) disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In total, 76 CSF specimens collected from 65 HIV-1-positive patients diagnosed with HCMV CNS disease, other non-HCMV-related CNS diseases, or no CNS disease were tested for the presence of HCMV pp67 mRNA using the NucliSens cytomegalovirus (CMV) pp67 assay (Organon Teknika, Durham, N.C.). The results were compared to those of a nested PCR for the detection of HCMV glycoprotein B DNA and to those obtained by viral culture (54 samples). CSF specimens collected from patients without HCMV CNS disease yielded the following results: pp67 assay negative, 62 of 62 specimens; culture negative, 41 of 41 specimens; and PCR negative, 56 of 62 specimens (6 specimens were positive). CSF specimens collected from patients with HCMV CNS disease yielded the following results: pp67 assay positive, 9 of 13 specimens; PCR positive, 13 of 13 specimens; and culture positive, 2 of 13 specimens. After resolution of the discordant results, the following positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) for the diagnosis of HCMV CNS disease were determined. The PPV for PCR, pp67 assay, and culture were 68.4, 100, and 100%, respectively, and the NPV for PCR, pp67 assay, and culture were 100, 97.0, and 82. 7%, respectively. The sensitivities for DNA PCR, pp67 assay, and culture for the detection of HCMV were 100, 84.6, and 18%, respectively, and the clinical specificities were 90.5, 100, and 100%, respectively. This study indicates that the detection of HCMV pp67 mRNA in CSF has good correlation with active HCMV CNS disease, whereas CSF culture is insensitive and qualitative DNA PCR may detect latent nonreplicating virus in CSF from patients without HCMV CNS disease.

  18. Analysis of tumor progression by transcriptional profiling of mouse MK16 cell lines transformed with human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes and activated H-ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smahel, Michal; Smahelová, Jana; Tejklová, Pavla; Tachezy, Ruth; Jelínek, Frantisek

    2005-12-01

    A better understanding of the molecular basis of tumor progression and invasion is needed to improve therapy for malignant tumors. Recently, we established a mouse metastatic MK16 model by transduction of secondary kidney cells with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 oncogenes and human H-ras activated by G12V mutation. In this study, we extended the model to MK16 cell lines derived from lung metastases and compared the oncogenicity of seven cell lines successively isolated from primary tumors or metastases. By observing the formation and growth of subcutaneous tumors and generation of lung metastasis, we showed a gradual increase in oncogenicity of MK16 cell lines. Interestingly, we demonstrated metastatic potential of MK16/A cells with low oncogenic potential in primary tumor development. To detect changes in gene expression associated with increasing oncogenicity of MK16 cell lines, we performed transcriptional profiling with the Atlas Plastic Mouse 5K microarray. We found that a substantial proportion of up-regulated genes encoded ribosomal proteins. Among the down-regulated genes, the highest number (n=10) belonged to a group coding for transcription factors. Expression of two of these, Pou3f2 and Gtl3, was reduced both in cells derived from primary tumors and those isolated from metastases. Furthermore, microarray hybridization suggested that the down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16(Ink4a) and p57(Kip2) and up-regulation of A6 and A10 members of the S100 protein family might play a role in the increase of MK16 oncogenicity.

  19. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Simpson, Jennifer L; Wechsler, Steven L

    2015-10-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular immune mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) explant-induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild-type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT((+)) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT((-)) virus) were irradiated with UV-B, and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT((-)) virus, LAT((+)) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B-induced reactivation mouse model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs is discussed.

  20. Role of the cell envelope stress regulators BaeR and CpxR in control of RND-type multidrug efflux pumps and transcriptional cross talk with exopolysaccharide synthesis in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Daniel; Stahl, Antje; Oja, Anna Elisabeth; Weingart, Helge

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the role of the cell envelope stress-sensing systems BaeSR and CpxARP in regulation of multidrug efflux and exopolysaccharide synthesis in Erwinia amylovora. We have previously reported that BaeR activates transcription of the RND-type efflux pumps AcrD and MdtABC. In this study, we found that a cpxR-deficient mutant was highly susceptible to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and lincomycin, whereas a baeR mutant showed no change in antimicrobial sensitivity. However, overexpression of BaeR in a mutant lacking the major RND pump AcrB increased resistance of E. amylovora to several compounds that are not substrates of AcrD or MdtABC. Furthermore, we observed that overexpression of BaeR significantly increased amylovoran production. Moreover, the expression of RND-type efflux pumps was changed in regulatory mutants of exopolysaccharide production. Our data suggest that BaeSR and CpxARP regulate additional mechanisms, beside efflux, which are responsible for antimicrobial resistance of E. amylovora.

  1. Inhibition of Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB and Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in HepG2 Cells by Cucurbitane-Type Triterpene Glycosides from Momordica charantia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Yen, Pham Hai; Ngan, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Quang, Tran Hong; Kiem, Phan Van; Minh, Chau Van; Tai, Bui Huu; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Song, Seok Bean

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Momordica charantia: is used to treat various diseases, including inflammatory conditions. Previous reports indicated that the extract of this plant inhibits activation of nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) but activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Additionally, cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides are the main bioactive components of the fruit of M. charantia. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 17 cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides (1–17) isolated from this plant. Their inhibition of NF-κB and activation of PPAR activities in HepG2 cells were measured using luciferase reporter and PPAR subtype transactivation assays. Compounds 6 and 8 were found to inhibit NF-κB activation stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in a dose-dependent manner. With 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values of 0.4 μM, compounds 6 and 8 were more potent inhibitors than the positive control, sulfasalazine (IC50=0.9 μM). Compounds 4, 6, and 8 also inhibited TNFα-induced expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA. However, only compound 13 significantly increased PPARγ transactivation. PMID:22248180

  2. Inhibition of nuclear transcription factor-κB and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in HepG2 cells by cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides from Momordica charantia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Yen, Pham Hai; Ngan, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Quang, Tran Hong; Kiem, Phan Van; Minh, Chau Van; Tai, Bui Huu; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Song, Seok Bean; Kim, Young Ho

    2012-04-01

    Momordica charantia is used to treat various diseases, including inflammatory conditions. Previous reports indicated that the extract of this plant inhibits activation of nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) but activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Additionally, cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides are the main bioactive components of the fruit of M. charantia. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 17 cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides (1-17) isolated from this plant. Their inhibition of NF-κB and activation of PPAR activities in HepG2 cells were measured using luciferase reporter and PPAR subtype transactivation assays. Compounds 6 and 8 were found to inhibit NF-κB activation stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in a dose-dependent manner. With 50% inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values of 0.4 μM, compounds 6 and 8 were more potent inhibitors than the positive control, sulfasalazine (IC(50)=0.9 μM). Compounds 4, 6, and 8 also inhibited TNFα-induced expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA. However, only compound 13 significantly increased PPARγ transactivation.

  3. Transcription in archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  4. DBD: a transcription factor prediction database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression influences almost all biological processes in an organism; sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors are critical to this control. For most genomes, the repertoire of transcription factors is only partially known. Hitherto transcription factor identification has been largely based on genome annotation pipelines that use pairwise sequence comparisons, which detect only those factors similar to known genes, or on functional classification schemes that amalgamate many types of proteins into the category of 'transcription factor'. Using a novel transcription factor identification method, the DBD transcription factor database fills this void, providing genome-wide transcription factor predictions for organisms from across the tree of life. The prediction method behind DBD identifies sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors through homology using profile hidden Markov models (HMMs) of domains. Thus, it is limited to factors that are homologus to those HMMs. The collection of HMMs is taken from two existing databases (Pfam and SUPERFAMILY), and is limited to models that exclusively detect transcription factors that specifically recognize DNA sequences. It does not include basal transcription factors or chromatin-associated proteins, for instance. Based on comparison with experimentally verified annotation, the prediction procedure is between 95% and 99% accurate. Between one quarter and one-half of our genome-wide predicted transcription factors represent previously uncharacterized proteins. The DBD (www.transcriptionfactor.org) consists of predicted transcription factor repertoires for 150 completely sequenced genomes, their domain assignments and the hand curated list of DNA-binding domain HMMs. Users can browse, search or download the predictions by genome, domain family or sequence identifier, view families of transcription factors based on domain architecture and receive predictions for a protein sequence.

  5. Transcriptional network underlying Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takao; Wang, Minqin; Ririe, Ted O; Fernandes, Jolene S; Sternberg, Paul W

    2005-04-05

    The vulval development of Caenorhabditis elegans provides an opportunity to investigate genetic networks that control gene expression during organogenesis. During the fourth larval stage (L4), seven vulval cell types are produced, each of which executes a distinct gene expression program. We analyze how the expression of cell-type-specific genes is regulated. Ras and Wnt signaling pathways play major roles in generating the spatial pattern of cell types and regulate gene expression through a network of transcription factors. One transcription factor (lin-29) primarily controls the temporal expression pattern. Other transcription factors (lin-11, cog-1, and egl-38) act in combination to control cell-type-specific gene expression. The complexity of the network arises in part because of the dynamic nature of gene expression, in part because of the presence of seven cell types, and also because there are multiple regulatory paths for gene expression within each cell type.

  6. In silico and wet lab approaches to study transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestand, Matthew Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is a complicated process with multiple types of regulation, including binding of proteins termed transcription factors. This thesis looks at transcription factors and transcription factor binding site discovery through computational predictions and wet lab work to better elucidate th

  7. Evolutionary dynamics of prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan Babu, M; Teichmann, Sarah A; Aravind, L

    2006-04-28

    The structure of complex transcriptional regulatory networks has been studied extensively in certain model organisms. However, the evolutionary dynamics of these networks across organisms, which would reveal important principles of adaptive regulatory changes, are poorly understood. We use the known transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli to analyse the conservation patterns of this network across 175 prokaryotic genomes, and predict components of the regulatory networks for these organisms. We observe that transcription factors are typically less conserved than their target genes and evolve independently of them, with different organisms evolving distinct repertoires of transcription factors responding to specific signals. We show that prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks have evolved principally through widespread tinkering of transcriptional interactions at the local level by embedding orthologous genes in different types of regulatory motifs. Different transcription factors have emerged independently as dominant regulatory hubs in various organisms, suggesting that they have convergently acquired similar network structures approximating a scale-free topology. We note that organisms with similar lifestyles across a wide phylogenetic range tend to conserve equivalent interactions and network motifs. Thus, organism-specific optimal network designs appear to have evolved due to selection for specific transcription factors and transcriptional interactions, allowing responses to prevalent environmental stimuli. The methods for biological network analysis introduced here can be applied generally to study other networks, and these predictions can be used to guide specific experiments.

  8. Analysis of the interaction between transcription factor 7-like 2 genetic variants with nopal and wholegrain fibre intake: effects on anthropometric and metabolic characteristics in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ortiz, M M; Garay-Sevilla, M E; Tejero, M E; Perez-Luque, E L

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) genetic variants have shown differential effect on low-fat and high-fat diet in obese subjects. Nopal is a Mexican variety of cactus that is a traditional food and has been used in the treatment of diabetes. Its hypoglycaemic effect may be because of its soluble fibre (mucopolysaccharide) content. This study analysed the effects of the rs7903146 and rs12255372 TCF7L2 variants on anthropometric, metabolic and hormonal parameters in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who consumed fibre from either nopal tortilla or wholegrain bread for 8 weeks. We followed-up seventy-four patients who consumed an individualised isoenergetic diet that included nopal tortilla (Diet 1) and sixty-three patients with a diet that included wholegrain bread (Diet 2). Anthropometric, metabolic and hormonal measures were collected at baseline and final intervention. The size effect and carry-over effect were estimated. To assess the interaction of genotype and diets, we used a general linear model repeated-measures analysis. Minor allele frequency of rs7903146T was 0·27 and for rs12255372T it was 0·13. At 8 weeks after Diet 1 intake, weight, BMI, waist and hip circumference decreased (P=0·00015) in rs7903146CC and rs12255372GG genotypes. In particular, patients carrying of the rs7903146CC and consuming Diet 1 showed a reduction in waist circumference of more than 2·5 cm compared with Diet 2 (P<0·001). No significant interaction between rs7903146 or rs12255372 and diet was seen in this study. In conclusion, in the carriers of the rs7903146CC and rs12255372GG wild types, significant changes in all anthropometric measures were observed, and had better response to both diets.

  9. Significant differences in the frequency of transcriptional units, types and numbers of repetitive elements, GC content, and the number of CpG islands between a 1010-kb G-band genomic segment on chromosome 9q31.3 and a 1200-kb R-band genomic segment on chromosome 3p21.3

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daigo, Y; Isomura, M; Nishiwaki, T; Suzuki, K; Maruyama, O; Takeuchi, K; Yamane, Y; Hayashi, R; Minami, M; Hojo, Y; Uchiyama, I; Takagi, T; Nakamura, Y

    1999-01-01

    ... 3p21.3 corresponding to an R-band region. The two segments were significantly different with respect to the frequency of transcriptional units, the types and numbers of repetitive elements present, their GC content, and the number of CpG islands...

  10. Expression and significance of transcription factor Ets-1 in type 2 diabetic nephropathy%转录因子Ets-1在2型糖尿病肾病中的表达及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈京群; 刘殿阁; 陈涵枝; 丁弘; 汪湜; 周建东

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ets-1 proto-oncogene is a member of the transcriptional factor family and was identified by homology to the V-ets oncogene. It was recently demonstrated that Ets-l protein interacts with the promoter region of the genes coding for proteinases, including matrix metalloproteinases ( MMPs ), suggesting that it may play an important role in the regulation of MMPs expression. The role of the Ets-l proto-oncogene in diabetic nephropathy ( DN ), where extracellular matrix ( ECM ) accumulation is observed, remains undefined. To elucidate the role of Ets-l in DN,we studied the expression pattern of Ets-l,Matrix metaloproteinase-2 ( MMP-2 ), Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinase-2 ( TIMP-2 ), α- smooth muscle action ( α- SMA ) and type IV collagen ( Col IV ) in matrix remodeling in Type 2 DN. Methods: 25 cases of renal biopsy sections diagnosed as DN were selected. Type 2 diabetes was defined according to Standards of Medical Care in diabetes. 2007/ADA. Meanwhile, 20 cases of renal biopsy specimens diagnosed as minor glomerular abnormalities ( minimal change disease, MCD ) were simultaneously studied as controls. Pathological classifications were made according to the WHO criteria of 1982 for renal pathology or the modified WHO criteria of 1995. Histopathological findings were identified under light microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry and double immunostaining, we investigated the expression of Ets- 1 , MMP-2, TIMP-2, α- SMA, vimentin and collagen type Ⅳ( Col Ⅳ )in type 2 DN. The experimental data was statistically analyzed and statistical significance was achieved at corrected P < 0. 05. Results: 25 DN cases ( male 15, female 10 ) between the ages of 35 and 67 years were observed. 20 MCD patients ( male 12, female 8 ), aged 18-46 years, were noted. By immunnohistochemistry, the expression of Ets-1 in glomeruli and tubulointerstitium was significantly increased in the kidneys obtained from DN group compared with MCD groups ( P < 0. 05 ). Compared to MCD

  11. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face....

  12. A Nonnatural Transcriptional Coactivator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanguile, Origene; Uesugi, Motonari; Austin, David J.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    1997-12-01

    In eukaryotes, sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins activate gene expression by recruiting the transcriptional apparatus and chromatin remodeling proteins to the promoter through protein-protein contacts. In many instances, the connection between DNA-binding proteins and the transcriptional apparatus is established through the intermediacy of adapter proteins known as coactivators. Here we describe synthetic molecules with low molecular weight that act as transcriptional coactivators. We demonstrate that a completely nonnatural activation domain in one such molecule is capable of stimulating transcription in vitro and in vivo. The present strategy provides a means of gaining external control over gene activation through intervention using small molecules.

  13. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout (MASTER): Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O.; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R.; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M.; Ebright, Richard H.; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 47 (~16,000) bar-coded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields ("massively systematic transcript end readout," MASTER). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo, we define the TSS-region DNA-sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield, and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching"). PMID:26626484

  14. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout, "MASTER": Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2015-12-17

    We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 4(7) (∼ 16,000) barcoded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields (massively systematic transcript end readout, "MASTER"). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo; we define the TSS-region DNA sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield; and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching").

  15. Notation systems for transcription: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Catherine; O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine

    2002-11-01

    A 21-syllable question posed by Bernard Shaw in a CNN television interview with Margaret Thatcher was presented to 90 participants, either as an audio recording or as a typed transcript or as both. Participants were asked to speak it, as closely as possible, as Shaw had (or, in conditions without the audio recording, as he might have). The typed version was either an ordinary transcript or a transcript in one of three transcription systems used currently in research on spoken discourse, all of which incorporate notations for prosody. Hence, there were nine conditions in all, with five women and five men in each. Contrary to the experimental hypothesis, approximations to Shaw's original temporal measures of performance were not degraded but were instead improved significantly by the addition of a prosodically notated transcript to the audio recording and significantly more in the absence of the audio recording. Presentation of the ordinary transcript alone produced the worst approximation to Shaw's temporal measures. The usefulness, accuracy, and readability of transcripts prepared according to detailed notation systems are discussed.

  16. Our evolving knowledge of the transcriptional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A

    2008-01-01

    The development of a genome-scale approach to identification of the 5' ends of capped mRNAs (CAGE) has given new insights into many aspects of mammalian RNApolII transcription control. They include the identification of the minimal initiator motif, the different types of proximal promoter architecture, the promoters of noncoding RNAs, the transcription of retrotransposons, and the extensive impact of alternative promoters on the proteome. CAGE also offers applications as a form of expression profiling that measures promoter use, allowing more precise development of transcriptional network models.

  17. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  18. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  19. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  20. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein codi...

  1. The DNA-binding domain of BenM reveals the structural basis for the recognition of a T-N11-A sequence motif by LysR-type transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Amer M; Neidle, Ellen L; Momany, Cory

    2013-10-01

    LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs) play critical roles in metabolism and constitute the largest family of bacterial regulators. To understand protein-DNA interactions, atomic structures of the DNA-binding domain and linker-helix regions of a prototypical LTTR, BenM, were determined by X-ray crystallography. BenM structures with and without bound DNA reveal a set of highly conserved amino acids that interact directly with DNA bases. At the N-terminal end of the recognition helix (α3) of a winged-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif, several residues create hydrophobic pockets (Pro30, Pro31 and Ser33). These pockets interact with the methyl groups of two thymines in the DNA-recognition motif and its complementary strand, T-N11-A. This motif usually includes some dyad symmetry, as exemplified by a sequence that binds two subunits of a BenM tetramer (ATAC-N7-GTAT). Gln29 forms hydrogen bonds to adenine in the first position of the recognition half-site (ATAC). Another hydrophobic pocket defined by Ala28, Pro30 and Pro31 interacts with the methyl group of thymine, complementary to the base at the third position of the half-site. Arg34 interacts with the complementary base of the 3' position. Arg53, in the wing, provides AT-tract recognition in the minor groove. For DNA recognition, LTTRs use highly conserved interactions between amino acids and nucleotide bases as well as numerous less-conserved secondary interactions.

  2. Development and validation of a real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay for investigation of wild poliovirus type 1-South Asian (SOAS) strain reintroduced into Israel, 2013 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindiyeh, M Y; Moran-Gilad, J; Manor, Y; Ram, D; Shulman, L M; Sofer, D; Mendelson, E

    2014-02-20

    In February 2013, wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) was reintroduced into southern Israel and resulted in continuous silent circulation in the highly immune population. As a part of the public health emergency response, a novel real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was developed, to allow for the sensitive and specific detection of the circulatingWPV1-South Asian (SOAS) strain. Specific primers and probes derived from the VP-1 region were designed, based on sequenced sewage isolates, and used to simultaneously amplify this WPV1-SOAS sequence together with bacteriophage MS-2 as internal control. High titre WPV1-SOAS stock virus was used for assay optimisation and 50 processed sewage samples collected from southern Israel and tested by reference culture based methods were used for analytical validation of the assay’s performance. The limit of detection of the multiplex qRT-PCR (SOAS/MS-2) assay was 0.1 plaque-forming unit (pfu)/reaction (20 pfu/mL) for WPV1-SOAS RNA with 100% sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values when compared to the culture based method. The turnaround time was rapid, providing results for environmental samples within 24 to 48 hours from completion of sewage processing, instead of five to seven days by culture-based analysis. Direct sewage testing by qRT-PCR assay proved to be a useful tool for rapid detection and environmental surveillance of WPV1-SOAS circulating strain during emergency response. Application of the approach for detection of WPV1-SOAS in stool samples obtained during acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance or field surveys should be further evaluated.

