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Sample records for crown removal device

  1. Removal of failed crown and bridge

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G.R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    Crown and bridge have life span of many years but they fail for a number of reasons. Over the years, many devices have been designed to remove crowns and bridges from abutment teeth. While the removal of temporary crowns and bridges is usually very straightforward, the removal of a definitive cast crown with unknown cement is more challenging. Removal is often by destructive means. There are a number of circumstances, however, in which conservative disassembly would aid the practitioner in co...

  2. Radioactive ruthenium removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imoto, Yoshie.

    1992-01-01

    In a device for passing gaseous wastes generated from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant through a high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) to remove ruthenium, a polyethylene filler is disposed at the pre-stage of the high efficiency particulate air filter. RuO 4 is considered as gaseous ruthenium present in the gaseous wastes. RuO 4 is reduced into RuO 2 easily in a reducing atmosphere. Polyethylene includes double bonds and has an effect of reducing RuO 4 to RuO 2 . RuO 2 reduced by the filler charged with polyethylene is deposited on the filler. Further, also RuO 2 transferred to the gaseous wastes can be removed by the high efficiency particulate air filter. Further, since RuO 4 is adsorbed effectively to RuO 2 deposited on the polyethylene, it is not necessary to exchange the filler, to increase the effect of ruthenium removal. (T.M.)

  3. Well device for removing small objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastorguyev, M.A.; Mubashirov, S.G.; Nikolayev, G.I.; Prokopov, O.I.

    1982-01-01

    A well device is proposed for removing small objects. It contains a hollow housing with worm and crown installed with the possibility of rotation in relation to the housing. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to increase reliability of holding the trapped objects, on the lower end of the housing there is a disc which forms with the housing a chamber for the trapped objects. In this case the disc is made with sector slit, one of whose sidewalls is superposed with the worm blade rigidly connected to the disc, while along the other side wall a plate is vertically attached.

  4. Tritium removal and retention device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.; Durigon, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    A device is provided for removing and retaining tritium from a gaseous medium, and also a method of manufacturing the device. The device, consists of an inner core of zirconium alloy, preferably Zircaloy-4, and an outer adherent layer of nickel which acts as a selective and protective window for passage of tritium. The tritium then reacts with or is absorbed by the zirconium alloy, and is retained until such time as it is desirable to remove it during reprocessing. (auth)

  5. After-heat removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwashige, Kengo; Otsuka, Masaya; Yokoyama, Iwao; Yamakawa, Masanori.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an after-heat removing device for first reactors. A heat accumulation portion provided in a cooling channel of an after-heat removing device is disposed before a coil-like heat conduction pipe for cooling of the after-heat removing device. During normal reactor operation, the temperature in the heat accumulation portion is near the temperature of the high temperature plenum due to heat conduction and heat transfer from the high temperature plenum. When the reactor is shutdown and the after-heat removing device is started, coolants cooled in the air cooler start circulation. The coolants arriving at the heat accumulation portion deprive heat from the heat accumulation portion and, ion turn, increase their temperature and then reach the cooling coil. Subsequently, the heat calorie possessed in the heat accumulation portion is reduced and the after-heat removing device is started for the operation at a full power. This can reduce the thermal shocks applied to the cooling coil or structures in a reactor vessel upon starting the after-heat removing device. (I.N.)

  6. Control rod removal blocking device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ritsuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent excess power increase resulted from erroneous control rod removal during high power operation in BWR type reactor by decreasing the continuous removal enabling distance for the control rods along with increase in the reactor power where the reactor power is greater than a predetermined level. Constitution: When control rod selection signals are supplied from a control unit to a control rod removal blocking device, the blocking device judges whether the reactor core power is greater than a predetermined value A or not, using reactor core power signals outputted from an average power monitor. Where the reactor core power exceeds the predetermined value A and if the reactor core power is relatively low, a large continuous removal enabling distance N 1 is calculated in the blocking device to allow the continuous removal as far as the notch N 1 . The continuous removal enabling distance is shortened as the reactor core power increases and the removal is blocked, for example, at notch N 2 . While on the other hand, if the reactor core power is below the predetermined value A, both of the notchwise removal and the continuous removal are enabled. (Seki, T.)

  7. Radioactive waste removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To cleanup primary coolants for LMFBR type reactors by magnetically generating a high speed rotational flow in the flow of liquid metal, and adsorbing radioactive corrosion products and fission products onto capturing material of a complicated shape. Constitution: Three-phase AC coils for generating a rotational magnetic field are provided to the outside of a container through which liquid sodium is passed to thereby generate a high speed rotational stream in the liquid sodium flowing into the container. A radioactive substance capturing material made of a metal plate such as of nickel and stainless steel in the corrugated shape with shape edges is secured within a flow channel. Magnetic field at a great slope is generated in the flow channel by the capturing material to adsorb radioactive corrosion products and fission products present in the liquid sodium onto the capturing material and removing therefrom. This enables to capture the ferri-magnetic impurities by adsorption. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Radioactive substance removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Jun; Tayama, Ryuichi; Teruyama, Hidehiko; Hikichi, Takayoshi.

    1992-01-01

    If inert gases are jetted from a jetting device to liquid metals in a capturing vessel, the inert gases are impinged on the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel, to reduce the thickness of a boundary layer as a diffusion region of radioactive materials formed between the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel and the liquid metals. Further, a portion of the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the adsorption amount of radioactive materials by the capturing vessel. When the inert gases are jetted on the inner or outer circumference of the capturing vessel to rotate the capturing vessel, the flow of the liquid metals is formed along with the rotation, and the thickness of the boundary layer is reduced or the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the absorption amount of the radioactive materials. If gas bubbles are formed in the liquid metals by the inert gases, the liquid metals are stirred by the gas bubbles to reduce the thickness of the boundary layer or peel it off, thereby enabling to increase the adsorption amount of the radioactive materials. Since it is not necessary to pass through the rotational member to the wall surface of the vessel, safety and reliability can be improved. (N.H.)

  9. Tritium removal and retention device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The patent discloses an apparatus comprising a two-layered composite with an internal core of zirconium or zirconium alloy which retains tritium, and an adherent nickel outer layer which acts as a protective and selective window for passage of the tritium. The invention provides a device to remove and store tritium from a gaseous medium as well as a method for manufacturing the device. It specifically provides a device which may be incorporated in the fuel rod of a nuclear reactor to minimize release of tritium to the reactor coolant

  10. In vitro influence of ultrasonic stress, removal force preload and thermocycling on the retrievability of implant-retained crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Christian; Harder, Sönke; Schwarz, Dorothee; Steiner, Martin; Vollrath, Oliver; Kern, Matthias

    2012-08-01

    The main goals of this in vitro study were to evaluate the influence of thermocycling, ultrasonic stress and the removal force preload on the retrievability of cemented implant crowns using a clinical removal device (Coronaflex) and evaluating the tensile strength using a universal testing machine (UTM). Thirty-six crowns were cast from a Co-Cr alloy for 36 tapered titanium abutments (5° taper, 4.3 mm diameter, 6 mm height, Camlog, Germany). The crowns were cemented with a glass-ionomer (Ketac Cem) or a polycarboxylate (Durelon) cement, followed by 3 days of storage in ionized water without thermocycling or 150 days of storage with 37,500 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C. Before removal, the crowns were subjected to ultrasonic stress for 0, 5 or 10 min with a contact pressure of either 50 or 500 g. The Coronaflex was used with a removal force preload of 50 or 400 cN, respectively, applied on the point of loading. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the impact of the removal on the abutment screws. Crowns cemented with the glass-ionomer cement were significantly easier to remove with the Coronaflex or the UTM than crowns cemented with the polycarboxylate cement (P≤0.05). Ultrasonic stress showed no significant impact on the retrievability regardless of the contact pressure or duration applied (P>0.05). No significant differences could be found for both cements when removed with the Coronaflex or the UTM (P>0.05) after thermocycling was applied. A removal force preload of 400 cN resulted in significantly reduced removal attempts in comparison with 50 cN for both cements (P≤0.05). Ultrasound and thermal cycling did not result in reduced cement strength, but to retrieve the crowns, the full impact of a removal instrument has to be applied. Ketac Cem can be used as a "semipermanent" solution, whereas Durelon might serve for permanent cementation. None of the abutment screws showed signs of wear caused by the removal process. © 2011 John

  11. A Simple Chairside Technique of Removing Crown and Fixed Partial Denture Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Gupta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Retrieving failed cemented crowns and fixed partial dentures with minimum discomfort to the patient has always been a clinical concern. This article describes a technique which will allow easy and predictable removal of these restorations.

  12. MOLECULAR CLIPS BASED ON THE CROWN ETHERS: PROSPECTIVE RECEPTORS FOR THE Sr2+CATIONS REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Lyapunov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Strontium cation complexation with diphenylglycoluril-based molecular clips containing 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5, 18-crown-6 and 21-crown-7 residues was qualitatively studied by FAB mass-spectrometry. It was found that at low concentrations of Sr2+ cations molecular clip with fragments of 15-crown-5 is the most effective, and it is assumed that it is due to the formation of the most stable «sandwich-type» complex. The higher removal degree with an excess of Sr2+ cations is observed in the case of molecular clips with fragments of 18-crown-6 due to the formation of 1:2 composition complexes.

  13. Ultrasound-guided removal of Implanon devices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Persaud, T

    2008-11-01

    Our study has shown that ultrasound-guided localisation and removal of Implanon rods is safe, practical and highly successful. Over a 4-year period, 119 patients had successful, uncomplicated removal of their subdermal devices.The technique is particularly useful for removal of the device when it is not palpable or when an attempt at removal of a palpable device has not been successful.

  14. Effect of Cervical Collar Removal on the Fracture Load of Anterior Zirconia Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fernanda; Cardoso, Mayra; de Melo, Renata Marques; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Souza, Rodrigo Oa

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of the extension of collar and fatigue cycling on the fracture load of anterior zirconia crowns. A total of 60 anterior full-crown preparations (central incisor) were machined in glass fiber-filled epoxy resin. Zirconia copings were designed and milled using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (thickness: buccal = 0.62 mm, lingual = 0.65 mm, incisal = 0.72 mm). The cervical collars (occlusogingival height = 0.8 mm, buccolingual width = 1.0 mm) were totally or partially (buccal face) removed for modified copings. They were randomly allocated to six groups according to the type of cervical collar design and the presence (or not) of fatigue cycling (n = 10). The veneering ceramic layer was pressed, and the crowns were cemented with resin cement. The samples were tested until fracture in a universal testing machine and analyzed by stereomicroscopy. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (5%). Removal of the cervical collar significantly affected the fracture strength of zirconia crowns (P = .000), whereas fatigue cycling did not (P = .428). The mean failure load was lower in the groups with no collar. The most frequent failure modes were cracking of the veneer porcelain in collarless crowns and catastrophic failure in the others. The authors concluded that removal of the vestibular collar of zirconia copings in anterior crowns does not reduce the fracture load of the crowns. However, removal of the entire collar reduces the fracture load and cannot be recommended.

  15. Preliminary study on a miniature laser manipulation robotic device for tooth crown preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dangxiao; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yuru; Lv, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Xiao, Jing

    2014-12-01

    The existing methods in dental clinical operations for hard tissue removal have several drawbacks which affect the long-term success of the dental treatment. In this paper, we introduce a miniature robotic device called LaserBot, which can manipulate a femtosecond laser beam to drill/burr a decayed tooth to realize clinical tooth crown preparation. In order to control the 3D motion of the laser focal point on the surface of a tooth, three miniature voice-coil motors with optical grating rulers are utilized to drive the 2D pitch/yaw rotation of a vibration mirror and 1D translation of a protruding optical lens. This method can provide high-resolution control of the laser beam. In order to maintain the small size of the robot, a parallel five linkage mechanism combined with a slider-rocker mechanism is developed to realize 2D pitch/yaw rotation of the vibration mirror. Experiment results show that the movement range and resolution of the laser beam point can meet the requirement of typical dental operations. The size of the working end of the device that enters the mouth is 25 × 22 × 57 mm (height × width × length), which is small enough to be mounted on any tooth. The average repeatability error of the laser focal point is about 40 µm. Ablation experiments on wax-resin material and on tooth validate that a femtosecond laser can be used for tooth ablation. The developed robotic device achieved precise 3D motion control of a laser focal point and is small enough to be used in the narrow workspace of the oral cavity. Limitations of the prototype have been identified, and quantified specifications are identified for designing the next generation prototype. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of effectiveness of cement removal from implant-retained crowns using a proposed circular crisscross flossing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cimara Fortes; Shafter, Mohamed Amer; Jain, Vinay; Wicks, Russel Anthony; Linder, Erno; Ledo, Carlos Alberto da Silva

    2018-02-13

    Extruded cement during dental implant crown cementation may cause peri-implant diseases if not removed adequately. Evaluate the efficiency of removal of cement after cementation of implant crowns using an experimental "circular crisscross flossing technique (CCCFT) flossing technique, compared to the conventional "C" shape flossing technique (CSFT). Twenty-four patients rendered 29 experimental and 29 control crowns. Prefabricated abutments were secured to the implant with the margins at least 1 mm subgingivally. The abutments were scanned using CADCAM technology and Emax crowns were fabricated in duplicates. Each crown was cemented separately and excess cement was removed using the CSFT and the CCFT techniques. After completion of cementation was completed, the screw access holes were accessed and the crown was unscrewed along with the abutment. The samples were disinfected using 70% ethanol for 10 minutes. Crowns were divided into 4 parts using a marker in order to facilitate measurement data collection. Vertical and horizontal measurements were made for extruded cement for each control and experimental groups by means of a digital microscope. One-hundred and seventeen measurements were made for each group. Mann-Whitney test was applied to verify statistical significance between the groups. The CCFT showed a highly statistically significant result (104.8 ± 13.66, pimplant crowns cementation when compared with the CSFT.

  17. Removal of technetium from alkaline nuclear-waste media by a solvent-extraction process using crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnesen, P.V.; Presley, D.J.; Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    Crown ethers dissolved in suitably modified aliphatic kerosene diluents can be employed to extract technetium as pertechnetate anion (TcO 4 - ) with good extraction ratios from realistic simulants of radioactive alkaline nitrate waste. The modifiers utilized are non-halogenated and non-volatile, and the technetium can be removed from the solvent by stripping using water. The crown ethers bis-4,4'(5')[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 (di-t-BuCH18C6) and dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) provide stronger TcO 4 - extraction than dicyclohexano-21-crown-7 and 4-tert-butylcyclohexano 15-crown-5. Whereas DCH18C6 provides somewhat higher TcO 4 - extraction ratios than the more lipophilic di-t-BuCH18C6 derivative, the latter was selected for further study owing to its lower distribution to the aqueous phase. Particularly good extraction and stripping results were obtained with di-t-BuCH 18C6 at 0.02 M in a 2:1 vol/vol blend of tributyl phosphate and Isopar reg-sign M. Using this solvent, 98.9% of the technetium contained (at 6 x 10 -5 M) in a Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) Hanford tank waste simulant was removed following two cross-current extraction contacts. Two cross-current stripping contacts with deionized water afforded removal of 99.1% of the technetium from the organic solvent

  18. Veneered zirconia crowns as abutment teeth for partial removable dental prostheses: a clinical 4-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlaja, Juha; Näpänkangas, Ritva; Kuoppala, Ritva; Raustia, Aune

    2015-11-01

    The mechanical properties of zirconia suggest that it might serve as a material for abutment crowns for partial removable dental prostheses (RDPs). Only limited clinical evidence is available for the use of ceramics as abutment crowns. The purpose of this retrospective clinical study was to evaluate the outcome of veneered zirconia single crowns in abutment teeth for RPDs in participants treated by predoctoral students. Thirty-seven veneered zirconia single crowns in 17 participants (9 men and 8 women; mean age 62.5 years) were prepared as abutment teeth for a clasp-retained RDP with a metal framework: 22 crowns with an occlusal rest seat and 15 crowns with both an occlusal rest seat and retentive clasps. The mean follow-up time was 4.2 years (2.9 to 5.4 years). In a clinical examination, the anatomic form of the crown, marginal fidelity (the border between the crown and the tooth was felt with an explorer), wear of the ceramic surface in the rest seat, and fracture of the veneering porcelain were examined and assessed as good, acceptable, or unacceptable. The retention and stability of the RDPs were recorded as good, moderate, or poor. The complications found were fracture of the veneering porcelain (11%) and fracture of the occlusal rest seat (3%). Wear of porcelain at the occlusal contact point was found in 24% of the zirconia single crowns. Wear of the ceramic surfaces of the rest seats for the RDPs was not found. The retention was good in all RDPs. The stability was good in 73% and moderate in 23% of the RDPs. Veneered zirconia single crowns are suitable in abutment teeth for RDPs with a metal framework. Fracture in the veneering porcelain remains a problem with veneered zirconia, although the zirconia surface in the rest seats for RDPs showed no wear. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Removal of strontium from high-level radioactive waste by crown-ether extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Longhai; Wong Ximei; Yang Dazhu; Jiao Rongzhou; Song Chongli

    1995-01-01

    The removal of strontium from high-level radioactive waste (HLW) by the extraction with dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC18C6) in n-octanol has been investigated. The distribution coefficients of Sr 2+ and other ions Na + , K + , Cs + , Ni 2+ , Fe 3+ , Al 3+ , Cr 3+ , and Mo(VI) in DC18C6-1-octanol-HNO 3 were determined. The influence of the major cation ions (Na + , Ni 2+ , Cr 3+ , Fe 3+ , Al 3+ ) on the extraction of Sr 2+ by DC18C6 in 1-octanol was studied. The results show that DC18C6 has a high selectivity of the extraction for Sr. The most cation ions in the waste solution are not extractable, except for K + and Mo(VI). A new process for the removal of Sr from acidic high-level radioactive waste was developed and batch countercurrent extraction experiments with synthetic HLW solution were carried out. Through the process with three extraction stages, one scrub stage and four strip stages, 99% of Sr in the feed were removed. The percentage in weight of Sr in the products was 76%, while that in the original feed was 0.6%. This process can be used for the removal or recovery of Sr from HLW

  20. Removing device for fuel assembly crud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Shinji; Kanehira, Yoshinori; Iwai, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention removes cruds deposited on the surface of fuel assemblies in fuel pool water efficiently, to prevent leakage of cruds into the pool water. That is, a fuel cleaning vessel is disposed in the fuel pool water. Cruds on the surface of the fuel assembly are removed by a ultrasonic wave oscillator while the fuel assembly moves vertically in the cleaning vessel. Removed cruds are sucked together with water in the cleaning vessel by a submerged pump, and sent to a preceding coarse filter, in which relatively great cruds are captured. Fine cruds passing through the preceding filter are sent to a succeeding fine filter together with the filtered water by way of a water supply pump at the outside of the pool, in which fine cruds are completely captured. The filtered water is released into the pool water again. Since the two stage filters are prepared, each of the filters is less clogged. Accordingly, frequency for the exchange of the filters can be reduced. (I.S.)

  1. Using Long-Term Removal Data to Manage a Crown-of-Thorns Starfish Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nakamura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Removal programs are effective strategies for short-term management of Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster spp. populations, especially on a small scale. However, management programs are costly, and, in order to be effective, they must be based on local Acanthaster spp. population dynamics. We have developed simple models to predict the annual number of removable A. cf. solaris along the Onna coast of western central Okinawa Island, where chronic outbreaks have continued for several decades. Methods: The Onna coastal area was divided into five sectors, and annual abundance of small A. cf. solaris individuals was used to predict the total number of removable individuals of a cohort in each sector. Three models were developed, based on size class data collected by the Onna Village Fisheries Cooperative (OVFC for 2003–2015, according to possible patterns of recruitment and adult occurrence. Using the best-fit models selected for each of the five sectors, the number of individuals that potentially escaped removal was calculated. Results: Best-fit models were likely to differ among the five sectors instead of small differences in the coefficients of determination. The models predict differences in the number of residual starfish among sectors; the northernmost sector was predicted to have a high number of residuals and the potential density of A. cf. solaris in the sector exceeded the outbreak criterion. Conclusions: These results suggest how to allocate resources to reduce the population of A. cf. solaris along the Onna coast in 2016. The OVFC implemented a control program for A. cf. solaris based on three model predictions.

  2. Interim rehabilitation of occlusal vertical dimension using a double-crown-retained removable dental prosthesis with polyetheretherketone framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Scherl, Christian; Rosentritt, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a polymeric material that has recently been introduced in dentistry and can be used as framework material for fixed and removable dental prostheses. This clinical report describes the fabrication of a double-crown-retained prosthesis with a PEEK framework in a patient with a substantially diminished occlusal vertical dimension. The insertion of the removable dental prosthesis with a PEEK framework resulted in the functional and esthetic rehabilitation of the patient; however, removable dental prostheses fabricated from PEEK should currently be regarded as interim restorations because of the limited available scientific evidence. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation After Intracardiac Parachute Device Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Bruckner, Brian A; Suarez, Erik E; Estep, Jerry D; Loebe, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Left ventricular assist device implantation is a proven and efficient modality for the treatment of end-stage heart failure. Left ventricular assist device versatility as a bridge to heart transplantation or destination therapy has led to improved patient outcomes with a concomitant rise in its overall use. Other less invasive treatment modalities are being developed to improve heart function and morbidity and mortality for the heart failure population. Percutaneous ventricular restoration is a new investigational therapy that deploys an intracardiac parachute to wall off damaged myocardium in patients with dilated left ventricles and ischemic heart failure. Clinical trials are under way to test the efficacy of percutaneous ventricular restoration using the parachute device. This review describes our encounter with the parachute device, its explantation due to refractory heart failure, and surgical replacement with a left ventricular assist device. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical performance of cements as luting agents for telescopic double crown-retained removable partial and complete overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Michael; Kolbeck, Carola; Lang, Reinhold; Hahnel, Sebastian; Dirschl, Lisa; Handel, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the survival rates and technical failures of removable prostheses (RPs) supported by telescopic double crown (TDC)-retained abutment teeth luted with zinc-phosphate or glass-ionomer cement. Clinical records of 577 patients (288 women, 289 men) who received 577 TDC-retained RPs supported by 1,807 abutments at the Department of Prosthodontics of the University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany, between 1984 and 2007 were analyzed. The 577 prostheses included 200 attached to telescopic crowns with friction fit (FFs), 62 to conical crowns (CCs), and 315 to parallel-sided telescopic crowns with clearance fit (CFs). Survival probabilities were evaluated for the RPs, loss of cementation of the inner copings, secondary caries, and abutment teeth that required endodontic treatment using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis determined the impact of covariates such as sex, denture location (maxilla/mandible), Eichner classification, number of abutment teeth, and the type of double crown system used. The 10-year survival probability was 98.8% +/- 0.09% for FFs, 92.9% +/- 0.41% for CCs, and 86.6% +/- 0.05% for CFs. During the observation period, loss of cementation was frequently observed (FFs: 32%, CCs: 53.2%, CFs: 21.3%). After 15 years, more than 75% of patients had experienced at least one "loss of cementation" event. In this respect, zinc-oxide phosphate and glass-ionomer cements did not show any significant difference. The long-term successful outcome of the RP experience was not compromised, although numerous clinical visits were required for maintenance. The predominant maintenance procedure was the need for recementation of the inner copings.

  5. Bone-anchored hearing device placement with translabyrinthine tumor removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRackan, Theodore R; Goddard, John C; Wilkinson, Eric P; Slattery, William H; Brackmann, Derald E

    2015-02-01

    Translabyrinthine resection of intracranial tumors results in single-sided deafness, which can be treated by surgical and nonsurgical means. Here we describe the first series examining complication and device usage rates among patients receiving a surgically implanted bone-anchored hearing device (BAHD) at the time of translabyrinthine tumor removal. Case series with chart review. Private tertiary neurotologic referral center. Patients (N = 154) undergoing concurrent BAHD placement and translabyrinthine tumor resection. Concurrent BAHD placement and translabyrinthine tumor removal. Postoperative complication rates and BAHD usage. Of the 154 patients, 121 (78.6%) had no device-related complications. The most common device-related complications were skin overgrowth (8.4%), acute infection (5.2%), and chronic infection (3.2%). The overall and specific complication rates did not differ from published BAHD complication rates. One patient (0.6%) developed a cerebrospinal leak through the surgical site for the device. At the time of last follow-up (mean, 39.8 months), 151 patients (95.0%) were still using their devices. Patients undergoing concurrent translabyrinthine tumor removal and BAHD placement exhibit similar device-related complication profiles as patients undergoing standard device placement. Based on these outcomes and the high long-term usage rates, BAHD insertion at the time of translabyrinthine intracranial surgery can be considered a safe and useful procedure. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  6. Clinical Outcome of Double Crown-Retained Mandibular Removable Dentures Supported by a Combination of Residual Teeth and Strategic Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Sven; Ziebolz, Dirk; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Frisch, Eberhard

    2015-07-01

    There is a lack of data regarding the clinical outcome of removable partial dentures (RPDs) supported by a combination of residual natural teeth and implants placed in strategic positions. The aim of the present case series was to conduct a retrospective investigation of the clinical outcome of mandibular tooth-implant-retained partial dentures (TIRPD) rigidly retained via telescopic double crowns. Between 1999 and 2010, 18 patients with reduced residual dentition (1 to 3 natural abutment teeth) and in need of an RPD received 1 to 3 implants in strategic positions for support of the removable prostheses. All TIRPDs were rigidly retained by telescopic crowns according to the Marburg Double Crown (MDC) technique; all prostheses were placed in a private practice. Tooth/implant survival and success rates, prosthetic maintenance requirements, and peri-implant parameters were analyzed retrospectively using patient records and clinical examinations during the final recall appointments. Only patients attending at least annual supportive post-implant hygiene therapy visits (SIT) were included. After a mean functional period of 5.84 ± 3 years (range: 3.01-12.21), 14 patients with 14 dentures supported by 24 implants and 27 teeth (mean number of abutments: 3.6) were available for assessment. Four teeth (survival rate: 85.19%) and no implants (survival rate: 100%) were lost. Peri-implantitis was observed around one implant (4.17%). All 14 dentures were functional (survival rate: 100%) and required only limited maintenance (i.e., screw loosening, acrylic resin fracture repairs, relining) amounting to 0.086 treatments per patient per year (T/P/Y). Within the limitations of this case series, it can be concluded that TIRPDs retained via MDCs might represent a viable treatment option in mandibles with few remaining abutment teeth. Further long-term clinical evaluations with a greater sample size are needed for a more detailed evaluation of this treatment concept. © 2014 by the

  7. Tentacle -a Device to Facilitate Satellite Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirsch, Uli

    The active removal of large scale objects, such as defunct satellites, clearly plays a role in combating space debris. However, it is hampered by the challenges of maneuvering, the risk of collision and the absence of standardized attachment points. This paper proposes an attachment module "TENTACLE" to alleviate all three problems. TENTACLE consists of a wire coil of several meters in length. Stowed in a dedicated module, it is to be attached to the outside of any future satellite. One end is connected to the host satellite, while the other attaches to an end mass, identified by color markings and/or an array of retro-reflectors. Furnished with a small standalone power supply, TENTACLE remains active even if the host satellite becomes defunct. An approaching tow spacecraft can trigger TENTACLE remotely. The adapter is ejected, the wire uncoils. Alternatively, TENTACLE triggers autonomously in case its power supply fails (i.e. fail safe). The mass at the end of the wire increases the moment of inertia of the satellite and thus reduces its rotational rate. The tow spacecraft can now easily capture the wire and attach -without threat of collision with appendages of the defunct satellite. Upon sufficient orbit lowering, the tow spacecraft severs the wire and ascends for another mission.

  8. Laparoscopic removal of migrated intrauterine device embedded in intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnemai-Azar, Amir A; Apfel, Tehilla; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Cosgrove, John Morgan; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is a popular family planning method worldwide. Some of the complications associated with insertion of an IUD are well described in the literature. The frequency of IUD perforation is estimated to be between 0.05 and 13 per 1000 insertions. There are many reports of migrated intrauterine devices, but far fewer reports of IUDs which have penetrated into the small intestine. Herein we report a case of perforated intrauterine device embedded in the small intestine. By using a wound protector retraction device, and fashioning the anastomosis extra-corporeally, we were able to more easily perform this laparoscopically. This left the patient with a quicker recovery, and a better cosmetic result. IUD perforation into the peritoneal cavity is a known complication, and necessitates close follow-up. Most, if not all, should be removed at the time of diagnosis. In the majority of previously reported cases, removal was done through laparotomy. Even in cases where removal was attempted laparoscopically, many were later converted to laparotomy. Surgeons should be aware of different techniques, including using a wound protector retraction device, in order to facilitate laparoscopic removal.

  9. Indications for removal of intrauterine contraceptive devices in Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) are commonly used reversible methods of contraception. The CuT 380A is recommended for use for 10 years but common observation has shown that they are removed much earlier than the recommended duration of use. Methodology: A retrospective study of all clients ...

  10. Application of crown-ethers to cesium and strontium removal from Marcoule reprocessing concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, J.F.; Casas I Garcia, J.

    1990-01-01

    The liquid wastes arising from reprocessing plants are treated by evaporation, the distillate is discharged into environment and the concentrate containing all the active and inactive salts must be stored in geological formation, after embedding, due to the activity of long life radionuclides (actinides, Cs, Sr). The objective of this work, is after removal actinides, to remove cesium/strontium from high sodium content acidic concentrates in order to sharply decrease the volume of wastes to be stored in geological formation

  11. Device for removing foreign objects from anatomic organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device is disclosed for removing foreign objects from anatomic organs such as the ear canal or throat. It has a housing shaped like a flashlight, an electrical power source such as a battery or AC power from a wall socket, and a tip extending from the housing. The tip has at least one wire loop made from a shape-memory-effect alloy, such as Nitinol, switchably connected to the electrical power source such that when electric current flows through the wire loop the wire loop heats up and returns to a previously programmed shape such as a curet or tweezers so as to facilitate removal of the foreign object.

  12. Multidisciplinary emergent removal of a metal penoscrotal constriction device

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nason, GJ

    2017-03-01

    Strangulation of the genital organs is a rare presentation to the emergency department which requires urgent intervention to avoid long term complications. Penoscrotal constriction devices are either used for autoerotic stimulus or to increase sexual performance by maintaining an erection for a longer period. We report a case of a man who presented with penile strangulation following the application of a titanium penoscrotal constriction ring during sexual intercourse seven hours previously. The Fire Brigade department attended with an electric operated angle grinder to facilitate removal of the ring as standard medical equipment (orthopaedic saws, bolt and bone cutters) were insufficient. Fully functional recovery was achieved.

  13. Dental crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than metal crowns Match the color of other teeth May be a good choice if you have a metal allergy Porcelain fused to metal crowns: Are made from porcelain covering a metal crown Metal makes the crown stronger Porcelain part is more prone to fracture than crowns made of all porcelain After the ...

  14. Spontaneous ventilation cooling type after-heat removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Atsuko; Kinoshita, Izumi.

    1991-01-01

    In a spontaneous ventilation cooling type after-heat removing device of an FBR type reactor, heat collectors prepared by continuously stacking cylindrical materials each of a predetermined length substantially horizontally are disposed between an safety vessel and a concrete wall surrounding the vessel. Then, air taken from the outside is introduced through the heat collectors to the outer circumferential surfaces of the safety vessel passing and caused to uprise along them. When the temperature of the safety vessel is elevated upon after-heat removal, heat is conducted by radiation to the heat collector which is caused to flow the inside while undergoing multi-reflection and partially absorbed and partially passed. Heat permeability can be reduced by extending the length of the cylindrical material or increasing radiation rate of the heat collectors. Accordingly, most of the heat from the safety vessel can be absorbed by the heat collectors, to suppress the temperature elevation in the opposing concrete wall and simplify the structure. Since the surface of the heat collectors serves as a heat conductive surface and the collectors are composed of an assembly of the cylindrical materials, the area of heat conduction is great and the amount of heat-removal is also large. (N.H.)

  15. Removal of an intraabdominal levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, David; Latta, Richard

    2013-06-01

    A woman with a viable intrauterine 12-week pregnancy and an intraabdominal levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device had the device successfully removed under local anesthesia. The pregnancy continued without complication. The decision to remove an intraabdominal levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device during pregnancy remains controversial. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Retention force of secondary crowns to copings after temporary cementation: the effect of crown material and luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Torsten; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Golecki, Gudrun; Schwahn, Christian; Biffar, Reiner

    2010-12-01

    Tooth-implant supported restorations can be temporarily cemented if the natural abutments are protected by permanently cemented copings. This in vitro study investigated the retention forces of pure titanium crowns to milled titanium alloy copings and of cobalt-chromium crowns to copings made of electroplated gold after cementation with different luting agents. Five specimens per group were cemented with acrylic-urethane cement (inner crown surface preisolated with petroleum jelly) and provisional zinc oxide cement. The retention was measured using a universal testing machine and a dental device for crown removal. The differences between groups were compared using analysis of variance. The pull-off forces for the cobalt-chromium secondary crowns cemented on gold copings using zinc oxide cement were significantly higher (mean=144.5 N) than the other crown-cement combinations (32.2-54.4 N), which showed no significant differences in the retention force. The impulse number and magnitude of the dental device was usually low and showed no substantial differences between the crown-cement combinations. It can be concluded that the results of the clinical removal method for prostheses differ from the results of the pull-off test. The question which luting agent is the better choice for retrievable restorations remains unanswered without further clinical and laboratory studies.

  17. Subgingival plaque removal using a new air-polishing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moëne, Raphaël; Décaillet, Fabien; Andersen, Elene; Mombelli, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, patient acceptance, and short-term microbiologic effect of a new air-polishing device in subjects in maintenance care with residual pockets > or =5 mm. This was an examiner-masked, randomized, split-mouth clinical trial. A new disposable nozzle, allowing the subgingival application of amino acid glycine powder at a limited pressure, was compared to scaling and root planing (SRP) in 50 subjects with residual pockets during the maintenance phase. After removing supragingival deposits, the spray was applied for 4 to 5 seconds in all sites > or =5 mm in the test quadrant, whereas SRP was used in the control quadrant. Microbiologic samples were taken from one treated test and one control site 2 days before and 7 days after treatment. Total bacterial counts and the counts of six periodontal pathogens were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. No adverse event was noted in any subject for the test or control treatment. Using a visual analog scale, the patients perceived the test treatment to be significantly less painful/uncomfortable than the hand instrumentation (P control quadrants (P = 0.019 and P bacterial load and the counts of six periodontal pathogens between the test and control sites did not reach statistical significance. The longitudinal reduction was significant in control sites for total bacteria load (P <0.001), Porphyromonas gingivalis (P = 0.01), Treponema denticola (P <0.001), and Tannerella forsythia (previously T. forsythensis) (P <0.001). Subgingival air polishing with a new device was safe (no adverse events were noted), perceived to be more acceptable by the patients, and was more time-efficient than SRP; however, on a microbiologic level, it was not superior to conventional SRP.

  18. Physical removal of metallic carbon nanotubes from nanotube network devices using a thermal and fluidic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Alexandra C; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M; Kane, Alexander A; Krafcik, Karen L; Léonard, François; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V; Billups, W Edward; Hauge, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is versatile and is applied to devices post-fabrication. (paper)

  19. Improvement of oral health-related quality-of-life by use of different kinds of double-crown-retained removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, Thomas; Danner, Daniel; Bömicke, Wolfgang; Hassel, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    To verify the hypotheses that treatment with double-crown-retained removable partial dentures (RPDs) improves oral health-related quality-of life (OHRQoL) over a 36-month period and that the performance of RPDs retained by use of electroplated double crowns (EP-RPDs) was different to that of RPDs retained by use of cast double crowns (C-RPDs). Fifty-four patients (mean age = 64 years, 63% men) were recruited and randomly assigned to C-RPD or EP-RPD. OHRQoL was assessed pre-treatment, post-treatment and 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after insertion, by use of the oral health impact profile (OHIP). An unweighted total score was calculated (OHIP-SUM). A two-level hierarchical model was used for statistical analysis. First-level units were the measurements on the six occasions; second-level units were the patients. Improvement of OHRQoL was observed in both groups after treatment (t = 7.27, p < 0.001). Whereas a treatment-material interaction indicated that treatment with EP-RPDs resulted in greater immediate improvement of OHRQoL, a time-material interaction indicated that long-term improvement was greater for C-RPDs. Treatment with EP-RPDs and C-RPDs improved OHRQoL initially. Over a period of 36 months the effect was significant. The treatment is, therefore, a promising therapeutic option. The cast conical design seems to have advantages with regard to long-term OHRQoL.

  20. Unsplinted implants and teeth supporting maxillary removable partial dentures retained by telescopic crowns: a retrospective study with >6 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Data regarding tooth- and implant-supported maxillary removable partial dentures (TIRPDs) are scarce. The objective of this research was to perform a retrospective evaluation of the clinical long-term outcome of maxillary TIRPDs rigidly retained via telescopic crowns in patients undergoing supportive post-implant therapy (SIT). The inclusion criteria were met by 26 patients restored with maxillary TIRPDs between 1997 and 2011 in a private practice. Primary crowns (Marburg double crowns, MDCs) on teeth were cemented, whereas those on implants were screw-retained. Using patient records and data from a cross-sectional clinical examination in 2013, the survival rates of the teeth, implants and prostheses, together with the biological and technical complications, were analyzed. After 6.12 ± 3.80 (range: 2-16) years of loading, 23 non-smoking patients with 23 dentures supported by 60 implants and 66 teeth were available for assessment. Nine teeth (survival rate: 86.36%) were lost, whereas 1 implant (survival rate: 98.36%) failed because of peri-implantitis. Although 30 implants (50%) in 16 patients (69.57%) showed bleeding on probing (BOP+), no further peri-implantitis was observed. The mean peri-implant probing depth (PPD) was 3.68 ± 0.71 mm. All dentures were functional and required technical maintenance efforts amounting to 0.128 treatments per patient per year (T/P/Y). Within the limitations of this study, we conclude that TIRPDs retained via MDCs may represent a viable treatment option for patients with residual maxillary teeth. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Early surgical removal of membranous ventricular septal device might allow recovery of atrio-ventricular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaert, Caroline; Dragulescu, Andreea; Sluysmans, Thierry; Carminati, Mario; Fraisse, Alain

    2008-09-01

    Complete atrio-ventricular heart block is a well-reported complication after percutaneous closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects. The incidence seems to be higher than after surgical closure. Early heart block can be transient and pacemaker implantation is not always required. Late heart block is also described. We describe two patients who both presented with complete atrio-ventricular block 4 days after device insertion. Surgical device removal was followed by a rapid and complete recovery of the atrio-ventricular conduction. Surgical device removal should be considered in cases of subacute heart block, as removal might result in recovery of the atrio-ventricular conduction.

  2. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a... polymethylmethacrylate, intended to make a temporary prosthesis, such as a crown or bridge, for use until a permanent...

  3. The Probability of Detection in the Telephone Line of Device of the Unauthorized Removal of Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Svintsov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the theory of quantitative description of the possible presence in the telephone line devices unauthorized removal of information, investigated with the help of probability theory.

  4. The role of friction in the mechanism of retaining the partial removable dentures with double crown system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowa, Tomasz; Dobrowolska, Anna; Wieleba, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Cylindrical telescopic crowns belong to bolt dentures, because their adhesion strength is based on the friction force. The magnitude of static and slide friction forces depends on the strain within the contact area and properties of materials employed. Friction force value between telescope elements declines in the first phase of wearing period and, subsequently, maintains particular constant value of 8 to 10 N. In the telescopic technique, homo and heterogenic joints are used. The following prosthodontic materials have been examined: goldbase alloys (Degudent Kiss, Degulor M), cobalt-base alloy (Brealloy 270), ceramics (Zircon Oxide, Zirconia) during tribological investigations on FGP composite resin. The cooperating surfaces were moistened with synthetic saliva. The research confirmed the dependence of the static friction coefficient on the contact pressure for the analyzed pairs of materials used in prosthodontics. The biggest effect of the contact pressure on the coefficient of friction value occurs when the ceramic rubs on FGP composite resin. The most stable friction coefficient in the context of contact pressure changes as well as life has been found in the case of the cobalt alloy Brealloy 270. An interesting material is a gold alloy Degulor M, for which the coefficient of friction varies only slightly with pressure in the range of 0.6 to 0.9 MPa.

  5. Densities in the left innominate vein after removal of an implantable venous device: a case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastelaar, J. van; Janssen, C.H.; Bont, E. de; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Baren, R. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Pericatheter calcifications are unusual and rare after removal of indwelling central venous catheters with few reports in the literature. We present a case of a woman with calcifications in her left innominate vein after removal of an implantable venous device. CASE

  6. Prognosis of implants and abutment teeth under combined tooth-implant-supported and solely implant-supported double-crown-retained removable dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammelsberg, Peter; Bernhart, Gunda; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Schmitter, Marc; Schwarz, Stefanie

    2014-07-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of complications in dental implants and abutment teeth used for combined tooth-implant- and solely implant-supported double crown-retained removable dental prostheses (RDPs). Patients were selected from a prospective clinical study. Seventy-three RDPs retained by 234 implants and 107 abutment teeth were placed in 39 men and 22 women with a mean age of 65 years. Forty-five RDPs were located in the maxilla and 28 in the mandible. Thirty-four RDPs were solely implant-supported and 39 were combined tooth-implant-supported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate success defined as survival without severe abutment-related complications, and Cox regression was used to isolate the most relevant prognostic risk factors. After a median observation period of 2.7 years for the RDPs, six implants failed and eleven implants were diagnosed with peri-implantitis. Four abutment teeth were extracted, and three abutment teeth showed severe complications requiring extended interventions. For both abutment teeth and implants, Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed a 5-year probability of success of 85% for solely implant-supported RDPs and 92% for combined tooth-implant-supported RDPs. Multiple Cox regression identified RDP location (P = 0.01), age (P = 0.01), and gender (P = 0.04) as prognostic risk factors for severe implant-related complications. Solely implant-supported RPDs showed a poorer prognosis, but the risk difference did not reach statistical significance. Preliminary data suggest that the combination of teeth and implants to support double crown-retained RDPs may result in a prognostic advantage. The present findings should be validated in independent studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Removal selectivity of Prometheus: a new extracorporeal liver support device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Kinan; Ernst, Thomas; Kretschmer, Ulrich; Haller, Hermann; Manns, Michael Peter; Fliser, Danilo

    2006-02-14

    To evaluate whether treatment with the Prometheus reg system significantly affects cytokines, coagulation factors and other plasma proteins. We studied nine patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure and accompanying renal failure. Prometheus reg therapy was performed on 2 consecutive days for up to 6 h in all patients. Several biochemical parameters and blood counts were assessed at regular time points during Prometheus reg treatment. We observed a significant decrease of both protein-bound (e.g. bile acids) and water-soluble (e.g. ammonia) substances after Prometheus reg therapy. Even though leukocytes increased during treatment (P0.5). Further, antithrombin 3, factor II and factor V plasma levels did not decrease during Prometheus reg therapy (all P>0.5), and the INR remained unchanged (P=0.4). Plasma levels of total protein, albumin, and fibrinogen were also not altered during Prometheus reg treatment (all P>0.5). Finally, platelet count did not change significantly during therapy (P=0.6). Despite significant removal of protein-bound and water-soluble substances, Prometheus reg therapy did not affect the level of cytokines, coagulation factors or other plasma proteins. Thus, the filters and adsorbers used in the system are highly effective and specific for water-soluble substances and toxins bound to the albumin fraction.

  8. Fluid removal in acute heart failure: diuretics versus devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Felker, G Michael

    2014-10-01

    Fluid removal and relief of congestion are central to treatment of acute heart failure. Diuretics have been the decongestive mainstay but their known limitations have led to the exploration of alternative strategies. This review compares diuretics with ultrafiltration and examines the recent evidence evaluating their use. Relevant recent studies are the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation trial (of diuretics) and the Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (of ultrafiltration). The Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation study evaluated strategies of loop diuretic use during acute heart failure (continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus and high dose versus low dose). After 72  h, there was no significant difference with either comparison for the coprimary end points. Patients treated with a high-dose strategy tended to have greater diuresis and more decongestion compared with low-dose therapy, at the cost of transient changes in renal function. The Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure study showed that in acute heart failure patients with persistent congestion and worsening renal function, ultrafiltration, as compared with a medical therapy, was associated with similar weight loss but greater increase in serum creatinine and more adverse events. Decongestion remains a major challenge in acute heart failure. Although recent studies provide useful data to guide practice, the relatively poor outcomes point to the continued need to identify better strategies for safe and effective decongestion.

  9. Heat removing device for nuclear reactor container facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateno, Seiya; Tominaga, Kenji; Iwata, Yasutaka; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Niino, Tsuyoshi

    1994-09-30

    A pressure suppression chamber incorporating pool water is disposed inside of a reactor container for condensating steams released to a dry well upon occurrence of abnormality. A pool is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure suppression chamber having a steel wall surface of the reactor container as a partition wall. The outer circumferential pool is in communication with ocean by way of a lower communication pipeline and an upper communication pipeline. During normal plant operation state, partitioning valves disposed respectively to the upper and lower communication pipelines are closed, so that the outer circumferential pool is kept empty. After occurrence loss of coolant accident, steams generated by after-heat of the reactor core are condensated by pool water of the pressure suppression chamber, and the temperature of water in the pressure suppression chamber is gradually elevated. During the process, the partition valves of the upper and lower communication pipelines are opened to introduce cold seawater to the outer circumferential pool. With such procedures, heat of the outer circumferential pool is released to the sea by natural convection of seawater, thereby enabling to remove residual heat without dynamic equipments. (I.N.).

  10. Prognosis of Combining Remaining Teeth and Implants in Double-Crown-Retained Removable Dental Prostheses: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Meifei; Zhao, Kai; Feng, Yunzhi; Yao, Qian

    The reliability of combining natural teeth and implants in one removable prosthesis is controversial. This systematic review was conducted to evaluate the prognosis of combined tooth/implant-supported double-crown-retained removable dental prostheses (DCR-RDPs) and to compare them with solely implant-supported prostheses with a minimum observation period of 3 years. Electronic database (PubMed, Embase, Central, and SCI) and manual searches up to August 2016 were conducted to identify human clinical studies on tooth/implant-supported DCR-RDPs. Literature selection and data extraction were accomplished by two independent reviewers. Meta-analyses of survival and complication rates were performed separately for combined tooth/implant-supported and solely implant-supported DCRRDPs. Among the initially identified 366 articles, 17 were included in a quantitative analysis. The estimated overall cumulative survival rate (CSR) for implants in combined tooth/implant-supported DCRRDPs was 98.72% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 96.98% to 99.82%), and that for implants in solely implant-supported DCR-RDPs was 98.83% (95% CI: 97.45% to 99.75%). The summary CSR for abutment teeth was 92.96% (95% CI: 85.38% to 98.12%). Double-crown-retained dentures with both abutment types showed high CSRs, most of which were approximately 100%. Regarding prosthetic maintenance treatment, the estimated incidence for patients treated with combined tooth/implant-supported RDPs was 0.164 (95% CI: 0.089 to 0.305) per patient per year (T/P/Y) and that for patients restored with solely implant-supported RDPs was 0.260 (95% CI: 0.149 to 0.454) T/P/Y. Based on four studies with combined tooth/implant-supported DCR-RDPs, no intrusion phenomena were encountered. Subject to the limitations of the present review, combining remaining teeth and implants in DCR-RDPs is a reliable and predictable treatment modality for partially edentulous patients. Comparable high survival rates and minor biologic or

  11. Safe and cost-effective ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Usha; Astudillo-Dávalos, Fausto E; Gerkowicz, Sabrina A

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and difference in cost of ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device (IUD). A total of 23 women underwent ultrasound-guided retrieval of retained IUDs between January 2013 and March 2014. Transvaginal ultrasound was performed in all cases to assess the localization of the IUD. Under transabdominal ultrasound guidance, either the crochet type IUD hook (Gyneas, Goussainville, France) or Alligator forceps were used to grasp the IUD and remove it from the uterine cavity. The costs of the ultrasound guided procedure and the hysteroscopic removal of the IUD were compared. Twenty-three patients who failed IUD removal in the clinic were referred to our department for ultrasound-guided removal. All patients had an IUD present in the uterine cavity. Eleven patients had Paragard IUDs (48%), eight had Mirena IUDs (35%), three had Lippes loop (13%), and one had a ring IUD (4%). The patients' ages ranged from 20-56 years. The IUDs were in place for 8 months to 23 years. Of the 23 patients with retained IUDs, 19 were successfully removed (83%), and 4 underwent hysteroscopic removal of IUD. The IUD removal cost in the operating room on average was $3562 US dollars and the cost of ultrasound-guided removal was $465 US dollars. Retained intrauterine devices with or without strings can often be safely removed in an office-based setting under ultrasound guidance at less cost than in the operating room, even in cases with embedded IUDs. Our experience leads us to propose in-office IUD removal under ultrasound guidance as the first line in management of retained IUDs after failed removal by conventional practices. Ultrasound provides numerous advantages including direct visualization in a less invasive manner than hysteroscopy. Three-dimensional imaging can also be used for enhanced perspective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Zirconia-based dental crown to support a removable partial denture: a three-dimensional finite element analysis using contact elements and micro-CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Freitas, Amilcar Chagas; Martini, Ana Paula; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Sales; Luersen, Marco Antonio; Ko, Ching Chang

    2015-01-01

    Veneer fracture is the most common complication in zirconia-based restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical behavior of a zirconia-based crown in a lower canine tooth supporting removable partial denture (RPD) prosthesis, varying the bond quality of the veneer/coping interface. Microtomography (μCT) data of an extracted left lower canine were used to build the finite element model (M) varying the core material (gold core - MAu; zirconia core - MZi) and the quality of the veneer/core interface (complete bonded - MZi; incomplete bonded - MZi-NL). The incomplete bonding condition was only applied for zirconia coping by using contact elements (Target/Contact) with 0.3 frictional coefficients. Stress fields were obtained using Ansys Workbench 10.0. The loading condition (L = 1 N) was vertically applied at the base of the RPD prosthesis metallic support towards the dental apex. Maximum principal (σmax) and von Mises equivalent (σvM) stresses were obtained. The σmax (MPa) for the bonded condition was similar between gold and zirconia cores (MAu, 0.42; MZi, 0.40). The incomplete bonded condition (MZi-NL) raised σmax in the veneer up to 800% (3.23 MPa) in contrast to the bonded condition. The peak of σvM increased up to 270% in the MZi-NL. The incomplete bond condition increasing the stress in the veneer/zirconia interface.

  13. [A study of a laser fluorescence device for assessing caries removal in primary teeth in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianghao; Qi, Man

    2011-10-01

    To explore the feasibility of using laser fluorescence device for assessing caries removal in primary teeth in vitro. 8 primary molars with approximal caries were collected, and caries were removed in vitro. The laser fluorescence readings of dentin before and after caries removal were recorded. To judge the degree of caries removal by caries detector, polarizing microscope and dental microhardness tester. The correlation of DIAGNO-dent reading with Viker's Hardness was analyzed. The feasibility of using laser fluorescence for assessing caries removal was explored. The average Viker's Hardness of dentin after caries removal with staining was (46.99 +/- 12.44) HV, and the average Viker's Hardness of normal control was (67.39 +/- 16.59) HV. There was significant difference between the two groups (P laser fluorescence readings before and after caries removal with staining (P > 0.05). And there was significant difference between the laser fluorescence readings before and after the caries removal without staining (P caries residue in sample, no matter stain or not. The laser fluorescence could not distinguish stained dentin from caries, and is not suitable for assessing caries removal.

  14. Method and device for removing nuclear fuel pellets from a metal fuel can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, C.D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    There are to be removed the pellets from a nuclear fuel rod without being destroyed by the process. For this purpose at one end of the fuel rod an opening is produced, through which a fluid is pressed at high pressure. Thereby the can is expanded and subsequently cut open by means of a cutting device. The pellets then may slip out. (TK) [de

  15. Home hair removal in all skin types with a combined radiofrequency and optical energy source device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, Jerome M; Zelickson, Brian; Gold, Michael H; Friedman, David; Kutscher, Tuvia D; Afsahi, Vince

    2014-02-01

    Home hair removal devices are available for skin types I to IV. Side effects may limit hair removal in darker-pigmented individuals. To evaluate a home hair removal device using combined radiofrequency (RF) and intense pulsed light (IPL) energy for effectiveness and safety with all skin types (I-VI). Two study designs: effectiveness (treating 94 bilateral patient areas weekly seven times, with one side then receiving three additional treatments at 4-week intervals) and safety (37 patient areas treated every 2-4 days for three sessions). Hairs were counted 3 months after treatment for the first design and 2 months after for the second. In the first study design, 55% hair count reduction was achieved1 month after seven treatments to all sites. The side with no further sessions had 43% hair reduction and the side receiving ongoing treatment had 58% reduction after two further treatments. Side effects were transient and minor. In the second study, with 46% of the patients having skin types V/VI, 2 months after the procedure there was 44% hair reduction. There were no adverse effects reported. For the first time, a home hair removal device has been shown to be effective and safe in all skin types using a low-energy RF-IPL device. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Retrievability of implant-supported crowns when using three different cements: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worni, Andreas; Gholami, Hadi; Marchand, Laurent; Katsoulis, Joannis; Mericske-Stern, Regina; Enkling, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the removal of implant-supported crowns retained by three different cements using an air-accelerated crown remover and to evaluate the patients' response to the procedure. This controlled clinical trial was conducted with 21 patients (10 women, 11 men; mean age: 51 ± 10.2 years) who had received a total of 74 implants (all placed in the posterior zone of the mandible). Four months after implant surgery, the crowns were cemented on standard titanium abutments of different heights. Three different cements (two temporary: Harvard TEMP and Improv; and one definitive: Durelon) were used and randomly assigned to the patients. Eight months later, one blinded investigator removed all crowns. The number of activations of the instrument (CORONAflex, KaVo) required for crown removal was recorded. The patients completed a questionnaire retrospectively to determine the impact of the procedure and to gauge their subjective perception. A linear regression model and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. All crowns could be retrieved without any technical complications or damage. Both abutment height (P = .019) and cement type (P = .004) had a significant effect on the number of activations, but the type of cement was more important. An increased total number of activations had no or only a weak correlation to the patients' perception of concussion, noise, pain, and unwillingness to use the device. Cemented implant crowns can be removed, and the application of an air-accelerated device is a practicable method. A type of cement with appropriate retention force has to be selected. The impact on the patients' subjective perception should be taken into account.

  17. Endoscopic removal of over-the-scope clips: Clinical experience with a bipolar cutting device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel; Schmidt, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Background Over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) are increasingly used for the closure of perforations/fistulae, hemostasis and endoscopic full-thickness resection (FTRD system). When OTSC-associated complications occur or re-therapy at the OTSC site is needed, OTSC removal may be indicated. An experimental study in an animal model and a case series have shown good results for OTSC removal with a bipolar cutting device. We present a larger clinical study using this device. Methods Data of all consecutive patients with indication for OTSC removal were collected and analyzed retrospectively. OTSCs were cut at two opposing sites using a bipolar grasping device to apply short direct current impulses. OTSC fragments were extracted with a standard forceps and a cap at the tip of the endoscope to avoid tissue damage. Results Between December 2012 and February 2016 a total of 42 OTSC removals in the upper (n = 25) and lower (n = 17) gastrointestinal tract have been performed at our department. Overall technical success, defined as cutting the OTSC at two opposing sites and extraction of both fragments, was achieved in 92.9% (39/42) of all cases. Successful fragmentation of the OTSC was achieved in 97.6% (41/42). Minor bleedings were rare and could be managed endoscopically in all cases. There were no perforations and no major or delayed bleedings. Conclusion Endoscopic OTSC removal with a bipolar cutting device is feasible, effective and safe. This technique can be applied in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:28588877

  18. Evaluation of the plaque removal efficacy of two commercially available dental floss devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanck, M; Mankodi, S; Wesley, P; Tasket, R; Nelson, B

    2007-01-01

    This single blind, crossover design, clinical trial provided a comparative assessment of the oral cleaning of two dental devices as demonstrated through the removal of dental plaque when used according to marketed product-use directions. Twenty-six subjects, both male and female between the ages of 19 and 64 years, completed this two-cell crossover study. Subjects were assessed for whole mouth plaque levels, both before and after use of each of the randomly assigned floss devices, by assessing disclosed plaque using the Modified Turesky Plaque Index. The two floss devices were a Mint Floss Pick and a standard rolled floss. Subjects abstained from brushing the night before appearing in the clinic, and based upon meeting the minimum plaque criteria of 1.5 at the first phase of the crossover, used one of the two floss devices according to the directions for use found on the product packaging. Both pre- and post-device use plaque levels were recorded with calculations made of both the actual difference in plaque level, as well as the percent plaque removed. Data were subjected to an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and employed a model consistent with crossover design. Overall results from both phases of the crossover showed the Mint Floss Pick product removed 19.4% of the plaque. The standard rolled floss product removed 15% of the plaque. Both products removed statistically significant plaque when assessed versus pre-treatment levels. Although the ANCOVA identified a statistically significant difference between treatments favoring the Floss Pick product, further statistical examination revealed a significant sequence effect, which led to a conservative product comparison of equivalence. This analysis confirmed that the Floss Pick product was "at least as good as" the standard floss product for plaque removal. Additional analyses of various sites in the mouth, i.e., interproximal, anterior, posterior, etc., also confirmed similarity of performance for both products in

  19. Intraoperative Management of Hypercapnia With an Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal Device During Giant Bullectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Amore, Andrea; D'Andrea, Rocco; Caroli, Guido; Mazzoli, Carlo Alberto; Rocca, Alberto; Stella, Franco; Bini, Alessandro; Melotti, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal CO2-removal devices have been introduced in clinical practice to provide protective and ultraprotective ventilation strategies in different settings to avoid retention of carbon dioxide. The need to facilitate lung-protective ventilation is required not only for the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome but also in thoracic surgery during complex operations, especially in respiratory compromised patients. This report describes a case of giant bullectomy for vanishing lung syndrome in which intraoperative hypercapnia secondary to protective ventilation was managed with a CO2-removal device (Decap-Hemodec s.r.l., Salerno, Italy). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of the intraoperative use of the Decap system for giant bullectomy.

