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Sample records for crowfoot

  1. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo, Jessica

    2009-10-01

    Born in 1910 in Cairo, Egypt, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin would later be known as the third woman in history to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her research on the structure of vitamin B-12. Her X-ray crystallography work also included discovering the molecular structure of penicillin and insulin. Dr. Hodgkin's work has aided in determining the structures of molecules for others to expand the technology necessary for today's medicine.

  2. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    his first students, Max Perutz6 and Dorothy Crowfoot. Hodgkin7 .... As a student in Cambridge just after the. Great War, he ... be subjected to the Research Assessment Exercise of the ..... tive formative roles of environmental and genetic factors.

  3. Biographies | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biographies of Women Scientists that have appeared in Resonance. Amalie Emmy Noether · Beatrice Tinsley · Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin · Florence Jessie MacWilliams · Henrietta Swan Leavitt · Marie Skoldowska Curie · Rosalind Franklin · Maria Goeppert Mayer · Edavaleth Kakkat Janaki Ammal; Grace Murray Hopper ...

  4. Interim Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Midwest Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Ceratophyllum demersum), bladderwort (Utricularia macrorhiza), white water crowfoot (Ranunculus longirostris), and duckweeds ( Lemna , Spirodela, and...divide the landscape into areas called map units. Map units usually contain more than one soil type or component. They often contain several minor ...bladderworts (Utricularia spp.), and duckweeds ( Lemna spp.) (Figure 36). Figure 36. Dried remains of water-lilies in a semipermanently ponded

  5. A Summary of Aquatic Vegetation Monitoring at Selected Locations in Pools 4, 8, 13, and 26 and La Grange Pool of the Upper Mississippi River System. 1993 Annual Status Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Monitoring Program, arranged alphabetically by common name within family . Family Common name"b Scientific name’ Ceratophyllaceae Coon’s tail, coontail...pondweed Potamogeton pectinatus L. Potamogetonaceae Variableleaf pondweed Potamogeton gramineus L. 8 Table 2. Continued. Family Common nameab Scientific...name’ Ranunculaceae Longbeak buttercup Ranunculus longirostris Godron. Ranunculaceae White water-crowfoot Ranunculus trichophyllus Chauix

  6. Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Midwest Region (Version 2.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    bladderwort (Utricularia macrorhiza), white water crowfoot (Ranunculus longirostris), and duckweeds ( Lemna , Spirodela, and Wolffia). As mentioned...units. Map units usually contain more than one soil type or component. They often contain several minor components or inclusions of soils with...bladderworts (Utricularia spp.), and duckweeds ( Lemna spp.) (Figure 37). ERDC/EL TR-10-16 87 Figure 37. Dried remains of water-lilies in a

  7. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin – A Tribute The word 'scientist' evokes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    milind1

    The most important childhood event in relation to the development of her scientific interest also took place ... University of Oxford. The four ... to Oxford to start her independent research career and remained there for the rest of her life. Dorothy ...

  8. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck.

  9. Archaeologists-in-Training: Students of the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem, 1920-1936

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amara Thornton

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Compiled in the process of doctoral research, this list of students at the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem covers the terms of the School’s first two directors, John Garstang and John Crowfoot. It has been gathered from the School’s Minute Books, now in the archive of the Palestine Exploration Fund, and from contemporary published reports in the Palestine Exploration Quarterly. By naming and enumerating the students at this institution, still in existence today, the diaspora of and networks inherent in archaeological training during the early years of professionalization become clear. The data also includes the background and education (where known of these prospective archaeologists, an important factor in evaluating issues of gender, class and education in the history of the discipline.