  3. Association of the Genetic Polymorphisms in Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors-γ2 with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Interaction with Obesity Status in Emirati Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiba Al-Safar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transcription factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-γ2 (PPAR-γ2 have a profound effect on the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and had previously been found to be associated with T2DM risk in various ppopulations. However, studies in the Arab population are inconsistent. We conducted a case control study to confirm the association of variants rs10885409 of TCF7L2 and Pro12Ala (rs1801282 of PPAR-γ2 with risk of T2DM and related complications in Emirati population of Arab origin. We also investigated the interaction of these associations with obesity status. Methods. DNA was extracted from the saliva samples of 272 T2DM patients and 216 nondiabetic Emiratis. Genotyping for rs10885409 (TCF7L2 and rs1801282 (PPAR-γ2 P12A variants was accomplished with a TaqMan assay. The subgroups were constituted according to obesity status. Results. In the nonobese group, the rs10885409 C allele in the recessive model was significantly associated with the incidence of T2DM (OR 1.975 [95% CI 1.127–3.461], P=0.017, but this association was not observed in the obese group or when BMI was not considered. PPAR-γ2 risk allele Pro12 frequency (0.96 was similar in the groups tested and more than 90% population was homozygous for this allele. Conclusions. Our case-control study is the first of its kind in Emiratis which establishes TCF7L2 rs10885409 C allele as a T2DM risk factor in Emiratis and this association is modulated by obesity status. We also confirmed that Pro12Ala mutation in PPAR-γ2 is not associated with T2DM risk in this population.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Stuart A.; Levine, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical properties of transcription have recently been shown to play a central role in gene expression. However, a full physical characterization of this central biological process is lacking. In this Letter, we introduce a simple description of the basic physical elements of transcription where RNA elongation, RNA polymerase rotation, and DNA supercoiling are coupled. The resulting framework describes the relative amount of RNA polymerase rotation and DNA supercoiling that occurs during RNA elongation. Asymptotic behavior is derived and can be used to experimentally extract unknown mechanical parameters of transcription. Mechanical limits to transcription are incorporated through the addition of a DNA supercoiling-dependent RNA polymerase velocity. This addition can lead to transcriptional stalling and resulting implications for gene expression, chromatin structure and genome organization are discussed.

  5. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  6. Structure, regulation, and putative function of the arginine deiminase system of Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruening, Petra; Fulde, Marcus; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important cause of infectious diseases in young pigs. Little is known about the virulence factors or protective antigens of S. suis. Recently, we have identified two proteins of the arginine deiminase system (ADS) of S. suis, which were temperature induced and expressed on the streptococcal surface (N. Winterhoff, R. Goethe, P. Gruening, M. Rohde, H. Kalisz, H. E. Smith, and P. Valentin-Weigand, J. Bacteriol. 184:6768-6776, 2002). In the present study, we analyzed the complete ADS of S. suis. Due to their homologies to the recently published S. gordonii ADS genes, the genes for arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl-transferase, and carbamate kinase, which were previously designated adiS, octS, and ckS, respectively, were renamed arcA, arcB, and arcC, respectively. Our data revealed that arcA, arcB, and arcC of the S. suis ADS are transcribed from an operon (arcABC operon). Additionally, putative ADS-associated genes were cloned and sequenced which, however, did not belong to the arcABC operon. These were the flpS gene upstream of the arcABC operon with homology to the flp transcription regulator of S. gordonii and the arcD, arcT, arcH, and argR genes downstream of the arcABC operon with high homologies to a putative arginine-ornithine antiporter, a putative dipeptidase of S. gordonii, a putative beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase of S. pneumoniae, and a putative arginine repressor of S. gordonii, respectively. The transcriptional start point of the arcABC operon was determined, and promoter analysis provided evidence that multiple factors contribute to the regulation of the ADS. Thus, a putative binding site for a transcription regulator of the Crp/Fnr family, an ArgR-binding site, and two cis-acting catabolite response elements were identified in the promoter-operator region of the operon. Consistent with this, we could demonstrate that the ADS of S. suis is inducible by arginine and reduced O2 tension and subject to carbon catabolite

  7. DNA supercoiling during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  8. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  9. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here...... we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network...... as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes n(D) needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8...

  10. Transcriptional Regulation by CHIP/LDB Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstein, Revital; Levkovitz, Liron; Yosef, Nir; Yanku, Michaela; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded; Westphal, Heiner; Oliver, Brian; Segal, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that transcription factors play versatile roles in turning genes “on” or “off” depending on cellular context via the various transcription complexes they form. This poses a major challenge in unraveling combinatorial transcription complex codes. Here we use the powerful genetics of Drosophila combined with microarray and bioinformatics analyses to tackle this challenge. The nuclear adaptor CHIP/LDB is a major developmental regulator capable of forming tissue-specific transcription complexes with various types of transcription factors and cofactors, making it a valuable model to study the intricacies of gene regulation. To date only few CHIP/LDB complexes target genes have been identified, and possible tissue-dependent crosstalk between these complexes has not been rigorously explored. SSDP proteins protect CHIP/LDB complexes from proteasome dependent degradation and are rate-limiting cofactors for these complexes. By using mutations in SSDP, we identified 189 down-stream targets of CHIP/LDB and show that these genes are enriched for the binding sites of APTEROUS (AP) and PANNIER (PNR), two well studied transcription factors associated with CHIP/LDB complexes. We performed extensive genetic screens and identified target genes that genetically interact with components of CHIP/LDB complexes in directing the development of the wings (28 genes) and thoracic bristles (23 genes). Moreover, by in vivo RNAi silencing we uncovered novel roles for two of the target genes, xbp1 and Gs-alpha, in early development of these structures. Taken together, our results suggest that loss of SSDP disrupts the normal balance between the CHIP-AP and the CHIP-PNR transcription complexes, resulting in down-regulation of CHIP-AP target genes and the concomitant up-regulation of CHIP-PNR target genes. Understanding the combinatorial nature of transcription complexes as presented here is crucial to the study of transcription regulation of gene batteries required

  11. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    • Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  12. The transcriptional regulation of pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Chi Yeo; Huck-Hui Ng

    2013-01-01

    The defining features of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are their self-renewing and pluripotent capacities.Indeed,the ability to give rise into all cell types within the organism not only allows ESCs to function as an ideal in vitro tool to study embryonic development,but also offers great therapeutic potential within the field of regenerative medicine.However,it is also this same remarkable developmental plasticity that makes the efficient control of ESC differentiation into the desired cell type very difficult.Therefore,in order to harness ESCs for clinical applications,a detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling ESC pluripotency and lineage commitment is necessary.In this respect,through a variety of transcriptomic approaches,ESC pluripotency has been found to be regulated by a system of ESC-associated transcription factors; and the external signalling environment also acts as a key factor in modulating the ESC transcriptome.Here in this review,we summarize our current understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network in ESCs,discuss how the control of various signalling pathways could influence pluripotency,and provide a future outlook of ESC research.

  13. Development and assay of RNA transcripts of enterovirus species A to D, rhinovirus species a to C, and human parechovirus: assessment of assay sensitivity and specificity of real-time screening and typing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeish, Nigel J; Witteveldt, Jeroen; Clasper, Lucy; McIntyre, Chloe; McWilliam Leitch, E Carol; Hardie, Alison; Bennett, Susan; Gunson, Rory; Carman, William F; Feeney, Susan A; Coyle, Peter V; Vipond, Barry; Muir, Peter; Benschop, Kimberley; Wolthers, Katja; Waris, Matti; Osterback, Riikka; Johannessen, Ingo; Templeton, Kate; Harvala, Heli; Simmonds, Peter

    2012-09-01

    Nucleic acid amplification methods such as the PCR have had a major impact on the diagnosis of viral infections, often achieving greater sensitivities and shorter turnaround times than conventional assays and an ability to detect viruses refractory to conventional isolation methods. Their effectiveness is, however, significantly influenced by assay target sequence variability due to natural diversity and rapid sequence changes in viruses that prevent effective binding of primers and probes. This was investigated for a diverse range of enteroviruses (EVs; species A to D), human rhinoviruses (HRVs; species A to C), and human parechovirus (HPeV) in a multicenter assay evaluation using a series of full-length prequantified RNA transcripts. RNA concentrations were quantified by absorption (NanoDrop) and fluorescence methods (RiboGreen) prior to dilution in buffer supplemented with RNase inhibitors and carrier RNA. RNA transcripts were extremely stable, showing minimal degradation after prolonged storage at temperatures between ambient and -20°C and after multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Transcript dilutions distributed to six referral laboratories were screened by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays using different primers and probes. All of the laboratories reported high assay sensitivities for EV and HPeV transcripts approaching single copies and similar amplification kinetics for all four EV species. HRV detection sensitivities were more variable, often with substantially impaired detection of HRV species C. This could be accounted for in part by the placement of primers and probes to genetically variable target regions. Transcripts developed in this study provide reagents for the ongoing development of effective diagnostics that accommodate increasing knowledge of genetic heterogeneity of diagnostic targets.

  14. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site...... RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels.......Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site......, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites...

  15. DMD transcript imbalance determines dystrophin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitali, Pietro; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Verhaart, Ingrid E C; Wokke, Beatrijs; Janson, Anneke A M; van den Eijnde, Rani; den Dunnen, Johan T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2013-12-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by out-of-frame and in-frame mutations, respectively, in the dystrophin encoding DMD gene. Molecular therapies targeting the precursor-mRNA are in clinical trials and show promising results. These approaches will depend on the stability and expression levels of dystrophin mRNA in skeletal muscles and heart. We report that the DMD gene is more highly expressed in heart than in skeletal muscles, in mice and humans. The transcript mutated in the mdx mouse model shows a 5' to 3' imbalance compared with that of its wild-type counterpart and reading frame restoration via antisense-mediated exon skipping does not correct this event. We also report significant transcript instability in 22 patients with Becker dystrophy, clarifying the fact that transcript imbalance is not caused by premature nonsense mutations. Finally, we demonstrate that transcript stability, rather than transcriptional rate, is an important determinant of dystrophin protein levels in patients with Becker dystrophy. We suggest that the availability of the complete transcript is a key factor to determine protein abundance and thus will influence the outcome of mRNA-targeting therapies.

  16. Smad transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massagué, Joan; Seoane, Joan; Wotton, David

    2005-12-01

    Smad transcription factors lie at the core of one of the most versatile cytokine signaling pathways in metazoan biology-the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) pathway. Recent progress has shed light into the processes of Smad activation and deactivation, nucleocytoplasmic dynamics, and assembly of transcriptional complexes. A rich repertoire of regulatory devices exerts control over each step of the Smad pathway. This knowledge is enabling work on more complex questions about the organization, integration, and modulation of Smad-dependent transcriptional programs. We are beginning to uncover self-enabled gene response cascades, graded Smad response mechanisms, and Smad-dependent synexpression groups. Our growing understanding of TGFbeta signaling through the Smad pathway provides general principles for how animal cells translate complex inputs into concrete behavior.

  17. Virtual Reference Transcript Analysis: A Few Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    Describes the introduction of virtual, or digital, reference service at the University of New Brunswick libraries. Highlights include analyzing transcripts from LIVE (Library Information in a Virtual Environment); reference question types; ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries) information literacy competency standards; and the Big 6…

  18. A sensitive RNase protection assay to detect transcripts from potentially functional human endogenous L1 retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodcock, D M; Williamson, M R; Doherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    A high background of read-through transcripts from degenerate human L1 retrotransposons is present in almost all human cell types. This prevents the detection of RNA transcripts from potentially functional elements. To overcome this, we have developed an RNase protection assay based on the recons...... transcripts from divergent L1 families but are either discrete shorter transcripts or specifically processed products from longer initial transcripts....

  19. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  20. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written......ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  1. Rhythm quantization for transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.; Desain, P.W.M.; Kappen, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Automatic Music Transcription is the extraction of an acceptable notation from performed music. One important task in this problem is rhythm quantization which refers to categorization of note durations. Although quantization of a pure mechanical performance is rather straightforward, the task becom

  2. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any a

  3. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  4. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any

  5. FRUITING GENES OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE ARE TRANSCRIPTIONALLY REGULATED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; VANDERLENDE, TR; WESSELS, JGH

    Fruiting genes in Schizophyllum commune are controlled by the mating-type genes and other regulatory genes. To examine whether differential accumulation of mRNAs for these fruiting genes is caused by transcriptional regulation, run-on transcription assaYs were performed with nuclei isolated from

  6. Nucleic Acid Analogue Induced Transcription of Double Stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    RNA is transcribed from a double stranded DNA template by forming a complex by hybridizing to the template at a desired transcription initiation site one or more oligonucleic acid analogues of the PNA type capable of forming a transcription initiation site with the DNA and exposing the complex...

  7. FRUITING GENES OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE ARE TRANSCRIPTIONALLY REGULATED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; VANDERLENDE, TR; WESSELS, JGH

    1993-01-01

    Fruiting genes in Schizophyllum commune are controlled by the mating-type genes and other regulatory genes. To examine whether differential accumulation of mRNAs for these fruiting genes is caused by transcriptional regulation, run-on transcription assaYs were performed with nuclei isolated from cul

  8. FRUITING GENES OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE ARE TRANSCRIPTIONALLY REGULATED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; VANDERLENDE, TR; WESSELS, JGH

    1993-01-01

    Fruiting genes in Schizophyllum commune are controlled by the mating-type genes and other regulatory genes. To examine whether differential accumulation of mRNAs for these fruiting genes is caused by transcriptional regulation, run-on transcription assaYs were performed with nuclei isolated from cul

  9. Transcription Dynamics in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Rodriguez, Joseph; Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    The transcription cycle can be roughly divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Understanding the molecular events that regulate all these stages requires a dynamic view of the underlying processes. The development of techniques to visualize and quantify transcription in single living cells has been essential in revealing the transcription kinetics. They have revealed that (a) transcription is heterogeneous between cells and (b) transcription can be discontinuous within a cell. In this review, we discuss the progress in our quantitative understanding of transcription dynamics in living cells, focusing on all parts of the transcription cycle. We present the techniques allowing for single-cell transcription measurements, review evidence from different organisms, and discuss how these experiments have broadened our mechanistic understanding of transcription regulation.

  10. Switching on cilia: transcriptional networks regulating ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choksi, Semil P; Lauter, Gilbert; Swoboda, Peter; Roy, Sudipto

    2014-04-01

    Cilia play many essential roles in fluid transport and cellular locomotion, and as sensory hubs for a variety of signal transduction pathways. Despite having a conserved basic morphology, cilia vary extensively in their shapes and sizes, ultrastructural details, numbers per cell, motility patterns and sensory capabilities. Emerging evidence indicates that this diversity, which is intimately linked to the different functions that cilia perform, is in large part programmed at the transcriptional level. Here, we review our understanding of the transcriptional control of ciliary biogenesis, highlighting the activities of FOXJ1 and the RFX family of transcriptional regulators. In addition, we examine how a number of signaling pathways, and lineage and cell fate determinants can induce and modulate ciliogenic programs to bring about the differentiation of distinct cilia types.

  11. GmDREB2A;2, a canonical DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN2-type transcription factor in soybean, is posttranslationally regulated and mediates dehydration-responsive element-dependent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoi, Junya; Ohori, Teppei; Moriwaki, Takashi; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Todaka, Daisuke; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Kusakabe, Kazuya; Osakabe, Yuriko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2013-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is an important crop around the world. Abiotic stress conditions, such as drought and heat, adversely affect its survival, growth, and production. The DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN2 (DREB2) group includes transcription factors that contribute to drought and heat stress tolerance by activating transcription through the cis-element dehydration-responsive element (DRE) in response to these stress stimuli. Two modes of regulation, transcriptional and posttranslational, are important for the activation of gene expression by DREB2A in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the regulatory system of DREB2 in soybean is not clear. We identified a new soybean DREB2 gene, GmDREB2A;2, that was highly induced not only by dehydration and heat but also by low temperature. GmDREB2A;2 exhibited a high transactivation activity via DRE and has a serine/threonine-rich region, which corresponds to a negative regulatory domain of DREB2A that is involved in its posttranslational regulation, including destabilization. Despite the partial similarity between these sequences, the activity and stability of the GmDREB2A;2 protein were enhanced by removal of the serine/threonine-rich region in both Arabidopsis and soybean protoplasts, suggestive of a conserved regulatory mechanism that involves the recognition of serine/threonine-rich sequences with a specific pattern. The heterologous expression of GmDREB2A;2 in Arabidopsis induced DRE-regulated stress-inducible genes and improved stress tolerance. However, there were variations in the growth phenotypes of the transgenic Arabidopsis, the induced genes, and their induction ratios between GmDREB2A;2 and DREB2A. Therefore, the basic function and regulatory machinery of DREB2 have been maintained between Arabidopsis and soybean, although differentiation has also occurred.

  12. An overview on transcriptional regulators in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Rodríguez, Alba; Robledo-Casados, Ivonne; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Streptomyces are Gram-positive microorganisms able to adapt and respond to different environmental conditions. It is the largest genus of Actinobacteria comprising over 900 species. During their lifetime, these microorganisms are able to differentiate, produce aerial mycelia and secondary metabolites. All of these processes are controlled by subtle and precise regulatory systems. Regulation at the transcriptional initiation level is probably the most common for metabolic adaptation in bacteria. In this mechanism, the major players are proteins named transcription factors (TFs), capable of binding DNA in order to repress or activate the transcription of specific genes. Some of the TFs exert their action just like activators or repressors, whereas others can function in both manners, depending on the target promoter. Generally, TFs achieve their effects by using one- or two-component systems, linking a specific type of environmental stimulus to a transcriptional response. After DNA sequencing, many streptomycetes have been found to have chromosomes ranging between 6 and 12Mb in size, with high GC content (around 70%). They encode for approximately 7000 to 10,000 genes, 50 to 100 pseudogenes and a large set (around 12% of the total chromosome) of regulatory genes, organized in networks, controlling gene expression in these bacteria. Among the sequenced streptomycetes reported up to now, the number of transcription factors ranges from 471 to 1101. Among these, 315 to 691 correspond to transcriptional regulators and 31 to 76 are sigma factors. The aim of this work is to give a state of the art overview on transcription factors in the genus Streptomyces.

  13. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, J. Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals propagating through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programs in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. In many cases, the dynamical performance of transcriptional re...

  14. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... targeting specific cis-acting elements in genes, and by the significant lack of fixed tertiary structure in their extensive intrinsically disordered regions. Recent research in protein intrinsic disorder (ID) has changed our understanding of transcriptional activation domains from 'negative noodles' to ID...... them to participate in large interactomes, how they use only a few hydrophobic residues, short sequence motifs, prestructured motifs, and coupled folding and binding for their interactions with co-activators, and how their accessibility to post-translational modification affects their interactions...

  15. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  16. SNFing HIV transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukrinsky Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is an essential regulator of transcription of cellular genes. HIV-1 infection induces exit of a core component of SWI/SNF, Ini1, into the cytoplasm and its association with the viral pre-integration complex. Several recent papers published in EMBO Journal, Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Retrovirology provide new information regarding possible functions of Ini1 and SWI/SNF in HIV life cycle. It appears that Ini1 has an inhibitory effect on pre-integration steps of HIV replication, but also contributes to stimulation of Tat-mediated transcription. This stimulation involves displacement of the nucleosome positioned at the HIV promoter.

  17. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    RNA); and ii) translation, in which the mRNA is translated into a protein. This thesis focus on the ¿rst of these steps, transcription, and speci¿cally the initiation of this. Simpli¿ed, initiation is preceded by the binding of several proteins, known as transcription factors (TFs), to DNA. This takes place......The myriad of cells in the human body are all made from the same blueprint: the human genome. At the heart of this diversity lies the concept of gene regulation, the process in which it is decided which genes are used where and when. Genes do not function as on/off buttons, but more like a volume...... control spanning the range from completely muted to cranked up to maximum. The volume, in this case, is the production rate of proteins. This production is the result of a two step procedure: i) transcription, in which a small part of DNA from the genome (a gene) is transcribed into an RNA molecule (an m...