  20. METHOD AND DEVICE FOR REMOVING AN IONIC IMPURITY FROM BUILDING STRUCTURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for removing an ionic impurity from building structures comprising the steps of: forming at least one electrode unit (2, 3) by mixing a clay compound with an ion exchange component; placing at least one anode (4) and at least one cathode (5) at the same or separate...... poultices (8); providing a buffer by applying a carbonate to the poultice (8) at the anode (4) and providing a buffer by applying an acid to the poultice (8) at the cathode (4); position one or more poultices (8) at the building structure (1); and apply an electric current to the electrodes (4, 5......). The invention further relates to a device for removing an ionic impurity from building structures, the device including electrode units (2, 3) consisting of at least one electrode being an anode) (4) or a cathode (5) and at least one buffer component arranged in a poultice (8) including an ion exchange...

  1. Laparoscopic Removal of An Ectopic Intrauterine Device From The Anterior Abdominal Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaprak Engin Üstün

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The intrauterine devices (IUDs have been used widely by women of childbearing years. In this report, we presented a case of a 25-year-old gravida 4, parity 3 woman with an abdominal wall penetration by an IUD. She had an IUD (TCu-380A inserted immediately after dilatation & curettage. The IUD was removed laparoscopically.

  2. An extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) device operating at hemodialysis blood flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, R Garrett; Lund, Laura; Frankowski, Brian; Federspiel, William J

    2017-09-06

    Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO 2 R) systems have gained clinical appeal as supplemental therapy in the treatment of acute and chronic respiratory injuries with low tidal volume or non-invasive ventilation. We have developed an ultra-low-flow ECCO 2 R device (ULFED) capable of operating at blood flows comparable to renal hemodialysis (250 mL/min). Comparable operating conditions allow use of minimally invasive dialysis cannulation strategies with potential for direct integration to existing dialysis circuitry. A carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) removal device was fabricated with rotating impellers inside an annular hollow fiber membrane bundle to disrupt blood flow patterns and enhance gas exchange. In vitro gas exchange and hemolysis testing was conducted at hemodialysis blood flows (250 mL/min). In vitro carbon dioxide removal rates up to 75 mL/min were achieved in blood at normocapnia (pCO 2  = 45 mmHg). In vitro hemolysis (including cannula and blood pump) was comparable to a Medtronic Minimax oxygenator control loop using a time-of-therapy normalized index of hemolysis (0.19 ± 0.04 g/100 min versus 0.12 ± 0.01 g/100 min, p = 0.169). In vitro performance suggests a new ultra-low-flow extracorporeal CO 2 removal device could be utilized for safe and effective CO 2 removal at hemodialysis flow rates using simplified and minimally invasive connection strategies.

  3. Simultaneous laparoscopic cholecystectomy and removal of an intrauterine device translocated to the right subdiaphragmal region: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Salih; Ahmeti, Elvis; Hoxha, Sejdullah A; Ymeri, Halit; Shaqiri, Ismet; Kastrati-Spahija, Nexhmije B; Krasniqi, Avdyl S

    2009-08-25

    Intrauterine devices are often accompanied by various complications, of which the uterine perforation constitutes the most dangerous one. We present a case of a 41-year-old woman complaining of right upper quadrant pain. She had an intrauterine device inserted 12 years earlier without regular follow-up. Abdominal plain X-ray revealed the intrauterine device trans-located into the right subdiaphragmal area. Abdominal ultrasound showed gallbladder stones without any other sonographic pathologic finding. Patient underwent simultaneous laparoscopic cholecystectomy and removal of the intrauterine device from the right subdiaphragmal area. Laparoscopy is an appropriate method for removal of intrauterine device translocated to the right subdiaphragmatic region.

  4. A newly developed removable dental device for fused 3-D MRI/Meg imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuboki, Takuo; Clark, G.T.; Akhtari, M.; Sutherling, W.W.

    1999-01-01

    Recently 3-D imaging techniques have been used to shed light on the role of abnormal brain functions in such conditions as nocturnal bruxism and orofacial pain. In order to achieve precise 3-D image fusion between magnetic resonance images (MRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we developed a removable dental device which attaches rigidly to the teeth. Using this device, correlation of MEG and MRI data points was achieved by the co-registration of 3 or more fiducial points. Using a Polhemus 3-space digitizer the locations of the points were registered on MEG and then a small amount of high-water-content material was placed at each point for registering these same points on MRI. The mean reproducibility of interpoint distances, determined for 2 subjects, was between 0.59 and 0.82 mm. Using a Monte Carlo statistical analysis we determined that the accuracy of a posterior projection from the fiducial points to any point within the strata of the brain is ±3.3 mm. The value of this device is that it permits reasonably precise and repeatable co-registration of these points and yet it is easily removed and replaced by the patient. Obviously such a device could also be adapted for use in diagnosis and analysis of brain functions related with other various sensory and motor functions (e.g., taste, pain, clenching) in maxillofacial region using MRI and MEG. (author)

  5. Dinar-crown banknotes

    OpenAIRE

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Dinar-crown banknotes were: ½ dinars (i.e. 2 crowns), 1 dinar (i.e. 4 crowns), 5 dinars (i.e. 20 crowns), 10 dinars (i.e. 40 crowns), 20 dinars (i.e. 80 crowns), 100 dinars (i.e. 400 crowns), and 1000 dinars (i.e. 4000 crowns). The ½- and 1-dinar banknotes are assumed to have been issued in 1919, whereas the other five banknotes, according to one source, were released into circulation on 21.02.1920. Pursuant to the regulations, the replacement of the nostrified crown banknotes by the new crow...

  6. The risks of do-it-yourself and over-the-counter devices for tattoo removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The tattoo removal market has boomed over the years following the increased prevalence of tattooed individuals around the world. Surgery and laser are currently the gold standards for tattoo removal. However, both of them have drawbacks. Surgery is better suited for small tattoos in areas of adequate skin laxity but leave a scar, while laser removal is a long and painful procedure, with no guarantee of a complete efficacy. Both are expensive procedures, and not all individuals are ready to fund them privately. Consequently, some individuals are in the search of faster, easier, and cheaper procedures that can be performed either by themselves or by laypeople. The unregulated market of internet provides a favorable ground for many websites to offer various tattoo removal methods. Besides, some tattooists and other non-medical laypeople have started to get interested by such a growing market, especially as some laser devices manufactured in Asia are now available at competitive prices, and due to weaknesses in the EU legislation regarding the use of lasers for cosmetic procedures by non-medical laypeople. We review here different do-it-yourself and over-the-counter tattoo removal methods. We discuss the potential risks for tattooed individuals and stress the importance of a better regulation of such a market. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. Comparison of the time required for removal of intraradicular cast posts using two Brazilian ultrasound devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Brito-Júnior

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the time required for removal of intraradicular cast posts cemented with zinc phosphate (ZF or glass ionomer cement (GIC, using two Brazilian ultrasound devices (BUD. Seventy two human inferior premolars with single root canals were sectioned transversally at the cementoenamel junction. In each specimen, the root canal was endodontically treated, the post space was prepared to a depth of 9 mm and the canal was molded to obtain a post impression. After the casting procedures, the posts were randomly distributed into 2 groups (n = 36 according to the luting material used: G1 - ZF and G2 - GIC. The tooth and luted post set was then embedded in an acrylic resin block. The groups were then divided into 3 subgroups (n = 12 according to the ultrasound device used: A - Enac (Osada Electric, Japan, used as a control group; B - Profi II Ceramic (Dabi Atlante, Brazil and C - Jet Sonic Satelec (Gnatus, Brazil. The posts were submitted to the vibration process with maximum power set on all surrounding surfaces. Time of application was recorded with a chronometer until complete post dislodgment, and the data were analyzed by the ANOVA test (p < 0.05. The averages required for post removal in G1 and G2 were respectively 41.42 and 92.03 seconds, with significant statistical difference (p = 0.001. No statistical difference was observed among the three ultrasound devices (p = 0.088, and the BUD presented a performance similar to that of the international gold standard device (Enac. Moreover, the type of luting agent had a greater influence on the time required for post removal than the origin of the ultrasonic unit.

  8. Long-term clinical performance of esthetic primary molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Diana; Fuks, Anna B; Eidelman, Eliecer

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to report the long-term clinical performance of esthetic primary molar crowns and compare them to that of stainless steel crowns (SSC). Twenty crowns (10 conventional and 10 esthetic) placed in 10 children who had participated in a previously reported study, were assessed again after 4 years. The crowns were evaluated clinically and radiographically according to the following parameters: gingival health, marginal extension, crown adequacy, proper occlusion, proximal contact, chipping of the facing (for esthetic crowns only), and cement removal. At the 4 year evaluation, all the esthetic crowns showed chipping of the facing. No difference was found for marginal extension, occlusion, crown adequacy and periodontal health between SSCs and the esthetic crowns. After 4 years, all the esthetic crowns presented chipping of the facing and, consequently, a very poor esthetic appearance.

  9. Partial extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal using a standard continuous renal replacement therapy device: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Jean-Marie; Barbot, Olivier; Thevenot, Florence; de Matteis, Olivier; Benayoun, Laurent; Leibinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    To test the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of partial extracorporeal CO2 removal (PECCO2R) using a standard continuous renal replacement (CRRT) device with a pediatric oxygenation membrane introduced into the circuit in a serial manner. In this retrospective single-center study, we have studied mechanically ventilated patients with persistent significant respiratory acidosis and acute renal failure requiring ongoing CRRT. Sixteen patients were treated with our PECCO2R device. PaCO2 and arterial pH were measured before as well as at 6 and 12 hours after PECCO2R implementation. Hemodynamic parameters were continuously monitored. Our PECCO2R system was efficient to significantly reduce PaCO2 and increase arterial pH. The median PaCO2 before treatment was 77 mm Hg (59-112) with a median reduction of 24 mm Hg after 6 hours and 30 mm Hg after 12 hours (31% and 39%, respectively). The median pH increase was 0.16 at 6 hours and 0.23 at 12 hours. Partial extracorporeal CO2 removal treatment had no effect on oxygenation. No complication was observed. Our PECCO2R approach based on the simple introduction of a pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation membrane into the circuit of a standard CRRT device is easy to implement, safe, and efficient to improve respiratory acidosis.

  10. Removing device and method for radiation-contaminated concrete surface layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Kiyoshi.

    1996-01-01

    When a radiation-contaminated concrete surface layer is crushed, peeled or melted, and the products generated by the procedures are captured by sucking, the activity of the products is measured. It is judged whether the result is higher than a predetermined level or not, and when the activity is lowered to a predetermined level or less, the portion to be crushed, peeled or melted is moved and the radiation-contaminated concrete surface layer is thus successively removed. In the device of the present invention, microwave energy, millimeter wave energy, or AC arc plasma is used as an energy irradiation means. With such procedures, the contaminated concrete surface layer can be removed efficiently with neither more nor less. (T.M.)

  11. Radioactive gas removing device from off-gas from nuclear reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Nishino, Yoshitaka; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Kurokawa, Hideaki; Miura, Eiichi; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Sawa, Toshio.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention removes a small amount of radioactive gases ( 14 CO 2 and the like) at high efficiency from off gases of a nuclear reactor facility and solidifies them. That is, a module comprising a bundle of hydrophobic porous hollow thread membranes or gas separation hollow thread membranes is disposed. Off-gases are caused to flow to the inside of the hollow thread membranes and a NaOH aqueous solution is circulated as an absorption liquid to the outer side from a tank. Carbon dioxide in the off-gases is absorbed in the form of sodium carbonate by way of the hollow thread membranes. The absorption liquid is transferred from the tank to a securing vessel. An aqueous solution of barium chloride is added to the solidifying vessel as a solidifying liquid. Then, sodium carbonate is precipitated as barium carbonate. Further, if an aqueous solution of barium chloride is used as the absorption liquid, the solidifying vessel or the solidifying liquid is no more necessary. Since the device utilizes chemical reaction, it absorbs carbon dioxide efficiently. As a result, the concentration of gaseous carbon dioxide on the side of the hollow thread membrane liquid is reduced to make the diffusion in the hollow thread membrane faster and high removing efficiency can be obtained. (I.S.)

  12. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01

    Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the

  13. Overdenture dengan Pegangan Telescopic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pambudi Santoso

    2014-06-01

    pasien. Perawatan GTS kerangka logam dengan kaitan presisi telescopic crown dipilih untuk meningkatkan estetik, retensi gigi, stabilisasi, dan mempertahankan gigi yang masih ada. Overdenture with Telescopic Crown. Attachment retained overdentures helps in distribution of masticatory forces, minimizes trauma to abutments and soft tissues, attenuate ridge resorption, improves the esthetics and retains proprioception. The purpose of this paper is provide information about the rehabilitation of partially edentulous maxilla patients with telescopic crowns. A 45 years old female came with mastication and aesthetic problems. She had missing teeth as in 11 12 15 16 17 21 22 24 25 26 and 27. In the upper jaw, the remaining tooth 13 and 14, were fabricated as  telescopic  crowns with parallel-sided system combined with metal framework denture. Fabrication of telescopic crown began by making of study model with preliminary bite record. As in preliminary treatment, root canal treatment was done on 13, proceeded with the cementation of fiber post and rewalling of missing buccal wall. Full crown preparation was done on 13 and 14, and impression was made with double impression technique. Laboratorium procedures for making the primary crowns, secondary crowns and metalwork denture base were finished and the primary crowns were cemented on the abutment teeth. Secondary crowns soldered with metalwork denture base were tried in the patient, bite registration was done, proceeded with impression taking which bite registration embedded inside of the impression. Artificial teeth were arranged and tried to the patient, continued with processing and insertion of the denture. Metal framework removable partial denture with telescopic crown is chosen for this case to improve retention and to preserve the healthy remaining tooth.

  14. A stable and convenient protein electrophoresis titration device with bubble removing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Fan, Liu-Yin; Li, Wen-Lin; Cong, Feng-Song; Zhong, Ran; Chen, Jing-Jing; He, Yu-Chen; Xiao, Hua; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2017-07-01

    Moving reaction boundary titration (MRBT) has a potential application to immunoassay and protein content analysis with high selectivity. However, air bubbles often impair the accuracy of MRBT, and the leakage of electrolyte greatly decreases the safety and convenience of electrophoretic titration. Addressing these two issues a reliable MRBT device with modified electrolyte chamber of protein titration was designed. Multiphysics computer simulation was conducted for optimization according to two-phase flow. The single chamber was made of two perpendicular cylinders with different diameters. After placing electrophoretic tube, the resident air in the junction next to the gel could be eliminated by a simple fast electrolyte flow. Removing the electrophoretic tube automatically prevented electrolyte leakage at the junction due to the gravity-induced negative pressure within the chamber. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experiments showed that the improved MRBT device has following advantages: (i) easy and rapid setup of electrophoretic tube within 20 s; (ii) simple and quick bubble dissipates from the chamber of titration within 2 s; (iii) no electrolyte leakage from the two chambers: and (iv) accurate protein titration and safe instrumental operation. The developed technique and apparatus greatly improves the performance of the previous MRBT device, and providing a new route toward practical application. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. In Vitro Analysis of the Tribological Behaviour of Different Material Combinations for Telescopic Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wigbert Linek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Telescopic crowns are used to connect removable dental prostheses with the remaining dentition. Several material combinations are used for manufacturing primary and secondary crowns. The present experimental study analysed the influence of different material combinations on the long-term development of surface roughness and pull-off forces. Six different material combinations were tested. Secondary crowns were manufactured either by casting or electroforming. Each material combination was tested with n = 10 specimens. A material testing device with integrated power sensors was used for 10,000 cycles per test. Signs of wear were identified by surface roughness measurements, and visualized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray spectroscopy (EDX technologies. Statistical significances were tested by using the U-Test with Bonferroni correction. The choice of materials and the manufacturing process were found to influence the long-term development of pull-off forces as well as wear-associated surface roughness. Combinations of different groups of materials for primary and secondary crowns showed favourable results. Worse results were found for the combination pure titanium and pure titanium and the combination high gold alloy and electroformed gold. Wear-associated surface roughness was higher for combinations of similar or identical groups of materials. For manufacturing telescopic crowns, combinations of different groups of materials are preferred. For secondary crown manufacturing, electroforming is superior to casting.

  16. The effectiveness of chemical denture cleansers and ultrasonic device in biofilm removal from complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Costa Cruz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate denture hygiene can prevent and treat infection in edentulous patients. They are usually elderly and have difficulty for brushing their teeth. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the efficacy of complete denture biofilm removal using chemical (alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets, mechanical (ultrasonic and combined (association of the effervescent and ultrasonic methods. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty complete denture wearers participated in the experiment for 21 days. They were distributed into 4 groups (n=20: (1 Brushing with water (Control; (2 Effervescent tablets (Corega Tabs; (3 Ultrasonic device (Ultrasonic Cleaner, model 2840 D; (4 Association of effervescent tablets and ultrasonic device. All groups brushed their dentures with a specific brush (Bitufo and water, 3 times a day, before applying their treatments. Denture biofilm was collected at baseline and after 21 days. To quantify the biofilm, the internal surfaces of the maxillary complete dentures were stained and photographed at 45º. The photographs were processed and the areas (total internal surface stained with biofilm quantified (Image Tool 2.02. The percentage of the biofilm was calculated by the ratio between the biofilm area multiplied by 100 and the total area of the internal surface of the maxillary complete denture. RESULTS: The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison among groups followed by the Dunn multiple-comparison test. All tests were performed respecting a significance level of 0.05. Significant difference was found among the treatments (KW=21.18; P<0.001, the mean ranks for the treatments and results for Dunn multiple comparison test were: Control (60.9; Chemical (37.2; Mechanical (35.2 and Combined (29.1. CONCLUSION: The experimental methods were equally effective regarding the ability to remove biofilm and were superior to the control method (brushing with water. Immersion in alkaline peroxide and ultrasonic vibration can be used as auxiliary agents

  17. Reorientation simplified: A device for recording and reproducing the path of insertion for removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav D Kamble

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The record of path of insertion on the dental cast is part of the dentist′s work authorization to the dental laboratory technician. The path of insertion record enables the dental technician to replace the cast on a surveyor in the same position that the dentist selected. Analysis of factors that influence the path of insertion should determine a path of insertion that will reduce the potential for dislodgement and promote stability of removable partial denture (RPD. Materials and Methods: The recording of the relation of a cast to a dental surveyor and the transfer of this relationship to the dental laboratory may be done by tripodization, by scoring the base of the cast, or by cementing a reference pin on the cast. Conclusion: Recording the established path of insertion can be difficult when the procedure uses a cemented pin and the casts are mounted in an articulator. This article describes a procedure for innovative dowel pin and sleeve device to record the path of insertion of RPDs, which serves the same purpose as the cemented pin but can be easily removed and replaced.

  18. A systematic review of light-based home-use devices for hair removal and considerations on human safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Petersen, D; Bjerring, P; Dierickx, C

    2012-01-01

    Background Hair removal with professional light-based devices is established as an effective, mainstream treatment. The field of optical home-based hair removal is evolving and movement from control by physicians into hands of consumers warrants understanding efficacy and human safety. Objectives...... To systematically review and evaluate the efficacy and human safety of currently available home-based optical hair removal devices. Methods A comprehensive Pub Med literature search was conducted which systematically identified publications of relevance. Prospective clinical trials were included whether controlled......, one CT, five UCTs) and limited evidence for laser devices (one diode laser, one UCT). Most studies evaluated short-term hair reduction up to 3 and 6 months following light exposure at different body sites. Hair reduction percentages ranged from 6% to 72% after repetitive treatments. The most...

  19. Endoscopic removal of over-the-scope clips using a novel cutting device: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur; Riecken, Bettina; Damm, Michael; Cahyadi, Oscar; Bauder, Markus; Caca, Karel

    2014-09-01

    Over-the-scope clips (OTSCs; Ovesco Endoscopy, Tübingen, Germany) are extensively used for treatment of gastrointestinal perforations, leakages, fistulas, and bleeding. In this report, a new method of removing OTSCs using a prototype bipolar cutting device is described. A total of 11 patients underwent endoscopic removal of an OTSC. The OTSC was cut at two opposing sites by a prototype device (DC ClipCutter; Ovesco Endoscopy). The remaining clip fragments were extracted using a standard forceps. Mean procedure time was 47 minutes (range 35 - 75 minutes). Cutting of the OTSC at two opposing sites was successful in all cases (100 %). Complete retrieval of all clip fragments was possible in 10 patients (91 %). The overall success rate for cutting and complete removal of the clip was 91 %. No major complications were observed. Removal of OTSCs with the prototype device was feasible and effective. The device may be valuable for OTSC removal in emergency as well as elective indications. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Left Atrial Appendage (LAA Closure-Device Disengagement as a Serious Complication and How it Can Be Easily Removed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim Soydan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A stroke attack in the brainstem area as a serious complication of atrial fibrillation (AF in a 51 year old woman with known paroxysmal AF (CHADS² score 3 was treated with LAA occlusion procedure after the complication of arterial bleeding secondary to anticoagulation therapy. LAA closure device embolisation was developed following the LAA occlusion procedure. The device was located and removed successfully from the systemic circulation.

  1. 40 CFR 63.4166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control....4166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? (a) For..., and stack gas moisture must be performed, as applicable, during each test run. (b) Measure total...

  2. Evaluation of the antimicrobial removal device when used with the BACTEC blood culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    A study to determine the value of the Antimicrobial Removal Device (ARD) used in conjunction with radiometric detection of bacteremia using three media was conducted. During a 12-month period, 622 duplicate ARD/BACTEC blood-culture sets were collected. There were 88 positive cultures that yielded 68 pathogenic isolates and 28 probable contaminant isolates. When all patients were considered, 31 pathogenic isolates were detected by both systems, 25 pathogenic isolates were detected faster or only by the BACTEC system, and 12 pathogenic isolates were detected faster or only when the ARD was employed. This difference is statistically significant (P less than 0.05). Thus, the standard BACTEC blood-culture system using three different media was superior to the same BACTEC system using ARD-processed blood specimens. When only patients receiving antimicrobial therapy were considered, there were more pathogenic isolates detected from unprocessed blood than from blood processed in the ARD; however, this difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, there appears to be no advantage to using the ARD system in conjunction with the three-bottle BACTEC blood-culture system

  3. A Novel Technique Using a Protection Filter During Fibrin Sheath Removal for Implanted Venous Access Device Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotiriadis, Charalampos; Hajdu, Steven David [University Hospital of Lausanne, Cardiothoracic and Vascular Unit, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Degrauwe, Sophie [University Hospital of Lausanne, Department of Cardiology (Switzerland); Barras, Heloise; Qanadli, Salah Dine, E-mail: salah.qanadli@chuv.ch [University Hospital of Lausanne, Cardiothoracic and Vascular Unit, Department of Radiology (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    With the increased use of implanted venous access devices (IVADs) for continuous long-term venous access, several techniques such as percutaneous endovascular fibrin sheath removal, have been described, to maintain catheter function. Most standard techniques do not capture the stripped fibrin sheath, which is subsequently released in the pulmonary circulation and may lead to symptomatic pulmonary embolism. The presented case describes an endovascular technique which includes stripping, capture, and removal of fibrin sheath using a novel filter device. A 64-year-old woman presented with IVAD dysfunction. Stripping was performed using a co-axial snare to the filter to capture the fibrin sheath. The captured fragment was subsequently removed for visual and pathological verification. No immediate complication was observed and the patient was discharged the day of the procedure.

  4. Selective removal of carbon dioxide contained in the effluent from ion chromatography suppressors using a new non-vacuum device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a new CO2 gas removal device optimized to selectively remove CO2 gas contained in the effluent from suppressors used in ion chromatography (IC) under non-vacuum conditions is described. This device consists of a closed vessel equipped with gas permeable tubing (GPT) and a CO2 adsorbent. During operation, the CO2 adsorbent adsorbs CO2 gas in the vessel, creating CO2 partial pressure difference between the inside of the GPT and the vessel. The CO2 gas contained in the effluent being pumped into the GPT is selectively removed from the effluent based on the diffusion of the CO2 associated with the CO2 partial pressure difference. The purpose of this study is to optimize the IC operating conditions with the aim of selectively removing HCO3(-) (CO3(2-)) contained in the effluent and reducing the electrical conductivity of the effluent under non-vacuum conditions. The electrical conductivity of the effluent and the signal intensity of the water dip is decreased by approximately 25 μS/cm (from 30 to 5 μS/cm) and by approximately twentieth, respectively, using the optimized CO2 remover. In addition, the anion detection limit achieved in IC instruments with a CO2 remover is on the order of a few ppb. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Demonstration tests of tritium removal device under the conditions of nuclear fusion reactor. Cooperation test between Japan and USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Masataka

    2001-01-01

    Performance of oxidation catalysis in emergency tritium removal device was tested in Los Alamos National Laboratory by cooperation between Japan and USA on November 8, 2000. To reduce the effects of tritium on the environment, a plan of the closed space for trapping tritium was made. A tritium removal device using oxidation catalysis and water vapor adsorption removes the tritium in the closed space. The treatment flow rate of the device is about 2,500 m 3 /h, the same as ITER(3,000 to 4,500 m 3 /h). Catalysis is Pt/ alumina. The closed space is 3,000m 2 . The initial concentration of tritium was about 7 Bq/cm 2 , ten times as large as the concentration limit in atmosphere. The concentration of tritium in the test laboratory decreased linearly with time and attained to the limit value after about 200 min. Residue of tritium on the wall had been removed and the significant quantity was not detected after three days. The results proved to satisfy safety of ITER. (S.Y.)

  6. Early experience of a new extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device for acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Buscher, Hergen; Winearls, James; Breeding, Jeff; Ghosh, Debasish; Chaterjee, Shimonti; Braun, Gary; Paul, Eldho; Fraser, John F; Botha, John

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in the technology of extracorporeal respiratory assist systems have led to a renewed interest in extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCOR). The Hemolung is a new, low-flow, venovenous, minimally invasive, partial ECCOR device that has recently been introduced to clinical practice to aid in avoiding invasive ventilation or to facilitate lung-protective ventilation. We report our early experience on use, efficacy and safety of the Hemolung in three Australian intensive care units. Retrospective review of all patients with acute or acute-on-chronic respiratory failure (due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] with severe hypercapnic respiratory failure when non-invasive ventilation failed; acute respiratory distress syndrome; COPD; or asthma when lung-protective ventilation was not feasible due to hypercapnia) for whom the Hemolung was used. Fifteen patients were treated with ECCOR. In four out of five patients, the aim of avoiding intubation was achieved. In the remaining 10 patients, the strategy of instituting lung-protective ventilation was successful. The median duration for ECCOR was 5 days (interquartile range, 3-7 days). The pH and PCO 2 improved significantly within 6 hours of instituting ECCOR, in conjunction with a significant reduction in minute ventilation. The CO 2 clearance was 90-100 mL/min. A total of 93% of patients survived to weaning from ECCOR, 73% survived to ICU discharge and 67% survived to hospital discharge. Our data shows that ECCOR was safe and effective in this cohort. Further experience is vital to identify the patients who may benefit most from this promising therapy.

  7. Dinar-crown banknotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dinar-crown banknotes were: ½ dinars (i.e. 2 crowns, 1 dinar (i.e. 4 crowns, 5 dinars (i.e. 20 crowns, 10 dinars (i.e. 40 crowns, 20 dinars (i.e. 80 crowns, 100 dinars (i.e. 400 crowns, and 1000 dinars (i.e. 4000 crowns. The ½- and 1-dinar banknotes are assumed to have been issued in 1919, whereas the other five banknotes, according to one source, were released into circulation on 21.02.1920. Pursuant to the regulations, the replacement of the nostrified crown banknotes by the new crown- dinar banknotes started on 3 February 1920 in Serbia and Montenegro and on 16 February 1920 in other parts of the country. All seven denominations of the dinar-crown banknotes were being withdrawn from circulation throughout a lengthy period of time from 21 February 1921 until May 1934. The first to be withdrawn were the 20-dinar banknotes, from 1 February to 30 April 1921, then the 5-dinar banknotes, from 20 July to 20 November 1922, and the 10-dinar banknotes, from 10 February to 10 June 1924. The 100-dinar (400-crown and 1000-dinar (4000-crown banknotes remained in circulation the longest. The withdrawal of the 100- and 1000-dinar banknotes started in 1929 and lasted until 25 May 1934. The 1924 rulebook on minting coins of ½, 1 and 2 dinars precisely defines their withdrawal from circulation and replacement by minted coins within one year after the last batch of minted coins gets released into circulation. However, in 1927 the decree of the Minister of Finance prescribed that the remaining paper banknotes be withdrawn from circulation on 30 September 1927 by being replaced by the metal coins of the same denominations.

  8. Enhancing mercury removal across air pollution control devices for coal-fired power plants by desulfurization wastewater evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Hu; Yang, Yi; Cai, Liang; Yang, Linjun; Roszak, Szczepan

    2017-10-09

    Desulfurization wastewater evaporation technology is used to enhance the removal of gaseous mercury (Hg) in conventional air pollution control devices (APCDs) for coal-fired power plants. Studies have affirmed that gaseous Hg is oxidized and removed by selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) in a coal-fired thermal experiment platform with WFGD wastewater evaporation. Effects of desulfurization wastewater evaporation position, evaporation temperature and chlorine ion concentration on Hg oxidation were studied as well. The Hg 0 oxidation efficiency was increased ranging from 30% to 60%, and the gaseous Hg removal efficiency was 62.16% in APCDs when wastewater evaporated before SCR. However, the Hg 0 oxidation efficiency was 18.99% and the gaseous Hg removal efficiency was 40.19% in APCDs when wastewater evaporated before ESP. The results show that WFGD wastewater evaporation before SCR is beneficial to improve the efficiency of Hg oxidized and removed in APCDs. Because Hg 2+ can be easily removed in ACPDs and WFGD wastewater in power plants is enriched with chlorine ions, this method realizes WFGD wastewater zero discharge and simultaneously enhances Hg removal in APCDs.

  9. Influence of abutment height and thermocycling on retrievability of cemented implant-supported crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Christian; Harder, Sönke; Shahriari, Ahoo; Steiner, Martin; Kern, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of abutment height and thermocycling on the retrievability of cemented implant crowns. Ninety tapered titanium abutments (6 degree taper, 4.3 mm diameter, 8.5 mm height) were shortened to 2, 3, or 4 mm, respectively. Ninety crowns were designed and manufactured using CAD/CAM techniques and laser sintering a CoCr alloy. The crowns were cemented either with a glass-ionomer, a polycarboxylate, or a composite resin cement followed by 3-day storage in demineralized water without thermocycling or 150-day storage with 37,500 thermal cycles. The force (in N) and the number of attempts needed to remove the crowns using a universal testing machine (UTM) or a clinically used removal device (Coronaflex) were recorded. Statistical analysis at a level of significance of P ≤ .05 was conducted using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (Coronaflex) and three-way and two-way ANOVA, Tukey's HSD post hoc tests, and t tests (UTM). Regardless of whether the crowns were retrieved with Coronaflex or UTM, the crowns cemented with the glass-ionomer cement were significantly easier to retrieve followed by the polycarboxylate and the resin cement, both of which differed significantly from each other (P ≤ .001). With both retrieval methods, the cement, abutment height, and thermocycling were significantly influential (P ≤ .0001). Significant interactions could be found for retrieval with UTM between the abutment height and thermocycling, between the cement and thermocycling, and between all three factors (P ≤ .05). Glass-ionomer cement may be used for retrievable cementation of implant restorations, whereas polycarboxylate cement and especially composite resin cement should be used for a nonretrievable permanent cementation.

  10. Method for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas, device for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hann-Sheng; Livengood, Charles David

    1997-12-01

    A method for the simultaneous removal of oxides and heavy metals from a fluid is provided comprising combining the fluid with compounds containing alkali and sulfur to create a mixture; spray drying the mixture to create a vapor phase and a solid phase; and isolating the vapor phase from the solid phase. A device is also provided comprising a means for spray-drying flue gas with alkali-sulfide containing liquor at a temperature sufficient to cause the flue gas to react with the compounds so as to create a gaseous fraction and a solid fraction and a means for directing the gaseous fraction to a fabric filter.

  11. Feasibility of cell transplantation with a left ventricular assist device to improve the success rate of left ventricular assist device removal: the first experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) greatly support heart recovery, but recurrent heart failure after LVAD removal limits their use as 'a bridge to recovery'. The combination of LVADs and cell transplantation (CTx) is expected to be effective to improve the success rate of LVAD removal. We investigated the feasibility of combined CTx therapy and LVAD support with a new heterotopic rat heart-lung transplantation model that could simulate LVAD support and LVAD removal. The heart and both lungs of a rat were heterotopically transplanted, and the heart was kept unloaded for two weeks. The heart was then reloaded for two weeks (LVAD group). Syngenic smooth muscle cells were transplanted into the hearts that had been unloaded for a week, and the hearts were kept unloaded for another week and then reloaded (CT-LVAD group). In the unloaded state, CTx could reduce the left ventricle (LV) volume more effectively than LVAD therapy alone (P<0.01) and maintain the LV volume even after the hearts were reloaded (P<0.01). The results suggest that CTx with LVAD support can prevent recurrent LV dilation after LVAD removal and improve the success rate of LVAD removal.

  12. Evaluation of tensile retention of Y-TZP crowns after long-term aging: effect of the core substrate and crown surface conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, R; Rippe, M; Oliveira, B G; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the core substrate type (dentin and composite resin) on the retention of crowns made of yttrium oxide stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP), submitted to three inner surface conditionings. For this purpose, 72 freshly extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin, perpendicular to the long axis, and prepared for full crowns: 36 specimens had crown preparations in dentin; the remaining 36 teeth had the crowns removed, and crown preparations were reconstructed with composite resin plus fiber posts with dimensions identical to the prepared dentin. The preparations were impressed using addition silicone, and 72 Y-TZP copings for the tensile test were produced. Cementation was performed with a dual-cured cement containing phosphate monomers. For cementation, the crown preparation (dentin or resin) was conditioned with the adhesive system, and the ceramic was subjected to one of three surface treatments: isopropyl alcohol, tribochemical silica coating, or thin low-fusing glassy porcelain layer application plus silanization. After 24 hours, all specimens were submitted to thermocycling (6000 cycles) and placed in a special tensile testing device in a universal testing machine to determine failure loads. The failure modes of all samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. Two-way analysis of variance showed that the surface treatment and substrate type (α=0.05) affected the tensile retention results. The dentin substrate presented the highest tensile retention values, regardless of the surface treatment. When the substrate was resin, the tribochemical silica coating and low-fusing glaze application plus silanization groups showed the higher retention values.

  13. 40 CFR 63.4766 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Option § 63.4766 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency... conduct three test runs as specified in § 63.7(e)(3), and each test run must last at least 1 hour. (a) For...

  14. 40 CFR 63.4566 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Controls Option § 63.4566 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal.... You must conduct three test runs as specified in § 63.7(e)(3) and each test run must last at least 1...

  15. 40 CFR 63.3166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Limitations § 63.3166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency... conduct three test runs as specified in § 63.7(e)(3), and each test run must last at least 1 hour. (a) For...

  16. 40 CFR 63.3545 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use... three test runs as specified in § 63.7(e)(3) and each test run must last at least 1 hour. (a) For all...

  17. 40 CFR 63.4362 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... § 63.4362 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You....4350. You must conduct three test runs as specified in § 63.7(e)(3) and each test run must last at...

  18. 40 CFR 63.4965 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control....4965 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must... three test runs as specified in § 63.7(e)(3), and each test run must last at least 1 hour. (a) For all...

  19. Postoperative environmental anesthetic vapour concentrations following removal of the airway device in the operating room versus the postanesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sara K; Özelsel, Timur; Rashiq, Saifee; Tsui, Ban C

    2016-09-01

    This study was designed to compare waste anesthetic gas (WAG) concentrations within patients' breathing zones after removal of the patient's airway device in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) vs in the operating room (OR). Following Research Ethics Board approval and patient consent, we recruited patients undergoing surgery who received volatile anesthesia via an endotracheal tube or supraglottic airway. Patients had their airway device removed in the OR or in the PACU depending on the attending anesthesiologist's preference. Upon the patient's arrival in the PACU, concentrations of exhaled sevoflurane and desflurane were measured at their breathing zone (i.e., 15 cm from the patient's mouth and nose) using a single-beam infrared spectrophotometer. Seventy patients were recruited during the five-month study period. The median [interquartile range] WAG levels in the patients' breathing zones were higher when their airway devices were removed in the PACU vs in the OR. The WAG levels for sevoflurane were 0.7 [0.4-1.1] parts per million (ppm) vs 0.5 [0.4-0.7] ppm, respectively; median difference, 0.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.1 to 0.6; P = 0.04. The WAG levels for desflurane were 2.4 [1.2-3.4] ppm vs 4.1 [2.5-5.2] ppm, respectively; median difference, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.7; P = 0.04. After a volatile-based anesthetic, our results suggest that removal of the airway device in the PACU vs in the OR increases the amount of waste anesthetic gas in a patient's breathing zone and thus potentially in the PACU nurse's working zone.

  20. Crowns and Crypts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The product was isolated to be dibenzo-. 18-Crown-6. Many other crowns were ... fashion with their lone pairs pointing inward towards the metal atom. The bonding M-O is largely ... Macrocycles, though extremely effective as polydentate ligands, are not essential for the production of stable alkali complexes; additional ...

  1. A new intraoral device to facilitate preparation of the guide plane for removable dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Borges, Alessandra Buhler; da Silva, Lucas Hian; Uemura, Eduardo Shigueuki; Saavedra, Guilherme de Siqueira Ferreira Anzalone

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a prototype of an intraoral device that facilitates preparation of parallel guide planes with accuracy and minimal occlusal divergence. The design of this device facilitates transfer of the desired path of insertion from the diagnostic cast to the mouth quickly and efficiently.

  2. A NOVEL, REMOVABLE, CERROBEND, BEAM-BLOCKING DEVICE FOR RADIATION THERAPY OF THE CANINE HEAD AND NECK: PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael S; Berlato, Davide; Vanhaezebrouck, Isabelle; Gordon, Ira K; Hansen, Katherine S; Theon, Alain P; Holt, Randall W; Trestrail, Earl A

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the head and neck can result in mucositis and other acute affects in the oral cavity. This prospective pilot study evaluated a novel, intraoral, beam-blocking device for use during imaging and therapeutic procedures. The beam-blocking device was made from a metal alloy inserted into a coated frozen dessert mold (Popsicle® Mold, Cost Plus World Market, Oakland, CA). The device was designed so that it could be inserted into an outer shell, which in turn allowed it to be placed or removed depending on the need due to beam configuration. A Farmer type ionization chamber and virtual water phantom were used to assess effects of field size on transmission. Six large breed cadaver dogs, donated by the owner after death, were recruited for the study. Delivered dose at the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the device, with and without the alloy block in place, were measured using radiochromic film. It was determined that transmission was field size dependent with larger field sizes leading to decreased attenuation of the beam, likely secondary to scatter. The mean and median transmission on the ventral surface without the beam-blocking device was 0.94 [range 0.94-0.96]. The mean and median transmission with the beam-blocking device was 0.52 [range 0.50-0.57]. The mean and median increase in dose due to backscatter on the dorsal surface of the beam-blocking device was 0.04 [range 0.02-0.04]. Findings indicated that this novel device can help attenuate radiation dose ventral to the block in dogs, with minimal backscatter. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  3. Integrated SDS removal and protein digestion by hollow fiber membrane based device for SDS-assisted proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Simin; Yuan, Huiming; Chen, Yuanbo; Liang, Zheng; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a novel integrated sample preparation device for SDS-assisted proteome analysis was developed, by which proteins dissolved in 4% (w/v) SDS were first diluted by 50% methanol, and then SDS was online removed by a hollow fiber membrane interface (HFMI) with 50mM ammonium bicarbonate (pH 8.0) as an exchange buffer, finally digested by an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). To evaluate the performance of such an integrated device, bovine serum albumin dissolved in 4% (w/v) SDS as a model sample was analyzed; it could be found that similar to that obtained by direct analysis of BSA digests without SDS (the sequence coverage of 60.3±1.0%, n=3), with HFMI as an interface for SDS removal, BSA was identified with the sequence coverage of 61.0±1.0% (n=3). However, without SDS removal by HFMI, BSA could not be digested by the IMER and none peptides could be detected. In addition, such an integrated sample preparation device was also applied for the analysis of SDS extracted proteins from rat brain, compared to those obtained by filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), not only the identified protein group and unique peptide number were increased by 12% and 39% respectively, but also the sample pretreatment time was shortened from 24h to 4h. All these results demonstrated that such an integrated sample preparation device would provide an alternative tool for SDS assisted proteome analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. An evaluation of immediate sheath removal and use of the Angio-Seal vascular closure device in neuroradiological interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierot, L. [Hopital Maison Blanche, Department of Radiology, Reims (France); Hopital Maison Blanche, Service de Radiologie, Reims (France); Herbreteau, D. [CHU, Department of Neuroradiology, Tours (France); Bracard, S. [CHU, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Neuroradiology, Nancy (France); Berge, J. [CHU, Department of Neuroradiology, Bordeaux (France); Cognard, C. [Hopital Purpan, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Neuroradiology, Toulouse (France)

    2006-01-01

    We set out to assess the effect of using an arteriotomy closure device in patients at high risk of access site complications. One-hundred nineteen patients with femoral artery access were prospectively included in five centers in France (56 males, 63 females, age range 20-84 years). The neurointerventional procedures were embolization of intracranial aneurysm (71.4%), carotid angioplasty (11.8%), cerebral angioplasty (1.7%), thrombolysis (0.8%), and other procedures (14.3%). Sheaths were removed and the closure device deployed immediately postprocedure. One patient developed a false aneurysm, and one developed a small hematoma. Neither required treatment. Postdevice deployment bleeding was experienced in three patients (2.5%), requiring minimal management. There were no major complications. Three patients died of causes unrelated to the vessel closure. Patient comfort was 2.2 on a scale of 1 (none) to 10 (severe). The results showed that immediate sheath removal followed by use of the closure device is safe in patients undergoing neurointerventional procedures and offers a low level of patient discomfort. In selected patients, early hospital discharge was possible. (orig.)

  5. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed crown. 872.3330 Section 872.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... device also may be intended for use as a functional restoration for a badly decayed deciduous (baby...

  6. Profile of clients requesting for removal of intrauterine devices in Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objective: Method: A retrospective study of all patients having their previously inserted IUDs removed at the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Northern Nigeria, between January 1999 and December 2004. Results: The mean (± SD) age and parity of the clients was 32.9 ± 6.9 years and 4.0 ± 2.2 respectively.

  7. Microfluidic devices as gas – Ionic liquid membrane contactors for CO2 removal from anaesthesia gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malankowska, Magdalena; Martins, C. F.; Rho, H. S.; Neves, L. A.; Tiggelaar, R. M.; Crespo, João G.; Pina, M.P.; Mallada, R.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Coelhoso, I. M.

    2018-01-01

    This work proposes a microfluidic gas – ionic liquid contactor for CO2 removal from anaesthesia gas, containing Xe. The working principle involves the transport of CO2 through a polymer flat membrane followed by its capture and enzymatic bioconversion in the ionic liquid solvent. Microfluidic

  8. Crown Fire Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Crown fire potential was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The...

  9. Obstacle detection method, obstacle removing method, device and production line for practicing the methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Takao; Ishimatsu, Tsuneo; Komata, Hisashi; Suzuki, Keisaburo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides techniques for detecting and removing obstacles, which can be applied to pipelines and vessels to be used in structures such as nuclear power structures and electric power generation facilities. Namely, when the pipelines or vessels are in any of the stages, namely, production, installation, before the use after installation and before the reuse after inspection, obstacles remaining in the pipelines and vessels are blown off by using a fluid jetting mechanism (air compressor). Elastic waves generated when the blown off obstacles abut against the pipelines and vessels are detected by using a sensor. As a result, the remaining obstacles can be detected during any one of the stages described above. The blowing is repeated till the absence of the obstacles is confirmed by elastic wave signals detected by the sensor. As a result, the remaining obstacles can be removed. (I.S.)

  10. In vitro Comparison of Debris Removal Using Various Adjunct Irrigation Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    microorganisms , and biofilms (4,5). Several factors can complicate the process of debris removal, especially complex canal morphology. Isthmuses...A sponge was placed in the chamber and the access and distal root orifice were sealed with Cavit (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN). The distal roots were...Canal Preparation: Specimens were reassembled in the K-Kube and all external hex bolts firmly tightened. Specimens were accessed again, the sponge

  11. Efficient device for the benign removal of organic pollutants from aqueous solutions using modified mesoporous magnetite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojoudi, H.; Badiei, A.; Amiri, A.; Banaei, A.; Ziarani, G. M.; Schenk-Joß, K.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, a home-made device comprising a column filled with magnetic mesoporous silica-coated nanostructures (MSCM-PA) as an adsorbent was constructed and used to remove organic pollutants from aqueous solutions. The MSCM-PA adsorbent was prepared and characterized using Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis, and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. The adsorption behavior of the MSCM-PA sorbent was studied based on the removal of Everzol blue dye from aqueous solutions. We investigated the effects of various parameters such as the solution pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dose, flow rate, and contact time on the adsorption of Everzol blue from aqueous solutions. The adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, and a good fit was obtained with the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum Everzol blue adsorption capacity by MSCM-PA was 162 mg g-1. The results indicate that our device is capable of adsorbing anionic dyes from aqueous solutions.

  12. Method and device to remove the decay heat produced in the core of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loimann, E.; Reutler, H.

    1977-01-01

    For decay haet removal of the HTGR the heat absorbed by the top reflector is discharged by means of heat exchangers. For this purpose the heat exchangers are arranged between the top bricks consisting of graphite blocks. By convection or forced circulation with the aid of pumps the liquid coolant is flowing in a cycle between the individual heat exchangers connected in parallel and a heat sink arranged outside the containment. The distributing and collection pipes are mounted between the upper and lower thermal shield. The heat exchanger compartments themselves consist of double-walled hollow bodies with a disc-shaped section and a columnar part extending from there to one side respectively. (RW) [de

  13. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, F.Q.L.; John, B.; Skinner, C.H.; Roquemore, A.L.; Calle, C.I.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  14. Solid-phase extraction microfluidic devices for matrix removal in trace element assay of actinide materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Manard, Benjamin T; Castro, Alonso; Montoya, Dennis P; Xu, Ning; Chamberlin, Rebecca M

    2017-05-15

    Advances in sample nebulization and injection technology have significantly reduced the volume of solution required for trace impurity analysis in plutonium and uranium materials. Correspondingly, we have designed and tested a novel chip-based microfluidic platform, containing a 100-µL or 20-µL solid-phase microextraction column, packed by centrifugation, which supports nuclear material mass and solution volume reductions of 90% or more compared to standard methods. Quantitative recovery of 28 trace elements in uranium was demonstrated using a UTEVA chromatographic resin column, and trace element recovery from thorium (a surrogate for plutonium) was similarly demonstrated using anion exchange resin AG MP-1. Of nine materials tested, compatibility of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chips with the strong nitric acid media was highest. The microcolumns can be incorporated into a variety of devices and systems, and can be loaded with other solid-phase resins for trace element assay in high-purity metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biodegradable device applied in flatfoot surgery: Comparative studies between clinical and technological aspects of removed screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruozi, Barbara; Belletti, Daniela; Manfredini, Giuseppe; Tonelli, Massimo; Sena, Paola; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Forni, Flavio; Tosi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Poly-L-lactide (PLLA) is one of the most used polymers for biomedical application; its use in sutures and other implants has been widely investigated. Although the knowledge of PLLA biodegradation and biocompatibility features is deep, PLLA screws used to correct the flat foot deformity have deserved attention since they are not degraded in most of cases after a long period of years (3–7) from the implantation. In this article, a clinical and radiological evaluation (NMR, histological and clinical outcomes) on patients was correlated with physico-chemical characterization (by SEM, DSC, GPC and XRD analysis at different temperatures) on both native and patient-recovered screws together with the theoretical degradation processes of PLLA-based implants. The data demonstrated the need for crossing the biodegradation and bioabsorption of the polymer with the characteristics of both the device (geometry, structure and fabrication process) and the implantation site. Highlights: ► Resorbable PLLA screws were proposed for arthroereisis in pediatric flatfoot. ► Satisfactory clinical results were obtained almost in the totality of patients. ► The bioabsorption period is slightly longer than what is expected. ► Patient-recovered screws were analyzed to evaluate the biodegradation stage. ► Degradability/structural integrity during implantation should be ameliorated

  16. Biodegradable device applied in flatfoot surgery: Comparative studies between clinical and technological aspects of removed screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruozi, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.ruozi@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Belletti, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.belletti@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Manfredini, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe626@virgilio.it [Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Clinic, University Hospital of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena Italy, Director Prof. F. Catani, Via del Pozzo 71, Policlinico, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Tonelli, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.tonelli@unimore.it [CIGS, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Sena, Paola, E-mail: paola.sena@unimore.it [Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, Policlinico, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Vandelli, Maria Angela, E-mail: mariaangela.vandelli@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Forni, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.forni@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Tosi, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.tosi@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy)

    2013-04-01

    Poly-L-lactide (PLLA) is one of the most used polymers for biomedical application; its use in sutures and other implants has been widely investigated. Although the knowledge of PLLA biodegradation and biocompatibility features is deep, PLLA screws used to correct the flat foot deformity have deserved attention since they are not degraded in most of cases after a long period of years (3–7) from the implantation. In this article, a clinical and radiological evaluation (NMR, histological and clinical outcomes) on patients was correlated with physico-chemical characterization (by SEM, DSC, GPC and XRD analysis at different temperatures) on both native and patient-recovered screws together with the theoretical degradation processes of PLLA-based implants. The data demonstrated the need for crossing the biodegradation and bioabsorption of the polymer with the characteristics of both the device (geometry, structure and fabrication process) and the implantation site. Highlights: ► Resorbable PLLA screws were proposed for arthroereisis in pediatric flatfoot. ► Satisfactory clinical results were obtained almost in the totality of patients. ► The bioabsorption period is slightly longer than what is expected. ► Patient-recovered screws were analyzed to evaluate the biodegradation stage. ► Degradability/structural integrity during implantation should be ameliorated.

  17. Modular extracorporeal life support: effects of ultrafiltrate recirculation on the performance of an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaravilli, Vittorio; Kreyer, Stefan; Linden, Katharina; Belenkiy, Slava; Jordan, Bryan; Pesenti, Antonio; Zanella, Alberto; Chung, Kevin; Cannon, Jeremy; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Batchinsky, Andriy I

    2014-01-01

    The combination of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) and hemofiltration is a possible therapeutic strategy for patients needing both lung and renal support. We tested the effects of the recirculation of ultrafiltrate on membrane lung (ML) CO2 removal (VCO2ML). Three conscious, spontaneously breathing sheep were connected to a commercially produced ECCO2R device (Hemolung; Alung Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA) with a blood flow of 250 ml/min and a gas flow of 10 L/min. A hemofilter (NxStage, NxStage Medical, Lawrence, MA) was interposed in series after the ML. Ultrafiltrate flow was generated and recirculated before the ML. We tested four ultrafiltrate flows (0, 50, 100, and 150 ml/min) for 25 min each, eight times per animal, resulting in 24 randomized test repetitions. We recorded VCO2ML, hemodynamics and ventilatory variables, and natural lung CO2 transfer (VCO2NL) and collected arterial and circuitry blood samples. VCO2ML was unchanged by application of ultrafiltrate recirculation (40.5 ± 4.0, 39.7 ± 4.2, 39.8 ± 4.2, and 39.2 ± 4.1 ml/min, respectively, at ultrafiltrate flow of 0, 50, 100, and 150 ml/min). Minute ventilation, respiratory rate, VCO2NL, and arterial blood analyses were not affected by ultrafiltrate recirculation. In the tested configuration, ultrafiltrate recirculation did not affect VCO2ML. This modular technology may provide a suitable platform for coupling CO2 removal with various forms of blood purification.

  18. Crowns and Crypts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    biologically occurring natural compounds they are expected to provide insight into the biological phenomena occurring in living systems. For example, the mechanism of the sodium pump occurring across a cell membrane could be understood using the formation of the alkali metal-crown complex mecha- nism as a model.

  19. Crowns and Crypts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 6. Crowns and Crypts - A Fascinating Group of Multidentate Macrocyclic Ligands. Debasis Bandyopadhyay. General Article Volume 6 Issue 6 June 2001 pp 71-79. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Management of crown-of-thorns sea star (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.R.; Gumanao, G.S.; Mueller, B.; Saceda-Cardoza, M.M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Removals of crown-of-thorns sea stars (Acanthaster planci L) are crucial initiatives in limiting the damage to coral reefs during outbreaks, but have often been unable to control the populations. We hypothesized that reef topography and exact timing of removals (before reproduction) determine their

  1. Crown lengthening procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA. Khoshkhonejad

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, due to recent developments and researches in dental science, it is possible to preserve and restore previously extracted cases such as teeth with extensive caries, fractured or less appropriate cases for crown coverage as well as teeth with external perforation caused by restorative pins. In order to restore the teeth with preservation of periodontium, we should know thoroughly physiological aspects of periodontium and protection of Biologic Width which is formed by epithelial and supracrestal connective tissue connections. Considering biologic width is one of the principal rules of teeth restoration, otherwise we may destruct periodontal tissues. Several factors are involved in placing a restoration and one of the most important ones is where the restoration margin is terminated. Many studies have been conducted on the possible effects of restoration margin on the gingiva and due to the results of these studies it was concluded that restoration margin should be finished supragingivally. However, when we have to end the restoration under Gingival Crest, First a healthy gingival sulcus is required. Also, we should not invade the biological width. Since a normal biologic with is reported 2 mm and sound tooth tissue should be placed at least 2 mm coronal to the epithelial tissue, the distance between sound tooth tissue and crown margin should be at least 4mm. Thus, performing crown lengthening is essential to increase the clinical crown length. Basically, two objectives are considered: 1 restorative 2 esthetic (gummy smile Surgical procedure includes gingivectomy and flap procedure. Orthodontic procedure involves orthodontic extrusion or force eruption technique which is controlled vertical movements of teeth into occlusion. Besides, this procedure can also used to extrude teeth defects from the gingival tissue. By crown lengthening, tooth extraction is not required and furthermore, adjacent teeth preparation for placing a fixed

  2. Is There a Correlation Between Tensile Strength and Retrievability of Cemented Implant-Retained Crowns Using Artificial Aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Christian; Ali, Shurouk; El Bahra, Shadi; Harder, Sönke; Vollrath, Oliver; Kern, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this in-vitro study was to evaluate whether tensile strength and retrievability of cemented implant-retained crowns correlate when using artificial aging. A total of 128 crowns were fabricated from a cobalt-chromium alloy for 128 tapered titanium abutments (6 degrees taper, 4.3 mm diameter, 4 mm length, Camlog). The crowns were cemented with glass-ionomer (Ketac Cem, 3M) or resin cements (Multilink Implant, Telio CS Cem [Ivoclar Vivadent], Retrieve [Parkell]). Multilink Implant was used without priming. The experimental groups were subjected to either 37,500 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, 1,200,000 chewing cycles, or a combination of both. Control groups were stored for 10 days in deionized water. The crowns were removed with a universal testing machine or a clinically used removal device (Coronaflex, KaVo). Data were statistically analyzed using nonparametrical tests. Retention values were recorded between 31 N and 362 N. Telio CS Cem showed the lowest retention values, followed by Retrieve, Ketac Cem, and Multilink Implant (P≤.0001). The number of removal attempts with the Coronaflex were not significantly different between the cements (P>.05). Thermal cycling and chewing simulation significantly influenced the retrieval of Retrieve Telio CS Cem, and Ketac Cem specimens (P≤.05). Only for Multilink Implant and Telio CS Cem correlations between removal with the universal testing machine and the Coronaflex could be revealed (P≤.0001). Ketac Cem and Multilink Implant (without silane) can be used for a semipermanent cementation. Retrieve and Telio CS Cem are recommendable for a temporary cementation.