  10. Mine, thine, and ours: collaboration and co-authorship in the material culture of the mid-twentieth century chemical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Mary Jo

    2014-08-01

    Patterns of collaboration and co-authorship in chemical science from the 1920s to the 1960s are examined with an eye to frequency of co-authorship and differences in allocation of credit during a period of increasing team research and specialization within chemical research groups. Three research leaders in the cross-disciplinary and cutting edge field of X-ray crystallography and molecular structure are the focus of this historical study within a framework of sociological literature on different collaborative patterns followed by eminent scientists. The examples of Michael Polanyi in Berlin and Manchester, Linus Pauling in Pasadena, and Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin in Oxford demonstrate the need to de-centre historical narrative from the heroic 'he' or 'she' to the collaborative 'they.' These cases demonstrate, too, the roles of disciplinary apprenticeships, local conditions, and individual personalities for historical explanation that transcends universal generalizations about scientific practice, material culture, and sociological trends.

  11. Protein crystallography and drug discovery: recollections of knowledge exchange between academia and industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom L. Blundell

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of structure-guided drug discovery is a story of knowledge exchange where new ideas originate from all parts of the research ecosystem. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin obtained insulin from Boots Pure Drug Company in the 1930s and insulin crystallization was optimized in the company Novo in the 1950s, allowing the structure to be determined at Oxford University. The structure of renin was developed in academia, on this occasion in London, in response to a need to develop antihypertensives in pharma. The idea of a dimeric aspartic protease came from an international academic team and was discovered in HIV; it eventually led to new HIV antivirals being developed in industry. Structure-guided fragment-based discovery was developed in large pharma and biotechs, but has been exploited in academia for the development of new inhibitors targeting protein–protein interactions and also antimicrobials to combat mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis. These observations provide a strong argument against the so-called `linear model', where ideas flow only in one direction from academic institutions to industry. Structure-guided drug discovery is a story of applications of protein crystallography and knowledge exhange between academia and industry that has led to new drug approvals for cancer and other common medical conditions by the Food and Drug Administration in the USA, as well as hope for the treatment of rare genetic diseases and infectious diseases that are a particular challenge in the developing world.

  12. Protein crystallography and drug discovery: recollections of knowledge exchange between academia and industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Tom L

    2017-07-01

    The development of structure-guided drug discovery is a story of knowledge exchange where new ideas originate from all parts of the research ecosystem. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin obtained insulin from Boots Pure Drug Company in the 1930s and insulin crystallization was optimized in the company Novo in the 1950s, allowing the structure to be determined at Oxford University. The structure of renin was developed in academia, on this occasion in London, in response to a need to develop antihypertensives in pharma. The idea of a dimeric aspartic protease came from an international academic team and was discovered in HIV; it eventually led to new HIV antivirals being developed in industry. Structure-guided fragment-based discovery was developed in large pharma and biotechs, but has been exploited in academia for the development of new inhibitors targeting protein-protein interactions and also antimicrobials to combat mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis. These observations provide a strong argument against the so-called 'linear model', where ideas flow only in one direction from academic institutions to industry. Structure-guided drug discovery is a story of applications of protein crystallography and knowledge exhange between academia and industry that has led to new drug approvals for cancer and other common medical conditions by the Food and Drug Administration in the USA, as well as hope for the treatment of rare genetic diseases and infectious diseases that are a particular challenge in the developing world.