  18. Randomized clinical trial in vitamin D-deficient adults comparing replenishment with oral vitamin D3 with narrow-band UV type B light: effects on cholesterol and the transcriptional profiles of skin and blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponda, Manish P; Liang, Yupu; Kim, Jaehwan; Hutt, Richard; Dowd, Kathleen; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary M; Rodrick, Tori; Kim, Dong Joo; Barash, Irina; Lowes, Michelle A; Breslow, Jan L

    2017-02-22

    Background: Vitamin D deficiency, defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration replenishment of vitamin D with UVB exposure would lower LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared with the effect of oral vitamin D3 supplementation.Design: We performed a randomized clinical trial in vitamin D-deficient adults and compared vitamin D replenishment between subjects who received oral vitamin D3 (n = 60) and those who received narrow-band UVB exposure (n = 58) ≤6 mo.Results: There was no difference in the change from baseline LDL-cholesterol concentrations between oral vitamin D3 and UVB groups (difference in median of oral vitamin D3 minus that of UVB: 1.5 mg/dL; 95% CI: -5.0, 7.0 mg/dL). There were also no differences within groups or between groups for changes in total or HDL cholesterol or triglycerides. Transcriptional profiling of skin and blood, however, revealed significant upregulation of immune pathway signaling with oral vitamin D3 but significant downregulation with UVB.Conclusions: Correcting vitamin D deficiency with either oral vitamin D3 or UVB does not improve the lipid profile. Beyond cholesterol, these 2 modalities of raising 25(OH)D have disparate effects on gene transcription. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01688102.

  19. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  20. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C; Côté, Maxime C; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-14

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  1. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors. PMID:27739523

  2. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2011-10-11

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals that propagate through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programmes in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. Cellular response dynamics are ultimately determined by interactions between transcriptional and non-transcriptional networks, with dramatic implications for physiology and evolution. Here, we provide an overview of non-transcriptional interactions that can affect the performance of natural and synthetic bacterial regulatory networks.

  3. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by histone lysine methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublitz, Philip; Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-01-01

    . In this report, we review the recent literature to deduce mechanisms underlying Polycomb and H3K9 methylation mediated repression, and describe the functional interplay with activating H3K4 methylation. We summarize recent data that indicate a close relationship between GC density of promoter sequences......, transcription factor binding and the antagonizing activities of distinct epigenetic regulators such as histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and histone demethylases (HDMs). Subsequently, we compare chromatin signatures associated with different types of transcriptional outcomes from stable repression to highly...... dynamic regulated genes, strongly suggesting that the interplay of different epigenetic pathways is essential in defining specific types of heritable chromatin and associated transcriptional states....

  4. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  5. Absolute measurement of gene transcripts with Selfie-digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesniy, Petar; Trullas, Ramon

    2017-08-21

    Absolute measurement of the number of RNA transcripts per gene is necessary to compare gene transcription among different tissues or experimental conditions and to assess transcription of genes that have a variable copy number per cell such as mitochondrial DNA. Here, we present a method called Selfie-digital PCR that measures the absolute amount of an RNA transcript produced by its own coding DNA at a particular moment. Overcoming the limitations of previous approaches, Selfie-digital PCR allows for the quantification of nuclear and mitochondrial gene transcription in a strand-specific manner that is comparable among tissues and cell types that differ in gene copy number or metabolic state. Using Selfie-digital PCR, we found that, with the exception of the liver, different organs exhibit marked variations in mitochondrial DNA copy number but similar transcription of mitochondrial DNA heavy and light chains, thus suggesting a preferential role of mitochondrial DNA abundance over its transcription in organ function. Moreover, the strand-specific analysis of mitochondrial transcription afforded by Selfie-digital PCR showed that transcription of the heavy strand was significantly higher than that of the light strand in all the tissues studied.

  6. Evolution of transcriptional regulation in "Escherichia coli"

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Luise

    2014-01-01

    During gene expression, transcription initiation marks the first step towards synthesis of functional proteins. Expression levels of specific types of RNA molecules in the cell depend on the underlying genotype of the promoter sequence. Prediction of expression levels from the promoter sequence alone can have important implications for the design of artificial promoters. In this work, we explored promoter determinants that cause differences in expression levels and tracked how ...

  7. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen...

  8. Regulated assembly of transcription factors and control of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D

    2001-11-30

    Proteins that function in regulation of transcription initiation are typically homo or hetero-oligomeric. Results of recent biophysical studies of transcription regulators indicate that the assembly of these proteins is often subject to regulation. This regulation of assembly dictates the frequency of transcription initiation via its influence on the affinity of a transcription regulator for DNA and its affect on target site selection. Factors that modulate transcription factor assembly include binding of small molecules, post-translational modification, DNA binding and interactions with other proteins. Here, the results of recent structural and/or thermodynamic studies of a number of transcription regulators that are subject to regulated assembly are reviewed. The accumulated data indicate that this phenomenon is ubiquitous and that mechanisms utilized in eukaryotes and prokaryotes share common features. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Genetic and epigenetic control of RKIP transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datar, Ila; Tegegne, Hanna; Qin, Kevin; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bitar, Milad S; Trumbly, Robert J; Yeung, Kam C

    2014-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is known to modulate key signaling cascades and regulate normal physiological processes such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The expression of RKIP is found to be downregulated in several cancer metastases and the repressed RKIP expression can be reactivated on treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. RKIP is a proven tumor metastasis suppressor gene and investigating the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of RKIP is therefore of immense clinical importance. In this review, we discuss the basal expression of RKIP in various tissues and the genetic aspects of the RKIP chromosomal locus including the structure of the RKIP promoter as well as gene regulatory elements such as enhancers. We also review the genetic and epigenetic modulation of RKIP transcription through EZH2, a component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and sequence specific transcription factors (TFs) BACH1 and Snail. Emerging experimental evidence supports a unifying model in which both these TFs repress RKIP transcription in cancers by recruiting the EZH2 containing repressive complex to the proximal RKIP promoter. Finally, we review the known mechanisms employed by different types of chemotherapeutic agents to activate RKIP expression in cancer cells.

  10. Reverse Transcription of Retroviruses and LTR Retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen H

    2015-04-01

    The enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT) was discovered in retroviruses almost 50 years ago. The demonstration that other types of viruses, and what are now called retrotransposons, also replicated using an enzyme that could copy RNA into DNA came a few years later. The intensity of the research in both the process of reverse transcription and the enzyme RT was greatly stimulated by the recognition, in the mid-1980s, that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was a retrovirus and by the fact that the first successful anti-HIV drug, azidothymidine (AZT), is a substrate for RT. Although AZT monotherapy is a thing of the past, the most commonly prescribed, and most successful, combination therapies still involve one or both of the two major classes of anti-RT drugs. Although the basic mechanics of reverse transcription were worked out many years ago, and the first high-resolution structures of HIV RT are now more than 20 years old, we still have much to learn, particularly about the roles played by the host and viral factors that make the process of reverse transcription much more efficient in the cell than in the test tube. Moreover, we are only now beginning to understand how various host factors that are part of the innate immunity system interact with the process of reverse transcription to protect the host-cell genome, the host cell, and the whole host, from retroviral infection, and from unwanted retrotransposition.

  11. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...

  12. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...

  13. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  14. DNA topology and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions.

  15. The post-transcriptional operon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    A post-transcriptional operon is a set of monocistronic mRNAs encoding functionally related proteins that are co-regulated by a group of RNA-binding proteins and/or small non-coding RNAs so that protein expression is coordinated at the post-transcriptional level. The post-transcriptional operon...... model (PTO) is used to describe data from an assortment of methods (e.g. RIP-Chip, CLIP-Chip, miRNA profiling, ribosome profiling) that globally address the functionality of mRNA. Several examples of post-transcriptional operons have been documented in the literature and demonstrate the usefulness...

  16. Promoter-mediated transcriptional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiajun; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-21

    Genes in eukaryotic cells are typically regulated by complex promoters containing multiple binding sites for a variety of transcription factors, but how promoter dynamics affect transcriptional dynamics has remained poorly understood. In this study, we analyze gene models at the transcriptional regulation level, which incorporate the complexity of promoter structure (PS) defined as transcriptional exits (i.e., ON states of the promoter) and the transition pattern (described by a matrix consisting of transition rates among promoter activity states). We show that multiple exits of transcription are the essential origin of generating multimodal distributions of mRNA, but promoters with the same transition pattern can lead to multimodality of different modes, depending on the regulation of transcriptional factors. In turn, for similar mRNA distributions in the models, the mean ON or OFF time distributions may exhibit different characteristics, thus providing the supplemental information on PS. In addition, we demonstrate that the transcriptional noise can be characterized by a nonlinear function of mean ON and OFF times. These results not only reveal essential characteristics of promoter-mediated transcriptional dynamics but also provide signatures useful for inferring PS based on characteristics of transcriptional outputs. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. GFAP and vimentin deficiency alters gene expression in astrocytes and microglia in wild-type mice and changes the transcriptional response of reactive glia in mouse model for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Kooijman, Lieneke; Orre, Marie; Stassen, Oscar; Pekny, Milos; Hol, Elly M

    2015-06-01

    Reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filament (IF) proteins Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Vimentin (VIM) surround amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The functional consequences of this upregulation are unclear. To identify molecular pathways coupled to IF regulation in reactive astrocytes, and to study the interaction with microglia, we examined WT and APPswe/PS1dE9 (AD) mice lacking either GFAP, or both VIM and GFAP, and determined the transcriptome of cortical astrocytes and microglia from 15- to 18-month-old mice. Genes involved in lysosomal degradation (including several cathepsins) and in inflammatory response (including Cxcl5, Tlr6, Tnf, Il1b) exhibited a higher AD-induced increase when GFAP, or VIM and GFAP, were absent. The expression of Aqp4 and Gja1 displayed the same pattern. The downregulation of neuronal support genes in astrocytes from AD mice was absent in GFAP/VIM null mice. In contrast, the absence of IFs did not affect the transcriptional alterations induced by AD in microglia, nor was the cortical plaque load altered. Visualizing astrocyte morphology in GFAP-eGFP mice showed no clear structural differences in GFAP/VIM null mice, but did show diminished interaction of astrocyte processes with plaques. Microglial proliferation increased similarly in all AD groups. In conclusion, absence of GFAP, or both GFAP and VIM, alters AD-induced changes in gene expression profile of astrocytes, showing a compensation of the decrease of neuronal support genes and a trend for a slightly higher inflammatory expression profile. However, this has no consequences for the development of plaque load, microglial proliferation, or microglial activation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-05-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes nD needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8% for the human network. The high controllability (low number of drivers needed to control the system) in yeast, mouse and human is due to the presence of internal loops in their regulatory networks where the TFs regulate each other in a circular fashion. We refer to these internal loops as circular control motifs (CCM). The E. coli transcriptional regulatory network, which does not have any CCMs, shows a hierarchical structure of the transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to the eukaryal networks. The presence of CCMs also has influence on the stability of these networks, as the presence of cycles can be associated with potential unstable steady-states where even small changes in binding affinities can cause dramatic rearrangements of the state of the network.

  19. JAZF1 promotes proliferation of C2C12 cells, but retards their myogenic differentiation through transcriptional repression of MEF2C and MRF4—Implications for the role of Jazf1 variants in oncogenesis and type 2 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Aoki, Natsumi; Hijikata, Takao, E-mail: hijikata@musashino-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-15

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified in Jazf1, which is also involved in the oncogenesis of endometrial stromal tumors. To understand how Jazf1 variants confer a risk of tumorigenesis and T2D, we explored the functional roles of JAZF1 and searched for JAZF1 target genes in myogenic C2C12 cells. Consistent with an increase of Jazf1 transcripts during myoblast proliferation and their decrease during myogenic differentiation in regenerating skeletal muscle, JAZF1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation, whereas it retarded myogenic differentiation. Examination of myogenic genes revealed that JAZF1 overexpression transcriptionally repressed MEF2C and MRF4 and their downstream genes. AMP deaminase1 (AMPD1) was identified as a candidate for JAZF1 target by gene array analysis. However, promoter assays of Ampd1 demonstrated that mutation of the putative binding site for the TR4/JAZF1 complex did not alleviate the repressive effects of JAZF1 on promoter activity. Instead, JAZF1-mediated repression of Ampd1 occurred through the MEF2-binding site and E-box within the Ampd1 proximal regulatory elements. Consistently, MEF2C and MRF4 expression enhanced Ampd1 promoter activity. AMPD1 overexpression and JAZF1 downregulation impaired AMPK phosphorylation, while JAZF1 overexpression also reduced it. Collectively, these results suggest that aberrant JAZF1 expression contributes to the oncogenesis and T2D pathogenesis. - Highlights: • JAZF1 promotes cell cycle progression and proliferation of myoblasts. • JAZF1 retards myogenic differentiation and hypertrophy of myotubes. • JAZF1 transcriptionally represses Mef2C and Mrf4 expression. • JAZF1 has an impact on the phosphorylation of AMPK.

  20. Mastering Transcription: Multiplexed Analysis of Transcription Start Site Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochschild, Ann

    2015-12-17

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Vvedenskaya et al. (2015) describe a high-throughput sequencing-based methodology for the massively parallel analysis of transcription from a high-complexity barcoded template library both in vitro and in vivo, providing a powerful new tool for the study of transcription.

  1. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  2. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance.

  3. Analysis artefacts of the INS-IGF2 fusion transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Frogne, Thomas; Rescan, Claude

    2015-01-01

    transcript, which has recently been reported to be among the highest expressed transcripts in human pancreatic beta cells and its protein indicated as a novel autoantigen in Type 1 Diabetes. Results: Through RNA sequencing and variant specific qPCR analyses we demonstrate that the true abundance of INS-IGF2...... proteomics analysis we could not demonstrate INS-IGF2 protein in samples of human islets nor in EndoC-βH1. Conclusions: Sequence features, such as fusion transcripts spanning multiple genes can lead to unexpected results in gene expression analysis, and care must be taken in generating and interpreting...

  4. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional profile of human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Sergey I; Deutsch, Samuel; Genolet, Raphael; Borel, Christelle; Parand, Leila; Ucla, Catherine; Schütz, Frederic; Duriaux Sail, Genevieve; Dupré, Yann; Jaquier-Gubler, Pascale; Araud, Tanguy; Conne, Beatrice; Descombes, Patrick; Vassalli, Jean-Dominique; Curran, Joseph; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated extensive transcriptional activity across the human genome, a substantial fraction of which is not associated with any functional annotation. However, very little is known regarding the post-transcriptional processes that operate within the different classes of RNA molecules. To characterize the post-transcriptional properties of expressed sequences from human chromosome 21 (HSA21), we separated RNA molecules from three cell lines (GM06990, HeLa S3, and SK-N-AS) according to their ribosome content by sucrose gradient fractionation. Polyribosomal-associated RNA and total RNA were subsequently hybridized to genomic tiling arrays. We found that approximately 50% of the transcriptional signals were located outside of annotated exons and were considered as TARs (transcriptionally active regions). Although TARs were observed among polysome-associated RNAs, RT-PCR and RACE experiments revealed that approximately 40% were likely to represent nonspecific cross-hybridization artifacts. Bioinformatics discrimination of TARs according to conservation and sequence complexity allowed us to identify a set of high-confidence TARs. This set of TARs was significantly depleted in the polysomes, suggesting that it was not likely to be involved in translation. Analysis of polysome representation of RefSeq exons showed that at least 15% of RefSeq transcripts undergo significant post-transcriptional regulation in at least two of the three cell lines tested. Among the regulated transcripts, enrichment analysis revealed an over-representation of genes involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including APP and the BACE1 protease that cleaves APP to produce the pathogenic beta 42 peptide. We demonstrate that the combination of RNA fractionation and tiling arrays is a powerful method to assess the transcriptional and post-transcriptional properties of genomic regions.

  5. Mechanosensitive mechanisms in transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Ingber, Donald E

    2012-07-01

    Transcriptional regulation contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, self-renewal and differentiation in embryonic cells and in stem cells. Therefore, control of gene expression at the level of transcription is crucial for embryonic development, as well as for organogenesis, functional adaptation, and regeneration in adult tissues and organs. In the past, most work has focused on how transcriptional regulation results from the complex interplay between chemical cues, adhesion signals, transcription factors and their co-regulators during development. However, chemical signaling alone is not sufficient to explain how three-dimensional (3D) tissues and organs are constructed and maintained through the spatiotemporal control of transcriptional activities. Accumulated evidence indicates that mechanical cues, which include physical forces (e.g. tension, compression or shear stress), alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics and changes in cell shape, are transmitted to the nucleus directly or indirectly to orchestrate transcriptional activities that are crucial for embryogenesis and organogenesis. In this Commentary, we review how the mechanical control of gene transcription contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, determination of cell fate, pattern formation and organogenesis, as well as how it is involved in the control of cell and tissue function throughout embryogenesis and adult life. A deeper understanding of these mechanosensitive transcriptional control mechanisms should lead to new approaches to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  6. Transcriptional networks controlling adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, R; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is regulated by a complex cascade of signals that drive the transcriptional reprogramming of the fibroblastic precursors. Genome-wide analyses of chromatin accessibility and binding of adipogenic transcription factors make it possible to generate "snapshots" of the trans...

  7. Improving accuracy of transcripts in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Lynne M; Meyer, Mechthild; Estable, Alma

    2004-01-01

    Everyone who has worked with qualitative interview data has run into problems with transcription error, even if they do the transcribing themselves. A thoughtful, accurate, reliable, multilingual transcriptionist with a quick turnaround time is worth her or his weight in gold. In this article, the authors examine some transcription circumstances that seem to bring about their own consistent set of problems. Based on their experiences, the authors examine the following issues: use of voice recognition systems; notation choices; processing and active listening versus touch typing; transcriptionist effect; emotionally loaded audiotaped material; class and/or cultural differences among interviewee, interviewer, and transcriptionist; and some errors that arise when working in a second language. The authors offer suggestions for working with transcriptionists as part of the qualitative research team.

  8. Structural basis of transcription activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Structural basis of transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rucobo, Fuensanta W; Cramer, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    For transcription elongation, all cellular RNA polymerases form a stable elongation complex (EC) with the DNA template and the RNA transcript. Since the millennium, a wealth of structural information and complementary functional studies provided a detailed three-dimensional picture of the EC and many of its functional states. Here we summarize these studies that elucidated EC structure and maintenance, nucleotide selection and addition, translocation, elongation inhibition, pausing and proofreading, backtracking, arrest and reactivation, processivity, DNA lesion-induced stalling, lesion bypass, and transcriptional mutagenesis. In the future, additional structural and functional studies of elongation factors that control the EC and their possible allosteric modes of action should result in a more complete understanding of the dynamic molecular mechanisms underlying transcription elongation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA polymerase II Transcript Elongation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermodynamic Model of Transcription Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadigotla, Vasisht; O'Maoileidigh, Daibhid; Sengupta, Anirvan; Epshtein, Vitaly; Ebright, Richard; Nudler, Evgeny; Ruckenstein, Andrei

    2006-03-01

    We present a statistical mechanics approach to the prediction of backtracked pauses in prokaryotic transcription elongation derived from structural models of the transcription elongation complex (TEC). Our algorithm is based on the thermodynamic stability of TEC along the DNA template calculated from the sequence dependent free-energy of DNA-DNA, DNA-RNA and RNA-RNA base pairing associated with (a) the translocation and size fluctuations of the transcription bubble; (b) the changes in the DNA-RNA hybrid; and (c) the changes in the RNA folding free-energy. The calculations involve no adjustable parameters apart from a cutoff used to discriminate paused from non-paused complexes. When applied to 100 experimental pauses in transcription elongation by E. coli RNA polymerase on ten DNA templates the approach produces highly statistically significant results. Transcription elongation is an inherently kinetic process and a simplified kinetic model with the same predictive power is presented separately.