  3. Preventive and conservative prosthodontic treatment using overdenture and Richmond crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevin Stivie Cialy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosthodontic treatment aims to restore the chewing function (rehabilitation and to prevent tooth decay and bone resorption (preventive and conservative. As an example, treatment by overdenture and Richmond crown. Overdenture is a partial or complete removable denture covered and supported by one or more teeth, the tooth roots and/or dental implants. Richmond crown is fixed denture by post and crown system, in which the post part goes into the root canal and its crown covers the entire of original tooth crown surface. By retaining the original teeth and/or roots, it could improve the stability and retention of the denture, and defend proprioseptic of teeth and vertical dimensions. To provide information about preventive prosthodontic treatment and prevention by using overdenture and Richmond crown. Case Report: A 50 year old woman only has 44 teeth on the mandible which is indicated for the overdenture construction and loss teeth 13, 14, 17 and 27 on the maxilla with deep caries in teeth 22 which is indicated for a removable partial denture (RPDs construction by Richmond crown gear 22. On an early stage study, printing models is done. Then treatment of the root canal on teeth 22 and 44, followed by root canal preparation, core construction (cast post and Richmond crown on tooth 22 and bareroot preparation on tooth 44 for overdenture construction. The procedure followed by printing, recording bite to insertion. Choosing treatment either overdenture or Richmond crown is very important because it could mantain remain original teeth, thus it can help to improve the retention and stabilization.

  4. Retention of cast crown copings cemented to implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, J E; Richards, L C; Abbott, J R

    2008-12-01

    The cementation of crowns to dental implant abutments is an accepted form of crown retention that requires consideration of the properties of available cements within the applied clinical context. Dental luting agents are exposed to a number of stressors that may reduce crown retention in vivo, not the least of which is occlusal loading. This study investigated the influence of compressive cyclic loading on the physical retention of cast crown copings cemented to implant abutments. Cast crown copings were cemented to Straumann synOcta titanium implant abutments with three different readily used and available cements. Specimens were placed in a humidifier, thermocycled and subjected to one of four quantities of compressive cyclic loading. The uniaxial tensile force required to remove the cast crown copings was then recorded. The mean retention values for crown copings cemented with Panavia-F cement were statistically significantly greater than both KetacCem and TempBond non-eugenol cements at each compressive cyclic loading quantity. KetacCem and TempBond non-eugenol cements produced relatively low mean retention values that were not statistically significantly different at each quantity of compressive cyclic loading. Compressive cyclic loading had a statistically significant effect on Panavia-F specimens alone, but increased loading quantities produced no further statistically significant difference in mean retention. Within the limitations of the current in vitro conditions employed in this study, the retention of cast crown copings cemented to Straumann synOcta implant abutments with a resin, glass ionomer and temporary cement was significantly affected by cement type but not compressive cyclic loading. Resin cement is the cement of choice for the definitive non-retrievable cementation of cast crown copings to Straumann synOcta implant abutments out of the three cements tested.

  5. Effect of water temperature on the fit of provisional crown margins during polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, T; Aizawa, S; Tanaka, M; Matsuya, S; Hasegawa, A; Koyano, K

    1999-12-01

    When fabricating a provisional crown with the direct technique, dentists are concerned with margin discrepancies that result from polymerization shrinkage. This in vitro study examined the effect of water temperature on the fit of provisional crown margins during resin polymerization. The experiment was designed to simulate a direct technique to fabricate provisional crowns. After mixing autopolymerizing methyl methacrylate resin, the material was placed in a preformed polycarbonate crown. The crown was seated on a prepared premolar-shaped die with a shoulder margin. After 1 minute and 50 seconds, the crown was removed and polymerization was continued under the following conditions: 20 degrees C air, and water at 0 degrees C, 10 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 30 degrees C, 40 degrees C, 60 degrees C, and 80 degrees C. Six minutes after polymerization, the crown was trimmed and reseated on the die. Discrepancy of crown margin was measured with a 3-dimensional digitizer. Margin discrepancy varied with the condition during resin-polymerization (ANOVA, P crowns polymerized in 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C water revealed the best margin fit, showing 3 times more accurate margin fit than those polymerized in 20 degrees C air (Bonferroni/Dunn procedure, P provisional crowns using the direct technique. Water temperatures of 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C produced the best fit at the margin of the provisional crown.

  6. An ingested mobile phone in the stomach may not be amenable to safe endoscopic removal using current therapeutic devices: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinwa, Obinna; Cooper, David; O'Riordan, James M

    2016-01-01

    This case report is intended to inform clinicians, endoscopists, policy makers and industry of our experience in the management of a rare case of mobile phone ingestion. A 29-year-old prisoner presented to the Emergency Department with vomiting, ten hours after he claimed to have swallowed a mobile phone. Clinical examination was unremarkable. Both initial and repeat abdominal radiographs eight hours later confirmed that the foreign body remained in situ in the stomach and had not progressed along the gastrointestinal tract. Based on these findings, upper endoscopy was performed under general anaesthesia. The object could not be aligned correctly to accommodate endoscopic removal using current retrieval devices. Following unsuccessful endoscopy, an upper midline laparotomy was performed and the phone was delivered through an anterior gastrotomy, away from the pylorus. The patient made an uneventful recovery and underwent psychological counselling prior to discharge. In this case report, the use of endoscopy in the management when a conservative approach fails is questioned. Can the current endoscopic retrieval devices be improved to limit the need for surgical interventions in future cases? An ingested mobile phone in the stomach may not be amenable for removal using the current endoscopic retrieval devices. Improvements in overtubes or additional modifications of existing retrieval devices to ensure adequate alignment for removal without injuring the oesophagus are needed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Crowned dens syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Belfiore

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Microcrystalline deposition in peri-odontoid articular structures is mainly responsible for acute or chronic cervical pain and is known as “crowned dens syndrome”.Materials and methods We described two cases of acute cervical pain associated with onset of fever and peripheral acute monoarthritis. Cervical computed tomography (CT scan showed linear calcification of the retrodens ligament and calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate (CPPD crystals were found in synovial fluid of inflamed joints. Both patients were treated with anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine.Discussion Calcium depositions around the odontoid process of the axis can be occasionally detected by radiological studies. They are frequently asymptomatic but sometimes can be associated with severe neurological abnormalities, fever and acute neck pain. CPPD crystals are usually deposited in joints and bursae but occasionally can disrupt these anatomical confines and deposit in periarticular tissues, sometimes forming large masses confused with tumours.Conclusions Acute onset of cervical neck pain associated with elevation of inflammatory indicators and/or signs of cervical myelopathy should suggest CT scans searching for microcrystal depositions in the peryodonthoid tissue. Differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin (FUO should include crowned dens syndrome specially in the elderly after exclusion of several endocrine or metabolic disorders, infection diseases (meningitis, arthritis (psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis and tumours (chordoma, meningioma, osteoblastoma.

  9. Ready to crown

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McReynolds, David

    2017-04-01

    When multiple teeth or localised segments of the mouth require crowns, the restorative interventions involved can be psychologically and physically demanding for the operator, patient and dental technician alike.1,2 It is important that all parties involved in restorations of this nature hold a shared understanding of the expected outcome of treatment, with a realistic, common end goal in mind right from the very beginning. Such clarity of thought and communication is key to avoiding biological, mechanical and aesthetic failures in the planning and execution of advanced restorative treatments. Biomechanically stable and aesthetically pleasing provisional restorations are an essential aspect of treatment, which allow teeth to be prepared and provisionalised over multiple appointments within the comfort zone of the operator and patient.3

  10. Effectiveness of the antimicrobial removal device, BACTEC 16B medium, and thiol broth in neutralizing antibacterial activities of imipenem, norfloxacin, and related agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberg, E; Shungu, D L; Gadebusch, H H

    1984-01-01

    The Antimicrobial Removal Device (ARD), BACTEC 16B medium, and Thiol broth were evaluated for their effectiveness in reducing the activity of imipenem (IPM), cefoxitin, moxalactam, and ceftazidime in blood samples. In addition, the capability of the ARD and Thiol broth to bind norfloxacin and the ARD to bind oxolinic and nalidixic acids in urine samples was investigated. At the highest concentrations of the drugs tested (32 micrograms/ml for the four beta-lactams and 256 micrograms/ml for the...

  11. Twenty-year follow-up of metal-ceramic single crowns: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näpänkangas, Ritva; Raustia, Aune

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this clinical retrospective study was to evaluate the survival and success of single metal-ceramic crowns after 20 years. The biologic and technical complications as well as patient satisfaction were recorded. Fifty patients treated with 100 single metal-ceramic crowns attended the clinical 20-year follow-up examination. The mean follow-up time was 18.8 years (17.5 to 20.5 years). Twenty-one teeth with single crowns were extracted because of root fractures or esthetic or periodontal reasons. Ninety-seven percent of the subjects had no complaints about the esthetics of the crowns. The most common clinical findings were supragingival crown margins caused by gingival recessions, gingival bleeding on probing, and occlusal wear in opposing teeth. The success of the crowns after 20 years was 75%, and the survival was 78%. In the 20-year follow-up of single metal-ceramic crowns, there were few biologic and technical complications, and patients were satisfied with the crowns. Crown removal was in most cases the result of root fractures in single crowns with endodontic posts.

  12. PEEK Primary Crowns with Cobalt-Chromium, Zirconia and Galvanic Secondary Crowns with Different Tapers—A Comparison of Retention Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Stock

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In prosthetic dentistry, double crown systems have proved their suitability as retainers for removable partial dentures. However, investigations in this context, regarding polyetheretherketone, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the retention force (RF between polyetheretherketone (PEEK primary and cobalt-chromium (CoCr, zirconia (ZrO2 and galvanic (GAL secondary crowns with three different tapers. Primary PEEK-crowns were milled with the tapers 0°, 1°, and 2° (n = 10/taper, respectively. Afterwards, 90 secondary crowns were fabricated: (i 30 CoCr-crowns milled from Ceramill Sintron (AmannGirrbach, Koblach, Austria (n = 10/taper, (ii 30 ZrO2-crowns milled from Ceramill ZI (AmannGirrbach, Koblach, Austria (n = 10/taper, and (iii 30 GAL-crowns made using electroforming (n = 10/taper. RF was measured in a pull-off test (20 pull-offs/specimen and data were analyzed using 2-/1-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Honestly Significant Difference (HSD post hoc test and linear regression analyses (p < 0.05. The measured mean RF values ranged between 9.6 and 38.2 N. With regard to the 0°, 1°, and 2° tapered crowns, no statistically significant differences between CoCr and ZrO2 were observed (p > 0.141. At 0° taper, no differences in retention forces between GAL, CrCr, and ZrO2 crowns were found (p = 0.075. However, at 1° and 2° taper, lower RF for GAL-crowns were observed (p < 0.009, p < 0.001, respectively. According to this laboratory study, PEEK might be a suitable material for primary crowns, regardless of the taper and the material of secondary crown. Long-term results, however, are still necessary.

  13. Evaluation of tensile retention of Y-TZP crowns cemented on resin composite cores: effect of the cement and Y-TZP surface conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, M P; Amaral, R; Oliveira, F S; Cesar, P F; Scotti, R; Valandro, L F; Bottino, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the cement type (adhesive resin, self-adhesive, glass ionomer, and zinc phosphate) on the retention of crowns made of yttria-stabilized polycrystalline tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP). Therefore, 108 freshly extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin, perpendicular to their long axis, and prepared for full crowns: the crown preparations were removed and reconstructed using composite resin plus fiber posts with dimensions identical to the prepared dentin. The preparations were impressed using addition silicone, and Y-TZP copings were produced, which presented a special setup for the tensile testing. Cementation was performed with two adhesive resin cements (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar-Vivadent; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE), one glass ionomer based cement (RelyX Luting, 3M ESPE), and one zinc phosphate cement (Cimento de Zinco, SS White, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). For the resin cement groups, the inner surfaces of the crowns were subjected to three surface treatments: cleaning with isopropyl alcohol, tribochemical silica coating, or application of a thin low-fusing glass porcelain layer plus silanization. After 24 hours, all groups were subjected to thermocycling (6000 cycles) and included in a special device for tensile testing in a universal testing machine to test the retention of the infrastructure. After testing, the failure modes of all samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the surface treatment and cement type (α=0.05) affected the tensile retention results. The Multilink cement presented the highest tensile retention values, but that result was not statistically different from RelyX ARC. The surface treatment was statistically relevant only for the Multilink cement. The cement choice was shown to be more important than the crown surface treatment for cementation of a Y-TZP crown to a composite resin substrate.

  14. Immediate esthetic crown with a facet of the extracted element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Giovanni de Almeida Prado; Magalhães, Amanda; Ajzen, Sergio

    2014-07-01

    The present report describes a case of implant loading with an immediate temporary crown. The buccal crown surface was removed from the extracted tooth to obtain an aesthetically satisfactory result. After periodontal treatment, tooth 21 appeared proclined and showed Grade 3 mobility, indicating the need for its extraction. The remaining bone was imaged using computed tomography, and virtual surgical planning was performed using these results. The implant was immediately loaded postextraction into the fresh alveolus without a graft and flap procedure. The temporary tooth, which was manufactured using the extracted buccal surface, was a simple, fast, and low cost procedure that produced an excellent esthetic outcome.

  15. Crown rust control on oats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, K.J.; Browning, J.A.; Simons, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    Attempts have been made to test the relative effectiveness of EMS treatment for inducing tolerance to crown rust among oat strains Clintland-60 of different ploidy levels. One strain of diploid and one of tetraploid oats were treated with EMS. These two strains are as susceptible to damage from crown rust as are cultivars of hexaploid oats. Multiline cultivars of oats have been shown to provide adequate protection from economic loss due to crown-rust disease in Iowa. Since 1968, eleven multiline cultivars of oats have been released from the Iowa station for use in commercial production in the midwestern USA. During the past two winter seasons, the effectiveness of multiline oat cultivars against crown-rust disease has been researched in Texas, USA, which has a ''long rust season'' of about four months, not an Iowa ''short rust season''. The protection against crown rust afforded by the multiline cultivars appeared equally good in Texas and Iowa. The seasonal productions of crown-rust spores relative to completely resistant and susceptible checks were nearly identical in both environments. Fifteen new isolines of oats have been developed for use in multiline varieties, with seed supplies sufficiently large for immediate use

  16. A prototype of novel agro-waste based column bed device for removal of textile dye Optilan Red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gita, Samchetshabam; Shukla, S P; Choudhury, T G; Prakash, C; Singh, A R

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the potentiality of an agro-waste (sugarcane bagasse) for removal of the textile dye (Optilan Red) using novel column based filtration unit with a packed column of chemically treated sugarcane bagasse. The treated and untreated sugarcane bagasse (biosorbent) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Effect of initial dye concentration on percentage removal of dye, equilibrium adsorption of sugarcane bagasse, kinetic studies, breakthrough point equilibrium and desorption of dye from the column material were studied. An inverse dependence of initial dye concentration on percent removal of dye was observed, whereas the equilibrium adsorption (q e ) showed a direct relationship with dye concentration. The time required for reaching breakthrough point was 120 min. Desorption of dye through alkali wash resulted in complete desorption after 1 h washing of the column for its reuse for next cycle. FT-IR analysis shows vibration in valence bands of the hydrogen bond of OH group, and the bands of intra-molecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which results in interaction of treated bagasse with Optilan Red textile dye. The present study showed that more than 93% removal of the dye can be achieved in the concentration range 10-50 ppm (aqueous solution). The removal efficiency of the column remained almost unchanged for the treatment of dye-house wastewater spiked with the dye. The agro-waste based treatment process shows a considerable potential for a low-cost treatment of dye contaminated water.

  17. Device and process for extracting a blocking sleeve of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly removable guide tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, B.

    1990-01-01

    Removal the blocking sleeve of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly guide tube consits of deforming by bonding towards the inside of the blocking sleeve each of the zones of the formule having a deformed part projecting radially outwards in a manner to remove those deformed parts from location in the corresponding cavity of the tube plate. The blocking sleeve is then extracted by pulling it in the axial direction of the guide tube. A tod is used to bond it the sectors of the formule and grip them to allow extraction of the blocking sleeve by pulling. This extraction is performed under the water of a cooling pool [fr

  18. Fluorescent switch for fast and selective detection of mercury (II) ions in vitro and in living cells and a simple device for its removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Jiang, Shenlong; Miao, Qingqing; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Mengjing; An, Linna; Cao, Qinjingwen; Guan, Yafeng; Zhang, Qun; Liang, Gaolin

    2014-07-01

    A water-soluble, biocompatible, and fluorescent chemosensor (1) for label-free, simple, and fast detection of mercury ions (Hg(2+)) in aqueous solutions and in HepG2 cells with high selectivity is reported herein. Chelation of 1 with Hg(2+) results in the disappearance of its fluorescence emission at 350 nm and the appearance of a new emission at 405 nm. Selectivity and interference studies indicated that 1 could be selectively chelated by Hg(2+) without interference from other metal ions. Insight into the mechanisms responsible for its fluorescence effect was gained from ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. With these properties, 1 was successfully applied for imaging Hg(2+) in living cells and for removing Hg(2+) from river water. Moreover, we also constructed a simple device for fast and effective removal of Hg(2+) from contaminated liquid samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effectiveness of the antimicrobial removal device, BACTEC 16B medium, and thiol broth in neutralizing antibacterial activities of imipenem, norfloxacin, and related agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, E; Shungu, D L; Gadebusch, H H

    1984-02-01

    The Antimicrobial Removal Device (ARD), BACTEC 16B medium, and Thiol broth were evaluated for their effectiveness in reducing the activity of imipenem (IPM), cefoxitin, moxalactam, and ceftazidime in blood samples. In addition, the capability of the ARD and Thiol broth to bind norfloxacin and the ARD to bind oxolinic and nalidixic acids in urine samples was investigated. At the highest concentrations of the drugs tested (32 micrograms/ml for the four beta-lactams and 256 micrograms/ml for the three quinolinecarboxylic acids), there was at least a 95% reduction in the in vitro activity of each of the antibacterial agents for treated versus untreated samples. Of the compounds tested in the ARD system, the organic acids were more completely removed than were the beta-lactams. The Thiol broth was more effective than the ARD and the BACTEC 16B medium in inactivating imipenem, but it had no effect on the antibacterial activity of norfloxacin.

  20. Fatigue resistance and microleakage of CAD/CAM ceramic and composite molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Amr S; Atta, Osama; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine effect of compressive cyclic loading on fatigue resistance and microleakage of monolithic CAD/CAM molar ceramic and composite crowns. Thirty-two extracted molars were prepared to receive CEREC crowns according to manufacturer's guidelines using a special paralleling device (Parallel-A-Prep). Sixteen feldspathic ceramic crowns (VITABLOCS Mark II) (VMII) and 16 resin-composite crowns (Paradigm-MZ100 blocks) (PMZ) were milled using a CEREC-3D machine. Eight crowns of each group were cemented to their respective teeth using self-etching resin cement (Panavia-F-2.0) (PAN), and eight were cemented using self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX-Unicem-Clicker) (RXU). Following storage for 1 week in water, specimens were subjected to uniaxial compressive cyclic loading in an Instron testing machine at 12 Hz for 1,000,000 cycles. Load was applied at the central fossa, and the cycle range was 60-600 N. Specimens were then subjected to microleakage testing. Data were statistically analyzed using factorial ANOVA and Post Hoc (Tukey HSD) tests. All composite crowns survived compressive cyclic loading without fracture, while three ceramic crowns from the subgroup cemented with RXU developed surface cracks at the center of occlusal surfaces, extending laterally. Microleakage scores of ceramic crowns cemented with PAN were significantly lower than those of the other three subgroups (p crowns were more fatigue-resistant than VMII ceramic crowns. Cement type had a significant effect on fatigue resistance of the ceramic crowns but not the composite ones. Microleakage scores of ceramic crowns cemented with PAN were significantly lower than those of the other subgroups (p < 0.05). © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. 40 CFR 63.3966 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... with Add-on Controls Option § 63.3966 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction... required by § 63.3960. You must conduct three test runs as specified in § 63.7(e)(3) and each test run must...

  2. In vitro fracture behavior of maxillary premolars with metal crowns and several post-and-core systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Kreulen, C.M.; Bell-Ronnlof, A.M. Le; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro fracture behavior of severely damaged premolars, restored with metal crowns with limited ferrule and several post-and-core systems, was investigated. Crowns of maxillary premolars were removed and canals were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and with Parapost drills. Groups of 11

  3. Wave Forces on Crown Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan; Burcharth, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from a large parametric laboratory study including more than 200 long-duration model tests. The study addresses both the wave forces imposed on the breakwater crown wall as well as the performance of the structure in reducing the wave overtopping. The testing...... programme includes variations of the sea state parameters and of the geometrical configuration of the breakwater and crown wall. Basic relations between forces/overtopping and the varied parameters are examined and preliminary design guidelines for structures within the tested range of variations...

  4. Earth Pressure on Tunnel Crown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    Two different analyses have been carried out in order to find the vertical earth pressure, or overburden pressure, at the crown of a tunnel going through a dike. Firstly, a hand calculation is performed using a simple dispersion of the stresses over depth. Secondly, the finite‐element program...

  5. Equations to convert compacted crown ratio to uncompacted crown ratio for trees in the Interior West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Toney; Matthew C. Reeves

    2009-01-01

    Crown ratio is the proportion of total tree length supporting live foliage. Inventory programs of the US Forest Service generally define crown ratio in terms of compacted or uncompacted measurements. Measurement of compacted crown ratio (CCR) involves envisioning the transfer of lower branches of trees with asymmetric crowns to fill holes in the upper portion of the...

  6. Changes in retention force with electroplated copings on conical crowns: a comparison of gold and zirconia primary crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Stefan; Kraus, Dominik; Keilig, Ludger; Gölz, Lina; Stark, Helmut; Enkling, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the wear behavior of conical crowns with electroplated gold copings that are used to connect implants and teeth to a removable denture. Gold alloy and zirconium dioxide ceramic crowns were compared. Fifteen crowns each were milled for two groups: gold alloy and zirconium dioxide. Each specimen had a 2-degree taper. The electroplated coping was established by direct electroforming. The retentive forces and the correlating distance during insertion and separation were measured after 10,000 wear cycles were applied. The wear testing was separated into a start phase, an initial wear phase, and the long-term wear period. The retention force value and the force-distance integral of the first 0.3 mm of each cycle were calculated. The changes in retention force and integral did not differ significantly between both groups in the start and the initial wear phase. No differences were seen in force development during the long-term wear period. Only the force-distance integral showed a significant difference: the median values of the gold crowns increased slightly, and they decreased slightly for the zirconia crowns. The median force values never fell below 6 N for gold and 4 N for zirconia. Within the limitations of this study, the tested conical crowns showed clinically acceptable retentive properties. As with other retentive elements for dentures, the specimens tested showed the greatest amount of change in retentive forces during the first 2,000 cycles. The development of retention force in both groups was not significantly different. However, the zirconia specimens showed reduced variability, which is preferable in clinical practice.

  7. Comparison of Amount of Primary Tooth Reduction Required for Anterior and Posterior Zirconia and Stainless Steel Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Larkin; Wells, Martha H; Harris, Edward F; Lou, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    To determine if aggressiveness of primary tooth preparation varied among different brands of zirconia and stainless steel (SSC) crowns. One hundred primary typodont teeth were divided into five groups (10 posterior and 10 anterior) and assigned to: Cheng Crowns (CC); EZ Pedo (EZP); Kinder Krowns (KKZ); NuSmile (NSZ); and SSC. Teeth were prepared, and assigned crowns were fitted. Teeth were weighed prior to and after preparation. Weight changes served as a surrogate measure of tooth reduction. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference in tooth reduction among brand/type for both the anterior and posterior. Tukey's honest significant difference test (HSD), when applied to anterior data, revealed that SSCs required significantly less tooth removal compared to the composite of the four zirconia brands, which showed no significant difference among them. Tukey's HSD test, applied to posterior data, revealed that CC required significantly greater removal of crown structure, while EZP, KKZ, and NSZ were statistically equivalent, and SSCs required significantly less removal. Zirconia crowns required more tooth reduction than stainless steel crowns for primary anterior and posterior teeth. Tooth reduction for anterior zirconia crowns was equivalent among brands. For posterior teeth, reduction for three brands (EZ Pedo, Kinder Krowns, NuSmile) did not differ, while Cheng Crowns required more reduction.

  8. Effect of the simulated periodontal ligament on cast post-and-core removal using an ultrasonic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Brito-Junior

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of simulated periodontal ligament (SPDL on custom cast dowel and core removal by ultrasonic vibration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-two human maxillary canines were included in resin cylinders with or without SPDL made from polyether impression material. In order to allow tensile testing, the roots included in resin cylinders with SPDL were fixed to cylinders with two stainless steel wires. Post-holes were prepared by standardizing the length at 8 mm and root canal impressions were made with self-cured resin acrylic. Cast dowel and core sets were fabricated and luted with Panavia F resin cement. Half of the samples were submitted to ultrasonic vibration before the tensile test. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (p<0.05. RESULTS: The ultrasonic vibration reduced the tensile strength of the samples directly included in resin cylinders. There was no difference between the values, whether or not ultrasonic vibration was used, when the PDL was simulated. However, the presence of SPDL affected the tensile strength values even when no ultrasonic vibration was applied. CONCLUSION: Simulation of PDL has an effect on both ultrasonic vibration and tensile testing.

  9. Retention of metal-ceramic crowns with contemporary dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Zhang, Hai; Wataha, John C

    2009-09-01

    New types of crown and bridge cement are in use by practitioners, and independent studies are needed to assess their effectiveness. The authors conducted a study in three parts (study A, study B, and study C) and to determine how well these new cements retain metal-ceramic crowns. The authors prepared teeth with a 20-degree taper and a 4-millimeter length. They cast high-noble metal-ceramic copings, then fitted and cemented them with a force of 196 newtons. The types of cements they used were zinc phosphate, resin-modified glass ionomer, conventional resin and self-adhesive modified resin. They thermally cycled the cemented copings, then removed them. They recorded the removal force and calculated the stress of dislodgment by using the surface area of each preparation. They used a single-factor analysis of variance to analyze the data (alpha = .05). The mean stresses necessary to remove crowns, in megapascals, were 8.0 for RelyX Luting (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), 7.3 for RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), 5.7 for Panavia F (Kuraray America, New York) and 4.0 for Fuji Plus (GC America, Alsip, Ill.) in study A; 8.1 for RelyX Luting, 2.6 for RelyX Luting Plus (3M ESPE) and 2.8 for Fuji CEM (GC America) in study B; and 4.9 for Maxcem (Kerr, Orange, Calif.), 4.0 for BisCem (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.), 3.7 for RelyX Unicem Clicker (3M ESPE), 2.9 for iCEM (Heraeus Kulzer, Armonk, N.Y.) and 2.3 for Fleck's Zinc Cement (Keystone Industries, Cherry Hill, N.J.) in study C. Powder-liquid versions of new cements were significantly more retentive than were paste-paste versions of the same cements. The mean value of crown removal stress for the new self-adhesive modified-resin cements varied appreciably among the four cements tested. All cements retained castings as well as or better than did zinc phosphate cement. Powder-liquid versions of cements, although less convenient to mix, may be a better clinical choice when crown retention is an issue. All cements tested will retain castings

  10. Evaluation of a new method of irrigation and aspiration for removal of ophthalmic viscoelastic device during cataract surgery in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Arisa; Suzuki, Takashi; Tasaka, Yoshitaka; Uda, Takahiro; Hiramatsu, Yukako; Kawasaki, Shiro; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2014-11-07

    To determine if a method for irrigation and aspiration (I/A) during cataract surgery provides effective removal of ophthalmic viscoelastic device (OVD). Japanese porcine eyes were used to evaluate I/A performance with Technique 1 (the I/A tip placed on the center of the anterior surface of the IOL), Technique 2 (the I/A tip alternately pressed near the edge of the IOL optic anterior surface on one side and then the other to tilt the IOL back and forth), and Technique 3 (the I/A tip inserted behind the IOL optic, between it and the posterior capsule). Techniques 1 and 2 were compared using the Miyake-Apple posterior view video technique to visualize the flow of irrigation fluid containing triamcinolone acetonide particles behind the IOL. To check the efficacy of OVD removal from behind the IOL for of all three I/A techniques, OVD with fluorescein beads were inserted inside the lens capsule before implantation of the IOL. After each I/A technique, eyes were prepared for Miyake-Apple viewing and pictures of the lens capsule were taken using fluorescent microscopy. Residual fluorescein beads in the capsular bag were analyzed. Technique 1 resulted in a straight flow of fluid behind the IOL, while Technique 2 resulted in a vortex flow. The average amount of OVD retained inside the capsule after using Technique 2 or 3 was significantly lower than after using Technique 1 (p <0.0001). Technique 2 proved to remove more effectively fluorescein bead-labelled OVD under the IOL than Technique 1.

  11. Response surface method for modeling the removal of carbon dioxide from a simulated gas using water absorption enhanced with a liquid-film-forming device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Diem-Mai Kim; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Dang, Thanh-Loc Thi; Kanno, Ariyo; Higuchi, Takaya; Yamamoto, Koichi; Sekine, Masahiko

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the results from using a physical absorption process to absorb gaseous CO 2 mixed with N 2 using water by producing tiny bubbles via a liquid-film-forming device (LFFD) that improves the solubility of CO 2 in water. The influence of various parameters-pressure, initial CO 2 concentration, gas-to-liquid ratios, and temperature-on the CO 2 removal efficiency and its absorption rate in water were investigated and estimated thoroughly by statistical polynomial models obtained by the utilization of the response surface method (RSM) with a central composite design (CCD). Based on the analysis, a high efficiency of CO 2 capture can be reached in conditions such as low pressure, high CO 2 concentration at the inlet, low gas/liquid ratio, and low temperature. For instance, the highest removal efficiency in the RSM-CCD experimental matrix of nearly 80% occurred for run number 20, which was conducted at 0.30MPa, CO 2 concentration of 35%, gas/liquid ratio of 0.71, and temperature of 15°C. Furthermore, the coefficients of determination, R 2 , were 0.996 for the removal rate and 0.982 for the absorption rate, implying that the predicted values computed by the constructed models correlate strongly and fit well with the experimental values. The results obtained provide essential information for implementing this method properly and effectively and contribute a promising approach to the problem of CO 2 capture in air pollution treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Fracture Strength of Implant-Supported Ceramic Crowns with Customized Zirconia Abutments: Screw Retained vs. Cement Retained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Lorenna Bastos Lima Verde; Moura, Carmem Dolores Vilarinho Soares; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Valente, Valdimar Silva; Alencar, Suyá Moura Mendes; Moura, Walter Leal; Soares Martins, Gregorio Antonio

    2016-01-01

    To compare the fracture resistance before and after cyclic fatigue assays of ceramic crowns with customized zirconia abutments when screw retained and cemented onto implants. The sample of this study consisted of 40 ceramic crowns with zirconia infrastructure fixed onto external hexagonal implants. The crowns were distributed into two groups (n = 20): Screw-retained and cemented crowns. Half the crowns of each group (n = 10) underwent compression until fracture and the other half (n = 10) underwent cyclic fatigue and subsequent compression until fracture. The cyclic fatigue test was carried out using an electromechanical fatigue device (loads from 0 to 100 N, 2 Hz frequency, in distilled water, at 37 °C for a period of 1 million cycles). The compression test was carried out using a universal testing machine with a 0.5 mm/min speed and 5 KN load cell. After fracture, the crowns were classified according to the type of fracture. Student's t test (p crowns (before = 1068.31 N, after = 891.49 N; p > 0.05) nor that of the cemented crowns (before = 2117.78 N; after = 2094.81 N; p > 0.05); however, the mean fracture resistance of the cemented crowns was higher than that of the screw-retained crowns both before (p crowns cemented onto the customized zirconia abutments offered greater fracture resistance than ceramic crowns with customized zirconia abutments screw retained onto implants. The cyclic fatigue did not seem to influence the fracture resistance of these crowns, whether cemented or screw retained onto implants. Fracture of the veneering ceramic was the predominant failure in this study. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Castillo-Ruiz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments.

  14. Crown structure of Picea omorika trees in the plantation

    OpenAIRE

    Krstić M.; Stavretović N.; Isajev V.; Bjelanović I.

    2012-01-01

    The study was carried out in Serbian spruce (Picea omorika Panč/Purkynĕ) plantations in the western Serbia. The paper presents results of the analysis of crown development. The following elements were analyzed: total tree height, height of the crown base, absolute and relative crown length, maximal crown diameter, coefficient of crown spreading and degree of crown girth. We discuss approaches to the modeling of tree crown growth and development, growing under favorable environmental and...

  15. Effect of a fluoride varnish on the margin leakage and retention of luted provisional crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Fuhrer, Nitzan; Ganor, Yehuda

    2003-01-01

    Provisional crowns cemented with provisional luting agents are susceptible to washout, margin leakage, and secondary caries when placed for a prolonged period. This study was conducted to determine the effect of combining a varnish containing 2.26% NaF with 2 provisional luting agents on the margin leakage and retention of provisional crowns. Acrylic resin provisional crowns were fabricated for 8 shoulder-prepared molars. The eight provisional (N=24) crowns were luted individually with Temp-Bond (TB), Freegenol (FG), or Duraphat (DU). Specimens were thermocycled 500 times (5 degrees and 60 degrees C) with a 1-minute dwell time, stored in 100% relative humidity at 37 degrees C for 6 days, and then immersed in a 0.5% Gentian violet solution for 24 hours. Seven days after cementation, a removal test of the crowns (shear retention test) was conducted with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Retention was determined as the maximum recorded force needed for crown dislodgment. DU varnish was applied to the inner surface of the dislodged crowns with no removal of the cement layer TB, FG (N=16). The crowns were relined with a 0.5-mm layer of acrylic resin and luted with a combination of luting agent and DU (TB, FG) N=16. No luting agent (NC) served as the control (N=8). Results were analyzed with the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Leakage at the margins was assessed with a 4-level dye penetration scale, and statistical differences were identified with a chi(2) test. All hypothesis testing was conducted at the 95% level of confidence. The mean 7-day retention forces were as follows: 44.5 N (Temp-Bond), 51.6 N (Freegenol), and 35.9 N (Duraphat). There were no significant differences among these values. Duraphat combined with Freegenol decreased the retention of provisional crowns, but Duraphat combined with Temp-Bond increased the retention of provisional crowns by 69-145%. Duraphat alone and in combination with both provisional luting

  16. Kombinasi hybrid prosthesis dengan precision attachment pada kasus mahkota klinis pendek Hybrid prosthesis combined with precision attachment to overcome clinically short crown

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Melina; Soekobagiono Soekobagiono; Harry Laksono

    2013-01-01

    In the case of losing many teeth and the residual teeth have short clinical crown, design of the denture may hybrid denture. Hybrid denture is a removable partial denture with metal frame which have retention in the form of precision attachment. In short clinical crown, placement of crowns and the use of traction can be a problem, because there is no or lack of retention. In the manufacture of hybrid denture with precision attachment retention, using abutment with short clinical c...

  17. Fracture resistance of porcelain veneered zirconia crowns with exposed lingual zirconia for anterior teeth after thermal cycling: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Rad, Fatemeh A.; Succaria, Faysal G.; Morgano, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of problem: In some clinical conditions minimally invasive complete crown tooth preparations are indicated. This is especially true when gross removal of tooth structure would weaken the remaining tooth or violate the vitality of the dental pulp. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of (1) exposed lingual zirconia with veneered zirconia crowns, and (2) reduced lingual thickness of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns on the fracture resistance of ...

  18. Hair Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths...... suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair......, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available...

  19. Hair removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths...... suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair......, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available...

  20. Pericoronal radiolucency associated with incomplete crown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo

    2013-01-01

    The author experienced 8 cases of pericoronal radiolucency involving an incomplete tooth crown that had not developed to form the cemento-enamel junction, and the underdeveloped crown sometimes appeared to be floating within the radiolucency radiographically. The first impression was that these cystic lesions had odontogenic keratocysts, but half of them turned out to be dentigerous cysts histopathologically. There has been no report concerning odontogenic cysts involving an incompletely developed crown. The purpose of this paper is to report that dentigerous cysts may develop before the completion of the cemento-enamel junction of a developing crown.

  1. Pericoronal radiolucency associated with incomplete crown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The author experienced 8 cases of pericoronal radiolucency involving an incomplete tooth crown that had not developed to form the cemento-enamel junction, and the underdeveloped crown sometimes appeared to be floating within the radiolucency radiographically. The first impression was that these cystic lesions had odontogenic keratocysts, but half of them turned out to be dentigerous cysts histopathologically. There has been no report concerning odontogenic cysts involving an incompletely developed crown. The purpose of this paper is to report that dentigerous cysts may develop before the completion of the cemento-enamel junction of a developing crown.

  2. Fracture resistance of various temporary crown materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Asude; Baydaş, Seyfettin

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of various provisional crown materials using an in vitro model test system. In the present study polycarbonate crowns, prefabricated by the manufacturer (3M Polycarbonate Crown), and the temporary crowns, fabricated in the dental laboratory environment, were fabricated using bis-acryl composite (Protemp II), autopolymerizing PMMA resin (BISICO Temp S), and heat-polymerized PMMA resin (Major C&B-V Dentine). All temporary crowns were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at room temperature prior to testing. The crowns were seated on metal dies, fabricated from Cr-Co alloy (AZ Dental, Konstanz, Germany), and then tested using the indenter of a Hounsfield testing machine (Hounsfield Tensometer, Hounsfield Test Equipment, Raydon, England). The tip of the indenter was located at a position one-third of the way down the inciso-palatine surface at 135 masculine. The data were statistically analyzed for differences using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey HSD test (P crowns were significantly different from the BISICO Temp S, Protemp II, and Major C&B-V Dentine (P crowns may be preferable to the other types of temporary crowns used in this study.

  3. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  4. A new device to select carriers for biomass immobilization and application in an aerobic/anaerobic fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor for nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, A; Lamon, A W; Ono, A; Foresti, E

    2016-12-01

    This study proposes a new approach to selecting a biofilm carrier for immobilization using dissolved oxygen (DO) microsensors to measure the thickness of aerobic and anaerobic layers in biofilm. The biofilm carriers tested were polyurethane foam, mineral coal (MC), basaltic gravel, and low-density polyethylene. Development of layers in the biofilm carrier surface was evaluated using a flow cell device, and DO profiles were conducted to determine the size of the layers (aerobic and anaerobic). MC was the biofilm carrier selected due to allowing the development of larger aerobic and anaerobic layers in the biofilm (896 and 1,058 μm, respectively). This ability is supposed to improve simultaneous nitrogen removal by nitrification and denitrification biological processes. Thus, as a biofilm carrier, MC was used in a fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (FB-SBBR) for treatment of wastewater with a high ammonia concentration (100-400 mgNH 4 + -N L -1 ). The FB-SBBR (15.0 L) was filled with matrices of the carrier and operated under alternating aeration and non-aeration periods of 6 h each. At a mean nitrogen loading rate of 0.55 ± 0.10 kgNH 4 + -N m -3 d -1 , the reactor attained a mean nitrification efficiency of 95 ± 9% with nitrite as the main product (aerobic period). Mean denitrification efficiency during the anoxic period was 72 ± 13%.

  5. Incorporating crown dimensions into stem height and basal area for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four crown dimensions (crown diameter, crown projection area, crown length and crown ratio) were each incorporated into nonlinear individual tree total height and basal area increment models for African white wood (Triplochiton scleroxylon K. Schum). The basic height/basal area growth model was formulated as a ...

  6. Equations for predicting uncompacted crown ratio based on compacted crown ratio and tree attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente J. Monleon; David Azuma; Donald. Gedney

    2004-01-01

    Equations to predict uncompacted crown ratio as a function of compacted crown ratio, tree diameter, and tree height are developed for the main tree species in Oregon, Washington, and California using data from the Forest Health Monitoring Program, USDA Forest Service. The uncompacted crown ratio was modeled with a logistic function and fitted using weighted, nonlinear...

  7. Immediate maxillary lateral incisor implants with nonocclusal loading provisional crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrocha, Miguel; Lamas, Joana; Peñarrocha, Maria; Garcia, Berta

    2008-01-01

    This clinical report series describes a treatment modality involving immediately placed dental implants in maxillary lateral incisor sites using noncemented immediate provisional crowns retained with calcinable copings (prosthetic complement used in preparing the metal for the definitive prosthesis). Ten implants were placed in eight patients for the replacement of maxillary lateral incisors: two immediate and eight corresponding to cases of agenesis. All were subjected to immediate rehabilitation with provisional acrylic resin crowns in nonocclusal loading. One implant failed 3 weeks after placement due to acute local trauma. The other nine remained functional within the mouth, with normal clinical and radiological characteristics after a minimum of 12-month follow-up. Immediate placement of implant fixed provisional restorations retained by friction in maxillary lateral incisors offers an esthetic solution, eliminates the need for a removable provisional restoration, and avoids implant failures associated with excess cement or screw loosening. Moreover, in the case of extractions, immediate placement and provisionalization of implants in maxillary lateral incisors can effectively optimize the peri-implant esthetic results by maintaining the existing hard and soft tissue architecture of the replaced tooth. As no cement or screws are required, and the provisional crowns are placed in nonocclusal loading, the risk of complications is minimized.

  8. FRACTURE-RESISTANT MONOLITHIC DENTAL CROWNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Methods Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Results Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. Significance The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. PMID:26792623

  9. Fracture-resistant monolithic dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self-consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  10. The Homburg Lung: Efficacy and Safety of a Minimal-Invasive Pump-Driven Device for Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Frederik; Trudzinski, Franziska C; Hennemann, Kai; Niermeyer, Tom; Schmoll, Christian; Kamp, Annegret; Bals, Robert; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Haake, Hendrik; Lepper, Philipp M

    Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) is increasingly considered a viable therapeutic approach in the management of hypercapnic lung failure to avoid intubation or to allow lung-protective ventilator settings. This study aimed to analyze efficacy and safety of a minimal-invasive ECCO2R device, the Homburg lung. The Homburg lung is a pump-driven system for veno-venous ECCO2R with ¼″ tubing and a 0.8 m surface oxygenator. Vascular access is usually established via a 19F/21 cm bilumen cannula in the right internal jugular vein. For this work, we screened patient registries from two German centers for patients who underwent ECCO2R with the Homburg lung because of hypercapnic lung failure since 2013. Patients who underwent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation before ECCO2R were excluded. Patients who underwent ECCO2R more than one time were only included once. In total, 24 patients (aged 53.86 ± 12.49 years; 62.5% male) were included in the retrospective data analysis. Ventilatory failure occurred because of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (50%), cystic fibrosis (16.7%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (12.5%), and other origins (20.8%). The system generated a blood flow of 1.18 ± 0.23 liters per minute (lpm). Sweep gas flow was 3.87 ± 2.97 lpm. Within 4 hours, paCO2 could be reduced significantly from 82.05 ± 15.57 mm Hg to 59.68 ± 12.27 mm Hg, thereby, increasing pH from 7.23 ± 0.10 to 7.36 ± 0.09. Cannulation-associated complications were transient arrhythmia (1/24 patients) and air embolism (1/24). Fatal complications did not occur. In conclusion, the Homburg lung provides effective carbon dioxide removal in hypercapnic lung failure. The cannulation is a safe procedure, with complication rates comparable to those in central venous catheter implantation.

  11. Fracture resistance of zirconia-composite veneered crowns in comparison with zirconia-porcelain crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadon, Omar; Patrick, David; Johnson, Anthony; Pollington, Sarah; Wood, Duncan

    2017-05-31

    The objectives were to evaluate the fracture resistance and stress concentration in zirconia/composite veneered crowns in comparison to zirconia/porcelain crowns using occlusal fracture resistance and by stress analysis using finite element analysis method. Zirconia substructures were divided into two groups based on the veneering material. A static load was applied occlusally using a ball indenter and the load to fracture was recorded in Newtons (N). The same crown design was used to create 3D crown models and evaluated using FEA. The zirconia/composite crowns subjected to static occlusal load showed comparable results to the zirconia/porcelain crowns. Zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress on the zirconia substructure at 63.6 and 50.9 MPa on the zirconia substructure veneered with porcelain. In conclusion, zirconia/composite crowns withstood high occlusal loads similar to zirconia/porcelain crowns with no significant difference. However, the zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress values than the zirconia/porcelain crowns at the zirconia substructure.

  12. Comparison of internal fit between implant abutments and cast metal crowns vs laser-sintered crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçarslan, Mehmet Ali; Özkan, Pelin; Uludag, Bülent; Mumcu, Emre

    2014-07-01

    A common problem related to cemented single crowns is the internal misfit, which may cause inadequate retention, especially when seated on the implant abutment. The aim of this study was to compare the internal fit of Co-Cr crowns using a traditional lost-wax casting technique from laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy crowns. Twelve metallic crowns per each technique were fabricated. The effect of the thickness of cement, originated internal gap was evaluated. Crowns were cemented on the implant abutments with resin cement, and the internal fit of crowns was measured at five areas with an optical microscope. The data were analyzed, and the means were compared with a t-test (pcrowns obtained through the lost wax method (min. 65.50 ± 9.54 μm and max. 313.46 ± 48.12 μm). The fit of the metal crown likely varies with the fabrication technique. The use of techniques that enable the adjustment of crown parameters, such as the laser sintering technique, maintains the desired fit between casting and implant abutments. This study investigated which technique affects the internal fit of cemented implant-supported crowns, comparing the use of lost wax casting and laser-sintered metal dental alloys. The results of this study indicate that the use of laser-sintered crowns can improve for crown accuracy.

  13. Lava zirconia crowns and bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttor, D

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic restorations--suitable for the anterior as well as the posterior region, simultaneously satisfying the demand for high strength, longevity, and esthetics--are an increasingly important field for the dental professional. Because of its outstanding mechanical properties and esthetics with a proven track record in other industrial areas, zirconium oxide (zirconia) is emerging in the dental industry. As the manufacturing method of choice, CAD/CAM is important for the dental laboratory; however, in the final analysis, the primary focus will be on the material properties and the clinical performance of the result of the CAD/CAM process--in this case, zirconia crowns and bridges. This is especially true since some concepts do not require the acquisition of a CAD/CAM system at all.

  14. Fracture resistance of porcelain veneered zirconia crowns with exposed lingual zirconia for anterior teeth after thermal cycling: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir Rad, Fatemeh A; Succaria, Faysal G; Morgano, Steven M

    2015-04-01

    In some clinical conditions minimally invasive complete crown tooth preparations are indicated. This is especially true when gross removal of tooth structure would weaken the remaining tooth or violate the vitality of the dental pulp. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of (1) exposed lingual zirconia with veneered zirconia crowns, and (2) reduced lingual thickness of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns on the fracture resistance of the crowns after cyclic loading. Metal-ceramic crowns with exposed lingual metal served as controls. Twenty-four maxillary central incisor crowns were fabricated in identical shape on metal testing dies in 3 groups: metal-ceramic crowns (MC, n = 8), veneered zirconia crowns (VZ, n = 8), and monolithic lithium disilicate crowns (MO, n = 8). A conservative preparation design with 0.75 mm lingual clearance was used for each crown system. All crowns were cemented to their corresponding crown preparations with self-adhesive resin cement (Multilink Automix). The crowns were subjected to 1000 cycles of thermal cycling, then cyclic loading of 111 N by means of a stainless steel ball, and 50,000 cycles of loading were applied for the fatigue test. Fatigue loading was followed by a continuously increasing compressive load, at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. The compressive load (N) required to cause failure was recorded. Means were calculated and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α = .05). There was a significant difference between MO vs. MC (P = .0001), MO vs. VZ (P = .0001), and VZ vs. MC (P = .012). There was a significant difference in the mean fracture resistance of MC, VZ, and MO crowns in this in vitro study. The MC group recorded the highest mean fracture strength.

  15. Fracture resistance of different primary anterior esthetic crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Al Shobber, Manar Zaki; Alkhadra, Thamer A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Investigate and compare fracture resistance of four commercially available esthetic crowns. Methods: Sixty-four anterior crowns were used: NuSmile Primary crowns (NuSmile, Houston, Tex. USA) (16); Preveneered Cheng Crowns, (Orthodontic Technologies Inc., Houston, TX) (16); NuSmile ZR (NuSmile, Houston, Tex. USA); and Cheng Crowns zirconia (Orthodontic Technologies Inc., Houston, TX). Crowns were mounted and cemented on a negative replica and placed under servo hydraulic mechanical...

  16. Repair of fractured abutment teeth under pre-existing crowns: An alternative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Mascarenhas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a technique for repair of abutment tooth which fractured during removal of a provisional restoration before bisque trial. The technique uses plastic templates to fabricate new composite core foundation for the existing crowns. This technique helps the dentist to rebuild the core in a single appointment.

  17. The Effect of Full Crown Preparation on Normal and Inflamed Pulp Tissue: An Animal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bidar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Full crown preparation may have adverse effects on pulp tissue. In this study, the effect of full-crown preparation on intact versus inflamed pulp tissue was studied. Methods: Fifteen healthy mature cats were randomly selected for this study. The study was performed on four canine teeth of each cat. Cats were anesthetized and then radiographs were taken from the canine teeth. Class V cavities were prepared in cat canine teeth. Soft decayed dentin was placed on the floor of cavities and sealed. After 1 month, all of the samples prepared for crown fabrication. Before crown preparation, an impression was taken in a custom tray. During crown preparation, the remnants of carious dentin were removed and undercuts were sealed by glass-ionomer. After preparation, self-cured acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated in a direct procedure and cemented permanently by glass-ionomer. One week later, teeth of the opposite jaw were prepared in a similar procedure. After 2 months, vital perfusion performed and the pulp tissue was histologically examined. Results: There was no significant difference between 4 groups, regarding to histologic status of the pulp. In healthy lower jaw, inflammation was the most frequent but in the other groups, necrosis was most frequent. Also, there was no significant difference between the upper jaw and the lower jaw groups regarding to the frequency of necrosis and inflammation. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between intact and inflamed groups regarding the frequency of necrosis and inflammation

  18. The Effect of Full Crown Preparation on Normal and Inflamed Pulp Tissue: An Animal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Vardkar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Full crown preparation may have adverse effects on pulp tissue. In this study, the effect of full-crown preparation on intact versus inflamed pulp tissue was studied. Methods: Fifteen healthy mature cats were randomly selected for this study. The study was performed on four canine teeth of each cat. Cats were anesthetized and then radiographs were taken from the canine teeth. Class V cavities were prepared in cat canine teeth. Soft decayed dentin was placed on the floor of cavities and sealed. After 1 month, all of the samples prepared for crown fabrication. Before crown preparation, an impression was taken in a custom tray. During crown preparation, the remnants of carious dentin were removed and undercuts were sealed by glass-ionomer. After preparation, self-cured acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated in a direct procedure and cemented permanently by glass-ionomer. One week later, teeth of the opposite jaw were prepared in a similar procedure. After 2 months, vital perfusion performed and the pulp tissue was histologically examined. Results: There was no significant difference between 4 groups, regarding to histologic status of the pulp. In healthy lower jaw, inflammation was the most frequent but in the other groups, necrosis was most frequent. Also, there was no significant difference between the upper jaw and the lower jaw groups regarding to the frequency of necrosis and inflammation. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between intact and inflamed groups regarding the frequency of necrosis and inflammation

  19. Development of methods for immobilisation of crown ethers onto solid supports for separation of metal ions from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, Sandip Janardan; Renjithkumar, A.U.; Maithania, K.N.; Mukhopadhyay, Sulekha; Shenoy, K.T.; Ghosh, Sunil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Since the serendipitous discovery of dibenzo-18-crown-6 (1) by C.J. Pedersen in 1967, many significant developments have been made in the field of host-guest chemistry. The very important use of these molecules in nuclear industry is removal of metal ions selectively. The removal of 90 Sr from the nuclear waste solution is very essential in order to reduce the vitrification period. Dicyclohexyl 18 Crown 6 ether (hydrogenated form of 1) has been reported to be efficient selective ligand for recovery of 90 Sr from nitrate medium. The application of crown ether in liquid-liquid extraction mode has some issue related to choice of diluents and aqueous solubility. Both of these problems can be overcome by the incorporation of crown ethers onto polymers. Polymer supported reagents offer many advantages, including ease of handling and recoverability when used in the removal of toxic metal ions from the environment. Due to increased concern with the remediation of wastewater, polymer-supported reagents, including immobilized crown ethers, have been studied for the selective removal of targeted metal ions. This will allow ease of handling, recyclability and adaption to continuous processes. There are three principal methods by which crown ethers can be incorporated into polymer matrices a) step-growth mechanism; b) chain-growth mechanism; c) post-functionalization wherein a crown ether is covalently bound to a pre-formed polymer backbone. The last method requires the crown to have a reactive functional group that can bond to the polymer. The immobilisation of (1) and (2) onto a solid support zeocarb-226 via amide linkage is successfully achieved by our group. We have synthesized novel extraction chromatographic resins by covalently binding on polymeric substrate. The covalent bonding in synthesized polymeric material has characterized by the FTIR. The resultant material is providing a simple and effective means of isolating 90 Sr and 6 Li

  20. Electroplated telescopic retainers with zirconia primary crowns: 3-year results from a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Lehmann, Franziska; Terebesi, Sophia; Corcodel, Nicoleta; Zenthöfer, Andreas; Rammelsberg, Peter; Stober, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the clinical outcome for electroplated telescopic removable dental prostheses (E-RDPs) with zirconia primary crowns. Sixty E-RDPs, with primary crowns manufactured from either cobalt-chromium alloy or zirconia, were fabricated for 56 participants. Electroplating was used to produce gold copings directly on the telescopic primary crowns. These copings were bonded intra-orally to the prosthesis framework. After 36 months, prosthesis survival and number of complications were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed by the use of Kaplan-Meier modeling and the log-rank test. Survival of the E-RDPs, 96.4% after 3 years, was identical in both groups. The need for aftercare was high but not significantly different: technical complications were observed for 37% and 42.9% of the prostheses for the zirconia and cobalt-chromium alloy primary crowns, respectively. Fracture of composite veneer was the most frequent complication (59.1%). The incidence of fractured abutment teeth, decementation, and endodontic problems was 7.9% in the zirconia group and 14% in the control group. The majority of abutment-level complications were treated restoratively. A significant difference was found for maximum probing depth at the abutment teeth: In the zirconia group, it decreased by 0.2 mm, whereas it increased by 0.8 mm in the control group (p = 0.04). After 3 years of observation, survival of zirconia E-RDPs was favorable and comparable with that of established double-crown-retained prostheses. Further studies must clarify whether there are benefits of zirconia primary crowns for periodontal health. Although these results encourage the use of zirconia primary crowns, more research is necessary to reduce the number of complications observed for secondary telescopic crowns, for example, failure of the veneer.

  1. Effect of thermocycling with or without 1 year of water storage on retentive strengths of luting cements for zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Vicky; Kampf, Gabriel; Stender, Elmar; Willershausen, Brita; Ernst, Claus-Peter

    2015-06-01

    Bond stability between zirconia crowns and luting cement and between cement and dentin is a main concern; however, only limited evidence is available as to its longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the retentive strengths of 7 self-adhesive cements (RelyX Unicem Aplicap, RelyX Unicem Clicker, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, iCEM, Maxcem Elite, Bifix SE, SpeedCem), 2 adhesive cements with self-etch primers (Panavia 21, SEcure), 1 glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem), 1 resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Meron Plus), and 1 zinc phosphate cement for luting zirconia crowns (LAVA) to extracted teeth after thermocycling with or without 1 year of water storage. Two-hundred-forty extracted human molars (2 treatments; n=10 per cement) were prepared in a standardized manner. All cements were used according to the manufacturers' recommendations. The intaglios of the crowns were treated with airborne-particle abrasion. After thermocycling (×5000, 5°C/55°C) with or without 1 year of water storage, the cemented ceramic crowns were removed by using a Zwick universal testing device. Statistical analyses were done with the Wilcoxon rank sum and the 2-independent-samples Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Median retentive strengths [MPa] for specimens thermocycled only/thermocycled with 1 year of water storage were as follows: Panavia 21: 1.7/2.5, SEcure: 3.0/3.0, RelyX Unicem Aplicap: 3.1/3.4, RelyX Unicem Clicker: 4.1/4.2, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix: 3.8/3.1, iCEM: 2.3/2.7, Maxcem Elite: 3.0/3.2, Bifix SE: 1.7/1.7, SpeedCem: 1.3/1.6, Meron Plus: 3.1/2.7, Ketac Cem: 1.4/1.4, and zinc phosphate cement: 1.1/1.6. Statistically significant differences were found only among specimens thermocycled only or thermocycled with 1-year water storage (P<.001). Significant differences in retentive strengths were observed among cements after thermocycling only or thermocycling with 1 year of water storage, but not for the effect of the additional 1 year of water storage. Copyright © 2015

  2. Marginal Strength of Collarless Metal Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikka Swati

    2010-01-01

    fracture strength at margins of metal ceramic crowns cemented to metal tooth analogs. Crowns evaluated with different marginal configurations, shoulder and shoulder bevel with 0 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 1.5 mm, were selected. Methods. Maxillary right canine typhodont tooth was prepared to receive a metal ceramic crown with shoulder margin. This was duplicated to get 20 metal teeth analogs. Then the same tooth was reprepared to get shoulder bevel configuration. These crowns were then cemented onmetal teeth analogs and tested for fracture strength atmargin on an Instron testing machine. A progressive compressive load was applied using 6.3 mm diameter rod with crosshead speed of 2.5 mm per minute. Statisticaly analysis was performed with ANOVA, Student's “t” test and “f” test. Results. The fracture strength of collarless metal ceramic crowns under study exceeded the normal biting force. Therefore it can be suggested that collarless metal ceramic crowns with shoulder or shoulder bevel margins up to 1.5 mm framework reduction may be indicated for anteriormetal ceramic restorations. Significance. k Collarless metal ceramic crowns have proved to be successful for anterior fixed restorations. Hence, it may be subjected to more clinical trials.