  13. Out of the Shadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Nina; Williams, Gary

    2010-12-01

    Foreword Freeman J. Dyson; Introduction Nina Byers; 1. Hertha Aryton 1854-1923 Joan Mason; 2. Margaret Maltby 1860-1944 Peggy Kidwell; 3. Agnes Pockels 1862-1935 Gary A. Williams; 4. Marie Curie 1867-1934 A. Pais; 5. Henrietta Leavitt 1868-1921 Jean L. Turner; 6. Harriet Brooks 1876-1933 C. W. Wong; 7. Lise Meitner 1878-1968 Ruth Lewin Sime; 8. Emmy Noether 1882-1935 Nina Byers; 9. Inge Lehmann 1888-1993 Bruce A. Bolt; 10. Marietta Blau 1894-1970 Leopold Halpern and Maurice M. Shapiro; 11. Hertha Sponer 1895-1968 Helmut Rechenberg; 12. Irene Joliot-Curie 1897-1956 Hélène Langevin-Joliot and Pierre Radvanyi; 13. Katherine Burr Blodgett 1898-1979 Gary A. Williams; 14. Cecilia Payne Gaposchkin 1900-1979 Vera C. Rubin; 15. Mary Cartwright 1900-1998 Freeman J. Dyson; 16. Bertha Jeffreys 1903-1999 Ruth M. Williams; 17. Kathleen Yardley Lonsdale1903-1971 Judith Milledge; 18. Maria Goeppert Mayer 1906-1972 Steven A. Moszkowski; 19. Helen Megaw 1907-2002 A. Michael Glazer and Christine Kelsey; 20. Yvette Cauchois 1908-1999 Christiane Bonnelle; 21. Marguerite Perey 1909-1975 Jean-Pierre Adloff and George B. Kauffman; 22. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin 1910-1994 Jenny P. Glusker; 23. Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber 1911-1998 Alfred Scharff Goldhaber; 24. Chien Shiung Wu 1912-1997 Noemie Bencze-Koller; 25. Margaret E. Burbidge 1919 Virginia Trimble; 26. Phyllis Freier 1921-1992 Cecil J. Waddington; 27. Rosalyn S. Yalow 1921 M. S. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 28. Esther Conwell 1922 Lewis Rothberg; 29. Cecile Dewitt-Morette 1922 Bryce DeWitt; 30. Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat 1923 James W. York Jr.; 31. Vera Rubin 1928 Robert J. Rubin; 32. Mildred S. Dresselhaus 1930 G. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 33. Myriam Sarachik 1933 Jonathan R. Friedman; 34. Juliet Lee-Franzini 1933 Paolo Franzini; 35. Helen T. Edwards 1936 John Peoples; 36. Mary K. Gaillard 1939 Andreszej Buras; 37. Renata Kallosh 1943 Andrei Linde and Michael Gutperle; 38. Jocelyn Bell Burnell 1943 Ferdinand V. Coroniti and Gary A

  14. Chemical Achievers: The Human Face of the Chemical Sciences (by Mary Ellen Bowden)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, George B.

    1999-02-01

    (formal and informal, familiar and unfamiliar), caricatures, apparatus, patent drawings, models, manuscripts, memoranda, laboratories, and plants and buildings are featured. The book presents many images of chemists in the work settings where they actually made their discoveries. The quaint pictures of Chandler with his wash bottle, William H. Walker with his slide rule, Carl Djerassi peering at a flask without goggle protection, and Edward Goodrich Acheson with his omnipresent cigar evoke a bygone era that will induce nostalgia in instructors and curiosity or disbelief in students. Many of the 80 featured chemists are minority scientists; 10 are women (Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Marie Curie, Iréne Joliot-Curie, Mme. Lavoisier, Rosalind Franklin, Stephanie L. Kwolek, Ellen Swallow Richards, Alice Hamilton, Rachel Carson, and Julia Brainerd Hall, whose role in her brother Charles Martin Hall's development of the electrolytic production of metal is underappreciated), and three are African-Americans (Percy Lavon Julian, Walter Lincoln Hawkins, and Henry Aaron Hill). The book's 11 sections, each prefaced with a short, helpful summary, and the number of scientists profiled in each are Forerunners, 4; Theory and Production of Gases, 4; Electrochemistry and Electrochemical Industries, 12; The Path to the Periodic Table, 9; Atomic and Nuclear Structure, 9; Chemical Synthesis, Structure, and Bonding, 9; Pharmaceuticals and the Path to Biomolecules, 10; Petroleum and Petrochemicals, 4; Plastics and Other Polymers, 6; Chemical Engineering (most of whose practitioners were unfamiliar to me), 6; and Human and Natural Environmental Concerns, 7. An extensive bibliography (five double-column pages), arranged according to these sections, includes books, articles, dissertations, collections, and oral histories. Items as recent as 1997 and even a 1998 book in press are cited. An index (three triple-column pages) facilitates location of material. Chemical Achievers is to some extent similar