  11. Transcription profile analysis reveals that zygotic division results in uneven distribution of specific transcripts in apical/basal cells of tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asymmetric zygotic division in higher plants results in the formation of an apical cell and a basal cell. These two embryonic cells possess distinct morphologies and cell developmental fates. It has been proposed that unevenly distributed cell fate determinants and/or distinct cell transcript profiles may be the underlying reason for their distinct fates. However, neither of these hypotheses has convincing support due to technical limitations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using laser-controlled microdissection, we isolated apical and basal cells and constructed cell type-specific cDNA libraries. Transcript profile analysis revealed difference in transcript composition. PCR and qPCR analysis confirmed that transcripts of selected embryogenesis-related genes were cell-type preferentially distributed. Some of the transcripts that existed in zygotes were found distinctly existed in apical or basal cells. The cell type specific de novo transcription was also found after zygotic cell division. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, we found that the transcript diversity occurs between apical and basal cells. Asymmetric zygotic division results in the uneven distribution of some embryogenesis related transcripts in the two-celled proembryos, suggesting that a differential distribution of some specific transcripts in the apical or basal cells may involve in guiding the two cell types to different developmental destinies.

  12. Human mediator subunit MED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsubo, Takuya; Nishitani, Saori; Kikuchi, Yuko; Iida, Satoshi; Yamada, Kana; Tanaka, Aki; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the Mediator complex is an essential transcriptional cofactor of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, it contains up to 30 subunits and consists of four modules: head, middle, tail, and CDK/Cyclin. One of the subunits, MED15, is located in the tail module, and was initially identified as Gal11 in budding yeast, where it plays an essential role in the transcriptional regulation of galactose metabolism with the potent transcriptional activator Gal4. For this reason, we investigated the function of the human MED15 subunit (hMED15) in transcriptional activation. First, we measured the effect of hMED15 knockdown on cell growth in HeLa cells. The growth rate was greatly reduced. By immunostaining, we observed the colocalization of hMED15 with the general transcription factors TFIIE and TFIIH in the nucleus. We measured the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown of hMED15 on transcriptional activation using two different transcriptional activators, VP16 and SREBP1a. Treatment with siRNAs reduced transcriptional activation, and this reduction could be rescued by overexpression of HA/Flag-tagged, wild-type hMED15. To investigate hMED15 localization, we treated human MCF-7 cells with the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3, thus inducing p21 transcription. We found that hMED15 localized to both the p53 binding site and the p21 promoter region, along with TFIIE and TFIIH. These results indicate that hMED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

  13. Experimental Studies on Pathogenesis of Waardenburg Syndrome Type Ⅱ Resulting from Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor Gene Mutations%MITF基因突变致Ⅱ型Waardenburg综合征发病的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; 陈红胜; 李家大; 罗洪金; 梅凌云; 贺楚峰; 冯永

    2014-01-01

    目的 通过体外实验研究小眼球畸形相关转录因子(microphthalmia-associated transcription factor,MITF)突变基因功能,初步探讨其致Ⅱ型Waardenburg综合征(Waardenburg syndrome,WS)发病的分子机制.方法 以野生型MITF基因真核细胞表达质粒pCMV-MITF-Flag为模板分别构建二个致Ⅱ型WS的MITF基因新发突变R217I和T192fsX18的真核细胞表达质粒.野生MITF和突变R217I和T192fsX18表达质粒瞬时转染黑色素瘤细胞或小鼠胚胎成纤维细胞(NIH3T3细胞),应用Western blot和细胞免疫荧光分别检测其表达和亚细胞定位;应用荧光素酶活性检测系统通过对酪氨酸酶(tyrosinase,TYR)报告基因活性检测观察野生/突变MITF蛋白对其靶基因TYR转录活性的调控作用,以及二个突变蛋白对野生MITF蛋白功能的影响;应用生物素标记的含E box基序(CATGTG)的DNA寡核苷酸链探针分别沉淀MITF、R217I及T192fsX18蛋白,检测野生/突变MITF蛋白与靶基因TYR启动子的结合力.结果 成功构建了突变型R217I、T192fsX18真核细胞重组表达质粒pCMV-R217I-Flag和pCMV-T192fsX18-Flag,MITF蛋白与R217I、T192fsX18突变蛋白在黑色素瘤细胞中正确表达,进一步验证了重组质粒构建的正确性.突变R217I蛋白与野生MITF蛋白一样仅在细胞核中分布,而T192fsX18蛋白则出现异常亚细胞定位,仅在细胞质中分布.尽管R217I蛋白仍残余部分功能可增加TYR启动子转录活性,但与野生MITF蛋白相比,二者差异有显著统计学意义(P<0.01),而T192fsX18蛋白则完全失去调控TYR启动子转录活性作用(P<0.01);二者均未对野生MITF蛋白功能产生显性负效应(P>0.05).突变R217I蛋白与野生MITF蛋白均可与TYR启动子特异DNA序列E-box结合,而突变T192fs X18蛋白则不能与之结合.结论 R217I和T192fsX18突变蛋白通过影响靶基因TYR转录活性,使其表达下调、黑色素合成减少,以单倍体剂量不足效应致Ⅱ型WS.

  14. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  15. A developmental transcriptional network for maize defines coexpression modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Gregory S; Bi, Yong-Mei; Colasanti, Joseph; Wu, Wenqing; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Tong; Rothstein, Steven J; Lukens, Lewis N

    2013-04-01

    Here, we present a genome-wide overview of transcriptional circuits in the agriculturally significant crop species maize (Zea mays). We examined transcript abundance data at 50 developmental stages, from embryogenesis to senescence, for 34,876 gene models and classified genes into 24 robust coexpression modules. Modules were strongly associated with tissue types and related biological processes. Sixteen of the 24 modules (67%) have preferential transcript abundance within specific tissues. One-third of modules had an absence of gene expression in specific tissues. Genes within a number of modules also correlated with the developmental age of tissues. Coexpression of genes is likely due to transcriptional control. For a number of modules, key genes involved in transcriptional control have expression profiles that mimic the expression profiles of module genes, although the expression of transcriptional control genes is not unusually representative of module gene expression. Known regulatory motifs are enriched in several modules. Finally, of the 13 network modules with more than 200 genes, three contain genes that are notably clustered (P < 0.05) within the genome. This work, based on a carefully selected set of major tissues representing diverse stages of maize development, demonstrates the remarkable power of transcript-level coexpression networks to identify underlying biological processes and their molecular components.

  16. Cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2, PAP2d, with two different transcripts PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liyun; Gu, Shaohua; Sun, Yaqiong; Zheng, Dan; Wu, Qihan; Li, Xin; Dai, Jianfeng; Dai, Jianliang; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    This study reports the cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 isoform cDNAs (PAP2d) from the foetal brain cDNA library. The PAP2d gene is localized on chromosome 1p21.3. It contains six exons and spans 112 kb of the genomic DNA. By large-scale cDNA sequencing we found two splice variants of PAP2d, PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 1722 bp in length and spans an open reading frame from nucleotide 56 to 1021, encoding a 321aa protein. The PAP2d_v2 cDNA is 1707 bp in length encoding a 316aa protein from nucleotide 56-1006. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 15 bp longer than the PAP2d_v2 cDNA in the terminal of the fifth exon and it creates different ORF. Both of the proteins contain a well-conserved PAP2 motif. The PAP2d_v1 is mainly expressed in human brain, lung, kidney, testis and colon, while PAP2d_v2 is restricted to human placenta, skeletal muscle, and kidney. The two splice variants are co-expressed only in kidney.

  17. Camel Whey Protein Protects B and T Cells from Apoptosis by Suppressing Activating Transcription Factor-3 (ATF-3)-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Enhancing Phosphorylation of AKT and IκB-α in Type I Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Gamal; Sayed, Leila H; Omar, Hossam El-Din M; Abd El-Rahim, Ali M; Ahmed, Emad A; Mahmoud, Mohamed H

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with severe immune system complications. Camel whey protein (CWP) decreases free radicals (ROS) and modulates immune functions, but its effect on DM-impaired immune systems has not been studied. We investigated the impact of CWP on the immune system in a Type 1 diabetes mouse model. Three experimental groups were used: (1) non-diabetic control; (2) diabetic; and (3) CWP-treated diabetic mice. Induction of diabetes by streptozotocin was associated with reduction of body weight and insulin level, increase in glucose level and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), and reduction in IL-2 and IL-4 levels. Upregulated ATF-3 expression was followed by a marked elevation in ROS levels. Lymphocytes from diabetic mice exhibited increased apoptosis through decreased phosphorylation of AKT and IκB-α, increased infiltration of T cells in the spleen and thymus, and decreased B cell numbers in the spleen. Supplementation with CWP decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, ROS, and ATF-3 expression, and increased the levels of IL-4. Treatment with CWP decreased apoptosis by enhancing the phosphorylation of AKT and IκB-α as well as T-cell and B-cell distribution in the spleen and thymus. Our findings suggest the beneficial effects of CWP supplementation during diabetes on decreasing and orchestrating the redox status and subsequently rescuing the immune cells from exhaustion. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Addressing some Common Problems in Transcript Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Fahy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer conferencing is one of the more useful parts of computer-mediated communications (CMC, and is virtually ubiquitous in distance education. The temptation to analyze the resulting interaction has resulted in only partial success, however (Henri, 1992; Kanuka and Anderson, 1998; Rourke, Anderson, Garrison and Archer, 1999; Fahy, Crawford, Ally, Cookson, Keller and Prosser, 2000. Some suggest the problem is made more complex by failings of both technique and, more seriously, theory capable of guiding transcript analysis research (Gunawardena, Lowe and Anderson, 1997.We have previously described development and pilot-testing of an instrument and a process for transcript analysis, call the the TAT (Transcript Analysis Tool, based on a model originally developed by Zhu (1996. We found that the instrument and coding procedures used provided acceptable – sometimes excellent – levels of interrater reliability (varying from 70 percent to 94 percent in pilot applications, depending upon user training and practice with the instrument, and that results of pilots indicated the TAT discriminated well among the various types of statements found in online conferences (Fahy, et al., 2000.

  19. Ranges of control in the transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyan Helga

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The positioning of genes in the genome is an important evolutionary degree of freedom for organizing gene regulation. Statistical properties of these distributions have been studied particularly in relation to the transcriptional regulatory network. The systematics of gene-gene distances then become important sources of information on the control, which different biological mechanisms exert on gene expression. Results Here we study a set of categories, which has to our knowledge not been analyzed before. We distinguish between genes that do not participate in the transcriptional regulatory network (i.e. that are according to current knowledge not producing transcription factors and do not possess binding sites for transcription factors in their regulatory region, and genes that via transcription factors either are regulated by or regulate other genes. We find that the two types of genes ("isolated" and "regulatory" genes show a clear statistical repulsion and have different ranges of correlations. In particular we find that isolated genes have a preference for shorter intergenic distances. Conclusions These findings support previous evidence from gene expression patterns for two distinct logical types of control, namely digital control (i.e. network-based control mediated by dedicated transcription factors and analog control (i.e. control based on genome structure and mediated by neighborhood on the genome.

  20. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  1. Heterogeneity of Calcium Channel/cAMP-Dependent Transcriptional Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    The major function of the voltage-gated calcium channels is to provide the Ca(2+) flux into the cell. L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav1) serve as voltage sensors that couple membrane depolarization to many intracellular processes. Electrical activity in excitable cells affects gene expression through signaling pathways involved in the excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. E-T coupling starts with activation of the Cav1 channel and results in initiation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription. In this review we discuss the new quantitative approaches to measuring E-T signaling events. We describe the use of wavelet transform to detect heterogeneity of transcriptional activation in nuclei. Furthermore, we discuss the properties of discovered microdomains of nuclear signaling associated with the E-T coupling and the basis of the frequency-dependent transcriptional regulation.

  2. The eukaryotic gene transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornberg, R D

    2001-08-01

    Seven purified proteins may be combined to reconstitute regulated, promoter-dependent RNA polymerase II transcription: five general transcription factors, Mediator, and RNA polymerase II. The entire system has been conserved across species from yeast to humans. The structure of RNA polymerase II, consisting of 10 polypeptides with a mass of about 500 kDa, has been determined at atomic resolution. On the basis of this structure, that of an actively transcribing RNA polymerase II complex has been determined as well.

  3. Systematic identification of transcription factors associated with patient survival in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Pedro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant activation or expression of transcription factors has been implicated in the tumorigenesis of various types of cancer. In spite of the prevalent application of microarray experiments for profiling gene expression in cancer samples, they provide limited information regarding the activities of transcription factors. However, the association between transcription factors and cancers is largely dependent on the transcription regulatory activities rather than mRNA expression levels. Results In this paper, we propose a computational approach that integrates microarray expression data with the transcription factor binding site information to systematically identify transcription factors associated with patient survival given a specific cancer type. This approach was applied to two gene expression data sets for breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. We found that two transcription factor families, the steroid nuclear receptor family and the ATF/CREB family, are significantly correlated with the survival of patients with breast cancer; and that a transcription factor named T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 is significantly correlated with acute myeloid leukemia patient survival. Conclusion Our analysis identifies transcription factors associating with patient survival and provides insight into the regulatory mechanism underlying the breast cancer and leukemia. The transcription factors identified by our method are biologically meaningful and consistent with prior knowledge. As an insightful tool, this approach can also be applied to other microarray cancer data sets to help researchers better understand the intricate relationship between transcription factors and diseases.

  4. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Modeling of Transcriptional Pausing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vasisht R. Tadigotla; Dáibhid Ó. Maoiléidigh; Anirvan M. Sengupta; Vitaly Epshtein; Richard H. Ebright; Evgeny Nudler; Andrei E. Ruckenstein

    2006-01-01

    We present a statistical mechanics approach for the prediction of backtracked pauses in bacterial transcription elongation derived from structural models of the transcription elongation complex (EC...

  5. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions taken...

  6. PlnTFDB: an integrative plant transcription factor database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzicic Slobodan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs are key regulatory proteins that enhance or repress the transcriptional rate of their target genes by binding to specific promoter regions (i.e. cis-acting elements upon activation or de-activation of upstream signaling cascades. TFs thus constitute master control elements of dynamic transcriptional networks. TFs have fundamental roles in almost all biological processes (development, growth and response to environmental factors and it is assumed that they play immensely important functions in the evolution of species. In plants, TFs have been employed to manipulate various types of metabolic, developmental and stress response pathways. Cross-species comparison and identification of regulatory modules and hence TFs is thought to become increasingly important for the rational design of new plant biomass. Up to now, however, no computational repository is available that provides access to the largely complete sets of transcription factors of sequenced plant genomes. Description PlnTFDB is an integrative plant transcription factor database that provides a web interface to access large (close to complete sets of transcription factors of several plant species, currently encompassing Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress, Populus trichocarpa (poplar, Oryza sativa (rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Ostreococcus tauri. It also provides an access point to its daughter databases of a species-centered representation of transcription factors (OstreoTFDB, ChlamyTFDB, ArabTFDB, PoplarTFDB and RiceTFDB. Information including protein sequences, coding regions, genomic sequences, expressed sequence tags (ESTs, domain architecture and scientific literature is provided for each family. Conclusion We have created lists of putatively complete sets of transcription factors and other transcriptional regulators for five plant genomes. They are publicly available through http://plntfdb.bio.uni-potsdam.de. Further data will be

  7. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf

    2010-10-21

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  8. Structural Analysis of the Key Intermediate Formed during Transcription through a Nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H-W; Shaytan, A K; Hsieh, F-K; Kulaeva, O I; Kirpichnikov, M P; Studitsky, V M

    2013-01-01

    Transcription through chromatin by different RNA polymerases produces different biological outcomes and is accompanied by either nucleosome survival at the original location (Pol II-type mechanism) or backward nucleosome translocation along DNA (Pol III-type mechanism). It has been proposed that differences in the structure of the key intermediates formed during transcription dictate the fate of the nucleosomes. To evaluate this possibility, structure of the key intermediate formed during transcription by Pol III-type mechanism was studied by DNase I footprinting and molecular modeling. The Pol III-type mechanism is characterized by less efficient formation of the key intermediate required for nucleosome survival (Ø-loop, Pol II-type mechanism), most likely due to steric interference between the RNA polymerase and DNA in the Ø-loop. The data suggest that the lower efficiency of Ø-loop formation induces formation of a lower nucleosomal barrier and nucleosome translocation during transcription by Pol III-type mechanism.

  9. Transcriptional coordination of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratsios, Paschalis; Pinan-Lucarré, Bérangère; Kerk, Sze Yen; Weinreb, Alexis; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-05-18

    During nervous system development, postmitotic neurons face the challenge of generating and structurally organizing specific synapses with appropriate synaptic partners. An important unexplored question is whether the process of synaptogenesis is coordinated with the adoption of specific signaling properties of a neuron. Such signaling properties are defined by the neurotransmitter system that a neuron uses to communicate with postsynaptic partners, the neurotransmitter receptor type used to receive input from presynaptic neurons, and, potentially, other sensory receptors that activate a neuron. Elucidating the mechanisms that coordinate synaptogenesis, neuronal activation, and neurotransmitter signaling in a postmitotic neuron represents one key approach to understanding how neurons develop as functional units. Using the SAB class of Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons as a model system, we show here that the phylogenetically conserved COE-type transcription factor UNC-3 is required for synaptogenesis. UNC-3 directly controls the expression of the ADAMTS-like protein MADD-4/Punctin, a presynaptically secreted synapse-organizing molecule that clusters postsynaptic receptors. UNC-3 also controls the assembly of presynaptic specializations and ensures the coordinated expression of enzymes and transporters that define the cholinergic neurotransmitter identity of the SAB neurons. Furthermore, synaptic output properties of the SAB neurons are coordinated with neuronal activation and synaptic input, as evidenced by UNC-3 also regulating the expression of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and putative stretch receptors. Our study shows how synaptogenesis and distinct, function-defining signaling features of a postmitotic neuron are hardwired together through coordinated transcriptional control.

  10. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vicari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2, encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  11. Structural basis of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Yu; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Tuske, Steve; Ho, Mary X; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2012-11-23

    During transcription initiation, RNA polymerase (RNAP) binds and unwinds promoter DNA to form an RNAP-promoter open complex. We have determined crystal structures at 2.9 and 3.0 Å resolution of functional transcription initiation complexes comprising Thermus thermophilus RNA polymerase, σ(A), and a promoter DNA fragment corresponding to the transcription bubble and downstream double-stranded DNA of the RNAP-promoter open complex. The structures show that σ recognizes the -10 element and discriminator element through interactions that include the unstacking and insertion into pockets of three DNA bases and that RNAP recognizes the -4/+2 region through interactions that include the unstacking and insertion into a pocket of the +2 base. The structures further show that interactions between σ and template-strand single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preorganize template-strand ssDNA to engage the RNAP active center.

  12. Transcription factors - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A hearty wellcome to prof. Higgins editorial toil: a necessary tool for those colleagues (young and older fighting each day with the transcription factor they are involved with. In fact, the book is a full coverage compendium of state of the art papers dealing with practical thecniques and theoretical concepts about transcription factors. Each of the chapters (twenty-four is written by colleagues already working with one of the many trascription factors we become acquainted with. For the sake of the reader the volume is divided in four parts: Part I is a brief (when compared to the others three ! introductory presentation of the shuttling (i.e., transcription factor nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking achieved by three reviews presentation of this biologically critical phenomenon. Part II (nine chapters is devoted to the necessary techniques to study nuclear translocation ...............

  13. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  14. Analysis of tomato spotted wilt virus genome transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippenberg, van I.C.

    2005-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is the type species of the genus Tospovirus within the Bunyaviridae, a family of segmented negative strand RNA viruses. Although much ground has been covered in the past two decades, many questions concerning the mechanism of replication and transcription of this

  15. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene exp

  16. Analysis of tomato spotted wilt virus genome transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippenberg, van I.C.

    2005-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is the type species of the genus Tospovirus within the Bunyaviridae, a family of segmented negative strand RNA viruses. Although much ground has been covered in the past two decades, many questions concerning the mechanism of replication and transcription of this imp

  17. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.;

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes...... as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics...

  18. Subventricular zone microglia transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starossom, Sarah C; Imitola, Jaime; Wang, Yue; Cao, Li; Khoury, Samia J

    2011-07-01

    Microglia play an important role in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system. There is evidence of microglial diversity with distinct phenotypes exhibiting either neuroprotection and repair or neurotoxicity. However the precise molecular mechanisms underlying this diversity are still unknown. Using a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we performed transcriptional profiling of isolated subventricular zone microglia from the acute and chronic disease phases of EAE. We found that microglia exhibit disease phase specific gene expression signatures, that correspond to unique gene ontology functions and genomic networks. Our data demonstrate for the first time, distinct transcriptional networks of microglia activation in vivo, that suggests a role as mediators of injury or repair.