  3. Colorimetric values of esthetic stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Omachi, Koichi; Staninec, Michal

    2002-01-01

    The colorimetric values of two different kinds of esthetic stainless steel crowns were measured and compared with the colorimetric values of primary anterior teeth in Japanese children. The colorimetric values of resin composite-faced stainless steel crowns (Kinder Krown) and epoxy-coated stainless steel crowns (White Steel Crown) were measured with a color difference meter. The Commission Internationale de Eclairage L*, a*, b*, and delta E*ab values and Munsell value, chroma, and hue were calculated. The data were compared with previously reported colorimetric values of Japanese primary anterior teeth measured with the same color difference meter used in this study. Compared to Japanese primary anterior teeth, Kinder Krown Pedo I and Pedo II showed much higher L* values and lower hue; on the other hand, White Steel Crown showed much higher L*, a*, b* values, much higher value and chroma, and much lower hue. Color analysis revealed that the colors of the White Steel Crown and Kinder Krown Pedo I were substantially different from the color of Japanese primary anterior teeth. The color difference between Pedo II crowns and Japanese primary anterior teeth was relatively high, but the color of Pedo II might be acceptable for clinical use.

  4. Retention and surface changes of zirconia primary crowns with secondary crowns of different materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turp, Işıl; Bozdağ, Ergün; Sünbüloğlu, Emin; Kahruman, Cem; Yusufoğlu, Ibrahim; Bayraktar, Gülsen

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate zirconia as a substitute for gold alloy in primary crowns facing secondary crowns manufactured with different materials, in terms of long-term retention force changes, wear, and phase transformation was aimed. A total of 12 groups, each containing six samples, consisting of gold alloy primary crown-electroformed gold secondary crowns (AA), zirconia primary crown-electroformed gold secondary crowns (ZA) and zirconia primary crown-casted non-precious alloy secondary crowns (ZC) with conus angles of 0°, 2°, 4°, and 6° were evaluated. Samples were subjected to 10,000 insertion-separation cycles in artificial saliva and retention force was measured. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope analysis were performed on the sample surfaces. The highest retention forces were obtained from ZC-0° group (72.09-71.26 N) and the lowest were obtained from ZA-4° (12.73-19.44 N) and ZA-6° (5.36-19.73 N) groups in the beginning and after 10,000 cycles, respectively. Retention force increased as the conus angle decreased. The monoclinic phase ratio of the zirconia primary crowns decreased after the experiments. No wear was observed in zirconia primary crowns except for the ZC-0° and ZC-2° groups. The use of zirconia primary crowns resulted in a less excursive retention force. A more predictable and less excursive retention force can be obtained using a hard and rigid primary crown material like zirconia. Despite a lack of knowledge about the aging of zirconia without a veneer layer in the oral environment, zirconia primary crowns are more advantageous in terms of retention force development and wear.

  5. Internal fit evaluation of crowns prepared using a new dental crown fabrication technique: laser-sintered Co-Cr crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Yurdanur; Akova, Tolga; Akyil, Musa S; Brantley, William A

    2009-10-01

    Difficulties encountered during casting of base metal dental alloys limit their use. Application of these alloys might be enhanced if new techniques are used. The purpose of this study was to compare the internal fit of laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy crowns with base metal restorations prepared from another Co-Cr alloy and a Ni-Cr alloy using conventional casting techniques. Internal fit of laser-sintered Co-Cr crowns was compared with the fit of conventionally cast Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloy crowns. Twelve crown-shaped specimens were prepared on a stainless steel die representing a prepared maxillary right central incisor for each group. Fit of crowns was evaluated using 2 different techniques: (1) weighing the light-body addition silicone that simulated a cement material, and (2) measuring the internal gap width on a die for longitudinally sectioned specimens. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey multiple comparison test was used for statistical analysis (alpha=.05). Significantly higher mean (SD) light-body silicone weights (Pcrowns. However, no significant difference was found among the 3 alloy groups evaluated for the internal gap width of sectioned crown specimens.

  6. Reactor for removing ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weifang [Livermore, CA; Stewart, Kenneth D [Valley Springs, CA

    2009-11-17

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  7. Comparison of different ultrasonic vibration modes for post removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Neilor Mateus Antunes; Silva, Juliana Monteiro da; Carvalho-Júnior, Jacy Ribeiro de; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Saquy, Paulo César; Brito-Júnior, Manoel

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study compared different ultrasonic vibration modes for intraradicular cast post removal. The crowns of 24 maxillary canines were removed, the roots were embedded in acrylic resin blocks, and the canals were treated endodontically. The post holes were prepared and root canal impressions were taken with self-cured resin acrylic. After casting, the posts were cemented with zinc phosphate cement. The samples were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=8): G1: no ultrasonic vibration (control); G2: tip of the ultrasonic device positioned perpendicularly to core surface and close to the incisal edge; and G3: tip of the ultrasonic device positioned perpendicularly to core surface at cervical region, close to the line of cementation. An Enac OE-5 ultrasound unit with an ST-09 tip was used. All samples were submitted to the tensile test using an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). Mean values of the load to dislodge the posts (MPa) were: G1 = 4.6 (± 1.4) A; G2 = 2.8 (± 0.9) B, and G3= 0.9 (± 0.3) C. Therefore, the ultrasonic vibration applied with the tip of device close to the core's cervical area showed higher ability to reduce the retention of cast post to root canal.

  8. Fracture resistance of zirconia-composite veneered crowns in comparison with zirconia-porcelain crowns.

    OpenAIRE

    Alsadon, O.; Patrick, D.; Johnson, A.; Pollington, S.; Wood, D.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the fracture resistance and stress concentration in zirconia/composite veneered crowns in comparison to zirconia/porcelain crowns using occlusal fracture resistance and by stress analysis using finite element analysis method. Zirconia substructures were divided into two groups based on the veneering material. A static load was applied occlusally using a ball indenter and the load to fracture was recorded in Newtons (N). The same crown design was used to create ...

  9. Activity relationships for aromatic crown ethers

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, M J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis involves an investigation of aromatic crown ethers and a study of their binding constants for alkali metals. The study was motivated by the current needs of the semiconductor industry to improve the scavenging of mobile ions from fabricated circuits. A number of aromatic crown ethers have been sulphonated in an attempt to improve their water solubility and cation binding activity. These materials have been extensively studied and their binding activity determined. In collaboration with a molecular modelling study, the effect of ionisable sulphonate groups on the macrocycles' behaviour has been investigated. The broader issue of the effect of substituents in aromatic crown ethers has also been studied with the preparation of a wide range of substituted crown ethers. The cation binding activity of these materials has been found to bear a simple relationship to the electron withdrawing nature of the aromatic substituents. This relationship can be accurately monitored using electronic charge densities...

  10. Methods for evaluating crown area profiles of forest stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrasich, Michael E.; Hann, D.W.; Tappeiner, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Canopy architectures of five structurally complex forest stands and three structurally simple forest stands in southwest Oregon and the Willamette Valley, Oregon, were evaluated and quantified through crown area profiles. Mixed conifer and mixed conifer hardwood stands across a range of sites were sampled for crown widths and heights. Crown width and shape equations were derived and used to quantify the stand crown area at incremental heights above the forest floor. Crown area profiles describe the spatial arrangement of aboveground forest vegetation and the total pore spaces between crowns. Plot by plot profiles were combined to produce vertical and horizontal displays of the stand crown area distribution. In complex stands, the forest space was moderately occupied by crowns from the forest floor up to heights over 30 m, producing uniform distributions of between-crown porosity. The structurally complex stands had between-crown porosity values of 70% to 90% for more than 23 vertical metres of canopy, and they had total between-crown porosities of 86% to 91%. The structurally simple stands had between-crown porosity values of 70% to 90% for less than 8 vertical metres of canopy, and they had total between-crown porosities of 69% to 85%. Variances in crown area indicate that variation in horizontal crown area (within heights) was larger in complex stands than in simple stands, but vertical crown areas (between heights) varied less in complex stands. The study provides a basis for discriminating between canopy architectures and for quantifying the porosity of forest canopies.

  11. Experimental and numerical modeling of shrub crown fire initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharapong Tachajapong; Jesse Lozano; Shakar Mahalingam; Xiangyang Zhou; David Weise

    2009-01-01

    The transition of fire from dry surface fuels to wet shrub crown fuels was studied using laboratory experiments and a simple physical model to gain a better understanding of the transition process. In the experiments, we investigated the effects of varying vertical distances between surface and crown fuels (crown base height), and of the wind speed on crown fire...

  12. Marginal fit of cemented and screw-retained crowns incorporated on the Straumann (ITI) Dental Implant System: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosches, N A; Brägger, U; Lang, N P

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the marginal fit of crowns on the Straumann (ITI) Dental Implant System with special consideration of different casting dental materials. Sixty porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns were fabricated: 18 crowns on standard cone abutments with an impression cylinder, partially prefabricated analogs, no coping and screw-retained (A); 18 crowns on solid abutments without an impression device, no analogs, no coping and cemented (B); and 18 crowns on solid abutments using an impression transfer cap, an analog with a shoulder, no coping and cemented (C). In each group, six crowns were made on epoxy mastercasts (Bluestar), six on synthetic plaster (Moldasynt) and six on super hard stone (Fujirock). Six additional crowns were fabricated with the transversal screw retention system onto the Octa system with impression transfer caps, metal analogs, gold copings and screw-retained (D). Impregum was used as impression material. Crowns of B and C were cemented with KetacCem. Crowns of A and D were fixed with an occlusal screw torqued at 15 N cm. Crowns were embedded, cut and polished. Under a light microscope using a magnification of x 100, the distance between the crown margin (CM) and the shoulder (marginal gap, MG) and the distance between the CM and the end of the shoulder (crown length, CL) was measured. MGs were 15.4+/-13.2 microm (A), 21.2+/-23.1 microm (B), 11+/-12.1 microm (C) and 10.4+/-9.3 microm (D). No statistically significantly differences using either of the casting materials were observed. CLs were -21.3+/-24.8 microm (A), 3+/-28.9 microm (B), 0.5+/-22 microm (C) and 0.1+/-15.8 microm (D). Crowns were shorter on synthetic casting materials compared with stone casts (Pcemented and screw-retained versions as well as when using no, partial or full analogs.

  13. Compare the fracture resistance of IPS Empress2-crowns to natural teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Kluthe, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the molar fracture resistance of IPS Empress 2 crowns compared to natural teeth. The effect of luting media (composite luting material Variolink 2, zinc phosphat cement Harvard) as well as of thermocyclic aging (5°C/55°C) was analyzed. Orthogonal stress was applied with the use of the universal checking device Instron. An average fracture resistance of 1738 ± 714 N for natural teeth and of 2420 ± 720 N for Empress 2 crowns without aging and 1974 ...

  14. Loss of Crown Immunity in the NHS; the effect on hotel services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B J

    1988-10-01

    A less than "holy" combination of the Environmental Officers of Health (EHO) and the pest control industry had for some time been conducting a campaign for the removal of Crown Immunity from hospitals. They had not been so vociferous in their campaign to remove the same privilege from prisons and the armed services. I find it difficult to believe this was out of conviction that other institutions were trouble free. For in 1985 of the 191 Institutional outbreaks only 37 (19%) were in hospitals. The outbreak of Salmonella food poisoning at the Stanley Royd hospital provided enough public pressure to be generated for crown immunity to be removed from NHS premises. It remained in prisons and the armed services.

  15. Effect of preparation surface area on the clinical outcome of full veneer crowns in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Jessica; Soukup, Jason W; Collins, Caitlyn; Siverling, Sarah; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn; Snyder, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Crown therapy is commonly used in veterinary medicine to provide support to teeth which have previously fractured, received root canal therapy, have significant wear, or experienced other detrimental removal of tooth substance. As with several aspects of veterinary medicine, many of the recommendations or guidelines for crown therapy originate from human dentistry, which are then transferred to veterinary patients. Due to the significant difference in the anatomy of teeth and function of the oral cavity between humans and dogs, these guidelines need to be studied to determine the appropriateness of their use in veterinary patients. This article evaluates the relationship between surface area of the preparation and clinical outcome of full veneer crown therapy of the canine tooth in dogs. Although there appeared to be a positive relationship between preparations with greater surface area and successful clinical outcome, it was not found to be statistically significant.

  16. Multidisciplinary management of subgingival crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Zahedpasha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the multidisciplinary management of subgingival horizontal crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old boy. After removal of the fractured fragment, pulpotomy was performed within 48 h from the injury to promote apexogenesis. The tooth was orthodontically extruded until the fracture line was located above the alveolar bone level. Frenectomy, supracrestal fiberotomy, and crown lengthening were performed after adequate stabilization of the extruded tooth for 5 months. Finally, the tooth was restored with composite resin by using the acid etch technique. This report highlights that a multidisciplinary treatment approach with strict cooperation among specialists to manage a complicated crown-root fracture can save and restore a traumatized immature permanent tooth.

  17. An investigation of crown fuel bulk density effects on the dynamics of crown fire initiation in shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharapong Tachajapong; Jesse Lozano; Shankar Mahalingam; Xiangyang Zhou; David R. Weise

    2008-01-01

    Crown fire initiation is studied by using a simple experimental and detailed physical modeling based on Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Experiments conducted thus far reveal that crown fuel ignition via surface fire occurs when the crown base is within the continuous flame region and does not occur when the crown base is located in the hot plume gas region of the surface...

  18. Extraction separation of lithium isotopes with crown-ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivadze, A.Yu.; Demin, S.V.; Levkin, A.V.; Zhilov, V.I.; Nikol'skij, S.F.; Knyazev, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    By the method of extraction chromatography lithium isotope separation coefficients are measured during chemical isotope exchange between lithium aquocomplex and its complex in chloroform with crown-ethers: benzo-15-crown-5, 15crown-5, dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 and dibenzo-18-crown-6. Lithium perchlorate and trichloroacetate are the salts extracted. Values of 6 Li/ 7 Li isotope separation are 1.0032-1.020

  19. Comparison of the fracture strengths of metal-ceramic crowns and three ceromer crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chul-Whoi; Park, Sang-Won; Yang, Hong-So

    2002-08-01

    The fracture strength of a number of new ceromer systems for the fabrication of anterior fixed partial dentures is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of metal-ceramic crowns and 3 types of ceromer crowns in a simulated anterior tooth preparation. A resin maxillary central incisor analog was prepared with a 5-degree convergence angle and a 90-degree, 1-mm shoulder. The incisal edge was reduced by 2 mm, and the axiogingival and axioincisal line angles were rounded. A mold of this tooth was made with vinyl polysiloxane impression material. Ten wax patterns were made from the mold and cast in a nickel-chromium alloy for the fabrication of metal dies, from which 10 metal-ceramic crowns were fabricated. Ten crowns for each of 3 ceromer systems (Artglass, Sculpture, and Targis) were fabricated from the same metal die. Each crown group was prepared, polymerized, air-particle abraded, and finished in accordance with the specific manufacturer's instructions. All 4 types of finished crowns were luted to the dies and embedded in polymethyl methacrylate resin blocks. Their fracture resistance was tested in a universal testing machine. The load was directed at the incisolingual line angle, at 130 degrees to the long axis of each specimen, until catastrophic failure occurred. A 7-mm-diameter rod was used to load the artificial crowns, with the center of the rod in contact with the crown surfaces. Analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (Pceromer crowns (1317 vs 602 N, respectively) (Pceromer crowns tested, although significantly lower than the values for metal-ceramic crowns, still exceeded normal occlusal forces.

  20. An alternative method for flapless implant placement and an immediate provisional crown: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Suarez, Jose Carlos

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this case report is to present a description of bone mapping as an alternative method to determine the dimensions of bone prior to placement of a flapless implant and an immediate provisional crown. The use of a temporary removable partial denture (RPD) or "flipper" during healing following an extraction is not acceptable for some highly demanding patients. As a result, flapless implant placement is gaining popularity because it offers some advantages such as less bleeding, less swelling, and the protection of soft tissue contours. A 65-year-old woman missing a maxillary left lateral incisor was treated using flapless implant placement and an immediate provisional acrylic crown. Under local anesthesia, the bone anatomy was mapped by inserting a standard periodontal probe in the gingiva. By using the recorded measurements, the thickness of soft tissue was removed from the cast. A surgical guide based on this adjusted model was fabricated prior to surgery. The guide was seated on the teeth when actual surgery was performed to facilitate bone drilling and then the implant was placed. Utilizing the previously fabricated acrylic tooth index, the temporary acrylic crown was fabricated on the adjusted temporary metal abutment and delivered to the patient the same day. In this case report the missing maxillary left lateral tooth was restored using flapless implant placement and an immediate provisional single crown. The dimension of the bone at the implant recipient area was determined by an alternative bone mapping method. This case report suggests the use of flapless implant placement using the bone mapping method and immediate provisional crowns for single crowns when esthetics are a high priority and preserving ideal soft tissue contours and papillary heights are critical.

  1. Early sheath removal after percutaneous coronary intervention using Assiut Femoral Compression Device is feasible and safe. Results of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman K.M. Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that AFCD2 is a simple and effective alternative to MC for hemostasis following PCI. Early sheath removal 2 h post PCI is feasible, safe, and improves the patient’s comfort.

  2. Comparative analysis of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture by using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radović Katarina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Various mobile devices are used in the therapy of unilateral free-end saddle. Unilateral dentures with precise connectivity elements are not used frequently. In this paper the problem of applying and functionality of unilateral freeend saddle denture without major connector was taken into consideration. Objective. The aim was to analyze and compare a unilateral RPD (removable partial denture and a classical RPD by calculating and analyzing stresses under different loads. Methods. 3D models of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture with casted clasps were made by using computer program CATIA V5 (abutment teeth, canine and first premolar, with crowns and abutment tissues were also made. The models were built in full-scale. Stress analyses for both models were performed by applying a force of 300 N on the second premolar, a force of 500 N on the first molar and a force of 700 N on the second molar. Results. The Fault Model Extractor (FME analysis and calculation showed the complete behavior of unilateral removable partial denture and abutments (canine and first premolar, as well as the behavior of RPD under identical loading conditions. Applied forces with extreme values caused high stress levels on both models and their abutments within physiological limits. Conclusion. Having analyzed stresses under same conditions, we concluded that the unilateral RPD and classical RPD have similar physiological values.

  3. The effects of crown venting or pre-cementing of CAD/CAM-constructed all-ceramic crowns luted on YTZ implants on marginal cement excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Lucia K; Zehnder, Isabella; Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the cement excess produced when cementing CAD/CAM-fabricated lithium disilicate (L) or zirconium dioxide (Z) crowns using adhesive cement (A) or resin-modified glass ionomer cement (B). Three different cementation techniques were applied: palatal venting (PV), pre-cementation with custom analogs (CA), and conventional standard procedure (SP). Seventy-two crowns (36 each material) were assigned to 12 experimental groups depending on the restoration material (L, Z), type of cement (A, B), and cementation technique (PV, CA, SP). Weight measurements were taken during cementation, and the amounts of excess cement, cement retained in crown, and relative excess cement were calculated and statistically analyzed. A significant direct relation between the amounts of cement applied and excess cement was observed in groups CA and SP. Vented crowns showed least amounts of marginal excess cement (0.8 ± 0.3 μl) followed by CA (4.2 ± 1.1 μl) and SP (8.8 ± 2.5 μl; p cement (95%CI: 28.4, 35.7) was produced than in the SP group (p cement (A) than of glass ionomer cement (B) were retained in crowns. Using crown venting was the most effective measure to reduce the amount of marginal excess cement, followed using a pre-cementation device. To keep the marginal excess cement of one-piece zirconia implants to a minimum, both techniques should be considered for clinical application. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Influence of surface treatment and cyclic loading on the durability of repaired all-ceramic crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATTIA, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the durability of repaired all-ceramic crowns after cyclic loading. Material and methods Eighty In-ceram zirconia crowns were fabricated to restore prepared maxillary premolars. Resin cement was used for cementation of crowns. Palatal cusps were removed to simulate fracture of veneering porcelain and divided into 4 groups (n = 20). Fracture site was treated before repair as follows: roughening with diamond bur, (DB); air abrasion using 50 µm Al2O3, (AA) and silica coating using Cojet system followed by silane application, (SC). Control group (CG) 20 specimens were left without fracture. Palatal cusps were repaired using composite resin. Specimens were stored in water bath at 37°C for one week. Ten specimens of each group were subjected to cyclic loading. Fracture load (N) was recorded for each specimen using a universal testing machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) test (α=.05) were used for statistical analysis. Results There was statistically significant difference between control and tested groups, (pcrowns (pzirconia crowns after chairside treatment of the fracture site by silica coating and silane application could improve longevity of repaired In-ceram zirconia crowns. PMID:20485932

  5. Urban Crowns: crown analysis software to assist in quantifying urban tree benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew F. Winn; Sang-Mook Lee Bradley; Philip A. Araman

    2010-01-01

    UrbanCrowns is a Microsoft® Windows®-based computer program developed by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station. The software assists urban forestry professionals, arborists, and community volunteers in assessing and monitoring the crown characteristics of urban trees (both deciduous and coniferous) using a single side-view digital photograph. Program output...

  6. Restoring crown fractures by direct composite layering using transparent strip crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Ece; Taviloğlu, Engin

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are mostly seen at childhood and adolescence. The most common fracture in permanent anterior teeth is crown fracture. Esthetic and easy rehabilitation of these anterior teeth is possible using layering techniques and direct composite resin restorations. Shape, color and surface texture are the most important factors in restoring crown fractures esthetically. This article illustrates how to perform an esthetic composite resin restoration of crown fractures using strip crowns. The technique suggests using a strip crown as a mold for direct resin composite restoration. This provides a cost-effective treatment with operator friendly approach where most outstanding advantage is the minimum chair-side time with a single visit that is very important for young trauma patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Indications & predisposing factors of crown lengthening surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghavan Amini-Behbahani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since crown lengthening surgery could be accompanied by stress, pain and discomfort, knowledge about its predisposing factors could reduce the demands for such surgery.The aim of this study was to identify the most important indications of crown lengthening surgery in order to present new ideas to clinicians on how to reduce the need for this surgery. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 470 patients (aged 12-89 years referred for crown lengthening surgery. The patients' demographic data and their reasons for surgery, the teeth restoration condition and its type, condition of the opposite tooth, type of fractured cusp (posterior teeth, root canal therapy condition and quality, and size of existing intracanal posts were recorded in a data sheet. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software.The chi-square and fisher exact test were used for statistical analysis. The significant difference was p<0.05. Results: The most frequent indication in men and women was dental caries followed by tooth fracture.The second upper premolars and first lower molars needed crown lengthening surgery more often, respectively. Conclusions: Since dental caries and fracture are the most important factors that predispose teeth to crown lengthening surgery, controlling caries with a regular recall sequence can reduce the need for such surgery, especially in the elderly.

  8. Method of Retention Control for Compromised Periodontal Bone Support Abutment of Conical Crown Retained Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau-Hsiang Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Conical crown-retained dentures (CCRD show a higher survival rate and greater patient satisfaction than transitional removable partial dentures during long-term follow-up. However, unsustainable denture retention force on supporting abutments after initial delivery and loss retention are frequently seen in long-term follow-up of clinical cases. The main causes are insufficient information concerning denture retention designs and the retention-tolerance of the supporting abutments. Monitoring by dental technicians of the quality of dental prostheses is critical. This case report describes an optimal method for CCRD construction that determines and distributes an optimal denture retention force on the supporting abutments to allow the patient to easily remove the denture while ensuring that the CCRD remains in place during physiologic activities. Oral rehabilitation with CCRD should consider the condition of the abutment periodontal support, the interarch occlusal relationship, supplemental fatigue of the terminal abutment, and patient's estimated bite force. The effects of friction on the abutment's inner crown were based on an optimal a angle. The dental laboratory used these measurements to fabricate a CCRD using a Koni-Meter to adjust the retention of the inner crown. This method protects the abutments and reduces the wear between the inner and outer crowns. The CCRD achieved good esthetic results and physiologic functions. Periodic long-term follow-up of the patient and CCRD after initial placement is recommended.

  9. Crown ether derivatives of EDTA: Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhongqun; Qin Shengying; Chen Shaojin; Tan Lin

    1988-01-01

    EDTA-diaminodibenzo-18-crown-6 (cis- and trans-) condensation polymer is a new compound of crown ether derivatives of EDTA. In this paper the adsorption behaviors of U(IV) and U(VI) on this polymer from chloride solutions and effects of hydrochloric acid concentrations, salting-out agents and organic solvents on distribution coefficient (K d ) of uranium are investigated. Adsorption mechanism of uranyl ion (UO 2 2+ ) on this polymer was studied with IR spectra and by means of the adsorption behaviors of compounds of similar structure. Experimental results show that both polyether section and carboxyl groups in EDTA-diaminodibenzo-18-crown-6 take part in complexation with uranyl ion and synergistic effect appeared

  10. Clinical Evaluation and Parental Satisfaction with Pediatric Zirconia Anterior Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsinger, Daniel M; Wells, Martha H; Scarbecz, Mark; Donaldson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical success of and parental satisfaction with anterior pediatric zirconia crowns. A retrospective analysis of maxillary anterior pediatric zirconia crowns was performed. Crowns were evaluated for retention, gingival health, color match, contour, marginal integrity, and opposing tooth wear. Parental satisfaction regarding the esthetics of the crowns and parental perception of the impact of treatment on the child's appearance and oral health were evaluated by questionnaire. Fifty-seven crowns were evaluated in 18 children. Eight teeth were lost to exfoliation, three were extracted due to pathology, and two crowns debonded, leaving 44 available for examination. The average crown age at time of examination was 20.8 months. Sixteen crowns (36 percent) displayed gingival inflammation and color mismatch. No recurrent caries or opposing tooth wear was noted. Parents reported high satisfaction with the color, size, and shape of the crowns. The majority of parents reported that crowns improved the appearance and oral health of their child (78 percent and 83 percent, respectively). Eight-nine percent of parents reported that they would highly recommend these crowns. Zirconia crowns are clinically acceptable restorations in the primary maxillary anterior dentition. Parental satisfaction with zirconia crowns is high.

  11. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Mi-ae; Kim, Ah-hyeon; Shim, Youn-soo; An, So-youn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent tee...

  12. Retention and marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with provisional cements enriched with chlorhexidine diacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Chweidan, Harry; Matalon, Shlomo; Pilo, Raphael

    2007-11-01

    Provisional crowns cemented with provisional luting agents are susceptible to washout, marginal leakage, and secondary caries when placed for a prolonged period. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of incorporating chlorhexidine diacetate (antibacterial agent) into provisional cements on retention and marginal leakage of provisional crowns in vitro. Provisional crowns of acrylic resin (Duralay) were fabricated for 12 intact human molars with rounded-shoulder preparations. The 12 provisional crowns were luted individually with Temp Bond, Temp Bond NE, and Freegenol provisional cements with and without incorporation of chlorhexidine diacetate (CHDA) salt. Each test group included the same 12 specimens. Specimens with no luting agent served as the control (n=12). Specimens were thermal cycled 100 times (5 degrees C and 55 degrees C) with a 10-second dwell time, stored in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for 6 days, and then immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsin at 37 degrees C for 6 hours. Seven days after cementation, removal test of the crowns (tensile retention test) was conducted with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Marginal leakage was assessed with a 5-level dye penetration scale. Results of the retention test were subjected to a 2-way ANOVA with repeated measures. A Bonferroni test was used to compare the means. Marginal leakage data were subjected to a nonparametric Wilcoxon signed ranks test. All hypothesis testing was conducted at the 95% level of confidence. Retention of provisional crowns cemented with Freegenol enriched with CHDA increased 3-fold to an average level of 80.9 N. However, incorporation of CHDA into Temp Bond or Temp Bond NE did not affect retention. CHDA incorporated into the cements had no significant effect on the marginal leakage of all the tested cements. The addition of CHDA increased retention of Freegenol and had no significant effect on the marginal leakage of the tested cements.

  13. Influence of surface treatment and cyclic loading on the durability of repaired all-ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Attia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the durability of repaired all-ceramic crowns after cyclic loading. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty In-ceram zirconia crowns were fabricated to restore prepared maxillary premolars. Resin cement was used for cementation of crowns. Palatal cusps were removed to simulate fracture of veneering porcelain and divided into 4 groups (n = 20. Fracture site was treated before repair as follows: roughening with diamond bur, (DB; air abrasion using 50 µm Al2O3, (AA and silica coating using Cojet system followed by silane application, (SC. Control group (CG 20 specimens were left without fracture. Palatal cusps were repaired using composite resin. Specimens were stored in water bath at 37ºC for one week. Ten specimens of each group were subjected to cyclic loading. Fracture load (N was recorded for each specimen using a universal testing machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD test (a=.05 were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: There was statistically significant difference between control and tested groups, (p<0.001. Post Hoc analysis with the Tukey HSD test showed that cyclic loading fatigue significantly decreased means fracture load of control and test groups as follows (CG, 950.4±62.6 / 872.3±87.4, P = 0.0004, (DB, 624.2 ±38 / 425.5± 31.7, P <.001, (AA, 711.5 ±15.5 / 490 ± 25.2, p <0.001 and (SC, 788.7 ± 18.1 / 610.2 ± 25.2, P <.001, while silica coating and silane application significantly increased fracture load of repaired crowns (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Repair of fractured In-ceram zirconia crowns after chairside treatment of the fracture site by silica coating and silane application could improve longevity of repaired In-ceram zirconia crowns.

  14. Retention, marginal leakage, and cement solubility of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cement containing stannous fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Fuhrer, Nitzan; Gelfand, Katerina; Cardash, Harold; Pilo, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the (1) retention and microleakage of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cements to which stannous fluoride (SnF2) was added, and (2) solubility of these cements. Provisional crowns were constructed of acrylic resin with shoulder preparations for 12 molars. The crowns were luted with Tempbond, Tempbond NE, and Freegenol temporary cements, and also with SnF2 added to these cements. Specimens were thermocycled 100 times, stored for 6 days, and immersed in 0.5% basic fuschin. Seven days after cementation, crown removal (retention) tests were conducted. Marginal leakage was assessed using a five-level scale to score dye penetration. Solubility in water of the cements with and without SnF2 was assessed using cement disks. Freegenol was more retentive than the other cements. The incorporation of SnF2 significantly increased the retention capacity of Freegenol and Tempbond NE but had no effect on Tempbond. Tempbond showed significantly higher dye penetration than Freegenol. The addition of SnF2 did not alter the dye penetration of the cements. There were no significant differences in the solubility of the cements. However, the incorporation of SnF2 increased the solubility of Freegenol and Tempbond NE (P crowns cemented with Tempbond NE and Freegenol but did not affect the retention of those cemented with Tempbond. The marginal leakage of crowns cemented with the tested temporary cements with and without the incorporation of SnF2 was similar. However, the addition of SnF2 increased the solubility of the cements.

  15. Relative Clinical Success of Bis-Acryl Composite Provisional Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozmacs, Carla; Baumann, Vanessa; Bunz, Oskar; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2018-01-01

    The high demands on the clinical performance of a single-tooth provisional restoration necessitate that said performance be examined. The authors evaluated 24 teeth evaluated. Two test groups received bis-acrylic composite for provisional crowns (n = 12) and a single-unit, self-supporting, malleable, light-curing composite crown (n = 12). Final crowns (n = 24) served as paired controls. Evaluation of clinical success was measured using previously selected subcategories of FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using McNemar's Test (α = 0.05). The null hypothesis of no improvement of the definitive crown relative to the provisionals was rejected at the 5% significance level (McNemar's P value provisional crowns, 75% received a clinically insufficient valuation, while only 8% of the definitive crowns did. The authors concluded that, independent of the manufacturing process, a bis-acrylic composite provisional crown cannot serve as a replacement for a conventionally manufactured definitive crown.

  16. The molecular genetics of crown gall tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooykaas, P.J.J.; Schilperoort, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes are the causative agents of the widespread plant diseases ''crown gall'' and ''hairy root'' respectively. It is now well established that virulent strains of these bacterial species transfer a piece of bacterial DNA into plant cells, thereby transforming these into tumor cells. In research much attention has been paid to the agrobacteria for several reasons. First is the desire to develop a system for the genetic engineering of plant cells based on the natural system for gene transfer between Agrobacterium species and plant cells. Second, there is a striking resemblance between the etiology of animal cancers and the plant cancer crown gall that was recognized as early as in 1927. This led to basic studies on the process of plant tumor induction and on the recovery of plant cells from the tumorous state. A third important interest lies in crown gall as a disease that is the cause of economically important losses in agriculture an horticulture in Europe, North America, and Austrailia. Research has been aimed at finding means to prevent crown gall and to cure plants of this disease

  17. Temperature rise during removal of fractured components out of the implant body: an in vitro study comparing two ultrasonic devices and five implant types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisberger, Eric W; Bakker, Sjoerd J G; Cune, Marco S

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonic instrumentation under magnification may facilitate mobilization of screw remnants but may induce heat trauma to surrounding bone. An increase of 5°C is considered detrimental to osseointegration. The objective of this investigation was to examine the rise in temperature of the outer implant body after 30 s of ultrasonic instrumentation to the inner part, in relation to implant type, type of ultrasonic equipment, and the use of coolants in vitro. Two ultrasonic devices (Satelec Suprasson T Max and Electro Medical Systems (EMS) miniMaster) were used on five different implant types that were provided with a thermo couple (Astra 3.5 mm, bone level Regular CrossFit (RC) 4.1 mm, bone level Narrow CrossFit (NC) 3.3 mm, Straumann tissue level regular body regular neck 3.3 mm, and Straumann tissue level wide body regular neck 4.8 mm), either with or without cooling during 30 s. Temperature rise at this point in time is the primary outcome measure. In addition, the mean maximum rise in temperature (all implants combined) was assessed and statistically compared among devices, implant systems, and cooling mode (independent t-tests, ANOVA, and post hoc analysis). The Satelec device without cooling induces the highest temperature change of up to 13°C, particularly in both bone level implants (p < 0.05) but appears safe for approximately 10 s of continuous instrumentation, after which a cooling down period is rational. Cooling is effective for both devices. However, when the Satelec device is used with coolant for a longer period of time, a rise in temperature must be anticipated after cessation of instrumentation, and post-operational cooling is advised. The in vitro setup used in this experiment implies that care should be taken when translating the observations to clinical recommendations, but it is carefully suggested that the EMS device causes limited rise in temperature, even without coolant.

  18. Fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM glass-ceramic materials used for single-tooth implant crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sahin, Erdal; Gürbüz, Riza; Akça, Kivanç

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM in-office monoceramic materials with single-tooth implant-supported crowns in functional area. A metal experimental model with a dental implant was designed to receive in-office CAD/CAM-generated monoceramic crowns. Laterally positioned axial dynamic loading of 300 N at 2 Hz was applied to implant-supported crowns machined from 2 different glass materials for 100,000 cycle. Failures in terms of fracture, crack formation, and chipping were macroscopically recorded and microscopically evaluated. Four of 10 aluminasilicate glass-ceramic crowns fractured at early loading cycles, the rest completed loading with a visible crack formation. Crack formation was recorded for 2 of 10 leucite glass-ceramic crowns. Others completed test without visible damage but fractured upon removal. Lack in chemical adhesion between titanium abutment and dental cement likely reduces the fatigue resistance of machinable glass-ceramic materials. However, relatively better fractural strength of leucite glass-ceramics could be taken into consideration. Accordingly, progress on developmental changes in filler composition of glass-ceramics may be promising. Machinable glass-ceramics do not possess sufficient fatigue resistance for single-tooth implant crowns in functional area.

  19. Internal adaptation of cast titanium crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicknan Soares da Rocha

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available As the adaptation of titanium crowns obtained by Rematitan Plus investment, specific for titanium, is not recognized to be suitable, this study evaluated the effect of the concentration of the specific liquid and the temperature of the mold of investments on the internal misfit of crowns cast on commercially pure titanium. Individual dies of epoxy resin were obtained, representing teeth prepared for full-crown restoration with a 6-degree axial surface convergence angle and shoulder (1.0 mm. For the waxing of each crown, a ring-shaped stainless steel matrix (8.0mm internal diameter; 7.5 mm height was adapted above the individual dies of epoxy resin. The Rematian Plus investment was mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions using two different concentrations of the specific liquid: 100%, 75%. Casting was performed in a Discovery Plasma Ar-arc vacuum-pressure casting machine with molds at temperatures of 430ºC, 515ºC and 600ºC. The crowns were cleaned individually in a solution (1% HF + 13% HNO3 for 10 min using a ultrasonic cleaner, with no internal adaptations, and luted with zinc phosphate cement under a 5 kg static load. The crown and die assemblies were embedded in resin and sectioned longitudinally. The area occupied by cement was observed using stereoscopic lens (10X and measured by the Leica Qwin image analysis system (mm². The data for each experimental condition (n=8 were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (á=0.05. The results showed that liquid dilution and the increase in mold temperature did not significantly influence the levels of internal fit of the cast titanium crowns. The lowest means (±SD of internal misfit were obtained for the 430ºC/100%: (7.25 mm² ±1.59 and 600ºC/100% (8.8 mm² ±2.25 groups, which presented statistically similar levels of internal misfit.

  20. Selective crystallization of cations with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffels, Dennis Egidius

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the selectivity and preferences of the incorporation of differently sized cations in the cavities of various crown ethers and the characterization of the resulting compounds. The coordination preferences of crown ethers with different cavities have long been known, and the impact of other effects on the structure formation have increasingly become the focus of attention. In this work a comparative overview of the coordination preferences depending on various factors was undertaken. The focus was mainly on the variation of the cavity of the crown ether in the presence of differently sized cations. In addition, the effects of the solvent and differently coordinating anions have been investigated. Within the framework of this work, basic coordination preferences could be detected with rare earth nitrates, which are affected particularly by the choice of the solvent. The formation of different types of structures could be controlled by varying the conditions such that the incorporation of the cation in the cavity of the crown ether was influenced and the formation of a particular type of structure can be influenced partly by the choice of solvent. In this case no direct preferences for the incorporation into the cavity of the crown ether in relation to the cation size were observed for rare earth cations. However, the coordination of the crown ether leads in each case - for lanthanides - to rather high coordination numbers. A total of five new rare earth complexes and two structural variants could be observed with crown ethers. In the study of the selectivity of the incorporation into the cavity, known structures were also reproduced and further structures were characterized but the crystal structures not entirely solved. With the use of monovalent cations such as potassium, lithium or silver a total of nine new compounds could be synthesized, while no clear preferences for the incorporation of certain cations were detected. The

  1. Guidelines on the safety of light-based home-use hair removal devices from the European Society for Laser Dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham; Ash, C; Dierickx, C

    2012-01-01

    . These guidelines provide a definition of light-based home-use technology, to inform healthcare professionals about home-use light-based technology and encourage manufacturers wishing to sell in Europe to adopt 'best practice'. The review presents the current status on standards and regulation issues and considers...... home-use safety issues, encompassing human, device and electrical safety, given risks to the eyes and skin from optical radiation both to the consumer and persons in the vicinity. Proposed technical measurement methodology is considered with focus on recognized critical parameters for the safe use...... regulations exist, they differ from region to region and there is a specific need for international common principles and guidelines relating to the manufacture, marketing and use of intense pulsed light and laser devices, including manufacturing standards for home-use products intended, amongst others...

  2. Two-body wear comparison of zirconia crown, gold crown, and enamel against zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min-Seok; Oh, Sang-Yeob; Cho, Sung-Am

    2015-07-01

    Full zirconia crowns have recently been used for dental restorations because of their mechanical properties. However, there is little information about their wear characteristics against enamel, gold, and full zirconia crowns. The purpose of this study was to compare the wear rate of enamel, gold crowns, and zirconia crowns against zirconia blocks using an in vitro wear test. Upper specimens were divided into three groups: 10 enamels (group 1), 10 gold crowns (group 2, Type III gold), and 10 zirconia crowns (group 3, Prettau(®)Zirkon 9H, Zirkonzahn, Italy). Each of these specimens was wear tested against a zirconia block (40×30×3mm(3)) as a lower specimen (30 total zirconia blocks). Each specimen of the groups was abraded against the zirconia block for 600 cycles at 1Hz with 15mm front-to-back movement on an abrading machine. Moreover, the load applied during the abrading test was 50N, and the test was performed in a normal saline emulsion for 10min. Three-dimensional images were taken before and after the test, and the statistical analysis was performed using the Krushal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test (p=0.05). The mean volume loss of group 1 was 0.47mm(3), while that of group 2 and group 3 was 0.01mm(3). The wear volume loss of enamels against zirconia was higher than that of gold and zirconia crowns. Moreover, according to this result, zirconia crowns are not recommended for heavy bruxers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shembish, F.A.; Tong, H.; Kaizer, M.; Janal, M.N.; Thompson, V.P.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. METHODS: Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava

  4. Digital photography for urban street tree crown conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil A. Clark; Sang-Mook Lee; William A. Bechtold; Gregory A. Reams

    2006-01-01

    Crown variables such as height, diameter, live crown ratio, dieback, transparency, and density are all collected as part of the overall crown assessment (USDA 2004). Transparency and density are related to the amount of foliage and thus the photosynthetic potential of the tree. These measurements are both currently based on visual estimates and have been shown to be...

  5. Evaluation of sampling strategies to estimate crown biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna P Poudel; Hailemariam Temesgen; Andrew N Gray

    2015-01-01

    Depending on tree and site characteristics crown biomass accounts for a significant portion of the total aboveground biomass in the tree. Crown biomass estimation is useful for different purposes including evaluating the economic feasibility of crown utilization for energy production or forest products, fuel load assessments and fire management strategies, and wildfire...

  6. Crown dilacerations - Two case reports | Rao | Nigerian Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crown dilaceration is a relatively abnormal clinical finding when compared to root dilacerations. The incidence of crown dilacerations is stated to be as low as 3%. This report presents two cases of crown dilacerations in two different locations. A brief review of the literature pertinent to the condition, and the clinical and ...

  7. Simplified cementation of lithium disilicate crowns: Retention with various adhesive resin cement combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Patterson, Amanda; Schäfer, Oliver

    2017-09-27

    A composite resin cement and matching self-etch adhesive was developed to simplify the dependable retention of lithium disilicate crowns. The efficacy of this new system is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether lithium disilicate crowns cemented with a new composite resin and adhesive system and 2 other popular systems provide clinically acceptable crown retention after long-term aging with monthly thermocycling. Extracted human molars were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20-degree convergence, and 4 mm axial length. The axio-occlusal line angle was slightly rounded. The preparation surface area was determined by optical scanning and the analysis of the standard tessellation language (STL) files. The specimens were distributed into 3 cement groups (n=12) to obtain equal mean surface areas. Lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max Press) were fabricated for each preparation, etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid for 15 seconds, and cleaned. Cement systems were RelyX Ultimate with Scotch Bond Universal (3M Dental Products); Monobond S, Multilink Automix with Multilink Primer A and B (Ivoclar Vivadent AG); and NX3 Nexus with OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp). Each adhesive provided self-etching of the dentin. Before cementation, the prepared specimens were stored in 35°C water. A force of 196 N was used to cement the crowns, and the specimens were polymerized in a 35°C oven at 100% humidity. After 24 hours of storage at 100% humidity, the cemented crowns were thermocycled (5°C to 55°C) for 5000 cycles each month for 6 months. The crowns were removed axially at 0.5 mm/min. The removal force was recorded and the dislodgement stress calculated using the preparation surface area. The type of cement failure was recorded, and the data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the chi-square test (α=.05) after the equality of variances had been assessed with the Levene test. The Levene test was nonsignificant (P=.936). The ANOVA revealed the mean removal

  8. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud, E. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a

  9. Method and device for detecting impact events on a security barrier which includes a hollow rebar allowing insertion and removal of an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pies, Ross E.

    2016-03-29

    A method and device for the detection of impact events on a security barrier. A hollow rebar is farmed within a security barrier, whereby the hollow rebar is completely surrounded by the security barrier. An optical fiber passes through the interior of the hollow rebar. An optical transmitter and an optical receiver are both optically connected to the optical fiber and connected to optical electronics. The optical electronics are configured to provide notification upon the detection of an impact event at the security barrier based on the detection of disturbances within the optical fiber.

  10. 33 CFR 159.85 - Sewage removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sewage removal. 159.85 Section...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.85 Sewage removal. The device must be designed for efficient removal of nearly all of the liquid and solids in the sewage retention...

  11. 33 CFR 159.87 - Removal fittings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Removal fittings. 159.87 Section...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.87 Removal fittings. If sewage removal fittings or adapters are provided with the device, they must be of either 11/2″ or 4″ nominal pipe...

  12. Proton-Ionizable Crown Ethers. A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-30

    Triazole’Subcyclic Unit 14. Proton-Ionizable Crown Ethers Containing Sulfonamide Groups 15. Miscellaneous Proton-Ionizable Crown Ethers 1. INTRODUCTION. ""Since...the diaza dinitrile crown. Subsequent hydrolysis produced the diacid 33 (Procedure E). 27 Monoaza-crowns 35-38 (Figure V, Table 5) were obtained by the...followed by hydrolysis of the cetidi to f the acid.3o Complextion by th~eam crownsJ hasJ boon extensively castudieon and transportat es of thos ecaions have

  13. Dentin-bonded all-ceramic crowns: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J; Qualtrough, A J; Hale, R W

    1998-04-01

    Dentin-bonded all-ceramic crowns employ contemporary techniques to lute the crown to the tooth using a resin luting material and dentin-bonding system. The advantages of these crowns are that they provide good esthetics and fracture resistance and can be used in cases of substantial tooth loss. Their principal disadvantages are that the luting procedure is more time-consuming and that these crowns should not be used where margins are subgingival. Dentin-bonded all-ceramic crowns may be a useful addition to the dentist's armamentarium, but long-term clinical studies are needed to fully assess their performance.

  14. Anchoring device enabling relaxation of a multi-strand prestressing cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Anchoring device, in a concrete structure, for a multi-strand prestressing cable, enabling the cable to be stressed or relaxed, comprising: (a) an axisymmetrical block, fitted with channels to enable the cable strands to be stressed and anchored through this block, (b) a duct with its opening splayed to a diameter greater than that of the block over a length corresponding to the stretching of the cable when being stressed, (c) a round bearing plate on the concrete around the expanded hole of the duct and (d) at least one intermediate removable bearing piece coming between the edge of the block and the internal edge of the plate. The removable parts are crown sectors of which the opposite bearing faces of each are slanted with respect to the centre line of the block and orientated in the same direction so as to transmit the cable stress at an angle from the block to the edge of the bearing plate [fr

  15. Removal of Escherichia coli and faecal coliforms from surface water and groundwater by household water treatment devices/systems: a sustainable solution for improving water quality in rural communities of the Southern African development community region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwabi, Jocelyne K; Mamba, Bhekie B; Momba, Maggy N B

    2012-01-01

    There is significant evidence that household water treatment devices/systems (HWTS) are capable of dramatically improving microbially contaminated water quality. The purpose of this study was to examine five filters [(biosand filter-standard (BSF-S); biosand filter-zeolite (BSF-Z); bucket filter (BF); ceramic candle filter (CCF); and silver-impregnated porous pot (SIPP)] and evaluate their ability to improve the quality of drinking water at the household level. These HWTS were manufactured in the workshop of the Tshwane University of Technology and evaluated for efficiency to remove turbidity, faecal coliforms and Escherichia coli from multiple water source samples, using standard methods. The flow rates ranged from 0.05 L/h to 2.49 L/h for SIPP, 1 L/h to 4 L/h for CCF, 0.81 L/h to 6.84 L/h for BSF-S, 1.74 L/h to 19.2 L/h and 106.5 L/h to 160.5 L/h for BF The turbidity of the raw water samples ranged between 2.17 and 40.4 NTU. The average turbidity obtained after filtration ranged from 0.6 to 8 NTU (BSF-S), 1 to 4 NTU (BSF-Z), 2 to 11 NTU (BF), and from 0.6 to 7 NTU (CCF) and 0.7 to 1 NTU for SIPP. The BSF-S, BSF-Z and CCF removed 2 to 4 log(10) (99% to 100%) of coliform bacteria, while the BF removed 1 to 3 log (90% to 99.9%) of these bacteria. The performance of the SIPP in removing turbidity and indicator bacteria (>5 log(10), 100%) was significantly higher compared to that of the other HWTS (p bacteria from test water, can be manufactured using locally available materials, and is easy to operate and to maintain.

  16. Endoscopic Removal of Ingested Dentures and Dental Instruments: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dentures and dental instruments are frequently encountered ingested foreign bodies. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of endoscopically removing ingested dental objects. Methods. Twenty-nine consecutive patients with 29 dental objects who were treated at the Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital from August 2009 to December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Characteristics of the patients and the ingested dental objects, the clinical features and findings of radiological imaging tests, and outcomes of endoscopic removal were analyzed. Results. Patients’ mean age was 62.9±21.0 years. The ingested dental objects included 23 dentures (13 crowns, 4 bridges, 4 partial dentures, and 2 other dentures and 6 dental instruments. Twenty-seven upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and 2 colonoscopies were performed, and their success rates were 92.6% and 100%, respectively. There were 2 cases of removal failure; one case involved an impacted partial denture in the cervical esophagus, and this case required surgical removal. Conclusions. Endoscopic removal of ingested dentures and dental instruments is associated with a favorable success rate and acceptable complications. The immediate intervention and appropriate selection of devices are essential for managing ingested dental objects.

  17. Fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns with reduced thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, Akio; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relationship between fracture load of monolithic zirconia crowns and axial/occlusal thickness and to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns with reduced thickness in comparison with that of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns with regular thickness. Monolithic zirconia crowns (Lava Plus Zirconia, 3M/ESPE) with specified axial/occlusal thicknesses and lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max press, Ivoclar/Vivadent) with regular thickness were fabricated using a dental CAD/CAM system and a press technique, respectively. The crowns cemented onto dies were loaded until fracture. Based on measurements of the crown thickness made by micro-CT and the fracture load, multiple regression analysis was performed. It was revealed that the occlusal thickness significantly affected the fracture load (p zirconia crowns, the fracture load of the zirconia crowns with the occlusal thickness of 0.5 mm (5558 ± 522 N) was significantly higher than that of lithium disilicate crowns with an occlusal thickness of 1.5 mm (3147 ± 409 N). Within the limitations of the present study, it is suggested that monolithic zirconia crown with chamfer width of 0.5 mm and occlusal thickness of 0.5 mm can be used in the molar region in terms of fracture resistance.

  18. Surgical removal of atrial septal defect occlusion device and mitral valve replacement in a 39-year-old female patient with infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Zotov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Atrial septal defects represent the second most frequent congenital heart disease after ventricular septal defects. Transcatheter closure of an atrial septal defect is usually performed following strict indications on patients with significant left-to-right shunt. Infective endocarditis after transcatheter implantation of atrial septal defect occluder is an extremely rare complication. We report a case of infective endocarditis of the mitral valve (with severe mitral valve insufficiency in a 39-year-old female patient 13 years after transcatheter closure of an atrial septal defect. Complex prophylactic antibiotic coverage was performed prior to surgical intervention. Surgical removal of atrial septal defect occluder, mitral valve replacement, atrial septal defect closure and left atrial appendage resection were performed. Postoperative course was uneventful.

  19. Short communication: The effect of premilking with a teat cup-like device, in a novel robotic rotary, on attachment accuracy and milk removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbach, R; Kerrisk, K L; Garcia, S C

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of premilking teat preparation on attachment accuracy and milk removal characteristics for individual cows in a novel 16-bail prototype robotic rotary (RR; automatic milking rotary system; DeLaval AMR, Tumba, Sweden). The first commercial versions of the RR systems will have the option of purchasing and installing a teat preparation module (TPM) for premilking stimulation and cleaning of teats. It is expected that attachment of teat cups would be faster and more successful with the use of a TPM, and that the efficiency of milk removal, in terms of average and peak milk flow rates, would increase. We observed a significant effect of treatment (no wash vs. wash) and individual quarters on attachment success: cows exposed to the wash treatment had up to 1.5 times higher odds of being successfully attached. The attachment was not only more successful but was also found to be 4.3 s faster after cows were exposed to the wash treatment. Average milk flow rate was not affected by the wash treatment. Nevertheless, a significant interaction was found between wash treatment and milking interval affecting the peak milk flow (kg/min) of individual cows. This interaction showed that cows with a milking interval ≤8 h subjected to the wash treatment had significantly higher peak flow rates (300 g/min increase) compared with cows in the same milking interval category with no wash treatment. The relationship between premilking stimulation and attachment success shown in this study will increase awareness (of both farmers and developers of the technology) of the importance of teat cleaning within the RR. The effects of the improved system performance should be taken into account (alongside the capital investment cost) when deciding to install a RR equipped (or not) with a TPM. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant.

  1. Crown structure of Picea omorika trees in the plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out in Serbian spruce (Picea omorika Panč/Purkynĕ plantations in the western Serbia. The paper presents results of the analysis of crown development. The following elements were analyzed: total tree height, height of the crown base, absolute and relative crown length, maximal crown diameter, coefficient of crown spreading and degree of crown girth. We discuss approaches to the modeling of tree crown growth and development, growing under favorable environmental and stand conditions, without anomalies in development. In order to establish the relationship between analyzed factors, regression analyses were applied. Data fitting was by the analytic method, by the implementation of Prodan’s functions of growth, linear and parabolic function. Received models can be used for the simulation of various growth and developing processes in forest.

  2. TRANSFORMATIONS OF BENZO-15-CROWN-5, [3.3]DIBENZO-18-CROWN-6 AND [4.4]DIBENZO-24-CROWN-8 IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF NITRIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Pluzhnik-Gladyr

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of benzo-15-crown-5 (I, [3.3]dibenzo-18-crown-6 (II, and [4.4]diben zo-24-crown-8 (III nitration by the dilute nitric acid and the mixture HCl-HNO3(4:1, «aqua regia» at room temperature are discussed. It was revealed that the «reactivity» of studied crown ethers (symbatically/antisymbatic to their hydrophili ci ty/lipophilicity is variated as follows: I>> III> II.

  3. Antagonist wear by polished zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkamp, Oliver; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Reich, Sven

    The aim of this in vivo study was to measure antagonist wear caused by polished monolithic posterior zirconia crowns over a 24-month period using the intraoral digital impression (IDI) technique. Thirteen zirconia crowns were placed in nine patients. The crowns and adjacent teeth were captured using an intraoral scanner (Lava C.O.S.). The corresponding antagonist teeth and the respective neighboring teeth were also scanned. Scanning was performed immediately after the restoration (baseline) as well as 12 and 24 months after crown placement. Geomagic Qualify software was used to superimpose the follow-up data sets onto the corresponding baseline data set, identify wear sites, and measure maximum vertical height loss in each individual wear site. Overall antagonist wear was then determined as the mean of wear rates measured in all of the individual antagonist units. In addition, wear rates in enamel and ceramic antagonists were analyzed as part of the scope of this study. The maximum mean wear with standard deviation (SD) in the overall sample with a total of nine patients, 13 antagonist units, and 98 evaluable wear sites was 86 ± 23 µm at 12 months, and 103 ± 39 µm at 24 months. The maximum mean wear in the enamel antagonist subgroup was 87 ± 41 µm at 12 months, and 115 ± 71 µm at 24 months; and in the ceramic antagonist subgroup 107 ± 22 µm at 12 months, and 120 ± 27 µm at 24 months. The wear rates determined in this study are comparable to those of existing studies. The IDI technique of wear analysis can be carried out in a practical manner and produces useful results.

  4. Removable pipeline plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassalotti, M.; Anastasi, F.

    1984-01-01

    A removable plugging device for a pipeline, and particularly for pressure testing a steam pipeline in a boiling water reactor, wherein an inflatable annular sealing member seals off the pipeline and characterized by radially movable shoes for holding the plug in place, each shoe being pivotally mounted for self-adjusting engagement with even an out-of-round pipeline interior

  5. An Investigation Into the Integrity of Fit of Provisional Crowns Using Current Proprietary Temporary Crown Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Philip D; Georgakis, Georgios; Niggli, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Three methods of direct provisional crown construction were investigated for accuracy of marginal fit. A modified proprietary crown coping was compared to Bis GMA and isobutyl methacrylate resin provisional crowns with margins modified by using a flowable composite and 'bead on' isobutyl methacrylate respectively. Measurement was at 50x magnification at seven sites over the fit surface. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13.0.1 and measurement compared using the Mann Whitney test set at a significance level of 0.05. Reliability was checked using the Bland Altman test. Statistical significant differences were found between the three groups. The order of best fit was Bis-GMA and flowable composite > isobutyl methacrylate with 'bead on' margins > Bis-GMA modified implant temporary coping. The clinical significance is that the Bis GMA and flowable composite combination can be used with equal confidence to traditional methods of temporarisation.