  19. Characterizing disease states from topological properties of transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluger Harriet M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput gene expression experiments yield large amounts of data that can augment our understanding of disease processes, in addition to classifying samples. Here we present new paradigms of data Separation based on construction of transcriptional regulatory networks for normal and abnormal cells using sequence predictions, literature based data and gene expression studies. We analyzed expression datasets from a number of diseased and normal cells, including different types of acute leukemia, and breast cancer with variable clinical outcome. Results We constructed sample-specific regulatory networks to identify links between transcription factors (TFs and regulated genes that differentiate between healthy and diseased states. This approach carries the advantage of identifying key transcription factor-gene pairs with differential activity between healthy and diseased states rather than merely using gene expression profiles, thus alluding to processes that may be involved in gene deregulation. We then generalized this approach by studying simultaneous changes in functionality of multiple regulatory links pointing to a regulated gene or emanating from one TF (or changes in gene centrality defined by its in-degree or out-degree measures, respectively. We found that samples can often be separated based on these measures of gene centrality more robustly than using individual links. We examined distributions of distances (the number of links needed to traverse the path between each pair of genes in the transcriptional networks for gene subsets whose collective expression profiles could best separate each dataset into predefined groups. We found that genes that optimally classify samples are concentrated in neighborhoods in the gene regulatory networks. This suggests that genes that are deregulated in diseased states exhibit a remarkable degree of connectivity. Conclusion Transcription factor-regulated gene links and

  20. Apparent ploidy effects on silencing are post-transcriptional at HML and telomeres in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny M McLaughlan

    Full Text Available The repression of genes in regions of heterochromatin is known as transcriptional silencing. It occurs in a wide range of organisms and can have importance in adaptation to the environment, developmental changes and disease. The model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for many years to study transcriptional silencing, but until recently no study has been made in relation to ploidy. The aim of this work was to compare transcriptional silencing in haploids and diploids at both telomeres and the hidden mating-type (HM loci. Transcriptional silencing was assayed, by growth on 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA media or by flow cytometry, on strains where a telomere or HM locus was marked. RNA levels were measured by quantitative RT-PCR to confirm that effects were transcriptional. 5-FOA assays and flow cytometry were consistent with transcriptional silencing at telomeres and at HML being reduced as ploidy increases which agreed with conclusions in previous publications. However, QRT-PCR revealed that transcriptional silencing was unaffected by ploidy and thus protein levels were increasing independently of RNA levels. At telomere XI left (XI-L, changes in protein level were strongly influenced by mating-type, whereas at HML mating-type had much less influence. The post-transcriptional effects seen in this study, illustrate the often ignored need to measure RNA levels when assaying transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  1. Brain Region and Cell Type Transcripts for Informative Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    to 8, the caudoputamen (CP), Globus pallidus internal and external segment (GPi, GPe), inner cerebral cortex (CTX), piriform cortex (PIR), corpus...Hippocampus Formation), PIR ( piriform cortex), and TH (Thalamus). More specifically, the VS region is usually increased with age and enlarged in a number of

  2. PCV-2感染对PK-15细胞IL mRNA转录水平的影响%Analysis of the transcriptional profiles of inflammatory related cytokines of PK-15 cell cultures following Porcine circovirus type 2 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商艳红; 刘欣辛; 李金磊; 王淑娟; 魏静; 赵岩; 崔保安; 魏战勇

    2012-01-01

    【Objective】The study was conducted to investigate the effect of Porcine circovirus type 2(PCV-2) on the expression of inflammatory cytokines in PK-15 cells(PK-15),and to explore the host and PCV-2 interaction and the mechanism for cellular inflammatory responses.【Method】PCV-2 was used to infect PK-15 cells,then the viral DNA and the transcript level of inflammatory cytokines(IL-6,IL-8,IL-12p35,IL-12p40,IL-13,IL-17 and IL-18) were detected and analyzed in different post-infectious time using real-time PCR,respectively.【Result】The results showed that the mRNA transcript levels of IL-6,IL-13,IL-17,IL-18 significantly decreased on 12 h postinoculation(p.i.),however,the mRNA transcript levels notably increased on 24 h p.i.The mRNA transcript levels of IL-8 were 2.5 times the control group within 48 h p.i,and notably increased on 24 h p.i;The mRNA transcript levels of IL-12p35,IL-12p40 were significantly lower than the control with time.【Conclusion】The mRNA transcript levels of IL-6,IL-8,IL-13,IL-17,IL-18 cytokines increased,and the level of IL-12 decreased when PCV-2 infected PK-15 cells.The results suggested that the inflammatory responses of PK-15 cells induced by PCV-2 infection were associated with the changes of inflammatory related cytokines.%【目的】观察猪圆环病毒2型(PCV-2)感染对猪肾传代细胞(PK-15细胞)炎性细胞因子白细胞介素(IL)mRNA转录水平的影响,探讨宿主与病毒之间的作用关系及细胞炎性反应机制。【方法】以未感染PCV-2的PK-15细胞为对照组,运用相对定量PCR技术,测定和分析PCV-2感染PK-15细胞后,PCV-2DNA相对含量的变化,以及炎性细胞因子IL-6、IL-8、IL-12p35、IL-12p40、IL-13、IL-17、IL-18mRNA转录水平在1,6,12,24,48,和72h的变化。【结果】PCV-2感染后,PK-15细胞的IL-6、IL-13、IL-17、IL-18的mRNA转录水平在12h显著增加,24h后mRNA转录水平下降;IL-8的mRNA转录水平在48h

  3. Evolution of transcriptional regulation in closely related bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsoy Olga V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exponential growth of the number of fully sequenced genomes at varying taxonomic closeness allows one to characterize transcriptional regulation using comparative-genomics analysis instead of time-consuming experimental methods. A transcriptional regulatory unit consists of a transcription factor, its binding site and a regulated gene. These units constitute a graph which contains so-called “network motifs”, subgraphs of a given structure. Here we consider genomes of closely related Enterobacteriales and estimate the fraction of conserved network motifs and sites as well as positions under selection in various types of non-coding regions. Results Using a newly developed technique, we found that the highest fraction of positions under selection, approximately 50%, was observed in synvergon spacers (between consecutive genes from the same strand, followed by ~45% in divergon spacers (common 5’-regions, and ~10% in convergon spacers (common 3’-regions. The fraction of selected positions in functional regions was higher, 60% in transcription factor-binding sites and ~45% in terminators and promoters. Small, but significant differences were observed between Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. This fraction is similar to the one observed in eukaryotes. The conservation of binding sites demonstrated some differences between types of regulatory units. In E. coli, strains the interactions of the type “local transcriptional factor gene” turned out to be more conserved in feed-forward loops (FFLs compared to non-motif interactions. The coherent FFLs tend to be less conserved than the incoherent FFLs. A natural explanation is that the former imply functional redundancy. Conclusions A naïve hypothesis that FFL would be highly conserved turned out to be not entirely true: its conservation depends on its status in the transcriptional network and also from its usage. The fraction of positions under selection in

  4. Structural insights into transcription complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Imre; Blanco, Alexandre G; Boelens, Rolf; Cavarelli, Jean; Coll, Miquel; Folkers, Gert E; Nie, Yan; Pogenberg, Vivian; Schultz, Patrick; Wilmanns, Matthias; Moras, Dino; Poterszman, Arnaud

    2011-08-01

    Control of transcription allows the regulation of cell activity in response to external stimuli and research in the field has greatly benefited from efforts in structural biology. In this review, based on specific examples from the European SPINE2-COMPLEXES initiative, we illustrate the impact of structural proteomics on our understanding of the molecular basis of gene expression. While most atomic structures were obtained by X-ray crystallography, the impact of solution NMR and cryo-electron microscopy is far from being negligible. Here, we summarize some highlights and illustrate the importance of specific technologies on the structural biology of protein-protein or protein/DNA transcription complexes: structure/function analysis of components the eukaryotic basal and activated transcription machinery with focus on the TFIID and TFIIH multi-subunit complexes as well as transcription regulators such as members of the nuclear hormone receptor families. We also discuss molecular aspects of promoter recognition and epigenetic control of gene expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural insights into transcription complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, I.; Blanco, A.G.; Boelens, R.; Cavarelli, J.; Coll, M.; Folkers, G.E.; Nie, Y.; Pogenberg, V.; Schultz, P.; Wilmanns, M.; Moras, D.; Poterszman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Control of transcription allows the regulation of cell activity in response to external stimuli and research in the field has greatly benefited from efforts in structural biology. In this review, based on specific examples from the European SPINE2-COMPLEXES initiative, we illustrate the impact of

  6. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  7. Regulating transcription traffic around DSBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plosky, Brian S

    2015-05-07

    If a double-strand break (DSB) occurs and either a DNA polymerase or RNA polymerase is coming along, how do we save the train? In this issue of Molecular Cell, Ui et al. (2015) describe a connection between an elongation factor and a repressive complex to prevent transcription in proximity to a DSB.

  8. HDG1 transcription factor targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.; Boutilier, K.A.; Sanchez Perez, Gabino

    2015-01-01

    The AIL transcription factor BABY BOOM (BBM) is required together with the related PLETHORA proteins for embryo and root meristem development and its expression is sufficient to confer pluripotency and totipotency to somatic tissues. We show that BBM and other AIL proteins interact with multiple

  9. Transcriptional networks in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kenichi; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-05-01

    Next to numerous abiotic stresses, plants are constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens within their environment. Thus, their ability to survive and prosper during the course of evolution was strongly dependent on adapting efficient strategies to perceive and to respond to such potential threats. It is therefore not surprising that modern plants have a highly sophisticated immune repertoire consisting of diverse signal perception and intracellular signaling pathways. This signaling network is intricate and deeply interconnected, probably reflecting the diverse lifestyles and infection strategies used by the multitude of invading phytopathogens. Moreover it allows signal communication between developmental and defense programs thereby ensuring that plant growth and fitness are not significantly retarded. How plants integrate and prioritize the incoming signals and how this information is transduced to enable appropriate immune responses is currently a major research area. An important finding has been that pathogen-triggered cellular responses involve massive transcriptional reprogramming within the host. Additional key observations emerging from such studies are that transcription factors (TFs) are often sites of signal convergence and that signal-regulated TFs act in concert with other context-specific TFs and transcriptional co-regulators to establish sensory transcription regulatory networks required for plant immunity.

  10. Current and emerging approaches to define intestinal epithelium-specific transcriptional networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krûger; Boyd, Mette; Danielsen, Erik Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Upon developmental or environmental cues, the composition of transcription factors in a transcriptional regulatory network is deeply implicated in controlling the signature of the gene expression and thereby specifies the cell- or tissue-type. Novel methods including ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq have b...

  11. Current and emerging approaches to define intestinal epithelium-specific transcriptional networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krüger; Boyd, Mette; Danielsen, Erik Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Upon developmental or environmental cues, the composition of transcription factors in a transcriptional regulatory network is deeply implicated in controlling the signature of the gene expression and thereby specifies the cell or tissue type. Novel methods including ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq have be...

  12. Integrative analysis of histone ChIP-seq and transcription data using Bayesian mixture models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Schäfer, Martin; Porse, Bo T;

    2014-01-01

    Histone modifications are a key epigenetic mechanism to activate or repress the transcription of genes. Datasets of matched transcription data and histone modification data obtained by ChIP-seq exist, but methods for integrative analysis of both data types are still rare. Here, we present a novel...

  13. Stepwise mechanism for transcription fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorov Savva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription is the first step of gene expression and is characterized by a high fidelity of RNA synthesis. During transcription, the RNA polymerase active centre discriminates against not just non-complementary ribo NTP substrates but also against complementary 2'- and 3'-deoxy NTPs. A flexible domain of the RNA polymerase active centre, the Trigger Loop, was shown to play an important role in this process, but the mechanisms of this participation remained elusive. Results Here we show that transcription fidelity is achieved through a multi-step process. The initial binding in the active centre is the major discrimination step for some non-complementary substrates, although for the rest of misincorporation events discrimination at this step is very poor. During the second step, non-complementary and 2'-deoxy NTPs are discriminated against based on differences in reaction transition state stabilization and partly in general base catalysis, for correct versus non-correct substrates. This step is determined by two residues of the Trigger Loop that participate in catalysis. In the following step, non-complementary and 2'-deoxy NTPs are actively removed from the active centre through a rearrangement of the Trigger Loop. The only step of discrimination against 3'-deoxy substrates, distinct from the ones above, is based on failure to orient the Trigger Loop catalytic residues in the absence of 3'OH. Conclusions We demonstrate that fidelity of transcription by multi-subunit RNA polymerases is achieved through a stepwise process. We show that individual steps contribute differently to discrimination against various erroneous substrates. We define the mechanisms and contributions of each of these steps to the overall fidelity of transcription.

  14. Modeling transcriptional networks in Drosophila development at multiple scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative models of developmental processes can provide insights at multiple scales. Ultimately, models may be particularly informative for key questions about network level behavior during development such as how does the system respond to environmental perturbation, or operate reliably in different genetic backgrounds? The transcriptional networks that pattern the Drosophila embryo have been the subject of numerous quantitative experimental studies coupled to modeling frameworks in recent years. In this review, we describe three studies that consider these networks at different levels of molecular detail and therefore result in different types of insights. We also discuss other developmental transcriptional networks operating in Drosophila, with the goal of highlighting what additional insights they may provide.

  15. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Felicia S L; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-12-16

    Combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding is essential for cell-type-specific gene regulation. However, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of TF interactions, including to what extent constrained spacing and orientation of interacting TFs are critical for regulatory element activity. To examine the relative prevalence of the 'enhanceosome' versus the 'TF collective' model of combinatorial TF binding, a comprehensive analysis of TF binding site sequences in large scale datasets is necessary. We developed a motif-pair discovery pipeline to identify motif co-occurrences with preferential distance(s) between motifs in TF-bound regions. Utilizing a compendium of 289 mouse haematopoietic TF ChIP-seq datasets, we demonstrate that haematopoietic-related motif-pairs commonly occur with highly conserved constrained spacing and orientation between motifs. Furthermore, motif clustering revealed specific associations for both heterotypic and homotypic motif-pairs with particular haematopoietic cell types. We also showed that disrupting the spacing between motif-pairs significantly affects transcriptional activity in a well-known motif-pair-E-box and GATA, and in two previously unknown motif-pairs with constrained spacing-Ets and Homeobox as well as Ets and E-box. In this study, we provide evidence for widespread sequence-specific TF pair interaction with DNA that conforms to the 'enhanceosome' model, and furthermore identify associations between specific haematopoietic cell-types and motif-pairs. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. GGRNA: an ultrafast, transcript-oriented search engine for genes and transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yuki; Bono, Hidemasa

    2012-07-01

    GGRNA (http://GGRNA.dbcls.jp/) is a Google-like, ultrafast search engine for genes and transcripts. The web server accepts arbitrary words and phrases, such as gene names, IDs, gene descriptions, annotations of gene and even nucleotide/amino acid sequences through one simple search box, and quickly returns relevant RefSeq transcripts. A typical search takes just a few seconds, which dramatically enhances the usability of routine searching. In particular, GGRNA can search sequences as short as 10 nt or 4 amino acids, which cannot be handled easily by popular sequence analysis tools. Nucleotide sequences can be searched allowing up to three mismatches, or the query sequences may contain degenerate nucleotide codes (e.g. N, R, Y, S). Furthermore, Gene Ontology annotations, Enzyme Commission numbers and probe sequences of catalog microarrays are also incorporated into GGRNA, which may help users to conduct searches by various types of keywords. GGRNA web server will provide a simple and powerful interface for finding genes and transcripts for a wide range of users. All services at GGRNA are provided free of charge to all users.

  17. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2.

  18. From tissue mechanics to transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmey, Paul A; Wells, Rebecca G; Assoian, Richard K; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2013-10-01

    Changes in tissue stiffness are frequently associated with diseases such as cancer, fibrosis, and atherosclerosis. Several recent studies suggest that, in addition to resulting from pathology, mechanical changes may play a role akin to soluble factors in causing the progression of disease, and similar mechanical control might be essential for normal tissue development and homeostasis. Many cell types alter their structure and function in response to exogenous forces or as a function of the mechanical properties of the materials to which they adhere. This review summarizes recent progress in identifying intracellular signaling pathways, and especially transcriptional programs, that are differentially activated when cells adhere to materials with different mechanical properties or when they are subject to tension arising from external forces. Several cytoplasmic or cytoskeletal signaling pathways involving small GTPases, focal adhesion kinase and transforming growth factor beta as well as the transcriptional regulators MRTF-A, NFκB, and Yap/Taz have emerged as important mediators of mechanical signaling. © 2013 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cloning and Expression Profiles of TaWRKY46,a WRKY Type Transcription Factor Gene in Wheat(Triticum aestivum L.)%小麦转录因子基因TaWRKY46的克隆与表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁长欢; 孙昭华; 李小娟; 肖凯

    2012-01-01

    在富集低磷胁迫特异表达基因的小麦根系cDNA差减杂交文库中,鉴定了1个小麦WRKY型转录因子基因(TaWRKY46).依据该基因的cDNA序列,在石新828中克隆了该基因.TaWRKY46的cDNA长度为872 bp,开放阅读框为669 bp,编码222个氨基酸残基,氨基酸组成上含有保守的WRKY基序和C2H2基序.系统进化分析表明,TaWRKY46与大麦WRKY34可能来自相同的祖先.与对照供磷水平(2 mmol/L Pi)相比,低磷处理(20 μmol/L Pi)使根系中TaWRKY46的转录本数量明显增多,表明TaWRK46对低磷胁迫逆境产生了明显应答.此外,TaWRKY46对氮、钾、锌和钙养分胁迫也表现明显的上调表达特征.表明该基因编码蛋白在介导上述养分逆境信号的转导中具有重要作用.此外,TaWRKY46对干旱、盐分等非生物逆境和脱落酸(ABA)也产生明显应答.因此,TaWRKY46是小麦种属中应答多种非生物逆境的重要调控转录因子,在增强小麦抵御养分胁迫和非生物逆境的能力中可能具有重要作用.%One WRKY type transcription factor gene designated as TaWRKY46 was identified in a root subtrae-tive cDNA library in which the differential expressed genes responding to the low-Pi stress were enriched. Based on the eDNA sequence of TaWRKY46, this gene was cloned in wheat cultivar Shixin828. The cDNA of TaWRKY46 was 872 bp in length, with an open reading frame of 669 bp and an encoded polypeptide of 222 aa. TaWRKY46 contains a conserved WRKY motif and a C2H2 conserved domain. Phylogenetic analysis displays a high similarity between TaWRKY46 and HvWRKY34, a WRKY transcription family gene in barley , suggesting them to be possibly derived from a same ancestor. Compared with those in sufficient-P (2 mmol/L Pi) condition,the transcripts of TaWRKY46 in roots under the deficient-P (20 |x"mol/L Pi) condition were dramatically increased, suggesting that TaWRKY46 gene was involved in the response to low P stress in the plants. In the meantime, TaWRKY46 was

  20. Investigating transcription reinitiation through in vitro approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieci, Giorgio; Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    By influencing the number of RNA molecules repeatedly synthesized from the same gene, the control of transcription reinitiation has the potential to shape the transcriptome. Transcription reinitiation mechanisms have been mainly addressed in vitro, through approaches based on both crude and reconstituted systems. These studies support the notion that transcription reinitiation and its regulation rely on dedicated networks of molecular interactions within transcription machineries. At the same time, comparison with in vivo transcription rates suggests that additional mechanisms, factors and conditions must exist in the nucleus, whose biochemical elucidation is a fascinating challenge for future in vitro transcription studies.

  1. Pleiotropic action of aldosterone in epithelia mediated by transcription and post-transcription mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrey, F; Pearce, D; Pfeiffer, R; Spindler, B; Mastroberardino, L; Summa, V; Zecevic, M

    2000-04-01

    The aldosterone-induced increase in sodium reabsorption across tight epithelia can be divided schematically into two functional phases: an early regulatory phase starting after a lag period of 20 to 60 minutes, during which the pre-existing transport machinery is activated, and a late phase (>2.5 h), which can be viewed as an anabolic action leading to a further amplification/differentiation of the Na+ transport machinery. At the transcriptional level, both early and late responses are initiated during the lag period, but the functional impact of newly synthesized regulatory proteins is faster than that of the structural ones. K-Ras2 and SGK were identified as the first early aldosterone-induced regulatory proteins in A6 epithelia. Their mRNAs also were shown to be regulated in vivo by aldosterone, and their expression (constitutively active K-Ras2 and wild-type SGK) was shown to increase the function of ENaC coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes. Recently, aldosterone was also shown to act on transcription factors in A6 epithelia: It down-regulates the mRNAs of the proliferation-promoting c-Myc, c-Jun, and c-Fos by a post-transcriptional mechanism, whereas it up-regulates that of Fra-2 (c-Fos antagonist) at the transcriptional level. Together, these new data illustrate the complexity of the regulatory network controlled by aldosterone and support the view that its early action is mediated by the induction of key regulatory proteins such as K-Ras2 and SGK. These early induced proteins are sites of convergence for different regulatory inputs, and thus, their aldosterone-regulated expression level tunes the impact of other regulatory cascades on sodium transport. This suggests mechanisms for the escape from aldosterone action.

  2. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  3. Engineering prokaryotic transcriptional activators as metabolite biosensors in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise; Snoek, Tim; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin

    2016-01-01

    real-time monitoring of production has attracted attention. Here we applied systematic engineering of multiple parameters to search for a general biosensor design in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on small-molecule binding transcriptional activators from the prokaryote superfamily......,cis-muconic acid at different levels, and found that reporter gene output correlated with production. The transplantation of prokaryotic transcriptional activators into the eukaryotic chassis illustrates the potential of a hitherto untapped biosensor resource useful for biotechnological applications....... of LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs). We identified a design supporting LTTR-dependent activation of reporter gene expression in the presence of cognate small-molecule inducers. As proof of principle, we applied the biosensors for in vivo screening of cells producing naringenin or cis...

  4. Decoding the Pluripotency Network: The Emergence of New Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chuen Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the successful isolation of mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs in the past decades, massive investigations have been conducted to dissect the pluripotency network that governs the ability of these cells to differentiate into all cell types. Beside the core Oct4-Sox2-Nanog circuitry, accumulating regulators, including transcription factors, epigenetic modifiers, microRNA and signaling molecules have also been found to play important roles in preserving pluripotency. Among the various regulations that orchestrate the cellular pluripotency program, transcriptional regulation is situated in the central position and appears to be dominant over other regulatory controls. In this review, we would like to summarize the recent advancements in the accumulating findings of new transcription factors that play a critical role in controlling both pluripotency network and ESC identity.

  5. Determination and inference of eukaryotic transcription factor sequence specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirauch, Matthew T; Yang, Ally; Albu, Mihai; Cote, Atina G; Montenegro-Montero, Alejandro; Drewe, Philipp; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Lambert, Samuel A; Mann, Ishminder; Cook, Kate; Zheng, Hong; Goity, Alejandra; van Bakel, Harm; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Galli, Mary; Lewsey, Mathew G; Huang, Eryong; Mukherjee, Tuhin; Chen, Xiaoting; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Shaulsky, Gad; Walhout, Albertha J M; Bouget, François-Yves; Ratsch, Gunnar; Larrondo, Luis F; Ecker, Joseph R; Hughes, Timothy R

    2014-09-11

    Transcription factor (TF) DNA sequence preferences direct their regulatory activity, but are currently known for only ∼1% of eukaryotic TFs. Broadly sampling DNA-binding domain (DBD) types from multiple eukaryotic clades, we determined DNA sequence preferences for >1,000 TFs encompassing 54 different DBD classes from 131 diverse eukaryotes. We find that closely related DBDs almost always have very similar DNA sequence preferences, enabling inference of motifs for ∼34% of the ∼170,000 known or predicted eukaryotic TFs. Sequences matching both measured and inferred motifs are enriched in chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) peaks and upstream of transcription start sites in diverse eukaryotic lineages. SNPs defining expression quantitative trait loci in Arabidopsis promoters are also enriched for predicted TF binding sites. Importantly, our motif "library" can be used to identify specific TFs whose binding may be altered by human disease risk alleles. These data present a powerful resource for mapping transcriptional networks across eukaryotes.

  6. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Anna; Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE). These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function. PMID:24832221

  7. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Marcello

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE. These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function.

  8. Transcriptional Wiring of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Mutwil; Colin Ruprecht; Federico M. Giorgi; Martin Bringmann; Bj(o)rn Usadel; Staffan Persson

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the correspond-ing proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of anal-yses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  9. Cytoplasmic male sterility of tuber mustard is associated with the alternative spliced mitochondrial T gene transcripts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Yanxi; CHEN Zhujun; CAO Jiashu; CHEN Xuejun; LIU Xiaohui

    2004-01-01

    Two transcripts of T gene, T1170 and T1243, were obtained from the mitochondrial cDNA of tuber mustard CMS line. T1243 was a transcript with an intron unspliced, which has the basic characteristics of type Ⅱ intron. The expressions of the two transcripts were analyzed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The results showed that, at seedling stage, the expression of T gene was mainly in the form of T1170 but decreased with the development gradually, while the expression abundance of another transcript, T1243, increased gradually. The T1243 was prevalent at the profuse flowering stage. The expression pattern was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. These results suggested that the alternative spliced mitochondrial T gene transcripts were related to CMS of tuber mustard.

  10. Gfi1 and gfi1b repress rag transcription in plasmacytoid dendritic cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan T Chow

    Full Text Available Growth factor independence genes (Gfi1 and Gfi1b repress recombination activating genes (Rag transcription in developing B lymphocytes. Because all blood lineages originate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and different lineage progenitors have been shown to share transcription factor networks prior to cell fate commitment, we hypothesized that GFI family proteins may also play a role in repressing Rag transcription or a global lymphoid transcriptional program in other blood lineages. We tested the level of Rag transcription in various blood cells when Gfi1 and Gfi1b were deleted, and observed an upregulation of Rag expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs. Using microarray analysis, we observed that Gfi1 and Gfi1b do not regulate a lymphoid or pDC-specific transcriptional program. This study establishes a role for Gfi1 and Gfi1b in Rag regulation in a non-B lineage cell type.

  11. Engineered transcriptional systems for cyanobacterial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camsund, Daniel; Lindblad, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria can function as solar-driven biofactories thanks to their ability to perform photosynthesis and the ease with which they are genetically modified. In this review, we discuss transcriptional parts and promoters available for engineering cyanobacteria. First, we go through special cyanobacterial characteristics that may impact engineering, including the unusual cyanobacterial RNA polymerase, sigma factors and promoter types, mRNA stability, circadian rhythm, and gene dosage effects. Then, we continue with discussing component characteristics that are desirable for synthetic biology approaches, including decoupling, modularity, and orthogonality. We then summarize and discuss the latest promoters for use in cyanobacteria regarding characteristics such as regulation, strength, and dynamic range and suggest potential uses. Finally, we provide an outlook and suggest future developments that would advance the field and accelerate the use of cyanobacteria for renewable biotechnology.

  12. Engineered transcriptional systems for cyanobacterial biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eCamsund

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria can function as solar-driven biofactories thanks to their ability to perform photosynthesis and the ease with which they are genetically modified. In this review, we discuss transcriptional parts and promoters available for engineering cyanobacteria. First, we go through special cyanobacterial characteristics that may impact engineering, including the unusual cyanobacterial RNA polymerase, sigma factors and promoter types, mRNA stability, circadian rhythm, and gene dosage effects. Then, we continue with discussing component characteristics that are desirable for synthetic biology approaches, including decoupling, modularity and orthogonality. We then summarize and discuss the latest promoters for use in cyanobacteria regarding characteristics such as regulation, strength and dynamic range and suggest potential uses. Finally, we provide an outlook and suggest future developments that would advance the field and accelerate the use of cyanobacteria for renewable biotechnology.

  13. How to build transcriptional network models of mammalian pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrissa Kioussi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic regulatory networks of sequence specific transcription factors underlie pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Deciphering and representing the mammalian networks is a central problem in development, neurobiology, and regenerative medicine. Transcriptional networks specify intermingled embryonic cell populations during pattern formation in the vertebrate neural tube. Each embryonic population gives rise to a distinct type of adult neuron. The homeodomain transcription factor Lbx1 is expressed in five such populations and loss of Lbx1 leads to distinct respecifications in each of the five populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have purified normal and respecified pools of these five populations from embryos bearing one or two copies of the null Lbx1(GFP allele, respectively. Microarrays were used to show that expression levels of 8% of all transcription factor genes were altered in the respecified pool. These transcription factor genes constitute 20-30% of the active nodes of the transcriptional network that governs neural tube patterning. Half of the 141 regulated nodes were located in the top 150 clusters of ultraconserved non-coding regions. Generally, Lbx1 repressed genes that have expression patterns outside of the Lbx1-expressing domain and activated genes that have expression patterns inside the Lbx1-expressing domain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Constraining epistasis analysis of Lbx1 to only those cells that normally express Lbx1 allowed unprecedented sensitivity in identifying Lbx1 network interactions and allowed the interactions to be assigned to a specific set of cell populations. We call this method ANCEA, or active node constrained epistasis analysis, and think that it will be generally useful in discovering and assigning network interactions to specific populations. We discuss how ANCEA, coupled with population partitioning analysis, can greatly facilitate the systematic dissection of

  14. Transcript-RNA-templated DNA recombination and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Shen, Ying; Huang, Fei; Patel, Mikir; Yang, Taehwan; Ashley, Katie; Mazin, Alexander V; Storici, Francesca

    2014-11-20

    Homologous recombination is a molecular process that has multiple important roles in DNA metabolism, both for DNA repair and genetic variation in all forms of life. Generally, homologous recombination involves the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules; however, homologous recombination can also occur between RNA molecules, as shown for RNA viruses. Previous research showed that synthetic RNA oligonucleotides can act as templates for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in yeast and human cells, and artificial long RNA templates injected in ciliate cells can guide genomic rearrangements. Here we report that endogenous transcript RNA mediates homologous recombination with chromosomal DNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed a system to detect the events of homologous recombination initiated by transcript RNA following the repair of a chromosomal DSB occurring either in a homologous but remote locus, or in the same transcript-generating locus in reverse-transcription-defective yeast strains. We found that RNA-DNA recombination is blocked by ribonucleases H1 and H2. In the presence of H-type ribonucleases, DSB repair proceeds through a complementary DNA intermediate, whereas in their absence, it proceeds directly through RNA. The proximity of the transcript to its chromosomal DNA partner in the same locus facilitates Rad52-driven homologous recombination during DSB repair. We demonstrate that yeast and human Rad52 proteins efficiently catalyse annealing of RNA to a DSB-like DNA end in vitro. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of homologous recombination and DNA repair in which transcript RNA is used as a template for DSB repair. Thus, considering the abundance of RNA transcripts in cells, RNA may have a marked impact on genomic stability and plasticity.

  15. Tat gets the "green" light on transcription initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashanchi Fatah

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Tat transactivation is an essential step in the viral life cycle. Over the past several years, it has become widely accepted that Tat exerts its transcriptional effect by binding the transactivation-responsive region (TAR and enhancing transcriptional elongation. Consistent with this hypothesis, it has been shown that Tat promotes the binding of P-TEFb, a transcription elongation factor composed of cyclin T1 and cdk9, and the interaction of Tat with P-TEFb and TAR leads to hyperphosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNA Pol II and increased processivity of RNA Pol II. A recent report, however, has generated renewed interest that Tat may also play a critical role in transcription complex (TC assembly at the preinitiation step. Using in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, the authors reported that the HIV TC contains TBP but not TBP-associated factors. The stimulatory effect involved the direct interaction of Tat and P-TEFb and was evident at the earliest step of TC assembly, the TBP-TATA box interaction. In this article, we will review this data in context of earlier data which also support Tat's involvement in transcriptional complex assembly. Specifically, we will discuss experiments which demonstrated that Tat interacted with TBP and increased transcription initiation complex stability in cell free assays. We will also discuss studies which demonstrated that over expression of TBP alone was sufficient to obtain Tat activated transcription in vitro and in vivo. Finally, studies using self-cleaving ribozymes which suggested that Tat transactivation was not compatible with pausing of the RNA Pol II at the TAR site will be discussed.

  16. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  17. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A

    2015-05-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity.

  18. Developmental transcriptional networks are required to maintain neuronal subtype identity in the mature nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin T Eade

    Full Text Available During neurogenesis, transcription factors combinatorially specify neuronal fates and then differentiate subtype identities by inducing subtype-specific gene expression profiles. But how is neuronal subtype identity maintained in mature neurons? Modeling this question in two Drosophila neuronal subtypes (Tv1 and Tv4, we test whether the subtype transcription factor networks that direct differentiation during development are required persistently for long-term maintenance of subtype identity. By conditional transcription factor knockdown in adult Tv neurons after normal development, we find that most transcription factors within the Tv1/Tv4 subtype transcription networks are indeed required to maintain Tv1/Tv4 subtype-specific gene expression in adults. Thus, gene expression profiles are not simply "locked-in," but must be actively maintained by persistent developmental transcription factor networks. We also examined the cross-regulatory relationships between all transcription factors that persisted in adult Tv1/Tv4 neurons. We show that certain critical cross-regulatory relationships that had existed between these transcription factors during development were no longer present in the mature adult neuron. This points to key differences between developmental and maintenance transcriptional regulatory networks in individual neurons. Together, our results provide novel insight showing that the maintenance of subtype identity is an active process underpinned by persistently active, combinatorially-acting, developmental transcription factors. These findings have implications for understanding the maintenance of all long-lived cell types and the functional degeneration of neurons in the aging brain.

  19. Transcription Against an Applied Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong; Wang, Michelle D.; Svoboda, Karel; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M.; Gelles, Jeff

    1995-12-01

    The force produced by a single molecule of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase during transcription was measured optically. Polymerase immobilized on a surface was used to transcribe a DNA template attached to a polystyrene bead 0.5 micrometer in diameter. The bead position was measured by interferometry while a force opposing translocation of the polymerase along the DNA was applied with an optical trap. At saturating nucleoside triphosphate concentrations, polymerase molecules stalled reversibly at a mean applied force estimated to be 14 piconewtons. This force is substantially larger than those measured for the cytoskeletal motors kinesin and myosin and exceeds mechanical loads that are estimated to oppose transcriptional elongation in vivo. The data are consistent with efficient conversion of the free energy liberated by RNA synthesis into mechanical work.

  20. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Resetting the transcription factor network reverses terminal chronic hepatic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Taichiro; Bell, Aaron; Brooks, Jenna M; Setoyama, Kentaro; Melis, Marta; Han, Bing; Fukumitsu, Ken; Handa, Kan; Tian, Jianmin; Kaestner, Klaus H; Vodovotz, Yoram; Locker, Joseph; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fox, Ira J

    2015-04-01

    The cause of organ failure is enigmatic for many degenerative diseases, including end-stage liver disease. Here, using a CCl4-induced rat model of irreversible and fatal hepatic failure, which also exhibits terminal changes in the extracellular matrix, we demonstrated that chronic injury stably reprograms the critical balance of transcription factors and that diseased and dedifferentiated cells can be returned to normal function by re-expression of critical transcription factors, a process similar to the type of reprogramming that induces somatic cells to become pluripotent or to change their cell lineage. Forced re-expression of the transcription factor HNF4α induced expression of the other hepatocyte-expressed transcription factors; restored functionality in terminally diseased hepatocytes isolated from CCl4-treated rats; and rapidly reversed fatal liver failure in CCl4-treated animals by restoring diseased hepatocytes rather than replacing them with new hepatocytes or stem cells. Together, the results of our study indicate that disruption of the transcription factor network and cellular dedifferentiation likely mediate terminal liver failure and suggest reinstatement of this network has therapeutic potential for correcting organ failure without cell replacement.

  2. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  3. Sry is a transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, R A; Ostrer, H

    1994-09-01

    The SRY gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The mouse Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORFs) share a conserved DNA-binding domain (the HMG-box) yet exhibit no additional homology outside this region. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and mouse SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The mouse Sry HMG-box domain selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when challenged with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. When put under the control of a heterologous promotor, the mouse Sry gene activated transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was likewise observed for a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, when the mouse Sry gene was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-mouse Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive reporter gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and the mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  4. Functionality of intergenic transcription: an evolutionary comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Khaitovich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts.

  5. Functionality of Intergenic Transcription: An Evolutionary Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Johann; Giger, Thomas; Joerchel, Sabrina; Petzold, Ekkehard; Green, Richard E; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2006-01-01

    Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts. PMID:17040132

  6. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  7. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  8. Uncovering transcriptional interactions via an adaptive fuzzy logic approach

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    Chen Chung-Ming

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, only a limited number of transcriptional regulatory interactions have been uncovered. In a pilot study integrating sequence data with microarray data, a position weight matrix (PWM performed poorly in inferring transcriptional interactions (TIs, which represent physical interactions between transcription factors (TF and upstream sequences of target genes. Inferring a TI means that the promoter sequence of a target is inferred to match the consensus sequence motifs of a potential TF, and their interaction type such as AT or RT is also predicted. Thus, a robust PWM (rPWM was developed to search for consensus sequence motifs. In addition to rPWM, one feature extracted from ChIP-chip data was incorporated to identify potential TIs under specific conditions. An interaction type classifier was assembled to predict activation/repression of potential TIs using microarray data. This approach, combining an adaptive (learning fuzzy inference system and an interaction type classifier to predict transcriptional regulatory networks, was named AdaFuzzy. Results AdaFuzzy was applied to predict TIs using real genomics data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following one of the latest advances in predicting TIs, constrained probabilistic sparse matrix factorization (cPSMF, and using 19 transcription factors (TFs, we compared AdaFuzzy to four well-known approaches using over-representation analysis and gene set enrichment analysis. AdaFuzzy outperformed these four algorithms. Furthermore, AdaFuzzy was shown to perform comparably to 'ChIP-experimental method' in inferring TIs identified by two sets of large scale ChIP-chip data, respectively. AdaFuzzy was also able to classify all predicted TIs into one or more of the four promoter architectures. The results coincided with known promoter architectures in yeast and provided insights into transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. Conclusion AdaFuzzy successfully integrates multiple types of

  9. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  10. TAF7: traffic controller in transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegonne, Anne; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Singer, Dinah S

    2013-01-01

    TAF7, a component of the TFIID complex, controls the first steps of transcription. It interacts with and regulates the enzymatic activities of transcription factors that regulate RNA polymerase II progression. Its diverse functions in transcription initiation are consistent with its essential role in cell proliferation.

  11. Interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling has been shown to be an important regulator of transcription that is broadly present in the cell. Here we review experimental work which shows that RNA polymerase is a powerful torsional motor that can alter DNA topology and structure, and DNA supercoiling in turn directly affects transcription elongation.

  12. A unified model for yeast transcript definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Carl G; van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Li, Joyce; Morris, Quaid D; Nislow, Corey; Greenblatt, Jack F; Hughes, Timothy R

    2014-01-01

    Identifying genes in the genomic context is central to a cell's ability to interpret the genome. Yet, in general, the signals used to define eukaryotic genes are poorly described. Here, we derived simple classifiers that identify where transcription will initiate and terminate using nucleic acid sequence features detectable by the yeast cell, which we integrate into a Unified Model (UM) that models transcription as a whole. The cis-elements that denote where transcription initiates function primarily through nucleosome depletion, and, using a synthetic promoter system, we show that most of these elements are sufficient to initiate transcription in vivo. Hrp1 binding sites are the major characteristic of terminators; these binding sites are often clustered in terminator regions and can terminate transcription bidirectionally. The UM predicts global transcript structure by modeling transcription of the genome using a hidden Markov model whose emissions are the outputs of the initiation and termination classifiers. We validated the novel predictions of the UM with available RNA-seq data and tested it further by directly comparing the transcript structure predicted by the model to the transcription generated by the cell for synthetic DNA segments of random design. We show that the UM identifies transcription start sites more accurately than the initiation classifier alone, indicating that the relative arrangement of promoter and terminator elements influences their function. Our model presents a concrete description of how the cell defines transcript units, explains the existence of nongenic transcripts, and provides insight into genome evolution.