  6. Comparative analysis of bacterial decrease by Er:YAG laser radiation and by a tip mounted on a high-rotation device after remove of carious tissue in dentine: study 'in anima mobile'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blay, Claudia Campos

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze bacterial decrease after removal of carious tissue in dentine by Er:YAG laser, comparing the results with those achieved by using a tip mounted on a high-rotation device. In view of the difficulty of totally eliminating microorganisms from dentine, even after removing all the carious tissue, and since the presence of a smear layer is a proven fact, it would be extremely convenient to eliminate or to achieve better disinfecting of this notoriously contaminated dentine layer, so as to prevent failure of the restoration process in most cases. For this study, we selected 30 pre-molars and molars with caries rated as medium sized and which required restoration treatment. The teeth were divided in two groups, where 15 teeth received conventional treatment (control group - I) and 15 teeth were treated with Er:YAG laser (Kavo Key Laser) (laser group - II). Microbiologic analysis was used in order to determine presence or absence of bacteria. In group I as well as in group II a previous curettage of part of the dentine caries was performed, and the sample was seeded in an Agar culture medium and incubated at 37 deg C for 72 hours, for a quantitative analysis of bacteria colony forming units (c.f.u.) and qualitative bacterial analysis. After this procedure, carious lesions were removed in group I, using a spherical diamond drill mounted on a high rotation tip, followed by cleaning of the cavity with chlorhexidine digluconate at 2%. In group II, an Er:YAG laser emitting a wave length of 2,94 μm, delivering a 250 mJ energy per pulse at a repetition rate of 2 Hz was used for carious tissue removal. Furthermore in group II (laser), the cavity was conditioned by performing a sweeping at all walls of the preparation with the 50/10 fiber (Kavo), in contact mode, using an energy of 60 mJ per pulse at a frequency of 10 Hz. After removing all caries and performing a cleaning operation in both groups, dentine shavings were collected and seeded

  7. Retention behavior of double-crown attachments with zirconia primary and secondary crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Stober, Thomas; Rustemeier, Rainer; Schmitter, Marc; Rues, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    To investigate whether adequate retention of zirconia conical crown (CC) attachments can be achieved, and to investigate their long-term retention. Sixteen individual zirconia primary crowns were produced with convergence angles of 1° or 2° (eight of each). After determination of the convergence angles of the primary crowns, monolithic zirconia secondary crowns were manufactured. To evaluate the retention behavior of all-zirconia CC, the crowns were fitted with forces from F=12.5-100 N. Force magnitudes during the loosening process (L) were then measured. L/F ratios were recorded and the coefficient of friction (μ0) was calculated. Long-term retention was tested with up to 50,000 cycles of denture integration at a speed of 30 mms(-1) and a fitting force magnitude of 53 N. Even when primary crowns were manufactured with the utmost care, the real convergence angles were greater than the nominal angles of the standardized burs (1° and 2°) by 0.28° (SD 0.11°). Without mechanical aging, mean L/F was 0.632 (SD 0.038) for 1° samples and 0.526 (SD 0.022) for 2° samples, indicative of high retentive forces of up to 63.2% of the fitting forces. When all the test results were used, best-fitting curves gave μ0=0.117 for new samples and μ0=0.126 for samples after 50,000 integration cycles. When the correct milling and sintering parameters are chosen, the retention behavior of zirconia CCs is adequate and stable. This innovative type of attachment is appealing because of the beneficial properties of zirconia and the efficient CAD/CAM-based manufacture. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Alkali-ion-crown ether in art and conservation: the applied bioinorganic chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfrich, Uwe; Taylor, Harold; Weser, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    Dried varnish is rich in many ester moieties, which may be broken down into small, soluble compounds by esterase activity or alkaline hydrolysis. Two methods for varnish removal have been developed, including the treatment of either lipase or RbOH / PEG-400 crown ether which allow aged oil varnishes or paint coverings to be removed or thinned. These techniques are designed to proceed in a controlled manner without damaging lower paint or base layers. Unfortunately, lipase did not react with the aged ester groups of dried linseed oil varnish. Surprisingly, the varnish came off in the presence of Tris buffer alone which, in addition, formed reactive metal complexes. A better choice was the use of high M(r) alkali ion polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400) crown ether type chelates. PEG-400 complexes alkali ions including rubidium and other alkaliions impeding the diffusion of their basic counter ions into lower varnish or paint layers. Possible migration of alkali metal ions into the paint layer during alkaline varnish removal was determined by labelling the cleansing solutions with (86)Rb. Fortunately, varnish is degraded on the surface only. Lower paint or varnish layers are not attacked even if chemically similar to the varnish or over painting to be removed as virtually no (86)Rb was detected on the paint surface.

  9. [Comparison of the clinical effects of selective laser melting deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy base crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-min; Wang, Wei-qian; Ma, Jing-yuan

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effects of selective laser melting (SLM) deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns. One hundred and sixty eight patients treated with either SLM deposition basal crowns (110 teeth) or cobalt chromium alloy casting basal crowns (110 teeth) were followed-up for 1 month, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months. The revised standard of American Public Health Association was used to evaluate the clinical effect of restoration, including the color of porcelain crowns, gingival inflammation, gingival margin discoloration, and crack or fracture. Data analysis was conducted with SPSS 20 software package for Student's t test and Chi-square test. Six cases were lost to follow-up. The patients who were treated with SLM deposition basal crowns (104 teeth) and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns (101 teeth) completed the study. Patients were more satisfied with SLM deposition cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crowns. There was 1 prosthesis with poor marginal fit after 24 months of restoration in SLM crowns. There were 6 prostheses with edge coloring and 8 with poor marginal fit in cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns, which was significantly different between the 2 groups(P<0.05). The SLM deposition copings results in smaller edge coloring and better marginal fit than those of cobalt-chrome copings. Patients are pleased with short-term clinical results.

  10. Single-center, noninterventional clinical trial to assess the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of a dimeticone-based medical device in facilitating the removal of scales after topical application in patients with psoriasis corporis or psoriasis capitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengge UR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulrich R Hengge,1 Kristina Röschmann,2 Henning Candler3 1Skin Center, Düsseldorf, 2Department of Clinical Research, 3Department of Medical Affairs, G. Pohl‑Boskamp GmbH & Co. KG, Hohenlockstedt, Germany Introduction: Psoriasis is a frequent inflammatory skin disease affecting ~2%–3% of the population in western countries. Scaling of the psoriatic lesions is the most impairing symptom in patients with psoriasis. In contrast to conventional keratolytic treatment concepts containing salicylic acid or urea, a dimeticone-based medical device (Loyon® removes scales in a physical way without any pharmacological effect.Objective: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of a dimeticone-based medical device in removal of scales in patients with psoriasis corporis/capitis under real-life conditions.Methods: Forty patients with psoriasis capitis or corporis were included and received once-daily treatments for 7 days. Clinical assessment of the psoriasis area severity index score (psoriasis corporis and the psoriasis scalp severity index score (psoriasis capitis was performed and evaluated at baseline, after 3 and 7 days of treatment. Baseline scaling scores and redness scores were calculated for two target lesions of the scalp or the body on a 5-point scale each.Results: For the primary efficacy variable scaling score, a statistically significant decrease was observed after treatment, with a relative reduction in scaling of 36.8% after 7 days of treatment within patients affected by psoriasis capitis. Treatment success was achieved in 76.8% of patients with psoriasis capitis, and time to treatment success was evaluated to be 4.14 days for these patients and 4.33 days for patients suffering from psoriasis corporis.Conclusion: In conclusion, this trial demonstrated that the dimeticone-based medical device is a safe, well-tolerated, practicable, and efficient keratolytic compound, which can be well implemented in and recommended for standard therapy

  11. Fracture resistance of implant- supported monolithic crowns cemented to zirconia hybrid-abutments: zirconia-based crowns vs. lithium disilicate crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshiyab, Shareen H; Nawafleh, Noor; Öchsner, Andreas; George, Roy

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the fracture resistance under chewing simulation of implant-supported posterior restorations (crowns cemented to hybrid-abutments) made of different all-ceramic materials. Monolithic zirconia (MZr) and monolithic lithium disilicate (MLD) crowns for mandibular first molar were fabricated using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and then cemented to zirconia hybrid-abutments (Ti-based). Each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10): (A) control group, crowns were subjected to single load to fracture; (B) test group, crowns underwent chewing simulation using multiple loads for 1.2 million cycles at 1.2 Hz with simultaneous thermocycling between 5℃ and 55℃. Data was statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and a Post-Hoc test. All tested crowns survived chewing simulation resulting in 100% survival rate. However, wear facets were observed on all the crowns at the occlusal contact point. Fracture load of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns was statistically significantly lower than that of monolithic zirconia crowns. Also, fracture load was significantly reduced in both of the all-ceramic materials after exposure to chewing simulation and thermocycling. Crowns of all test groups exhibited cohesive fracture within the monolithic crown structure only, and no abutment fractures or screw loosening were observed. When supported by implants, monolithic zirconia restorations cemented to hybrid abutments withstand masticatory forces. Also, fatigue loading accompanied by simultaneous thermocycling significantly reduces the strength of both of the all-ceramic materials. Moreover, further research is needed to define potentials, limits, and long-term serviceability of the materials and hybrid abutments.

  12. Basal ganglia - thalamus and the crowning enigma

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    Marianela eGarcia-Munoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available When Hubel (1982 referred to layer 1 of primary visual cortex as …a ‘crowning mystery’ to keep area-17 physiologists busy for years to come... he could have been talking about any cortical area. In the 80’s and 90’s there were no methods to examine this neuropile on the surface of the cortex: a tangled web of axons and dendrites from a variety of different places with unknown specificities and doubtful connections to the cortical output neurons some hundreds of microns below. Recently, three changes have made the crowning enigma less of an impossible mission: the clear presence of neurons in layer 1 (L1, the active conduction of voltage along apical dendrites and optogenetic methods that might allow us to look at one source of input at a time. For all of those reasons alone, it seems it is time to take seriously the function of L1. The functional properties of this layer will need to wait for more experiments but already L1 cells are GAD67 positive, i.e., inhibitory! They could reverse the sign of the thalamic glutamate (GLU input for the entire cortex. It is at least possible that in the near future normal activity of individual sources of L1 could be detected using genetic tools. We are at the outset of important times in the exploration of thalamic functions and perhaps the solution to the crowning enigma is within sight. Our review looks forward to that solution from the solid basis of the anatomy of the basal ganglia output to motor thalamus. We will focus on L1, its afferents, intrinsic neurons and its influence on responses of pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5. Since L1 is present in the whole cortex we will provide a general overview considering evidence mainly from the somatosensory cortex before focusing on motor cortex.

  13. Evidence for [18-Crown-6 Na]2[S2O4] in methanol and dissociation to Na2S2O4 and 18-Crown-6 in the solid state; accounting for the scarcity of simple oxy dianion salts of alkali metal crown ethers in the solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Pablo J; Greer, Scott; Passmore, Jack; Rautiainen, J Mikko

    2011-02-21

    [18-Crown-6 Na](2)S(2)O(4) complex was prepared in methanol solution but dissociates into 18-Crown-6 ((s)) and Na(2)S(2)O(4 (s)) on removal of the solvent. Evidence for complexation in methanol is supported by a quantitative mass analysis and the dissociation in the solid state by vibrational spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. These observations are accounted for by investigating the energetics of complexation in solution and dissociation in the solid state using calculated density functional theory (DFT) gas phase binding enthalpies and free energies combined with conductor-like screening model (COSMO) solvation energies and lattice enthalpy and free energy terms derived from volume based thermodynamics (VBT). Our calculations show that complexation of alkali metal dianion salts to crown ethers are much less favorable than that of the corresponding monoanion salts in the solid state and that the formation of alkali metal crown complexes of stable simple oxy-dianion (e.g., CO(3)(2-), SO(4)(2-)) salts is unlikely. The roles of complexation with 18-Crown-6 and ion pair formation in the process of dissolution of Na(2)S(2)O(4) to methanol are discussed.

  14. Characterization of Microsolvated Crown Ethers from Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Cristobal; Schnell, Melanie; Blanco, Susana; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Since they were first synthetized, crown ethers have been extensively used in organometallic chemistry due to their unparalleled binding selectivity with alkali metal cations. From a structural point of view, crown ethers are heterocycles containing oxygen and/or other heteroatoms, although the most common ones are formed from ethylene oxide unit. Crown ethers are conventionally seen as being hydrophilic inside and hydrophobic outside when the structures found for the metal cation complexes are considered. However, crown ethers are extremely flexible and in isolation may present a variety of stable conformations so that their structure may be easily adapted in presence of a strong ligand as an alkali metal cation minimize the energy of the resulting complex. Water can be considered a soft ligand which interacts with crown ethers through moderate hydrogen bonds. It is thus interesting to investigate which conformers are selected by water to form complexes, the preferred interaction sites and the possible conformational changes due to the presence of one or more water molecules. Previous studies identified microsolvated crown ethers but in all cases with a chromophore group attached to the structure. Here we present a broadband rotational spectroscopy study of microsolvated crown ethers produced in a pulsed molecular jet expansion. Several 1:1 and 1:2 crown ether:water aggregates are presented for 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6. Unambiguous identification of the structures has been achieved using isotopic substitution within the water unit. The subtle changes induced in the structures of the crown ether monomer upon complexation and the hydrogen-bonding network that hold them together will be also discussed. F. Gámez, B. Martínez-Haya, S. Blanco,J. C. López and J. L. Alonso, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 14 12912-12918 V. A. Shubert, C.W. Müller and T. Zwier, J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113 8067-8079

  15. Zirconia crowns - the new standard for single-visit dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedhahn, Klaus; Fritzsche, Günter; Wiedhahn, Claudine; Schenk, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia crowns combine the advantages of metal restorations, such as minimally invasive tooth preparation and ease of cementation, with those of full ceramic crowns, such as low thermal conductivity and tooth color. With the introduction of a high-speed sintering procedure, it is possible to produce and cement zirconia crowns and small monolithic bridges in a Cerec Single Visit procedure. This new procedure is compared to established chairside methods.

  16. Fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns with reduced thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, A.; Inagaki, R.; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Y.; Milleding, Percy; Ørtengren, Ulf Thore

    2015-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript version. Published version is available at Acta Odontologica Scandinavica Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relationship between fracture load of monolithic zirconia crowns and axial/occlusal thickness, and to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns with reduced thickness in comparison with that of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns with regular thickness. Materials and methods. Monolithic zi...

  17. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N; Thompson, Van P; Opdam, Niek J; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n=24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n=24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electron microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450N. Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3-4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinically relevant fracture testing of all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øilo, Marit; Kvam, Ketil; Tibballs, John E; Gjerdet, Nils Roar

    2013-08-01

    Fracture strength measured in vitro indicates that most all-ceramic crowns should be able to withstand mastication forces. Nevertheless, fractures are one of the major clinical problems with all-ceramic restorations. Furthermore, the fracture mode of all-ceramic crowns observed in clinical use differs from that found in conventional fracture strength tests. The aim of the present study was to develop and investigate a method that simulates clinical fracture behavior in vitro. 30 crowns with alumina cores were made to fit a cylindrical model with a molar-like preparation design. These crowns were randomly allocated to 3 tests groups (n=10). The crowns in group 1 were cemented to abutment models of epoxy and subsequently fractured by occlusal loading without contact damage. The crowns in group 2 were fractured by cementation with expanding cement. The crowns in group 3 were cemented on an abutment model of epoxy split almost in two and fractured by increasing the diameter of the model in the bucco-lingual direction. The fractured crowns were analyzed by fractographic methods and compared to a reference group of 10 crowns fractured in clinical use. The fracture modes of all the in vitro crowns were similar to clinical fracture modes. The fracture modes in group 1 were most closely matched to the clinical fractures. These crowns also fractured at clinically relevant loads. Laboratory tests that induce a distortion of the abutment model during occlusal loading without occlusal contact damage can simulate clinical fractures of all-ceramic crowns. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fatigue Resistance of CAD/CAM Resin Composite Molar Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A.; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N.; Thompson, Van P.; Opdam, Niek J.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Methods Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n = 24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n = 24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electronic microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. Results The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700 N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450 N. Significance Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3 – 4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. PMID:26777092

  20. Pediatric Preformed Metal Crowns - An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangameshwar Sajjanshetty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stainless Steel crowns (SSC were introduced in 1947 by the Rocky Mountain Company and popularized by Humphrey in 1950. Prefabricated SSC can be adapted to individual primary teeth and cemented in place to provide a definitive restoration. The SSC is extremely durable, relatively inexpensive, subject to minimal technique sensitivity during placement, and offers the advantage of full coronal coverage. SSC are often used to restore primary and permanent teeth in children and adolescents where intracoronal restorations would otherwise fail. This article brings the update of this definitive restoration.

  1. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  2. Crown preservation of the mandibular first molar tooth impacts the strength and stiffness of three noninvasive jaw fracture repair constructs in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eLothamer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Repairing mandibular body fractures present unique challenges not encountered when repairing long bones. Large tooth roots and the presence of the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle limit safe placement for many types of orthopedic implants. Use of noninvasive fracture repair methods have increasingly become popular and have proven safe and effective at achieving bone healing. Noninvasive fixation constructs have not been tested in dogs using cantilevered bending. Furthermore noninvasive fracture repair constructs have not been tested at the location of a common fracture location- the mandibular first molar tooth (M1. The objectives of this study were to test the strength and stiffness of three noninvasive mandibular fracture repair constructs and to characterize the impact that tooth crown preservation has on fixation strength for fractures occurring at the M1 location. Specimens were assigned to three treatment groups: (1 composite only, (2 interdental wiring and composite and (3 transmucosal fixation screw and composite. For each pair of mandibles, one mandible received crown amputation at the alveolar margin to simulate the effect of crown loss on fixation strength and stiffness. Regardless of the status of crown presence, interdental wiring and composite demonstrated the greatest bending stiffness and load to failure. With the crown removed, interdental wiring and composite was significantly stronger compared to other treatments. All fixation constructs were stiffer when the tooth crown was preserved. In fractures at this location, retaining the tooth crown of M1 significantly increases stiffness of interdental wiring with composite and transmucosal screw with composite constructs. If the crown of M1 was removed, interdental wiring and composite was significantly stronger than the other two forms of fixation.

  3. Crown Preservation of the Mandibular First Molar Tooth Impacts the Strength and Stiffness of Three Non-Invasive Jaw Fracture Repair Constructs in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothamer, Charles; Snyder, Christopher John; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Kloke, John; McCabe, Ronald P; Vanderby, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Repairing mandibular body fractures presents unique challenges not encountered when repairing long bones. Large tooth roots and the presence of the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle limit safe placement for many types of orthopedic implants. Use of non-invasive fracture repair methods have increasingly become popular and have proven safe and effective at achieving bone healing. Non-invasive fixation constructs have not been tested in dogs using cantilevered bending. Furthermore, non-invasive fracture repair constructs have not been tested at the location of a common fracture location - the mandibular first molar tooth (M1). The objectives of this study were to test the strength and stiffness of three non-invasive mandibular fracture repair constructs and to characterize the impact that tooth crown preservation has on fixation strength for fractures occurring at the M1 location. Specimens were assigned to three treatment groups: (1) composite only, (2) interdental wiring and composite (IWC), and (3) transmucosal fixation screw and composite. For each pair of mandibles, one mandible received crown amputation at the alveolar margin to simulate the effect of crown loss on fixation strength and stiffness. Regardless of the status of crown presence, IWC demonstrated the greatest bending stiffness and load to failure. With the crown removed, IWC was significantly stronger compared to other treatments. All fixation constructs were stiffer when the tooth crown was preserved. In fractures at this location, retaining the tooth crown of M1 significantly increases stiffness of interdental wiring with composite and transmucosal screw with composite constructs. If the crown of M1 was removed, IWC was significantly stronger than the other two forms of fixation.

  4. Posterior preveneered stainless steel crowns: clinical performance after three years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Anne C; Kratunova, Evelina; Leith, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of posterior preveneered stainless steel crowns after three years. NuSmile crowns and Kinder Krowns were randomly allocated on paired molars using a split-mouth design. Variables such as fracture, wear, gingival health, and esthetics were recorded. (Pcrowns in 14 children. After three years, 53 percent of crowns were fracture free compared to 81 percent at one year. There was minimal esthetic impact for most fractures due to the location of the veneer fracture, but five crowns had extensive fracture. No difference was reported in the clinical performance between the two crown types. Fracture was more likely to occur where the adjacent tooth was missing. Parents reported a satisfaction rating of 8.3 out of 10. Clinical performance of both crown types was similar and successful for three years. Facing fracture occurred in 47 percent of crowns but had minimal impact on the esthetic value or parental satisfaction in the majority of cases. These crowns offer an esthetic alternative to the traditional stainless steel crown, but parents should be alerted to the possibility of veneer loss over time.

  5. Adhesive Cementation Promotes Higher Fatigue Resistance to Zirconia Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, F; Valandro, L F; Feitosa, S A; Kleverlaan, C J; Feilzer, A J; de Jager, N; Bottino, M A

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the cementation strategy on the fatigue resistance of zirconia crowns. The null hypothesis was that the cementation strategy would not affect the fatigue resistance of the crowns. Seventy-five simplified molar tooth crown preparations were machined in glass fiber-filled epoxy resin. Zirconia crowns were designed (thickness=0.7 mm), milled by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and sintered, as recommended. Crowns were cemented onto the resin preparations using five cementation strategies (n=15): ZP, luting with zinc phosphate cement; PN, luting with Panavia F resin cement; AL, air particle abrasion with alumina particles (125 μm) as the crown inner surface pretreatment + Panavia F; CJ, tribochemical silica coating as crown inner surface pretreatment + Panavia F; and GL, application of a thin layer of porcelain glaze followed by etching with hydrofluoric acid and silanization as crown inner surface pretreatment + Panavia F. Resin cement was activated for 30 seconds for each surface. Specimens were tested until fracture in a stepwise stress fatigue test (10,000 cycles in each step, 600 to 1400 N, frequency of 1.4 Hz). The mode of failure was analyzed by stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Mantel-Cox (log rank) tests and a pairwise comparison (pzirconia layer. Finite element analysis showed the different stress distribution for the two models. Adhesive cementation of zirconia crowns improves fatigue resistance.

  6. Relation of Crown Width to Tree Diameter In Some Upland Hardwood Stands of Southern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon S. Minckler; Samuel F. Gingrich

    1970-01-01

    Crown width-d.b.h. relationships in well stocked, uneven-aged stands of oak and hickory were similar to those for open-grown trees and were independent of site, crown class, and species. The irregular crowns of forest grown trees interface and overlap, however, and measuring crown extensions to the branch tips tended to overestimate effective crown area

  7. Influence of surface treatment on the in-vitro fracture resistance of zirconia-based all-ceramic anterior crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, M; Lotze, G; Bömicke, W; Rues, S

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface treatment on the fracture resistance of zirconia-based all-ceramic anterior crowns. Sixty-four zirconia-based all-ceramic anterior crowns, veneered by use of a press-on technique, were produced. For 48 crowns intraoral adjustment was simulated (A-group), 16 crowns remained unadjusted (WA-group). The adjusted area was then treated in three ways: 1. no further surface treatment; 2. polishing, with irrigation, using polishers interspersed with diamond grit for ceramics; and 3. polishing and glaze firing. Half of the specimens were loaded until fracture in an universal testing device without artificial ageing; the other crowns underwent thermocycling and chewing simulation before ultimate-load testing. Explorative statistical analysis was performed by use of non-parametric and parametric tests. In addition, fracture-strength tests according to ISO 6872 were performed for veneer ceramic subjected to the different surface treatments. Finite element analysis was also conducted for the crowns, and surface roughness was measured. Crowns in the A-group were more sensitive to aging than crowns in the WA-group (p=0.038). Although both polishing and glaze firing slightly improved the fracture resistance of the specimens, the fracture resistance in the WA-group (initial fracture resistance (IFR): 652.0 ± 107.7N, remaining fracture resistance after aging (RFR): 560.6 ± 233.3N) was higher than the fracture resistance in the A-group (polished: IFR: 477.9 ± 108.8N, RFR: 386.0 ± 218.5N; glaze firing: IFR: 535.5 ± 128.0N, RFR: 388.6 ± 202.2N). Surface roughness without adjustment was Ra=0.1 μm; for adjustment but without further treatment it was Ra=1.4 μm; for adjustment and polishing it was Ra=0.3 μm; and for adjustment, polishing, and glazing it was Ra=0.6 μm. Stress distributions obtained by finite element analysis in combination with fracture strength tests showed that fractures most probably originated from

  8. Clinical study on the success of posterior monolithic zirconia crowns and fixed dental prostheses: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Bankoğlu Güngör

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this report was to present preliminary clinical results regarding the success rates and technical outcomes of posterior monolithic zirconia single tooth crowns (STs and fixed dental prostheses (FDPs. Materials and Method: Thirty-four patients received 43 posterior monolithic zirconia restorations as single tooth crowns (STs and/or fixed dental prostheses (FDPs, which were fabricated using a CAD-CAM (Computer Aided Design - Computer Aided Manufacturing system. At baseline and every 6 months, the restorations were examined for survival and technical outcomes. Success of the restorations was defined as the restoration remaining in situ, with no need for removal or replacement at follow-up visits. Technical outcomes were evaluated with a modified version of the United States Public Health Services criteria. Survival of restorations was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. For each restoration, duration of follow-up was calculated from the time of placement to the date of its first failure. Results: After a mean observation period of 18.6 ± 3.9 months (between 8-24 months, cumulative survival rates were 86.7% and 92.3% for STs and FDPs, respectively. Technical evaluation revealed good marginal adaptation and crown contours; however, modifications were needed for shade and occlusion of restorations. Conclusion: These preliminary results revealed high survival rate and generally successful technical outcomes for posterior monolithic zirconia STs and FDPs.

  9. Crowns cemented on crown preparations lacking geometric resistance form. Part II: effect of cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2004-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different cements on resistance to dislodgment of crowns cemented on preparations lacking geometric resistance form. A preparation that offered no geometric resistance form, with 20 degrees total occlusal convergence (TOC), 0.9 mm wide shoulder finish line, and a 2.5 mm axial wall height was created on an ivorine tooth using a milling machine. Ten metal test specimen die replicas and 10 standardized metal crowns with recipient sites for the application of external forces through a universal testing machine were fabricated. The crowns were cemented on the dies under 5 and 10 kg external loads, the marginal openings measured, loaded to dislodgment, and cleaned of cement. The process was repeated using zinc oxide and eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate (ZPh), resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI), and composite resin (CR) cements. Marginal openings under 5 kg cementation loads were 74.63 (+/-15.04) for ZOE, 75.98 (+/-18.20) microm for ZPh, 98.58 (+/-22.62) microm for RMGI, and 105.82 (+/-20.07) microm for CR cements respectively; under 10 kg cementation loads they were 57.62 (+/-15.86) microm, 59.55 (+/-15.41) microm, 95.00 (+/-19.52) microm, 101.30 (+/-12.52) microm respectively. Oblique dislodgment forces, measured with a Universal testing machine, were 40.18 (+/- 6.76) N for ZOE, 215.65 (+/-45.79) N for ZPh, 165.43 (+/-19.53) N for RMGI, and 181.54 (+/-30.75) N for CR respectively when crowns were cemented under 5 kg loads. The corresponding values for 10 kg loads were 38.62 (+/-4.19), 274.86 (+/-54.22), 139.70 (+/-21.71), and 160.40 (+/-21.21) respectively. Only zinc phosphate cement produced statistically enhanced resistance when crowns were cemented under 10 kg force (p value = 0.035). Under the conditions of the present study only crowns cemented with zinc phosphate displayed increased resistance to dislodgment on preparations lacking resistance form.

  10. Long-term behavior of double crown retained dentures with metal and metal-free secondary crowns and frameworks made of Vectris(©) on all-ceramic primary crowns: a prospective, randomized clinical trial up to 14 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, T; Zahn, B; Janko, S; Weigl, P; Gerhardt-Szép, S; Lauer, H C

    2016-06-01

    use of Vectris(©) cannot be recommended for the fabrication of double crown retained removable dentures as permanent restorations.

  11. Usurpation of a Crowned Lapwing Vanellus coronatus nest by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I report an instance of usurpation of a Crowned Lapwing Vanellus coronatus nest by a pair of African Wattled Lapwings Vanellus senegalensis. The nest, which originally contained a single Crowned Lapwing egg, eventually contained an additional three Wattled Lapwing eggs, before it was predated. Although parents of ...

  12. Short clinical crowns (SCC) – treatment considerations and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, G. R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    When the clinical crowns of teeth are dimensionally inadequate, esthetically and biologically acceptable restoration of these dental units is difficult. Often an acceptable restoration cannot be accomplished without first surgically increasing the length of the existing clinical crowns; therefore, successful management requires an understanding of both the dental and periodontal parameters of treatment. The complications presented by teeth with short clinical crowns demand a comprehensive treatment plan and proper sequencing of therapy to ensure a satisfactory result. Visualization of the desired result is a prerequisite of successful therapy. This review examines the periodontal and restorative factors related to restoring teeth with short clinical crowns. Modes of therapy are usually combined to meet the biologic, restorative, and esthetic requirements imposed by short clinical crowns. In this study various methods for treating short clinical crowns are reviewed, the role that restoration margin location play in the maintenance of periodontal and dental symbiosis and the effects of violation of the supracrestal gingivae by improper full-coverage restorations has also been discussed. Key words:Short clinical crown, surgical crown lengthening, forced eruption, diagnostic wax up, alveoloplasty, gingivectomy. PMID:24558561

  13. Evaluation of wild Juglans species for crown gall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradox, the most widely used rootstock in CA walnut production, is highly susceptible to the causal agent of crown gall (CG) Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The bacterial pathogen induces the formation of large tumors around the crown of the tree resulting in a reduction in both vigor and yield. If left...

  14. Gloss and Surface Roughness of Anterior Pediatric Zirconia Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Adrien L; Frey, Gary N; Ontiveros, Joe C; Badger, Gary

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine gloss and surface roughness (Ra) of pediatric anterior zirconia crowns. Gloss of labial and lingual surfaces of pediatric anterior zirconia crowns from three manufacturers was measured on 20 specimens using a small area gloss meter on each. Ra (μm) was measured using a contact-type surface profilometer. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance and pair-wise comparison at the 0.05 level of significance. There were statistically significant interactions between surface location and crown type for both gloss and Ra scores. NuSmile had higher mean gloss scores and lower mean Ra scores than both Kinder Krowns and EZCrowns. Kinder Krowns showed lower mean gloss scores and higher Ra scores than other crown groups. Among all crowns, there was a trend of higher mean gloss paired with lower mean surface roughness, and lower mean gloss paired with higher mean Ra. Hand smoothed followed by mechanically polished zirconia crowns (NuSmile) displayed the highest mean gloss and lowest mean Ra compared to hybrid polishedglazed zirconia crowns (Kinder Krowns, EZCrowns). Of the hybrid polished-glazed zirconia crowns, Kinder Krowns displayed the lowest mean gloss and highest mean Ra.

  15. Re/crowning the Jowo Śākyamuni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warner, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    of ritual observance and visions received.  In 1409, Tsongkhapa Lozang Drakpa  (1357-1419) crowned the Jowo, changing his doctrinal and iconographic representations.  I connect the controversy surrounding Tsongkhapa's decision to re/crown the Jowo in 1409 to the significance placed on authenticity...

  16. Relationships among alfalfa resistance to Sclerotinia crown and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sclerotinia crown and stem rot (SCSR) of alfalfa caused by Sclerotinia trifoliorum is one of the main constraints for efficient alfalfa cultivation in temperate climate all over the world. The resistance of 200 alfalfa accessions to Sclerotinia crown and stem rot was evaluated during 2010 to 2011 in the field nursery established in ...

  17. Evaluation of Vertical Marginal Adaptation of Provisional Crowns by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate and compare the degree of vertical marginal discrepancy of four provisional crown materials by digital microscope. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 provisional crowns were fabricated on standardized resin dies by direct technique of provisional fabrication, using four different provisional ...

  18. Short clinical crowns (SCC) - treatment considerations and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G R; Poduval, Soorya T; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-10-01

    When the clinical crowns of teeth are dimensionally inadequate, esthetically and biologically acceptable restoration of these dental units is difficult. Often an acceptable restoration cannot be accomplished without first surgically increasing the length of the existing clinical crowns; therefore, successful management requires an understanding of both the dental and periodontal parameters of treatment. The complications presented by teeth with short clinical crowns demand a comprehensive treatment plan and proper sequencing of therapy to ensure a satisfactory result. Visualization of the desired result is a prerequisite of successful therapy. This review examines the periodontal and restorative factors related to restoring teeth with short clinical crowns. Modes of therapy are usually combined to meet the biologic, restorative, and esthetic requirements imposed by short clinical crowns. In this study various methods for treating short clinical crowns are reviewed, the role that restoration margin location play in the maintenance of periodontal and dental symbiosis and the effects of violation of the supracrestal gingivae by improper full-coverage restorations has also been discussed. Key words:Short clinical crown, surgical crown lengthening, forced eruption, diagnostic wax up, alveoloplasty, gingivectomy.

  19. Spectrophotometric evaluation of crown fragment a year after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Crown fracture is the most common type of fracture and frequently affects the anterior teeth. Crown fractures have been treated in several ways depending on the location and kind of fracture. This case emphasizes reattachment of fractured fragments using fiber-reinforced post. Also this case report underlines ...

  20. Crown ratio models for tropical rainforests species in Oban division ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crown ratio (CR) is a characteristic used to describe the crown size, which is an important element of forest growth and yield. It is often used as an important predictor variable for tree-level growth equations. It indicates tree vigour and is an important habitat variable. It is often estimated using allometry. Modified versions of ...

  1. Calorimetric study of binding of some disaccharides with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, Olga I.; Lebedeva, Nataliya Sh.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2004-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry has been applied to the determination of the thermodynamic parameters of binding of β-lactose, α,α-trehalose and sucrose with 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6 in water at 298.15 K. The formation of 1:1 molecular associates has been found for the systems studied except 18-crown-6 and β-lactose. The associates are preferentially or completely entropy stabilized. The most stable associate is formed between α,α-trehalose and 18-crown-6. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters of binding are discussed from the point of view of solute-solvent interactions as well as conformational and structural peculiarities of the disaccharides (DS) and crown ethers (CE)

  2. [Clinical evaluation of zirconia crowns for single posterior teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanhua; Meng, Xiangfeng; Yu, Qing

    2014-06-01

    To observe and evaluate the clinical performance of zirconia crowns made by CEREC inLab computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing(CAD/CAM) for posterior teeth. A total of 242 patients were implanted with zirconia crowns fabricated by CEREC inLab CAD/CAM. The crowns were evaluated by Modified US Public Health Service criteria at baseline, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. The chi-square test was used to analyze the survival rate. All but five crowns were evaluated by an independent evaluator at baseline, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. The survival rate declined with time. The A score percentage was above 85% at 36 months. The single zirconia crowns fabricated by CEREC inLab CAD/CAM demonstrate satisfactory clinical performance during a short period.

  3. Structural Study of Mismatched Disila-Crown Ether Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Reuter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mismatched complexes of the alkali metals cations Li+ and Na+ were synthesized from 1,2-disila[18]crown-6 (1 and 2 and of K+ from 1,2,4,5-tetrasila[18]crown-6 (4. In these alkali metal complexes, not all crown ether O atoms participate in the coordination, which depicts the coordination ability of the C-, Si/C-, and Si-bonded O atoms. Furthermore, the inverse case—the coordination of the large Ba2+ ion by the relatively small ligand 1,2-disila[15]crown-5—was investigated, yielding the dinuclear complex 5. This structure represents a first outlook on sandwich complexes based on hybrid crown ethers.

  4. Triaquachlorido(18-crown-6barium chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Min Zhao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [BaCl(C12H24O6(H2O3]Cl, the BaII atom, the coordinating and free Cl− anions, one coordinating water molecule and two O atoms of an 18-crown-6 molecule lie on a mirror plane. The environment of the ten-coordinate Ba2+ ion is defined by one Cl atom, three water molecules and six O atoms from the macrocyclic ether. The macrocycle adopts a conformation with an approximate D3d symmetry. In the crystal, O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds link the complex cations and Cl− anions into a two-dimensional network parallel to (010. An intramolecular O—H...Cl hydrogen bond is also present.

  5. Gingival pigmentation beneath a metallic crown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Hirayasu, R.; Sakai, H.; Hashimoto, N.

    1988-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies and energy dispersive X-ray analysis disclosed that the essential cause of gingival discoloration following the placement of a metallic crown, was marked deposition of melanin pigment. Deposition of melanin pigment was observed in epithelial cells, on basement membranes, and in fibroblasts, macrophages and among intercellular ground substance of the proprial layer. Brown or dark brown colored granules were observed in the deep portion of the proprial layer. Some metallic elements as silver and sulfur were detected. It was presumed that these materials were dental metals accidentally implanted in gingival tissues during the therapeutic procedure. The deposition of melanin pigment closely corresponded with mucosal tissue where these materials were present in the deep portion of the proprial layer. These findings suggested that these materials influenced the physiological metabolism of melanin and induced its pathological deposition in the proprial tissue. (author)

  6. EL CROWN HALL. CONTEXTO Y PROYECTO / The Crown Hall. Context and project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Santatecla Fayós

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN El artículo enmarca el edificio del Crown Hall en el contexto docente y arquitectónico de Mies van der Rohe. Revisa sus inicios en la Bauhaus con su primera intervención en un espacio docente para la Bauhaus de Berlín en 1932, así como su marcha a Estados Unidos, los planteamientos arquitectónicos del campus del IIT y el proyecto del Crown Hall. El texto incide en el estudio del proceso proyectual del Crown Hall analizando la evolución de su concepción arquitectónica a través de las diferentes versiones del proyecto. Se constata la transición desde los primeros planteamientos arquitectónicos de los edificios del campus del IIT proyectados por Mies hacia el planteamiento del gran espacio unitario del Crown Hall. Este proyecto se puede entender desde la creciente importancia de la estructura, la claridad constructiva y el manejo del acero y vidrio como únicos materiales de la imagen del edificio y el carácter flexible y unitario del espacio. Finalmente se hace referencia al concepto del “espacio universal” en la arquitectura de Mies, como un concepto abstracto que supera los de flexibilidad de uso o unidad espacial, insinuando, a modo de reflexión, las principales variables que definirían el espacio universal miesiano. SUMMARY The article showcases the Crown Hall building in the educational and architectural context of Mies van der Rohe. It reviews his beginnings in the Bauhaus with his first intervention in an educational space for the Bauhaus of Berlin in 1932, as well as his sojourn to the United States, and the architectural approaches to the IIT campus and the Crown Hall project. The text touches on the study of the planning process for the Crown Hall, analysing the evolution of its architectural conception, through the different versions of the project. The article covers the transition from the first architectural approaches for the IIT campus buildings, planned by Mies, to the approach of the large unitary space

  7. Removal of particulates from nuclear offgas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchsted, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Particulate removal from nuclear offgases can be broken down into three parts: pretreatment, prefiltration, and absolute filtration. Pretreatment, using conventional air cleaning devices in most cases, is sometimes required to temper the gases and remove heavy concentrations of particulate matter. Prefiltration, if required, serves primarily to protect the final filter stages from heavy dust loadings in order to extend their life. HEPA filters are the most commonly used ''absolute'' filtration devices and are always required for removal of submicrometer particulates that cannot be removed effectively by other devices

  8. Removal of impurity phases from electrochemical devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a solid oxide cell comprising a support layer, a first electrode layer, an electrolyte layer, and a second cathode layer, wherein at least one of the electrode layers comprises electrolyte material, a catalyst and agglomerated particles selected from the group...

  9. [Comparison of adaptation of crowns of different lithium disilicate glass-ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kemeng; Ai, Hongjun; Yi, Zhe

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the adaptation of different lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown and whether different fabrication processes affect the adaptation of crowns. Thirty epoxy dies crowns were divided into 3 groups. They were cemented to domestic lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns in Group A, to IPS e.max CAD crowns in Group B and to IPS e.max Press crowns in Group C respectively. All crowns were cut by cutting machine. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to measure the gap between crown tissue surface and die. There were significant differences in the three groups of measurement points(Pcrowns appeared to have clinically acceptable fit.

  10. Evaluation of vertical marginal adaptation of provisional crowns by digital microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rifaiy, M Q

    2017-12-01

    To investigate and compare the degree of vertical marginal discrepancy of four provisional crown materials by digital microscope. A total of 100 provisional crowns were fabricated on standardized resin dies by direct technique of provisional fabrication, using four different provisional materials (n = 25): Provisionals Fabricated by Systemp® c and b II, ivoclar vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein (group A); ProtempTM Plus, 3M ESPE, Neuss, Germany (group B); Success CD, PROMEDICA, Neumunster, Germany (group C); and Trim® Plus, Bosworth Company, Illinois, USA (group D). The provisional crowns were finished, tried, and locked with a customized device under 15N of vertical axial force. The vertical marginal discrepancy between the crown margin and the resin die was measured in micrometers using digital microscope (KH-7700, Hirox-USA, Inc., NJ, USA) at mid of buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal margin areas by a trained technician. The mean values obtained for each group were as follows: group A = 129.10 ± 41.64, group B = 123.36 ± 40.94, group C = 89.67 ± 25.34, and group D = 107.24 ± 38.32. Assessment by post hoc Tukey's test at 5% significance level showed a statistically significant difference (P 0.05) between the means of the four areas of measurement for each group. Marginal discrepancy of the group C (Success CD) was the lowest among the provisionals tested. The mean vertical marginal gap values for the materials tested were found to be with in the clinically acceptable range (<130 μm).

  11. Fracture strength of lithium disilicate crowns compared to polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network and zirconia reinforced lithium silicate crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieper, Kim; Wille, Sebastian; Kern, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength of crowns made from current CAD/CAM materials. In addition the influence of crown thickness and chewing simulation on the fracture strength was evaluated. Crowns were fabricated from lithium disilicate, zirconia reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS-ceramic) and a polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network (PICN) with an occlusal thickness of 1.0mm or 1.5mm, respectively (n=16). Crowns were cemented on composite dies. Subgroups of eight specimens were loaded with 5kg in a chewing simulator for 1,200,000 cycles with thermal cycling. Finally, all specimens were loaded until fracture in a universal testing machine. Three-way ANOVA was used to detect statistical interaction. Differences regarding the materials were tested with two-way ANOVA, following one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey's-Test. All crowns survived the chewing simulation. The material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance (p≤0.05). Lithium disilicate achieved the highest values of fracture strength in almost all groups followed by ZLS-ceramic. PICN achieved the lowest values of fracture strength. Chewing simulation increased the fracture strength of thick lithium disilicate crown significantly. Greater occlusal thickness of all crown materials resulted in higher crown fracture strength before chewing simulation. After chewing simulation occlusal thickness of lithium disilicate and PICN crowns had no significant influence on the fracture strength. All crowns revealed fracture strength above the clinically expected loading forces. Therefore the durability of the tested CAD/CAM materials seems promising also in an occlusal thickness of 1.0mm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Use of Implants to Improve Removable Partial Denture Function

    OpenAIRE

    Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Arréllaga, Juan Pablo; Bacchi, Ataís; Del Bel Cury, Altair A.

    2013-01-01

    The oral rehabilitation with conventional removable partial dentures in Kennedy class I patients allows continuous bone resorption, dislodgment of the prosthesis during the mastication caused by the resilience of the mucosa, and rotation of the prosthesis. Thus, the associations of distal implants become an attractive modality of treatment for these patients. This case report presented an association of removable partial dentures, milled crowns and osseointegrated implants to rehabilitate a p...

  13. Guided tooth preparation for a pediatric zirconia crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hyoung

    2018-03-01

    Unesthetic primary incisors can produce negative self-perceptions in preschool-aged children. In recent years, because of increased esthetic demands, prefabricated zirconia crowns have become increasingly popular. However, zirconia crowns cannot be crimped, and the clinician must prepare the teeth to fit the zirconia crowns. Therefore, extended preparation and fitting times are necessary, especially for inexperienced practitioners. A 1- to 2-millimeter subgingival feather margin also is required. Gingival hemorrhage after subgingival preparation compromises the retention of zirconia crowns. In this clinical report, the author presents a step-by-step description of the clinical and laboratory procedures for restoring a discolored traumatized incisor with a zirconia crown. The author used a polyvinyl siloxane occlusal registration material as an impression material and made 2 identical casts. The author fabricated 3 reduction guides after prospective tooth preparation on the casts. The author rapidly prepared the discolored incisor with the reduction guides and ultrasonic burs. A zirconia crown provided an optimal esthetic result and gingival health. Because the reduction guides provided a visibility intraorally, fast tooth reduction, less trial placement, and passive adaptation of the crown were successful. Because the ultrasonic burs prevented gingival injuries, hemorrhage control was not necessary. The presented technique reduced the patient's discomfort and total chair time. Therefore, this alternative technique is helpful for inexperienced practitioners. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Review of Alberta Crown Crude Oil Marketing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, G. R.; Kromm, R. B.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains an independent evaluation of the operations of the private marketing agents that are currently marketing the Alberta Crown's share of royalty crude oil. The evaluation includes a review of pricing performance, working relationship, current issues and the overall performance of the marketing arrangements during the fiscal years of 1997 and 1998. Overall, the outsourcing of sales of Crown production to agents is judged to be successful. For example, it has been noted that agents are becoming more aggressive in maintaining and increasing their margins. On the other hand, the increased level of aggressiveness in marketing, while tending to maximize Crown revenues, is also creating a potential conflict on how margins should be shared between the Crown and its agents. Also, there has been evidence of some management issues between the agents and the Crown concerning the extent to which the Crown should share in any increased value which the agent generates by increased third party marketing activities. These differences need to be addressed in order to maintain the strong performance of the marketing program. The consultants also recommend additional guidelines on risk management issues that more clearly define the Crown's risk tolerance. 2 tabs., 4 figs

  15. Marginal Assessment of Crowns by the Aid of Parallel Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Fattahi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Marginal adaptation is the most critical item in long-term prognosis of single crowns. This study aimed to assess the marginal quality as well asthe discrepancies in marginal integrity of some PFM single crowns of posterior teeth by employing parallel radiography in Shiraz Dental School, Shiraz, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive study, parallel radiographies were taken from 200 fabricated PFM single crowns of posterior teeth after cementation and before discharging the patient. To calculate the magnification of the images, a metallic sphere with the thickness of 4 mm was placed in the direction of the crown margin on the occlusal surface. Thereafter, the horizontal and vertical space between the crown margins, the margin of preparations and also the vertical space between the crown margin and the bone crest were measured by using digital radiological software. Results: Analysis of data by descriptive statistics revealed that 75.5% and 60% of the cases had more than the acceptable space (50µm in the vertical (130±20µm and horizontal (90±15µm dimensions, respectively. Moreover, 85% of patients were found to have either horizontal or vertical gap. In 77% of cases, the margins of crowns invaded the biologic width in the mesial and 70% in distal surfaces. Conclusion: Parallel radiography can be expedient in the stage of framework try-in to yield some important information that cannot be obtained by routine clinical evaluations and may improve the treatment prognosis

  16. The repair of preveneered posterior stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Yucel; Gurbuz, Taskin; Eyuboglu, Ozge; Belduz, Nihal

    2008-01-01

    This study's purposes were to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) for and to perform dye penetration (microleakage) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluations of preveneered posterior stainless steel crowns (SSCs) that were repaired using 2 different materials. Twenty-two crowns were used. They were stored in artificial saliva for 30 days and then thermocycled. A force was applied on the crowns' occlusal surfaces until the original veneer material appeared to be fractured. The fracture types and S8S values were recorded. The crowns were then repaired using Panavia opaque cement and Tetric Flow or Monoopaque and Tetric Flow. Twenty of the repaired crowns were subjected to dye penetration and SBS tests, and the remaining 2 were evaluated using SEM. Statistical analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in the results of either the S8S or the dye penetration test (P = .58 and P = 38, respectively). A statistically significant difference was found between original and repaired crowns regarding fracture extent (P = .02), but not failure type (P = .08). SEM evaluation showed that there was no observable gap at the interface of the original or repaired materials and the stainless steel base. Preveneered posterior stainless steel crowns may be repaired using either repair material types tested here.

  17. Tattoo removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatto, Maurice A; Halachmi, Shlomit; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Over 50,000 new tattoos are placed each year in the United States. Studies estimate that 24% of American college students have tattoos and 10% of male American adults have a tattoo. The rising popularity of tattoos has spurred a corresponding increase in tattoo removal. Not all tattoos are placed intentionally or for aesthetic reasons though. Traumatic tattoos due to unintentional penetration of exogenous pigments can also occur, as well as the placement of medical tattoos to mark treatment boundaries, for example in radiation therapy. Protocols for tattoo removal have evolved over history. The first evidence of tattoo removal attempts was found in Egyptian mummies, dated to have lived 4,000 years BC. Ancient Greek writings describe tattoo removal with salt abrasion or with a paste containing cloves of white garlic mixed with Alexandrian cantharidin. With the advent of Q-switched lasers in the late 1960s, the outcomes of tattoo removal changed radically. In addition to their selective absorption by the pigment, the extremely short pulse duration of Q-switched lasers has made them the gold standard for tattoo removal. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Survival Predictions of Ceramic Crowns Using Statistical Fracture Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrin, S; Katsube, N; Seghi, R R; Rokhlin, S I

    2017-05-01

    This work establishes a survival probability methodology for interface-initiated fatigue failures of monolithic ceramic crowns under simulated masticatory loading. A complete 3-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis model of a minimally reduced molar crown was developed using commercially available hardware and software. Estimates of material surface flaw distributions and fatigue parameters for 3 reinforced glass-ceramics (fluormica [FM], leucite [LR], and lithium disilicate [LD]) and a dense sintered yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YZ) were obtained from the literature and incorporated into the model. Utilizing the proposed fracture mechanics-based model, crown survival probability as a function of loading cycles was obtained from simulations performed on the 4 ceramic materials utilizing identical crown geometries and loading conditions. The weaker ceramic materials (FM and LR) resulted in lower survival rates than the more recently developed higher-strength ceramic materials (LD and YZ). The simulated 10-y survival rate of crowns fabricated from YZ was only slightly better than those fabricated from LD. In addition, 2 of the model crown systems (FM and LD) were expanded to determine regional-dependent failure probabilities. This analysis predicted that the LD-based crowns were more likely to fail from fractures initiating from margin areas, whereas the FM-based crowns showed a slightly higher probability of failure from fractures initiating from the occlusal table below the contact areas. These 2 predicted fracture initiation locations have some agreement with reported fractographic analyses of failed crowns. In this model, we considered the maximum tensile stress tangential to the interfacial surface, as opposed to the more universally reported maximum principal stress, because it more directly impacts crack propagation. While the accuracy of these predictions needs to be experimentally verified, the model can provide a fundamental understanding of the

  19. Intrauterine Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    S HARE W ITH W OMEN INTRAUTERINE DEVICES INTRAUTERINE DEVICES What is An Intrauterine Device? An intrauterine device (IUD) is anything that is placed inside the uterus (womb) to prevent pregnancy. ...

  20. Lanthanide crown ether complexes of p-sulfonatocalix[5]arene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgarno, Scott J; Hardie, Michaele J; Warren, John E; Raston, Colin L

    2004-08-21

    Two types of arrays are formed in water involving aza-crown ethers, p-sulfonatocalix[5]arene and europium(III) ions. One is a co-ordination polymer connecting calixarenes, sodium ions and lanthanide ions based on "ferris wheel" moieties incorporating aza-18-crown-6 and sodium ions. The second structure is a host-guest arrangement with di-protonated diaza-18-crown-6 in the cavity of the calixarenes as part of secondary coordination spheres of aquated europium(iii) ions.

  1. Unique case of a geminated supernumerary tooth with trifid crown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ather, Amber; Ather, Hunaiza; Sheth, Sanket Milan; Muliya, Vidya Saraswathi [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Gemination, a relatively uncommon dental anomaly, is characterized by its peculiar representation as a tooth with a bifid crown and a common root and root canal. It usually occurs in primary dentition. To come across gemination in a supernumerary tooth is a rare phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to present a unique case of hyperdontia wherein gemination in an impacted supernumerary tooth resulted in a trifid crown unlike the usual bifid crown. The role of conventional radiographs as well as computed tomography, to accurately determine the morphology and spatial location, and to arrive at a diagnosis, is also emphasized in this paper.

  2. Reduction of HCCI combustion noise through piston crown design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Seven shapes of piston crowns have been evaluated for their ability to reduce HCCI knock and transmission of combustion noise to the engine. The performance of each piston crown was evaluated with measurements of cylinder pressure, engine vibration and acoustic sound pressure measured one meter....... The largest and most consistent reduction in noise level was however achieved with a diesel bowl type piston. The increased surface area as well as the larger crevice volumes of the experimental piston crowns generally resulted in lower IMEP than the flat piston. While the crevice volumes can be reduced...... reduction as well as heat losses....

  3. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-ae Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1 not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2 decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3 overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries.

  4. An investigation of heat transfer to the implant-bone interface when drilling through a zirconia crown attached to a titanium or zirconia abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Amy G; Sutton, Alan; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2014-11-01

    Thermal injury to the implant-bone interface may lead to bone necrosis and loss of osseointegration. This is a concern during manipulation of the implant throughout the restorative phase of treatment. The risk of heat transfer to the implant-bone interface during abutment preparation or prosthesis removal should be considered. The purpose of the study was to examine the amount of heat transferred to the implant-bone interface when a zirconia crown is drilled to access the screw channel or section a crown with a high-speed dental handpiece. Of the 64 ceramic-veneered zirconia crowns fabricated, 32 had a coping thickness of 0.5 mm and 32 had a coping thickness of 1.0 mm. The crowns were cemented on either titanium stock abutments or zirconia stock abutments. Each group was further subdivided to evaluate heat transfer when the screw channel was accessed or the crown was sectioned with a high-speed handpiece with or without irrigation. Temperature change was recorded for each specimen at the cervical and apical aspect of the implant with thermocouples and a logging thermometer. ANOVA was used to assess the statistical significance in temperature change between the test combinations, and nonparametric Mann-Whitney U tests were used to evaluate the findings. The use of irrigation during both crown removal processes yielded an average temperature increase of 3.59 ±0.35°C. Crown removal in the absence of irrigation yielded an average temperature increase of 18.76 ±3.09°C. When all parameter combinations in the presence of irrigation were evaluated, the maximum temperature change was below the threshold of thermal injury to bone. The maximum temperature change was above the threshold for thermal injury at the coronal aspect of the implant and below the threshold at the apical aspect in the absence of irrigation. Within the limitations of this investigation, the use of irrigation with a high-speed dental handpiece to remove a ceramic-veneered zirconia crown results in

  5. The energetic characterization of pineapple crown leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, R M; Queiroga, T S; Calixto, G Q; Almeida, H N; Melo, D M A; Melo, M A F; Freitas, J C O; Curbelo, F D S

    2015-12-01

    Energetic characterization of biomass allows for assessing its energy potential for application in different conversion processes into energy. The objective of this study is to physicochemically characterize pineapple crown leaves (PC) for their application in energy conversion processes. PC was characterized according to ASTM E871-82, E1755-01, and E873-82 for determination of moisture, ash, and volatile matter, respectively; the fixed carbon was calculated by difference. Higher heating value was determined by ASTM E711-87 and ash chemical composition was determined by XRF. The thermogravimetric and FTIR analyses were performed to evaluate the thermal decomposition and identify the main functional groups of biomass. PC has potential for application in thermochemical processes, showing high volatile matter (89.5%), bulk density (420.8 kg/m(3)), and higher heating value (18.9 MJ/kg). The results show its energy potential justifying application of this agricultural waste into energy conversion processes, implementing sustainability in the production, and reducing the environmental liabilities caused by its disposal.

  6. Cement selection for cement-retained crown technique with dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, James L; Wilcox, Charles; Wilwerding, Terry

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the retentive nature of common dental cements that have been adapted for use in the implant abutment cement-retained crown (CRC) technique with those specifically formulated for this purpose. Ten regular diameter implant analogs were embedded in stainless steel disks. Unmodified CRC abutments were attached and torqued to 30 Ncm. Test crowns were waxed and cast with base metal alloy. Castings were fitted, cleaned with aluminum oxide, and steam cleaned prior to application of the cement. The cements used were: (1) Temp Bond, (2) UltraTemp, regular, (3) UltraTemp firm, (4) ImProv with petroleum jelly coating of crown, (5) ImProv without petroleum jelly, (6) Premier Implant with KY Jelly coating of abutment, (7) Premier Implant without KY jelly, (8) TR-2, (9) Fleck's, (10) Ketac Cem Aplicap, and (11) Fuji Plus Capsule. After cementation, assemblies were stored for 24 hours. Each sample was subjected to a pull-out test using an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5.0 mm/min. Loads required to remove the crowns were recorded, and mean values for each group determined. A one-way ANOVA and a post hoc least square difference (LSD) test were done for pairwise comparison at a confidence interval of 95%. The mean values (+/-SD) of loads at failure (n = 10) for various cements were as follows (N): Ultratemp, regular 358.6 (+/-38.2) (Group A), ImProv without petroleum jelly 172.4 (+/-59.6) (Group B), Fleck's 171.8 (+/-62.2) (Group B), Ketac Cem 167.8 (+/-69.1) (Group B), UltraTemp firm 158.8 (+/-62.7) (Group BC), Fuji Plus 147.5 (+/-69.7) (Group BC), Premier without KY jelly 131.6 (+/-31.8) (Group BC), ImProv using petroleum jelly 130.8 (+/-42.5) (Group BC), Temp Bond 117.8 (+/-48.3) (Group C), TR-2 41.2 (+/-16.6) (Group D), and Premier with KY jelly 31.6 (+/-24.8) (Group D). Groups with the same letter were not significantly different. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it is not suggested

  7. [Esthetic evaluation of Cerec 3D anterior crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Feng, Hai-lan; Wei, Xiu-xia; Xing, Yan-xi; Jia, Lu; Zhou, Yong-sheng

    2012-03-27

    To observe the short-term effect of clinical application of Cerec 3D anterior crowns. A total of 16 patients were restored with 31 Cerec 3D anterior crowns. All restorations were stained before cementation. The evaluation started 1 week after luting. The restorations were examined in accordance with the modified US Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria at baseline and every 6 - 12 months. The observation period of 31 Cerec 3D anterior crowns varied from 8 to 33 months. The mean observation period was 22 months. All restorations scored A or B by modified USPHS standard. And 22 out of 31 restorations scored A for all criteria while 8 restorations scored B in color matching. Slight differences of translucency and chroma could be observed. Between baseline and follow-up examinations, insignificant shift from A-to B-rating occurred. Cerec 3D anterior crowns may achieve favorable short-term esthetic effects.

  8. Synthesis of Crown Ethers Containing a Rubicene Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Smet

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A symmetrically disubstituted derivative of the highly fluorescing and photostable rubicene was incorporated in a macrocycle using high dilution conditions and a hydroxyrubicene was functionalized with a modified aminobenzo-15-crown-5.

  9. Probing supramolecular complexation of cetylpyridinium chloride with crown ethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhadeep; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2017-11-01

    Supramolecular complexations of cetylpyridinium chloride with three comparable cavity dimension based crown ethers, namely, dibenzo-18-crown-6, 18-crown-6 and dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 have been explored and adequately compared in acetonitrile with the help of conductivity in a series of temperatures to reveal the stoichiometry of the three host-guest complexes. Programme based mathematical treatment of the conductivity data affords association constants for complexations from which the thermodynamic parameters were derived for better comprehension about the process. The interactions at molecular level have been explained and decisively discussed by means of FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies that demonstrate H-bond type interactions as the primarily force of attraction for the investigated supramolecular complexations.

  10. Luminescent Lariat Aza-Crown Ether Carboxylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard König

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lariat ethers are interesting recognition motifs in supramolecular chemistry. The synthesis of a luminescent lariat aza-crown ether with a carboxyl group appended by azide-alkyne (Huisgen cycloaddition is presented.

  11. Sentencing dangerous offenders: policy and practice in the Crown Court

    OpenAIRE

    Henham, R

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of Crown Courts' use of protective sentencing powers under s.80(2)(b), s.85, and s.109 of 2000 Act and whether preference for s.85 reflects fundamental flaw in leaving determination of "dangerousness" to judiciary.

  12. Fractal approach to computer-analytical modelling of tree crown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezovskaya, F.S.; Karev, G.P.; Kisliuk, O.F.; Khlebopros, R.G.; Tcelniker, Yu.L.

    1993-09-01

    In this paper we discuss three approaches to the modeling of a tree crown development. These approaches are experimental (i.e. regressive), theoretical (i.e. analytical) and simulation (i.e. computer) modeling. The common assumption of these is that a tree can be regarded as one of the fractal objects which is the collection of semi-similar objects and combines the properties of two- and three-dimensional bodies. We show that a fractal measure of crown can be used as the link between the mathematical models of crown growth and light propagation through canopy. The computer approach gives the possibility to visualize a crown development and to calibrate the model on experimental data. In the paper different stages of the above-mentioned approaches are described. The experimental data for spruce, the description of computer system for modeling and the variant of computer model are presented. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs

  13. Fuel assembly cleaning device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable efficient and sufficient cleaning of a fuel assembly even in corners without disassembling the assembly and to effectively remove crud. Constitution: Cleaning water mixed with abrasive is injected into a fuel assembly contained within a cleaning device body to remove crud adhering to the fuel assembly. Since a coolant passage from the opening of the bottom surface is of the fuel assembly to the opening of the top surface is utilized as the cleaning water passage at this, the crud can be removed by the abrasive in the water stream even from narrow gaps of the fuel assembly. (Aizawa, K.)

  14. Development of post-fire crown damage mortality thresholds in ponderosa pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    James F. Fowler; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Joel McMillin; Kurt K. Allen; Jose F. Negron; Linda L. Wadleigh; John A. Anhold; Ken E. Gibson

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that crown scorch volume and crown consumption volume are the major predictors of post-fire mortality in ponderosa pine. In this study, we use piecewise logistic regression models of crown scorch data from 6633 trees in five wildfires from the Intermountain West to locate a mortality threshold at 88% scorch by volume for trees with no crown...

  15. Crown profile equations for stand-grown western hemlock trees in northwestern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David D. Marshall; Gregory P. Johnson; David W. Hann

    2003-01-01

    Crown profile equations were developed for stand-grown western hemlock(Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) in northwest Oregon. The profile model uses a segmented approach, dividing the crown into an upper and lower portion at the point of the largest crown width (LCW). The model explains about 86% of the variation in crown width when LCW is known but...

  16. Root-Crown Relations of Young Sugar Maple and Yellow Birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl H. Tubbs

    1977-01-01

    Young forest-grown sugar maple and yellow birch (1 to 6 inches d.b.h.) crowns were mapped and roots excavated. Crown dimensions were compared. Sugar maple roots usually terminated within a few feet of the crown perimeter. Yellow birch roots frequently terminated well outside crown perimeters and roots of birch were more irregularly distributed than those of maple....

  17. Adhesively luted, metal-free composite crowns after five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Franziska; Spiegl, Katrin; Eickemeyer, Grit; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The effect of location and preparation design of abutment teeth and of preparation design on the survival and complication rate of metal-free, adhesively luted composite crowns (Artglass, Heraeus Kulzer) and their clinical performance was investigated in this controlled, randomized, prospective clinical study. After randomization, 114 single crowns (68 posterior, 46 anterior) were prepared either with a 0.5 mm chamfer finishing line or with a 0.5 mm shoulder combined with occlusal reduction of at least 1.5 mm. Buildups were made with a composite material, using the corresponding dentin adhesive. Crowns were manufactured on stone dies and intraorally adhesively luted with resin cement. Follow-up examinations were conducted after 1 month and 1, 2, 3, and 5 years. Documentation included failures and complications, occlusal contacts, plaque accumulation and patients' rating of esthetics and functionality. After 5 years, data for 83 single crowns had been obtained. Within an observation period of 5 years, 18 complications occurred, including 13 major failures which resulted in replacement of the crowns, and 5 minor complications which could be repaired. All loosened crowns (n = 2) were successfully re-cemented. The Cox Regression did not reveal any effect of location or preparation design on complication rate. Calculation of the Kaplan-Meier survival curve on the basis of major failures indicated a probability of survival of 96% after 3 years and 88.5% after 5 years. Four Artglass crowns had no contact in static occlusion after 5 years and plaque accumulation was significantly higher than for control teeth. esthetic and functional evaluation by patients revealed that acceptance was high. Metal-free composite crowns may be recommended for long-term temporary use. However, the complication rate and the increased plaque accumulation restrict the indication for permanent restorations.

  18. Failure Probability of Three Designs of Zirconia Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gabriela Freitas; Monteiro, Evelyn Barbosa; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Zhang, Yu; Marques de Melo, Renata

    2015-01-01

    This study used a two-parameter Weibull analysis for evaluation of the lifespan of fully or partially porcelain-/glaze-veneered zirconia crowns after fatigue test. A sample of 60 first molars were selected and prepared for full-coverage crowns with three different designs (n = 20): traditional (crowns with zirconia framework covered with feldspathic porcelain), modified (crowns partially covered with veneering porcelain), and monolithic (full-contour zirconia crowns). All specimens were treated with a glaze layer. Specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (100 N, 3 Hz) with a piston with a hemispherical tip (Ø = 6 mm) until the specimens failed or up to 2 × 10⁶ cycles. Every 500,000 cycles, the fatigue tests were interrupted and stereomicroscopy (10×) was used to inspect the specimens for damage. The authors performed Weibull analysis of interval data to calculate the number of failures in each interval. The types and numbers of failures according to the groups were: cracking (13 traditional, 6 modified) and chipping (4 traditional) of the feldspathic porcelain, followed by delamination (1 traditional) at the veneer/core interface and debonding (2 monolithic) at the cementation interface. Weibull parameters (β, scale; η, shape), with a two-sided confidence interval of 95%, were: traditional-1.25 and 0.9 × 10⁶ cycles; modified-0.58 and 11.7 × 10⁶ cycles; and monolithic-1.05 and 16.5 × 10⁶ cycles. Traditional crowns showed greater susceptibility to fatigue, the modified group presented higher propensity to early failures, and the monolithic group showed no susceptibility to fatigue. The modified and monolithic groups presented the highest number of crowns with no failures after the fatigue test. The three crown designs presented significantly different behaviors under fatigue. The modified and monolithic groups presented less probability of failure after 2 × 10⁶ cycles.

  19. Slow cooling protocol improves fatigue life of zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Vitor G; Lorenzoni, Fabio C; Bonfante, Estevam A; Silva, Nelson R F A; Thompson, Van P; Bonfante, Gerson

    2015-02-01

    To compare the fatigue life and damage modes of zirconia crowns fabricated with and without framework design modification when porcelain veneered using a fast or slow cooling protocol. Composite resin replicas of a first molar full crown preparation were fabricated. Zirconia copings were milled as conventional (0.5mm even thickness, Zr-C, n=20,) or modified (lingual margin of 1.0mm thickness, 2.0mm height connected to two proximal struts of 3.5mm height, Zr-M, n=20). These groups were subdivided (n=10 each) according to the veneer cooling protocol employed: fast cooling (Zr-CFast and Zr-MFast) and slow cooling (Zr-CSlow and Zr-MSlow). Crowns were cemented and fatigued for 10(6) cycles in water. The number of cycles to failure was recorded and used to determine the interval databased 2-parameter probability Weibull distribution parameter Beta (β) and characteristic life value Eta (η). 2-parameter Weibull calculation presented β=5.53 and β=4.38 for Zr-MFast and Zr-CFast, respectively. Slow cooled crowns did not fail by completion of 10(6) cycles, thereby Weibayes calculation was applied. Increased fatigue life was observed for slow cooled crowns compared to fast cooled ones. Groups Zr-MFast and Zr-MSlow presented no statistical difference. Porcelain cohesive fractures were mainly observed in fast cooled groups. Slow cooled crowns presented in some instances inner cone cracks not reaching the zirconia/veneer interface. Improved fatigue life in tandem with the absence of porcelain fractures were observed in slow cooled crowns, regardless of framework design. Crowns fast cooled chiefly failed by porcelain cohesive fractures. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Surgical crown lengthening: a periodontal and restorative interdisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwani, Simran R; Parwani, Rajkumar N

    2014-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening helps to provide an adequate retention form for proper tooth preparation, thus enabling dentists to create esthetically pleasing and healthy restorations. Long-term stability requires accurate diagnosis and development of a comprehensive treatment plan in each case. This sequence of events stresses the importance of communication between the restorative dentist and the periodontist. This article presents 2 cases that involve surgical crown lengthening (including mucoperiosteal flap and ostectomy) for the restoration of teeth.

  1. Mechanical performance of implant-supported posterior crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kok, Paul; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; de Jager, Niek; Kuijs, Ruud; Feilzer, Albert J

    2015-07-01

    The fracture of implant-supported restorations, especially of the veneering layer, is a common problem in dentistry. Monolithic ceramic or resin restorations might help solve this problem. The purpose of this in vitro study was to obtain additional insight into the risk of fracture of implant-supported restorations. Identical crowns (n=10) of 10 different ceramic and composite resin materials were cemented on conventional abutments on implant replicas embedded in polymethyl methacrylate blocks. The specimens were subjected to compressive load in a universal testing machine to record initial load to failure (ILF). Additionally, the flexural strength (FS), compressive strength (CS), and elastic modulus (E) of the investigated materials were determined. These results were used in a finite element analysis model of a composite resin and a lithium disilicate crown. Anatomic contour zirconia (Lava Plus) crowns had the highest ILF (6065 N), followed by lithium disilicate (IPS e.max) (2788 N) and the composite resin materials (Protemp 4, Majesty Flow, Telio CAD, Estenia C&B, Lava Ultimate, VITA Enamic) (2386 to 1935 N). Veneered zirconia (Lava) crowns showed the lowest ILF (1477 N). The highest FS, CS, and E were found for Lava Plus and IPS e.max. No direct relationship was found between ILF and the FS, CS, or E. The finite element analysis showed stresses that did not exceed the FS or CS of IPS e.max. The surface roughness of these crowns might have caused initial failure at relatively low stresses. In this laboratory study, monolithic implant-supported crowns showed a higher ILF than conventional veneered ceramic crowns. Monolithic ceramic restorations might perform better than composite resin crowns. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Failure probability of three designs of zirconia crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, G. Freitas; Monteiro, E. Barbosa Carmona; Bottino, M.A.; Zhang, Y.; de Melo, R. Marques

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study utilized a 2-parameter Weibull analysis for evaluation of lifetime of fully or partially porcelain-/glaze-veneered zirconia crowns after fatigue test. Methods Sixty first molars were selected and prepared for full-coverage crowns with three different designs(n = 20): Traditional –crowns with zirconia framework covered with feldspathic porcelain; Modified– crowns partially covered with veneering porcelain; and Monolithic–full-contour zirconia crowns. All specimens were treated with a glaze layer. Specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (100N, 3Hz) with a piston with hemispherical tip (Ø=6 mm) until the specimens failed or up to 2×106 cycles. Every 500,000 cycles intervals, the fatigue tests were interrupted, and stereomicroscopy (10 X) was used to inspect the specimens for damage. We performed Weibull analysis of interval data to calculate the number of failures in each interval. Results The types and number of failures according to the groups were: cracking (Traditional-13, Modified-6) and chipping (Traditional-4) of the feldspathic porcelain, followed by delamination (Traditional-1) at the veneer/core interface and debonding (Monollithic-2) at the cementation interface. Weibull parameters (beta, scale; and eta, shape), with a two-sided confidence interval of 95%, were: Traditional – 1.25 and 0.9 × 106cycles; Modified– 0.58 and 11.7 × 106 cycles; and Monolithic – 1.05 and 16.5 × 106 cycles. Traditional crowns showed greater susceptibility to fatigue, the Modified group presented higher propensity to early failures, and the Monolithic group showed no susceptibility to fatigue. The Modified and Monolithic groups presented the highest number of crowns with no failures after the fatigue test. Conclusions The three crown designs presented significantly different behaviors under fatigue. The Modified and the Monolithic groups presented less probability to failure after 2×106cycles. PMID:26509988

  3. Variation in crown light utilization characteristics among tropical canopy trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kaoru; Mulkey, Stephen S; Wright, S Joseph

    2005-02-01

    Light extinction through crowns of canopy trees determines light availability at lower levels within forests. The goal of this paper is the exploration of foliage distribution and light extinction in crowns of five canopy tree species in relation to their shoot architecture, leaf traits (mean leaf angle, life span, photosynthetic characteristics) and successional status (from pioneers to persistent). Light extinction was examined at three hierarchical levels of foliage organization, the whole crown, the outermost canopy and the individual shoots, in a tropical moist forest with direct canopy access with a tower crane. Photon flux density and cumulative leaf area index (LAI) were measured at intervals of 0.25-1 m along multiple vertical transects through three to five mature tree crowns of each species to estimate light extinction coefficients (K). Cecropia longipes, a pioneer species with the shortest leaf life span, had crown LAI <0.5. Among the remaining four species, crown LAI ranged from 2 to 8, and species with orthotropic terminal shoots exhibited lower light extinction coefficients (0.35) than those with plagiotropic shoots (0.53-0.80). Within each type, later successional species exhibited greater maximum LAI and total light extinction. A dense layer of leaves at the outermost crown of a late successional species resulted in an average light extinction of 61% within 0.5 m from the surface. In late successional species, leaf position within individual shoots does not predict the light availability at the individual leaf surface, which may explain their slow decline of photosynthetic capacity with leaf age and weak differentiation of sun and shade leaves. Later-successional tree crowns, especially those with orthotropic branches, exhibit lower light extinction coefficients, but greater total LAI and total light extinction, which contribute to their efficient use of light and competitive dominance.

  4. Fracture load of different crown systems on zirconia implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, T; Kirsten, A; Kappert, H F; Fischer, H

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture load of single zirconia abutment restorations using different veneering techniques and materials. The abutment restorations were divided into 6 groups with 20 samples each: test abutments (control group A), lithium disilicate ceramic crowns bonded on incisor abutments (group B), leucite ceramic crowns bonded on incisor abutments (group C), premolar abutments directly veneered with a fluor apatite ceramic (group D (layered) and group E (pressed)) and premolar abutments bonded with lithium disilicate ceramic crowns (group F). The fracture load of the restorations was evaluated using a universal testing machine. Half of each group was artificially aged (chewing simulation and thermocycling) before evaluating the fracture load with the exception of the test abutments. The fracture load of the test abutments was 705 ± 43N. Incisor abutments bonded with lithium disilicate or leucite ceramic crowns (groups B and C) showed fracture loads of about 580N. Premolar restorations directly veneered with fluor apatite ceramic (groups D and E) showed fracture loads of about 850N. Premolar restorations bonded with lithium disilicate ceramic crowns (group F) showed fracture loads of about 1850N. The artificial ageing showed no significant influence on the strength of the examined restorations. All ceramic crowns made of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, adhesively bonded to premolar abutments showed the highest fracture loads in this study. However, all tested groups can withstand physiological bite forces. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Consequences of crown shortening canine teeth in Greenland sled dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortegaard, H E; Anthony Knudsen, T; Dahl, S; Agger, J F G; Eriksen, T

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the consequences of crown shortening, focusing on the prevalence of pulp exposure and periapical pathology in Greenland sled dogs that had had their canine crowns shortened at an early age. Five cadaver heads and 54 sled dogs underwent an oral examination for dental fractures and pulp exposure of canines. All canines were radiographed and evaluated for periapical pathology. The prevalence of canine pulp exposure in 12 (5 heads and 7 dogs) crown shortened dogs was 91 · 7%, and 21 · 3% in 47 not-crown shortened dogs. A significant (P canines in the crown shortened group compared to the not-crown shortened group was seen with a relative risk of 4 · 3 on a dog basis and a relative risk of 12 · 2 on a tooth basis. In dogs with pulp exposure of canines (n = 51) the prevalence of periapical pathology was 82 · 4%, but only 0 · 8% in dogs without pulp exposure (n = 133) resulting in a significant (relative risk, 109 · 5; P < 0 · 001) risk of periapical pathology in teeth with pulp exposure compared to teeth without pulp exposure. The high risk of periapical pathology observed in teeth with pulp exposure confirms that these teeth should not be neglected in affected dogs. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Antimicrobial efficacy of chemical disinfectants on contaminated full metal crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara Augusta; Villabona, Camilo Andrés; Kameoka, Eliana; Ferreira, Marly Christiènne C G; Ito, Izabel Yoko; Saravia, Marta Estela

    2010-01-01

    Prosthetic restorations that have been tried in the patient's mouth are potential sources of infection. In order to avoid cross-infection, protocols for infection control should be established in dental office and laboratory. This study evaluated the antimicrobial efficacy of disinfectants on full metal crowns contaminated with microorganisms. Full crowns cast in a Ni-Cr alloy were assigned to one control group (n=6) and 5 experimental groups (n=18). The crowns were placed in flat-bottom glass balloons and were autoclaved. A microbial suspension of each type of strain - S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, S. mutans, E. faecalis and C. albicans- was aseptically added to each experimental group, the crowns being allowed for contamination during 30 min. The contaminated specimens were placed into recipients with the chemical disinfectants (1% and 2% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde) for 5, 10 and 15 min. Thereafter, the crowns were placed into tubes containing different broths and incubated at 35ºC. The control specimens were contaminated, immersed in distilled water for 20 min and cultured in Thioglycollate broth at 35ºC. Microbial growth assay was performed by qualitative visual examination after 48 h, 7 and 12 days. Microbial growth was noticed only in the control group. In the experimental groups, turbidity of the broths was not observed, regardless of the strains and immersion intervals, thus indicating absence of microbial growth. In conclusion, all chemical disinfectants were effective in preventing microbial growth onto full metal crowns.

  7. Consequences of crown shortening canine teeth in Greenland sled dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortegaard, H E; Anthony Knudsen, T; Dahl, S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the consequences of crown shortening, focusing on the prevalence of pulp exposure and periapical pathology in Greenland sled dogs that had had their canine crowns shortened at an early age. METHODS: Five cadaver heads and 54 sled dogs underwent an oral examination for dental...... fractures and pulp exposure of canines. All canines were radiographed and evaluated for periapical pathology. RESULTS: The prevalence of canine pulp exposure in 12 (5 heads and 7 dogs) crown shortened dogs was 91 · 7%, and 21 · 3% in 47 not-crown shortened dogs. A significant (P ... exposure of the canines in the crown shortened group compared to the not-crown shortened group was seen with a relative risk of 4 · 3 on a dog basis and a relative risk of 12 · 2 on a tooth basis. In dogs with pulp exposure of canines (n = 51) the prevalence of periapical pathology was 82 · 4%, but only 0...

  8. Effect of abutment modification and cement type on retention of cement-retained implant supported crowns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Farzin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations.Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20. The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20. Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05.There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R between intact abutments (4.90±0.37 and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25 using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23 compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027.The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal.

  9. Fracture resistance and failure modes of CEREC endo-crowns and conventional post and core-supported CEREC crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yu Chang

    2009-09-01

    Conclusion: The bonded ceramic endo-crowns showed a significantly higher fracture resistance than the classic reinforced and designed group and, therefore, offer a feasible alternative for severely damaged teeth.

  10. Comparison of effect of desensitizing agents on the retention of crowns cemented with luting agents: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalandar, Sonune Shital; Pandharinath, Dange Shankar; Arun, Khalikar; Smita, Vaidya

    2012-08-01

    Many dentists use desensitizing agents to prevent hypersensitivity. This study compared and evaluated the effect of two desensitizing agents on the retention of cast crowns when cemented with various luting agents. Ninety freshly extracted human molars were prepared with flat occlusal surface, 6 degree taper and approximately 4 mm axial length. The prepared specimens were divided into 3 groups and each group is further divided into 3 subgroups. Desensitizing agents used were GC Tooth Mousse and GLUMA® desensitizer. Cementing agents used were zinc phosphate, glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cement. Individual crowns with loop were made from base metal alloy. Desensitizing agents were applied before cementation of crowns except for control group. Under tensional force the crowns were removed using an automated universal testing machine. Statistical analysis included one-way ANOVA followed by Turkey-Kramer post hoc test at a preset alpha of 0.05. Resin modified glass ionomer cement exhibited the highest retentive strength and all dentin treatments resulted in significantly different retentive values (In Kg.): GLUMA (49.02 ± 3.32) > Control (48.61 ± 3.54) > Tooth mousse (48.34 ± 2.94). Retentive strength for glass ionomer cement were GLUMA (41.14 ± 2.42) > Tooth mousse (40.32 ± 3.89) > Control (39.09 ± 2.80). For zinc phosphate cement the retentive strength were lowest GLUMA (27.92 ± 3.20) > Control (27.69 ± 3.39) > Tooth mousse (25.27 ± 4.60). The use of GLUMA® desensitizer has no effect on crown retention. GC Tooth Mousse does not affect the retentive ability of glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cement, but it decreases the retentive ability of zinc phosphate cement.

  11. Suitability of Secondary PEEK Telescopic Crowns on Zirconia Primary Crowns: The Influence of Fabrication Method and Taper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Merk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the retention load (RL between ZrO2 primary crowns and secondary polyetheretherketone (PEEK crowns made by different fabrication methods with three different tapers. Standardized primary ZrO2 crowns were fabricated with three different tapers: 0°, 1°, and 2° (n = 10/group. Ten secondary crowns were fabricated (i milled from breCam BioHPP blanks (PM; (ii pressed from industrially fabricated PEEK pellets (PP (BioHPP Pellet; or (iii pressed from granular PEEK (PG (BioHPP Granulat. One calibrated operator adjusted all crowns. In total, the RL of 90 secondary crowns were measured in pull-off tests at 50 mm/min, and each specimen was tested 20 times. Two- and one-way ANOVAs followed by a Scheffé’s post-hoc test were used for data analysis (p < 0.05. Within crowns with a 0° taper, the PP group showed significantly higher retention load values compared with the other groups. Among the 1° taper, the PM group presented significantly lower retention loads than the PP group. However, the pressing type had no impact on the results. Within the 2° taper, the fabrication method had no influence on the RL. Within the PM group, the 2° taper showed significantly higher retention load compared with the 1° taper. The taper with 0° was in the same range value as the 1° and 2° tapers. No impact of the taper on the retention value was observed between the PP groups. Within the PG groups, the 0° taper presented significantly lower RL than the 1° taper, whereas the 2° taper showed no differences. The fabrication method of the secondary PEEK crowns and taper angles showed no consistent effect within all tested groups.

  12. Fracture load of monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic crowns and veneered zirconia crowns as a posterior implant restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee Hwan; Lee, Su-Jeong; Park, Jun Sub; Ryu, Jae Jun

    2013-02-01

    To compare the fracture load and failure mode of the monolithic lithium disilicate crown (e.max group) and 2 types of veneered zirconia crowns, hand layer (ZV group) and heat pressed (ZP group), as a posterior implant-supported restoration. A total of 24 all-ceramic crowns for molar tooth were fabricated using the computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) system. The e.max group crowns and zirconia copings for ZV and ZP groups were fabricated using a Cerec milling unit. The ZV group was fabricated using a hand-layer veneering method, and the ZP group using a heat-pressing method. All crowns were luted to the abutments, which were connected to implant fixtures, using resin cement. Fracture load was measured using the universal testing machine, and the fracture surface was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The ZP group showed significantly higher fracture load (5229.3 N) compared with the e.max group (3852.1 N) and ZV group (3100.3 N). All fractures in the ZV group occurred in the veneered layer. Monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate crowns are applicable to posterior implant-supported restorations because the fracture load was higher than the average occlusal force.

  13. THE CONSTITUTIONAL ISSUE OF CROWNING IN CROATIANHUNGARIAN LAW (THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE EMPEROR FRANZ JOSEPH I CORONATION FOR THE KING OF HUNGARY AND CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Heka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Coronation of Franz Joseph l as the King of Hungary and Croatia which was marked by the Hungarian side as the condition of reconciliation with Vienna and the conclusion of the Austro-Hungarian settlement. This compromise between Austria and Hungary has served as a template for a yearlong Croatian-Hungarian settlement in many segments. With these two settlements, the Hungarians settled their relations with the court and with the Triune Kingdom of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia, with whom Hungary had been in the state community since 1102. This event marked the end of a long-standing conflict with Austria, and the Croatian issue was removed from the agenda in Budapest and Vienna. In the course of eight centuries of the common statehood, the Coronation was one of the pivotal constitutional questions. The act of the Coronation, which gave the King legitimacy, consisted of the church ritual (anointing and the secular part manifested in taking the oath, and it had a public character and meaning. The latter was reflected in the fact that the crown oath and crown vow (the diplomas of inauguration were considered the contract between the people and the King, and therefore the Crown Defender had a constitutional character. The King got his legitimacy only if he was crowned with the crown of St. Stephen (the Holy Crown, so Franz Joseph l became the Hungarian and Croatian King only after the crowning in Buda. Since the palatine function was incomplete at the time, Hungary had to be represented by Count Gyula Andrassy, who was then the president of the government. After the King’s death in 1916, during the last royal Coronation, a political-legal debate was raised about whether Hungary should be represented by the Prime Minister or other person on behalf of the people.

  14. Crown fracture: Failure load, stress distribution, and fractographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Roberto E; Soares, Paulo V; Versluis, Antheunis; de O Júnior, Osmir Batista; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B; Nunes, Isabella Ferola

    2015-09-01

    The outcomes from load-to-failure tests may not be applicable to clinical situations. The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the efficacy of load-to-failure tests in the investigation of the fracture load and pattern of metal-free crowns. Four groups were formed from 128 bovine roots restored with metal posts, resin cores, and feldspathic, leucite, or lithium disilicate ceramic systems or polymer crowns. Each group was divided into 4 (n=8) according to the cement: zinc phosphate, self-adhesive resin, autopolymerizing resin, and glass ionomer. Mean fracture loads from compressive tests were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Finite element and fractographic analyses were performed and associated with the fracture load and pattern. Significantly higher fracture load values were obtained for the lithium disilicate ceramic, but finite element and fractographic analyses showed that the cement effect could not be determined. The finite element analysis showed the cement likely affected the fracture pattern, confirmed that stresses in the cements were little affected by the crown materials, and found that the stressed conditions were lowest in the lithium disilicate compared with other crowns for all cement combinations. The stressed conditions in the crowns depended more on the adhesive properties than on the elastic modulus of the cement materials. The level of the stressed condition in the crowns at the occlusal surface was about the same or higher than along their cement interface, consistent with the fractography, which indicated fractures starting at the load point. Higher stress levels in the crowns corresponded with a lower number of catastrophic fractures, and higher stresses in the cements seemed to reduce the number of catastrophic fracture patterns. The highest stressed conditions occurred along the occlusal surface for crown materials with a low elastic modulus or in combination with adhesive cements. The method used was not appropriate

  15. Removing Bureaucracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    11 Defense AT&L: July–August 2015 Removing Bureaucracy Katharina G. McFarland McFarland is Assistant Secretary of Defense for Acquisition. I once...involvement from all of the Service warfighting areas came together to scrub the program requirements due to concern over the “ bureaucracy ” and... Bureaucracy ” that focuses on reducing cycle time, staffing time and all forms of inefficiencies. This includes review of those burdens that Congress

  16. Ceramometal crowns and bridges. Focus on failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A M; Kurzeja, R; Gamberg, M G

    1985-10-01

    There are numerous factors that can have an adverse or beneficial effect upon the esthetic appearance of a ceramometal restoration. Some of these factors are beyond the influence of the dentist unless he or she is aware of them. As knowledgable practicing dentists, they have the ability to prescribe for their patients in such a manner as to achieve greater success and, in turn, greater patient acceptance and recognition. These are the rewards of a successful crown and bridge practice, and the ceramometal restoration is the basic state of the art prosthesis in present use. Knowing how to take a shade under the proper lighting conditions is generally well taught as part of the dental school curriculum, but the knowledge that shade guides are manufactured with built in idiosyncrasies of color variations from guide to guide is an enlightening experience. O'Brien of the Department of Dental Materials at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry clearly demonstrated the variabilities of color intensities between porcelain manufacturers. Laboratory technicians have been frustrated by the inconsistency of shades of porcelains from one lot number to another. It is now more fully understood that fluorescence is an important factor in patient satisfaction, as patients observe and have their restorations seen under differing lighting conditions. The type of alloy used in the ceramometal combination can have an effect upon the esthetic result. The wider use of silver-palladium alloys requires that the porcelain employed be of a nongreening nature, or else the final glazed prosthesis will give off a greenish cast. The ability of the opaque to block out the metal substructure while blending with the gingival and incisal shades eliminates the graying out, which can be esthetically objectionable to the patient. However, one of the most important considerations in aesthetic ceramometal restorations is the correct anatomy, placement, and harmonious blending with the oral and

  17. Direct composite restoration of permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Evans Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An uncomplicated crown fracture is a fracture that involves only the tooth enamel or the dentin and tooth enamel without any damage or exposure to the pulp. Crown fracture of the anterior teeth usually caused by traumatic forces such as falls, accidents, violence, or sports activities. Traumatic injuries of the oral region frequently involve the anterior teeth, especially maxillary incisors due to the anatomic factors which may affect the functional and aesthetical values of the teeth. The objective of this literature study was to know more about uncomplicated crown fracture of the anterior teeth and its restoration. This research was a literature study performed by researching, highlighting various interesting facts and compiling the relevant published journals. The most common and ideal direct restoration of the anterior teeth was the composite resin restoration. The anterior teeth restoration was considered to be a complex and challenging case to solves due to the fact that besides reconstructing the tooth and regaining the function, the aesthetical aspect was also becoming the main objectives. The permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fracture was the most common case of tooth fractures which was mainly caused by traumatic injuries such as falls, accidents, excessive forces, violence, and also sports activities. Dental injuries of the anterior teeth also affected the aesthetical properties and the function of the tooth. Composite resin restoration was able to performed directly on the permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fracture.

  18. The use of stainless steel crowns: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, N Sue; Randall, Ros

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to review the published literature on stainless steel crowns (SSCs) from 2002 to the present as an update to an earlier review published in 2002. Included were published papers on clinical studies, case series, and laboratory testing on SSCs (including esthetic SSCs and the Hall technique) in peer-reviewed journals. Study quality and strength of evidence presented were assessed for papers reporting clinical results for SSCs as a primary study outcome using a list of weighting criteria. Sixty-one papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria (24 papers on 22 clinical studies, three case reports, 21 reviews and surveys, and 13 laboratory testing reports on SSCs and esthetic preformed metal crowns for primary and permanent molar teeth). Ten clinical studies achieved weighting scores ranging from 68 percent to 26 percent, with the two highest scoring studies (68 percent and 63 percent) considered good quality. Within the confines of the studies reviewed, primary molar esthetic crowns and SSCs had superior clinical performance as restoratives for posterior primary teeth, and the Hall technique was shown to have validity. No clinical studies were available on zirconia crowns. Further well-designed prospective studies on primary molar esthetic crowns and the Hall technique are needed.

  19. Crown sealing and buckling instability during water entry of spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2016-04-05

    We present new observations from an experimental investigation of the classical problem of the crown splash and sealing phenomena observed during the impact of spheres onto quiescent liquid pools. In the experiments, a 6 m tall vacuum chamber was used to provide the required ambient conditions from atmospheric pressure down to of an atmosphere, whilst high-speed videography was exploited to focus primarily on the above-surface crown formation and ensuing dynamics, paying particular attention to the moments just prior to the surface seal. In doing so, we have observed a buckling-type azimuthal instability of the crown. This instability is characterised by vertical striations along the crown, between which thin films form that are more susceptible to the air flow and thus are drawn into the closing cavity, where they atomize to form a fine spray within the cavity. To elucidate to the primary mechanisms and forces at play, we varied the sphere diameter, liquid properties and ambient pressure. Furthermore, a comparison between the entry of room-temperature spheres, where the contact line pins around the equator, and Leidenfrost spheres (i.e. an immersed superheated sphere encompassed by a vapour layer), where there is no contact line, indicates that the buckling instability appears in all crown sealing events, but is intensified by the presence of a pinned contact line. © 2016 Cambridge University Press.

  20. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a standard (ISO 9917-1:2004). Second, load-to-failure test was performed to analyze the crown fracture resistance. CAD/CAM-produced monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm were prepared and cemented to dies with each cement. The crown–die samples were loaded until fracture. Results The compressive strength of SRC, RC-D and RC-C was significantly higher than those of ZPC and GIC (p crown between the groups. Conclusion The values achieved in the load-to-failure test suggest that monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm may have good resistance against fracture regardless of types of cements. PMID:27335900

  1. Fracture Strength After Fatigue Loading of Lithium Disilicate Pressed Zirconia Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Yeun; Choi, Jae-Won; Ju, Sung-Won; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yoon, Mi-Jung; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of fatigued lithium disilicate pressed zirconia crowns versus other ceramic crowns. Lithium disilicate pressed zirconia, fluorapatite pressed zirconia, monolithic lithium disilicate, and monolithic zirconia crowns were fabricated. Cyclic and static loadings were applied to the mesiobuccal cusp tip after thermocycling and fracture strengths were recorded. Fatigued lithium disilicate pressed zirconia crowns were found to have a fracture resistance of 9,117.81 ± 727.04 N, compared with 9,240.61 ± 887.21 N for monolithic zirconia crowns, 3,030.18 ± 1,505.83 N for fluorapatite pressed zirconia crowns, and 4,173.94 ± 877.46 N for monolithic lithium disilicate crowns (P = .001). This in vitro study shows that fatigued lithium disilicate pressed zirconia and monolithic zirconia crowns have better fracture resistance than fluorapatite pressed zirconia and monolithic lithium disilicate crowns.

  2. Comparative study of the marginal microleakage of six cements in fixed provisional crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissara, P; Comin, G; Martone, F; Scotti, R

    1998-10-01

    In many situations, provisional restorations require a long-term permanence in the oral cavity. During this period, the abutments need the best possible biologic and mechanical protection. In this way, the vitality of the pulp and the integrity of mineralized tissues can be preserved. The luting cement used to fix interim restorations should have good mechanical properties, low solubility, and good adhesion to resist bacterial and molecular penetration. However, because of its provisional nature, the prosthesis should be easy to remove from the abutments. These contrasting requirements may lead to a compromise in cement behavior, particularly in its mechanical properties. This in vitro study evaluated the marginal microleakage of 4 provisional cements, a cavity base compound and a zinc-phosphate luting cement in provisional acrylic resin crowns fixed on extracted human teeth. Thirty acrylic resin crowns were made and fitted on intact human premolars with the 6 cements. All restorations were applied in a standardized manner by means of an axial load of 10 kg. Specimens were thermocycled then submerged in a 5% basic fuchsin solution, then sectioned and observed under a light stereomicroscope. A 5-level scale was used to score dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface. A high dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface was present in all 4 provisional cements. Microleakage existed in specimens where zinc-phosphate and cavity base compounds were used; however, it was lower than the other materials. A significant difference (P provisional cement as far as microleakage is concerned.

  3. Rehabilitation of Mohawk Lake: Brantford's crown jewel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, C.W.; Kube, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Mohawk Lake in Brantford, Ontario had been receiving contaminants from various industrial and municipal sources since the late 1800s. The lake suffered a slow death with the absence of any watershed management plan. A citizen committee was established in 1990 to rehabilitate the lake so that its recreational and resource potential could be fully realized. In 1993, the committee obtained government funding to carry out a detailed baseline environmental study of the lake. Lake sediments were found to consist of an upper horizon of poorly consolidated, organic-rich, odoriferous material overlying a more compact sandy layer. Lake water was characterized by high concentrations of nutrients and metals, and high biological oxygen demand. Sediments also had high concentrations of heavy metals and low concentrations of such organic contaminants as pyrene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls. The most distinct contaminant appeared to be petroleum hydrocarbons at 0.5-1% concentration. It was determined that lake rehabilitation would require removal of these sediments. Tests indicated that the sediments were non-hazardous non-registrable solid waste, and the preferred removal option was hydraulic dredging into settlement ponds along the undeveloped south shore of the lake. A sediment trap was recommended to be installed at the entrance of the lake, along with a constructed wetland to remove a variety of water pollutants. The sediment dredging, dewatering, trap and wetland installation, and land remediation of the sediment disposal area are estimated to cost ca $3.75 million, and the work will require at least 18 months to complete. 1 fig

  4. Digital evaluation of the fit of zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate crowns with a new three-dimensional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Moritz; Valcanaia, Andre; Neiva, Gisele; Mehl, Albert; Fasbinder, Dennis

    2017-11-30

    Several methods for the evaluation of fit of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM)-fabricated restorations have been described. In the study, digital models were recorded with an intraoral scanning device and were measured using a new three-dimensional (3D) computer technique to evaluate restoration internal fit. The aim of the study was to evaluate the internal adaptation and fit of chairside CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic crowns fabricated with different post-milling protocols. The null hypothesis was that different post-milling protocols did not influence the fitting accuracy of zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate restorations. A master all-ceramic crown preparation was completed on a maxillary right first molar on a typodont. Twenty zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic crowns (Celtra Duo, Dentsply Sirona) were designed and milled using a chairside CAD/CAM system (CEREC Omnicam, Dentsply Sirona). The 20 crowns were randomly divided into two groups based on post-milling protocols: no manipulation after milling (Group MI) and oven fired-glazing after milling (Group FG). A 3D computer method was used to evaluate the internal adaptation of the crowns. This was based on a subtractive analysis of a digital scan of the crown preparation and a digital scan of the thickness of the cement space over the crown preparation as recorded by a polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) impression material. The preparation scan and PVS scan were matched in 3D and a 3D difference analysis was performed with a software program (OraCheck, Cyfex). Three areas of internal adaptation and fit were selected for analysis: margin (MA), axial wall (AX), and occlusal surface (OC). Statistical analysis was performed using 80% percentile and one-way ANOVA with post-hoc Scheffé test (P = .05). The closest internal adaptation of the crowns was measured at the axial wall with 102.0 ± 11.7 µm for group MI-AX and 106.3 ± 29.3 µm for group FG

  5. Modeling the spatial distribution of forest crown biomass and effects on fire behavior with FUEL3D and WFDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell A. Parsons; William Mell; Peter McCauley

    2010-01-01

    Crown fire poses challenges to fire managers and can endanger fire fighters. Understanding of how fire interacts with tree crowns is essential to informed decisions about crown fire. Current operational crown fire predictions in the United States assume homogeneous crown fuels. While a new class of research fire models, which model fire behavior with computational...

  6. Iron removal, energy consumption and operating cost of electrocoagulation of drinking water using a new flow column reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Khalid S; Shaw, Andy; Al Khaddar, Rafid; Pedrola, Montserrat Ortoneda; Phipps, David

    2017-03-15

    The goal of this project was to remove iron from drinking water using a new electrocoagulation (EC) cell. In this research, a flow column has been employed in the designing of a new electrocoagulation reactor (FCER) to achieve the planned target. Where, the water being treated flows through the perforated disc electrodes, thereby effectively mixing and aerating the water being treated. As a result, the stirring and aerating devices that until now have been widely used in the electrocoagulation reactors are unnecessary. The obtained results indicated that FCER reduced the iron concentration from 20 to 0.3 mg/L within 20 min of electrolysis at initial pH of 6, inter-electrode distance (ID) of 5 mm, current density (CD) of 1.5 mA/cm 2 , and minimum operating cost of 0.22 US $/m 3 . Additionally, it was found that FCER produces H 2 gas enough to generate energy of 10.14 kW/m 3 . Statistically, it was found that the relationship between iron removal and operating parameters could be modelled with R 2 of 0.86, and the influence of operating parameters on iron removal followed the order: C 0 >t>CD>pH. Finally, the SEM (scanning electron microscopy) images showed a large number of irregularities on the surface of anode due to the generation of aluminium hydroxides. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Management of Complicated Crown Fracture and Associated Impacted Mesiodens- Case Report with 3yrs Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A, Victor; R, Mahesh; Gupta Y, Mohit

    2014-09-01

    Mesiodens being the most common type of supernumerary tooth, usually results in malocclusion, poor aesthetics and cyst formation if it is not corrected. The management protocol involves surgical removal. The situation can be complicated in young permanent dentition where there are a lot of chances of damage to the permanent dentition during surgical removal of impacted teeth. This article reports a case of impacted mesiodens which was diagnosed during management of complicated crown fracture. The case was followed up to 3years which showed a good bone formation. The article highlights the need for regular follow-up after surgical removal of impacted teeth in young children, to see any changes or damage in the developing permanent teeth.

  8. Chipping Resistance of Graded Zirconia Ceramics for Dental Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Chai, H.; Lee, J.J.-W.; Lawn, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    A serious drawback of veneering porcelains is a pronounced susceptibility to chipping. Glass-infiltrated dense zirconia structures can now be produced with esthetic quality, making them an attractive alternative. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that such infiltrated structures are much more chip-resistant than conventional porcelains, and at least as chip-resistant as non-infiltrated zirconia. A sharp indenter was used to produce chips in flat and anatomically correct glass-infiltrated zirconia crown materials, and critical loads were measured as a function of distance from the specimen edge (flat) or side wall (crown). Control data were obtained on zirconia specimens without infiltration and on crowns veneered with porcelains. The results confirmed that the resistance to chipping in graded zirconia is more than 4 times higher than that of porcelain-veneered zirconia and is at least as high as that of non-veneered zirconia. PMID:22232142

  9. Microleakage of core materials for complete cast gold crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjan, A H; Chiu, J

    1989-06-01

    This study evaluated the microleakage patterns of complete cast-gold crowns cemented onto teeth rebuilt with pin-retained cores made from cast gold, amalgam, composite resin, and silver-reinforced glass ionomer by using three different cements (zinc phosphate, glass ionomer, and resin cement). Crowns cemented onto unrebuilt tooth preparations with zinc phosphate cement served as controls. The cemented specimens were thermocycled between 4 degrees and 50 degrees C in waterbaths. They were then embedded in epoxy resin and sectioned. The extent of marginal microleakage was evaluated with a stereomicroscope and scored. The findings indicated that the type of luting agent used appeared to affect microleakage more than the core material. No significant differences in the degree of microleakage were found under crowns cemented onto teeth rebuilt with the four core materials when cemented with the same luting cement.

  10. A zirconia implant-crown system: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohal, Ralf J; Klaus, Gerold

    2004-04-01

    Exposed metal crown margins in the porcelain-fused-to-metal technique might be an esthetic problem. Therefore, all-ceramic crown systems are used for restoring teeth and dental implants. In addition, the gray color of a titanium implant might hamper the esthetic appearance of the entire reconstruction in cases of thin peri-implant soft tissue or tissue retraction. To further improve the esthetic aspect of dental implants, efforts are undertaken to develop implant systems fabricated out of tooth-colored materials that are biocompatible and able to withstand masticatory forces. One such material may be zirconia. The present article presents a case in which an all-ceramic custom-made zirconia implant-crown system was used for the replacement of a single tooth.

  11. Retention of crowns cemented on implant abutments with temporary cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yuko; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    This study was to examine the retentive force of crowns to implant abutments with commercial temporary cements. Six different temporary cements were investigated. Cast crowns were cemented to the abutments using each cement and their retentive forces to abutments were determined 7 or 28 days after cementing (n=10). The retentive force of the cements to abutments varied widely among the products [27-109 N (7-day), 18-80 N (28-days)]. The retentive force of all the cements was not reduced as the time elapsed, except for two products tested. The polycarboxylate cements and paste-mixing type eugenol-free cements revealed comparable retentive force after 28 days of storage. The powder-liquid type cements showed a positive correlation (pcement between the retentive force and compressive strength. Mechanical strength of temporary cements could not be a prominent predicting factor for retention of the crowns on the abutments.

  12. AB INITIO INVESTIGATION OF 12-CROWN-4 AND BENZO-12-CROWN-4 COMPLEXES WITH Li+, Na+, K+, Zn2+, Cd2+, AND Hg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahmin Yahmin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure and binding energies of 12-crown-4 and benzo-12-crown-4 complexes with Li+, Na+, K+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Hg2+were investigated with ab initio calculations using Hartree-Fock approximation and second-order perturbation theory. The basis set used in this study is lanl2mb. The structure optimization of cation-crown ether complexes was evaluated at HF/lanl2mb level of theory and interaction energy of the corresponding complexes was calculated at MP2/lanl2mb level of theory (MP2/lanl2mb//HF/lanl2mb. Interactions of the crown ethers and the cations were discussed in term of the structure parameter of crown ether. The binding energies of the complexes show that all complex formed from transition metal cations is more stable than the complexes formed from alkali metal cations.   Keywords: 12-crown-4, benzo-12-crown-4, alkali metals, transition metals

  13. Crown-ether functionalized carbon nanotubes for purification of lithium compounds: computational and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Deb, A.K.; Arora, S.K.; Joshi, J.M.; Ali, Sk. M.; Shenoy, K.T.; Goyal, Aiana

    2015-01-01

    Lithium compounds finds several applications in nuclear science and technology, viz, lithium fluoride/hydroxide/alloys are used as dosimetric materials in luminescence devices, molten-salt breeder reactor, international thermonuclear experimental reactor, single crystal based neutron detectors etc. The lithium compounds should be in a proper state of purity; especially it should not contain other alkali metal cations which can downgrade the performance. Hence, there is a need to develop a process for purification of the lithium salt to achieve the desired quality. Therefore an attempt has been made to develop advanced nanomaterials for purification of the lithium salts. In this work, benzo-15-crown-5(B15C5) functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), owing to the good adsorption properties of CNT and alkali metal encapsulation behaviour of B15C5, were showed to bind preferentially with sodium and potassium ions compared to lithium ions. DFT based computation calculations have shown that the free energy of complexation of Na + and K + by B15C5-CNT is higher than that of Li + , implying that B15C5-CNT selectively binds Na + and K + . The experimental batch solid-liquid extraction has also revealed the same trend as in the calculations. The crown-ethers functionalized CNTs have the potentiality for use in purifying lithium compounds. (author)

  14. Uniform versus asymmetric shading mediates crown recession in conifers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Schoonmaker

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the impact of asymmetrical vs. uniform crown shading on the mortality and growth of upper and lower branches within tree crowns, for two conifer species: shade intolerant lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta and shade tolerant white spruce (Picea glauca. We also explore xylem hydraulics, foliar nutrition, and carbohydrate status as drivers for growth and expansion of the lower and upper branches in various types of shading. This study was conducted over a two-year period across 10 regenerating forest sites dominated by lodgepole pine and white spruce, in the lower foothills of Alberta, Canada. Trees were assigned to one of four shading treatments: (1, complete uniform shading of the entire tree, (2 light asymmetric shading where the lower 1/4-1/3 of the tree crown was shaded, (3 heavy asymmetric shading as in (2 except with greater light reduction and (4 control in which no artificial shading occurred and most of the entire crown was exposed to full light. Asymmetrical shading of only the lower crown had a larger negative impact on the bud expansion and growth than did uniform shading, and the effect was stronger in pine relative to spruce. In addition, lower branches in pine also had lower carbon reserves, and reduced xylem-area specific conductivity compared to spruce. For both species, but particularly the pine, the needles of lower branches tended to store less C than upper branches in the asymmetric shade, which could suggest a movement of reserves away from the lower branches. The implications of these findings correspond with the inherent shade tolerance and self-pruning behavior of these conifers and supports a carbon based mechanism for branch mortality--mediated by an asymmetry in light exposure of the crown.

  15. Provisional crown failures in dental school predoctoral clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jeffrey D; Bader, James A; Shugars, Daniel A

    2007-11-01

    Following a preliminary study indicating that at least 10 percent of single-unit crown temporary restorations failed in patients who received treatment by predoctoral students, a comprehensive examination of provisional crown failure was initiated to identify strategies to reduce the failure rate. For all provisionalized, natural tooth, single-unit crown preparations in University of North Carolina School of Dentistry predoctoral clinics for one year (N=1008), we noted tooth type, type of crown, student level, faculty coverage experience, treatment clinic, temporary material and luting agent, and retreatment (failure) of the provisional restoration. For failures, we also noted the stage of crown preparation at failure and the time since initial placement of the temporary. We analyzed these data using simple cross-tabs and logistic regression on need for retreatment (alpha =0.05). The failure rate was 18.75 percent (N=189). The median time to failure was twelve days; the 25(th) and 75(th) percentiles were six and twenty-six days. Significant risk factors, in order of odds ratio estimates, were molar tooth, second- or third-year student, and inexperienced faculty. Most provisional failures occurred during the final preparation phase of treatment. Provisional restoration failure is more frequent than was initially suspected from preliminary studies. Strategies for institutional intervention to reduce provisional restoration failure include greater attention to evaluating provisional crowns placed by inexperienced students (sophomores and juniors) and placing more emphasis on the retentiveness of provisional restorations reused following the final impression. Review of provisional evaluation procedures is also indicated for faculty who do not routinely supervise these procedures.

  16. Displacement of Monolithic Rubble-Mound Breakwater Crown-Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2012-01-01

    of the accumulated sliding distance of crown-wall superstructures, which is in contrast to findings from previous similar studies on caisson breakwaters. The calculated sliding distance is approximately three times larger than the measured one when using the original one-dimensional model suggested in previous...... studies on caisson breakwaters, but correction terms are suggested in the present paper to obtain almost equal measured and estimated displacements. This is of great practical importance since many existing rubble-mound crown-walls are subjected to increasing wave loads due to rising sea water level from...

  17. Evaluation of retention of cemented laser-sintered crowns on unmodified straight narrow implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicarslan, Mehmet Ali; Ozkan, Pelin

    2013-01-01

    A common problem with cemented crowns is inadequate retention at the crown-abutment interface. The aim of this study was to compare the retention of new laser-sintered cobalt-chromium alloy crowns to the retention of cobalt-chromium alloy crowns fabricated with a traditional casting technique with and without an alloy primer. Twenty-four metallic crowns per casting technique were fabricated, and surface roughness values were recorded with a profilometer. Alloy primer was applied to half the specimens, and all crowns were luted with resin cement. After 24 hours, specimens were subjected to tensile force application with a universal testing machine. The effect of the cement amount was evaluated with an analytic balance. The results were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis multiple-comparison test. The Spearman correlation was used to determine correlations between crown retention and cement weight. The laser-sintered crowns (2.72 μm) were rougher than conventionally cast crowns. The mean load to failure values were as follows: 455.10 ± 192.69 Ncm for conventional crowns, 565.52 ± 112.87 Ncm for conventional crowns with alloy primer, 534.78 ± 130.15 Ncm for laser-sintered crowns, and 678.60 ± 212.83 Ncm for laser-sintered crowns with alloy primer. Laser-sintered crowns (10.10 ± 2.15 mg) showed a significant difference in terms of cement weight compared with cast crowns. In addition, negative correlations were found for retention and cement weight between all groups, except for the laser-sintered group without alloy primer. Retentive forces were significantly higher for laser-sintered crowns than for conventionally cast crowns. An increase in the surface roughness and the application of alloy primers led to an increase in the adhesive bonding of resin cements to metal alloys. It was concluded that a reduction in cement weight improved retention.

  18. In vitro fracture resistance of three commercially available zirconia crowns for primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Janice A; Knoell, Patrick; Yu, Qingzhao; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yapin; Zhu, Han; Beattie, Sean; Xu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the fracture resistance of primary mandibular first molar zirconia crowns from three different manufacturers-EZ Pedo (EZP), NuSmile (NSZ), and Kinder Krowns (KK)-and compare it with the thickness of the zirconia crowns and the measured fracture resistance of preveneered stainless steel crowns (SSCs). The thickness of 20 zirconia crowns from three manufacturers were measured. The mean force required to fracture the crowns was determined. Preveneered NuSmile (NSW) SSCs were tested as a control. EZP crowns were significantly thicker in three of the six measured locations. The force required to fracture the EZP crown was significantly higher than that required for NSZ and KK. There was a positive correlation between fracture resistance and crown thickness in the mesial, distal, mesioocclusal, and distoocclusal dimensions. None of the zirconia crowns proved to be as resistant to fracture as the preveneered SSCs. Statistically significant differences were found among the forces required to fracture zirconia crowns by three different manufacturers. The increase in force correlated with crown thickness. The forces required to fracture the preveneered stainless steel crowns were greater than the forces required to fracture all manufacturers' zirconia crowns.

  19. Cast prosthesis removal using ultrasonics and a thermoplastic resin adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, F R; O'Connor, R P; Hutter, J W

    1994-03-01

    Nonsurgical endodontic procedures are routinely performed on teeth with existing cast restorations. The internal anatomy of the tooth and location of the root canals may be obscured by a crown or fixed partial denture. Tooth morphology and canal location may, therefore, be better visualized without the cast restoration in place. This article describes a conservative technique to remove an existing cast restoration to facilitate nonsurgical root canal treatment.

  20. Effect of different cement types on monolithic lithium disilicate complete crowns with feather-edge preparation design in the posterior region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Johannes H; Beani, Massimiliano

    2016-06-01

    Ideally, tooth preparation for complete crowns should require the removal of the smallest amount possible of sound tooth structure to maximize the strength of the remaining tooth. Some preparation designs, such as the feather-edge margin, are less invasive. However, limited data are available regarding monolithic lithium disilicate crowns for molars and premolars with this type of margin geometry. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcome and survival of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns in the posterior region fabricated with feather-edge margins and cemented either with conventional (glass ionomer) or resin self-etching cement in 2 private practices. A total of 257 monolithic lithium disilicate restorations on posterior teeth (108 premolars, 149 molars) were placed in 158 patients. All teeth were prepared with feather-edge margins and restored with single crowns. The modified California Dental Association (CDA) criteria were used to clinically evaluate participants recalled between June and December 2014. The mean ±standard deviation follow-up time was 24 (±13.6; range: 6-75) months. Three crowns were replaced during the follow-up period because of the bulk fracture of the material (98.83% survival rate). No other technical or biological failure was observed. In this retrospective evaluation, monolithic lithium disilicate crowns with feather-edge margins yielded clinical outcomes similar to those reported with other margin designs and materials. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrolysis iron injection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Ichiro; Aizawa, Motohiro; Usui, Naoshi; Osumi, Katsumi; Mizuniwa, Fumio.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a chemical cleaning device and a pipeline for cleaning in addition to an existent device comprising a vessel for supplying gaseous carbon dioxide under pressure, an electrolytic vessel made of an iron plate and a CO 2 disperser. The chemical cleaning device comprises a heater for heating a cleaning liquid, a cleaning liquid vessel for controlling and storing the cleaning liquid and a filter for capturing dissolved and defoliated iron. As the cleaning liquid, oxalic acid, citric acid, sulfuric acid or hydrogen peroxide is used solely or in combination. A closed loop is constituted to a portion in the device, where iron is formed by deposition, by the chemical cleaning device and the cleaning pipeline, and a recycling operation is conducted while heating to 30 to 60degC for a predetermined period to dissolve and remove deposited iron cruds. With such procedures, the device can be operated stably for a long period of time and radioactivity concentration of reactor water in a nuclear power plant can be reduced. (T.M.)

  2. URBAN TREE CROWN PROJECTION AREA MAPPING WITH OBJECT BASED IMAGE ANALYSIS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM SERVICE INDICATOR DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAKÁCS ÁGNES

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The continuous expansion of built-up areas in the urban environment at the expense of green spaces brings up numerous environmental problems, for which accurate and efficient solutions should be found. The assessment of ecosystem services developed within the field of landscape ecology is playing an ever more important role in environmental sciences and thus may offer suitable answers. Such assessments can be carried out by developing indicators. Accordingly, in the case of urban trees, an accurate quantitative characterization of their services (such as e.g. carbon sequestration, pollutant removal and microclimate regulation is also needed. The aim of this study is to establish a generally applicable method based on indicator development, using widely available data. In the case of urban green spaces there are several services for which the development of proper indicators and evaluation methods requires a delineation of tree crowns, or at least the crown projection area. Accordingly, in our work, we map the crown projection area of a large and popular urban park of Szeged, Széchenyi square, using object-based image analysis on UltraCamD digital orthophotos. Following a multiresolution segmentation the classification of the resulting objects was carried out, using the eCognition image analysis software. Besides fulfilling the policy objectives related to the evaluation of urban ecosystem services, the produced crown base can also be used in several other types of urban ecological and urban climatological studies (e.g. urban climate modelling, human-comfort assessment. In this paper the first results are presented.

  3. Fluorescence Sensing Properties of Thiazolobenzo-crown Ether Incorporating Coumarin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Helal, Aasif; Kim, Hong Seok

    2010-01-01

    A new coumarin-thiazolobenzo-crown ether based fluorogenic chemosensor BTC (1) was reported. The ion-selective binding properties of 1 with different alkali, alkaline earth metals and transitional metals were investigated in an ethanol- DMSO system. BTC (1) showed the highest binding constant toward Hg 2+ over Ag + , Pb 2+ and Cu 2+

  4. Fracture Resistance Force of Primary Molar Crowns Milled from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... and porcelain‑based ceramic blocks, metal alloy blocks, and various composite ... Mete, et al.: Primary molar CAD/CAM crowns brittleness, tendency to fracturing, and attrition on the enamel of the antagonist tooth.[9‑13] To overcome its ..... Yilmaz A, Ozdemir CE, Yilmaz Y. A delayed hypersensitivity reaction ...

  5. Effect of detachment time of pineapple ( Ananas comosus L .) crown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A limiting factor to large scale production of pineapple is the scarcity of planting materials. The use of pineapple crown as a propagation material is common, but with no regard to length of time after detachment. A study was conducted in the late seasons of 2007 and 2008 at the Teaching and Research Farm Ekiti State ...

  6. Fracture Resistance Force of Primary Molar Crowns Milled from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... are used.[8]. Glass‑ceramic material that is widely used with. CAD/CAM technologies has both advantages such as the esthetic appearance, color stability, biocompatibility, and life‑long durability and disadvantages such as. Original Article. Introduction. Stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were introduced by.

  7. CAD/CAM technology for implant abutments, crowns, and superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapos, Theodoros; Evans, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to compare implant prostheses fabricated by computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) with conventionally fabricated implant prostheses when assessing esthetics, complications (biologic and mechanical), patient satisfaction, and economic factors. Electronic searches for clinical studies focusing on long-term follow-up were performed using the PubMed and Ovid search engines. Concentrating on the restorative aspect of the CAD/CAM technology applicable to implant dentistry, pertinent literature was divided into articles related to implant abutments, crowns, and frameworks. A total of 18 articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. Two articles reported on CAD/CAM crowns, six on abutments, and 10 on implant-supported CAD/CAM frameworks. The mean survival rate for CAD/CAM crowns was 98.85% and for CAD/CAM abutments 100%. The mean survival rate for CAD/CAM frameworks was 95.98%. Based on the current literature, CAD/CAM fabricated crowns, abutments, and frameworks demonstrate survival rates comparable to conventionally fabricated prostheses. Implant survival appears unaffected by fabrication technique. Since this technology encompasses several manufacturing variations, a new definition might be necessary to accurately define the processes under which the CAD/CAM restorations are fabricated. "Complete CAD/CAM product" where no or minimal manual intervention is employed could be a possible term.

  8. Evaluaton of Wild Juglans Species for Crown Gall Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown Gall disease of walnut is caused by the ubiquitous soil-borne bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, which is able to transfer a specific piece of its own DNA into the genome of the plant host cell. The result of this genetic transformation is the autonomous undifferentiated massive growth of ...

  9. Loading capacity of zirconia implant supported hybrid ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Nadja; Coldea, Andrea; Zitzmann, Nicola U; Fischer, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Recently a polymer infiltrated hybrid ceramic was developed, which is characterized by a low elastic modulus and therefore may be considered as potential material for implant supported single crowns. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the loading capacity of hybrid ceramic single crowns on one-piece zirconia implants with respect to the cement type. Fracture load tests were performed on standardized molar crowns milled from hybrid ceramic or feldspar ceramic, cemented to zirconia implants with either machined or etched intaglio surface using four different resin composite cements. Flexure strength, elastic modulus, indirect tensile strength and compressive strength of the cements were measured. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA (p=0.05). The hybrid ceramic exhibited statistically significant higher fracture load values than the feldspar ceramic. Fracture load values and compressive strength values of the respective cements were correlated. Highest fracture load values were achieved with an adhesive cement (1253±148N). Etching of the intaglio surface did not improve the fracture load. Loading capacity of hybrid ceramic single crowns on one-piece zirconia implants is superior to that of feldspar ceramic. To achieve maximal loading capacity for permanent cementation of full-ceramic restorations on zirconia implants, self-adhesive or adhesive cements with a high compressive strength should be used. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Why do crown ethers activate enzymes in organic solvents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Unen, D.J.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks of enzymes in nonaqueous solvents is that their activity is often dramatically low compared to that in water. This limitation can be largely overcome by crown ether treatment of enzymes. In this paper, we describe a number of carefully designed new experiments that have

  11. Mandibular molar crown-topography, a biological predisposing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mandibular molar crown-topography, a biological predisposing factor to development of caries – a post-mortem analysis of 2500 extracted lower permanent molars at ... (12.57%), distol surface attack 1,528 (12.22%) buccal surface attack 926 (7.40%), lingual surface attack 59 (0.47%) occlusal surface attack 6540 (52.32%).

  12. Bio-inspired ion selective crown-ether polymer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Sinem

    2016-01-01

    Development of unctional membranes that are capable of selectively recognizing and transporting ions have key importance for the recovery and separation of specific icons (e.d. K+, Li+, Na+) from multicomponent mixtures. In this thesis, new membrane materials based on crown ether-metal ion

  13. Novel Ordered Crown Ether-Containing Polyimides for Ion Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, Jennifer A.; Stasko, Daniel; Fallis, Stephen; Guenthner, Andrew J.; Webber, Cynthia; Blackwell, John; Chvalun, Sergei N.

    2003-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of thermally-stable polyimides for use as battery and fuel cell electrolyte membranes. Dianhydrides used were 1,4,5,8- naphthalenetetracarboxylic dianhydride and/or 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic anhydride. Diamines used were anti-4,4-diaminodibenzo-l8-crown-6, 4,4'- diaminodibenzo-24-crown-8, 2,2-bis(4-aminophenyl)hexafluoropropane, and/or 2,5- diaminobenzenesulfonic acid. The polymers were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. Polymers containing the hexafluoroisopropylidene (HFIP) group were soluble in common organic solvents, while polymers without the HFIP group were very poorly soluble. Sulfonation yields polymers that are sparingly soluble in aqueous base and/or methanol. Degree of sulfonation, determined by titration, was between one and three sulfonate groups per repeat unit. Proton conductivity was determined as a function of water content, with a maximum conductivity of l x 10(exp -2) per centimeter when fully hydrated. Crown ether-containing polymers exhibit a high degree of order that may be indicative of crown ether channel formation, which may facilitate Li(+) transport for use in battery membranes.

  14. Chemical constituent analysis of the crown-of-thorns starfish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci is a major management issue on coral reefs and the exploring of effective control methods to the starfish is an interesting goal. In this study, the chemical constituent of the starfish were analyzed and the toxicity of the starfish was tested when it was used as mice diet.

  15. Towards an optimized method of olive tree crown volume measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Llorens, Jordi; Gamarra-Diezma, Juan L; Gil-Ribes, Jesús A; Gil, Emilio

    2015-02-04

    Accurate crown characterization of large isolated olive trees is vital for adjusting spray doses in three-dimensional crop agriculture. Among the many methodologies available, laser sensors have proved to be the most reliable and accurate. However, their operation is time consuming and requires specialist knowledge and so a simpler crown characterization method is required. To this end, three methods were evaluated and compared with LiDAR measurements to determine their accuracy: Vertical Crown Projected Area method (VCPA), Ellipsoid Volume method (VE) and Tree Silhouette Volume method (VTS). Trials were performed in three different kinds of olive tree plantations: intensive, adapted one-trunked traditional and traditional. In total, 55 trees were characterized. Results show that all three methods are appropriate to estimate the crown volume, reaching high coefficients of determination: R2 = 0.783, 0.843 and 0.824 for VCPA, VE and VTS, respectively. However, discrepancies arise when evaluating tree plantations separately, especially for traditional trees. Here, correlations between LiDAR volume and other parameters showed that the Mean Vector calculated for VCPA method showed the highest correlation for traditional trees, thus its use in traditional plantations is highly recommended.

  16. Calix salophen crown ethers as receptors for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichwein, A.M.; Reichwein, Arjen M.; Verboom, Willem; Harkema, Sybolt; Spek, Anthony L.; Reinhoudt, David

    1994-01-01

    The calix[4]arene based salophen crown ethers 7 and 8 were synthesized as lipophilic carriers for neutral molecules. The X-ray structures of the H2O, CH3OH and (CH3)2SO complexes of 8a have been determined.

  17. Diet of nesting African Crowned Eagles Stephanoaetus coronatus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the species composition of prey caught in the forest, savanna and emerging habitats in which African Crowned Eagles Stephanoaetus coronatus breed in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. At the 17 nest sites, the remains of 195 prey individuals were collected. The five dominant ...

  18. Notes on African Crowned Eagle Stephanoaetus coronatus diet in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our study reports on contrasts in prey items from African Crowned Eagle Stephanoaetus coronatus nesting in forest (n = 1) and savanna (n = 2) biomes in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. At least 12 taxa were identified at a forest nest, of which 92.1% were neonate/juvenile. Bovids and procaviids represented 73.7% and 19.6% ...

  19. Towards an Optimized Method of Olive Tree Crown Volume Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Llorens, Jordi; Gamarra-Diezma, Juan L.; Gil-Ribes, Jesús A.; Gil, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Accurate crown characterization of large isolated olive trees is vital for adjusting spray doses in three-dimensional crop agriculture. Among the many methodologies available, laser sensors have proved to be the most reliable and accurate. However, their operation is time consuming and requires specialist knowledge and so a simpler crown characterization method is required. To this end, three methods were evaluated and compared with LiDAR measurements to determine their accuracy: Vertical Crown Projected Area method (VCPA), Ellipsoid Volume method (VE) and Tree Silhouette Volume method (VTS). Trials were performed in three different kinds of olive tree plantations: intensive, adapted one-trunked traditional and traditional. In total, 55 trees were characterized. Results show that all three methods are appropriate to estimate the crown volume, reaching high coefficients of determination: R2 = 0.783, 0.843 and 0.824 for VCPA, VE and VTS, respectively. However, discrepancies arise when evaluating tree plantations separately, especially for traditional trees. Here, correlations between LiDAR volume and other parameters showed that the Mean Vector calculated for VCPA method showed the highest correlation for traditional trees, thus its use in traditional plantations is highly recommended. PMID:25658396

  20. Towards an Optimized Method of Olive Tree Crown Volume Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Miranda-Fuentes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate crown characterization of large isolated olive trees is vital for adjusting spray doses in three-dimensional crop agriculture. Among the many methodologies available, laser sensors have proved to be the most reliable and accurate. However, their operation is time consuming and requires specialist knowledge and so a simpler crown characterization method is required. To this end, three methods were evaluated and compared with LiDAR measurements to determine their accuracy: Vertical Crown Projected Area method (VCPA, Ellipsoid Volume method (VE and Tree Silhouette Volume method (VTS. Trials were performed in three different kinds of olive tree plantations: intensive, adapted one-trunked traditional and traditional. In total, 55 trees were characterized. Results show that all three methods are appropriate to estimate the crown volume, reaching high coefficients of determination: R2 = 0.783, 0.843 and 0.824 for VCPA, VE and VTS, respectively. However, discrepancies arise when evaluating tree plantations separately, especially for traditional trees. Here, correlations between LiDAR volume and other parameters showed that the Mean Vector calculated for VCPA method showed the highest correlation for traditional trees, thus its use in traditional plantations is highly recommended.

  1. Protonation of benzo-18-crown-6: Extraction and DFT study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Toman, Petr; Makrlík, E.; Vaňura, P.; Kašička, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 225, č. 2 (2011), s. 265-270 ISSN 0942-9352 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/10/2280 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : protonation * nitrobenzene * benzo-18-crown-6 Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2011

  2. Evaluating host resistance to Macrophomina crown rot in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophomina crown rot, caused by the soilborne fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, is an emerging pathogen in California strawberry production. When established, the pathogen can cause extensive plant decline and mortality. Host resistance will be a critical tool for managing this disease and guiding ...

  3. Evolution of the mandibular third premolar crown in early Australopithecus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delezene, Lucas K; Kimbel, William H

    2011-06-01

    The Pliocene hominins Australopithecus anamensis and Australopithecus afarensis likely represent ancestor-descendent taxa--possibly an anagenetic lineage--and capture significant change in the morphology of the canine and mandibular third premolar (P(3)) crowns, dental elements that form the canine honing complex in nonhuman catarrhines. This study focuses on the P(3) crown, highlighting plesiomorphic features in A. anamensis. The A. afarensis P(3) crown, in contrast, is variable in its expression of apomorphic features that are characteristic of geologically younger hominins. Temporal variation characterizes each taxon as well. The A. anamensis P(3) from Allia Bay, Kenya expresses apomorphic character states, shared with A. afarensis, which are not seen in the older sample of A. anamensis P(3)s from Kanapoi, Kenya, while spatiotemporal differences in shape exist within the A. afarensis hypodigm. The accumulation of derived features in A. afarensis results in an increased level of P(3) molarisation. P(3) molarisation did not evolve concurrent with postcanine megadontia and neither did the appearance of derived aspects of P(3) occlusal form coincide with the loss of canine honing in hominins, which is apparent prior to the origin of the genus Australopithecus. A. afarensis P(3) variation reveals the independence of shape, size, and occlusal form. The evolution of the P(3) crown in early Australopithecus bridges the wide morphological gap that exists between geologically younger hominins on the one hand and extant apes and Ardipithecus on the other. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. New die design for dimensional accuracy assessment of crown castings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Danny

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce a newly designed die for ceramometal restoration, and to compare the dimensional accuracy with the traditional complete-crown design. Two methods of dimensional accuracy assessment, vertical axial discrepancy and transverse diametral percentage, were compared. Patterns were prepared from two different die designs--complete crown and ceramometal. Two investments available for titanium crown casting were used, Titavest CB and T-invest C & B. Titanium castings were made from each investment with a high-pressure casting machine. Vertical axial discrepancy of casting was determined by measuring the discrepancy for each set of wax patterns and their castings on the same die under a traveling microscope. Dimensional accuracy was expressed as vertical axial discrepancy and by transforming the vertical axial discrepancy into transverse diametral percentage. Both dies produced undersized castings with T-invest C & B and oversized castings with Titavest CB. Dimensional accuracy assessment of the two different types of crown casting design showed no significant difference in vertical axial discrepancy. Compared to the traditional transverse diametral percentage calculation, the vertical axial discrepancy assessment is independent of the die's dimensions. The two types of investment materials studied resulted in castings with different dimensional accuracies.

  5. Evaluation of Vertical Marginal Adaptation of Provisional Crowns by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Department of Prosthetic Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry,. King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. E‑mail: malrifaiy@hotmail.com. How to cite this article: Al Rifaiy MQ. Evaluation of vertical marginal adaptation of provisional crowns by digital microscope. Niger J Clin Pract. 2017 ...

  6. Grey Crowned Cranes Balearica regulorum in urban areas of Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The greatest threat to birds in tropical Africa is habitat change; often a result of unsus- tainable agricultural practices (BirdLife International 2013a) and this certainly applies to Grey Crowned Cranes Balearica regulorum, whose primary breeding habitat — sea- sonal swamps — is increasingly being converted into cultivation ...

  7. Long-term survival of extensive amalgams and posterior crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smales, R J; Hawthorne, W S

    1997-01-01

    There is very little information available from private dental practices on the comparative survivals of extensive posterior amalgam restorations and posterior crowns placed in the same patient population. Therefore, the present retrospective study examined the performance of such restorations at three long-established Adelaide city practices. Life-table survival estimates were generated for 160 extensive amalgams, 96 cast gold crowns and 174 ceramometal crowns. The restorations were placed by 20 dentists at various times in 100 patients who attended the practices on a regular basis for around 25 years on average. There were no significant differences found in the survival times for both types of crowns, with around 70% still being present at 20 years. However, the median survival time for the extensive amalgams was much lower, at 14.6 years. Despite these differences in survival times, the extensive amalgam restorations survived for longer than is usually expected. In this present study, the survival findings have implications for the most cost-effective dental treatments of large lesions in posterior teeth.

  8. The impact of capture, domestication and trade on Black Crowned ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inland delta of the Niger, a vast floodplain, is the only refuge of Black Crowned Cranes in Mali. This study, centred on the regions of Mopti, Tenenkou and Youwarou, aimed to: (1) census the number of cranes in the delta and in captivity in the towns of Mopti and Bamako; (2) examine exploitation at different levels (local ...

  9. Evaluation of sampling strategies to estimate crown biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna P Poudel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Depending on tree and site characteristics crown biomass accounts for a significant portion of the total aboveground biomass in the tree. Crown biomass estimation is useful for different purposes including evaluating the economic feasibility of crown utilization for energy production or forest products, fuel load assessments and fire management strategies, and wildfire modeling. However, crown biomass is difficult to predict because of the variability within and among species and sites. Thus the allometric equations used for predicting crown biomass should be based on data collected with precise and unbiased sampling strategies. In this study, we evaluate the performance different sampling strategies to estimate crown biomass and to evaluate the effect of sample size in estimating crown biomass. Methods Using data collected from 20 destructively sampled trees, we evaluated 11 different sampling strategies using six evaluation statistics: bias, relative bias, root mean square error (RMSE, relative RMSE, amount of biomass sampled, and relative biomass sampled. We also evaluated the performance of the selected sampling strategies when different numbers of branches (3, 6, 9, and 12 are selected from each tree. Tree specific log linear model with branch diameter and branch length as covariates was used to obtain individual branch biomass. Results Compared to all other methods stratified sampling with probability proportional to size estimation technique produced better results when three or six branches per tree were sampled. However, the systematic sampling with ratio estimation technique was the best when at least nine branches per tree were sampled. Under the stratified sampling strategy, selecting unequal number of branches per stratum produced approximately similar results to simple random sampling, but it further decreased RMSE when information on branch diameter is used in the design and estimation phases. Conclusions Use of

  10. Asymptomatic ''crowned dens'' calcification in CT images for the craniovertebral junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Gen; Mori, Masataka; Fukushima, Tatsuro

    2007-01-01

    Calcification around the odontoid process suggests 'crowned dens' syndrome, when accompanied with acute occipital headache or neck pain and with inflammatory signs. We retrospectively searched for calcification around the odontoid process in routine CT images of 282 patients emcompassing the craniovertebral junction, and found 13 (4.6%) had 'crowned dens' calcifications with neither characteristic symptoms nor signs suggestive for crowned dens' syndrome. Females of older ages frequently showed asymptomatic crowned dens' calcifications. (author)

  11. Autologous reattachment of complicated crown fractures using intra canal anchorage: Report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Kashetty Panchakshari Bharath; Raju Umaji Patil; Haalaswamy Vishwanath Kambalimath; Ashokan Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Crown fractures are most common form of dental trauma sustained by children and adolescents. Major portion of these crown fractures are uncomplicated. Complicated crown fractures though infrequent and account only 4-16%, is an enigma to any clinician. Autologus reattachment of the tooth fragment is a simple and conservative procedure in managing such crown fractures. The present article intends to report the successful clinical management of Autologus tooth fragment reattachment in two compli...

  12. 77 FR 40735 - Unique Device Identification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... postmarket surveillance, and better security of devices through more effective detection and removal of... Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 16, 801, 803, et al. Unique Device Identification System; Proposed..., 806, 810, 814, 820, 821, 822, and 830 [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0090] RIN 0910-AG31 Unique Device...

  13. Electrostatic MEMS devices with high reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Charles L; Auciello, Orlando H; Sumant, Anirudha V; Mancini, Derrick C; Gudeman, Chris; Sampath, Suresh; Carlilse, John A; Carpick, Robert W; Hwang, James

    2015-02-24

    The present invention provides for an electrostatic microelectromechanical (MEMS) device comprising a dielectric layer separating a first conductor and a second conductor. The first conductor is moveable towards the second conductor, when a voltage is applied to the MEMS device. The dielectric layer recovers from dielectric charging failure almost immediately upon removal of the voltage from the MEMS device.

  14. Concentration device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A concentration device (2) for filter filtration concentration of particles (4) from a volume of a fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises a filter (8) configured to filter particles (4) of a predefined size in the volume of the fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises...

  15. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  16. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  17. Tire deflation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Stacey G [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-01-05

    A tire deflation device includes (1) a component having a plurality of bores, (2) a plurality of spikes removably insertable into the plurality of bores and (3) a keeper within each among the plurality of bores, the keeper being configured to contact a sidewall surface of a spike among the plurality of spikes and to exert force upon the sidewall surface. In an embodiment, the tire deflation device includes (a) a component including a bore in a material, the bore including a receiving region, a sidewall surface and a base surface, (b) a channel extending from the sidewall surface into the material, (c) a keeper having a first section housed within the channel and a second section which extends past the sidewall surface into the receiving region, and (d) a spike removably insertable into the bore.

  18. In vitro performance of full-contour zirconia single crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuer, Florian; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Gueth, Jan-Frederik; Edelhoff, Daniel; Naumann, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Zirconia based restorations exhibited high failure rates due to veneering-porcelain fractures. Milling to full-contour might be an alternative approach for zirconia restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate full-contour zirconia crowns in terms of light-transmission, contact wear (restoration and antagonist) and load-bearing capacity. Powder build-up veneered zirconia substructures and CAD/CAM-veneered zirconia substructures served as controls. Four different kinds of crowns were fabricated on 12 metal dies: zirconia substructure with powder build-up porcelain (veneering technique), zirconia substructure with CAD/CAM generated veneering (sintering technique), full-contour zirconia glazed (glazed full-contour) and full-contour zirconia polished (polished full-contour). All crowns had the same dimensions. After light-transmission was measured the crowns were cemented on the corresponding metal dies. The specimens were loaded according to a special wear method in the chewing simulator (120,000 mechanical cycles, 5 kg load, 0.7 mm sliding movement, 320 thermocycles). Wear of the restoration and the antagonist were measured. All specimens were loaded until failure. One-way ANOVA and a LSD post-hoc test were used to compare data at a level of 5%. Polished full-contour showed significantly higher light transmission than the other groups (p=0.003; ANOVA). Polished full-contour exhibited significantly less contact wear at the restoration (p=0.01; ANOVA) and higher contact wear at the antagonist (p=0.016; ANOVA) compared to the other groups. Glazed full-contour zirconia showed similar contact wear at the antagonist compared to veneering technique (p=0.513, post-hoc LSD). Crowns with conventional veneering showed significantly lower load-bearing capacity (pzirconia to full-contour with glazed surface might be an alternative to traditionally veneered restorations. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Unusual extraction behaviour of crown ether when intercalated in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaiah, M.V.; Krishna, R.M.; Murthy, G.S.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Sasidhar, P.

    2005-01-01

    Di-cyclo-hexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) has been intercalated in bentonite and the product, Ben-Crown, characterized by micro-elemental analysis, TG-DTA analysis, X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The permanent negative charge present in the bentonite layer has been exploited for more efficient extraction of cesium and strontium by Ben-Crown at nitric acid concentrations (≤ 1.0 M) that gave only a meagre extraction when either DCH18C6 or bentonite alone were employed. The extraction of cesium and strontium has been investigated as a function of time, temperature, and the concentrations of nitric acid, metal ion and sodium nitrate. An unusual extraction phenomenon was observed at low concentrations of nitric acid (≤ 1.0 M) in the absence of any organo-philic agents. Rapid extraction of the metal ion was followed by the establishment of an equilibrium, which occurred after 150 min. Distribution coefficients (K d ) of 599 and 1007 ml g -1 were obtained, respectively, for the extraction of cesium and strontium from 0.1 M nitric acid by Ben-Crown; K d decreased with an increase in the temperature or in the concentrations of nitric acid and sodium nitrate. The extraction data were fitted by the Langmuir adsorption model and the apparent experimental exchange capacity obtained by linear regression analysis was in good agreement with the amount of crown ether (0.22 mmol g -1 ) intercalated in bentonite. The enthalpy change (ΔH 0 ) for the extraction of cesium and strontium was found to be exothermic. (authors)

  20. Bud development and shoot morphology in relation to crown location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukk, Maarja; Sõber, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Plant architecture is shaped by endogenous growth processes interacting with the local environment. The current study investigated crown development in young black alder trees, assessing the effects of local light conditions and branch height on individual bud mass and contents. In addition, we examined the characteristics of parent shoots [the cross-sectional area (CSA) of stem and total leaf area, shoot length, the number of nodes, the number and total mass of buds per shoot] and leaf–stem as well as bud–stem allometry, as several recent studies link bud development to hydraulic architecture. We sampled shoots from top branches and two lower-crown locations: one subjected to deep shade and the other resembling the upper branches in light availability. Sampling was carried out three times between mid-July and late October, spanning from the early stages of bud growth to dormancy. Individual bud mass and shoot characteristics varied in response to light conditions, whereas leaf–stem allometry depended on branch height, most likely compensating for the increasing length of hydraulic pathways. Despite the differences in individual bud mass, the number of preformed leaves varied little across the crown, indicating that the plasticity in shoot characteristics was mainly achieved by neoformation. The relationship between total bud mass and stem CSA scaled similarly across crown locations. However, scaling slopes gradually decreased throughout the sampling period, driven by bud rather than by stem growth. This suggests that the allometry of total bud mass and CSA of stem is regulated locally, instead of resulting from crown-level processes. PMID:26187607

  1. Comparative fracture strength analysis of Lava and Digident CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taek-Ka; Pak, Hyun-Soon; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE All-ceramic crowns are subject to fracture during function. To minimize this common clinical complication, zirconium oxide has been used as the framework for all-ceramic crowns. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of two computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia crown systems: Lava and Digident. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and twenty Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns were fabricated. A metal die was also duplicated from the original prepared tooth for fracture testing. A universal testing machine was used to determine the fracture strength of the crowns. RESULTS The mean fracture strengths were as follows: 54.9 ± 15.6 N for the Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and 87.0 ± 16.0 N for the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns. The difference between the mean fracture strengths of the Lava and Digident crowns was statistically significant (Pzirconia crowns showed a complete fracture of both the veneering porcelain and the core whereas the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed fracture only of the veneering porcelain. CONCLUSION The fracture strengths of CAD/CAM zirconia crowns differ depending on the compatibility of the core material and the veneering porcelain. PMID:23755332

  2. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameira, Deborah Pacheco; Buarque e Silva, Wilkens Aurélio; Andrade e Silva, Frederico; De Souza, Grace M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness) and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer) configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n = 10): Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM); Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM); Bi-layer crowns (BL). Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37 °C), and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = .05) indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM = 3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM = 3561.5 N ± 991.6), which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6). There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength.

  3. Enhancing a eucalypt crown condition indicator driven by high spatial and spectral resolution remote sensing imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bradley; Lyons, Tom; Barber, Paul; Stone, Christine; Hardy, Giles

    2012-01-01

    Individual crown condition of Eucalyptus gomphocephala was assessed using two classification models to understand changes in forest health through space and time. Using high resolution (0.5 m) digital multispectral imagery, predictor variables were derived from textural and spectral variance of all pixels inside the crown area. The results estimate crown condition as a surrogate for tree health against the total crown health index. Crown condition is derived from combining ground-based crown assessment techniques of density, transparency, dieback, and the regrowth of foliage. This object-based approach summarizes the pixel data into mean crown indices assigned to crown objects which became the carrier of information. Models performed above expectations, with a significant weighted Cohen's kappa (κ>0.60 and p<0.001) using 70% of available data. Using in situ data for model development, crown condition was predicted forwards (2010) and backwards (2007) in time, capturing trends in crown condition and identifying decline in the healthiest between 2008 and 2010. The results confirm that combining spectral and textural information increased model sensitivity to small variations in crown condition. The methodology provides a cost-effective means for monitoring crown condition of this or other eucalypt species in native and plantation forests.

  4. Tree crown structure indicators in a natural uneven-aged mixed coniferous forest in northeastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier Jimenez-Perez; Oscar Aguirre-Calderon; Horst Kramer

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of tree crown structure provides critical information to assess a variety of ecological conditions for multiple purposes and applications. For biomass growth, for example, tree crowns have basic physiological functions: assimilation, respiration, and transpiration. How tree crowns spatially interact and grow can bring about a seamless landscape of...

  5. The use of Hall technique preformed metal crowns by specialist paediatric dentists in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, A; McKay, A; Albadri, S

    2018-01-01

    Examines treatment planning involving Hall technique preformed metal crowns by specialists in paediatric dentistry. Explores clinical situations in which specialists in paediatric dentistry feel it is appropriate or not to fit Hall technique preformed metal crowns. Investigates which types of carious lesions are being treated with Hall technique preformed metal crowns by specialists in paediatric dentistry.

  6. 18-Crown-6 and Dibenzo-18-crown-6 Assisted Extraction of Cesium from Water into Room Temperature Ionic Liquids and Its Correlation with Stability Constants for Cesium Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Vladimirovich Pletnev

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The pH-profiles of the extraction of Cs+ into four conventional (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and bis[trifluoromethylsulphonyl]imides of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium, and 1-(2-ethylhexyl-3- methylimidazolium and two novel (trioctylmethylammonium salicylate and tetrahexylammonium dihexylsulfosuccinate room temperature ionic liquids have been determined both in the absence and in the presence of crown ether (18-crown-6 or dibenzo-18-crown-6. The pH-profiles of distribution ratio of crown ethers have been established in the same conditions. The relationship of cesium extraction efficiency both with the stability of its complexes with crown ethers and crown ethers’ distribution ratio has been clarified.

  7. Comparison of Primary Molar Crown Dimensions with Stainless Steel Crowns in a Sample of Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Afshar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Due to anatomic variation in tooth anatomy between populations, this study compared the buccolingual (BL and mesiodistal (MD dimensions of primary molars with those of stainless steel crowns (SSCs in anIranian population. Materials and methods. Impressions were taken from both dental arches of children, and casts were poured. Teeth with caries, restoration, hypoplasia or other dental anomalies were excluded. 216 primary molars were selected and divided into 4 groups of 54 each (maxillary and mandibular first and second primary molars. MD/BL dimensions were measured using a digital caliper with 0.01 mm precision on casts and SCCs (3M brand. Data were assessed using paired t-test, post hoc test and ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. The MD dimension of the lower first molar SSC and the BL dimension of the lower second molar SSC had the least difference with the corresponding values of the respective teeth. The MD dimension of the upper second molar SSC and the BL dimension of the upper first molar SSC had the greatest difference with the corresponding values in the respective teeth. Comparison of the two different brands of SSCs for the upper first molar revealed that both types had significant differences with the teeth in terms of both MD (P = 0.0 and BL (P = 0.0 dimensions. Conclusion. In the studied population, best adaptation was seen in second lower molars and the least adaptationswere seen in first and second upper molars.

  8. Tritium Removal from Carbon Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Coad, J.P.; Federici, G.

    2003-01-01

    Tritium removal is a major unsolved development task for next-step devices with carbon plasma-facing components. The 2-3 order of magnitude increase in duty cycle and associated tritium accumulation rate in a next-step tokamak will place unprecedented demands on tritium removal technology. The associated technical risk can be mitigated only if suitable removal techniques are demonstrated on tokamaks before the construction of a next-step device. This article reviews the history of codeposition, the tritium experience of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) and the tritium removal rate required to support ITER's planned operational schedule. The merits and shortcomings of various tritium removal techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on oxidation and laser surface heating

  9. Tensile bond strength of ceramic crowns to dentin using resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, James F; de Rijk, Waldemar G; Hill, Jennifer; Hill, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cements and a bonded resin cement for crowns bonded to extracted teeth with preparations having a total taper greater than 30 degrees. A crown pull-off test was used with direction of pull along the path of insertion. The CAD/CAM system Cerec was used to create crowns with the pull-off loop as an integral part of the crown structure. One hundred extracted human molars were prepared for all-ceramic crowns with a 1.5-mm shoulder, greater than 30-degree axial wall convergence, a flat occlusal surface and 3 to 5 mm occlusal/ gingival height. All-ceramic crowns were cemented with five different self-adhesive cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem Elite, BisCem, SmartCem 2, and G-Cem) and one bonded resin cement (Multilink). Forfour cements (excluding GCem and Multilink) there were 2 groups, one with HF etching and one without ceramic surface treatment. The crowns were then subject to tensile stress until either the crown fractured or the crown was lifted off from the tooth. For several cements, the bond strength exceeded the tensile strength of the all-ceramic crown; thus, the crown fractured, leaving the cemented part of the crown on the tooth. The effect of ceramic surface etching was not statistically significant at p = 0.05; however, for each cement, the treated crowns showed a lower coefficient of variance (COV). For this study, the COV ranged from 24.9 % to 97.9 %. Loads ranged from 41.3 to 190.3 N. Some of the new self-etching resin cements can create bonds to non-retentive crown preparations that are stronger than the strength of a ceramic crown; however, these high bond strengths may not be able to be achieved consistently.

  10. 75 FR 21990 - Safety Zone; Extended Debris Removal in the Lake Champlain Bridge Construction Zone (Between...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Extended Debris Removal in the Lake Champlain Bridge Construction Zone (Between... surrounding the Lake Champlain Bridge construction zone between Chimney Point, VT and Crown Point, NY. This... north and south of the Lake Champlain Bridge construction site. The Captain of the Port may suspend part...

  11. MODELING OF DENTAL PROSTHESES REMOVAL PROCESS BY MEANS OF VIBROIMPACT ULTRASONIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Kiselev

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental research on modeling dental prostheses removal process are given in the paper. It is determined on the basis of their analysis that the best conditions for detachment of prosthesis from a tooth body are provided in the case when a vibroiinpact mode of fracturing a cement layer used for crown fixation is realized.

  12. Clinical Evaluation of Monolithic Zirconia Crowns: A Short-Term Pilot Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, Aki; Akatsuka, Ryo; Kato, Hiroaki; Yoda, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Keiichi

    This study aimed to prospectively evaluate the clinical performance of monolithic zirconia crowns made of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal. A total of 26 crowns placed on premolar or molar teeth in 18 patients were evaluated at the time of crown placement and at 2 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after placement. Twenty-five crowns rated as satisfactory according to the California Dental Association quality evaluation system. Most of the abutment and antagonist teeth showed good periodontal condition. An enamel cracking occurred on one antagonist tooth 1 year after placement. Monolithic zirconia crowns can be a clinically acceptable prosthetic option.

  13. Failure analysis of various monolithic posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porojan, Liliana; Topală, Florin

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of material stiffness and load on the biomechanical performance of the monolithic full-coverage posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element analysis. Three restorative materials for monolithic dental crowns were selected for the study: zirconia; lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, and resin-based composite. Stresses were calculated in the crowns for all materials and in the teeth structures, under different load values. The experiments show that dental crowns made from all this new aesthetic materials processed by CAD/CAM technologies would be indicated as monolithic dental crowns for posterior areas.

  14. Comparative fracture strength analysis of Lava and Digident CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Taek-Ka; Pak, Hyun-Soon; Yang, Jae-Ho; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun; Yeo, In-Sung

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE All-ceramic crowns are subject to fracture during function. To minimize this common clinical complication, zirconium oxide has been used as the framework for all-ceramic crowns. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of two computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia crown systems: Lava and Digident. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and twenty Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns were fabricated. A metal die was also ...

  15. Mercury removal sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  16. Clinical evaluation of and parental satisfaction with resin-faced stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C; Lee, J Y; Wright, J T

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical success and parental acceptance of anterior primary dentition caries treatment with prefabricated resin-faced stainless steel crowns. A retrospective analysis of maxillary anterior primary dentition caries treatment using Whiter Biter II Crowns was performed. Each crown was evaluated for retention, fracture, interface failure, color match, marginal integrity, and surface texture. Parental satisfaction regarding the esthetics of the crowns was evaluated by survey. Thirty-eight crowns were evaluated in 12 children. The average crown age at time of examination was 20.7 months. Three teeth were lost to trauma with all other crowns remaining intact. Twelve crowns (32%) showed loss of at least some facial resin. Nine crowns (24%) had complete loss of the resin facing. Overall parental satisfaction with the treatment was excellent, however, satisfaction with crown esthetics received the lowest rating. While parental satisfaction with treatment of anterior primary dentition caries with prefabricated resin-faced stainless steel crowns is excellent, the high failure rate of the resin facings is problematic.

  17. Canopy Fuel Load Mapping of Mediterranean Pine Sites Based on Individual Tree-Crown Delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos Mallinis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an individual tree-crown-based approach for canopy fuel load estimation and mapping in two Mediterranean pine stands. Based on destructive sampling, an allometric equation was developed for the estimation of crown fuel weight considering only pine crown width, a tree characteristic that can be estimated from passive imagery. Two high resolution images were used originally for discriminating Aleppo and Calabrian pines crown regions through a geographic object based image analysis approach. Subsequently, the crown region images were segmented using a watershed segmentation algorithm and crown width was extracted. The overall accuracy of the tree crown isolation expressed through a perfect match between the reference and the delineated crowns was 34.00% for the Kassandra site and 48.11% for the Thessaloniki site, while the coefficient of determination between the ground measured and the satellite extracted crown width was 0.5. Canopy fuel load values estimated in the current study presented mean values from 1.29 ± 0.6 to 1.65 ± 0.7 kg/m2 similar to other conifers worldwide. Despite the modest accuracies attained in this first study of individual tree crown fuel load mapping, the combination of the allometric equations with satellite-based extracted crown width information, can contribute to the spatially explicit mapping of canopy fuel load in Mediterranean areas. These maps can be used among others in fire behavior prediction, in fuel reduction treatments prioritization and during active fire suppression.

  18. The marginal fit of selective laser melting-fabricated metal crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2014-12-01

    The selective laser melting technique is attracting interest in prosthetic dentistry. The marginal fit is a key criterion for fixed restorations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the marginal fit of cast cobalt-chromium alloy crowns versus the fit of selective laser melting-fabricated crowns. The marginal gap widths of 36 single crowns (18 selective laser melting-fabricated cobalt-chromium metal crowns and 18 cobalt-chromium cast crowns) were determined with a silicone replica technique. Each crown specimen was cut into 4 sections, and the marginal gap width of each cross section was evaluated by stereomicroscopy (× 100). The Student t test was used to evaluate whether significant differences occurred in the marginal gap widths between the selective laser melting-fabricated and cast cobalt-chromium metal crowns (α=.05). The mean marginal gap width of the cast crowns (170.19 μm) was significantly wider than that of the selective laser melting-fabricated crowns (102.86 μm). Selective laser melting-fabricate cobalt-chromium dental crowns found improved marginal gap widths compared with traditional cast crowns. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Crown ethers as size-selective synergists in solvent extraction systems: a new selectivity parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinard, W.F.; McDowell, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Mixtures of macrocyclic polyethers (crown ethers) and organic-phase-soluble liquid cation exchangers have been found to produce a synergistic effect in the extraction of metal ions. The synergistic effect is size selective; that is, it tends to be greatest for those ions that best fit the crown ether cavity. The mixtures of a liquid cation exchanger and a crown ether also allow metal ion extraction from common mineral-acid anion systems (NO 3 - , Cl - , SO 4 2- ) that would be impossible with the crown ether alone, because of the difficulty of solubilizing those anions in nonpolar solvents. This cooperation makes the use of crown ethers as size-selective coordinators available for process applications. Size selectivity of compounds such as crown ethers may thus become a useful new parameter in designing selective solvent extraction systems. Results are reported for alkali (including Cs) and alkaline earth (including Sr) extraction by HDEHP mixed with various crown ethers. (author)

  20. 18F-fluorination by crown ether-metal fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, T.; Fukushi, K.; Ido, T.; Kasida, Y.; Nozaki, T.

    1982-01-01

    18 F-Fluorination by ''naked'' 18 F - anion produced by complexing anhydrous K 18 F, which was prepared from aqueous 18 F, with 18 -Crown-6 was described for preparing 18 F-21-fluoroprogesterone. In order to find out optimum conditions in this labelling method, various factors were investigated such as the solubility of KF in organic solvents containing 18 -Crown-6 and its reactivity for the nucleophilic displacement of 21-mesylate of progesterone. Chloroform was a good solvent in solubilization of KF and its reactivity. Problems in this labelling procedure were also examined, such as a supporter for transferring the labelled anhydrous K 18 F and reaction vessels. Use of a Teflon reaction vessel resulted in a good radiochemical yield based on the starting activity of $ 18 water. (author)

  1. 18F-fluorination by crown ether-metal fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, T.; Fukushi, K.; Ido, T.; Kasida, Y.; Nozaki, T.

    1984-01-01

    For non-carrier-added 18 F-labeling of organic compounds, details were studied concerning the previously developed KF-crown ether method. In the modified method, a minute amount of KOH instead of carrier KF is added for the preparation of the anhydrous 18 F from aqueous carrier-free 18 F. The following factors were examined in order to determine optimum conditions for the preparation of the anhydrous non-carrier-added 18 F and the labeling synthesis with it: effects of the vessel on the evaporation of the 18 F-KOH solution and the amount of added KOH for the conversion of aqueous 18 F to anhydrous 18 F, the solubilized activity of the 18 F obtained by the evaporation in organic solutions containing 18-Crown-6 and the labeling reaction, as exemplified by the synthesis of 21-fluoroprogesterone. (author)

  2. Modeling tree crown dynamics with 3D partial differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Robert; Letort, Véronique; Cournède, Paul-Henry

    2014-01-01

    We characterize a tree's spatial foliage distribution by the local leaf area density. Considering this spatially continuous variable allows to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the tree crown by means of 3D partial differential equations. These offer a framework to rigorously take locally and adaptively acting effects into account, notably the growth toward light. Biomass production through photosynthesis and the allocation to foliage and wood are readily included in this model framework. The system of equations stands out due to its inherent dynamic property of self-organization and spontaneous adaptation, generating complex behavior from even only a few parameters. The density-based approach yields spatially structured tree crowns without relying on detailed geometry. We present the methodological fundamentals of such a modeling approach and discuss further prospects and applications.

  3. Modeling Tree Crown Dynamics with 3D Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eBeyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We characterize a tree's spatial foliage distribution by the local leaf area density. Considering this spatially continuous variable allows to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the tree crown by means of 3D partial differential equations. These offer a framework to rigorously take locally and adaptively acting effects into account, notably the growth towards light. Biomass production through photosynthesis and the allocation to foliage and wood are readily included in this model framework. The system of equations stands out due to its inherent dynamic property of self-organization and spontaneous adaptation, generating complex behavior from even only a few parameters. The density-based approach yields spatially structured tree crowns without relying on detailed geometry. We present the methodological fundamentals of such a modeling approach and discuss further prospects and applications.

  4. Design algorithm for generatrix profile of cylindrical crowned rollers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creţu Spiridon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cross-section of roller profile controls the pressure distribution in the contact area and radically affects the roller bearings basic dynamic load rating and rating lives. Today the most used roller profiles are the logarithmic profile and cylindrical-crowned (ZB profile. The logarithmic profile has a continuous evolution with no discontinuities till the intersection with the end fillet while ZB profile has two more discontinuities at the intersections points between the crowning circle and straight line generatrix. Using a semianalytical method, a numerical study has been carried out to find the optimum ZB profile for rollers incorporated in cylindrical rollers bearings. The basic reference rating life (L10_r has been used as optimization criterion.

  5. Increasing the thermopower of crown-ether-bridged anthraquinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Ali K.; Grace, Iain; Lambert, Colin J.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate strategies for increasing the thermopower of crown-ether-bridged anthraquinones. The novel design feature of these molecules is the presence of either (1) crown-ether or (2) diaza-crown-ether bridges attached to the side of the current-carrying anthraquinone wire. The crown-ether side groups selectively bind alkali-metal cations and when combined with TCNE or TTF dopants, provide a large phase-space for optimising thermoelectric properties. We find that the optimum combination of cations and dopants depends on the temperature range of interest. The thermopowers of both 1 and 2 are negative and at room temperature are optimised by binding with TTF alone, achieving thermpowers of -600 μV K-1 and -285 μV K-1 respectively. At much lower temperatures, which are relevant to cascade coolers, we find that for 1, a combination of TTF and Na+ yields a maximum thermopower of -710 μV K-1 at 70 K, whereas a combination of TTF and Li+ yields a maximum thermopower of -600 μV K-1 at 90 K. For 2, we find that TTF doping yields a maximum thermopower of -800 μV K-1 at 90 K, whereas at 50 K, the largest thermopower (of -600 μV K-1) is obtain by a combination TTF and K+ doping. At room temperature, we obtain power factors of 73 μW m-1 K-2 for 1 (in combination with TTF and Na+) and 90 μW m-1 K-2 for 2 (with TTF). These are higher or comparable with reported power factors of other organic materials.We investigate strategies for increasing the thermopower of crown-ether-bridged anthraquinones. The novel design feature of these molecules is the presence of either (1) crown-ether or (2) diaza-crown-ether bridges attached to the side of the current-carrying anthraquinone wire. The crown-ether side groups selectively bind alkali-metal cations and when combined with TCNE or TTF dopants, provide a large phase-space for optimising thermoelectric properties. We find that the optimum combination of cations and dopants depends on the temperature range of interest. The

  6. Theobrominium perchlorate dibenzo-18-crown-6 3.25-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Kulikov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The co-crystal, C7H9N4O2+·ClO4−·C20H24O6·3.25H2O, consists of theobrominium (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1H-purin-9-ium cations, perchlorate anions and dibenzo-18-crown-6 and water molecules. The crown ether is in a bent conformation, in which the planes of the aromatic rings subtend an angle of 63.7 (1°. Intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonding between the water molecules and the O atoms of the cyclic ether delimit an empty space reminiscent of a hollow cage. The water molecules are additionally linked to the cations by N—H...O hydrogen bonding. One of the positions of the water molecules is occupied only fractionally (25% and is located outside this framework.

  7. Allergic reactions associated with metal alloys in porcelain-fused-to-metal fixed prosthodontic devices-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Lauren; Barak, Shlomo; Katz, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    To systematically review the allergic reactions associated with metal alloys in porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) fixed prosthetic devices. After reviewing the titles and abstracts of the articles as well as removing duplicates, 22 articles were considered relevant. PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar from 1970 to 2012 were evaluated, and randomized studies, review articles, case reports, cross-sectional surveys, and abstracts were included. Conference papers and posters were excluded. Although reported, allergic reactions to metallic alloys in the context of PFM devices are not well documented. Allergic reactions to high noble and noble metal alloy cores of palladium and gold and to base metal alloys nickel and cobalt in the context of PFM fixed partial dentures (FPDs) are reported. Each type of metal is associated with a different rate of allergic reactions, which may be attributed to the extent of corrosion of the alloy, population exposure, and the biologic environment. Because few studies document allergic reactions to metals that comprise PFM crowns and partial dentures, further research in this field is necessary to determine the frequency and type of reactions elicited. Though allergic reactions to metal alloys used in dentistry are well documented, only few articles focus on the correlation between FPDs and metal allergies. Thus, this paper surveys case reports of hypersensitivity reactions linked to FPDs and reviews the current literature on allergic reactions to the metallic elements comprising those devices.

  8. [Finite element analysis of the maxillary central incisor with traditional and modified crown lengthening surgery and post-core restoration in management of crown-root fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, M; Wei, Y P; Hu, W J; Rong, Q G; Zhang, H

    2016-06-01

    To construct three-dimensional finite element models with modified crown lengthening surgery and post-core restoration in management of various crown-root fracture types, to investigate the intensity and distribution of stressin models mentioned above, and to compare and analyze the indications of traditional and modified crown lengthening surgeries from the mechanic point of view. Nine three-dimensional finite element models with modified crown lengthening surgery and post-core restoration were established and analyzed by micro-CT scanning technique, dental impression scanner, Mimics 10.0, Geomagic studio 9.0 and ANSYS 14.0 software. The von Mises stress of dentin, periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, post and core, as well as the periodontal ligament area and threshold limit value were calculated and compared with the findings of traditional crown lengthening models which had been published earlierby our research group. The von Mises stress intensity of modified crown lengthening models were: dentin>post>core>alveolar bone>periodontal ligament. The maximum von Mises stress of dentin(44.37-80.58 MPa)distributed in lingual central shoulder. The periodontal ligament area of the modified crown lengthening surgery was reduced by 6% to 28%, under the same crown-root fracture conditions, the periodontal ligament area of modified crown lengthening models was larger than that of the traditional crown lengthening models. In modified crown lengthening surgery models, the von Mises stress of periodontal ligament of B3L1m, B3L2m, B3L3m models exceeded their limit values, however, the von Mises stress of periodontal ligament of the B2L2c, B2L3c, B3L1c, B3L2c, B3L3c models exceeded their limit values in traditional crown lengthening surgery models. The modified crown lengthening surgery conserves more periodontal supporting tissues, which facilitates the long-term survival of teeth. The indication of modified crown lengthening surgery is wider than traditional method. The

  9. Fracture toughness of zirconia ceramic crowns made by feather-edge tooth preparation design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Fracture toughness determines functional crown strenght and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. There is a lack of relevant literature data about fracture toughness of crowns made by feather-edge preparation. Mechanical testing of ceramic samples is supposed to show if feather-edge tooth preparation is a successful method for making ceramic crowns without any risk of reduction of their mechanical properties. This research was done to establish effects of feather-edge tooth preparation on fracture toughness of single zirconia ceramic crowns. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Sixty (60 ceramic crowns were made on non-carious extracted human premolars. Thirty (30 crowns were made on the basis of feather-edge preparation (experimental group I. The group II included 30 crowns made on 1 mm rounded shoulder. Crowns fabrication was executed on a copy mill production system “Zirkonzahn” (Zirkonzahn GMBH, Gais, Germany. The spherical compression test was used to determine fracture toughness, using 6 mm diameter ceramic ball. Fracture load for damaging ceramic crown was recorded on a universal testing machine - Zwick, type 1464, with the speed of 0.05 mm/min. Results. The results of this research introduced significant differences between fracture toughness of ceramic samples in every examined group. However, fracture toughness of crowns from both group was above 2 000 N, what was double beyond a recommended value. The mean value of fracture toughness in the feather-edge group was 2 090 N, and in shoulder group it was 2 214 N. Conclusion. This research showed a high fracture toughness of zirconia crowns made on feather-edge preparation. The examined crowns showed a fracture resistance at a sufficient distance in relation to the minimum values of functional loads. Further research of functional loads of these crown is necessary, as well as research of marginal adaptation of cemented crowns and

  10. [Fracture toughness of zirconia ceramic crowns made by feather-edge tooth preparation design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirković, Nemanja; Gostović, Aleksandra Spadijer; Lazić, Zoran; Trifković, Branka

    2012-07-01

    Fracture toughness determines functional crown strenght and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. There is a lack of relevant literature data about fracture toughness of crowns made by feather-edge preparation. Mechanical testing of ceramic samples is supposed to show if feather-edge tooth preparation is a successful method for making ceramic crowns without any risk of reduction of their mechanical properties. This research was done to establish effects of feather-edge tooth preparation on fracture toughness of single zirconia ceramic crowns. The research was performed as an experimental study. Sixty (60) ceramic crowns were made on non-carious extracted human premolars. Thirty (30) crowns were made on the basis of feather-edge preparation (experimental group I). The group II included 30 crowns made on 1 mm rounded shoulder. Crowns fabrication was executed on a copy mill production system "Zirkonzahn" (Zirkonzahn GMBH, Gais, Germany). The spherical compression test was used to determine fracture toughness, using 6 mmn diameter ceramic ball. Fracture load for damaging ceramic crown was recorded on a universal testing machine--Zwick, type 1464, with the speed of 0.05 mm/min. The results of this research introduced significant differences between fracture toughness of ceramic samples in every examined group. However, fracture toughness of crowns from both group was above 2000 N, what was double beyond a recommended value. The mean value of fracture toughness in the feather-edge group was 2090 N, and in shoulder group it was 2214 N. This research showed a high fracture toughness of zirconia crowns made on feather-edge preparation. The examined crowns showed a fracture resistance at a sufficient distance in relation to the minimum values of functional loads. Further research of functional loads of these crown is necessary, as well as research of marginal adaptation of cemented crowns and gingival inflammatory response.

  11. Synthesis and Characterisation of Macrocyclic Diamino Chiral Crown Ethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Scott

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A benign and efficient synthesis of chiral macrocyclic ‘aza-crown’ ethers of varying ring size is reported. The synthesis involves a Schiff base condensation of ether linked dialdehydes of varying chain length and (1R,2R-(–-1,2-diaminocyclohexane under mild conditions to yield the macrocycles, which are subsequently reduced to yield the diamino analogues.

  12. Laboratory fire behavior measurements of chaparral crown fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Sanpakit; S. Omodan; D. Weise; M Princevac

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, there was an estimated 9,900 wildland fires that claimed more than 577,000 acres of land. That same year, about 542 prescribed fires were used to treat 48,554 acres by several agencies in California. Being able to understand fires using laboratory models can better prepare individuals to combat or use fires. Our research focused on chaparral crown fires....

  13. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    OpenAIRE

    Gulve, Meenal Nitin; Gulve, Nitin Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a pa...

  14. In vitro evaluation of the marginal integrity of CAD/CAM interim crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelvin Khng, Kwang Yong; Ettinger, Ronald L; Armstrong, Steven R; Lindquist, Terry; Gratton, David G; Qian, Fang

    2016-05-01

    The accuracy of interim crowns made with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems has not been well investigated. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal integrity of interim crowns made by CAD/CAM compared with that of conventional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) crowns. A dentoform mandibular left second premolar was prepared for a ceramic crown and scanned for the fabrication of 60 stereolithical resin dies, half of which were scanned to fabricate 15 Telio CAD-CEREC and 15 Paradigm MZ100-E4D-E4D crowns. Fifteen Caulk and 15 Jet interim crowns were made on the remaining resin dies. All crowns were cemented with Tempgrip under a 17.8-N load, thermocycled for 1000 cycles, placed in 0.5% acid fuschin for 24 hours, and embedded in epoxy resin before sectioning from the mid-buccal to mid-lingual surface. The marginal discrepancy was measured using a traveling microscope, and dye penetration was measured as a percentage of the overall length under the crown. The mean vertical marginal discrepancy of the conventionally made interim crowns was greater than for the CAD/CAM crowns (P=.006), while no difference was found for the horizontal component (P=.276). The mean vertical marginal discrepancy at the facial surface of the Caulk crowns was significantly greater than that of the other 3 types of interim crowns (Pcrowns was significantly larger than that of the other 3 types, with no difference at the lingual margins (P=.150). The mean percentage dye penetration for the Paradigm MZ100-E4D crowns was significantly greater and for Jet crowns significantly smaller than for the other 3 crowns (Pcrowns at the facial surface and with the horizontal marginal discrepancies of the Caulk interim crowns at the lingual surface (Pcrowns fabricated by CAD/CAM as compared with PMMA crowns; however, this difference was not observed for the horizontal component. The percentage dye penetration was correlated with vertical and horizontal

  15. Seven-year prospective clinical study on zirconia-based single crowns and fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Sidoti, Ernesto; Sforza, Chiarella

    2015-06-01

    Zirconia-based prostheses are used for esthetic crown and fixed restorations, but follow-ups are still limited. The authors evaluated the 7-year clinical results of 303 zirconia core restorations, performed in a general dental private practice. Clinical events (fracture and loss of retention, gingivitis, tenderness, excess cement, and temporary pain) were recorded in 303 zirconia core restorations positioned in 88 patients. Kaplan-Meier survival probability estimates were computed for failures (needed the replacement or removal of the prosthesis) and complications (resolved without replacing the prosthesis). One hundred and fifty single crowns (130 tooth-supported, 20 implant-supported) and 153 multiple units up to 6 elements (49 tooth-supported, 104 implant-supported) were followed-up for 7 years in 88 patients (40 men, 48 women), aged 35-89 years (mean 57). During the follow-up period, there were no complications for 287 (95 %) of the restorations. Sixteen restorations/abutment teeth (5 %) had some complication: extraction of abutment tooth (7, 2 %); caries (2, 1 %), porcelain veneer fracture (3, 1 %), loss of retention (4, 1 %). Nine (3 %) restorations were recorded as failures. The overall 7-year survival probability estimate for failures was 0.966 (95 % confidence limits, 0.932 and 0.983), for complications was 0.976 (95 % confidence limits 0.947 and 0.989), with a cumulative survival rate of 94.7 %. Within the analyzed follow-up, zirconia core restorations appear a good clinical solution, with favorable functional properties. All ceramic restorations can be successfully used for both single-and multiple-unit prostheses, either teeth or implants supported.