  13. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  14. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, the gene most frequently mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Henson

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs comprise a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, due to axonal degeneration in the corticospinal motor tracts. HSPs are genetically heterogeneous and show autosomal dominant inheritance in ∼70-80% of cases, with additional cases being recessive or X-linked. The most common type of HSP is SPG4 with mutations in the SPAST gene, encoding spastin, which occurs in 40% of dominantly inherited cases and in ∼10% of sporadic cases. Both loss-of-function and dominant-negative mutation mechanisms have been described for SPG4, suggesting that precise or stoichiometric levels of spastin are necessary for biological function. Therefore, we hypothesized that regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of SPAST are important determinants of spastin biology, and if altered, could contribute to the development and progression of the disease. To examine the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, we used molecular phylogenetic methods to identify conserved sequences for putative transcription factor binding sites and miRNA targeting motifs in the SPAST promoter and 3'-UTR, respectively. By a variety of molecular methods, we demonstrate that SPAST transcription is positively regulated by NRF1 and SOX11. Furthermore, we show that miR-96 and miR-182 negatively regulate SPAST by effects on mRNA stability and protein level. These transcriptional and miRNA regulatory mechanisms provide new functional targets for mutation screening and therapeutic targeting in HSP.

  15. Regulation of transcription functions of the p53 tumor suppressor by the mdm-2 oncogene.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mdm-2, a zinc finger protein, negatively regulates the p53 tumor suppressor gene product by binding to it and preventing transcriptional activation (16). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Assays for p53 mediated transcription, repression and activation by mutant and wild-type p53 proteins were used to measure the ability of mdm-2 to block each activity. RESULTS: Mdm-2 was able to inhibit all three functions of the wild-type and mutant p53 activities; transcriptional activation by the wild-ty...

  16. Faithful transcription initiation from a mitochondrial promoter in transgenic plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohne, Alexandra-Viola; Ruf, Stephanie; Börner, Thomas; Bock, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    The transcriptional machineries of plastids and mitochondria in higher plants exhibit striking similarities. All mitochondrial genes and part of the plastid genes are transcribed by related phage-type RNA polymerases. Furthermore, the majority of mitochondrial promoters and a subset of plastid promoters show a similar structural organization. We show here that the plant mitochondrial atpA promoter is recognized by plastid RNA polymerases in vitro and in vivo. The Arabidopsis phage-type RNA polymerase RpoTp, an enzyme localized exclusively to plastids, was found to recognize the mitochondrial atpA promoter in in vitro assays suggesting the possibility that mitochondrial promoters might function as well in plastids. We have, therefore, generated transplastomic tobacco plants harboring in their chloroplast genome the atpA promoter fused to the coding region of the bacterial nptII gene. The chimeric nptII gene was found to be efficiently transcribed in chloroplasts. Mapping of the 5' ends of the nptII transcripts revealed accurate recognition of the atpA promoter by the chloroplast transcription machinery. We show further that the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the mitochondrial atpA transcript is capable of mediating translation in chloroplasts. The functional and evolutionary implications of these findings as well as possible applications in chloroplast genome engineering are discussed.

  17. Transcription Factors Exhibit Differential Conservation in Bacteria with Reduced Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Vásquez, Edgardo; Sánchez-Osorio, Ismael; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino

    2016-01-01

    The description of transcriptional regulatory networks has been pivotal in the understanding of operating principles under which organisms respond and adapt to varying conditions. While the study of the topology and dynamics of these networks has been the subject of considerable work, the investigation of the evolution of their topology, as a result of the adaptation of organisms to different environmental conditions, has received little attention. In this work, we study the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria from a genome reduction perspective, which manifests itself as the loss of genes at different degrees. We used the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli as a reference to compare 113 smaller, phylogenetically-related γ-proteobacteria, including 19 genomes of symbionts. We found that the type of regulatory action exerted by transcription factors, as genomes get progressively smaller, correlates well with their degree of conservation, with dual regulators being more conserved than repressors and activators in conditions of extreme reduction. In addition, we found that the preponderant conservation of dual regulators might be due to their role as both global regulators and nucleoid-associated proteins. We summarize our results in a conceptual model of how each TF type is gradually lost as genomes become smaller and give a rationale for the order in which this phenomenon occurs.

  18. Transcription Factors Exhibit Differential Conservation in Bacteria with Reduced Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Galán-Vásquez

    Full Text Available The description of transcriptional regulatory networks has been pivotal in the understanding of operating principles under which organisms respond and adapt to varying conditions. While the study of the topology and dynamics of these networks has been the subject of considerable work, the investigation of the evolution of their topology, as a result of the adaptation of organisms to different environmental conditions, has received little attention. In this work, we study the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria from a genome reduction perspective, which manifests itself as the loss of genes at different degrees. We used the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli as a reference to compare 113 smaller, phylogenetically-related γ-proteobacteria, including 19 genomes of symbionts. We found that the type of regulatory action exerted by transcription factors, as genomes get progressively smaller, correlates well with their degree of conservation, with dual regulators being more conserved than repressors and activators in conditions of extreme reduction. In addition, we found that the preponderant conservation of dual regulators might be due to their role as both global regulators and nucleoid-associated proteins. We summarize our results in a conceptual model of how each TF type is gradually lost as genomes become smaller and give a rationale for the order in which this phenomenon occurs.

  19. Transcriptional networks inferred from molecular signatures of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongbai, Ron; Idelman, Gila; Nordgard, Silje H; Cui, Wenwu; Jacobs, Jonathan L; Haggerty, Cynthia M; Chanock, Stephen J; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Livingston, Gary; Shaunessy, Patrick; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Kristensen, Vessela N; Bilke, Sven; Gardner, Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Global genomic approaches in cancer research have provided new and innovative strategies for the identification of signatures that differentiate various types of human cancers. Computational analysis of the promoter composition of the genes within these signatures may provide a powerful method for deducing the regulatory transcriptional networks that mediate their collective function. In this study we have systematically analyzed the promoter composition of gene classes derived from previously established genetic signatures that recently have been shown to reliably and reproducibly distinguish five molecular subtypes of breast cancer associated with distinct clinical outcomes. Inferences made from the trends of transcription factor binding site enrichment in the promoters of these gene groups led to the identification of regulatory pathways that implicate discrete transcriptional networks associated with specific molecular subtypes of breast cancer. One of these inferred pathways predicted a role for nuclear factor-kappaB in a novel feed-forward, self-amplifying, autoregulatory module regulated by the ERBB family of growth factor receptors. The existence of this pathway was verified in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation and shown to be deregulated in breast cancer cells overexpressing ERBB2. This analysis indicates that approaches of this type can provide unique insights into the differential regulatory molecular programs associated with breast cancer and will aid in identifying specific transcriptional networks and pathways as potential targets for tumor subtype-specific therapeutic intervention.

  20. Detection of EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts in paraffin embedded tissues of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors by nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixing Gong; Qinhe Fan; Zhihong Zhang; Weiming Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and significance of detecting EWS-FLIlfusion transcripts in paraffin embedded tissues of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) by nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Methods: Twelve formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples of PNET were retrieved from archive and consultation materials,together with eight cases of controlled tumor. EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts were detected by nested RT-PCR. Home-keeping gene β-actin was used to detect the quality of mRNA. Results: β-actin mRNA was detected in 9 of the 12 tumor cases. EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts were detected in 6 cases, among which 4 had a "type 1" fusion transcript and 2 had a "type 2" fusion transcript. None of the controlled tumor was detected the fusion gene. Conclusion: RT-PCR is a feasible method for the detection of EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts in FFPE tissues in PNET and the result is meaningful in differential diagnosis and prognostic evaluation.

  1. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  2. Contribution of transcription to animal early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Davis, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    In mature gametes and during the oocyte-to-embryo transition, transcription is generally silenced and gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated. However, we recently discovered that major transcription can occur immediately after fertilization, prior to pronuclear fusion, and in the first cell division of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in the nematode Ascaris suum. We postulate that the balance between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation during the oocyte-to-embryo transition may largely be determined by cell cycle length and thus the time available for the genome to be transcribed.

  3. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  4. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    MYBs to activate transcription of GLS biosynthetic genes. A lot is known about transcriptional regulation of these nine GLS regulators. This thesis aimed at identifying regulatory mechanisms at the protein level, allowing rapid and specific regulation of transcription factors using GLS as a model....... The general introduction and the first chapter provide background on protein level regulation and underline the importance of these mechanisms in regulating transcription factors. The remaining chapters report the identification of multiple new regulators of MYB transcription factors, potentially involved...... in their regulation at multiple steps of their activation. Plant signaling in connection with transcription factor regulation is an exciting field, allowing research on multiple regulatory mechanisms. This thesis shed light on the importance of integrating all steps of transcription factor activation in a regulatory...

  5. Transcriptional networks in leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-10-01

    Plant senescence is a natural phenomenon known for the appearance of beautiful autumn colors and the ripening of cereals in the field. Senescence is a controlled process that plants utilize to remobilize nutrients from source leaves to developing tissues. While during the past decades, molecular components underlying the onset of senescence have been intensively studied, knowledge remains scarce on the age-dependent mechanisms that control the onset of senescence. Recent advances have uncovered transcriptional networks regulating the competence to senesce. Here, gene regulatory networks acting as internal timing mechanisms for the onset of senescence are highlighted, illustrating that early and late leaf developmental phases are highly connected.

  6. General organisational principles of the transcriptional regulation system: a tree or a circle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskhelishvili, Georgi; Sobetzko, Patrick; Geertz, Marcel; Berger, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances of systemic approaches to gene expression and cellular metabolism provide unforeseen opportunities for relating and integrating extensive datasets describing the transcriptional regulation system as a whole. However, due to the multifaceted nature of the phenomenon, these datasets often contain logically distinct types of information determined by underlying approach and adopted methodology of data analysis. Consequently, to integrate the datasets comprising information on the states of chromatin structure, transcriptional regulatory network and cellular metabolism, a novel methodology enabling interconversion of logically distinct types of information is required. Here we provide a holistic conceptual framework for analysis of global transcriptional regulation as a system coordinated by structural coupling between the transcription machinery and DNA topology, acting as interdependent sensors and determinants of metabolic functions. In this operationally closed system any transition in physiological state represents an emergent property determined by shifts in structural coupling, whereas genetic regulation acts as a genuine device converting one logical type of information into the other.

  7. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Martinez

    Full Text Available RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX, is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription.

  8. Auxin and ethylene induce flavonol accumulation through distinct transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel R; Ramirez, Melissa V; Miller, Nathan D; Vallabhaneni, Prashanthi; Ray, W Keith; Helm, Richard F; Winkel, Brenda S J; Muday, Gloria K

    2011-05-01

    Auxin and ethylene are key regulators of plant growth and development, and thus the transcriptional networks that mediate responses to these hormones have been the subject of intense research. This study dissected the hormonal cross talk regulating the synthesis of flavonols and examined their impact on root growth and development. We analyzed the effects of auxin and an ethylene precursor on roots of wild-type and hormone-insensitive Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants at the transcript, protein, and metabolite levels at high spatial and temporal resolution. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) differentially increased flavonol pathway transcripts and flavonol accumulation, altering the relative abundance of quercetin and kaempferol. The IAA, but not ACC, response is lost in the transport inhibitor response1 (tir1) auxin receptor mutant, while ACC responses, but not IAA responses, are lost in ethylene insensitive2 (ein2) and ethylene resistant1 (etr1) ethylene signaling mutants. A kinetic analysis identified increases in transcripts encoding the transcriptional regulators MYB12, Transparent Testa Glabra1, and Production of Anthocyanin Pigment after hormone treatments, which preceded increases in transcripts encoding flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes. In addition, myb12 mutants were insensitive to the effects of auxin and ethylene on flavonol metabolism. The equivalent phenotypes for transparent testa4 (tt4), which makes no flavonols, and tt7, which makes kaempferol but not quercetin, showed that quercetin derivatives are the inhibitors of basipetal root auxin transport, gravitropism, and elongation growth. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate that auxin and ethylene regulate flavonol biosynthesis through distinct signaling networks involving TIR1 and EIN2/ETR1, respectively, both of which converge on MYB12. This study also provides new evidence that quercetin is the flavonol that modulates basipetal auxin transport.

  9. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription.

  10. Transcriptional control of mammalian pancreas organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, David A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2014-07-01

    The field of pancreas development has markedly expanded over the last decade, significantly advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pancreas organogenesis. This growth has been fueled, in part, by the need to generate new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diabetes. The creation of sophisticated genetic tools in mice has been instrumental in this progress. Genetic manipulation involving activation or inactivation of genes within specific cell types has allowed the identification of many transcription factors (TFs) that play critical roles in the organogenesis of the pancreas. Interestingly, many of these TFs act at multiple stages of pancreatic development, and adult organ function or repair. Interaction with other TFs, extrinsic signals, and epigenetic regulation are among the mechanisms by which TFs may play context-dependent roles during pancreas organogenesis. Many of the pancreatic TFs directly regulate each other and their own expression. These combinatorial interactions generate very specific gene regulatory networks that can define the different cell lineages and types in the developing pancreas. Here, we review recent progress made in understanding the role of pancreatic TFs in mouse pancreas formation. We also summarize our current knowledge of human pancreas development and discuss developmental pancreatic TFs that have been associated with human pancreatic diseases.

  11. Polymorphism of the Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 Gene (TCF7L2) Interacts with Obesity on Type-2 Diabetes in the PREDIMED Study Emphasizing the Heterogeneity of Genetic Variants in Type-2 Diabetes Risk Prediction: Time for Obesity-Specific Genetic Risk Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Dolores; Coltell, Oscar; Sorlí, Jose V; Estruch, Ramón; Quiles, Laura; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Castañer, Olga; Arós, Fernando; Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Portolés, Olga; Fiol, Miquel; Díez Espino, Javier; Basora, Josep; Fitó, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, José M

    2016-12-06

    Nutrigenetic studies analyzing gene-diet interactions of the TCF7L2-rs7903146 C > T polymorphism on type-2 diabetes (T2D) have shown controversial results. A reason contributing to this may be the additional modulation by obesity. Moreover, TCF7L2-rs7903146 is one of the most influential variants in T2D-genetic risk scores (GRS). Therefore, to increase the predictive value (PV) of GRS it is necessary to first see whether the included polymorphisms have heterogeneous effects. We comprehensively investigated gene-obesity interactions between the TCF7L2-rs7903146 C > T polymorphism on T2D (prevalence and incidence) and analyzed other T2D-polymorphisms in a sub-sample. We studied 7018 PREDIMED participants at baseline and longitudinally (8.7 years maximum follow-up). Obesity significantly interacted with the TCF7L2-rs7903146 on T2D prevalence, associations being greater in non-obese subjects. Accordingly, we prospectively observed in non-T2D subjects (n = 3607) that its association with T2D incidence was stronger in non-obese (HR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.13-2.92, p = 0.013 for TT versus CC) than in obese subjects (HR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.61-1.66; p = 0.979; p-interaction = 0.048). Accordingly, TCF7L2-PV was higher in non-obese subjects. Additionally, we created obesity-specific GRS with ten T2D-polymorphisms and demonstrated for the first time their higher strata-specific PV. In conclusion, we provide strong evidence supporting the need for considering obesity when analyzing the TCF7L2 effects and propose the use of obesity-specific GRS for T2D.

  12. Polymorphism of the Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 Gene (TCF7L2) Interacts with Obesity on Type-2 Diabetes in the PREDIMED Study Emphasizing the Heterogeneity of Genetic Variants in Type-2 Diabetes Risk Prediction: Time for Obesity-Specific Genetic Risk Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Dolores; Coltell, Oscar; Sorlí, Jose V.; Estruch, Ramón; Quiles, Laura; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Castañer, Olga; Arós, Fernando; Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Portolés, Olga; Fiol, Miquel; Díez Espino, Javier; Basora, Josep; Fitó, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrigenetic studies analyzing gene–diet interactions of the TCF7L2-rs7903146 C > T polymorphism on type-2 diabetes (T2D) have shown controversial results. A reason contributing to this may be the additional modulation by obesity. Moreover, TCF7L2-rs7903146 is one of the most influential variants in T2D-genetic risk scores (GRS). Therefore, to increase the predictive value (PV) of GRS it is necessary to first see whether the included polymorphisms have heterogeneous effects. We comprehensively investigated gene-obesity interactions between the TCF7L2-rs7903146 C > T polymorphism on T2D (prevalence and incidence) and analyzed other T2D-polymorphisms in a sub-sample. We studied 7018 PREDIMED participants at baseline and longitudinally (8.7 years maximum follow-up). Obesity significantly interacted with the TCF7L2-rs7903146 on T2D prevalence, associations being greater in non-obese subjects. Accordingly, we prospectively observed in non-T2D subjects (n = 3607) that its association with T2D incidence was stronger in non-obese (HR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.13–2.92, p = 0.013 for TT versus CC) than in obese subjects (HR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.61–1.66; p = 0.979; p-interaction = 0.048). Accordingly, TCF7L2-PV was higher in non-obese subjects. Additionally, we created obesity-specific GRS with ten T2D-polymorphisms and demonstrated for the first time their higher strata-specific PV. In conclusion, we provide strong evidence supporting the need for considering obesity when analyzing the TCF7L2 effects and propose the use of obesity-specific GRS for T2D. PMID:27929407

  13. 系统性硬化病成纤维细胞单克隆Ⅲ型前胶原基因转录特性及丹参对其的调控研究%Transcriptional characteristics of type Ⅲ procollagen gene in systemic scleroderma-derived fibroblast clones and their regulation by Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱鹭冰; 高地; 李明

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study transcriptional characteristics of type Ⅲ procollagen gene in systemic scleroderma (SS)-derived fibroblast clones and their regulation by Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae(RSM).Methods Eight fibroblast clones with different collagen-producing capacity were previously obtained from patients with SS and normal human controls.Recombinant plasmids containing different deletions of the human alpha 1 chain of type 3 procollagen (COL3A1) gene promoter were constructed,and transiently transfected into the fibroblast clones.Dual-luciferase reporter assay system was used to evaluate the activities of these recombinants in the fibroblast clones and to select a proximal transcriptional regulatory sequence.Then,the fibroblast clones were transfected with the plasmid containing the selected regulatory sequence (phCOLH30.1) followed by the treatment with RSM injection (1 g/L) and active monomers of RSM,including salvianolic acid B (5 mg/L),tanshinone Ⅱ A (5 mg/L),danshensu (20 mg/L) and protocatechuic aldehyde (5 mg/L),for 48 hours.The transfected fibroblast clones receiving no drug treatment served as the water-soluble control,and those treated with only dimethyl sulfoxide as the lipid-soluble control.Subsequently,the fibroblasts were lysed and subjected to the quantification of cellular proteins and determination of luciferase activity.The activity of recombinant promoters was compared by t test for the selection of proximal transcriptional regulatory sequence,and the activity of phCOLH30.1 by two-way analysis of variance in the RSM-interfering test (if there was interaction,one-way analysis of variance was conducted; and if there was no interaction,the main effect was tested after the removal of interaction item).Results Of the 6 recombinants,the recombinant containing COL3A1 proximal promoter from -96 bp to +16 bp (phCOLH30.1) showed the highest transcriptional activity in nearly all of the fibroblast clones,and the activity was positively correlated with the

  14. Regulation of virulence gene expression in pathogenic Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Ripio, M T; Vázquez-Boland, J A

    1996-06-01

    Dynamic interactions between host and pathogen are characteristic of infections caused by intracellular bacteria. This has favoured the evolution of highly effective control systems by which these pathogens regulate the expression of different virulence factors during sequential steps of the infection process. In the case of the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, these steps involve internalization by eukaryotic cells, lysis of the resulting phagosome, replication as well as movement within the host cytoplasm, direct cell-to-cell spread, and subsequent lysis of a double-membrane vacuole when entering neighbouring cells. Virulence factors which are involved in each of these steps have been identified and the expression of these factors is subject to a co-ordinate and differential control exerted by the major listerial virulence regulator PrfA. This protein belongs to the Crp/Fnr-family of transcriptional activators and recognizes specific target sequences in promoter regions of several listerial virulence genes. Differential expression of these genes during sequential steps of the infection seems to be at least partially mediated by different binding affinities of PrfA to its target sequences. Activity of PrfA-dependent genes and of prfA itself is under the control of several environmental variables which are used by the pathogen to recognize its transition from the free environment into a eukaryotic host.