  16. Sealing properties of three luting agents used for complete cast crowns: a bacterial leakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmener, O; Pameijer, C H; Rincon, S M H; Serrano, S A; Chaves, C

    2013-01-01

    To assess the sealing properties of three different luting materials used for cementation of full cast crowns on extracted human premolars. Thirty noncarious human premolars were prepared in a standardized fashion for full cast crown restorations. All margins were placed in dentin. After impressions of the preparations, stone dies were fabricated on which copings were waxed, which were cast in type III alloy using standardized laboratory methods. Teeth were randomly assigned to three groups of 10 samples each (n=10), for which the following cements were used: 1) a resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Rely X Luting Plus (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA); 2) a self-adhesive resin cement, Maxcem Elite (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA); and 3) a glass ionomer cement, Ketac Cem (3M ESPE), the latter used as control. After cementation the samples were allowed to bench-set for 10 minutes, stored in water at 37°C, subjected to thermal cycling (2000×, between 5°C and 55°C, dwell time 35 seconds), and then stored in sterile phosphate buffer for seven days at 37°C. Subsequently, the occlusal surface was carefully reduced until the dentin was exposed. Finishing on wet sand paper removed the gold flash caused by grinding. After sterilization, the specimens were subjected to bacterial microleakage in a dual chamber apparatus for 60 days. Bacterial leakage was checked daily. Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survival test. Significant pairwise differences were analyzed using the log-rank test followed by Fisher exact test at a pcement displayed significantly lower microleakage scores than a self-adhesive resin-based and conventional glass ionomer cement.

  17. Reliability of metalloceramic and zirconia-based ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, N R F A; Bonfante, E A; Zavanelli, R A; Thompson, V P; Ferencz, J L; Coelho, P G

    2010-10-01

    Despite the increasing utilization of all-ceramic crown systems, their mechanical performance relative to that of metal ceramic restorations (MCR) has yet to be determined. This investigation tested the hypothesis that MCR present higher reliability over two Y-TZP all-ceramic crown systems under mouth-motion fatigue conditions. A CAD-based tooth preparation with the average dimensions of a mandibular first molar was used as a master die to fabricate all restorations. One 0.5-mm Pd-Ag and two Y-TZP system cores were veneered with 1.5 mm porcelain. Crowns were cemented onto aged (60 days in water) composite (Z100, 3M/ESPE) reproductions of the die. Mouth-motion fatigue was performed, and use level probability Weibull curves were determined. Failure modes of all systems included chipping or fracture of the porcelain veneer initiating at the indentation site. Fatigue was an acceleration factor for all-ceramic systems, but not for the MCR system. The latter presented significantly higher reliability under mouth-motion cyclic mechanical testing.

  18. Reliability of Metalloceramic and Zirconia-based Ceramic Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, N.R.F.A.; Bonfante, E.A.; Zavanelli, R.A.; Thompson, V.P.; Ferencz, J.L.; Coelho, P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the increasing utilization of all-ceramic crown systems, their mechanical performance relative to that of metal ceramic restorations (MCR) has yet to be determined. This investigation tested the hypothesis that MCR present higher reliability over two Y-TZP all-ceramic crown systems under mouth-motion fatigue conditions. A CAD-based tooth preparation with the average dimensions of a mandibular first molar was used as a master die to fabricate all restorations. One 0.5-mm Pd-Ag and two Y-TZP system cores were veneered with 1.5 mm porcelain. Crowns were cemented onto aged (60 days in water) composite (Z100, 3M/ESPE) reproductions of the die. Mouth-motion fatigue was performed, and use level probability Weibull curves were determined. Failure modes of all systems included chipping or fracture of the porcelain veneer initiating at the indentation site. Fatigue was an acceleration factor for all-ceramic systems, but not for the MCR system. The latter presented significantly higher reliability under mouth-motion cyclic mechanical testing. PMID:20660796

  19. Plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens and crown gall development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Jochen; Deeken, Rosalia

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease on various plant species by introducing its T-DNA into the genome. Therefore, Agrobacterium has been extensively studied both as a pathogen and an important biotechnological tool. The infection process involves the transfer of T-DNA and virulence proteins into the plant cell. At that time the gene expression patterns of host plants differ depending on the Agrobacterium strain, plant species and cell-type used. Later on, integration of the T-DNA into the plant host genome, expression of the encoded oncogenes, and increase in phytohormone levels induce a fundamental reprogramming of the transformed cells. This results in their proliferation and finally formation of plant tumors. The process of reprogramming is accompanied by altered gene expression, morphology and metabolism. In addition to changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, further genome-wide (“omic”) approaches have recently deepened our understanding of the genetic and epigenetic basis of crown gall tumor formation. This review summarizes the current knowledge about plant responses in the course of tumor development. Special emphasis is placed on the connection between epigenetic, transcriptomic, metabolomic, and morphological changes in the developing tumor. These changes not only result in abnormally proliferating host cells with a heterotrophic and transport-dependent metabolism, but also cause differentiation and serve as mechanisms to balance pathogen defense and adapt to abiotic stress conditions, thereby allowing the coexistence of the crown gall and host plant. PMID:24795740

  20. Assessment of nickel release from stainless steel crowns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramazani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adverse effects of dental materials, especially metals, have been an important issue in recent decades.The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of nickel released from stainless steel crowns in artificial saliva.In this in-vitro study, 270 stainless steel crowns were divided into five groups, each with nine subgroups. Each group (I to V was comprised of four, five, six, seven and eight crowns, respectively. Each subgroup was placed in a polyethylene jar containing artificial saliva and held in an incubator at 37°C for four weeks. The amount of released nickel was determined on days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28, using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Wilcoxon Signed-Rank and Kruskal-Wallis with Dunn's post hoc tests (SPSS software, v. 18 were used for statistical analysis at a significance level of 0.05.The mean level of nickel on day 1 was more than that of day 7; this difference was statistically significant for all groups (P < 0.05, except for group II (P = 0.086. Also, the mean difference of released nickel between the groups was significant on day 1 (P = 0.006 and was insignificant on day 7 (P = 0.620. The nickel levels were zero on days 14, 21, and 28.The amount of nickel was below the toxic level and did not exceed the dietary intake.

  1. Surgical crown lengthening: a 12-month study - radiographic results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Eleutério Diniz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to perform a radiographic follow-up evaluation after a 12-month healing period, following crown lengthening surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-three periodontally healthy subjects (mean age 32.5 years that required crown lengthening surgery in premolars were recruited. In a total of 30 premolars, full thickness flaps, osseous resection, and flap suturing were performed. The restorative margin was defined in the pre-surgical phase and maintained unaltered during the healing period, serving as a reference point. Standardized bitewing radiographs were taken before and after osseous reduction, and at 2, 3, 6, and 12-month healing periods. RESULTS: Intact lamina dura was observed at both mesial and distal alveolar crests only from the 3rd month. At 12-months, all alveolar crests presented lamina dura. The overall mean distance from the restorative margin to the alveolar crest achieved after osseous resection was 3.28±0.87 mm at mesial and 2.81±0.51 mm at distal sites. No significant radiographic changes in the bone crest were observed during a 12-month healing period. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study suggest that the radiographic proximal bone level observed on bitewing radiographs following crown lengthening surgery can be used as a reference to predict the future level of the healed alveolar crest.

  2. Dental ceramics and the molar crown testing ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van P. Thompson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available All ceramic crowns are highly esthetic restorations and their popularity has risen with the demand for life-like and cosmetic dentistry. Recent ceramic research has concentrated on developing a fundamental understanding of ceramic damage modes as influenced by microstructure. Dental investigations have elucidated three damage modes for ceramic layers in the 0.5-2 mm thickness using point contacts that duplicate tooth cuspal radii; classic Hertzian cone cracking, yield (pseudo-plastic behavior, and flexural cracking. Constitutive equations based upon materials properties have been developed that predict the damage modes operational for a given ceramic and thickness. Ceramic thickness or thickness of the stiff supporting core in layer crowns is critical in flexural cracking as well as the flaw state of the inner aspect of the crown. The elastic module of the supporting structure and of the luting cement and its thickness play a role in flexural fracture. Clinical studies of ceramics extending over 16 years are compared to the above relationships and predictions. Recommendations for clinical practice are made based upon the above.

  3. In vitro study of fracture strength of provisional crown materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaokutan, Isil; Sayin, Gulsum; Kara, Ozlem

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the effect of the fabrication method and material type on the fracture strength of provisional crowns. A master model with one crown (maxillary left second premolar) was manufactured from Cr-Co alloy. The master model was scanned, and the data set was transferred to a CAD/CAM unit (Yenamak D50, Yenadent Ltd, Istanbul, Turkey) for the Cercon Base group. For the other groups, temporary crowns were produced by direct fabrication methods (Imident, Temdent, Structur Premium, Takilon, Systemp c&b II, and Acrytemp). The specimens were subjected to water storage at 37℃ for 24 hours, and then they were thermocycled (TC, 5000×, 5-55℃) (n=10). The maximum force at fracture (Fmax) was measured in a universal test machine at 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed by non-parametric statistics (α=.05). Fmax values varied between 711.09-1392.1 N. In the PMMA groups, Takilon showed the lowest values (711.09 N), and Cercon Base showed the highest values (959.59 N). In the composite groups, Structur Premium showed the highest values (1392.1 N), and Acrytemp showed the lowest values (910.05 N). The composite groups showed significantly higher values than the PMMA groups (P=.01). Composite-based materials showed significantly higher fracture strengths than PMMA-based materials. The CAD-CAM technique offers more advantages than the direct technique.

  4. Selective shielding device for scintiphotography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.W.; Kay, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    A selective shielding device to be used in combination with a scintillation camera is described. The shielding device is a substantially oval-shaped configuration removably secured to the scintillation camera. As a result of this combination scanning of preselected areas of a patient can be rapidly and accurately performed without the requirement of mounting any type of shielding paraphernalia on the patient. 1 claim, 2 drawing figures

  5. Descriptive statistics of tree crown condition in the Southern United States and impacts on data analysis and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    KaDonna C. Randolph

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (FIA) utilizes visual assessments of tree crown condition to monitor changes and trends in forest health. This report describes and discusses distributions of three FIA crown condition indicators (crown density, crown dieback, and foliage transparency) for trees in the Southern...

  6. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheen Juneja Arora

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The temporary cements with eugenol showed more microleakage than those without eugenol. SC-10 crowns showed more microleakage compared to Protemp 4 crowns. SC-10 crowns cemented with Kalzinol showed maximum microleakage and Protemp 4 crowns cemented with HY bond showed least microleakage.

  7. Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  8. PLASMA DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  9. In vitro microleakage of luting cements and crown foundation material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, T J; Connolly, J

    2001-03-01

    Microleakage is a concern for the long-term prognosis of a cemented crown and foundation. The aims of this investigation were, first, to evaluate microleakage of zinc phosphate cement and resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement under ideal (dry) versus contaminated (wet) conditions, and second, to compare 3 foundations under both ideal and contaminated conditions. One hundred forty extracted molar teeth were cleaned and mounted. Tooth preparations for complete veneer cast crowns were completed with a chamfer finish line. A mesial surface class II cavity preparation 4 mm wide buccolingually and 2 mm deep was made in each tooth. Seven restorative groups were formed: amalgam/cavity varnish, amalgam/dentinal bonding agent, and composite/dentinal bonding agent, each with dry and contaminated groups, and a seventh group of class II cavity preparations without foundations. Finish lines for crown margins were refined 1.5 mm gingival to the restoration. Artificial crowns were cast in type III gold. Treatment groups were divided into 4 cement groups: dry and contaminated zinc phosphate cement and dry and contaminated resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement. The specimens were thermocycled and immersed in erythrosine B solution for 24 hours. Subsequently, they were rinsed, and their coronal portions were embedded in clear resin. Teeth were sectioned mesiodistally, and standard photomicrographs were made. The microleakage of each restoration and crown was measured. The least foundation microleakage was recorded for amalgam/dentinal bonding agents (ideal group) and composite/dentinal bonding agents (ideal group). The most microleakage was observed within the group without a foundation. In cement groups, the control and experiment sides were evaluated separately but displayed the same order of finding. The least leakage was recorded with resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (ideal group); the most microleakage was noted with zinc phosphate cement (ideal group). An interaction was

  10. Reactor container cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1995-11-10

    The device of the present invention efficiently lowers pressure and temperature in a reactor container upon occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR-type reactor and can cool the inside of the container for a long period of time. That is, (1) pipelines on the side of an exhaustion tower of a filter portion in a filter bent device of the reactor container are in communication with pipelines on the side of a steam inlet of a static container cooling device by way of horizontal pipelines, (2) a back flow check valve is disposed to horizontal pipelines, (3) a steam discharge valve for a pressure vessel is disposed closer to the reactor container than the joint portion between the pipelines on the side of the steam inlet and the horizontal pipelines. Upon occurrence of a severe accident, when the pressure vessel should be ruptured and steams containing aerosol in the reactor core should be filled in the reactor container, the inlet valve of the static container cooling device is closed. Steams are flown into the filter bent device of the reactor container, where the aerosols can be removed. (I.S.).

  11. Immediate implant placement and provisional crown fabrication after a minimally invasive extraction of a peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisor: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Suarez, Jose Carlos; Company, Andrea M

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the replacement of a maxillary peg-shaped lateral incisor with the placement of an immediate implant and a provisional restoration following a minimally invasive extraction to preserve anterior esthetics. Extraction sites in the anterior maxilla can present restorative challenges with regard to esthetics. Resistance to wearing a temporary removable partial denture during healing makes immediate implant therapy an appealing alternative to patients. Implant placement into fresh extraction sockets using no flap elevation has recently become more popular due to some advantages including less bleeding, swelling, and the preservation of existing soft tissue contours. A 20-year-old woman with a peg-shaped maxillary left lateral incisor was treated using an implant placed into the fresh extraction socket using a flapless approach and immediate provisional crown fabrication. Flapless implant placement helps to preserve site morphology by protecting and supporting existing hard and soft tissues while minimizing surgical trauma to the adjacent tissues. Using a previously fabricated acrylic index, a provisional acrylic crown was fabricated on the adjusted temporary abutment and delivered to the patient the same day during the extraction visit. This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of an over-prepared peg-shaped maxillary left lateral incisor associated with multiple crown decementations. The tooth was extracted without flap elevation and an implant was inserted immediately using flapless surgery and placement of an immediate provisional single crown. Flapless implant insertion into fresh extraction sockets and placement of immediate provisional crowns in cases involving the maxillary anterior region represent a viable treatment option in appropriate clinical situations where esthetics are a high priority. The strategy preserves optimum gingival contours and papillary height may be a viable option compared to fixed partial

  12. Successful replacement of a HeartAssist 5 ventricular assist device with a HeartWare without removal of the original sewing/attachment rings: how to do it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Sáez, Diana; Mohite, Prashant; Zych, Bartlomeij; Sabashnikov, Anton; Simon, André R

    2013-06-01

    Despite technological advances in a newer generation of ventricular assist devices (VAD), complications, such as pump thromboses, remain a significant cause of morbidity and indeed mortality in these patients. We present the case of a 34-year old patient who underwent HeartAssist 5 (HA5) implantation as a bridge to cardiac transplant. After an initial uneventful recovery, he developed a pump thrombosis that was refractory to medical treatment. We present the surgical technique used to exchange the HA5 with a HeartWare (HVAD), leaving the old inflow-sewing ring in situ.

  13. Removing Hair Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Removing Hair Safely Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... related to common methods of hair removal. Laser Hair Removal In this method, a laser destroys hair ...

  14. Influence of implant position on clinical crown length and peri-implant soft tissue dimensions at implant-supported single crowns replacing maxillary central incisors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Min; Fei, Wei; Hosseini, Mandana

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the influence of implant position on clinical crown length and marginal soft tissue dimensions at implant-supported single crowns of maxillary central incisors, and to validate the papilla index score (PIS). Twenty-five patients, who had lost one...... as controls. Paired sample t-testand Pearson´s correlation analysis were used to analyze implant position, dimension of crownand papilla fill.Cohen’s ¿ andSpearman correlation were used to validate the PIS.The implant-supported crown was statistically longer than the contra-lateral tooth......, and there was significant correlation between the oro-facial position of the implant and the crown length difference (r=.607, p=.001). The distalpapilla was significantly shorter than the mesialpapilla at implant-supported crowns (ptooth (p=.415...

  15. Simulation of clinical fractures for three different all-ceramic crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øilo, Marit; Kvam, Ketil; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of fracture strength and fracture modes of different all-ceramic crown systems is not straightforward. Established methods for reliable testing of all-ceramic crowns are not currently available. Published in-vitro tests rarely simulate clinical failure modes and are therefore unsuited to distinguish between the materials. The in-vivo trials usually lack assessment of failure modes. Fractographic analyses show that clinical crowns usually fail from cracks initiating in the cervical margins, whereas in-vitro specimens fail from contact damage at the occlusal loading point. The aim of this study was to compare three all-ceramic systems using a clinically relevant test method that is able to simulate clinical failure modes. Ten incisor crowns of three types of all-ceramic systems were exposed to soft loading until fracture. The initiation and propagation of cracks in these crowns were compared with those of a reference group of crowns that failed during clinical use. All crowns fractured in a manner similar to fracture of the clinical reference crowns. The zirconia crowns fractured at statistically significantly higher loads than alumina and glass-ceramic crowns. Fracture initiation was in the core material, cervically in the approximal areas. PMID:24698209

  16. Shear bond strength of self-ligating orthodontic brackets on different types of porcelain crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamdeep Singh Ahluwalia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to compare shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI of self-ligating orthodontic brackets bonded to different porcelain crowns. Materials and Methods: Three groups of different types of porcelain crowns, each containing 12 crowns were fabricated by the same technician and allocated to one of the study groups as follows: Group I - IPS porcelain crowns (Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein, Group II - Porcelain fused to zirconia crowns (Zirkonzahn GmbH, Gais, Italy, Noritake Co., Tokyo, Japan and Group III - Conventional porcelain fused to metal crowns (Ceramco3, Densply, PA, USA. The orthodontic brackets were bonded to these crowns using hydrofluoric acid (HFA + silane etching protocol. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets were tested with a universal testing machine under standard test conditions. Results: Statistical evaluation using analysis of variance showed a significant difference between the groups (P 0.05. Chi-square comparison revealed no significant difference in ARI scores between groups (P > 0.05. Conclusions: When HFA + silane etching protocol were used, IPS crowns showed the greatest SBS of orthodontic brackets. The ARI score was non-significant. Therefore, if there is a need to place crowns over teeth then these crowns can be used for restoration of teeth before orthodontic treatment.

  17. Polyetherketoneketone (PEKK), a framework material for complete fixed and removable dental prostheses: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jonathan H; Hyde, Bart; Hurst, Mitch; Harris, Bryan T; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2017-11-29

    This clinical report demonstrates the use of polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) as a framework material with individually luted heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns for an implant-supported complete fixed dental prosthesis (ICFDP) and a conventional complete removable dental prosthesis (CRDP). This prosthesis design provides a non-computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) option for the fabrication of ICFDPs and CRDPs with individualized ceramic crowns for optimal esthetics. The performance of PEKK as a framework material needs to be assessed in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Strength of CAD/CAM-generated esthetic ceramic molar implant crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Daniel; Bindl, Andreas; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Lüthy, Heinz; Mörmann, Werner H

    2008-01-01

    One-visit in-office CAD/CAM fabrication of esthetic ceramic crowns as a superstructure for posterior implants is quite new. The aim of the study was to evaluate the strength of esthetic ceramic CAD/CAM crowns with varied occlusal thickness and seated with adhesive and nonadhesive cements on titanium and zirconia abutments. Esthetic ceramic CAD/CAM-generated molar crowns (n = 15 per group) with occlusal thicknesses of 0.5 mm and 1.5 mm were seated on titanium (1) and zirconia (2) abutments: noncemented (a) and with nonadhesive cement (b) or 2 adhesive resin-based cements (c) and (d). In addition, 15 molar crowns with 5.5-mm occlusal thickness were seated on short zirconia abutments (3) using cements (c) and (d). All crowns had the identical occlusal morphology and were loaded with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. Load data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA, the Scheffé test, and Weibull probability of failure analysis. Fracture loads of 1.5-mm occlusal thickness crowns (a, b, c, d) were higher (P crowns (except for group ld). Occlusal 5.5-mm crowns on short zirconia abutments had similar (2c) or less (2d) strength than the respective 1.5-mm crowns. Nonadhesive crowns (1b, 2b) were weaker (P crowns (1c, 1d, 2c, 2d). Fracture loads of 0.5- and 1.5-mm crowns were significantly higher on titanium than on zirconia abutments with both cements. Adhesive cement d generally showed higher fracture loads than c on both titanium and zirconia. Esthetic ceramic CAD/CAM molar implant crowns gained high strength with adhesive cements on both titanium and zirconia implant abutments compared to nonadhesive cementation.

  19. Evaluation of marginal circumference and marginal thickness changes in precrimped stainless steel crowns, after recrimping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshar H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The need for recrimping precrimped stainless steel crowns by the dentist in clinic is controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the rate of marginal circumference and marginal thickness change of precrimped stainless steel crowns after recrimping. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 primary photos were taken from margins of 30 S.S.Cs (3M, Ni-Cr related to tooth 85 with a digital camera fixed at a determined distance. Margins of crowns were crimped by 114 and 137 pliers with a controlled force (0.2 N and then 30 secondary photos were taken in the same conditions. The circumference of crown margins in primary (group A and secondary (group B photos were assessed by a digitizer system. Comparing the circumferences of crown margins in primary and secondary photos showed a significant decrease after crimping. Thickness of 30 random points on the crown margins of a crown similar to mentioned cases was measured by SEM (×150. Then similar procedures including taking a primary photo, crimping and taking a secondary photo was done for the sample crown. After significant reduction in margin circumference, thickness of 30 other random points on the crown margin were measured by SEM. Data were analyzed by paired sample t-test with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The mean marginal circumference of precrimped stainless steel crowns was reduced by 7.3% which was significant (P<0.001. On the other hand the mean marginal thickness of sample stainless steel crown showed 18µ increase. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, marginal circumference of precrimped stainless steel crowns (3M, Ni-Cr showed a significant decrease after crimping. It is concluded that crimping the stainless steel crowns even for precrimped ones seems necessary.

  20. Stud manipulating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyan, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    A device for inserting and removing studs from bores in a workpiece, for example a nuclear reactor vessel, comprises manipulating devices for operating on individual studs, each capable of tensioning a stud slackening a working nut on the stud, and subsequently removing the stud from the bore. A ring has dogs which can engage working nut recesses to interlock with the nut against relative rotation. Motors coupled to the ring rotate the working nut. A top nut is coupled to the motors to rotate the nut and screw it onto the stud. The top nut with other device parts can be raised and lowered on a tube by a hydraulic actuator. A hydraulic load cell between the top nut and a stool on the workpiece is pressurised to tension the stud by means of the top nut and thus facilitate rotation of the working nut when tightening or slackening. A dog clutch mechanism engages a stud end fitting against relative axial and rotational movement. The mechanism is raised and lowered on a guide member by an actuator. The mechanism has a tubular member and the drive coupling for the motors to the top nut includes a tubular member. Tubular members carry teeth which are engaged when the top nut is raised and the clutch mechanism is lowered, to provide a coupling between the motors and the mechanism for rotating the stud. (U.K.)

  1. Nanomechanical Water Purification Device, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Seldon Laboratories, LLC, proposes a lightweight, low-pressure water filtration device that harnesses the unique properties of nanoparticles to destroy or remove...

  2. Fracture behavior, marginal gap width, and marginal quality of vented or pre-cemented CAD/CAM all-ceramic crowns luted on Y-TZP implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Lucia K; Meyer, Simon; Rohr, Nadja; Zehnder, Isabella; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the fracture behavior and marginal gap region of CAD/CAM fabricated lithium disilicate (L) and zirconium dioxide (Z) crowns using palatal venting (PV), pre-cementation with custom analogs (CA), or conventional cementation technique (SP) with adhesive cement (A) or resin-modified glass ionomer cement (B). Twelve groups (n = 6) were set according to material (L, Z), cement (A, B), and technique (PV, CA, SP). Specimens were thermo-mechanical aged (TML), loaded until fracture (LF) and fracture patterns recorded. Marginal gap width and quality were assessed and compared to replicas obtained before and after TML. Crown material significantly influenced LF with a mean of 1037.6 ± 282.4 N in L and 5356.3 ± 1207.0 N in Z groups (p cement material nor cementation method affected the outcome. Fractures occurred along the mesial-distal central fissure in both materials. Gap width before TML was 22.04 ± 13.42 μm for L and 19.98 ± 12.72 μm for Z specimens, with overall no influence of crown material, cement type, or method. Marginal cleanliness just below the polished implant shoulder reached 66.7%-88.9% with A, and 91.7%-100% with B, and tended to increase in all groups during TML indicating a decrease in excess cement. Implant-crown junctions were cleaner with B compared to A (p ≤ .001) and along Z crown surfaces compared to L (p ≤ .007). Crown venting of lithium disilicate and zirconium dioxide crowns did not affect the fracture load and patterns. Complete cement removal was rare, and the observed particle ablation requires further clinical attention, particularly with submucosal margins. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. 77 FR 38177 - TRICARE; Off-Label Uses of Devices; Partial List of Examples of Unproven Drugs, Devices, Medical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... TRICARE; Off-Label Uses of Devices; Partial List of Examples of Unproven Drugs, Devices, Medical... removes the partial list of examples of unproven drugs, devices, and medical treatments or procedures... partial list of examples of unproven drugs, devices, and medical treatments or procedures proscribed under...

  4. Sealing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulson, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sealing device for minimising the leakage of toxic or radioactive contaminated environments through a biological shield along an opening through which a flexible component moves that penetrates the shield. The sealing device comprises an outer tubular member which extends over a length not less than the maximum longitudinal movement of the component along the opening. An inner sealing block is located intermediate the length of the component by connectors and is positioned in the bore of the outer tubular member to slide in the bore and effect a seal over the entire longitudinal movement of the component. The cross-section of the device may be circular and the block may be of polytetrafluoroethylene or of nylon impregnated with molybdenum or may be metallic. A number of the sealing devices may be combined into an assembly for a plurality of adjacent longitudinally movable components, each adapted to sustain a tensile load, providing the various drives of a master-slave manipulator. (author)

  5. Ferroelectric devices

    CERN Document Server

    Uchino, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Updating its bestselling predecessor, Ferroelectric Devices, Second Edition assesses the last decade of developments-and setbacks-in the commercialization of ferroelectricity. Field pioneer and esteemed author Uchino provides insight into why this relatively nascent and interdisciplinary process has failed so far without a systematic accumulation of fundamental knowledge regarding materials and device development.Filling the informational void, this collection of information reviews state-of-the-art research and development trends reflecting nano and optical technologies, environmental regulat

  6. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  7. Fracture Resistance of Monolithic High Translucency Zirconia Implant-Supported Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Álvarez-Arenal, Ángel; Chávarri-Prado, David; Solaberrieta, Eneko; Fernández-González, Felipe J; Chento-Valiente, Yelko; Santamaría-Arrieta, Gorka

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the resistance to axial forces of screw-retained monolithic high translucency zirconia (mHTZr) crowns compared with high translucency zirconia + feldspathic ceramic (HTZrC) crowns, low translucency zirconia + feldspathic ceramic (LTZrC) crowns, and metal-ceramic (MC) crowns, and also to observe the different fracture patterns between all groups. Twenty-four crowns were fabricated (6 of each group) and loaded until failure, using a testing machine with a 5.0-kN load cell. Mean fracture results varied between 1092.7 N (LTZrC group) and 3439.7 N (mHTZr group). No statistically significant differences were found between the HTZrC, LTZrC, and MC groups. However, statistically significant differences (P zirconia implant-supported crowns proved to be the toughest group studied when an axial force was applied. Fracture patterns varied between different materials, chipping being the most common occurrence.

  8. [Clinical evaluation of the zirconia all ceramic crowns in 40 consecutive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bing; He, Yan

    2016-06-01

    To investigate clinical application, aesthetics, stability and bio-compatibility of zirconia all-ceramic crowns in prosthodontic patients. Computer aided design and manufacturing techniques were used to make zirconia all ceramic crowns in 40 patients. They were divided into 2 groups according to the thickness of the gingival thickness. After 12 months of clinical observation, the aesthetics, stability, and bio-compatibility were evaluated by the crown color, crown edge fitness, losing ratio and gingival health. The data were analyzed using SPSS 13.0 software package. Slight marginal discrepancy was observed in 2 zirconia all ceramic crowns, no evidence of decay was observed at 1 year. Zirconia all ceramic crowns have a low fracture rate, good biological properties and excellent esthetic properties. It is ideal esthetic prosthesis.

  9. Holographic evaluation of the marginal fits of complete crowns loaded at the central fossa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chang, Guan L.; Wu, Shih H.

    1995-05-01

    In dentistry, a defect of cementation on the margins of crowns accumulates bacterial plaque easily. This can result in recurrent caries and periodontal disease. In this paper holographic interferometry was applied to evaluate the effect of masticatory force on various complete crowns. Four complete molar crowns made from different materials (Au alloy, Pd-Ag alloy, Ni-Cr alloy, and porcelain fused to metal) were tested. The out-of-plane displacements of the crown specimens were measured by the method of multiple observations. The displacements measured range from 6 to 10 micrometers under normal load (25 N). However, the marginal openings of all four crowns were estimated to be less than 0.2 micrometers . In addition the defect of the crown was examined.

  10. Holographic evaluation of the marginal fit of complete crowns loaded at central fossa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chang, Guan L.; Wu, Shih H.

    1993-07-01

    In dentistry, the defect of cementation on the margins of crowns accumulates bacterial plaque easily. This can result in recurrent caries and periodontal disease. In this paper holographic interferometry is applied to study the effect of masticatory force on various complete crowns. Four complete molar crowns made from different casting materials (Au, Pd-Ag, Ni-Cr, and PFM) were tested. The horizontal displacements of two points near the margin, measured by the method of multiple observations, could be as large as 15 micrometers under normal load (25 kgw). However, the marginal discrepancy of all four crowns estimated were quite small (cementation between the crown and the tooth is quite good. Nevertheless, when the load was increased to 45 kgw, a defect of cementation was found on the Pd-Ag crown.

  11. Fracture Resistance of Non-Metallic Molar Crowns Manufactured with CEREC 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Dalia A.

    Objectives. To compare fracture strength and fatigue resistance of ceramic (ProCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) (C) and resin composite (Paradigm MZ100, 3M/ ESPE) (R) crowns made with CEREC-3D. Methods. A prepared ivorine molar tooth was duplicated to produce 40 identical prepared specimens made of epoxy resin (Viade). Twenty (C) crowns and 20 (R) were cemented to their dies using resin cement. Ten of each group were subjected to compressive loading to fracture. The remaining 10 of each group were subjected to mechanical cyclic loading for 500,000 cycles. The survivors were subjected to compressive loading to fracture. Results. No significant difference in mean fracture load was found between the two materials. However, only 30% of the (C) crowns vs. 100% of the (R) crowns survived the cyclic loading test. Conclusions. (R) crowns demonstrated higher fatigue Resistance than (C) crowns in-vitro and might better resist cracking in-vivo.

  12. Bis(hydroxyammonium hexachloridoplatinate(IV–18-crown-6 (1/2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Bulatov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, (NH3OH2[PtCl6]·2C12H24O6, the PtIV atom is coordinated by six chloride anions in a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. The Pt—Cl bond lengths are comparable to those reported for other hexachloridoplatinate(IV species. The hydroxyammonium groups act as linkers between the [PtCl6]2− anion and the crown ether molecules. The anion is linked to two hydroxyammonium cations via O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds and each hydroxyammonium moiety is linked to a crown ether molecule by hydrogen bonds between ammonium H atoms and 18-crown-6 O atoms. The crown ether molecules have the classic crown shape in which all O atoms are located in the inner part of the crown ether ring and all –CH2– groups are turned to the outside.

  13. Prosthetic rehabilitation using adhesive bridge and fixed-fixed bridge on the maxilla and telescopic crown overdenture on mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Sulistiawaty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic rehabilitation is the rehabilitation process of masticatory and esthetics function for patients missing teeth and alveolar bone by means of manufacture and installation of dentures. The prosthetic rehabilitation commonly used include denture adhesive bridge, fixed-fixed bridge, as well as telescopic overdenture. Adhesive bridge is bridge denture consisting of single pontic and two retainer wings attached to the abutment using cement or resin. Fixed-fixed bridge is a bridge denture with rigid connectors on both ends of the pontics, whereas the telescopic crown Overdenture is a removable denture that uses linked precision on the original tooth in the form of primary coping on abutment and secondary coping on the denture. To expose the procedures of prosthetic rehabilitation using adhesive bridge and fixed-fixed bridge on the maxilla and telescopic crown Overdenture on mandible. Male patients aged 32 years came with complaints of difficulty to chew food because he had lost some teeth behind. In the maxilla, teeth are lost in the region of 15 and 16 performed by making the fixed-fixed bridge with abutment teeth 14 and 17. Loss of teeth in the region of 26, performed the manufacture of adhesive bridge with a box preparation on the occlusal 25 and 27. In the mandible, tooth loss in the region of 36,37,46, and 47 performed manufacture of telescopic crown Overdenture with primer coping on the teeth 35.38, 45, and 48 and the secondary coping on a metal frame. Prosthetic rehabilitation especially in the case of loss of back teeth is very important because with the denture patients can chew properly and maintain the stomatognathic system.

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of hemicelluloses removal from cellulosic fibers during the cold caustic extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Hu, Huichao; Li, Hailong; Huang, Liulian; Chen, Lihui; Ni, Yonghao

    2017-06-01

    The effective separation of hemicelluloses and cellulose is desirable for the production of high-purity cellulose, which is a sustainable raw material for many value-added applications. For this purpose, the kinetics and mechanism of hemicelluloses removal from the cold caustic extraction (CCE) were investigated in the present study. The hemicelluloses removal process consists of: 1) the bulk phase, characteristic of significant hemicelluloses removal; 2) the transition phase, hemicelluloses transferring from the inner to the outer region of the fiber wall, with negligible overall hemicelluloses removal; 3) the residual phase, presenting a weak but continuing hemicelluloses removal. Furthermore, the enzymatic peeling method was adopted to study the fundamentals of hemicelluloses removal. The results showed that the molecular weight of hemicelluloses is the main parameter governing their diffusion/dissolution processes, and that the low molecular weight hemicelluloses are preferentially removed. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Unicuspid and bicuspid tooth crown formation in squamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handrigan, Gregory R; Richman, Joy M

    2011-12-15

    The molecular and developmental factors that regulate tooth morphogenesis in nonmammalian species, such as snakes and lizards, have received relatively little attention compared to mammals. Here we describe the development of unicuspid and bicuspid teeth in squamate species. The simple, cone-shaped tooth crown of the bearded dragon and ball python is established at cap stage and fixed in shape by the differentiation of cells and the secretion of dental matrices. Enamel production, as demonstrated by amelogenin expression, occurs relatively earlier in squamate teeth than in mouse molars. We suggest that the early differentiation in squamate unicuspid teeth at cap stage correlates with a more rudimentary tooth crown shape. The leopard gecko can form a bicuspid tooth crown despite the early onset of differentiation. Cusp formation in the gecko does not occur by the folding of the inner enamel epithelium, as in the mouse molar, but by the differential secretion of enamel. Ameloblasts forming the enamel epithelial bulge, a central swelling of cells in the inner enamel epithelium, secrete amelogenin at cap stage, but cease to do so by bell stage. Meanwhile, other ameloblasts in the inner enamel epithelium continue to secrete enamel, forming cusp tips on either side of the bulge. Bulge cells specifically express the gene Bmp2, which we suggest serves as a pro-differentiation signal for cells of the gecko enamel organ. In this regard, the enamel epithelial bulge of the gecko may be more functionally analogous to the secondary enamel knot of mammals than the primary enamel knot. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  16. Crown retention and flexural strength of eight provisional cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O; Mercante, Donald

    2007-12-01

    Few studies have compared the retention of resin-based and zinc-oxide noneugenol provisional cements. Crown retention testing is difficult and variable; therefore, a simpler method of testing by using flexural strength is indicated. The purpose of this study was to measure the retention of base metal alloy castings to dentin provided by 8 provisional cements (3 resin-based and 5 zinc oxide) and correlate the retention to their flexural strength. Flexural strength specimens (2.5 x 2.5 x 22 mm) were made of each cement. The specimens were placed in a 3-point bending testing mode and loaded at 1 mm/min until failure. Ten extracted teeth were milled to a standardized complete crown preparation, fitted with Rexillium III castings, and cemented with each provisional cement. The specimens were subjected to a tensile load (1 mm/min) until failure in a universal testing machine. The flexural strength for each cement was calculated in MPa and correlated to the retention. A 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post hoc analysis were used to determine significant intergroup differences (alpha=.05). Linear regression was used to correlate flexural strength and crown retention (alpha=.05). Significant differences were found in the flexural strengths and retention provided by the various cements. Flexure strength was correlated with cement retention for resin-based cements (r=0.998) but not zinc-oxide noneugenol cements (r=0.058). Based on a 20-degree preparation, stronger cements provide increased retention. Therefore, the desired amount of retention should be based on both the cement and a clinical evaluation of the preparation.

  17. Crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness of mandibular second bicuspids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Augusto Fernandes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To achieve proper recontouring of anterior and posterior teeth, to obtain optimal morphology during enamel stripping, it is important to be aware of dental anatomy. This study aimed at evaluating crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness in a sample of 40 extracted sound, human, mandibular, second bicuspids (20 right and 20 left. Mesiodistal, cervico-occlusal and buccolingual crown dimensions were measured using a digital caliper, accurate to 0.01 mm. Teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and cut along their long axes through the proximal surfaces to obtain 0.7 mm-thick central sections. Enamel thickness on the cut sections was measured using a perfilometer. Comparative analyses were carried out using the Student's-t test (α= 5%. The mean mesiodistal crown widths for right and left teeth were 7.79 mm (± 0.47 and 7.70 mm (± 0.51, respectively. Mean cervico-occlusal heights ranged from 8.31 mm (± 0.75 on the right to 8.38 mm (± 0.85 on the left teeth. The mean values for the buccolingual dimension were 8.67 mm (± 0.70 on the right and 8.65 mm (± 0.54 on the left teeth. The mean enamel thickness on the mesial surfaces ranged from 1.35 mm (± 0.22 to 1.40 mm (± 0.17, on the left and right sides, respectively. On the distal surfaces, the corresponding values were 1.44 mm (± 0.21 and 1.46 mm (± 0.12. No significant differences were found between measurements for right and left teeth. However, enamel thickness was significantly greater on the distal surfaces, compared with the mesial surfaces.

  18. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    In a radioactive gaseous waste processing device, a dehumidifier in which a lot of hollow thread membranes are bundled and assembled is disposed instead of a dehumidifying cooling device and a dehumidifying tower. The dehumidifier comprises a main body, a great number of hollow thread membranes incorporated in the main body, a pair of fixing members for bundling and fixing both ends of the hollow thread membranes, a pair of caps for allowing the fixing members to pass through and fixing them on both ends of the main body, an off gas flowing pipe connected to one of the caps, a gas exhaustion pipe connected to the other end of the cap and a moisture removing pipeline connected to the main body. A flowrate control valve is connected to the moisture removing pipeline, and the other end of the moisture removing pipeline is connected between a main condensator and an air extraction device. Then, cooling and freezing devices using freon are no more necessary, and since the device uses the vacuum of the main condensator as a driving source and does not use dynamic equipments, labors for the maintenance is greatly reduced to improve economical property. The facilities are reduced in the size thereby enabling to use space effectively. (N.H.)

  19. DNA methylation mediated control of gene expression is critical for development of crown gall tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Gohlke

    Full Text Available Crown gall tumors develop after integration of the T-DNA of virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains into the plant genome. Expression of the T-DNA-encoded oncogenes triggers proliferation and differentiation of transformed plant cells. Crown gall development is known to be accompanied by global changes in transcription, metabolite levels, and physiological processes. High levels of abscisic acid (ABA in crown galls regulate expression of drought stress responsive genes and mediate drought stress acclimation, which is essential for wild-type-like tumor growth. An impact of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation on crown gall development has been suggested; however, it has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this study, the methylation pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana crown galls was analyzed on a genome-wide scale as well as at the single gene level. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the oncogenes Ipt, IaaH, and IaaM were unmethylated in crown galls. Nevertheless, the oncogenes were susceptible to siRNA-mediated methylation, which inhibited their expression and subsequently crown gall growth. Genome arrays, hybridized with methylated DNA obtained by immunoprecipitation, revealed a globally hypermethylated crown gall genome, while promoters were rather hypomethylated. Mutants with reduced non-CG methylation developed larger tumors than the wild-type controls, indicating that hypermethylation inhibits plant tumor growth. The differential methylation pattern of crown galls and the stem tissue from which they originate correlated with transcriptional changes. Genes known to be transcriptionally inhibited by ABA and methylated in crown galls became promoter methylated upon treatment of A. thaliana with ABA. This suggests that the high ABA levels in crown galls may mediate DNA methylation and regulate expression of genes involved in drought stress protection. In summary, our studies provide evidence that epigenetic processes

  20. Wear Behavior of Ceramic CAD/CAM Crowns and Natural Antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Naumova, Ella A.; Schneider, Stephan; Arnold, Wolfgang H.; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of wear behavior of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) crowns from various restorative materials and natural antagonists. Method: Full CAD/CAM crowns fabricated with nanoceramic resin (Lava Ultimate (LU)), a glass ceramic in a resin interpenetrating matrix (Vita Enamic (VE)) and a lithium silicate reinforced ceramic enriched with zirconia (Vita Suprinity (VS)) were cemented on human molars. The crown and antagonists were subjected to simulated c...

  1. Clinical evaluations of cast gold alloy, machinable zirconia, and semiprecious alloy crowns: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Man; Hong, Yong-Shin; Park, Eun-Jin; Heo, Seong-Joo; Oh, Namsik

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have compared the marginal and internal fits of crowns fabricated from machinable palladium-silver-indium (Pd-Ag-In) semiprecious metal alloy. The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate and compare the marginal and internal fits of machined Pd-Ag-In alloy, zirconia, and cast gold crowns. A prospective clinical trial was performed on 35 participants and 52 abutment teeth at 2 centers. Individuals requiring prosthetic restorations were treated with gold alloy or zirconia crowns (2 control groups) or Pd-Ag-In alloy crowns (experimental group). A replica technique was used to evaluate the marginal and internal fits. The buccolingual and mesiodistal cross-sections were measured, and a noninferiority comparison was conducted. The mean marginal gaps were 68.2 μm for the gold crowns, 75.4 μm for the zirconia crowns, and 76.9 μm for the Pd-Ag-In alloy crowns. In the 5 cross-sections other than the distal cross-section, the 2-sided 95% confidence limits for the differences between the Pd-Ag-In alloy crowns and the 2 control groups were not larger than the 25-μm noninferiority margin. The control groups displayed smaller internal gaps in the line angle and occlusal spaces compared with the Pd-Ag-In crown group. The marginal gaps of machinable Pd-Ag-In alloy crowns did not meet the noninferiority criterion in the distal margin compared with zirconia and gold alloy crowns. Nonetheless, all 3 crowns had clinically applicable precision. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Comparison of Marginal Fit Between Lithium-Disilicate Press and CAD Fabricated Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-27

    KBC, Nicholls JI. Evaluation of the marginal fit of a zirconia ceramic computer-aided machined (CAM) crown system. J Prosthet Dent 2010;104:216-27. 7...Workshops _Abstract _Other 6. Title: "A comparison of marginal fit between lithium-disilicate press and CAD fabricated crowns " 7. Intended...thesis manuscript entitled: "A comparison of marginal fit between lithium-disilicate press and CAD fabricated crowns " Is appropriately acknowledged

  3. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Pacheco Lameira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n=10: Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM; Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM; Bi-layer crowns (BL. Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37°C, and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P=.05 indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM=3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM=3561.5 N ± 991.6, which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6. There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength.

  4. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameira, Deborah Pacheco; Silva, Wilkens Aurélio Buarque e; Silva, Frederico Andrade e; De Souza, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness) and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer) configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n = 10): Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM); Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM); Bi-layer crowns (BL). Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37°C), and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = .05) indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM = 3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM = 3561.5 N ± 991.6), which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6). There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength. PMID:26576423

  5. Effect of Different Luting Agents on the Retention of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Mobilio, Nicola; Fasiol, Alberto; Mollica, Francesco; Catapano, Santo

    2015-01-01

    No studies are available that evaluate the retention of disilicate crowns according to different cementation procedures. The purpose of this study was to measure the retention of lithium disilicate crowns cemented using two different cementation systems. Twenty extracted mandibular premolars were prepared. Anatomic crowns were waxed and hot pressed using lithium disilicate ceramic. Teeth were divided into two groups (n = 10): (1) self-curing luting composite and (2) glass-ionomer cement (GIC)...

  6. Biomechanical three-dimensional finite element analysis of monolithic zirconia crown with different cement type

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Seung-Ryong

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of various cement types on the stress distribution in monolithic zirconia crowns under maximum bite force using the finite element analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS The models of the prepared #46 crown (deep chamfer margin) were scanned and solid models composed of the monolithic zirconia crown, cement layer, and prepared tooth were produced using the computer-aided design technology and were subsequently translated into 3-dimens...

  7. In Vitro Fit and Cementation Resistance of Provisional Crowns for Single Implant-Supported Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Moris,Izabela Cristina Maurício; Oliveira,Juliana Elias de; Faria,Adriana Cláudia Lapria; Ribeiro,Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues,Renata Cristina Silveira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: This study aimed to verify marginal fit and the effect of cement film thickness standardization on retention of provisional crowns made with prefabricated acrylic cylinders on abutments, using two temporary luting agents subjected or not to mechanical cycling. Provisional crowns were made from bis-acryl (Luxatemp Fluorescence) or methyl methacrylate (Duralay) resins on acrylic cylinders and marginal fit and cement film thickness were evaluated. For retention evaluation, crowns were ...

  8. Ink remover poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ink remover is a chemical used to get out ink stains. Ink remover poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... These ingredients can be found in: Ink removers Liquid bleaches Note: This list may not include all sources of ink removers.

  9. Obstacle recovery device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, Fujio; Furuya, Masaaki; Ugai, Masaru.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a fiber scope for taking a recovery operation portion and an obstacle into a field of vision and photographing the state of the operation in the recovery operation portion and a display section for displaying the photographed image at a remote place. Concretely, the monitor of a remote operation section displays an image photographed by the fiber scope. A operation unit attached with a forceps and a fiber scope are brought closer, for example, to a fuel assembly in a reactor in the recovery operation portion. Then, the obstacle intruded into a minute space between fuels is recovered by the forceps while displaying state of the operation on the monitor of the remote operation section. Such a device certainly recover and remove a minute obstacle present in such a circumstance that a man's hand can not access, by the operation conducted under visual confirmation. (I.S.)

  10. Radiochemical determination of 210Pb using crown ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, N.; Bodizs, D.; Vodicska, M.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma spectrometric determination of 210 Pb following chemical separation has been performed very precisely and with high sensitivity, due to the low and constant self-absorption of the chemically pure sample. A simple and quick method for the chemical separation of lead using crown ether has been developed. Its four steps are described in detail. The new method was verified using phosphate ore and gypsum samples that were measured in an interlaboratory comparison and with a standard reference material. This method can also be used for self-absorption correction in direct gamma spectrometry of 210 Pb. (N.T.) 4 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  11. Suppressing Nonradiative Recombination in Crown-Shaped Quantum Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwangwook [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ju, Gunwu [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Na, Byung Hoon [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Jho, Young-Dahl [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Myoung, NoSoung [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Yim, Sang-Youp [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Kim, Hyung-jun [Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Lee, Yong Tak [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology

    2018-02-06

    We examined the structural and optical properties of a crown-shaped quantum well (CSQW) to suppress nonradiative recombination. To reduce carrier loss in defect traps at the well/barrier interface, the CSQW was designed to concentrate carriers in the central region by tailoring the bandgap energy. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements showed that the CSQW had a high activation energy and low potential fluctuation. In addition, the long carrier lifetime of the CSQW at high temperatures can be interpreted as indicating a decrease in carrier loss at defect traps.

  12. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulve, Meenal Nitin; Gulve, Nitin Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a part of their jobs or hobbies and their dentists should know the causes of barotrauma. In addition, the clinician must be aware of the possible influence of pressure changes on the retention of dental components.

  13. Stress distribution difference between Lava Ultimate full crowns and IPS e.max CAD full crowns on a natural tooth and on tooth-shaped implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Ivo; Daher, René

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this short communication is to present finite element analysis comparison of the stress distribution between CAD/CAM full crowns made of Lava Ultimate and of IPS e.max CAD, adhesively luted to natural teeth and to implant abutments with the shape of natural teeth. Six 3D models were prepared using a 3D content-creating software, based on a micro-CT scan of a human mandibular molar. The geometry of the full crown and of the abutment was the same for all models representing Lava Ultimate full crowns (L) and IPS e.max CAD full crowns (E) on three different abutments: prepared natural tooth (n), titanium abutment (t) and zirconia abutment (z). A static load of 400 N was applied on the vestibular and lingual cusps, and fixtures were applied to the base of the models. After running the static linear analysis, the post-processing data we analyzed. The stress values at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lt and Lz groups were significantly higher than the stress values at the same interface of all the other models. The high stress concentration in the adhesive at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lava Ultimate group on implants might be one of the factors contributing to the reported debondings of crowns.

  14. Design and synthesis of the next generation of crown ethers for waste separations: An interlaboratory comprehensive proposal. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, B.A.; Dietz, M.L.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Hay, B.P.

    1997-09-01

    'The purpose of this task is to undertake the design, synthesis, and characterization of the next generation of crown ethers for metal-ion separations applicable to the US Department of Energy''s (DOE''s) environmental needs. The general target problem is the removal of alkali and alkaline-earth metal contaminants from certain environmental and waste streams. Although not a radioactivity hazard, Li{sup +} ions leaching from burial sites containing more than 12 metric tons of lithium compounds contaminate the groundwater at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and have raised noncompliance concerns because of the resultant toxicity to aquatic biota. A more highly visible problem has been treatment of high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and especially the Hanford Site. The fission products {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs have been explicitly targeted for removal by the following DOE programs: the Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Science and Technology, the Tank Waste Remediation System, the Tanks Focus Area, and the Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program. These seemingly ubiquitous fission products also appear in soil and groundwater at numerous DOE sites. In addition, radium has recently been named as a target contaminant at the Niagara Falls Storage Site. Unfortunately, the separations technologies needed to address these problems either do not exist or exhibit substantial deficiencies. Established techniques such as solvent extraction and ion exchange certainly have a strong role to play, especially as enhanced with the use of the new highly selective metal-ion hosts such as crown ethers and calixarenes. Recently applied results in the United States, France, Russia, and elsewhere have demonstrated the effective performance of crown ethers under realistic or actual process conditions for the removal of alkali and

  15. Design and synthesis of the next generation of crown ethers for waste separations: An interlaboratory comprehensive proposal. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandratos, S.D.; Dietz, M.L.; Hay, B.P.; Moyer, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    'The purpose of this task is to undertake the design, synthesis, and characterization of the next generation of crown ethers for metal-ion separations applicable to the US Department of Energy''s (DOE''s) environmental needs. The general target problem is the removal of alkali and alkaline-earth metal contaminants from certain environmental and waste streams. Although not a radioactivity hazard, Li + ions leaching from burial sites containing more than 12 metric tons of lithium compounds contaminate the groundwater at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and have raised noncompliance concerns because of the resultant toxicity to aquatic biota. A more highly visible problem has been treatment of high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and especially the Hanford Site. The fission products 90 Sr and 137 Cs have been explicitly targeted for removal by the following DOE programs: the Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Science and Technology, the Tank Waste Remediation System, the Tanks Focus Area, and the Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program. These seemingly ubiquitous fission products also appear in soil and groundwater at numerous DOE sites. In addition, radium has recently been named as a target contaminant at the Niagara Falls Storage Site. Unfortunately, the separations technologies needed to address these problems either do not exist or exhibit substantial deficiencies. Established techniques such as solvent extraction and ion exchange certainly have a strong role to play, especially as enhanced with the use of the new highly selective metal-ion hosts such as crown ethers and calixarenes. Recently applied results in the United States, France, Russia, and elsewhere have demonstrated the effective performance of crown ethers under realistic or actual process conditions for the removal of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions from waste

  16. Monolithic zirconia dental crowns. Internal fit, margin quality, fracture mode and load at fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriwer, Christian; Skjold, Anneli; Gjerdet, Nils Roar; Øilo, Marit

    2017-09-01

    Dental all-ceramic restorations of zirconia, with and without an aesthetic veneering layer, have become a viable alternative to conventional metal-ceramic restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether factors of the production methods or the material compositions affect load at fracture, fracture modes, internal fit or crown margins of monolithic zirconia crowns. Sixty crowns made from six different commercially available dental zirconias were produced to a model tooth with a shallow circumferential chamfer preparation. Internal fit was assessed by the replica method. The crown margin quality was assessed by light microscopy on an ordinal scale. The cemented crowns were loaded centrally in the occlusal fossa with a horizontal steel cylinder with a diameter of 13mm at 0.5mm/min until fracture. Fractographic analysis was performed on the fractured crowns. There were statistically significant differences among the groups regarding crown margins, internal fit and load at fracture (pFracture analyses revealed that all fractures started cervically and propagated to the occlusal surface similar to clinically observed fractures. There was statistically significant correlation between margin quality and load at fracture (Spearman's rank correlation, pfracture. The hard-machined Y-TZP zirconia crowns had the best margin quality and the highest load at fracture. Reduction of margin flaws will improve fracture strength of monolithic zirconia crowns and thereby increase clinical success. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radium separation through complexation by aqueous crown ethers and ion exchange or solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Burnett, W.C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Oceanography

    1997-11-01

    The effect of three water-soluble, unsubstituted crown ethers (15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6) and 21-crown-7 (21C7)) on the uptake of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra cations by a sulfonic acid cation exchange resin, and on the extraction of the same cations by xylene solutions of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) from aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions has been investigated. The crown ethers enhance the sorption of the larger cations by the ion exchange resin, thereby improving the resin selectivity over calcium, a result of a synergistic interaction between the crown ether and the ionic functional groups of the resin. Similarly, the extraction of the larger alkaline earth cations into xylene by HDNNS is strongly synergized by the presence of the crown ethers in the aqueous phase. Promising results for intra-Group IIa cation separations have been obtained using each of the three crown ethers as the aqueous ligands and the sulfonic acid cation exchange resin. Even greater separation factors for the radium-calcium couple have been measured with the crown-ethers and HDNNS solutions in the solvent extraction mode. The application of the uptake and extraction results to the development of radium separation schemes is discussed and a possible flowchart for the determination of {sup 226}Ra/{sup 228}Ra in natural waters is presented.

  18. Wear Behavior of Ceramic CAD/CAM Crowns and Natural Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella A. Naumova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of wear behavior of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM crowns from various restorative materials and natural antagonists. Method: Full CAD/CAM crowns fabricated with nanoceramic resin (Lava Ultimate (LU, a glass ceramic in a resin interpenetrating matrix (Vita Enamic (VE and a lithium silicate reinforced ceramic enriched with zirconia (Vita Suprinity (VS were cemented on human molars. The crown and antagonists were subjected to simulated chewing. 3D data sets, before and after the chewing simulation, were generated and matched. Occlusal surface roughness, vertical and volume loss of the crowns and antagonists were analyzed. Results: Crown roughness was significantly different between the LU and VE groups after chewing simulation. Crown vertical loss differed in all groups. The highest crown volume loss was found in the LU group, and the lowest in the VE group. Comparisons between the LU and VE groups and the LU and VS groups were significantly different. The highest antagonist volume loss was reached in the VE group, the lowest was in the LU group. Conclusion: Roughness increased after chewing simulation. LU crowns are the most natural antagonist-friendly; these were the most susceptible to vertical and volume loss. Of the tested materials, the VE crowns are the most stable regarding occlusion.

  19. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Lameira, Deborah Pacheco; Silva, Wilkens Aur?lio Buarque e; Silva, Frederico Andrade e; De Souza, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness) and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer) configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n = 10): Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM); Glazed mo...

  20. Measuring residual stress in ceramic zirconia-porcelain dental crowns by nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Allahkarami, M; Hanan, J C

    2012-02-01

    Residual stress plays a critical role in failure of ceramic dental crowns. The magnitude and distribution of residual stress in the crown system are largely unknown. Determining the residual stress quantitatively is challenging since the crown has such complex contours and shapes. This work explored the feasibility and validity of measuring residual stress of zirconia and porcelain in ceramic crowns by nanoindentation. Nanoindentation tests were performed on the cross-section of a crown for both porcelain and zirconia along four critical locations: the thickest, thinnest and medium porcelain thicknesses. Zirconia and porcelain pieces, chipped off from the crown and annealed at 400 °C, were used as reference samples. The residual stress was determined by comparing the measured hardness of the stressed sample with that of the reference sample. Nanoindentation impression images were acquired through a scanning probe microscope (SPM) equipped with a Hysitron Triboindenter. Zirconia showed large pile-up. Residual stress is determined along the thickness of crowns at the chosen locations for both porcelain and zirconia. The measured results were compared with the results from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and finite element modeling (FEM). Results show there are large amounts of residual stresses in the dental crown and their magnitude differs between locations due to the complex shape of the crown. The average residual stress readings were as high as -637 MPa and 323 MPa for zirconia and porcelain respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.