  15. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  16. Transcribed enhancers lead waves of coordinated transcription in transitioning mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Erik; Daub, Carsten O.; Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Andersson, Robin; Lilje, Berit; Drabløs, Finn; Lennartsson, Andreas; Rönnerblad, Michelle; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Vitezic, Morana; Freeman, Tom C.; Alhendi, Ahmad M. N.; Arner, Peter; Axton, Richard; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Beckhouse, Anthony; Bodega, Beatrice; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Davis, Margaret; Detmar, Michael; Ehrlund, Anna; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Eslami, Afsaneh; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Ferrai, Carmelo; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Forrester, Lesley; Goldowitz, Daniel; Guler, Reto; Ha, Thomas; Hara, Mitsuko; Herlyn, Meenhard; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Kai, Chieko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Khachigian, Levon M.; Klinken, S. Peter; Kojima, Soichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Klein, Sarah; Mejhert, Niklas; Miyaguchi, Ken; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Morris, Kelly J.; Mummery, Christine; Nakachi, Yutaka; Ogishima, Soichi; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Pombo, Ana; Qin, Xian-Yang; Roy, Sugata; Sato, Hiroki; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schwegmann, Anita; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Swoboda, Rolf; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tomoiu, Andru; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Yoneda, Misako; Zabierowski, Susan; Zhang, Peter; Abugessaisa, Imad; Bertin, Nicolas; Diehl, Alexander D.; Fukuda, Shiro; Furuno, Masaaki; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hori, Fumi; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kojima, Miki; Kondo, Naoto; Lizio, Marina; Meehan, Terrence F.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi; Sahin, Serkan; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Severin, Jessica; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Kawai, Jun; Kasukawa, Takeya; Lassmann, Timo; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kawaji, Hideya; Summers, Kim M.; Wells, Christine; Hume, David A.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Sandelin, Albin; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that cellular differentiation requires changes to transcriptional networks, dynamic regulation of promoters and enhancers at specific sets of genes has not been previously studied en masse. Exploiting the fact that active promoters and enhancers are transcribed, we simultaneously measured their activity in 19 human and 14 mouse time courses covering a wide range of cell types and biological stimuli. Enhancer RNAs, then messenger RNAs encoding transcription factors, dominated the earliest responses. Binding sites for key lineage transcription factors were simultaneously overrepresented in enhancers and promoters active in each cellular system. Our data support a highly generalizable model in which enhancer transcription is the earliest event in successive waves of transcriptional change during cellular differentiation or activation. PMID:25678556

  17. Mechanism of histone survival during transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaeva, Olga I; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2010-01-01

    This work is related to and stems from our recent NSMB paper, "Mechanism of chromatin remodeling and recovery during passage of RNA polymerase II" (December 2009). Synopsis. Recent genomic studies from many laboratories have suggested that nucleosomes are not displaced from moderately transcribed genes. Furthermore, histones H3/H4 carrying the primary epigenetic marks are not displaced or exchanged (in contrast to H2A/H2B histones) during moderate transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in vivo. These exciting observations suggest that the large molecule of Pol II passes through chromatin structure without even transient displacement of H3/H4 histones. The most recent analysis of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-type mechanism of chromatin remodeling in vitro (described in our NSMB 2009 paper) suggests that nucleosome survival is tightly coupled with formation of a novel intermediate: a very small intranucleosomal DNA loop (Ø-loop) containing transcribing Pol II. In the submitted manuscript we critically evaluate one of the key predictions of this model: the lack of even transient displacement of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription in vitro. The data suggest that, indeed, histones H3/H4 are not displaced during Pol II transcription in vitro. These studies are directly connected with the observation in vivo on the lack of exchange of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription.

  18. Minor groove binder distamycin remodels chromatin but inhibits transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parijat Majumder

    Full Text Available The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as "chromatin remodeling". In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance.

  19. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  20. Transcriptional analysis of exopolysaccharides biosynthesis gene clusters in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, Valeria; Perrone, Filomena; Marasco, Rosangela; Sacco, Margherita; Muscariello, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) from lactic acid bacteria contribute to specific rheology and texture of fermented milk products and find applications also in non-dairy foods and in therapeutics. Recently, four clusters of genes (cps) associated with surface polysaccharide production have been identified in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1, a probiotic and food-associated lactobacillus. These clusters are involved in cell surface architecture and probably in release and/or exposure of immunomodulating bacterial molecules. Here we show a transcriptional analysis of these clusters. Indeed, RT-PCR experiments revealed that the cps loci are organized in five operons. Moreover, by reverse transcription-qPCR analysis performed on L. plantarum WCFS1 (wild type) and WCFS1-2 (ΔccpA), we demonstrated that expression of three cps clusters is under the control of the global regulator CcpA. These results, together with the identification of putative CcpA target sequences (catabolite responsive element CRE) in the regulatory region of four out of five transcriptional units, strongly suggest for the first time a role of the master regulator CcpA in EPS gene transcription among lactobacilli.

  1. Accessorizing the human mitochondrial transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestwick, Megan L; Shadel, Gerald S

    2013-06-01

    The human genome comprises large chromosomes in the nucleus and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) housed in the dynamic mitochondrial network. Human cells contain up to thousands of copies of the double-stranded, circular mtDNA molecule that encodes essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes and the rRNAs and tRNAs needed to translate these in the organelle matrix. Transcription of human mtDNA is directed by a single-subunit RNA polymerase, POLRMT, which requires two primary transcription factors, TFB2M (transcription factor B2, mitochondrial) and TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial), to achieve basal regulation of the system. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the structure and function of the primary human transcription machinery and the other factors that facilitate steps in transcription beyond initiation and provide more intricate control over the system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The molecular basis of eucaryotic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornberg, R D

    2007-12-01

    Thanks to the Nobel Foundation for permission to publish this Lecture. We report here the Nobel Lecture delivered by Professor RD Kornberg describing his research in the understanding of transcription in eucaryotes. The amazing work by Professor Kornberg goes from the discovery of the nucleosome to the structural and functional studies of pol II transcription complexes. His research sheds light on fundamental molecular biology problems such as transcription initiation, fidelity of transcription, RNA release at the end of transcription, and many more. This is a beautiful report on how structural and functional studies can be combined to really understand in an accurate and detailed way how proteins combine in huge molecular complexes to regulate one of the most important cellular processes: gene transcription.

  3. Structural basis of eukaryotic gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeger, Hinrich; Bushnell, David A; Davis, Ralph; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Lorch, Yahli; Strattan, J Seth; Westover, Kenneth D; Kornberg, Roger D

    2005-02-07

    An RNA polymerase II promoter has been isolated in transcriptionally activated and repressed states. Topological and nuclease digestion analyses have revealed a dynamic equilibrium between nucleosome removal and reassembly upon transcriptional activation, and have further shown that nucleosomes are removed by eviction of histone octamers rather than by sliding. The promoter, once exposed, assembles with RNA polymerase II, general transcription factors, and Mediator in a approximately 3 MDa transcription initiation complex. X-ray crystallography has revealed the structure of RNA polymerase II, in the act of transcription, at atomic resolution. Extension of this analysis has shown how nucleotides undergo selection, polymerization, and eventual release from the transcribing complex. X-ray and electron crystallography have led to a picture of the entire transcription initiation complex, elucidating the mechanisms of promoter recognition, DNA unwinding, abortive initiation, and promoter escape.

  4. Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Till D.; Cheong, Alex; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.

  5. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

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    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  6. Experimental strategies for studying transcription factor-DNA binding specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz, Marcel; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2010-12-01

    Specific binding of transcription factors (TFs) determines in a large part the connectivity of gene regulatory networks as well as the quantitative level of gene expression. A multiplicity of both experimental and computational methods is currently used to discover and characterize the underlying TF-DNA interactions. Experimental methods can be further subdivided into in vitro- and in vivo-based approaches, each accenting different aspects of TF-binding events. In this review we summarize the flexibility and performance of a selection of both types of experimental methods. In conclusion, we argue that a serial combination of methods with different throughput and data type constitutes an optimal experimental strategy.

  7. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  8. Transcription in Archaea: in vitro transcription assays for mjRNAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smollett, Katherine; Blombach, Fabian; Werner, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The fully recombinant Methanocaldococcus jannaschii RNA polymerase allows for a detailed dissection of the different stages of the transcription. In the previous chapter, we discussed how to purify the different components of the M. jannaschii transcription system, the RNA polymerase subunits, and general transcription factors and how to assemble a functional M. jannaschii enzyme. Standard in vitro transcription assays can be used to examine the different stages of transcription. In this chapter, we describe how some of these assays have been optimized for M. jannaschii RNA polymerase, which transcribes at much higher temperatures than many other transcription complexes.

  9. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  10. Balanced Branching in Transcription Termination

    CERN Document Server

    Harrington, K J; Liang, S

    2000-01-01

    The theory of stochastic transcription termination based on free-energy competition requires two or more reaction rates to be delicately balanced over a wide range of physical conditions. A large body of work on glasses and large molecules suggests that this should be impossible in such a large system in the absence of a new organizing principle of matter. We review the experimental literature of termination and find no evidence for such a principle but many troubling inconsistencies, most notably anomalous memory effects. These suggest that termination has a deterministic component and may conceivably be not stochastic at all. We find that a key experiment by Wilson and von Hippel allegedly refuting deterministic termination was an incorrectly analyzed regulatory effect of Mg2+ binding.

  11. Genome-wide assembly and analysis of alternative transcripts in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2005-01-01

    To build a mouse gene index with the most comprehensive coverage of alternative transcription/splicing (ATS), we developed an algorithm and a fully automated computational pipeline for transcript assembly from expressed sequences aligned to the genome. We identified 191,946 genomic loci, which included 27,497 protein-coding genes and 11,906 additional gene candidates (e.g., nonprotein-coding, but multiexon). Comparison of the resulting gene index with TIGR, UniGene, DoTS, and ESTGenes databases revealed that it had a greater number of transcripts, a greater average number of exons and introns with proper splicing sites per gene, and longer ORFs. The 27,497 protein-coding genes had 77,138 transcripts, i.e., 2.8 transcripts per gene on average. Close examination of transcripts led to a combinatorial table of 23 types of ATS units, only nine of which were previously described, i.e., 14 types of alternative splicing, seven types of alternative starts, and two types of alternative termination. The 47%, 18%, and 14% of 20,323 multiexon protein-coding genes with proper splice sites had alternative splicings, alternative starts, and alternative terminations, respectively. The gene index with the comprehensive ATS will provide a useful platform for analyzing the nature and mechanism of ATS, as well as for designing the accurate exon-based DNA microarrays. PMID:15867436

  12. Harnessing transcription for bioproduction in cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensjö, Karin; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Tyystjärvi, Taina

    2017-01-01

    of cyanobacteria. A wide variety of expression systems will be required to adjust both the expression of heterologous enzyme(s) and metabolic routes to the best possible balance, allowing the optimal production of a particular substance. In bacteria, transcription, especially the initiation of transcription, has...... a central role in adjusting gene expression and thus also metabolic fluxes of cells according to environmental cues. Here we summarize the recent progress in developing tools for efficient cyanofactories, focusing especially on transcriptional regulation....

  13. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of transcriptional pausing

    OpenAIRE

    Tadigotla, Vasisht R.; Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid Ó; Sengupta, Anirvan M.; Epshtein, Vitaly; Ebright, Richard H.; Nudler, Evgeny; Ruckenstein, Andrei E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a statistical mechanics approach for the prediction of backtracked pauses in bacterial transcription elongation derived from structural models of the transcription elongation complex (EC). Our algorithm is based on the thermodynamic stability of the EC along the DNA template calculated from the sequence-dependent free energy of DNA–DNA, DNA–RNA, and RNA–RNA base pairing associated with (i) the translocational and size fluctuations of the transcription bubble; (ii) changes in the as...

  14. A New Vaccinia Virus Intermediate Transcription Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, Patrick; Moss, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the vaccinia virus genome is mediated by a virus-encoded multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in conjunction with early-, intermediate-, and late-stage-specific factors. Previous studies indicated that two virus-encoded proteins (capping enzyme and VITF-1) and one unidentified cellular protein (VITF-2) are required for specific transcription of an intermediate promoter template in vitro. We have now extensively purified an additional virus-induced intermediate transcript...

  15. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears ...

  16. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  17. Swinger RNAs with sharp switches between regular transcription and transcription systematically exchanging ribonucleotides: Case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    During RNA transcription, DNA nucleotides A,C,G, T are usually matched by ribonucleotides A, C, G and U. However occasionally, this rule does not apply: transcript-DNA homologies are detectable only assuming systematic exchanges between ribonucleotides. Nine symmetric (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric (X ↔ Y ↔ Z, e.g. A ↔ C ↔ G) exchanges exist, called swinger transcriptions. Putatively, polymerases occasionally stabilize in unspecified swinger conformations, possibly similar to transient conformations causing punctual misinsertions. This predicts chimeric transcripts, part regular, part swinger-transformed, reflecting polymerases switching to swinger polymerization conformation(s). Four chimeric Genbank transcripts (three from human mitochondrion and one murine cytosolic) are described here: (a) the 5' and 3' extremities reflect regular polymerization, the intervening sequence exchanges systematically between ribonucleotides (swinger rule G ↔ U, transcript (1), with sharp switches between regular and swinger sequences; (b) the 5' half is 'normal', the 3' half systematically exchanges ribonucleotides (swinger rule C ↔ G, transcript (2), with an intercalated sequence lacking homology; (c) the 3' extremity fits A ↔ G exchanges (10% of transcript length), the 5' half follows regular transcription; the intervening region seems a mix of regular and A ↔ G transcriptions (transcript 3); (d) murine cytosolic transcript 4 switches to A ↔ U + C ↔ G, and is fused with A ↔ U + C ↔ G swinger transformed precursor rRNA. In (c), each concomitant transcript 5' and 3' extremities match opposite genome strands. Transcripts 3 and 4 combine transcript fusions with partial swinger transcriptions. Occasional (usually sharp) switches between regular and swinger transcriptions reveal greater coding potential than detected until now, suggest stable polymerase swinger conformations.

  18. Exogenous reference gene normalization for real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis under dynamic endogenous transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen Johnston; Zachary Gallaher; Krzysztof Czaja

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is widely used to investigate transcriptional changes following experimental manipulations to the nervous system. Despite the widespread utilization of qPCR, the interpretation of results is marred by the lack of a suitable reference gene due to the dynamic nature of endogenous transcription. To address this inherent deficiency, we investigated the use of an exogenous spike-in mRNA, luciferase, as an internal reference gene for the 2-ΔΔCt normalization method. To induce dynamic transcription, we systemically administered capsaicin, a neurotoxin selective for C-type sensory neurons expressing the TRPV-1 receptor, to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. We later isolated nodose ganglia for qPCR analysis with the reference being either exogenous luciferase mRNA or the commonly used endogenous reference β-III tubulin. The exogenous luciferase mRNA reference clearly demonstrated the dynamic expression of the endogenous reference. Furthermore, variability of the endogenous reference would lead to misinterpretation of other genes of interest. In conclusion, traditional reference genes are often unstable under physiologically normal situations, and certainly unstable following the damage to the nervous system. The use of exogenous spike-in reference provides a consistent and easily implemented alternative for the analysis of qPCR data.

  19. Expression liver-directed genes by employing synthetic transcriptional control units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-Luise Lemken; Wolfgang A. Wybranietz; Ulrike Schmidt; Florian Graepler; Sorin Armeanu; Michael Bitzer; Ulrich M. Lauer

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To generate and characterize the synthetic transcriptional control units for transcriptional targeting of the liver,thereby compensating for the lack of specificity of currently available gene therapeutic vector systems.METHODS: Synthetic transcriptional control unit constructs were generated and analyzed for transcriptional activities in different cell types by FACS quantification, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blotting. RESULTS: A new bifunctionally-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)/neor fusion gene cassette was generated,and could flexibly be used both for transcript quantification and for selection of stable cell clones. Then, numerous synthetic transcriptional control units consisting of a minimal promoter linked to "naturally" derived composite enhancer elements from liver-specific expressed genes or binding sites of liver-specific transcription factors were inserted upstream of this reporter cassette. Following liposome-mediated transfection, EGFP reporter protein quantification by FACS analysis identified constructs encoding multimerized composite elements of the apolipoprotein B100 (ApoB) promoter or the ornithin transcarbamoylase (OTC) enhancer to exhibit maximum transcriptional activities in liver originating cell lines, but only background levels in non-liver originating cell lines. In contrast, constructs encoding only singular binding sites of liver-specific transcription factors, namely hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)1, HNF3, HNF4, HNF5, or CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) only achieved background levels of EGFP expression. Finally, both semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis of Hep3B cells demonstrated maximum transcriptional activities for a multimeric 4xApoB cassette construct, which fully complied with the data obtained by initial FACS analysis.CONCLUSION: Synthetic transcriptional control unit constructs not only exhibit a superb degree of structural compactness, but also provide new means for liver

  20. AltTrans: Transcript pattern variants annotated for both alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation

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    Lopez Fabrice

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three major mechanisms that regulate transcript formation involve the selection of alternative sites for transcription start (TS, splicing, and polyadenylation. Currently there are efforts that collect data & annotation individually for each of these variants. It is important to take an integrated view of these data sets and to derive a data set of alternate transcripts along with consolidated annotation. We have been developing in the past computational pipelines that generate value-added data at genome-scale on individual variant types; these include AltSplice on splicing and AltPAS on polyadenylation. We now extend these pipelines and integrate the resultant data sets to facilitate an integrated view of the contributions from splicing and polyadenylation in the formation of transcript variants. Description The AltSplice pipeline examines gene-transcript alignments and delineates alternative splice events and splice patterns; this pipeline is extended as AltTrans to delineate isoform transcript patterns for each of which both introns/exons and 'terminating' polyA site are delineated; EST/mRNA sequences that qualify the transcript pattern confirm both the underlying splicing and polyadenylation. The AltPAS pipeline examines gene-transcript alignments and delineates all potential polyA sites irrespective of underlying splicing patterns. Resultant polyA sites from both AltTrans and AltPAS are merged. The generated database reports data on alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation and the resultant alternate transcript patterns; the basal data is annotated for various biological features. The data (named as integrated AltTrans data generated for both the organisms of human and mouse is made available through the Alternate Transcript Diversity web site at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/atd/. Conclusion The reported data set presents alternate transcript patterns that are annotated for both alternative splicing and alternative

  1. Differential screening identifies transcripts with depot-dependent expression in white adipose tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shengli

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The co-morbidities of obesity are tied to location of excess fat in the intra-abdominal as compared to subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT depot. Genes distinctly expressed in WAT depots may impart depot-dependent physiological functions. To identify such genes, we prepared subtractive cDNA libraries from murine subcutaneous (SC or intra-abdominal epididymal (EP white adipocytes. Results Differential screening and qPCR validation identified 7 transcripts with 2.5-fold or greater enrichment in EP vs. SC adipocytes. Boc, a component of the hedgehog signaling pathway demonstrated highest enrichment (~12-fold in EP adipocytes. We also identified a dramatic enrichment in SC adipocytes vs. EP adipocytes and in SC WAT vs. EP WAT for transcript(s for the major urinary proteins (Mups, small secreted proteins with pheromone functions that are members of the lipocalin family. Expression of Boc and Mup transcript was further assessed in murine tissues, adipogenesis models, and obesity. qPCR analysis reveals that EP WAT is a major site of expression of Boc transcript. Furthermore, Boc transcript expression decreased in obese EP WAT with a concomitant upregulation of Boc transcript in the obese SC WAT depot. Assessment of the Boc binding partner Cdon in adipose tissue and cell fractions thereof, revealed transcript expression similar to Boc; suggestive of a role for the Boc-Cdon axis in WAT depot function. Mup transcripts were predominantly expressed in liver and in the SC and RP WAT depots and increased several thousand-fold during differentiation of primary murine preadipocytes to adipocytes. Mup transcripts were also markedly reduced in SC WAT and liver of ob/ob genetically obese mice compared to wild type. Conclusion Further assessment of WAT depot-enriched transcripts may uncover distinctions in WAT depot gene expression that illuminate the physiological impact of regional adiposity.

  2. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millette, R. L.; Klaiber, R.

    1980-06-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout