WorldWideScience

Sample records for crossflow transition control

  1. Roughness Based Crossflow Transition Control for a Swept Airfoil Design Relevant to Subsonic Transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Eppink, Jenna; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Streett, Craig L.

    2010-01-01

    A high fidelity transition prediction methodology has been applied to a swept airfoil design at a Mach number of 0.75 and chord Reynolds number of approximately 17 million, with the dual goal of an assessment of the design for the implementation and testing of roughness based crossflow transition control and continued maturation of such methodology in the context of realistic aerodynamic configurations. Roughness based transition control involves controlled seeding of suitable, subdominant crossflow modes in order to weaken the growth of naturally occurring, linearly more unstable instability modes via a nonlinear modification of the mean boundary layer profiles. Therefore, a synthesis of receptivity, linear and nonlinear growth of crossflow disturbances, and high-frequency secondary instabilities becomes desirable to model this form of control. Because experimental data is currently unavailable for passive crossflow transition control for such high Reynolds number configurations, a holistic computational approach is used to assess the feasibility of roughness based control methodology. Potential challenges inherent to this control application as well as associated difficulties in modeling this form of control in a computational setting are highlighted. At high Reynolds numbers, a broad spectrum of stationary crossflow disturbances amplify and, while it may be possible to control a specific target mode using Discrete Roughness Elements (DREs), nonlinear interaction between the control and target modes may yield strong amplification of the difference mode that could have an adverse impact on the transition delay using spanwise periodic roughness elements.

  2. Coordinated Control of Cross-Flow Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, have several advantages over axial-flow turbines for a number of applications including urban wind power, high-density arrays, and marine or fluvial currents. By controlling the angular velocity applied to the turbine as a function of angular blade position, we have demonstrated a 79 percent increase in cross-flow turbine efficiency over constant-velocity control. This strategy uses the downhill simplex method to optimize control parameter profiles during operation of a model turbine in a recirculating water flume. This optimization method is extended to a set of two turbines, where the blade motions and position of the downstream turbine are optimized to beneficially interact with the coherent structures in the wake of the upstream turbine. This control scheme has the potential to enable high-density arrays of cross-flow turbines to operate at cost-effective efficiency. Turbine wake and force measurements are analyzed for insight into the effect of a coordinated control strategy.

  3. Data Analysis for the NASA/Boeing Hybrid Laminar Flow Control Crossflow Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Jenna L.; Wlezien, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Hybrid-Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Crossflow Experiment, completed in 1995. generated a large database of boundary layer stability and transition data that was only partially analyzed before data analysis was abruptly ended in the late 1990's. Renewed interest in laminar flow technologies prompted additional data analysis, to integrate all data, including some post-test roughness and porosity measurements. The objective is to gain new insights into the effects of suction on boundary layer stability. A number of challenges were encountered during the data analysis, and their solutions are discussed in detail. They include the effect of the probe vibration, the effect of the time-varying surface temperature on traveling crossflow instabilities, and the effect of the stationary crossflow modes on the approximation of wall location. Despite the low turbulence intensity of the wind tunnel (0.01 to 0.02%), traveling crosflow disturbances were present in the data, in some cases at amplitudes up to 1% of the freestream velocity. However, the data suggests that transition was dominated by stationary crossflow. Traveling crossflow results and stationary data in the presence of suction are compared with linear parabolized stability equations results as a way of testing the quality of the results.

  4. Design of a wing shape for study of hypersonic crossflow transition in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godil, A.; Bertelrud, A.

    1992-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methods were used in the design of a wing shape for study of hypersonic crossflow transition in flight. The flight experiment is to be performed on the delta wing of the first stage of a Pegasus launch vehicle as a piggy-back experiment to support boundary-layer stability code development and validation. The design goal is to obtain crossflow-induced transition at 20-40 percent of the chord for a flight Mach number of approximately six. The present paper describes the design and analysis process utilized to obtain desired glove shape. A variety of schemes were used in the design, ranging from simple empirical crossflow correlations to three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes in conjunction with linear stability/N-factor computations. The sensitivity to various parameters, such as trajectory variations, allowable wing thickness, leading-edge radius and surface temperature, is also discussed.

  5. Intracycle Angular Velocity Control of Cross-Flow Turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Strom, Benjamin; Polagye, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, have numerous features that make them attractive for wind and marine renewable energy. To maximize power output, the turbine blade kinematics may be controlled during the course of the blade revolution, thus optimizing the unsteady fluid dynamic forces. Dynamically pitching the blades, similar to blade control in a helicopter, is an established method. However, this technique adds undesirable mechanical complexity to the turbine, increasing cost and reducing durability. Here we introduce a novel alternative requiring no additional moving parts: we optimize the turbine rotation rate as a function of blade position resulting in motion (including changes in the effective angle of attack) that is precisely timed to exploit unsteady fluid effects. We demonstrate experimentally that this approach results in a 79% increase in power output over industry standard control methods. Analysis of the fluid forcing and blade kinematics show that maximal power is ach...

  6. Control of stationary cross-flow modes in a mach 3.5 boundary layer using patterned passive and active roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuele, Chan Yong

    Spanwise-periodic roughness designed to excite selected wavelengths of stationary cross-flow modes was investigated in a 3-D boundary layer at Mach 3.5. The test model was a sharp-tipped 14° right-circular cone. The model and integrated sensor traversing system were placed in the Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low Disturbance Tunnel (SLDT) equipped with a "quiet design" nozzle at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model was oriented at a 4.2 angle of attack to produce a mean cross-flow velocity component in the boundary layer over the cone. Five removable cone tips have been investigated. One has a smooth surface that is used to document the baseline ("natural") conditions. Two had minute (20 - 40 mum) "dimples" that are equally spaced around the circumference, at a streamwise location that is just upstream of the linear stability neutral growth branch for cross-flow modes. The azimuthal mode numbers of the dimpled tips were selected to either enhance the most amplified wave numbers, or to suppress the growth of the most amplified wave numbers. Two of the cone tips had an array of plasma streamwise vortex generators that were designed to simulate the disturbances produced by the passive patterned roughness. The results indicate that the stationary cross-flow modes were highly receptive to the patterned roughness of both passive and active types. The patterned passive roughness that was designed to suppress the growth of the most amplified modes had an azimuthal wavelength that was 66% smaller that that of the most amplified stationary cross-flow mode. This had the effect to increase the transition Reynolds number from 25% to 50% depending on the measurement technique. The application of the research is on turbulent transition control on swept wings of supersonic aircraft. The plasma-based roughness has the advantage over the passive roughness of being able to be adaptable to different conditions that would occur during a flight mission.

  7. Cross-flow filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  8. Geometric optimization of cross-flow heat exchanger based on dynamic controllability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alotaibi Sorour

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The operation of heat exchangers and other thermal equipments in the face of variable loads is usually controlled by manipulating inlet fluid temperatures or mass flow rates, where the controlled variable is usually one of the output temperatures. The aim of this work is to optimize the geometry of a tube with internal flow of water and an external cross-flow of air, based on its controllability characteristics. Controllability is a useful concept both from theoretical and practical perspective since it tells us if a particular output can be controlled by a particular input. This concept can also provide us with information about the easiest operating condition to control a particular output. A transient model of a tube in cross-flow is developed, where an implicit formulation is used for transient numerical solutions. The aspect ratio of the tube is optimized, subject to volume constraints, based on the optimum operation in terms of controllability. The reported optimized aspect ratio, water mass flow rate and controllability are studied for deferent external properties of the tube.

  9. Study of parameters and entrainment of a jet in cross-flow arrangement with transition at two low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Camilo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe (Germany); Convenio Andres Bello, Instituto Internacional de Investigaciones Educativas para la Integracion, La Paz (Bolivia); Denev, Jordan A.; Bockhorn, Henning [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engler-Bunte-Institute, Combustion Division, Karlsruhe (Germany); Suntz, Rainer [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of the mixing process is one of the main issues in chemical engineering and combustion and the configuration of a jet into a cross-flow (JCF) is often employed for this purpose. Experimental data are gained for the symmetry plane in a JCF-arrangement of an air flow using a combination of particle image velocimetry (PIV) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The experimental data with thoroughly measured boundary conditions are complemented with direct numerical simulations, which are based on idealized boundary conditions. Two similar cases are studied with a fixed jet-to-cross-flow velocity ratio of 3.5 and variable cross-flow Reynolds numbers equal to 4,120 and 8,240; in both cases the jet issues from the pipe at laminar conditions. This leads to a laminar-to-turbulent transition, which depends on the Reynolds number and occurs quicker for the case with higher Reynolds number in both experiments and simulations as well. It was found that the Reynolds number only slightly affects the jet trajectory, which in the case with the higher Reynolds number is slightly deeper. It is attributed to the changed boundary layer shape of the cross-flow. Leeward streamlines bend toward the jet and are responsible for the strong entrainment of cross-flow fluid into the jet. Velocity components are compared for the two Reynolds numbers at the leeward side at positions where strongest entrainment is present and a pressure minimum near the jet trajectory is found. The numerical simulations showed that entrainment is higher for the case with the higher Reynolds number. The latter is attributed to the earlier transition in this case. Fluid entrainment of the jet in cross-flow is more than twice stronger than for a similar flow of a jet issuing into a co-flowing stream. This comparison is made along the trajectory of the two jets at a distance of 5.5 jet diameters downstream and is based on the results from the direct numerical simulations and recently published

  10. Cross-flow, filter-sorbet catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: A cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  11. Performance Evaluation, Emulation, and Control of Cross-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, Robert J.

    Cross-flow hydrokinetic turbines are a promising option for effectively harvesting energy from fast-flowing streams or currents. This work describes the dynamics of such turbines, analyzes techniques used to scale turbine properties for prototyping, determines and demonstrates the limits of stability for cross-flow rotors, and discusses means and objectives of turbine control. Novel control strategies are under development to utilize low-speed operation (slower than at maximum power point) as a means of shedding power under rated conditions. However, operation in this regime may be unstable. An experiment designed to characterize the stability of a laboratory-scale cross-flow turbine operating near a critically low speed yields evidence that system stall (complete loss of ability to rotate) occurs due, in part, to interactions with turbulent decreases in flow speed. The turbine is capable of maintaining 'stable' operation at critical speed for short duration (typically less than 10 s), as described by exponential decay. The presence of accelerated 'bypass' flow around the rotor and decelerated 'induction' region directly upstream of the rotor, both predicted by linear momentum theory, are observed and quantified with particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements conducted upstream of the turbine. Additionally, general agreement is seen between PIV inflow measurements and those obtained by an advection-corrected acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) further upstream. Performance of a turbine at small (prototype) geometric scale may be prone to undesirable effects due to operation at low Reynolds number and in the presence of high channel blockage. Therefore, testing at larger scale, in open water is desirable. A cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine with a projected area (product of blade span and rotor diameter) of 0.7 m2 is evaluated in open-water tow trials at three inflow speeds ranging from 1.0 m/s to 2.1 m/s. Measurements of the inflow velocity, the rotor mechanical

  12. Cross-flow filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. Second quarter technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  13. Nonlinear Development and Secondary Instability of Traveling Crossflow Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Duan, Lian; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2014-01-01

    Transition research under NASA's Aeronautical Sciences Project seeks to develop a validated set of variable fidelity prediction tools with known strengths and limitations, so as to enable "sufficiently" accurate transition prediction and practical transition control for future vehicle concepts. This paper builds upon prior effort targeting the laminar breakdown mechanisms associated with stationary crossflow instability over a swept-wing configuration relevant to subsonic aircraft with laminar flow technology. Specifically, transition via secondary instability of traveling crossflow modes is investigated as an alternate scenario for transition. Results show that, for the parameter range investigated herein, secondary instability of traveling crossflow modes becomes insignificant in relation to the secondary instability of the stationary modes when the relative initial amplitudes of the traveling crossflow instability are lower than those of the stationary modes by approximately two orders of magnitudes or more. Linear growth predictions based on the secondary instability theory are found to agree well with those based on PSE and DNS, with the most significant discrepancies being limited to spatial regions of relatively weak secondary growth, i.e., regions where the primary disturbance amplitudes are smaller in comparison to its peak amplitude. Nonlinear effects on secondary instability evolution is also investigated and found to be initially stabilizing, prior to breakdown.

  14. Observations of Traveling Crossflow Resonant Triad Interactions on a Swept Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Jenna L.; Wlezien, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates the presence of a triad resonance interaction between traveling crossflow modes in a swept wing flow. Results indicate that this interaction occurs when the stationary and traveling crossflow modes have similar and relatively low amplitudes (approx.1% to 6% of the total freestream velocity). The resonant interaction occurs at instability amplitudes well below those typically known to cause transition, yet transition is observed to occur just downstream of the resonance. In each case, two primary linearly unstable traveling crossflow modes are nonlinearly coupled to a higher frequency linearly stable mode at the sum of their frequencies. The higher-frequency mode is linearly stable and presumed to exist as a consequence of the interaction of the two primary modes. Autoand cross-bicoherence are used to determine the extent of phase-matching between the modes, and wavenumber matching confirms the triad resonant nature of the interaction. The bicoherence results indicate a spectral broadening mechanism and the potential path to early transition. The implications for laminar flow control in swept wing flows are significant. Even if stationary crossflow modes remain subcritical, traveling crossflow interactions can lead to early transition.

  15. Cross-flow, filter-sorbet catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. Fourth quarterly technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: A cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  16. Effects of particle size segregation on crossflow microfiltration performance: control mechanism for concentration polarisation and particle fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromkamp, J.; Faber, F.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Although the principal mechanisms of crossflow microfiltration (MF) are well-known, the practical applicability of the resulting microfiltration models is still limited. This can be largely attributed to the lack of understanding of effects of polydispersity in the particulate suspensions, as releva

  17. On the properties and mechanisms of microjet arrays in crossflow for the control of flow separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Erik J.

    By utilizing passive and active methods of flow control, the aerodynamic performance of external and internal components can be greatly improved. Recently however, the benefits of applying active flow control methods to turbomachinery components for improved fuel efficiency, reduced engine size, and greater operational envelope has sparked a renewed interest in some of these flow control techniques. The more attractive of these, is active control in the form of jets in cross flow. With their ability to be turned on and off, as well as their negligible effect on drag when not being actuated, they are well suited for applications such as compressor and turbine blades, engine inlet diffusers, internal engine passages, and general external aerodynamics. This study consists of two parts. The first is the application of active control on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) cascade to determine the effectiveness of microjet actuators on flow separation at relatively low speeds. The second study, motivated by the first, involves a parametric study on a more canonical model to examine the effects of various microjet parameters on the efficacy of separation control and to provide a better understanding of the relevant flow physics governing this control approach. With data obtained from velocity measurements across the wide parametric range, correlations for the growth of the counter-rotating vortex pairs generated by these actuators are deduced. From the information and models obtained throughout the study, basic suggestions for microjet actuator design are presented.

  18. Control of Radiationless Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert J.; Seideman, Tamar

    2016-07-01

    Radiationless transitions provide a mechanism for ultrafast conversion of electronic energy into nuclear motion of a molecule. This effect results from strong vibronic mixing at geometries where two or more electronic states are degenerate (or nearly degenerate in regions of avoiding crossing).We review in this chapter different approaches to controlling such transitions. General control strategies include (1) tuning the frequency of the actinic light to enhance the yield of a specific product, (2) tailoring the properties (spectral phase and amplitude) of the excitation source to guide the generated vibrational wave packet to a specific region of the conical seam between the potential energy surfaces, and (3) modifying the shape and location of the conical intersection either by altering the chemical environment of the molecule or by introducing a strong electromagnetic field. The goals of this chapter are to reveal underlying mechanistic similarities among these general methods and to outline areas for future research.

  19. Robust Control of Chaotic Vibrations for Impacting Heat Exchanger Tubes in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE BEDOUT, J. M.; FRANCHEK, M. A.; BAJAJ, A. K.

    1999-10-01

    A robust feedback controller design to suppress flutter-type chaotic vibrations in baffled heat exchanger tubes is presented. The vibrations are the result of the fluid dynamic forces on the tube which behave as a negative damping element. A consequence of these vibrations is that the heat exchanger tubes impact with the baffle plates thereby reducing the service life of the heat exchanger. To eliminate the resulting tube impacts, a feedback control strategy is proposed. The heat exchanger tube and the fluid dynamic forces acting on the tube are modeled with linear delayed differential equations. Due to the presence of the delay, these equations do not have a rational realization. The feedback controller is realized using a frequency domain loop shaping approach which is well suited for systems with transcendental transfer functions. The control effector is a magnetic force transducer that acts on the heat exchanger tube. The design strategy is based upon the premise that stabilizing the linear instability about the undeformed tube position will preclude the formation of the nonlinear chaotic vibrations that arise from impacting. The feedback controller is shown to provide robust stability and performance over a large flow velocity regime

  20. An experimental and numerical investigation of crossflow effects in two-phase displacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cinar, Y.; Jessen, Kristian; Berenblyum, Roman;

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present flow visualization experiments and numerical simulations that demonstrate the combined effects of viscous and capillary forces and gravity segregation on crossflow that occurs in two-phase displacements in layered porous media. We report results of a series of immiscible....... The experiments also illustrate the complex interplay of capillary, gravity, and viscous forces that controls crossflow. The experimental results confirm that the transition ranges of scaling groups suggested by Zhou et al. (1994) are appropriate/valid. We report also results of simulations of the displacement...... (IFT) by varying the isopropanol concentration. Experiments were performed for a wide range of capillary and gravity numbers. The experimental results illustrate the transitions from flow dominated by capillary pressure at high IFT to flow dominated by gravity and viscous forces at low IFT...

  1. CROSSFLOW FILTRATON: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the Filtration task EM-31, WP-2.3.6, which is a joint effort between Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), tests were planned to evaluate crossflow filtration in order to the improve the use of existing hardware in the waste treatment plants at both the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford Site. These tests included experiments to try different operating conditions and additives, such as filter aids, in order to create a more permeable filter cake and improve the permeate flux. To plan the SRNL tests a literature review was performed to provide information on previous experiments performed by DOE laboratories, and by academia. This report compliments PNNL report (Daniel, et al 2010), and is an attempt to try and capture crossflow filtration work performed in the past that provide a basis for future testing. However, not all sources on crossflow filtration could be reviewed due to the shear volume of information available. In this report various references were examined and a representative group was chosen to present the major factors that affect crossflow filtration. The information summarized in this review contains previous operating conditions studied and their influence on the rate of filtration. Besides operating conditions, other attempted improvements include the use of filter aids, a pre-filtration leaching process, the backpulse system, and various types of filter tubes and filter coatings. The results from past research can be used as a starting point for further experimentation that can result in the improvement in the performance of the crossflow filtration. The literature reviewed in this report indicates how complex the crossflow issues are with the results of some studies appearing to conflict results from other studies. This complexity implies that filtration of mobilized stored waste cannot be explained in a simple generic sense; meaning an empirical

  2. Influence of Stationary Crossflow Modulation on Secondary Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Paredes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    A likely scenario for swept wing transition on subsonic aircraft with natural laminar flow involves the breakdown of stationary crossflow vortices via high frequency secondary instability. A majority of the prior research on this secondary instability has focused on crossflow vortices with a single dominant spanwise wavelength. This paper investigates the effects of the spanwise modulation of stationary crossflow vortices at a specified wavelength by a subharmonic stationary mode. Secondary instability of the modulated crossflow pattern is studied using planar, partial-differential-equation based eigenvalue analysis. Computations reveal that weak modulation by the first subharmonic of the input stationary mode leads to mode splitting that is particularly obvious for Y-type secondary modes that are driven by the wall-normal shear of the basic state. Thus, for each Y mode corresponding to the fundamental wavelength of results in unmodulated train of crossflow vortices, the modulated flow supports a pair of secondary modes with somewhat different amplification rates. The mode splitting phenomenon suggests that a more complex stationary modulation such as that induced by natural surface roughness would yield a considerably richer spectrum of secondary instability modes. Even modest levels of subharmonic modulation are shown to have a strong effect on the overall amplification of secondary disturbances, particularly the Z-modes driven by the spanwise shear of the basic state. Preliminary computations related to the nonlinear breakdown of these secondary disturbances provide interesting insights into the process of crossflow transition in the presence of the first subharmonic of the dominant stationary vortex.

  3. Crossflow and water banks in viscous dominant regimes of waterflooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Zhang, Xuan; Shapiro, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the crossflow in multilayered reservoirs is of great importance for designing mobility control methods for enhanced oil recovery. The authors reveal saturation profiles in stratified reservoirs to study the interlayer communication in the viscous dominant regime. The displacement...

  4. Experimental study on a simplified crossflow turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiyembekezo S. Kaunda, Cuthbert Z. Kimambo, Torbjorn K. Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study is to enhance the design of a Crossflow turbine, as an appropriate technology for small-scale power generation. This study evaluates the performance of a simplified Crossflow turbine at conditions other than the ‘best efficiency point’. It also explores the ‘reaction’ behavior of the Crossflow turbine as well as characterizes the torque transfer in the two stages of the turbine. The experiments were conducted on a physical simplified Crossflow turbine model using the test facilities in the Waterpower Laboratory at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The results show that the maximum turbine efficiency is 79%, achieved at a head of 5m and reduced speed of 13.4; making it a low speed turbine. This turbine efficiency compares well with some reported efficiency values. The result also show that the turbine is efficient when it operates with a degree of reaction and this is achieved at large valve openings; validating observations that the Crossflow turbine is not a pure impulse turbine. Performance evaluation outside the best efficiency point shows that the efficiency decreases with increase in head above the best efficiency head. The turbine efficiency is not sensitive to flow variations: except at a head of 3m, at all tested heads, 25% of the flow at best efficiency point still generates efficiency of above 50%. Torque characterization shows that the second stage plays a significant role in torque transfer, especially when at large valve openings. Therefore, design efforts must also look at how the flow inside the runner interior space can be controlled so that the jet enters the second stage with optimum flow angles. The use of strain gauge to characterize the torque produced using momentum principle as employed in this study presents an additional opportunity to analyze the trends in the torque transfer.

  5. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The device described in this report will simultaneously remove particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the combustion gases of coal combustors. The device is configured as a cross-flow filter. The gas flows from the inlet passages to orthogonally oriented discharge channels via thin, multilayered porous walls. Flue gas enters from both the front and back of the device. With the left wall of the filter sealed, gas discharges from the right side of the device. The key to combined physical (fly ash) and chemical (SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}) cleaning is to utilize chemical active sorbent-catalysts (e.g., metal oxides) in the layered walls of the filter. This quarter, the NO{sub x} reduction activity of three sorbent-catalyst materials was tested over a temperature range from 200 to 500{degree}C. We were primarily interested in the sorbent-catalyst NO{sub x} reduction performance at 400{degree}C because this appears to be a minimum temperature for acceptable sulfur capture with these sorbents. the tradeoff between sulfur capture and NO{sub x} reduction performance for these sorbent-catalysts is clear: sulfation improves with higher temperatures (e.g., 400--600{degree}C) while NO{sub x} reduction improves at lower temperatures (e.g., 200--300{degree}C). Sorbent-catalyst materials included: Cu-7Al-O; Cu-Ce-O; and CeO{sub 2}. 7 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Controlled quantum evolutions and transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroni, Nicola Cufaro [INFN Sezione di Bari, INFM Unitadi Bari and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica dell' Universitae del Politecnico di Bari, Bari (Italy); De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio [INFM Unitadi Salerno, INFN Sezione di Napoli - Gruppo collegato di Salerno and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitadi Salerno, Baronissi, Salerno (Italy)

    1999-10-29

    We study the nonstationary solutions of Fokker-Planck equations associated to either stationary or non stationary quantum states. In particular, we discuss the stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields. We introduce a technique that allows arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations to account for controlled quantum transitions. As a first significant application we present a detailed treatment of the transition probabilities and of the controlling time-dependent potentials associated to the transitions between the stationary, the coherent, and the squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. (author)

  7. Controlled quantum evolutions and transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Petroni, N C; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F

    1999-01-01

    We study the nonstationary solutions of Fokker-Planck equations associated to either stationary or nonstationary quantum states. In particular we discuss the stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields. We introduce a technique that allows to realize arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations, to account for controlled quantum transitions. The method is illustrated by presenting the detailed treatment of the transition probabilities and of the controlling time-dependent potentials associated to the transitions between the stationary, the coherent, and the squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. Possible extensions to anharmonic systems and mixed states are briefly discussed and assessed.

  8. Stationary Crossflow Breakdown due to Mixed Mode Spectra of Secondary Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Duan, Lian

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations are used to study laminar breakdown characteristics associated with stationary crossflow instability in the boundary-layer flow over a subsonic swept-wing configuration. Previous work involving the linear and nonlinear development of individual, fundamental modes of secondary instability waves is extended by considering the role of more complex, yet controlled, spectra of the secondary instability modes. Direct numerical simulations target a mixed mode transition scenario involving the simultaneous presence of Y and Z modes of secondary instability. For the initial amplitudes investigated in this paper, the Y modes are found to play an insignificant role during the onset of transition, in spite of achieving rather large, O(5%), amplitudes of RMS velocity fluctuation prior to transition. Analysis of the numerical simulations shows that this rather surprising finding can be attributed to the fact that the Y modes are concentrated near the top of the crossflow vortex and exert relatively small influence on the Z modes that reside closer to the surface and can lead to transition via nonlinear spreading that does not involve interactions with the Y mode. Finally, secondary instability calculations reveal that subharmonic modes of secondary instability have substantially lower growth rates than those of the fundamental modes, and hence, are less likely to play an important role during the breakdown process involving complex initial spectra.

  9. Transition delay using control theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, S; Henningson, D S

    2011-04-13

    This review gives an account of recent research efforts to use feedback control for the delay of laminar-turbulent transition in wall-bounded shear flows. The emphasis is on reducing the growth of small-amplitude disturbances in the boundary layer using numerical simulations and a linear control approach. Starting with the application of classical control theory to two-dimensional perturbations developing in spatially invariant flows, flow control based on control theory has progressed towards more realistic three-dimensional, spatially inhomogeneous flow configurations with localized sensing/actuation. The development of low-dimensional models of the Navier-Stokes equations has played a key role in this progress. Moreover, shortcomings and future challenges, as well as recent experimental advances in this multi-disciplinary field, are discussed.

  10. AUTOMATION AND CONTROL OF A CROSS-FLOW MICRO-FILTRATION PLANT: APPLICATION TO TROPICAL FRUITS PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDINSON FRANCO MEJIA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta los resultados de una investigación aplicada a la automatización de una planta de microfiltración tangencial utilizada para el tratamiento de jugos de frutas tropicales. Con base en el estudio de las condiciones de operación de la planta original, mediante el análisis de las variables y de los lazos de control, se describen los instrumentos que se seleccionaron para la automatización y el control de las variables de operación, así como la herramienta computacional que se empleó para la adquisición y el registro de datos. Finalmente, se muestra la metodología de ajuste de los lazos de control de los subsistemas de la planta a partir de curvas de reacción y de técnicas heurísticas.

  11. Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Richard F.; Gallagher, Christopher T.; Leighton, David T., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Electrophoresis has long been recognized as an effective analytic technique for the separation of proteins and other charged species, however attempts at scaling up to accommodate commercial volumes have met with limited success. In this report we describe a novel electrophoretic separation technique - Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis (BOCE). Numerical simulations indicate that the technique has the potential for preparative scale throughputs with high resolution, while simultaneously avoiding many problems common to conventional electrophoresis. The technique utilizes the interaction of an oscillatory electric field and a transverse oscillatory shear flow to create an active binary filter for the separation of charged protein species. An oscillatory electric field is applied across the narrow gap of a rectangular channel inducing a periodic motion of charged protein species. The amplitude of this motion depends on the dimensionless electrophoretic mobility, alpha = E(sub o)mu/(omega)d, where E(sub o) is the amplitude of the electric field oscillations, mu is the dimensional mobility, omega is the angular frequency of oscillation and d is the channel gap width. An oscillatory shear flow is induced along the length of the channel resulting in the separation of species with different mobilities. We present a model that predicts the oscillatory behavior of charged species and allows estimation of both the magnitude of the induced convective velocity and the effective diffusivity as a function of a in infinitely long channels. Numerical results indicate that in addition to the mobility dependence, the steady state behavior of solute species may be strongly affected by oscillating fluid into and out of the active electric field region at the ends of the cell. The effect is most pronounced using time dependent shear flows of the same frequency (cos((omega)t)) flow mode) as the electric field oscillations. Under such conditions, experiments indicate that

  12. Mixing and Transition Control Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Considerable progress in understanding nonlinear phenomena in both unbounded and wallbounded shear flow transition has been made through the use of a combination of high- Reynolds-number asymptotic and numerical methods. The objective of this continuing work is to fully understand the nonlinear dynamics so that ultimately (1) an effective means of mixing and transition control can be developed and (2) the source terms in the aeroacoustic noise problem can be modeled more accurately. Two important aspects of the work are that (1) the disturbances evolve from strictly linear instability waves on weakly nonparallel mean flows so that the proper upstream conditions are applied in the nonlinear or wave-interaction streamwise region and (2) the asymptotic formulations lead to parabolic problems so that the question of proper out-flow boundary conditions--still a research issue for direct numerical simulations of convectively unstable shear flows--does not arise. Composite expansion techniques are used to obtain solutions that account for both mean-flow-evolution and nonlinear effects. A previously derived theory for the amplitude evolution of a two-dimensional instability wave in an incompressible mixing layer (which is in quantitative agreement with available experimental data for the first nonlinear saturation stage for a plane-jet shear layer, a circular-jet shear layer, and a mixing layer behind a splitter plate) have been extended to include a wave-interaction stage with a three-dimensional subharmonic. The ultimate wave interaction effects can either give rise to explosive growth or an equilibrium solution, both of which are intimately associated with the nonlinear self-interaction of the three dimensional component. The extended theory is being evaluated numerically. In contrast to the mixing-layer situation, earlier comparisons of theoretical predictions based on asymptotic methods and experiments in wall-bounded shear-flow transition have been somewhat lacking

  13. Well test analysis for wells producing layered reservoirs with crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, R.; Prijambodo, R.; Reynolds, A.C.

    1985-06-01

    The pressure response of a well producing a two-layer reservoir with crossflow is examined. Virtually all studies on the response of a well in multilayered systems with crossflow claim that after a few hours of production these systems behave as if they are single-layer systems. In this study, the authors show that the flowing pressure response of a well at early times can be divided into three flow periods. The first period is one in which the reservoir behaves as if it were a stratified (no-crossflow) system. This period is followed by a transitional period. The response of the well during this period depends on the contrast in horizontal permeabilities and on the degree of communication between the layers. During the third period, the reservoir can be described by an equivalent single-layer system. An examination of the time ranges of the various flow periods indicates that, unless tests are designed properly, most of the interpretable pressure buildup data would be measured during the time the well response is influenced by the transitional period. The influence of the skin regions on the well response is examined. The significance of the estimate of the skin factor obtained from a pressure test is discussed. The authors show that the nature and the magnitude of the skin regions and the size of the reservoir determine the applicability of conventional semilog procedures to systems with interlayer communication.

  14. Well test analysis for wells producing layered reservoirs with crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prijambodo, R.; Raghavan, R.; Reynolds, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    The pressure response of a well producing a two-layer reservoir with crossflow is examined. It is shown that the flowing pressure response of a well at early times can be divided into three flow periods. The first period is one in which the reservoir behaves as if it were a stratified system (no-crossflow). This period is followed by a transitional period. During the third period, the reservoir can be described by an equivalent single-layer system. The influence of the skin regions is presented. The significance of the estimate of the skin factor obtained from a pressure test is discussed. It is shown that the nature and magnitude of the skin regions and the size of the reservoir determine the applicability of procedures that are based on single-layer systems. 17 refs.

  15. Numerical Modelling of Non-Newtonian Fluid in a Rotational Cross-Flow MBR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Fouling is the main bottleneck of the widespread of MBR systems. One way to decrease and/or control fouling is by process hydrodynamics. This can be achieved by the increase of liquid crossflow velocity. In rotational cross-flow MBR systems, this is attained by the spinning of e.g. impellers. Val...... as function of the angular velocity and the total suspended solids concentration....

  16. Control of Stationary Cross-Flow Modes in a Mach 3.5 Boundary Layer Using Patterned Passive and Active Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuele, Chan Yong

    2011-01-01

    Spanwise-periodic roughness designed to excite selected wavelengths of stationary cross- ow modes was investigated in a 3-D boundary layer at Mach 3.5. The test model was a sharp-tipped 14deg right-circular cone. The model and integrated sensor traversing system were placed in the Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low Disturbance Tunnel (SLDT) equipped with a "quiet design" nozzle at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model was oriented at a 4:2deg angle of attack to produce a mean cross-fl ow velocity component in the boundary layer over the cone. Five removable cone tips have been investigated. One has a smooth surface that is used to document the baseline ("natural") conditions. Two had minute (20 - 40 micron) "dimples" that are equally spaced around the circumference, at a streamwise location that is just upstream of the linear stability neutral growth branch for cross- ow modes. The azimuthal mode numbers of the dimpled tips were selected to either enhance the most amplified wave numbers, or to suppress the growth of the most amplified wave numbers. Two of the cone tips had an array of plasma streamwise vortex generators that were designed to simulate the disturbances produced by the passive patterned roughness. The results indicate that the stationary cross-fl ow modes were highly receptive to the patterned roughness of both passive and active types. The patterned passive roughness that was designed to suppress the growth of the most amplified modes had an azimuthal wavelength that was 66% smaller that that of the most amplified stationary cross- ow mode. This had the effect to increase the transition Reynolds number from 25% to 50% depending on the measurement technique. The application of the research is on turbulent transition control on swept wings of supersonic aircraft. The plasma-based roughness has the advantage over the passive roughness of being able to be adaptable to different conditions that would occur during a flight mission.

  17. Controlled transitions between cupolets of chaotic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morena, Matthew A., E-mail: matthew.morena@wildcats.unh.edu; Short, Kevin M.; Cooke, Erica E. [Integrated Applied Mathematics Program, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We present an efficient control scheme that stabilizes the unstable periodic orbits of a chaotic system. The resulting orbits are known as cupolets and collectively provide an important skeleton for the dynamical system. Cupolets exhibit the interesting property that a given sequence of controls will uniquely identify a cupolet, regardless of the system's initial state. This makes it possible to transition between cupolets, and thus unstable periodic orbits, simply by switching control sequences. We demonstrate that although these transitions require minimal controls, they may also involve significant chaotic transients unless carefully controlled. As a result, we present an effective technique that relies on Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm from algebraic graph theory to minimize the transients and also to induce certainty into the control of nonlinear systems, effectively providing an efficient algorithm for the steering and targeting of chaotic systems.

  18. Controlled transitions between cupolets of chaotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morena, Matthew A; Short, Kevin M; Cooke, Erica E

    2014-03-01

    We present an efficient control scheme that stabilizes the unstable periodic orbits of a chaotic system. The resulting orbits are known as cupolets and collectively provide an important skeleton for the dynamical system. Cupolets exhibit the interesting property that a given sequence of controls will uniquely identify a cupolet, regardless of the system's initial state. This makes it possible to transition between cupolets, and thus unstable periodic orbits, simply by switching control sequences. We demonstrate that although these transitions require minimal controls, they may also involve significant chaotic transients unless carefully controlled. As a result, we present an effective technique that relies on Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm from algebraic graph theory to minimize the transients and also to induce certainty into the control of nonlinear systems, effectively providing an efficient algorithm for the steering and targeting of chaotic systems.

  19. Optimal control of vibrational transitions of HCl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KRISHNA REDDY NANDIPATI; ARUN KUMAR KANAKATI

    2016-10-01

    Control of fundamental and overtone transitions of a vibration are studied for the diatomic molecule, HCl. Specifically, the results of the effect of variation of the penalty factor on the physical attributes of the system (i.e., probabilities) and pulse (i.e., amplitudes) considering three different pulse durations for each value of the penalty factor are shown and discussed. We have employed the optimal control theory to obtain infrared pulses for selective vibrational transitions. The optimization of initial guess field with Gaussian envelope, phrased as maximization of cost functional, is done using the conjugate gradient method. The interaction of the field with the molecule is treated within the semiclassical dipole approximation. The potential and the dipole moment functions used in the calculations of control dynamics are obtained from high level ab-initio calculations.

  20. Theoretical and experimental study of a cross-flow induced-draft cooling tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo Elazm Mahmoud Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to find a proper solution for the cross-flow water cooling tower problem, also to find an empirical correlation's controlling heat and mass transfer coefficients as functions of inlet parameters to the tower. This is achieved by constructing an experimental rig and a computer program. The computer simulation solves the problem numerically. The apparatus used in this study comprises a cross-flow cooling tower. From the results obtained, the 'characteristic curve' of cross-flow cooling towers was constructed. This curve is very helpful for designers in order to find the actual value of the number of transfer units, if the values of inlet water temperature or inlet air wet bulb temperature are changed. Also an empirical correlation was conducted to obtain the required number of transfer units of the tower in hot water operation. Another correlation was found to obtain the effectiveness in the wet bulb operation.

  1. Structure, Mixing, and Stability of Flush and Elevated Jets in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkyan, Levon; Getsinger, Daniel; Peng, Terry Wen Yu; Smith, Owen; Karagozian, Ann

    2013-11-01

    The present experiments explore the characteristics of equidensity and variable density transverse jets using acetone PLIF, stereo PIV, and hot wire anemometry. Jets composed of mixtures of helium and nitrogen are injected normally from different types of nozzles (flush and elevated with respect to the wind tunnel wall, and converging as well as straight shapes) into an air crossflow. A range of jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios J and density ratios S is examined, within which previous studies have identified conditions for upstream shear layer transition from convective to absolute instability. The present study examines the relationships among transverse jet structure, including vortical rollup and cross-sectional symmetry/asymmetry, jet mixing characteristics, and shear layer stability characteristics. The role of the crossflow boundary layer as well as jet injection systems for structure, mixing, and stability is evaluated and related to prior observations on vorticity evolution for jets in crossflow. Supported by NSF grant CBET-1133015 & AFOSR grant FA9550-11-1-0128 (A001768901).

  2. Control of the Transitional Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belson, Brandt A.

    This work makes advances in the delay of boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow via feedback control. The applications include the reduction of drag over streamline bodies (e.g., airplane wings) and the decrease of mixing and heat transfer (e.g., over turbine blades in jet engines). A difficulty in many fields is designing feedback controllers for high-dimensional systems, be they experiments or high-fidelity simulations, because the required time and resources are too large. A cheaper alternative is to approximate the high-dimensional system with a reduced-order model and design a controller for the model. We implement several model reduction algorithms in "modred", an open source and publicly available library that is applicable to a wide range of problems. We use this library to study the role of sensors and actuators in feedback control of transition in the 2D boundary layer. Previous work uses a feedforward configuration in which the sensor is upstream of the actuator, but we show that the actuator-sensor pair is unsuitable for feedback control due to an inability to sense the exponentially-growing Tollmien-Schlichting waves. A new actuator-sensor pair is chosen that more directly affects and measures the TS waves, and as a result it is effective in a feedback configuration. Lastly, the feedback controller is shown to outperform feedforward controllers in the presence of unmodeled disturbances. Next, we focus on a specific type of actuator, the single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator. An array of these plasma actuators is oriented to produce stream-wise vorticity and thus directly cancel the structures with the largest transient growth (so-called stream-wise streaks). We design a feedback controller using only experimental data by first developing an empirical input-output quasi-steady model. Then, we design feedback controllers for the model such that the controllers perform well when applied to the experiment. Lastly, we

  3. CONTROL CHAOS IN TRANSITION SYSTEM USING SAMPLED-DATA FEEDBACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆君安; 谢进; 吕金虎; 陈士华

    2003-01-01

    The method for controlling chaotic transition system was investigated using sampled-data. The output of chaotic transition system was sampled at a given sampling rate,then the sampled output was used by a feedbacks subsystem to construct a control signal for controlling chaotic transition system to the origin. Numerical simulations are presented to show the effectiveness and feasibility of the developed controller.

  4. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-10-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer.

  5. Effect of correlations on controllability transition in network control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Sen; Wang, Xu-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Jiang, Luo-Luo

    2016-04-11

    The network control problem has recently attracted an increasing amount of attention, owing to concerns including the avoidance of cascading failures of power-grids and the management of ecological networks. It has been proven that numerical control can be achieved if the number of control inputs exceeds a certain transition point. In the present study, we investigate the effect of degree correlation on the numerical controllability in networks whose topological structures are reconstructed from both real and modeling systems, and we find that the transition point of the number of control inputs depends strongly on the degree correlation in both undirected and directed networks with moderately sparse links. More interestingly, the effect of the degree correlation on the transition point cannot be observed in dense networks for numerical controllability, which contrasts with the corresponding result for structural controllability. In particular, for directed random networks and scale-free networks, the influence of the degree correlation is determined by the types of correlations. Our approach provides an understanding of control problems in complex sparse networks.

  6. High-frequency instabilities of stationary crossflow vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan; Paredes, Pedro; Duan, Lian

    2016-09-01

    Hypersonic boundary layer flows over a circular cone at moderate incidence angle can support strong crossflow instability in between the windward and leeward rays on the plane of symmetry. Due to more efficient excitation of stationary crossflow vortices by surface roughness, such boundary layer flows may transition to turbulence via rapid amplification of the high-frequency secondary instabilities of finite-amplitude stationary crossflow vortices. The amplification characteristics of these secondary instabilities are investigated for crossflow vortices generated by an azimuthally periodic array of roughness elements over a 7° half-angle circular cone in a Mach 6 free stream. The analysis is based on both quasiparallel stability theory in the form of a partial-differential-equation-based eigenvalue analysis and plane marching parabolized stability equations that account for the effects of the nonparallel basic state on the growth of secondary disturbances. Depending on the local amplitude of the stationary crossflow mode, the most unstable high-frequency disturbances either originate from the second (i.e., Mack) mode instabilities of the unperturbed boundary layer or correspond to genuine secondary instabilities that reduce to stable disturbances at sufficiently small amplitudes of the stationary crossflow vortex. The predicted frequencies of the dominant secondary disturbances of either type are similar to those measured during wind tunnel experiments at Purdue University and the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany. Including transverse surface curvature within the quasiparallel predictions does not alter the topology of the unstable modes; however, the resulting changes in both mode shape and disturbance growth rate are rather significant and curvature can be either stabilizing or destabilizing depending on the disturbance frequency and mode type. Nonparallel effects are shown to be strongly destabilizing for secondary instabilities originating from

  7. Experimental study of crossflow instability on a Mach 6 yawed cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Stuart; Saric, William

    2014-11-01

    Boundary-layer stability and transition represents a key challenge for the designer of hypersonic vehicles, which typically feature highly-swept and conical features inclined to the free stream. The transition process on each of these geometries is typically dominated by the three-dimensional crossflow instability. In order to advance the goal of a physics-based transition prediction method, crossflow experiments were undertaken in the Mach 6 Quiet Tunnel at Texas A&M University. Detailed boundary-layer measurements were performed on a 7-degree cone at a 6-degree angle of incidence using constant-temperature hot-wire anemometry (CTA) to produce boundary-layer contours at constant axial location. These contours illustrate the characteristic streamwise vortex pattern and mean-flow distortion characteristic of crossflow-dominated flows. Additionally, the high frequency response of the CTA system allows for analysis of the spectral content of the flow. These measurements show a high degree of qualitative agreement with analogous studies performed in low-speed flows.

  8. Mixing characteristics of pulsed air-assist liquid jet into an internal subsonic cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inchul; Kang, Youngsu; Koo, Jaye

    2010-04-01

    Penetration depth, spray dispersion angle, droplet sizes in breakup processes and atomization processes are very important parameters in combustor of air-breathing engine. These processes will enhance air/fuel mixing inside the combustor. Experimental results from the pulsed air-assist liquid jet injected into a cross-flow are investigated. And experiments were conducted to a range of cross-flow velocities from 42˜136 m/s. Air is injected with 0˜300kPa, with air-assist pulsation frequency of 0˜20Hz. Pulsation frequency was modulated by solenoid valve. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer(PDPA) was utilized to quantitatively measuring droplet characteristics. High-speed CCD camera was used to obtain injected spray structure. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will offer rapid mixing and good liquid jet penetration. Air-assist makes a very fine droplet which generated mist-like spray. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will introduce additional supplementary turbulent mixing and control of penetration depth into a cross-flow field. The results show that pulsation frequency has an effect on penetration, transverse velocities and droplet sizes. The experimental data generated in these studies are used for a development of active control strategies to optimize the liquid jet penetration in subsonic cross-flow conditions and predict combustion low frequency instability.

  9. Liquid jets injected into non-uniform crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Samir

    An experimental study has been conducted with liquid jets injected transversely into a crossflow to study the effect of non-uniformities in the crossflow velocity distribution to the jet behavior. Two different non-uniform crossflows were created during this work, a shear-laden crossflow and a swirling crossflow. The shear-laden crossflow was generated by merging two independent, co-directional, parallel airstreams creating a shear mixing layer at the interface between them. The crossflow exhibited a quasi-linear velocity gradient across the height of the test chamber. By varying the velocities of the two airstreams, the sense and the slope of the crossflow velocity gradient could be changed. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) studies were conducted to characterize the crossflow. The parameter, UR, is defined as the ratio of the velocities of the two streams and governs the velocity gradient. A positive velocity gradient was observed for UR > 1 and a negative velocity gradient for UR 1), jet penetration increased and the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) distribution became more uniform. For low UR (designed axial swirlers. Three swirlers were used, with vane exit angles of 30°, 45° and 60°. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was used to study the crossflow velocities. The axial (Ux) and the tangential (Utheta) components of the crossflow velocity were observed to decrease with increasing radial distance away from the centerbody. The flow angle of the crossflow was smaller than the vane exit angle, with the difference increasing with the vane exit angle. Water jets were injected from a 0.5 mm diameter orifice located on a cylindrical centerbody. Multi-plane PIV measurements were conducted to study the penetration and droplet velocity distribution of the jets. The jets were observed to follow a path close to the helical trajectory of the crossflow with a flow angle slightly less than the crossflow. This deficit in flow angle is attributed to the centrifugal acceleration

  10. CANFLEX fuel bundle cross-flow endurance test (test report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the normal refuelling sequence of CANDU nuclear reactor, both new and irradiated bundles can be parked in the cross-flow region of the liner tubes. This situation occurs normally for a few minutes. The fuel bundle which is subjected to the cross-flow should be capable of withstanding the consequences of cross flow for normal periods, and maintain its mechanical integrity. The cross-flow endurance test was conducted for CANFLEX bundle, latest developed nuclear fuel, at CANDU-Hot Test Loop. The test was carried out during 4 hours at the inlet cross-flow region. After the test, the bundle successfully met all acceptance criteria after the 4 hours cross-flow test. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Chaotic vibrations of tubes with nonlinear supports in crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1992-12-01

    By means of the unsteady flow theory and a bilinear mathematical model, a theoretical study is presented for chaotic vibrations associated with the fluidelastic instability of nonlinearly supported tubes in a crossflow. A series of effective tools, including phase portraits, power spectral density, Poincar`e maps, Lyapunov exponent, fractal dimension, and bifurcation diagrams, are utilized to distinguish periodic and chaotic motions when the tubes vibrate in the instability region. Results show periodic and chaotic motions in the region corresponding to the fluid damping controlled instability. Nonlinear supports, with symmetric or asymmetric gaps, significantly affect the distributions of periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic motions of the tube with various flow velocity in the instability region of the TSP(tube-support-plate)-inactive mode.

  12. Chaotic vibrations of tubes with nonlinear supports in crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    By means of the unsteady flow theory and a bilinear mathematical model, a theoretical study is presented for chaotic vibrations associated with the fluidelastic instability of nonlinearly supported tubes in a crossflow. A series of effective tools, including phase portraits, power spectral density, Poincar'e maps, Lyapunov exponent, fractal dimension, and bifurcation diagrams, are utilized to distinguish periodic and chaotic motions when the tubes vibrate in the instability region. Results show periodic and chaotic motions in the region corresponding to the fluid damping controlled instability. Nonlinear supports, with symmetric or asymmetric gaps, significantly affect the distributions of periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic motions of the tube with various flow velocity in the instability region of the TSP(tube-support-plate)-inactive mode.

  13. Chaotic vibrations of nonlinearly supported tubes in crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1992-02-01

    By means of the unsteady-flow theory and a bilinear mathematical model, a theoretical study is presented for chaotic vibrations associated with the fluidelastic instability of nonlinearly supported tubes in a crossflow. Effective tools, including phase portraits, power spectral density, Poincare maps, Lyapunov exponent, fractal dimension, and bifurcation diagrams, are utilized to distinguish periodic and chaotic motions when the tubes vibrate in the instability region. The results show periodic and chaotic motions in the region corresponding to fluid-damping-controlled instability. Nonlinear supports, with symmetric or asymmetric gaps, significantly affect the distribution of periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic motions of a tube exposed to various flow velocities in the instability region of the tube-support-plate-inactive mode.

  14. Immigration Control in Transit States: The Case of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Sahin Mencutek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Transit countries exhibit many similarities with respect to state-led anti-transit and more restrictive actions toward contemporary transit migration flows. This paper examines the changes after 1990s in state concerns, behaviors, and policies regarding transit migration by taking Turkey as a case study. Which factors led to Turkey's increased attention to immigration, specifically transit migration in spite of its long history of immigration, emigration and the transit migration. Why has Turkey employed restrictive policies and projects to regularize immigration since 1993? How can we explain the anti-transit immigration projects in Turkey? I argue that two driving forces can explain the restrictive policies of Turkey as a transit state. First, Turkey attempts to reconfigure its state authority in different forms to respond to the challenges of irregular migration through immigration control. Second, the Turkish state`s concern is based upon the externalization/adoption of European Union's immigration control policies.

  15. Immigration Control in Transit States: The Case of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Sahin-Mencütek

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Transit countries exhibit many similarities with respect to state-led anti-transit and more restrictive actions toward contemporary transit migration flows. This paper examines the changes after 1990s in state concerns, behaviors, and policies regarding transit migration by taking Turkey as a case study. Which factors led to Turkey’s increased attention to immigration, specifically transit migration in spite of its long history of immigration, emigration and the transit migration. Why has Turkey employed restrictive policies and projects to regularize immigration since 1993? How can we explain the anti-transit immigration projects in Turkey? I argue that two driving forces can explain the restrictive policies of Turkey as a transit state. First, Turkey attempts to reconfigure its state authority in different forms to respond to the challenges of irregular migration through immigration control. Second, the Turkish state`s concern is based upon the externalization/adoption of European Union’s immigration control policies.

  16. In situ characterization by SAXS of concentration polarization layers during cross-flow ultrafiltration of Laponite dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignon, F; Abyan, M; David, C; Magnin, A; Sztucki, M

    2012-01-17

    The structural organization inside the concentration polarization layer during cross-flow membrane separation process of Laponite colloidal dispersions has been characterized for the first time by in situ time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Thanks to the development of new "SAXS cross-flow filtration cells", concentration profiles have been measured as a function of the distance z from the membrane surface with 50 μm accuracy and linked to the permeation flux, cross-flow, and transmembrane pressure registered simultaneously. Different rheological behaviors (thixotropic gel with a yield stress or shear thinning sol) have been explored by controlling the mutual interactions between the particles as a result on the addition of peptizer. The structural reversibility of the concentration polarization layer has been demonstrated being in agreement with permeation flux measurements. These observations were related to structure of the dispersions under flow and their osmotic pressure.

  17. Transitional justice as social control: political transitions, human rights norms and the reclassification of the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudai, Ron

    2017-09-12

    This article offers an interpretation of transitional justice policies - the efforts of post-conflict and post-dictatorship societies to address the legacy of past abuses - as a form of social control. While transitional justice is commonly conceptualized as responding to a core problem of impunity, this article argues that such formulation is too narrow and leads to lack of coherence in the analysis of the diverse array of transitional mechanisms, which include among others trials, truth commissions, reparations for victims and apologies. Building on the work of Stanley Cohen, the article contends that the core transitional problem is the denial of human rights violations, and consequently that the common purpose of all transitional justice mechanisms is to reclassify the past: redefining as deviant some acts and individuals which prior to the transition were considered 'normal'. The article identifies and analyses three themes in the application of a social control framework to transitional justice: (1) truth, memory and retroactive social control, pertains to the way truth-seeking transitional justice mechanisms reclassify past events by engaging in social control of and through memory; (2) censure, celebration and transitional social control refers to the reclassification of categories of individuals through expressions of both social disapproval and praise; and (3) civil society and social control from below concerns the role of social movements, organizations and groups as informal agents of social control during transitions. The concluding section recaps and briefly explores the concept of 'good moral panic' in the context of political transitions. While the concept of social control tends to have negative connotations for critical sociologists, this work suggests that efforts to categorize, punish and disapprove certain behaviours as deviant may not only be viewed as supporting a conservative status-quo, but also as promoting fledging human rights norms.

  18. Single-jet Spray Mixing with a Confined Crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Huijuan; BAI Bofeng; YAN Junjie; ZHANG Haibin

    2013-01-01

    In order to achieve uniform mixing between spray droplets and crossflow,cold-model experiment of a hollow-cone water spray in an air crossflow is investigated via a numerical simulation.The simulation cases are designed by using the orthogonal design method.The Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation is employed for modeling the droplets-crossflow two-phase flow while the realizable k-ε turbulence model is used to describe the turbulence.A new index,mixedness quality,is proposed to assess the overall mixing of the droplets in the crossflow.The simulation results demonstrate that the counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP) imposes a more significant impact on the spatial distribution than on the size distribution of the droplets.Pairs of CVP with smaller scales are preferable for achieving a better mixing.The influencing factors are listed in the following order in terms of the degree of their impact from the greatest to the least: the Sauter diameter of the initial droplets,the mixing tube diameter,the spray angle,the velocity of the inlet crossflow,and the vertical velocity of the initial droplets.A moderate droplet diameter,a smaller tube diameter,a moderate spray angle,a greater crossflow velocity and a moderate vertical velocity of the droplet are favorable for achieving a higher mixedness quality of the jet spray in a confined crossflow.

  19. Agricultural sprays in cross-flow and drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, M.; Balachandar, R.; Wulfsohn, Dvoralai

    2001-01-01

    The droplet size and velocity characteristics of an agricultural spray were studied in a wind tunnel in the presence of a non-uniform cross-flow. The spray was generated at three nozzle-operating pressures. The droplet size and velocity was measured in both the cross-flow direction and the vertical...... ratio (x/z) of two. Here, x is the distance in the cross-flow direction and z is the vertical distance below the nozzle exit. The behaviour of droplets of two particular size classes ( similar to 38 and 70 mum) were also investigated and found that the smaller droplets were subjected to an increased...

  20. Numerical Simulations of Morphology, Flow Structures and Forces for a Sonic Jet Exhausting in Supersonic Crossflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B.H Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study is performed for a sonic jet issuing from a blunted cone to provide possible directional control in supersonic crossflow by solving the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with the twoequation k −ω turbulence model. Results are presented in the form of static aerodynamic coefficients, computed at a free stream Mach number 4.0, with varying pressure ratios, incidence angle and keeping zero yaw and roll angles. The morphology and flow structure for the jet exhausting in crossflow at various pressure ratios is described in detail. The Flight control of the projectile can be accomplished by taking advantage of a complex shock-boundary layer interaction produced by jet interacting with the oncoming crossflow by altering pressure distribution in vicinity of the jet, a net increase in the net force can be utilized for maneuvering of vehicle and possible flight control. Computed static aerodynamic coefficients and pressure distribution using CFD analyses is with an accuracy of ± 5% in the supersonic range.

  1. Thermoelectric generator sandwiched in a crossflow heat exchanger with optimal connectivity between modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belanger, Simon [Departement de genie mecanique, Universite Laval, 1065, avenue de la Medecine, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada); Gosselin, Louis, E-mail: Louis.Gosselin@gmc.ulaval.ca [Departement de genie mecanique, Universite Laval, 1065, avenue de la Medecine, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} In this paper, we propose a numerical model for a crossflow heat exchanger with a thermoelectric generator sandwiched in its wall. {yields} The number of thermoelectric modules and the electrical connections between them is optimized with a genetic algorithm. {yields} Complex electric current topologies are achieved in order to maximize the total power output. - Abstract: The design of a thermoelectric generator sandwiched in the wall of a crossflow heat exchanger was optimized. A numerical model has been developed and validated. The objective function was the total power output. The design variables were the number of modules and the current in each control volume of the mesh. We also optimize directly the electrical topology of the system. A genetic algorithm was used to perform the optimizations. Complex optimal electrical topologies were achieved due to the non-uniform temperatures distributions in the heat exchanger.

  2. Flux Enhancement in Crossflow Membrane Filtration: Fouling and It's Minimization by Flow Reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-08-04

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Three feed solutions (Bovine serum albumin (BSA), apple juice and citrus fruit pectin) were studied in crossflow membrane filtration. These solutes are well-known in membrane filtration for their fouling and concentration polarization potentials. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using each of the feed solutes show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and

  3. A turbulent jet in crossflow analysed with proper orthogonal decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik; Pedersen, Jakob Martin; Özcan, Oktay

    2007-01-01

    Detailed instantaneous velocity fields of a jet in crossflow have been measured with stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV). The jet originated from a fully developed turbulent pipe flow and entered a crossflow with a turbulent boundary layer. The Reynolds number based on crossflow velocity...... and pipe diameter was 2400 and the jet to crossflow velocity ratios were R = 3.3 and R = 1.3. The experimental data have been analysed by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). For R = 3.3, the results in several different planes indicate that the wake vortices are the dominant dynamic flow structures...... and that they interact strongly with the jet core. The analysis identifies jet shear-layer vortices and finds that these vortical structures are more local and thus less dominant. For R = 1.3, on the other hand, jet shear-layer vortices are the most dominant, while the wake vortices are much less important. For both...

  4. Modeling and ecodesigning crossflow ventilation fans with Mathematica

    CERN Document Server

    Argentini, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of a simple model of crossflow fan is maximized when the geometry depends on a design parameter. The flow field is numerically computed using a Galerkin method for solving a Poisson partial differential equation.

  5. 77 FR 37346 - Export Control Reform Transition Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... Parts 120, 121, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, and 130 ] Export Control Reform Transition Plan... the President's export control reform initiative, the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (DDTC..., items not subject to the export control jurisdiction of the ITAR are subject to the jurisdiction of the...

  6. Thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Cabezas-Gómez, Luben; Saíz-Jabardo, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    This monograph introduces a numerical computational methodology for thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers, with applications in chemical, refrigeration and automobile industries. This methodology allows obtaining effectiveness-number of transfer units (e-NTU) data and has been used for simulating several standard and complex flow arrangements configurations of cross-flow heat exchangers. Simulated results have been validated through comparisons with results from available exact and approximate analytical solutions. Very accurate results have been obtained over wide ranges

  7. Automatic Control of Personal Rapid Transit Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for automatic longitudinal control of a string of closely packed personal vehicles are outlined. Optimal control theory is used to design feedback controllers for strings of vehicles. An important modification of the usual optimal control scheme is the inclusion of jerk in the cost functional. While the inclusion of the jerk term was considered, the effect of its inclusion was not sufficiently studied. Adding the jerk term will increase passenger comfort.

  8. System Control for the Transitional DCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    Hour Display 94 3-9 Trunk Status Summary Display 95 3-10 Routing Control Display for Hillingdon 95 4-1 CRU in the DCS Multiplex Hierarchy 109 4-2 CRU...SUMMARY Figure 3-10. Routing Control Display for Hillingdon 95 route and typing over it with the name of another route. If the controller simply wants...Control Functions for Croughton and Hillingdon , " Contract No. F1 9628- 73-C- 0220, Maclean, Virginia, March 1974.1. 11.* GTE Sylvania, "Digital Network

  9. Bus coordination holding control for transit hubs under APTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Jing; ZHAO Ming

    2009-01-01

    To increase the passenger transferring efficiency, the bus coordination holding control for transit hubs,hich is as an important dynamic dispatching method for improving the service level of transit hubs, was studied in the framework of bus coordination dispatching mode. Firstly, the bus coordination holding control flow was studied based on Advanced Public Transportation Systems (APTS) environment. Then a control model was presented to optimize the bus vehicle holding time, and a genetic algorithm was designed as the solving method. In the end, an example was given to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategy and the algorithm.

  10. Experimental study of a vertical jet in a vegetated crossflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Meftah, Mouldi; De Serio, Francesca; Malcangio, Daniela; Mossa, Michele; Petrillo, Antonio Felice

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems have long been used as receiving environments of wastewater discharges. Effluent discharge in a receiving water body via single jet or multiport diffuser, reflects a number of complex phenomena, affecting the ecosystem services. Discharge systems need to be designed to minimize environmental impacts. Therefore, a good knowledge of the interaction between effluents, discharge systems and receiving environments is required to promote best environmental management practice. This paper reports innovative 3D flow velocity measurements of a jet discharged into an obstructed crossflow, simulating natural vegetated channel flows for which correct environmental management still lacks in literature. In recent years, numerous experimental and numerical studies have been conducted on vegetated channels, on the one hand, and on turbulent jets discharged into unvegetated crossflows, on the other hand. Despite these studies, however, there is a lack of information regarding jets discharged into vegetated crossflow. The present study aims at obtaining a more thorough understanding of the interaction between a turbulent jet and an obstructed crossflow. In order to achieve such an objective, a series of laboratory experiments was carried out in the Department of Civil, Environmental, Building Engineering and Chemistry of the Technical University of Bari - Italy. The physical model consists of a vertical jet discharged into a crossflow, obstructed by an array of vertical, rigid, circular and threaded steel cylinders. Analysis of the measured flow velocities shows that the array of emergent rigid vegetation significantly affects the jet and the ambient flow structures. It reduces the mean channel velocity, allowing the jet to penetrate higher into the crossflow. It significantly increases the transversal flow motion, promoting a major lateral spreading of the jet within the crossflow. Due to the vegetation array effects, the jet undergoes notable variations in its

  11. Breakup characteristics of a liquid jet in subsonic crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopala, Yogish

    discharge coefficient of 0.95 at the operating conditions of interest. The other injector was a sharp edged orifice with a length to diameter ratio of 10 and a discharge coefficient of 0.74 at the operating conditions of interest. It was shown that the sharp edged orifice was likely to develop cavitation bubbles beyond a flow Reynolds number of 8,000. It was found that a sharp transition in the injector can lead to the liquid column disintegrating sooner. The classical Rayleigh Taylor instabilities that are usually seen with a smooth transition in the injector were not seen in the presence of a sharp transition. The droplets produced with such an injector are larger in size and the spray penetrated deeper into the crossflow.

  12. Quantum optimal control theory applied to transitions in diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysebo, Marius; Veseth, Leif

    2014-12-01

    Quantum optimal control theory is applied to control electric dipole transitions in a real multilevel system. The specific system studied in the present work is comprised of a multitude of hyperfine levels in the electronic ground state of the OH molecule. Spectroscopic constants are used to obtain accurate energy eigenstates and electric dipole matrix elements. The goal is to calculate the optimal time-dependent electric field that yields a maximum of the transition probability for a specified initial and final state. A further important objective was to study the detailed quantum processes that take place during such a prescribed transition in a multilevel system. Two specific transitions are studied in detail. The computed optimal electric fields as well as the paths taken through the multitude of levels reveal quite interesting quantum phenomena.

  13. Three-Dimensional Computations of Multiple Tandem Jets in Crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The mixing and merging characteristics of multiple tandem jets in crossflow are investigated by use of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. The realizable k~ε model is employed for turbulent closure of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical experiments are performed for 1-, 2- and 4-jet groups, for jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of R=4.2~16.3. The computed velocity and scalar concentration field are in good agreement with experiments using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), as well as previous work. The results show that the leading jet behavior is similar to a single free jet in crossflow, while all the downstream rear jets have less bent-over jet trajectories-suggesting a reduced ambient velocity for the rear jets. The concentration decay of the leading jet is greater than that of the rear jets. When normalized by appropriate crossflow momentum length scales, all jet trajectories follow a universal relation regardless of the sequential order of jet position and the number of jets. Supported by the velocity and trajectory measurements, the averaged maximum effective crossflow velocity ratio is computed to be in the range of 0.39 to 0.47.

  14. System Control for the Transitional DCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    Still other circuits go to Rheinmain . At Rheinmain , the weather circuits terminate at the Rheinmain weather central. The remaining circuits travel to...that link fails: - Command and control non common user voice circuits between Ramstein and Berlin, and Ramstein and Rheinmain are interrupted... Rheinmain AUTOVON users access circuits are interrupted - The access circuits from Frankfurt ULS to Donnersberg are interrupted. Frankfurt still has network

  15. FLOW CHARACTERISTICS OF TURBULENT JETS INJECTED OBLIQUELY IN CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ting-ting; LI Shao-hua; XU Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulation has been performed to investigate the characteristics of the turbulent jet issuing obliquely into a crossflow, at the injection angles of 90° and 60°. The SIMPLEC algorithm in the body-fitted coordinates and the wall-function method using the RNG k-ε turbulence model have been adopted to simulate this flow at two jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios, 2 and 4. The numerical results are good agreement with the experimental measurements, the jet trajectories have been given, the separation events in the lee of the jet exit have been found, and the forming mechanism has been analyzed.

  16. Flow Mapping of a Jet in Crossflow with Stereoscopic PIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik; Özcan, Oktay; Westergaard, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used to make a three-dimensional flow mapping of a jet in crossflow. The Reynolds number based on the free stream velocity and the jet diameter was nominally 2400. A jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 3.3 was used. Details of the formation...... of the counter rotating vortex pair found behind the jet are shown. The vortex pair results in two regions with strong reversed velocities behind the jet trajectory. Regions of high turbulent kinetic energy are identified. The signature of the unsteady shear layer vortices is found in the mean vorticity field....

  17. ON THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF A JET IN CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The RNG k-ε turbulence model is adopted to investigate a turbulent round jet issuing into crossflow, with the Reynolds number at jet exit of Re=6000 and jet-to crossflow velocity ratio of r=8. With the CFD code, FLUENT, the relations of dimensional analysis are successfully reproduced and the calculated coefficients agree well with the experimental measurements of Wong (1991) and Chu (1996). The investigations are then taken on the velocity, stream function and vorticity at the far field of the jet. It shows that at least within the covered range herein, the jet at the far field is self-similar.

  18. CROSS-FLOW ULTRAFILTRATION OF SECONDARY EFFLUENTS. MEMBRANE FOULING ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of cross-flow ultrafiltration to regenerate secondary effluents is limited by membrane fouling. This work analyzes the influence of the main operational parameters (transmembrane pressure and cross-flow velocity about the selectivity and fouling observed in an ultrafiltration tubular ceramic membrane. The experimental results have shown a significant retention of the microcolloidal and soluble organic matter (52 – 54% in the membrane. The fouling analysis has defined the critical operational conditions where the fouling resistance is minimized. Such conditions can be described in terms of a dimensionless number known as shear stress number and its relationship with other dimensionless parameter, the fouling number.

  19. Control wetting state transition by micro-rod geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Jiang, Chengyu; Wang, Shengkun; Yin, Hengxu; Yuan, Weizheng

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the effect of micro-structure geometry on wetting state transition is important to design and control surface wettability. Micro-rod model was proposed and the relationship between micro-rod geometry and wetting state was investigated in the paper taking into account only the surface roughness and neglecting the chemistry interaction. Micro-rods with different geometric parameters were fabricated using micro-fabrication technology. Their contact angles were measured and compared with theoretical ones. The experimental results indicated that increasing the height and decreasing the space of micro-rod may result in Cassie wetting state, while decreasing the height and increasing the space may result in Wenzel wetting state. A suspended wetting state model due to scallops was proposed. The wetting state transition was interpreted by intruding height, de-pinning and sag mechanism. It may offer a facile way to control the surface wetting state transition by changing the geometry of micro-rod.

  20. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MEAN AND TURBULENCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AN IMPINGING DENSITY JET IN A CONFINED CROSSFLOW IN NEAR FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jing-yu; WANG Dao-zeng; ZHANG Yan

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional mean and turbulence characteristics of an impinging density jet in a confined crossflow were numerically investigated using the RNG turbulence model. The comparison of the subregion structures and gross features between the numerical results and the experimental data show good agreement. The velocity, Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) and concentration distributions of the impinging jet in near field were obtained and analyzed. The results indicate that the flow and concentration fields of the impinging jet in the crossflow exhibit distinguished three-dimensionality in the near field. There exist upstream wall vortices and downstream wall jet zones in the impinging region, and the TKE and concentration decays are asymmetrical in relation to the stagnation point. The lateral concentration distribution range in the impinging region spreads considerably. The enhanced entrainment and mixing of the impinging jet in the confined crossflow are mostly associated with the impinging action and lateral expansion in the impinging region. The presence of the bottom wall restrains the formation of the spanwise rollers in the transverse jet region and vertical entrainment and mixing in the impinging region and the transition region.

  1. Performance characterization of a cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine in sheared inflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbush, Dominic; Polagye, Brian; Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Donegan, James; McEntee, Jarlath

    2016-12-01

    A method for constructing a non-dimensional performance curve for a cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine in sheared flow is developed for a natural river site. The river flow characteristics are quasi-steady, with negligible vertical shear, persistent lateral shear, and synoptic changes dominated by long time scales (days to weeks). Performance curves developed from inflow velocities measured at individual points (randomly sampled) yield inconclusive turbine performance characteristics because of the spatial variation in mean flow. Performance curves using temporally- and spatially-averaged inflow velocities are more conclusive. The implications of sheared inflow are considered in terms of resource assessment and turbine control.

  2. Effects of the jet-to-crossflow momentum ratio on a sonic jet into a supersonic crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Numerical investigation of a transverse sonic jet injected into a supersonic crossflow was carried out using large-eddy simulation for a free-stream Mach number M = 1.6 and a Reynolds number Re = 1.38×10~5 based on the jet diameter.Effects of the jet-to-crossflow momentum ratio on various fundamental mechanisms dictating the intricate flow phenomena,including flow structures, turbulent characters and frequency behaviors,have been studied.The complex flow structures and the relevant flow features are disc...

  3. Transition of control in highly automated vehicles : a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlakveld, W.P.

    2016-01-01

    The Directorate-General of Highways, Waterways, and Water Systems (Rijkswaterstaat in Dutch) of the Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment (Ministerie van Infrastructuur en Milieu (IenM) in Dutch) has commissioned SWOV to conduct a literature review about transition of control in highly and

  4. CrossFlow: Integrating Workflow Management and Electronic Commerce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffner, Y.; Ludwig, H.; Grefen, P.; Aberer, K.

    2001-01-01

    The CrossFlow1 architecture provides support for cross-organisational workflow management in dynamically established virtual enterprises. The creation of a business relationship between a service provider organisation performing a service on behalf of a consumer organisation can be made dynamic when

  5. Study on an undershot cross-flow water turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Omiya, Ryota; Fukutomi, Junichiro

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop a water turbine suitable for ultra-low heads in open channels, with the end goal being the effective utilization of unutilized hydroelectric energy in agricultural water channels. We performed tests by applying a cross-flow runner to an open channel as an undershot water turbine while attempting to simplify the structure and eliminate the casing. We experimentally investigated the flow fields and performance of water turbines in states where the flow rate was constant for the undershot cross-flow water turbine mentioned above. In addition, we compared existing undershot water turbines with our undershot cross-flow water turbine after attaching a bottom plate to the runner. From the results, we were able to clarify the following. Although the effective head for cross-flow runners with no bottom plate was lower than those found in existing runners equipped with a bottom plate, the power output is greater in the high rotational speed range because of the high turbine efficiency. Also, the runner with no bottom plate differed from runners that had a bottom plate in that no water was being wound up by the blades or retained between the blades, and the former received twice the flow due to the flow-through effect. As a result, the turbine efficiency was greater for runners with no bottom plate in the full rotational speed range compared with that found in runners that had a bottom plate.

  6. Effect of Cross-flow Velocity on the Critical Flux of Ceramic Membrane Filtration as a Pre-treatment for Seawater Desalination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Zhaoliang; PENG Wenbo; FAN Yiqun; XING Weihong; XU Nanping

    2013-01-01

    Pre-treatment,which supplies a stable,high-quality feed for reverse osmosis (RO) membranes,is a critical step for successful operation in a seawater reverse osmosis plant.In this study,ceramic membrane systems were employed as pre-treatment for seawater desalination.A laboratory experiment was performed to investigate the effect of the cross-flow velocity on the critical flux and consequently to optimize the permeate flux.Then a pilot test was performed to investigate the long-term performance.The result shows that there is no significant effect of the cross-flow velocity on the critical flux when the cross-flow velocity varies in laminar flow region only or in turbulent flow region only,but the effect is distinct when the cross-flow velocity varies in the transition region.The membrane fouling is slight at the permeate flux of 150 L·m-2·h-1 and the system is stable,producing a high-quality feed (the turbidity and silt density index are less than 0.1 NTU and 3.0,respectively) for RO to ran for 2922.4 h without chemical cleaning.Thus the ceramic membranes are suitable to filtrate seawater as the pre-treatment for RO.

  7. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements of Transition Downstream of a Forward-Facing Step in a Swept-Wing Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Jenna L.

    2017-01-01

    Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements were performed downstream of a forward-facing step in a stationary-crossflow dominated flow. Three different step heights were studied with the same leading-edge roughness configuration to determine the effect of the step on the evolution of the stationary-crossflow. Above the critical step height, which is approximately 68% of the boundary-layer thickness at the step, the step caused a significant increase in the growth of the stationary crossflow. For the largest step height studied (68%), premature transition occurred shortly downstream of the step. The stationary crossflow amplitude only reached approximately 7% of U(sub e) in this case, which suggests that transition does not occur via the high-frequency secondary instabilities typically associated with stationary crossflow transition. The next largest step of 60% delta still caused a significant impact on the growth of the stationary crossflow downstream of the step, but the amplitude eventually returned to that of the baseline case, and the transition front remained the same. The smallest step height (56%) only caused a small increase in the stationary crossflow amplitude and no change in the transition front. A final case was studied in which the roughness on the leading edge of the model was enhanced for the lowest step height case to determine the impact of the stationary crossflow amplitude on transition. The stationary crossflow amplitude was increased by approximately four times, which resulted in premature transition for this step height. However, some notable differences were observed in the behavior of the stationary crossflow mode, which indicate that the interaction mechanism which results in the increased growth of the stationary crossflow downstream of the step may be different in this case compared to the larger step heights.

  8. Nonlinear system identification and control using state transition algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chunhua; Gui, Weihua

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel optimization method named state transition algorithm (STA) to solve the problem of identification and control for nonlinear system. In the proposed algorithm, a solution to optimization problem is considered as a state, and the updating of a solution equates to the process of state transition, which makes the STA easy to understand and convenient to be implemented. First, the STA is applied to identify the optimal parameters of the estimated system with previously known structure. With the accurate estimated model, an off-line PID controller is then designed optimally by using the STA as well. Experimental results demonstrate the validity of the methodology, and comparison to STA with other optimization algorithms confirms that STA is a promising alternative method for system identification and control due to its stronger search ability, faster convergence speed and more stable performance.

  9. Control Mechanism and Security Region for Intentional Islanding Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Xu, Zhao; Østergaard, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the control mechanism for intentional islanding transition, when a Low Voltage (LV) or Medium Voltage (MV) distribution system, which is usually under grid connection mode, is supposed to be separated from the upstream grid, due to either maintenance or a disturbance...... in the grid. The concept of Islanding Security Region (ISR) has been proposed as an organic composition of the developed control mechanism. The purpose of this control mechanism is to maintain the frequency stability and eventually the security of power supply to the customers, by utilizing resources from...

  10. Control of State Transitions in Complex and Biophysical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Adilson; Wells, Daniel; Kath, William

    Noise is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here I will present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. I will discuss applications of this methodology to predict control interventions that can induce lineage changes and to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating network dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of complex networks exhibiting multi-stability. Reference: D. K. Wells, W. L. Kath, and A. E. Motter, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031036 (2015). Work funded by CBC, NCI, NIGMS, and NSF.

  11. A crossflow filtration system for constant permeate flux membrane fouling characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel J.; Paul, Donald R.; Freeman, Benny D.

    2013-03-01

    Membrane fouling is often characterized using a crossflow filtration apparatus. Typically, the transmembrane pressure (TMP) difference is fixed, and the flux is allowed to decline as the membrane fouls and the resistance to mass transfer increases. However, as flux varies, so too does the rate at which foulants are brought to the membrane surface, so the observed fouling behavior is not solely the result of membrane/foulant interactions. Constant flux experiments, where the permeate flux is fixed and the TMP difference varies, minimize such variations in the hydrodynamic conditions at the membrane surface, but constant TMP difference experiments dominate the fouling literature because they are more straightforward to execute than constant flux experiments. Additionally, most industrial water purification membrane installations operate at constant flux rather than at constant TMP. Here, we describe the construction and operation of a constant flux crossflow fouling apparatus. System measurement accuracy was validated by comparison of pure water permeance measurements to values specified by the membrane manufacturer, reported elsewhere, and measured by another technique. Fouling experiments were performed with two membrane/foulant systems: polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes with a soybean oil emulsion foulant and PVDF microfiltration membranes with a polystyrene latex bead suspension foulant. Automatic permeate flux control facilitated flux stepping experiments, which are commonly used to determine the threshold flux or critical flux of a membrane/foulant pair. Comparison of a flux stepping experiment with a literature report yielded good agreement.

  12. A surface-renewal model of cross-flow microfiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hasan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model using classical cake-filtration theory and the surface-renewal concept is formulated for describing cross-flow microfiltration under dynamic and steady-state conditions. The model can predict the permeate flux and cake buildup in the filter. The three basic parameters of the model are the membrane resistance, specific cake resistance and rate of surface renewal. The model is able to correlate experimental permeate flow rate data in the microfiltration of fermentation broths in laboratory- and pilot-scale units with an average root-mean-square (RMS error of 4.6%. The experimental data are also compared against the critical-flux model of cross-flow microfiltration, which has average RMS errors of 6.3, 5.5 and 6.1% for the cases of cake filtration, intermediate blocking and complete blocking mechanisms, respectively.

  13. Microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and method for its fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert; Wheatley, John C.

    1985-01-01

    A microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and a method for its fabrication are disclosed. The heat exchanger is formed from a stack of thin metal sheets which are bonded together. The stack consists of alternating slotted and unslotted sheets. Each of the slotted sheets includes multiple parallel slots which form fluid flow channels when sandwiched between the unslotted sheets. Successive slotted sheets in the stack are rotated ninety degrees with respect to one another so as to form two sets of orthogonally extending fluid flow channels which are arranged in a crossflow configuration. The heat exchanger has a high surface to volume ratio, a small dead volume, a high heat transfer coefficient, and is suitable for use with fluids under high pressures. The heat exchanger has particular application in a Stirling engine that utilizes a liquid as the working substance.

  14. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, D.A.; Bacchi, D.P.; Connors, T.F.; Collins, E.L. III

    1998-02-10

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by a novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken. 2 figs.

  15. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, David A. (Clifton Park, NY); Bacchi, David P. (Schenectady, NY); Connors, Timothy F. (Watervliet, NY); Collins, III, Edwin L. (Albany, NY)

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  16. Heat transfer in bundles of finned tubes in crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stasiulevicius, J.; Skrinska, A.; Zukauskas, A.; Hewitt, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides correlations of heat transfer and hydraulic data for bundles of finned tubes in crossflow at high Reynolds numbers. Results of studies of the effectiveness of the fin, local, and mean heat transfer coefficients are presented. The effect of geometric parameters of the fins and of the location of tubes in the bundle on heat transfer and hydraulic drag are described. The resistance of the finned tube bundles under study and other factors are examined.

  17. Fractal Characteristics of Round Jets in Steady Crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuliangLI; ChaoquanCHEN; 等

    1998-01-01

    The fractal dimensions of turbulent round jets in steady crossflow has been analyzed by using planar laser-induced fluorescence(PLIF) method.The relation between the fractal dimension and the momentum ratio,the variation of the fractal dimension with the elevation of jet and the dilution have been investigated.The comparison of the fractal characteristics between the multiple jets and the signal jet has been carried out.

  18. Saddle point of attachment in jet-crossflow interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenxing; Shi, Junxiang; Ke, Zhaoqing; Chen, Chung-Lung

    2017-08-01

    Numerical simulation and theoretical analysis were performed to investigate the upstream topology of a jet-crossflow interaction. The numerical results were validated with mathematical theory as well as a juncture flow structure. The upstream critical point satisfies the condition of occurrence for a saddle point of attachment in the horseshoe vortex system. In addition to the classical topology led by a saddle point of separation, a new topology led by a saddle point of attachment was found for the first time in a jet-crossflow interaction. The degeneration of the critical point from separation to attachment is determined by the velocity ratio of the jet over the crossflow, and the boundary layer thickness of the flat plate. When the boundary layer thickness at the upstream edge of the jet is close to one diameter of the jet, the flow topology is led by a saddle point of attachment. Variation of the velocity ratio does not change the topology but the location of the saddle point. When the boundary layer thickness is less than 0.255 of the jet flow diameter, large velocity ratio can generate a saddle point of attachment without spiral horseshoe vortex; continuously decreasing the velocity ratio will change the flow topology to saddle point of the separation. The degeneration of the critical point from attachment to separation was observed.

  19. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Jet in Channel Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao; Laurence, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the authors present a comparative analysis of Koopman modes computed from snap-shots of direct numerical simulations of a jet in channel crossflow (channel flow Re number = 3333, jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio = 1/6). The flow is complex due to interactions between the jet and the cross-flow, and contains geometry-dependent large-scale coherent structures; thus, the Koopman mode analysis provides a powerful tool for studying the spatial and spectral information of the flow. The Koopman modes are approximated by the DMD modes restricted to Krylov subspace, and the Koopman modes isolate structures associated with single frequency only. In this work, we address issues related to the physical interpretation of the DMD modes. The results show that the computed Koopman modes identify the relevant frequencies and the corresponding three-dimensional flow structures automatically. We present the selected DMD modes, which show big differences in the spatial structures and frequency. The shear layer vortices are separated from the horseshoe vortex. These modes have large amplitudes among all modes obtained. Acknowledging the IT Services at The University of Manchester, the use of ARCHER HPC allocated via UK EPSRC Turbulence Consortium (EPSRC Grant EP/L000261/1), the use of BlueGene/Q supercomputer sponsored by EDF R&D centre Chatou and Cedric Flageul.

  20. Saddle point of attachment in jet-crossflow interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenxing; Shi, Junxiang; Ke, Zhaoqing; Chen, Chung-Lung

    2017-03-01

    Numerical simulation and theoretical analysis were performed to investigate the upstream topology of a jet-crossflow interaction. The numerical results were validated with mathematical theory as well as a juncture flow structure. The upstream critical point satisfies the condition of occurrence for a saddle point of attachment in the horseshoe vortex system. In addition to the classical topology led by a saddle point of separation, a new topology led by a saddle point of attachment was found for the first time in a jet-crossflow interaction. The degeneration of the critical point from separation to attachment is determined by the velocity ratio of the jet over the crossflow, and the boundary layer thickness of the flat plate. When the boundary layer thickness at the upstream edge of the jet is close to one diameter of the jet, the flow topology is led by a saddle point of attachment. Variation of the velocity ratio does not change the topology but the location of the saddle point. When the boundary layer thickness is less than 0.255 of the jet flow diameter, large velocity ratio can generate a saddle point of attachment without spiral horseshoe vortex; continuously decreasing the velocity ratio will change the flow topology to saddle point of the separation. The degeneration of the critical point from attachment to separation was observed.

  1. Control of floral transition in the bioenergy crop switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lifang; Fu, Chunxiang; Lin, Hao; Wolabu, Tezera W; Wu, Yanqi; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Tadege, Million

    2016-10-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), a perennial warm season bunchgrass native to North America, has been a target in the U.S. as a renewable bioenergy crop because of its ability to produce moderate to high biomass yield on marginal soils. Delaying flowering can increase vegetative biomass production by allowing prolonged growth before switching to the reproductive phase. Despite the identification of flowering time as a biomass trait in switchgrass, the molecular regulatory factors involved in controlling floral transition are poorly understood. Here we identified PvFT1, PvAPL1-3 and PvSL1, 2 as key flowering regulators required from floral transition initiation to development of floral organs. PvFT1 expression in leaves is developmentally regulated peaking at the time of floral transition, and diurnally regulated with peak at approximately 2 h into the dark period. Ectopic expression of PvFT1 in Arabidopsis, Brachypodium and switchgrass led to extremely early flowering, and activation of FT downstream target genes, confirming that it is a strong activator of flowering in switchgrass. Ectopic expression of PvAPL1-3 and PvSL1, 2 in Arabidopsis also activated early flowering with distinct floral organ phenotypes. Our results suggest that switchgrass has conserved flowering pathway regulators similar to Arabidopsis and rice.

  2. Noise control for rapid transit cars on elevated structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, C. E.

    1983-03-01

    Noise control treatments for the propulsion motor noise of rapid transit cars on concrete elevated structures and the noise reduction from barrier walls were investigated by using acoustical scale models and supplemented by field measurements of noise from trains operated by the Port Authority Transportation Corporation (PATCO) in New Jersey. The results show that vehicle skirts and undercar sound absorption can provide substantial cost-effective reductions in propulsion noise at the wayside of transit systems with concrete elevated guideways. The acoustical scale model noise reductions applied to PATCO vehicles on concrete elevated structures show reductions in the A-weighted noise levels of 5 dB for undercar sound absorption, 5 dB for vehicle skirts, and 10 dB for combined undercar absorption and vehicle skirts. Acoustical scale model results for sound barrier walls lined with absorptive treatment showed reductions from 7 dB to 12 dB of noise from vehicles in the far track, depending on the height of the wall, and reductions from 12 dB to 20 dB of noise from vehicles on the near track. Transit vehicles at high speeds where propulsion system noise dominates are 7 dB(A) noisier at 50 ft on concrete elevated structures than on at-grade on tie and ballast. Of this amount, 3 dB is due to loss of ground effect, and 4 dB is due to the absence of undercar absorption provided by ballast.

  3. Mutual control of X-rays and nuclear transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunst, Jonas Friedrich

    2015-12-14

    In the course of this Thesis the mutual control between X-rays and nuclear transitions is investigated theoretically. In the first Part, we study the nuclear photoexcitation with the highly brilliant and coherent X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). Apart from amplifying the direct resonant interaction with nuclear transitions, the super-intense XFEL can produce new states of matter like cold, high-density plasmas where secondary nuclear excitation channels may come into play, e.g., nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC). Our results predict that in the case of {sup 57}Fe targets secondary NEEC can be safely neglected, whereas it is surprisingly the dominating contribution (in comparison to the direct photoexcitation) for the XFEL-induced {sup 93m}Mo isomer triggering. Based on these case studies, we elaborate a general set of criteria to identify the prevailing excitation channel for a certain nuclear isotope. These criteria may be most relevant for future nuclear resonance experiments at XFEL facilities. On the opposite frontier, the interplay between single X-ray photons and nuclear transitions offer potential storage and processing applications for information science in their most compact form. In the second Part of this Thesis, we show that nuclear forward scattering off {sup 57}Fe targets can be employed to process polarization-encoded single X-rays via timed magnetic field rotations. Apart from the realization of logical gates with X-rays, the polarization encoding is used to design an X-ray quantum eraser scheme where the interference between scattering paths can be switched off and on in a controlled manner. Such setups may advance time-energy complementarity tests to so far unexplored parameter regimes, e.g., to the domain of X-ray quanta.

  4. Mixing and Structural Characteristics of Unforced and Forced Jets in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Takeshi

    This dissertation describes an experimental exploration of structural and mixing characteristics of the unforced as well as forced jet in crossflow (JICF). For unforced experiments, variable jet-to-crossflow density ratios (0.35≤S≤1.00) and momentum flux ratios (5≤ J≤41) were explored, for three alternative injectors with a fixed jet Reynolds number (Rej=1900). For forced jet experiments, an equidensity jet emanating from two alternative flush nozzles (Rej=1900; Rej=1500) were explored. The interplay between scalar and velocity fields for the JICF was studied using simultaneous PLIF/stereo PIV measurements in the jet's centerplane. POD analysis showed a transition from convective to absolutely instability in the upstream shear layer as J was reduced, consistent with hotwire measurements. Local strain rates were extracted from both PLIF and PIV data via the Howarth transformation. Mixing characterization with variable mixing scale lengths was explored via centerplane PLIF images. Mixing associated with stirring as well as molecular mixing could be distinguished, apparent especially in vortical structures for flush pipe injection. Sinusoidal forcing of the convectively unstable JICF demonstrated that relatively low amplitude forcing affected jet structures and mixing, especially close to the fundamental frequency. For the absolutely unstable JICF, a much higher forcing amplitude was required to alter jet characteristics, consistent with lock-in, leading to enhanced molecular mixing. Single-pulse square wave forcing created deeply-penetrating vortical structures for specific stroke ratios (L/D), even for the absolutely unstable JICF. L/D producing the greatest jet spread and penetration decreased with decreasing J, but L/D for optimal molecular mixing corresponded to different values and trends in J. Double-pulse square wave excitation, with two variable pulses within each temporal period, enabled the jet's nearfield vortex rings to interact and collide, with

  5. CrossFlow: Cross-Organizational Workflow Management for Service Outsourcing in Dynamic Virtual Enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, Paul; Aberer, Karl; Ludwig, Heiko; Hoffner, Yigal

    2001-01-01

    In this report, we present the approach to cross-organizational workflow management of the CrossFlow project. CrossFlow is a European research project aiming at the support of cross-organizational workflows in dynamic virtual enterprises. The cooperation in these virtual enterprises is based on dyna

  6. CrossFlow: Cross-Organizational Workflow Management in Dynamic Virtual Enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, Paul; Aberer, Karl; Hoffner, Yigal; Ludwig, Heiko

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we present the approach to cross-organizational workflow management of the CrossFlow project. CrossFlow is a European research project aiming at the support of cross-organizational workflows in dynamic virtual enterprises. The cooperation in these virtual enterprises is based on dyna

  7. CrossFlow: cross-organizational workflow management in dynamic virtual enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, Paul; Aberer, Karl; Hoffner, Yigal; Ludwig, Heiko

    2000-01-01

    This paper gives a detailed overview of the approach to cross-organizational workflow management developed in the CrossFlow project. CrossFlow is a European research project aiming at the support of cross-organizational workflows in dynamic virtual enterprises. The cooperation in these virtual enter

  8. Transit Scratchitti Removal and Glass Resurfacing by Controlled Fire Polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Seongchan; Hong, Shane Y.

    Scratchitti vandalism, a new type of graffiti vandalism, in public transits systems and city neighborhood is a serious problem. To solve this problem, an innovative approach was developed-controlled fire polishing, which incorporates a technique of localized softening and surface tension. Intensive heat is positioned near to the scratch marks on the glass panel. The heat melts a thin layer of glass into liquid, changing the glass’s viscosity to a formable state. The glass is melted to a level close to the depth of the scratch, and allowed to cool down naturally. During the cooling process, the surface tension of the melted glass will even out the scratching indent. After cooling, the glass will be as even and smooth as it was originally. The process will enable the reuse of the damaged window/door and eliminate the otherwise waste by replacement new glass.

  9. Isolation of plasma from whole blood using a microfludic chip in a continuous cross-flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xing; CUI DaFu; ZHANG LuLu

    2009-01-01

    A novel microfluidic chip is developed for crossflow filtration plasma from the whole blood which is carried out in a continuous manner. This microfluidic chip was made of a silicon substrate sealed with a compound cover. The silicon substrate fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)technology consisted of microposts array, microchannels and reservoirs. Then the silicon substrate was characterized by Scaning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The performance of the microfiuidic chip was valued by the experiments of plasma isolation. During more than one hour of continuous blood infusion through the chip, there were no problems of jamming or clogging, and the plasma selectivity of 97.78% was achieved. Due to the chip's simple structure and control mechanism with a continuous,real time operating manner, this microfluidic chip is easily expected to be integrated into micro total analytical system (uTAS) which will create a microanalysis system for point-of-care diagnostics.

  10. Design guide for single circular cylinder in turbulent crossflow. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1982-03-01

    A design procedure is proposed for predicting the dynamic structural response of a circular cylinder in turbulent crossflow. The procedure is based on recently obtained data for a stationary, rigid cylinder and on existing information. The procedure is not applicable to conditions where the wake vortex shedding frequency locks into a structural natural frequency. This report is self-contained in that all the information and structural analysis methods employed in the procedure are reviewed and developed. Also, an example is given to illustrate the use of the method for a typical reactor component. The calculated responses are found to be very small.

  11. Mixing in Circular and Non-circular Jets in Crossflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Stankovic, D.; Fuchs, L.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent structures and mixing in the flow field of a jet in crossflow have been studied using computational (large eddy simulation) and experimental (particle image velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence) techniques. The mean scalar fields and turbulence statistics as determined by both...... orthogonal decomposition of the transverse velocity indicates that coherent structures may be responsible for this phenomenon. Nozzles which have a single-peaked distribution have stronger modes in transverse direction. The global mixing performance is superior for these nozzle types. This is the case...

  12. A CRITICAL PATTERN OF CROSSFLOW AROUND A SLENDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国辉; 邓学蓥

    2005-01-01

    Topological structure of a slender crossflow was discussed with topological analysis. It is pointed that the development of slender vortices leads to the change of topological structure about cross flow, and a critical flow pattern will appear. There is a high- order singular point in this critical flow pattern. And the index of the high-order singular is - 3/2. The topological structure of this singular point is instable , so bifurcation will occur and the topological structure of flowfield will be changed by little disturbance.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigations on the vortical structures of an impinging jet in crossflow%横流冲击射流涡旋结构的实验和数值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕

    2006-01-01

    @@ The objective of this dissertation is to investigate the impinging jet under the influence of crossflow.It has been known that there exist jet shear layer, impingement on the bottom wall, interactions between the induced wall jet and the ambient crossflow in near field.There are few intensive studies of the impinging jet in crossflow at home and abroad due to the complexities of flow, such as the formation and evolution of the vortical structures, interactions among vortices, while researches on the temporal and spatial evolution of these vortical structures can promote the practical applications in environment engineering, hydroelectricity engineering, etc., and provide the basis for flow control and improvement through revealing the inherent mechanism and development of the vortical structures.

  14. Voltage controlled magnetism in 3d transitional metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weigang

    2015-03-01

    Despite having attracted much attention in multiferroic materials and diluted magnetic semiconductors, the impact of an electric field on the magnetic properties remains largely unknown in 3d transitional ferromagnets (FMs) until recent years. A great deal of effort has been focused on the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect where the modulation of anisotropy field is understood by the change of electron density among different d orbitals of FMs in the presence of an electric field. Here we demonstrate another approach to alter the magnetism by electrically controlling the oxidation state of the 3d FM at the FM/oxide interface. The thin FM film sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and a gate oxide can be reversibly changed from an optimally-oxidized state with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy to a metallic state with an in-plane magnetic anisotropy, or to a fully-oxidized state with nearly zero magnetization, depending on the polarity and time duration of the applied electric fields. This is a voltage controlled magnetism (VCM) effect, where both the saturation magnetization and anisotropy field of the 3d FM layer can be simultaneously controlled by voltage in a non-volatile fashion. We will also discuss the impact of this VCM effect on magnetic tunnel junctions and spin Hall switching experiments. This work, in collaboration with C. Bi, Y.H. Liu, T. Newhouse-Illige, M. Xu, M. Rosales, J.W. Freeland, O. Mryasov, S. Zhang, and S.G.E. te Velthuis, was supported in part by NSF (ECCS-1310338) and by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  15. Control of the Transition to Flowering by Chromatin Modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuehui He

    2009-01-01

    The timing of floral transition is critical to reproductive success in angiosperms and is genetically controlled by a network of flowering genes.In Arabidopsis,expression of certain flowering genes is regulated by various chromatin modifications,among which are two central regulators of flowering,namely FLOWERING LOCUS C(FLC) and FLOWERING LOCUS T(FT).Recent studies have revealed that a number of chromatin-modifying components are involved in activation or repression of FLC expression.Activation of FLC expression is associated with various 'active' chromatin modifications including acetylation of core histone tails,histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4) methylation,H2B monoubiquitination,H3 lysine-36 (H3K36) di- and tri-methylation and deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z,whereas various 'repressive' histone modifications are associated with FLC repression,including histone deacetylation,H3K4 demethylation,histone H3 lysine-9(H3Kg) and H3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation,and histone arginine methylation.In addition,recent studies have revealed that Polycomb group gene-mediated transcriptional-silencing mechanism not only represses FLC expression,but also directly represses FT expression.Regulation of FLC expression provides a paradigm for control of the expression of other developmental genes in plants through chromatin mechanisms.

  16. Streak instability and generation of hairpin-vortices by a slotted jet in channel crossflow: Experiments and linear stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Jimmy; Karp, Michael; Cohen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Streaks and hairpin-vortices are experimentally generated in a laminar plane Poiseuille crossflow by injecting a continuous jet through a streamwise slot normal to the crossflow, with air as the working media. Small disturbances form stable streaks, however, higher disturbances cause the formation of streaks which undergo instability leading to the generation of hairpin vortices. Particular emphasis is placed on the flow conditions close to the generation of hairpin-vortices. Measurements are carried out in the cases of natural and phase-locked disturbance employing smoke visualisation, particle image velocimetry, and hot-wire anemometry, which include, the dominant frequency, wavelength, and the disturbance shape (or eigenfunctions) associated with the coherent part of the velocity field. A linear stability analysis for both one- and two-dimensional base-flows is carried out to understand the mechanism of instability and good agreement of wavelength and eigenfunctions are obtained when compared to the experimental data, and a slight under-prediction of the growth-rates by the linear stability analysis consistent with the final nonlinear stages in transitional flows. Furthermore, an energy analysis for both the temporal and spatial stability analysis revels the dominance of the symmetric varicose mode, again, in agreement with the experiments, which is found to be governed by the balance of the wallnormal shear and dissipative effects rather than the spanwise shear. In all cases the anti-symmetric sinuous modes governed by the spanwise shear are found to be damped both in analysis and in our experiments.

  17. Control of rare events in reaction and population systems by deterministically imposed transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasin, M; Dykman, M I

    2011-03-01

    We consider control of reaction and population systems by imposing transitions between states with different numbers of particles or individuals. The transitions take place at predetermined instants of time. Even where they are significantly less frequent than spontaneous transitions, they can exponentially strongly modify the rates of rare events, including switching between metastable states or population extinction. We also study optimal control of rare events. Specifically, we are interested in the optimal control of disease extinction for a limited vaccine supply. A comparison is made with control of rare events by modulating the rates of elementary transitions rather than imposing transitions deterministically. It is found that, unexpectedly, for the same mean control parameters, controlling the transitions rates can be more efficient.

  18. Performance of a Polymer Flood with Shear-Thinning Fluid in Heterogeneous Layered Systems with Crossflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Sang Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the potential of a polymer flood for mobility control requires an accurate model on the viscosities of displacement fluids involved in the process. Because most polymers used in EOR exhibit shear-thinning behavior, the effective viscosity of a polymer solution is a highly nonlinear function of shear rate. A reservoir simulator including the model for the shear-rate dependence of viscosity was used to investigate shear-thinning effects of polymer solution on the performance of the layered reservoir in a five-spot pattern operating under polymer flood followed by waterflood. The model can be used as a quantitative tool to evaluate the comparative studies of different polymer flooding scenarios with respect to shear-rate dependence of fluids’ viscosities. Results of cumulative oil recovery and water-oil ratio are presented for parameters of shear-rate dependencies, permeability heterogeneity, and crossflow. The results of this work have proven the importance of taking non-Newtonian behavior of polymer solution into account for the successful evaluation of polymer flood processes. Horizontal and vertical permeabilities of each layer are shown to impact the predicted performance substantially. In reservoirs with a severe permeability contrast between horizontal layers, decrease in oil recovery and sudden increase in WOR are obtained by the low sweep efficiency and early water breakthrough through highly permeable layer, especially for shear-thinning fluids. An increase in the degree of crossflow resulting from sufficient vertical permeability is responsible for the enhanced sweep of the low permeability layers, which results in increased oil recovery. It was observed that a thinning fluid coefficient would increase injectivity significantly from simulations with various injection rates. A thorough understanding of polymer rheology in the reservoir and accurate numerical modeling are of fundamental importance for the exact estimation

  19. Direct numerical simulation of a low momentum round jet in channel crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhao, E-mail: zhao.wu@manchester.ac.uk; Laurence, Dominique; Afgan, Imran

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Detailed flow physics of jet in crossflow with low velocity ratio, R, is analysed. • The horseshoe vortex comes from the reversed jet fluid, different from high R JICF. • CVP comes from the stretching and reorientation of the injection-flow vorticity. • Recirculation is seen at the downstream low-pressure region. • The shear layer vortices are from shed crossflow boundary layer vortices. - Abstract: Results of a direct numerical simulation of a jet in crossflow with passive scalar mixing are presented. The laminar jet issues from a circular exit into the channel crossflow with a low jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 1/6. The governing equations are solved by Incompact3d, an open-source code combining the high-order compact scheme and Poisson spectral solver. An internal recycling approach is used to generate the fully turbulent channel flow profile. Four main flow structures are identified: 1) a large recirculation seen immediately downstream of the jet-exit; 2) a contour-rotating vortex pair formed from the stretching and reorientation of the injection-flow vorticity; 3) a horseshoe vortex generated as a result of the stretching of the vorticity at the jet-exit windward side; 4) shear layer vortices coming from the lifted and shed crossflow boundary layer vorticity. Passive scalar profiles show the mixing are strong in the shear layer where the crossflow fluid encounters the jet fluid. The database is made available online for public access.

  20. Control of atomic transition rates via laser light shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Jauregui, R

    2015-01-01

    A modular systematic analysis of the feasibility of modifying atomic transition rates by tailoring the electromagnetic field of an external coherent light source is presented. The formalism considers both the center of mass and internal degrees of freedom of the atom, and all properties of the field: frequency, angular spectrum, and polarization. General features of recoil effects for internal forbidden transitions are discussed. A comparative analysis of different structured light sources is explicitly worked out. It includes spherical waves, Gaussian beams, Laguerre-Gaussian beams, and propagation invariant beams with closed analytical expressions. It is shown that increments in the order of magnitude of the transition rates for Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian beams, with respect to those obtained in the paraxial limit, requires waists of the order of the wavelength, while propagation invariant modes may considerably enhance transition rates under more favorable conditions. For transitions that can be natura...

  1. Degree of Rate Control: How Much the Energies of Intermediates and Transition States Control Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegelmann, Carsten; Andreasen, Anders; Campbell, Charles T.

    2009-01-01

    For many decades, the concept of a “rate-determining step” has been of central importance in understanding chemical kinetics in multistep reaction mechanisms and using that understanding to advantage. Yet a rigorous method for identifying the rate-determining step in a reaction mechanism was only...... model for any reaction mechanism. Thus, it is very important to identify these rate-controlling transition states and rate-controlling intermediates for both applied and basic research. Here, we present a method for doing that....

  2. Controlling factors for the brittle-to-ductile transition in tungsten single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbsch; Riedle; Hartmaier; Fischmeister

    1998-11-13

    Materials performance in structural applications is often restricted by a transition from ductile response to brittle fracture with decreasing temperature. This transition is currently viewed as being controlled either by dislocation mobility or by the nucleation of dislocations. Fracture experiments on tungsten single crystals reported here provide evidence for the importance of dislocation nucleation for the fracture toughness in the semibrittle regime. However, it is shown that the transition itself, in general, is controlled by dislocation mobility rather than by nucleation.

  3. CROSSFLOW FILTRATION: EM-31, WP-2.3.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

    2011-02-01

    In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing crossflow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed some of those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Crossflow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate solutions. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Integrated Salt Disposition Process and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the crossflow filter feed flow rate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and crossflow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several

  4. Vertical, Bubbly, Cross-Flow Characteristics over Tube Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    2005-12-01

    Two-phase flow over tube bundles is commonly observed in shell and tube-type heat exchangers. However, only limited amount of data concerning flow pattern and void fraction exists due to the flow complexity and the difficulties in measurement. The detailed flow structure in tube bundles needs to be understood for reliable and effective design. Therefore, the objective of this study was to clarify the two-phase structure of cross-flow in tube bundles by PIV. Experiments were conducted using two types of models, namely in-line and staggered arrays with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. Each test section contains 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The experiment’s data were obtained under very low void fraction (αtube bundles were described in terms of the velocity vector field, turbulence intensity and void fraction.

  5. Simultaneous Infrared And Pressure Measurements Of Crossflow Instability Modes For HIFiRE 5 (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TP-2017-0099 SIMULTANEOUS INFRARED AND PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS OF CROSSFLOW INSTABILITY MODES FOR HIFiRE-5 (POSTPRINT) Matthew...Postprint 01 April 2015 – 01 January 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SIMULTANEOUS INFRARED AND PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS OF CROSSFLOW INSTABILITY MODES FOR...elevated freestream noise levels. Simultaneous measurements were made using an infrared camera and 22 pressure sensors mounted flush with the model

  6. Study on an Undershot Cross-Flow Water Turbine with Straight Blades

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuyuki Nishi; Terumi Inagaki; Yanrong Li; Kentaro Hatano

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale hydroelectric power generation has recently attracted considerable attention. The authors previously proposed an undershot cross-flow water turbine with a very low head suitable for application to open channels. The water turbine was of a cross-flow type and could be used in open channels with the undershot method, remarkably simplifying its design by eliminating guide vanes and the casing. The water turbine was fitted with curved blades (such as the runners of a typical cross-flo...

  7. Effect of the nature of vitiated crossflow on the flow-field of a transverse reacting jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Pratikash P.; Busari, Oluwatobi; Lucht, Robert P.; Laster, Walter R.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the nature of vitiated crossflow on the structure and dynamics of non-reacting/reacting transverse jets is investigated. In this study, the vitiated crossflow is produced either by a low-swirl burner (LSB) that adds a swirling component to the crossflow or a bluff-body burner (BBB) that produces a uniform crossflow. The jet fluid is injected through a contoured injector, which provides a top-hat velocity profile. The swirling crossflow exhibits considerable swirl at the point of injection of the transverse jet. Two component high-repetition-rate PIV measurements demonstrate the influence of a vitiated crossflow generated by a low-swirl/bluff-body burner on the near-wake flow-field of the jet. Measurements at a plane below the injection location of the jet indicate that there is a continuous entrainment of PIV particles in case of swirling crossflow. The time-averaged flow-field shows that the velocity field for reacting/non-reacting jets in the LSB crossflow exhibits higher velocity gradients, in the measurement plane along jet cross section, as compared to BBB crossflow. It is found that the vorticity magnitude is lower in case of jets in the BBB crossflow and there is a delay in the formation of the wake vortex structure. The conditional turbulent statistics of the jet flow-field in the two crossflows shows that there is a higher degree of intermittency related to the wake vortex structure in case of a BBB crossflow, which results in a non-Gaussian distribution of the turbulent statistics. The wake Strouhal number calculation shows the influence of the nature of crossflow on the rate of wake vortex shedding. The wake Strouhal number for the jets in BBB crossflow is found to be lower than for the LSB crossflow. A decrease in the wake Strouhal number is observed with an increase in the nozzle separation distance. There is an increase in the dilatation rate owing to heat release which results in higher wake Strouhal number for reacting jets as compared

  8. Effect of internal coolant crossflow orientation on the discharge coefficient of shaped film-cooling holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsch, M.; Saumweber, C.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.; Sharp, E.

    2000-01-01

    Discharge coefficients of three film-cooling hole geometries are presented over a wide range of engine like conditions. The hole geometries comprise a cylindrical hole and two holes with a diffuser-shaped exit portion (a fanshaped and a laidback fanshaped hole). For all three hole geometries the hole axis was inclined 30 deg with respect to the direction of the external (hot gas) flow. The flow conditions considered were the hot gas crossflow Mach number (up to 0.6), the coolant crossflow Mach number (up to 0.6) and the pressure ratio across the hole (up to 2). The effect of internal crossflow approach direction, perpendicular or parallel to the main flow direction, is particularly addressed in the present study. Comparison is made of the results for a parallel and perpendicular orientation, showing that the coolant crossflow orientation has a strong impact on the discharge behavior of the different hole geometries. The discharge coefficients were found to strongly depend on both hole geometry and crossflow conditions. Furthermore, the effects of internal and external crossflow on the discharge coefficients were described by means of correlations used to derive a predicting scheme for discharge coefficients. A comparison between predictions and measurements reveals the capability of the method proposed.

  9. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. A method of transition conflict resolving in hierarchical control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabiak, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    The paper concerns the problem of automatic solving of transition conflicts in hierarchical concurrent state machines (also known as UML state machine). Preparing by the designer a formal specification of a behaviour free from conflicts can be very complex. In this paper, it is proposed a method for solving conflicts through transition predicates modification. Partially specified predicates in the nondeterministic diagram are transformed into a symbolic Boolean space, whose points of the space code all possible valuations of transition predicates. Next, all valuations under partial specifications are logically multiplied by a function which represents all possible orthogonal predicate valuations. The result of this operation contains all possible collections of predicates, which under given partial specification make that the original diagram is conflict free and deterministic.

  11. Risk Assessment on the Transition Program for Air Traffic Control Automation System Upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dong Bin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the safety risks of the transition program for Air Traffic Control (ATC automation system upgrade by using the event tree analysis method in this paper. We decomposed the occurrence progress of the three transition phase and built the event trees corresponding to the three stages, and then we determined the probability of success of each factor and calculated probability of success of the air traffic control automation system upgrade transition. In the conclusion, we illustrate the transition program safety risk according to the results.

  12. Modeling and experimental analysis of phased array synthetic jet cross-flow interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Zohaib

    Synthetic Jet Actuators (SJAs) are fluidic devices capable of adding momentum to static or non-static bodies of fluid without adding mass. They are therefore categorized as zero-net-mass-flux (ZNMF) momentum source. In its simplest compact form a SJA consists of an oscillatory surface connected to a cavity with a single exit orifice through which the fluid enters and exits. SJA technology has been utilized in applications ranging from boundary layer control over aerodynamic surfaces to fluidic mixing in dispersion applications. The ZNMF nature of the technology means it is not subject to constraints experienced by traditional momentum sources that require the addition of mass in order to impart momentum. The momentum that can be added by a single SJA is limited by the energy transfer capabilities of the oscillating surface. In modern SJAs this surface usually is a piezoceramic/metal composite subjected to a high voltage AC signal. For applications such as flow control over aerodynamic surfaces, modern SJAs are used in an array configuration and are capable of altering the flow momentum by values ranging from 0.01-10%. While it is possible to build larger actuators to increase this value the benefits associated with the compact size would be lost. It is therefore desirable to tune other parameters associated with SJA arrays to increase this value. The specific motivation for this study comes from the desire to control the momentum addition capacity of a specific SJA array, without having to alter any geometric parameters. In a broader sense this study focuses on understanding the physics of SJA interaction in array configuration through experiments which are then used to guide in the design of modeling technique that predicts SJA array behavior in cross-flows. The first half of the project focused on understanding SJA behavior through modeling. Numerical techniques were initially used to model SJA and SJA arrays in cross-flows. Reduced numerical models were then

  13. Electric control of superconducting transition through a spin-orbit coupled interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouassou, Jabir Ali; di Bernardo, Angelo; Robinson, Jason W. A.; Linder, Jacob

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate theoretically all-electric control of the superconducting transition temperature using a device comprised of a conventional superconductor, a ferromagnetic insulator, and semiconducting layers with intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. By using analytical calculations and numerical simulations, we show that the transition temperature of such a device can be controlled by electric gating which alters the ratio of Rashba to Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. The results offer a new pathway to control superconductivity in spintronic devices.

  14. Electric control of superconducting transition through a spin-orbit coupled interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouassou, Jabir Ali; Di Bernardo, Angelo; Robinson, Jason W. A.; Linder, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically all-electric control of the superconducting transition temperature using a device comprised of a conventional superconductor, a ferromagnetic insulator, and semiconducting layers with intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. By using analytical calculations and numerical simulations, we show that the transition temperature of such a device can be controlled by electric gating which alters the ratio of Rashba to Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. The results offer a new pathway to control superconductivity in spintronic devices. PMID:27426887

  15. Gate-controlled semimetal-topological insulator transition in an InAs/GaSb heterostructure

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kyoichi; Harada, Yuichi; Onomitsu, Koji; Muraki, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We report a gate-controlled transition of a semimetallic InAs/GaSb heterostructure to a topological insulator. The transition is induced by decreasing the degree of band inversion with front and back gate voltages. Temperature dependence of the longitudinal resistance peak shows the energy gap opening in the bulk region with increasing gate electric field. The suppression of bulk conduction and the transition to a topological insulator are confirmed by nonlocal resistance measurements using a...

  16. Investigation of Timing to Switch Control Mode in Powered Knee Prostheses during Task Transitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    Full Text Available Current powered prosthetic legs require switching control modes according to the task the user is performing (e.g. level-ground walking, stair climbing, walking on slopes, etc.. To allow prosthesis users safely and seamlessly transition between tasks, it is critical to determine when to switch the prosthesis control mode during task transitions. Our previous study defined critical timings for different types of task transitions in ambulation; however, it is unknown whether it is the unique timing that allows safe and seamless transitions. The goals of this study were to (1 systematically investigate the effects of mode switch timing on the prosthesis user's performance in task transitions, and (2 identify appropriate timing to switch the prosthesis control mode so that the users can seamlessly transition between different locomotion tasks. Five able-bodied (AB and two transfemoral (TF amputee subjects were tested as they wore a powered knee prosthesis. The prosthesis control mode was switched manually at various times while the subjects performed different types of task transitions. The subjects' task transition performances were evaluated by their walking balance and success in performing seamless task transitions. The results demonstrated that there existed a time window within which switching the prosthesis control mode neither interrupted the subjects' task transitions nor disturbed their walking balance. Therefore, the results suggested the control mode switching of a lower limb prosthesis can be triggered within an appropriate time window instead of a specific timing or an individual phase. In addition, a generalized criterion to determine the appropriate mode switch timing was proposed. The outcomes of this study could provide important guidance for future designs of neurally controlled powered knee prostheses that are safe and reliable to use.

  17. Extreme challenges on cardiovascular control during gravity transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, B.; Beckers, F.; Aubert, A. E.

    Introduction. During parabolic flights transient periods of hypergravity and microgravity are created. These periods cause translocations of bodily fluids in the longitudinal axis of the body, leading to altered cardiac preload and afterload. These extreme orthostatic challenges provide a unique platform to study baroreflex-mediated responses of the cardiovascular autonomic control system. This might have important features for the development of a model of cardiovascular deconditioning that is observed in a variety of patient populations. Purpose. Until now, due to methodological restrictions, most studies have been concentrating on the analysis of cardiovascular variability in time domain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) simultaneously, using frequency domain analysis techniques (low frequency power (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz); high frequency power (HF: 0.16-0.4 Hz)), providing additional information about cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic modulation during gravity transitions. Methods. 12 healthy non-medicated volunteers (age = 24 ± 2.5 yr) underwent continuous ECG and blood pressure (BP) recordings during the 32nd and 34th parabolic flight campaign organized by ESA. The subjects performed 15 parabolas in supine and 15 parabolas in standing position. 5 transient gravity phases were abstracted; phase 1 and 5: before and after the parabola (1G); phase 2 and 4: at the ascending and descending leg of the parabola (2G); phase 3: at the apex of the parabola (0g). Phase 2, 3 and 4 last 20 seconds. Results. No significant differences were found in HRV and BPV parameters in supine position between the different gravity phases. In standing position, mean RR- interval was higher during 0G (900 ± 103 ms) compared to 1G (700 ± 87 ms) and 2G (600 ± 94 ms). Mean arterial BP remained relatively constant during 0G but tended to decrease during 2G (102 ± 2 mmHg vs. 105 ± 3 mmHg). Positive correlations were

  18. Transcriptional regulation is a major controller of cell cycle transition dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Cardelli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    in various organisms showed the importance of positive feedbacks in other transitions as well. Here we investigate if a universal control system with transcriptional regulation(s) and post-translational positive feedback(s) can be proposed for the regulation of all cell cycle transitions. Through...... computational modeling, we analyze the transition dynamics in all possible combinations of transcriptional and post-translational regulations. We find that some combinations lead to 'sloppy' transitions, while others give very precise control. The periodic transcriptional regulation through the activator...... or the inhibitor leads to radically different dynamics. Experimental evidence shows that in cell cycle transitions of organisms investigated for cell cycle dependent periodic transcription, only the inhibitor OR the activator is under cyclic control and never both of them. Based on these observations, we propose...

  19. Event-based control for sit-to-stand transition using a wearable exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; Vinagre, Manuel; Aranda, Joan

    2017-07-01

    Sit-to-stand transition is an essential step in a lower limb rehabilitation therapy, mainly for assisting the patient to transit from wheel chair to the next level of therapy. A mixed stiffness-damping control adaptation is proposed for this task which will help in reaching the final position with a constant velocity. A combination of control model is proposed to ensure the initiation and the final stage of the transition, such as to ensure stability and to maintain the equilibrium. The combined control model helps in reaching the goal position with equal participation from the user. For patient studies, such as with paraplegic patients, a combinational control model with muscle stimulation can be included to provide a complete assistance. The role of muscle stimulation and joint movement assistance is also considered in this control model. Further, final stage of this transition must ensure keeping or helping the user to maintain the upright position.

  20. Chaos control applied to coherent states in transitional flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausch, Marina; Eckhardt, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.eckhardt@physik.uni-marburg.de [Fachbereich Physik, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Renthof 6, 35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-12-22

    Chaos control refers to a group of techniques by which an otherwise unstable dynamical state of a system can be maintained by small control forces. We here discuss their application to stabilizing the fixed points in a low dimensional model for shear flows. The simulations demonstrate a prototypical application of chaos control, show that control is almost always possible, and give insights into optimizing the control matrix from a design point of view.

  1. Size-Controlled Intercalation-to-Conversion Transition in Lithiation of Transition-Metal Chalcogenides-NbSe3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Langli; Zhao, Benliang; Xiang, Bin; Wang, Chong-Min

    2016-01-26

    Transition-metal chalcogenides (TMCs) can be used either as intercalation cathodes or as conversion-type anodes for lithium ion batteries, for which two distinctively different lithiation reaction mechanisms govern the electrochemical performance of TMCs. However, the factors that control the transition of lithiation mechanisms remain elusive. In this work, we investigated the lithiation process of NbSe3 ribbons using in situ transmission electron microscopy and observed a size-dependent transition from intercalation to the conversion reaction. Large NbSe3 ribbons can accommodate high concentrations of Li(+) through intercalation by relaxing their internal spacing, while lithiation of small NbSe3 ribbons proceeds readily to full conversion. We found that the size-dependent variation of the lithiation mechanism is associated with both Li(+) diffusion in NbSe3 and the accommodation of newly formed phases. For large NbSe3 ribbons, the intercalation-to-conversion transition is impeded by both long-range Li(+) diffusion and large-scale accommodation of volume expansion induced by the formation of new phases. These results demonstrate the inherent structural instability of NbSe3 as an intercalation cathode and its high lithiation rate as a promising conversion-type anode.

  2. Size-controlled Intercalation to Conversion Transition in Lithiation of Transition-Metal Chalcogenides – NbSe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli; Zhao, Benliang; Xiang, Bin; Wang, Chong M.

    2016-01-23

    Transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) can either be used as intercalation cathodes or as conversion type anodes for lithium ion batteries, for which two distinctively different lithiation reaction mechanisms govern the electrochemical performance of TMCs. However, it remains elusive that what controls the transition of lithiation mechanisms. Herein, we investigated the lithiation process of NbSe3 ribbons using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and observed a size dependent transition from intercalation to conversion reaction. The large NbSe3 ribbons can accommodate high concentration of Li+ through intercalation by relaxing its internal spacing, while lithiation of small NbSe3 ribbons proceeds readily to full conversion reaction. We find that the size dependent variation of lithiation mechanism is attributed to the Li+ diffusion in NbSe3 and the accommodation of newly formed phases, i.e., insufficient Li+ diffusion and limited space for accommodating the volume expansion induced by forming new phases in large size ribbons both impede the intercalation-to-conversion transition. These results demonstrate the inherent structural instability of NbSe3 as an intercalation cathode and fast lithiation rate as a promising conversion type anode.

  3. Investigation of the impact of high liquid viscosity on jet atomization in crossflow via high-fidelity simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Gao, Hui; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2017-08-01

    Atomization of extremely high viscosity liquid can be of interest for many applications in aerospace, automotive, pharmaceutical, and food industries. While detailed atomization measurements usually face grand challenges, high-fidelity numerical simulations offer the advantage to comprehensively explore the atomization details. In this work, a previously validated high-fidelity first-principle simulation code HiMIST is utilized to simulate high-viscosity liquid jet atomization in crossflow. The code is used to perform a parametric study of the atomization process in a wide range of Ohnesorge numbers (Oh = 0.004-2) and Weber numbers (We = 10-160). Direct comparisons between the present study and previously published low-viscosity jet in crossflow results are performed. The effects of viscous damping and slowing on jet penetration, liquid surface instabilities, ligament formation/breakup, and subsequent droplet formation are investigated. Complex variations in near-field and far-field jet penetrations with increasing Oh at different We are observed and linked with the underlying jet deformation and breakup physics. Transition in breakup regimes and increase in droplet size with increasing Oh are observed, mostly consistent with the literature reports. The detailed simulations elucidate a distinctive edge-ligament-breakup dominated process with long surviving ligaments for the higher Oh cases, as opposed to a two-stage edge-stripping/column-fracture process for the lower Oh counterparts. The trend of decreasing column deflection with increasing We is reversed as Oh increases. A predominantly unimodal droplet size distribution is predicted at higher Oh, in contrast to the bimodal distribution at lower Oh. It has been found that both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz linear stability theories cannot be easily applied to interpret the distinct edge breakup process and further study of the underlying physics is needed.

  4. On the optimality equation for average cost Markov control processes with Feller transition probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskiewicz, Anna; Nowak, Andrzej S.

    2006-04-01

    We consider Markov control processes with Borel state space and Feller transition probabilities, satisfying some generalized geometric ergodicity conditions. We provide a new theorem on the existence of a solution to the average cost optimality equation.

  5. Experimental investigation of a reacting transverse jet in a high pressure oscillating vitiated crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugger, Christopher A.

    Staged combustion is one design approach in a gas turbine engine to reduce pollutant emission levels. In axially staged combustion, portions of the air and fuel are injected downstream of a lean premixed low NOx primary combustion zone. The gas residence time at elevated temperatures is decreased resulting in lower thermal NOx, and the reduced oxygen and high temperature vitiated primary zone flow further help to reduce pollutant emissions and quickly complete combustion. One implementation of axially staged combustion is transverse fuel jet injection. An important consideration for staged combustion systems, though, is how the primary and secondary combustion zones can couple through the acoustic resonances of the chamber. These couplings can lead to additional source terms that pump energy into the resonant acoustic field and help sustain the high-amplitude combustor pressure oscillations. An understanding of these couplings is important so that it may be possible to design a secondary combustion system that provides inherent damping to the combustor system. To systematically characterize the coupling of a reacting jet in unsteady crossflow in detail, the effects of an an unsteady pressure flowfield and an unsteady velocity flowfield are separately investigated. An optically accessible resonant combustion chamber was designed and built as part of this work to generate a standing wave unsteady vitiated crossflow at a chamber pressure of 0.9 MPa. The location of transverse jet injection corresponds to one of two locations, where one location is the pressure node and the other location the pressure anti-node of the resonant chamber acoustic mode. The injection location is optically accessible, and the dynamic interactions between the transverse jet flow and the 1st and 2nd axial combustor modes are measured using 10 kHz OH-PLIF and 2D PIV. This document analyzes five test cases: two non-reacting jets and three reacting jets. All cases correspond to jet injection

  6. Turbulence Modeling of Flows with Extensive Crossflow Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyris G. Panaras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for the difficulty in simulating accurately strong 3-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SBLIs and high-alpha flows with classical turbulence models are investigated. These flows are characterized by the appearance of strong crossflow separation. In view of recent additional evidence, a previously published flow analysis, which attributes the poor performance of classical turbulence models to the observed laminarization of the separation domain, is reexamined. According to this analysis, the longitudinal vortices into which the separated boundary layer rolls up in this type of separated flow, transfer external inviscid air into the part of the separation adjacent to the wall, decreasing its turbulence. It is demonstrated that linear models based on the Boussinesq equation provide solutions of moderate accuracy, while non-linear ones and others that consider the particular structure of the flow are more efficient. Published and new Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations are reviewed, as well as results from a recent Large Eddy Simulation (LES study, which indicate that in calculations characterized by sufficient accuracy the turbulent kinetic energy of the reverse flow inside the separation vortices is very low, i.e., the flow is almost laminar there.

  7. Experimental Vortex Identification and Characterization in Reacting Jets in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vedanth; Emerson, Ben; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Reacting jets in crossflow (JICF) is an important canonical flow field in combustion problems where there is strong coupling between heat release and the evolution of vortical structures. We use vortex identification studies to experimentally characterize the spatial evolution of vortex dynamics in a reacting JICF. A vortex identification algorithm was designed to operate on particle image velocimetry (PIV) data and its raw Mie scattering images. The algorithm uses the velocity fields to obtain comparisons between the strain rate and the rotation rate. Additionally, the algorithm uses the raw Mie scattering data to identify regions where the high acceleration at vortex cores has centrifuged seeding particles out of the vortex cores. Together, these methods are used to estimate the vortex location and circulation. Analysis was done on 10 kHz PIV data from a reacting JICF experiment, and the resulting vortex trajectory, and growth rate statistics are presented. Results are compared between non-reacting JICF and reacting studies performed with different jet density ratios and different levels of acoustic forcing. We observed how the density ratio, the frequency and amplitude of the acoustic forcing affected the vortex characteristics and growth rate.

  8. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  9. Liquid Fuel Emulsion Jet-in-Crossflow Penetration and Dispersion Under High Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Guillermo Andres

    The current work focuses on the jet-in-crossflow penetration and dispersion behavior of water-in-oil emulsions in a high pressure environment. Both fuel injection strategies of using a water-in-oil emulsion and a jet-in-crossflow have demonstrated unique benefits in improving gas turbine performance from an emissions and efficiency standpoint. A jet-in-crossflow is very practical for use in gas turbine engines, rocket propulsion, and aircraft engines since it utilizes already available crossflow air to atomize fuel. Injecting water into a combustion chamber in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion allows for pollutant emissions reduction while reducing efficiency loses that may result from using a separate water or steam injection circuit. Dispersion effects on oil droplets are expected, therefore investigating the distribution of both oil and water droplets in the crossflow is an objective in this work. Understanding the synchronization and injection behavior of the two strategies is of key interest due to their combined benefits. A water-to-oil ratio and an ambient pressure parameter are developed for emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectories. To this end, a total of 24 emulsion jet-in-crossflow tests were performed with varying ambient pressures of 2-8 atm and momentum flux ratios of 50, 85, and 120. Sobel edge filtering was applied to each averaged image obtained from a high speed video of each test case. Averaged and filtered images were used to resolve top and bottom edges of the trajectory in addition to the overall peak intensity up to 40 mm downstream of the injection point. An optimized correlation was established and found to differ from literature based correlations obtained under atmospheric pressure conditions. Overall it was found that additional parameters were not necessary for the top edge and peak intensity correlations, but a need for a unique emulsion bottom edge and width trajectory correlation was recognized. In addition to investigating emulsion

  10. Axial Fan Blade Vibration Assessment under Inlet Cross-Flow Conditions Using Laser Scanning Vibrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Heinemann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In thermal power plants equipped with air-cooled condensers (ACCs, axial cooling fans operate under the influence of ambient flow fields. Under inlet cross-flow conditions, the resultant asymmetric flow field is known to introduce additional harmonic forces to the fan blades. This effect has previously only been studied numerically or by using blade-mounted strain gauges. For this study, laser scanning vibrometry (LSV was used to assess fan blade vibration under inlet cross-flow conditions in an adapted fan test rig inside a wind tunnel test section. Two co-rotating laser beams scanned a low-pressure axial fan, resulting in spectral, phase-resolved surface vibration patterns of the fan blades. Two distinct operating points with flow coefficients of 0.17 and 0.28 were examined, with and without inlet cross-flow influence. While almost identical fan vibration patterns were found for both reference operating points, the overall blade vibration increased by 100% at the low fan flow rate as a result of cross-flow, and by 20% at the high fan flow rate. While numerically predicted natural frequency modes could be confirmed from experimental data as minor peaks in the vibration amplitude spectrum, they were not excited significantly by cross-flow. Instead, primarily higher rotation-rate harmonics were amplified; that is, a synchronous blade-tip flapping was strongly excited at the blade-pass frequency.

  11. A new way to apply ultrasound in cross-flow ultrafiltration: application to colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengl, N; Jin, Y; Pignon, F; Baup, S; Mollard, R; Gondrexon, N; Magnin, A; Michot, L; Paineau, E

    2014-05-01

    A new coupling of ultrasound device with membrane process has been developed in order to enhance cross-flow ultrafiltration of colloidal suspensions usually involved in several industrial applications included bio and agro industries, water and sludge treatment. In order to reduce mass transfer resistances induced by fouling and concentration polarization, which both are main limitations in membrane separation process continuous ultrasound is applied with the help of a vibrating blade (20 kHz) located in the feed channel all over the membrane surface (8mm between membrane surface and the blade). Hydrodynamic aspects were also taking into account by the control of the rectangular geometry of the feed channel. Three colloidal suspensions with different kinds of colloidal interaction (attractive, repulsive) were chosen to evaluate the effect of their physico-chemical properties on the filtration. For a 90 W power (20.5 W cm(-2)) and a continuous flow rate, permeation fluxes are increased for each studied colloidal suspension, without damaging the membrane. The results show that the flux increase depends on the initial structural properties of filtered dispersion in terms of colloidal interaction and spatial organizations. For instance, a Montmorillonite Wyoming-Na clay suspension was filtered at 1.5 × 10(5)Pa transmembrane pressure. Its permeation flux is increased by a factor 7.1, from 13.6 L m(-2)h(-1) without ultrasound to 97 L m(-2)h(-1) with ultrasound.

  12. The effect of blade pitch in the rotor hydrodynamics of a cross-flow turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoano, Miguel; Huera-Huarte, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    In this work we will show how the hydrodynamics of the rotor of a straight-bladed Cross-Flow Turbine (CFT) are affected by the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR), and the blade pitch angle imposed to the rotor. The CFT model used in experiments consists of a three-bladed (NACA-0015) vertical axis turbine with a chord (c) to rotor diameter (D) ratio of 0.16. Planar Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used, with the laser sheet aiming at the mid-span of the blades, illuminating the inner part of the rotor and the near wake of the turbine. Tests were made by forcing the rotation of the turbine with a DC motor, which provided precise control of the TSR, while being towed in a still-water tank at a constant Reynolds number of 61000. A range of TSRs from 0.7 to 2.3 were covered for different blade pitches, ranging from 8° toe-in to 16° toe-out. The interaction between the blades in the rotor will be discussed by examining dimensionless phase-averaged vorticity fields in the inner part of the rotor and mean velocity fields in the near wake of the turbine. Supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Grant BES-2013-065366 and project DPI2015-71645-P.

  13. Gas-liquid mass transfer in a cross-flow hollow fiber module : Analytical model and experimental validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dindore, V. Y.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The cross-flow operation of hollow fiber membrane contactors offers many advantages and is preferred over the parallel-flow contactors for gas-liquid mass transfer operations. However, the analysis of such a cross-flow membrane gas-liquid contactor is complicated due to the change in concentrations

  14. Transition-based deadlock control policy using reachability graph for flexible manufacturing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyan Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most existing deadlock prevention policies deal with deadlock problems arising in flexible manufacturing systems modeled with Petri nets by adding control places. Based on the reachability graph analysis, this article proposes a novel deadlock control policy that recovers the system from deadlock and livelock states to legal states and reaches the same number of states as the original plant model by adding control transitions. In order to reduce the structural complexity of the supervisor, a set covering approach is developed to minimize the number of control transitions. Finally, two flexible manufacturing system examples are presented to illustrate the proposed approach.

  15. Numerical investigation and optimization on mixing enhancement factors in supersonic jet-to-crossflow flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Huang, Wei; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tian-tian

    2016-10-01

    Sufficient mixing between the supersonic airstream and the injectant is critical for the design of scramjet engines. The information in the two-dimensional supersonic jet-to-crossflow flow field has been explored numerically and theoretically, and the numerical approach has been validated against the available experimental data in the open literature. The obtained results show that the extreme difference analysis approach can obtain deeper information than the variance analysis method, and the optimal strategy can be generated by the extreme difference analysis approach. The jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio is the most important influencing factor for the supersonic jet-to-crossflow flow field, following is the injection angle, and all the design variables have no remarkable impact on the separation length and the height of Mach disk in the range considered in the current study.

  16. LARGE-SCALE VORTICAL STRUCTURES PRODUCED BY AN IMPINGING DENSITY JET IN SHALLOW CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The large-scale vortical structures produced by an impinging density jet in shallow crossflow were numerically investigated in detail using RNG turbulence model.The scales, formation mechanism and evolution feature of the upstream wall vortex in relation to stagnation point and the Scarf vortex in near field were analyzed. The computed characteristic scales of the upstream vortex show distinguished three-dimensionality and vary with the velocity ratio and the water depth. The Scarf vortex in the near field plays an important role in the lateral concentration distributions of the impinging jet in crossflow. When the velocity ratio is relatively small, there exists a distinct lateral high concentration aggregation zone at the lateral edge between the bottom layer wall jet and the ambient crossflow, which is dominated by the Scarf vortex in the near field.

  17. Effects of crossflow velocity and transmembrane pressure on microfiltration of oil-in-water emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the issue of oil removal from water using hydrophilic porous membranes. The effective separation of oil-in-water dispersions involves high flux of water through the membrane and, at the same time, high rejection rate of the oil phase. The effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity on rejection of oil droplets and thin oil films by pores of different cross-section are investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that in the absence of crossflow, the critical transmembrane pressure, which is required for the oil droplet entry into a circular pore of a given surface hydrophilicity, agrees well with analytical predictions based on the Young-Laplace equation. With increasing crossflow velocity, the shape of the oil droplet is strongly deformed near the pore entrance and the critical pressure of permeation increases. We determined numerically the phase diagram for the droplet rejection, permeation, and breakup depending of the transmembrane pressure and...

  18. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TURBULENT JETS WITH LATERAL INJECTION INTO A CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ting-ting; LI Shao-hua; XU Zhong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, Numerical simulations of mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy fields are presented for three-dimensional lateral jet in crossflow, at the injection angles of -60° and -30°. The RNG k-ε turbulence model, with the two-layer wall function method, is adopted to simulate the characteristics of this flow at the jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios, 1, 2 and 4. The results show that the injection angle and jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio can change the flow fields, and the range upstream affected by jet injected laterally increase and the curvature of jet trajectories varies along the flow direction. Furthermore, the separation events in the lee of the jet exit and behind the jet bending-segment have been found, and the mechanisms of two vortex systems are analyzed.

  19. Study of shear-thinning/thickening effects on plane Couette-Poiseuille flow with uniform crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉泉; 朱克勤

    2014-01-01

    The shear-thinning/thickening effects on the plane Couette-Poiseuille flow with a uniform crossflow are studied. The detailed solution procedures for both theo-retical and numerical purposes are given. In order to clarify the difference between the Newtonian flow and the power-law flow, all cases of the plane Couette-Poiseuille flows with uniform crossflows for different power indexes are assigned to the phase diagram in the parameter plane corresponding to the Couette number and the crossflow Reynolds number. The effects of shear-thinning/thickening on the phase diagram are discussed. An important feature of the shear-thinning circumstance distinguished from the shear-thickening circumstance is discovered.

  20. Dimer-tetramer transition controls RUNX1/ETO leukemogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Christian; Becker, Yvonne; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Vogel, Vitali; Vojtkova, Anna; Herglotz, Julia; Moore, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Lausen, Jörn; Mäntele, Werner; Gohlke, Holger; Grez, Manuel

    2010-07-29

    RUNX1/ETO, the fusion protein resulting from the chromosomal translocation t(8;21), is one of the most frequent translocation products in acute myeloid leukemia. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that the homo-tetramerization domain of ETO, the nervy homology region 2 (NHR2), is essential for RUNX1/ETO oncogenic activity. We analyzed the energetic contribution of individual amino acids within the NHR2 to RUNX1/ETO dimer-tetramer transition and found a clustered area of 5 distinct amino acids with strong contribution to the stability of tetramers. Substitution of these amino acids abolishes tetramer formation without affecting dimer formation. Similar to RUNX1/ETO monomers, dimers failed to bind efficiently to DNA and to alter expression of RUNX1-dependent genes. RUNX1/ETO dimers do not block myeloid differentiation, are unable to enhance the self-renewal capacity of hematopoietic progenitors, and fail to induce leukemia in a murine transplantation model. Our data reveal the existence of an essential structural motif (hot spot) at the NHR2 dimer-tetramer interface, suitable for a molecular intervention in t(8;21) leukemias.

  1. On fatigue damage accumulation from in-line and cross-flow vortex-induced vibrations on risers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baarholm, G. S.; Larsen, C. M.; Lie, H.

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale model tests of a tensioned steel riser were performed at Hanøytangen outside Bergen, Norway in 1997. The length of the model was 90 m and the diameter was 3 cm. The information from these tests consists of measured bending strains, tension, flow speed and all relevant riser data. In this work, this information is reexamined in an attempt to improve our understanding of vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) for cases with very high order of responding modes. The aim is in particular to study the relative importance of in-line (IL) and cross-flow (CF) vibrations for fatigue damage accumulation. It is shown that fatigue damage is proportional to U (U is the flow velocity) when the modes are dominated by tension. When bending controls the modes, the fatigue damage is proportional to U. A linear SN-curve with slope parameter m=3 is used. The Hanøytangen riser fatigue damage goes as U7 for the lowest velocities and U4 for the highest current velocities. Based on the Hanøytangen data, it seems that the transition velocity between the tension and the bending-stiffness-dominated regions is at the current velocity that gives response at a mode number where a tensioned string and an untensioned beam have equal eigenfrequencies. IL response has a significant contribution to fatigue for cases dominated by the lowest modes. The reason is that IL oscillations will take place at double the frequency of those in CF. For a tension-controlled case, this corresponds to a mode with half the wavelength, while a bending-controlled case will tend to have a wavelength ratio of 2. Since the curvature for a given amplitude increases with the inverse modal wavelength squared, fatigue from IL tends to dominate for cases with tension-controlled modes (low current speed), while CF will dominate for bending-controlled modes (high current speed). This tendency is clearly seen in the experimental data for both CF and IL responses. Fatigue damage is calculated directly from the measured

  2. Discretization chaos - Feedback control and transition to chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, Walter J.; Athalye, Amit M.

    1990-01-01

    Problems in the design of feedback controllers for chaotic dynamical systems are considered theoretically, focusing on two cases where chaos arises only when a nonchaotic continuous-time system is discretized into a simpler discrete-time systems (exponential discretization and pseudo-Euler integration applied to Lotka-Volterra competition and prey-predator systems). Numerical simulation results are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail. It is concluded that care must be taken in applying standard dynamical-systems methods to control systems that may be discontinuous or nondifferentiable.

  3. Crossflow microfiltration of yeast suspensions in tubular filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redkar, S G; Davis, R H

    1993-01-01

    Crossflow microfiltration experiments were performed on yeast suspensions through 0.2-microns pore size ceramic and polypropylene tubes at various operating conditions. The initial transient flux decline follows dead-end filtration theory, with the membrane resistance determined from the initial flux and the specific cake resistance determined from the rate of flux decline due to cake buildup. For long times, the observed fluxes reach steady or nearly steady values, presumably as a result of the cake growth being arrested by the shear exerted at its surface. The steady-state fluxes increase with increasing shear rate and decreasing feed concentration, and they are nearly independent of transmembrane pressure. The steady-state fluxes for unwashed yeast in deionized water or fermentation media are typically 2-4 times lower than those predicted by a model based on the properties of nonadhesive, rigid spheres undergoing shear-induced back-diffusion. In contrast, the steady-state fluxes observed for washed yeast cells in deionized water are only 10-30% below the predicted values. The washed yeast cells also exhibited specific cake resistances that are an order of magnitude lower than those for the unwashed yeast. The differences are due to the presence of extracellular proteins and other macromolecules in the unwashed yeast suspensions. These biopolymers cause higher cell adhesion and resistance in the cake layer, so that the cells at the top edge are not free to diffuse away. This is manifested as a concentration jump from the edge of the cake layer to the sheared suspension adjacent to it.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Development of an implantable oxygenator with cross-flow pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yuichi; Funakubo, Akio; Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Taga, Ichiro; Higami, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Thrombogenicity, a problem with long-term artificial lungs, is caused by blood-biomaterial interactions and is made worse by nonuniform flow, which also causes decreased gas exchange. To overcome these obstacles, we changed the inlet and added a uniform flow pump to our previous oxygenator design. Conventional membrane oxygenators have a (1/2)-inch port for the inlet of blood. These port structures make it difficult for the blood to flow uniformly in the oxygenator. In addition, the complex blood flow patterns that occur in the oxygenator, including turbulence and stagnation, lead to thrombogenicity. A cross-flow pump (CFP) can result in uniform blood flow to the inlet side of an oxygenator. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of an integrated oxygenator with a fiber bundle porosity of 0.6 and a membrane surface area of 1.3 m2. The inlet part of the oxygenator is improved and better fits the outlet of the CFP. Each of the three models of the improved oxygenator has a different inlet taper angle. The computational fluid dynamics analysis showed that, compared with the original design, uniform flow of the integrated oxygenator improved by 88.8% at the hollow fiber membrane. With the integrated oxygenator, O2 transfer increased by an average of 20.8%, and CO2 transfer increased by an average of 35.5%. The results of our experiments suggest that the CFP, which produces a wide, uniform flow to the oxygenator, is effective in attaining high gas exchange performance.

  5. A new approach for thermal performance calculation of cross-flow heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, H.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro (Brazil). Dpto. de Estatistica; Cabezas-Gomez, L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil). Dpto. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2005-08-01

    A new numerical methodology for thermal performance calculation in cross-flow heat exchangers is developed. Effectiveness-number of transfer units ({epsilon}-NTU) data for several standard and complex flow arrangements are obtained using this methodology. The results are validated through comparison with analytical solutions for one-pass cross-flow heat exchangers with one to four rows and with approximate series solution for an unmixed-unmixed heat exchanger, obtaining in all cases very small errors. New effectiveness data for some complex configurations are provided. (author)

  6. Hot-wire measurements of a single lateral jet injected into swirling crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, D. G.; Ong, L. H.; Mcmurry, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    In the present experiments documenting the time-mean and turbulent flowfield of a deflected turbulent jet in a combined, swirling crossflow, attention is given to a jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 4 at swirler vane angles of 45 and 70 deg. The results obtained are presented in the form of r-x plots in order to aid in three-dimensional flowfield visualization. The time-mean velocity measurements were found to closely correspond to pitot-probe data obtained in identical flow conditions. The lateral jet was found to deflect the axis of the precessing vortex core.

  7. Thermal design of multi-fluid mixed-mixed cross-flow heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roetzel, W.; Luo, X.

    2010-11-01

    A fast analytical calculation method is developed for the thermal design and rating of multi-fluid mixed-mixed cross-flow heat exchangers. Temperature dependent heat capacities and heat transfer coefficients can iteratively be taken into account. They are determined at one or two special reference temperatures. Examples are given for the application of the method to the rating of special multi-fluid multi-pass shell-and-tube heat exchangers and multi-fluid cross-flow plate-fin heat exchangers. The accuracy of the method is tested against numerical calculations with good results.

  8. Control of Optical Transitions with Magnetic Fields in Weakly Bound Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    McGuyer, B H; Iwata, G Z; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2015-01-01

    Forbidden optical transitions in weakly bound $^{88}$Sr$_2$ molecules become strongly enabled with moderate applied magnetic fields. We report the control of transition strengths by five orders of magnitude and measurements of highly nonlinear Zeeman shifts, which we explain with an accurate {\\it ab initio} model. Mixed quantization in an optical lattice enables the experimental procedure. Our observation of formerly inaccessible $f$-parity excited states offers a new avenue for improving theoretical models for divalent atom dimers. Furthermore, magnetically enabled transitions may lead to an extremely precise subradiant molecular lattice clock.

  9. Size Controlled Synthesis of Transition Metal Nanoparticles for Catalytic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Esparza, Angel

    2011-07-07

    Catalysis offers cleaner and more efficient chemical reactions for environmental scientists. More than 90% of industrial processes are performed with a catalyst involved, however research it is still required to improve the catalyst materials. The purpose of this work is to contribute with the development of catalysts synthesis with two different approaches. First, the precise size control of non-noble metals nanoparticles. Second, a new one-pot synthesis method based on a microemulsion system was developed to synthesize size-controlled metal nanoparticles in oxide supports. The one-pot method represents a simple approach to synthesize both support and immobilized nanometer-sized non-noble metal nanoparticles in the same reaction system. Narrow size distribution nickel, cobalt, iron and cobalt-nickel nanoparticles were obtained. High metal dispersions are attainable regardless the metal or support used in the synthesis. Thus, the methodology is adaptable and robust. The sizecontrolled supported metal nanoparticles offer the opportunity to study size effects and metal-support interactions on different catalytic reactions with different sets of metals and supports.

  10. Coherent control of non-resonant two-photon transition in molecular system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hui; Zhang Shi-An; Wang Zu-Geng; Sun Zhen-Rong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we study theoretically and experimentally the coherent control of non-resonant two-photon transition in a molecular system (Perylene dissolved in chloroform solution) by shaping the femtosecond pulses with simple phase patterns (cosinusoidal and π phase step-function shape).The control efficiency of the two-photon transition probability is correlated with both the laser field and the molecular absorption bandwidth.Our results demonstrate that,the two-photon transition probability in a molecular system can be reduced but not completely eliminated by manipulating the laser field,and the control efficiency is minimal when the molecular absorption bandwidth is larger than twice the laser spectral bandwidth.

  11. Fast online learning of control regime transitions for adaptive robotic mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Brian

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a new framework, Model Transition Control (MTC), that models robot control problems as sets of linear control regimes linked by nonlinear transitions, and a new learning algorithm, Dynamic Threshold Learning (DTL), that learns the boundaries of these control regimes in real-time. We demonstrate that DTL can learn to prevent understeer and oversteer while controlling a simulated high-speed vehicle. We also show that DTL can enable an iRobot PackBot to avoid rollover in rough terrain and to actively shift its center-of-gravity to maintain balance when climbing obstacles. In all cases, DTL is able to learn control regime boundaries in a few minutes, often with single-digit numbers of learning trials.

  12. Boundary-field-driven control of discontinuous phase transitions on hyperbolic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoju; Verstraete, Frank; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-08-01

    The multistate Potts models on two-dimensional hyperbolic lattices are studied with respect to various boundary effects. The free energy is numerically calculated using the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. We analyze phase transitions of the Potts models in the thermodynamic limit with respect to contracted boundary layers. A false phase transition is present even if a couple of the boundary layers are contracted. Its significance weakens, as the number of the contracted boundary layers increases, until the correct phase transition (deep inside the bulk) prevails over the false one. For this purpose, we derive a thermodynamic quantity, the so-called bulk excess free energy, which depends on the contracted boundary layers and memorizes additional boundary effects. In particular, the magnetic field is imposed on the outermost boundary layer. While the boundary magnetic field does not affect the second-order phase transition in the bulk if suppressing all the boundary effects on the hyperbolic lattices, the first-order (discontinuous) phase transition is significantly sensitive to the boundary magnetic field. Contrary to the phase transition on the Euclidean lattices, the discontinuous phase transition on the hyperbolic lattices can be continuously controlled (within a certain temperature coexistence region) by varying the boundary magnetic field.

  13. Controlled topological transitions in thin film phase separation

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, Matthew G; Goriely, Alain; Münch, Andreas; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the evolution of a binary mixture in a thin-film geometry with a wall at the top and bottom is considered. By bringing the mixture into its miscibility gap so that no spinodal decomposition occurs in the bulk, a slight energetic bias of the walls towards each one of the constituents ensures the nucleation of thin boundary layers that grow until the constituents have moved into one of the two layers. These layers are separated by an interfacial region where the composition changes rapidly. Conditions that ensure the separation into two layers with a thin interfacial region are investigated based on a phase-field model. Using matched asymptotic expansions a corresponding sharp-interface problem for the location of the interface is established. It is then argued that this newly created two-layer system is not at its energetic minimum but destabilizes into a controlled self-replicating pattern of trapezoidal vertical stripes by minimizing the interfacial energy between the phases while conserving th...

  14. Controlled Topological Transitions in Thin-Film Phase Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Hennessy, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. In this paper the evolution of a binary mixture in a thin-film geometry with a wall at the top and bottom is considered. By bringing the mixture into its miscibility gap so that no spinodal decomposition occurs in the bulk, a slight energetic bias of the walls toward each one of the constituents ensures the nucleation of thin boundary layers that grow until the constituents have moved into one of the two layers. These layers are separated by an interfacial region where the composition changes rapidly. Conditions that ensure the separation into two layers with a thin interfacial region are investigated based on a phase-field model. Using matched asymptotic expansions a corresponding sharp-interface problem for the location of the interface is established. It is then argued that this newly created two-layer system is not at its energetic minimum but destabilizes into a controlled self-replicating pattern of trapezoidal vertical stripes by minimizing the interfacial energy between the phases while conserving their area. A quantitative analysis of this mechanism is carried out via a thin-film model for the free interfaces, which is derived asymptotically from the sharp-interface model.

  15. Heat transfer, condensation and fog formation in crossflow plastic heat exchangers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, H.J.H.; Geld, van der C.W.M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper heat transfer of air-water-vapour mixtures in plastic crossflow heat exchangers is studied theoretically and experimentally. First, a model for heat transfer without condensation is derived, resulting in a set of classical differential equations. Subsequently, heat transfer with wall c

  16. Study on an Undershot Cross-Flow Water Turbine with Straight Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale hydroelectric power generation has recently attracted considerable attention. The authors previously proposed an undershot cross-flow water turbine with a very low head suitable for application to open channels. The water turbine was of a cross-flow type and could be used in open channels with the undershot method, remarkably simplifying its design by eliminating guide vanes and the casing. The water turbine was fitted with curved blades (such as the runners of a typical cross-flow water turbine installed in tube channels. However, there was ambiguity as to how the blades’ shape influenced the turbine’s performance and flow field. To resolve this issue, the present study applies straight blades to an undershot cross-flow water turbine and examines the performance and flow field via experiments and numerical analyses. Results reveal that the output power and the turbine efficiency of the Straight Blades runner were greater than those of the Curved Blades runner regardless of the rotational speed. Compared with the Curved Blades runner, the output power and the turbine efficiency of the Straight Blades runner were improved by about 31.7% and about 67.1%, respectively.

  17. Removal of Bacillus anthracis sterne spore from commercial unpasteurized liquid egg white using crossflow microfiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current pasteurization technology used by the egg industry is ineffective for destruction of spores such as those of Bacillus anthracis (BA). The validity of a cross-flow microfiltration (MF) process for separation of the attenuated strain of BA (Sterne) spores from commercial unpasteurized liquid ...

  18. A lifting surface computer code with jet-in-crossflow interference effects. Volume 1: Theoretical description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, K. L.; Fearn, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    A method is proposed to combine a numerical description of a jet in a crossflow with a lifting surface panel code to calculate the jet/aerodynamic-surface interference effects on a V/STOL aircraft. An iterative technique is suggested that starts with a model for the properties of a jet/flat plate configuration and modifies these properties based on the flow field calculated for the configuration of interest. The method would estimate the pressures, forces, and moments on an aircraft out of ground effect. A first-order approximation to the method suggested is developed and applied to two simple configurations. The first-order approximation is a noniterative precedure which does not allow for interactions between multiple jets in a crossflow and also does not account for the influence of lifting surfaces on the jet properties. The jet/flat plate model utilized in the examples presented is restricted to a uniform round jet injected perpendicularly into a uniform crossflow for a range of jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios from three to ten.

  19. Unsteady Computations of a Jet in a Crossflow with Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Shishir; Murman, Scott; Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A numerical study of a jet in crossflow with ground effect is conducted using OVERFLOW with dual time-stepping and low Mach number preconditioning. The results of the numerical study are compared to an experiment to show that the numerical methods are capable of capturing the dominant features of the flow field as well as the unsteadiness associated with the ground vortex.

  20. Fish Gill Inspired Crossflow for Efficient and Continuous Collection of Spilled Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yuhai; Tian, Dongliang; Sun, Ziqi; Liu, Qiannan; Zhang, Na; Kim, Jung Ho; Jiang, Lei; Dou, Shi Xue

    2017-01-25

    Developing an effective system to clean up large-scale oil spills is of great significance due to their contribution to severe environmental pollution and destruction. Superwetting membranes have been widely studied for oil/water separation. The separation, however, adopts a gravity-driven approach that is inefficient and discontinuous due to quick fouling of the membrane by oil. Herein, inspired by the crossflow filtration behavior in fish gills, we propose a crossflow approach via a hydrophilic, tilted gradient membrane for spilled oil collection. In crossflow collection, as the oil/water flows parallel to the hydrophilic membrane surface, water is gradually filtered through the pores, while oil is repelled, transported, and finally collected for storage. Owing to the selective gating behavior of the water-sealed gradient membrane, the large pores at the bottom with high water flux favor fast water filtration, while the small pores at the top with strong oil repellency allow easy oil transportation. In addition, the gradient membrane exhibits excellent antifouling properties due to the protection of the water layer. Therefore, this bioinspired crossflow approach enables highly efficient and continuous spilled oil collection, which is very promising for the cleanup of large-scale oil spills.

  1. Cross-flow deep fat frying and its effect on fry quality distribution and mobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, van K.N.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Somsen, D.; Boom, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional industrial frying systems are not optimised towards homogeneous product quality, which is partly related to poor oil distribution across the packed bed of fries. In this study we investigate an alternative frying system with an oil cross-flow from bottom to top through a packed bed o

  2. Heat transfer, condensation and fog formation in crossflow plastic heat exchangers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Jos; van der Geld, C.W.M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper heat transfer of air-water-vapour mixtures in plastic crossflow heat exchangers is studied theoretically and experimentally. First, a model for heat transfer without condensation is derived, resulting in a set of classical differential equations. Subsequently, heat transfer with wall

  3. Mode transition coordinated control for a compound power-split hybrid car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Zhao, Zhiguo; Zhang, Tong; Li, Mengna

    2017-03-01

    With a compound power-split transmission directly connected to the engine in hybrid cars, dramatic fluctuations in engine output torque result in noticeable jerks when the car is in mode transition from electric drive mode to hybrid drive mode. This study designed a mode transition coordinated control strategy, and verified that strategy's effectiveness with both simulations and experiments. Firstly, the mode transition process was analyzed, and ride comfort issues during the mode transition process were demonstrated. Secondly, engine ripple torque was modeled using the measured cylinder pumping pressure when the engine was not in operation. The complete dynamic plant model of the power-split hybrid car was deduced, and its effectiveness was validated by a comparison of experimental and simulation results. Thirdly, a coordinated control strategy was designed to determine the desired engine torque, motor torque, and the moment of fuel injection. Active damping control with two degrees of freedom, based on reference output shaft speed estimation, was designed to mitigate driveline speed oscillations. Carrier torque estimation based on transmission kinematics and dynamics was used to suppress torque disturbance during engine cranking. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed strategy effectively suppressed vehicle jerks and improved ride comfort during mode transition.

  4. EXPERIMENTS ON CAKE DEVELOPMENT IN CROSSFLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.

    2011-04-14

    Crossflow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self cleaning through the action of wall shear stress, which is created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduces permeability. Low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site and the Waste Treatment Plant at the Hanford Site. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date, increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the crossflow filter axial flowrate, which is limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, which is limited by space and increases the required pump load. In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing crossflow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on startup techniques and filter cake development. This paper discusses those filter studies. SRNL set up both dead-end and crossflow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, and filter cleaning. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, which were both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to demonstrate increases in filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions filter flow rates can be increased

  5. Coherent control of a strongly driven silicon vacancy optical transition in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Yu; Li, Ke; Xiong, Qihua; Aharonovich, Igor; Gao, Wei-bo

    2016-01-01

    The ability to prepare, optically read out and coherently control single quantum states is a key requirement for quantum information processing. Optically active solid state emitters have emerged as promising candidates with their prospects for on chip integration as quantum nodes and sources of coherent photons for connecting these nodes. Under strongly driving resonant laser field, such quantum emitter can exhibit quantum behavior such as Autler-Townes splitting and Mollow triplet spectrum. Here we demonstrate coherent control of a strongly driven optical transition in silicon vacancy (SiV) center in diamond. Rapid optical detection of photons enabled the observation of time resolved coherent Rabi oscillations and the Mollow triplet from an optical transition of a single SiV defect. Detection with a probing transition further confirmed Autler-Townes splitting generated by a strong laser field. Coherence time of the emitted photons is shown to be comparable to its lifetime and robust under very strong drivin...

  6. X-33 Attitude Control System Design for Ascent, Transition, and Entry Flight Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Charles E.; Gallaher, Michael W.; Hendrix, Neal D.

    1998-01-01

    The Vehicle Control Systems Team at Marshall Space Flight Center, Systems Dynamics Laboratory, Guidance and Control Systems Division is designing under a cooperative agreement with Lockheed Martin Skunkworks, the Ascent, Transition, and Entry flight attitude control system for the X-33 experimental vehicle. Ascent flight control begins at liftoff and ends at linear aerospike main engine cutoff (NECO) while Transition and Entry flight control begins at MECO and concludes at the terminal area energy management (TAEM) interface. TAEM occurs at approximately Mach 3.0. This task includes not only the design of the vehicle attitude control systems but also the development of requirements for attitude control system components and subsystems. The X-33 attitude control system design is challenged by a short design cycle, the design environment (Mach 0 to about Mach 15), and the X-33 incremental test philosophy. The X-33 design-to-launch cycle of less than 3 years requires a concurrent design approach while the test philosophy requires design adaptation to vehicle variations that are a function of Mach number and mission profile. The flight attitude control system must deal with the mixing of aerosurfaces, reaction control thrusters, and linear aerospike engine control effectors and handle parasitic effects such as vehicle flexibility and propellant sloshing from the uniquely shaped propellant tanks. The attitude control system design is, as usual, closely linked to many other subsystems and must deal with constraints and requirements from these subsystems.

  7. Shock Position Control for Mode Transition in a Turbine Based Combined Cycle Engine Inlet Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    A dual flow-path inlet for a turbine based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion system is to be tested in order to evaluate methodologies for performing a controlled inlet mode transition. Prior to experimental testing, simulation models are used to test, debug, and validate potential control algorithms which are designed to maintain shock position during inlet disturbances. One simulation package being used for testing is the High Mach Transient Engine Cycle Code simulation, known as HiTECC. This paper discusses the development of a mode transition schedule for the HiTECC simulation that is analogous to the development of inlet performance maps. Inlet performance maps, derived through experimental means, describe the performance and operability of the inlet as the splitter closes, switching power production from the turbine engine to the Dual Mode Scram Jet. With knowledge of the operability and performance tradeoffs, a closed loop system can be designed to optimize the performance of the inlet. This paper demonstrates the design of the closed loop control system and benefit with the implementation of a Proportional-Integral controller, an H-Infinity based controller, and a disturbance observer based controller; all of which avoid inlet unstart during a mode transition with a simulated disturbance that would lead to inlet unstart without closed loop control.

  8. Locust Control in Transition: The Loss and Reinvention of Collective Action in Post-Soviet Kazakhstan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toleubayev, K.; Jansen, K.; Huis, van A.

    2007-01-01

    The inability to organize collective action for pest control can lead to severe problems. This paper focuses on the locust management system in Kazakhstan since the formation of the Soviet State. During the Transition Period after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Plant Protection Service disint

  9. Supramolecular control of selectivity in transition metal catalysis: Substrate preorganization & cofactor-steered catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dydio, P.F.

    2013-01-01

    The selectivity displayed by transition metal catalysts is one of the key elements in catalysis, and various tools to control this by ligand modification have been reported. Some selectivity issues are, however, difficult to solve using the traditional methods. Therefore we have an interest in the

  10. Firing Patterns and Transitions in Coupled Neurons Controlled by a Pacemaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei-Sheng; LU Qi-Shao; DUAN Li-Xia; WANG Qing-Yun

    2008-01-01

    @@ To reveal the dynamics of neuronal networks with pacemakers, the firing patterns and their transitions are investigated in a ring HR neuronal network with gap junctions under the control of a pacemaker. Compared with the situation without pacemaker, the neurons in the network can exhibit various firing patterns as the external current is applied or the coupling strength of pacemaker varies. The results are beneficial for understanding the complex cooperative behaviour of large neural assemblies with pacemaker control.

  11. Controlled synthesis of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides: from vertical to planar MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fu; Momeni, Kasra; Abu AlSaud, Mohammed; Azizi, Amin; Hainey, Mel F., Jr.; Redwing, Joan M.; Chen, Long-Qing; Alem, Nasim

    2017-06-01

    Among post-graphene two dimensional (2D) materials, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs, such as MoS2) have attracted significant attention due to their superior properties for potential electronic, optoelectronic and energy applications. Scalable and controllable powder vapor transport (PVT) methods have been developed to synthesize 2D MoS2 with controllable morphologies (i.e. horizontal and vertical), yet the growth mechanism for the transition from horizontal to vertical orientation is not clearly understood. Here, we combined experimental and numerical modeling studies to investigate the key growth parameters that govern the morphology of 2D materials. The transition from vertical to horizontal growth is achieved by controlling the magnitude and distribution of the precursor concentration by placing the substrate at different orientations and locations relative to the source. We have also shown that the density of as-grown nanostructures can be controlled by the local precursor-containing gas flow rate. This study demonstrates the possibility for engineering the morphology of 2D materials by controlling the concentration of precursors and flow profiles, and provides a new path for controllable growth of 2D TMDs for various applications.

  12. Low flow rates and high air throughput: Cross-flow blowers; Niedrige Stroemungsgeschwindigkeiten bei hohem Luftdurchsatz: Querstromventilatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, J. [ebm-papst Landshut GmbH (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Cross-flow blowers are everywhere, in electric towel driers, heaters, night storage heaters, floor heating systems, and open chimneys. With a diameter of only 30 mm, they are compact and effective. (orig.)

  13. Controllable multiple-quantum transitions in a T-shaped small quantum dot-ring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiongwen, E-mail: hnsxw617@163.com [Department of Physics, Huaihua University, Huaihua 418008 (China); Chen, Baoju; Song, Kehui [Department of Physics, Huaihua University, Huaihua 418008 (China); Zhou, Guanghui [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Manipulation (Ministry of Education), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and the slave boson mean field approximation, we investigate the electron transport properties in a small quantum dot (QD)-ring system. Namely, a strongly correlated QD not only attaches directly to two normal metallic electrodes, but also forms a magnetic control Aharonov–Bohm quantum ring with a few noninteracting QDs. We show that the parity effect, the Kondo effect, and the multiple Fano effects coexist in our system. Moreover, the parities, defined by the odd- and even-numbered energy levels in this system, can be switched by adjusting magnetic flux phase ϕ located at the center of the quantum ring, which induces multiple controllable Fano-interference energy pathways. Therefore, the constructive and destructive multi-Fano interference transition, the Kondo and Fano resonance transition at the Fermi level, the Fano resonance and ani-resonance transition are realized in the even parity system. They can also be observed in the odd parity system when one adjusts the phase ϕ and the gate voltage V{sub g} applied to the noninteracting QDs. The multi-quantum transitions determine some interesting transport properties such as the current switch and its multi-flatsteps, the differential conductance switch at zero bias voltage and its oscillation or quantization at the low bias voltage. These results may be useful for the observation of multiple quantum effect interplays experimentally and the design of controllable QD-based device.

  14. Controllable multiple-quantum transitions in a T-shaped small quantum dot-ring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiongwen; Chen, Baoju; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-05-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and the slave boson mean field approximation, we investigate the electron transport properties in a small quantum dot (QD)-ring system. Namely, a strongly correlated QD not only attaches directly to two normal metallic electrodes, but also forms a magnetic control Aharonov-Bohm quantum ring with a few noninteracting QDs. We show that the parity effect, the Kondo effect, and the multiple Fano effects coexist in our system. Moreover, the parities, defined by the odd- and even-numbered energy levels in this system, can be switched by adjusting magnetic flux phase ϕ located at the center of the quantum ring, which induces multiple controllable Fano-interference energy pathways. Therefore, the constructive and destructive multi-Fano interference transition, the Kondo and Fano resonance transition at the Fermi level, the Fano resonance and ani-resonance transition are realized in the even parity system. They can also be observed in the odd parity system when one adjusts the phase ϕ and the gate voltage Vg applied to the noninteracting QDs. The multi-quantum transitions determine some interesting transport properties such as the current switch and its multi-flatsteps, the differential conductance switch at zero bias voltage and its oscillation or quantization at the low bias voltage. These results may be useful for the observation of multiple quantum effect interplays experimentally and the design of controllable QD-based device.

  15. Peclet number analysis of cross-flow in porous gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, P V; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2016-10-01

    Adoption of hydrogen economy by means of using hydrogen fuel cells is one possible solution for energy crisis and climate change issues. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is an important type of fuel cells, suffers from the problem of water management. Cross-flow is induced in some flow field designs to enhance the water removal. The presence of cross-flow in the serpentine and interdigitated flow fields makes them more effective in proper distribution of the reactants on the reaction layer and evacuation of water from the reaction layer than diffusion-based conventional parallel flow fields. However, too much of cross-flow leads to flow maldistribution in the channels, higher pressure drop, and membrane dehydration. In this study, an attempt has been made to quantify the amount of cross-flow required for effective distribution of reactants and removal of water in the gas diffusion layer. Unit cells containing two adjacent channels with gas diffusion layer (GDL) and catalyst layer at the bottom have been considered for the parallel, interdigitated, and serpentine flow patterns. Computational fluid dynamics-based simulations are carried out to study the reactant transport in under-the-rib area with cross-flow in the GDL. A new criterion based on the Peclet number is presented as a quantitative measure of cross-flow in the GDL. The study shows that a cross-flow Peclet number of the order of 2 is required for effective removal of water from the GDL. Estimates show that this much of cross-flow is not usually produced in the U-bends of Serpentine flow fields, making these areas prone to flooding.

  16. Perspective on traffic control: Aspects of freeway control, intersection control and the control of transit flow in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakkesteegt, P.

    1988-01-01

    Paper presented at the 1988 TRB Annual Meeting, Washington D.C., USA. The first part of this paper deals with the control and signalling system for motorways, directed to a more efficient use of available road capacity and to the improvement of road safety. The second part gives some insight into th

  17. Voltage-controllable colossal magnetocrystalline anisotropy in single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xuelei; Hu, Tao; Wang, Jianfeng; Gu, Bing-Lin; Duan, Wenhui; Miao, Mao-sheng

    2017-07-01

    Materials with large magnetocrystalline anisotropy and strong electric field effects are highly needed to develop new types of memory devices based on electric field control of spin orientations. Instead of using modified transition metal films, we propose that certain monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are the ideal candidate materials for this purpose. Using density functional calculations, we show that they exhibit not only a large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA), but also colossal voltage modulation under an external field. Notably, in some materials such as CrSe2 and FeSe2, where spins show a strong preference for in-plane orientation, they can be switched to an out-of-plane direction. This effect is attributed to the large band character alteration that the transition metal d states undergo around the Fermi energy due to the electric field. We further demonstrate that strain can also greatly change MCA, and can help to improve the modulation efficiency when combined with an electric field.

  18. Detecting the Evolution of Deliberate Fertility Control before the Demographic Transition in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaksandr Amialchuk

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pervious literature has established the existence of deliberate non-parity-specific fertility control in pre-transitional populations. However, less focus has been given to the timing of its onset. In addition, previous studies focused on the changes in fertility in response to the local prices of grains, which may be endogenous. OBJECTIVE This paper studies the emergence and evolution of deliberate fertility control by investigating the link between child mortality and economic stress on the one hand and non-parity-specific birth control on the other, in historic German villages between 1700 and 1900. METHODS Birth histories from fourteen German villages (1700-1900 and rye price series are used in a micro-level event history analysis. The fertility response of second and higher-order births to the mortality of children over age two and exogenous fluctuations in rye price are used as measures of the extent of deliberate non-parity-specific birth control. RESULTS Over the course of the demographic transition, the effect of the death of children generally increases after controlling for the effect of the death of children less than two years old. The negative fertility response to high rye prices before and in the year immediately following the price change occurred only after 1800. CONCLUSIONS The replacement and insurance effects associated with child mortality generally increased before the demographic transition. The emergence of the negative effect of high rye prices on fertility after 1800 further supports the presence and evolution of deliberate non-parity-specific fertility control before the demographic transition.

  19. Electrochemical control of the phase transition of ultrathin FeRh films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, M.; Chen, X. Z.; Zhou, X. J.; Cui, B.; Yan, Y. N.; Wu, H. Q.; Pan, F.; Song, C.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the electrical manipulation of the phase transition in ultrathin FeRh films through a combination of ionic liquid and oxide gating. The 5 nm-thick FeRh films show an antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transition at around 275 K with in-plane magnetic field of 70 kOe. A negative gate voltage seriously suppresses the transition temperature to ˜248 K, while a positive gate voltage does the opposite but with a smaller tuning amplitude. The formation of electric double layer associated with a large electric field induces the migration of oxygen ions between the oxide gate and the FeRh layer, producing the variation of Fe moments in antiferromagnetic FeRh accompanied by the modulation of the transition temperature. Such a modulation only occurs within several nanometers thick scale in the vicinity of FeRh surface. The reversible control of FeRh phase transition by electric field might pave the way for non-volatile memories with low power consumption.

  20. Some Insights on Roughness Induced Transition and Control from DNS and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Ibitayo, Ifeoluwa; Goldstein, David; Brown, Garry

    2016-11-01

    We study the receptivity and subsequent evolution of an initially laminar flat boundary layer on a flat plate to single and multiple discrete roughness elements (DRE) using a combination of immersed boundary DNS and water channel flow visualization experiments. We examine the transition caused by a single DRE and demonstrate the possibility of suppressing it by an appropriately designed second DRE in both DNS and experiments. The different phases of transition are identified and the roles of Reynolds numbers based on roughness height and boundary layer thickness are investigated. The underlying mechanisms in the observed transition and its control are understood by examining detailed vorticity flux balances. Connections are also made to recent developments in transient growth and streak instability. A unified picture is sought from a parametric study of different DRE dimensions and orientations. The potential applicability of the observations and understanding derived from this study to controlling transition caused by design and environmental roughness over aircraft wings is discussed. Supported by AFOSR # FA9550-15-1-0345.

  1. A pilot randomized control trial: testing a transitional care model for acute psychiatric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Nancy P; Solomon, Phyllis; Hurford, Matthew O

    2014-01-01

    People with multiple and persistent mental and physical health problems have high rates of transition failures when transferring from a hospital level of care to home. The transitional care model (TCM) is evidence-based and demonstrated to improve posthospital outcomes for elderly with physical health conditions, but it has not been studied in the population with serious mental illness. Using a randomized controlled design, 40 inpatients from two general hospital psychiatric units were recruited and randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 20) that received the TCM intervention that was delivered by a psychiatric nurse practitioner for 90 days posthospitalization, or a control group (n = 20) that received usual care. Outcomes were as follows: service utilization, health-related quality of life, and continuity of care. The intervention group showed higher medical and psychiatric rehospitalization than the control group (p = .054). Emergency room use was lower for intervention group but not statistically significant. Continuity of care with primary care appointments were significantly higher for the intervention group (p = .023). The intervention group's general health improved but was not statistically significant compared with controls. A transitional care intervention is recommended; however, the model needs to be modified from a single nurse to a multidisciplinary team with expertise from a psychiatric nurse practitioner, a social worker, and a peer support specialist. A team approach can best manage the complex physical/mental health conditions and complicated social needs of the population with serious mental illness. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Advanced Shock Position Control for Mode Transition in a Turbine Based Combined Cycle Engine Inlet Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    A dual flow-path inlet system is being tested to evaluate methodologies for a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system to perform a controlled inlet mode transition. Prior to experimental testing, simulation models are used to test, debug, and validate potential control algorithms. One simulation package being used for testing is the High Mach Transient Engine Cycle Code simulation, known as HiTECC. This paper discusses the closed loop control system, which utilizes a shock location sensor to improve inlet performance and operability. Even though the shock location feedback has a coarse resolution, the feedback allows for a reduction in steady state error and, in some cases, better performance than with previous proposed pressure ratio based methods. This paper demonstrates the design and benefit with the implementation of a proportional-integral controller, an H-Infinity based controller, and a disturbance observer based controller.

  3. Analysis of Control Characteristic for the Drive System of Electric Transit Bus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张承宁; 李红林; 孙逢春; 张旺

    2003-01-01

    The drive control system of the permanent magnetic direct current motor with the enhanced magnetism windings used in the electric transit bus is developed. The mathematics model of the drive control system for this motor is established. The new mode that the added-exiting magnetism field could be weakened and the speed of the motor could be controlled automatically is proposed and realized. The method of root locus design is applied to analyze the acceleration control characteristic. The results of simulation show that the new drive motor control system has extraordinary response characteristic and adjustable performance. Experiments of vehicle running show that the drive control system's antijamming ability is strong and the adjustable performance is fast and smooth, it can meet the demand of power characteristic very well.

  4. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  5. AN INVESTIGATION OF TURBULENT RECTANGULAR JET DISCHARGED INTO A NARROW CHANNEL WEAK CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PATHAK Manabendra; DASS Anoop K; DEWAN Anupam

    2008-01-01

    A computational investigation of the mean flow field of turbulent rectangular jets issuing into a narrow channel crossflow is presented. The length of the jet slot spans more than 55% of the crossflow channel bed, leaving a small clearance between the jet edge and sidewalls. A finite volume code employing the standard k-e model is used to predict the mean, three-dimensional flow field. The mean flow field is investigated for two velocity ratios (6 and 9). Important flow features, such as the formation of different vortical structures and their characteristics owing to different values of the velocity ratio, are discussed. Some predicted results are compared with the experimental data reported in the literature. The predicted mean and turbulent flow properties are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Cross-flow deep fat frying and its effect on fry quality distribution and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Koerten, K N; Schutyser, M A I; Somsen, D; Boom, R M

    2016-04-01

    Conventional industrial frying systems are not optimised towards homogeneous product quality, which is partly related to poor oil distribution across the packed bed of fries. In this study we investigate an alternative frying system with an oil cross-flow from bottom to top through a packed bed of fries. Fluidization of rectangular fries during frying was characterised with a modified Ergun equation. Mixing was visualized by using two coloured layers of fries and quantified in terms of mixing entropy. Smaller fries mixed quickly during frying, while longer fries exhibited much less mixing, which was attributed to the higher minimum fluidization velocity and slower dehydration for longer fries. The cross-flow velocity was found an important parameter for the homogeneity of the moisture content of fries. Increased oil velocities positively affected moisture distribution due to a higher oil refresh rate. However, inducing fluidization caused the moisture distribution to become unpredictable due to bed instabilities.

  7. Modal and nonmodal stability analysis of electrohydrodynamic flow with and without cross-flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Mengqi; Wu, Jian; Schmid, Peter J; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a complete modal and nonmodal linear stability analysis of the electrohydrodynamic flow (EHD) for the problem of electroconvection in the strong injection region. Convective cells are formed by Coulomb force in an insulating liquid residing between two plane electrodes subject to unipolar injection. Besides pure electroconvection, we also consider the case where a cross-flow is present, generated by a streamwise pressure gradient, in the form of a laminar Poiseuille flow. The effect of charge diffusion, often neglected in previous linear stability analyses, is included in the present study and a transient growth analysis, rarely considered in EHD, is carried out. In the case without cross-flow, a non-zero charge diffusion leads to a lower linear stability threshold and thus to a more unstable low. The transient growth, though enhanced by increasing charge diffusion, remains small and hence cannot fully account for the discrepancy of the linear stability threshold between theoretical a...

  8. Modeling of concentration polarization in a reverse osmosis channel with parabolic crossflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cui; Morse, Audra; Rainwater, Ken; Song, Lianfa

    2014-01-01

    Concentration polarization in narrow reverse osmosis channels with parabolic crossflow was numerically simulated with finite different equations related to permeate velocity, crossflow velocity, average salt concentration, and wall salt concentration. A significant new theoretical development was the determination of two correction functions, F2 and F3, in the governing equation for average salt concentration. Simulations of concentration polarization under various conditions were then presented to describe the features of the new model as well as discussions about the differences of concentration polarizations of the more realistic parabolic flow with those when plug flow or shear flow was assumed. The situations in which the simpler models based on shear or plug flow can be used were indicated. Concentration polarization was also simulated for various conditions to show the applicability of the model and general features of concentration polarization in a narrow, long reverse osmosis channel.

  9. THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF A CROSS-FLOW HEAT EXCHANGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tuğrul OĞULATA

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cross-flow plate type heat exchanger has been investigated because of its effective use in waste heat recovery systems. For this purpose, a heat regain system has been investigated and manufactured in laboratory conditions. Manufactured heat exchanger has been tested with an applicable experimental set up and temperatures, velocity of the air and the pressure losses occuring in the system have been measured and the efficiency of the system has been determined. The irreversibility of heat exchanger has been taken into consideration while the design of heat exchanger is being performed. So minimum entropy generation number has been analysied with respect to second law of thermodynamics in cross-flow heat exchanger. The minimum entropy generation number depends on parameters called optimum flow path length, dimensionless mass velocity and dimensionless heat transfer area. Variations of entropy generation number with these parameters have been analysied and introduced their graphics with their comments.

  10. Web Design Based on Integrated and Supervision Control System in City Rail Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Xing, Yu; Zheng, Hengchao

    This paper presents a method of setting up WEB System to Integrated Supervision Control System for the requirements of city Rail Transit. First, basic platform and software/hardware architecture of WEB System are discussed. Then the function module, data flow and communication mechanisms are described and a design based on technologies of SVG and Ajax is proposed and the WEB video release function and system security are described. This design makes it possible that important information of Integrated Supervision Control System can be browsed and queried in external Web pages. Watching Real-time images of all cameras in internal network of Rail Transit is possible, which is providing remote viewing and management functions for metro managers.

  11. Nonlinear optimal control of bypass transition in a boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dandan; Papadakis, George

    2017-05-01

    The central aim of the paper is to apply and assess a nonlinear optimal control strategy to suppress bypass transition, due to bimodal interactions [T. A. Zaki and P. A. Durbin, "Mode interaction and the bypass route to transition," J. Fluid Mech. 531, 85 (2005)] in a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. To this end, a Lagrange variational formulation is employed that results in a set of adjoint equations. The optimal wall actuation (blowing and suction from a control slot) is found by solving iteratively the nonlinear Navier-Stokes and the adjoint equations in a forward/backward loop using direct numerical simulation. The optimization is performed in a finite time horizon. Large values of optimization horizon result in the instability of the adjoint equations. The control slot is located exactly in the region of transition. The results show that the control is able to significantly reduce the objective function, which is defined as the spatial and temporal integral of the quadratic deviation from the Blasius profile plus a term that quantifies the control cost. The physical mechanism with which the actuation interacts with the flow field is investigated and analysed in relation to the objective function employed. Examination of the joint probability density function shows that the control velocity is correlated with the streamwise velocity in the near wall region but this correlation is reduced as time elapses. The spanwise averaged velocity is distorted by the control action, resulting in a significant reduction of the skin friction coefficient. Results are presented with and without zero-net mass flow constraint of the actuation velocity. The skin friction coefficient drops below the laminar value if there is no mass constraint; it remains however larger than laminar when this constraint is imposed. Results are also compared with uniform blowing using the same time-average velocity obtained from the nonlinear optimal algorithm.

  12. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  13. Shape optimization of multi-chamber cross-flow mufflers by SA optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Min-Chie; Chang, Ying-Chun

    2008-05-01

    It is essential when searching for an efficient acoustical mechanism to have an optimally shaped muffler designed specially for the constrained space found in today's plants. Because the research work of optimally shaped straight silencers in conjunction with multi-chamber cross-flow perforated ducts is rarely addressed, this paper will not only analyze the sound transmission loss (STL) of three kinds of cross-flow perforated mufflers but also will analyze the optimal design shape within a limited space. In this paper, the four-pole system matrix used in evaluating acoustic performance is derived by using the decoupled numerical method. Moreover, a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, a robust scheme in searching for the global optimum by imitating the softening process of metal, has been adopted during shape optimization. To reassure SA's correctness, the STL's maximization of three kinds of muffles with respect to one-tone and dual-tone noise is exemplified. Furthermore, the optimization of mufflers with respect to an octave-band fan noise by the simulated algorithm has been introduced and fully discussed. Before the SA operation can be carried out, an accuracy check of the mathematical model with respect to cross-flow perforated mufflers has to be performed by Munjal's analytical data and experimental data. The optimal result in eliminating broadband noise reveals that the cross-flow perforated muffler with more chambers is far superior at noise reduction than a muffler with fewer chambers. Consequently, the approach used for the optimal design of noise elimination proposed in this study is certainly easy and efficient.

  14. A Model for Transport Phenomena in a Cross-Flow Ultrafiltration Module with Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Yoshikawa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross-flow ultrafiltration of macromolecular solutions in a module with microchannels is expected to have the advantages of fast diffusion from the membrane surface and a high ratio of membrane surface area to feed liquid volume. Cross-flow ultrafiltration modules with microchannels are expected to be used for separation and refining and as membrane reactors in microchemical processes. Though these modules can be applied as a separator connected with a micro-channel reactor or a membrane reactor, there have been few papers on their performance. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between operational conditions and performance of cross-flow ultrafiltration devices with microchannels. In this study, Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone (PVP aqueous solution was used as a model solute of macromolecules such as enzymes. Cross-flow ultrafiltration experiments were carried out under constant pressure conditions, varying other operational conditions. The permeate flux decreased in the beginning of each experiment. After enough time passed, the permeate flux reached a constant value. The performance of the module was discussed based on the constant values of the flux. It was observed that the permeate flux increased with increasing transmembrane pressure (TMP and feed flow rate, and decreased with an increase of feed liquid concentration. A model of the transport phenomena in the feed liquid side channel and the permeation through the membrane was developed based on the concentration and velocity distributions in the feed side channel. The experimental results were compared with those based on the model and the performance of the ultrafiltration module is discussed.

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A HORIZONTAL MOMENTUM JET IN CROSS-FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The mixing characteristics of a Horizontal Momentum Jet in Cross-flow (HMJC) were investigated using the CFD code Fluent. The realizable k-ε model was employed for turbulent closure of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The computed results, including concentration field and velocity field, agree well with the relations of dimensional analysis, as well as the experimental results by Sherif and Pletcher, Ali and Yu et al.

  16. The transition from construction to operations on the ALMA control software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Ralph; Hiriart, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a set of 66 millimeter wave antenna in the Andes in Northern Chile. All antennas are connected and operate as an interferometer making ALMA the most powerful millimeter telescope in the world. In 2013 ALMA formally marked the end of construction and the beginning of operations. This paper will focus on the impact, on the ALMA control software, of this transition from construction to operations.

  17. DC Voltage Control Strategy for CHB-STATCOM during Capacitive-Inductive Load Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuation of DC capacitor voltage of CHC-STATCOM(Cascaded H-Bridge Converter Based STATCOM during capacitive-inductive load transition affects the dynamic response of the equipment and, with combination of other factors like of the switching devices, can degrade the stability of the equipment. This paper illustrates the cause ofthe voltage fluctuation and proposes a novel and practical control strategy to suppress it. A simulation was conducted to testify its effectiveness.

  18. Effects of running with backpack loads during simulated gravitational transitions: Improvements in postural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jeffrey David

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is planning for long-duration manned missions to the Moon and Mars. For feasible long-duration space travel, improvements in exercise countermeasures are necessary to maintain cardiovascular fitness, bone mass throughout the body and the ability to perform coordinated movements in a constant gravitational environment that is six orders of magnitude higher than the "near weightlessness" condition experienced during transit to and/or orbit of the Moon, Mars, and Earth. In such gravitational transitions feedback and feedforward postural control strategies must be recalibrated to ensure optimal locomotion performance. In order to investigate methods of improving postural control adaptation during these gravitational transitions, a treadmill based precision stepping task was developed to reveal changes in neuromuscular control of locomotion following both simulated partial gravity exposure and post-simulation exercise countermeasures designed to speed lower extremity impedance adjustment mechanisms. The exercise countermeasures included a short period of running with or without backpack loads immediately after partial gravity running. A novel suspension type partial gravity simulator incorporating spring balancers and a motor-driven treadmill was developed to facilitate body weight off loading and various gait patterns in both simulated partial and full gravitational environments. Studies have provided evidence that suggests: the environmental simulator constructed for this thesis effort does induce locomotor adaptations following partial gravity running; the precision stepping task may be a helpful test for illuminating these adaptations; and musculoskeletal loading in the form of running with or without backpack loads may improve the locomotor adaptation process.

  19. Numerical well testing interpretation model and applications in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyang; Guo, Hui; He, Youwei; Xu, Hainan; Li, Lei; Zhang, Tiantian; Xian, Bo; Du, Song; Cheng, Shiqing

    2014-01-01

    This work presents numerical well testing interpretation model and analysis techniques to evaluate formation by using pressure transient data acquired with logging tools in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. A well testing model is established based on rheology experiments and by considering shear, diffusion, convection, inaccessible pore volume (IPV), permeability reduction, wellbore storage effect, and skin factors. The type curves were then developed based on this model, and parameter sensitivity is analyzed. Our research shows that the type curves have five segments with different flow status: (I) wellbore storage section, (II) intermediate flow section (transient section), (III) mid-radial flow section, (IV) crossflow section (from low permeability layer to high permeability layer), and (V) systematic radial flow section. The polymer flooding field tests prove that our model can accurately determine formation parameters in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. Moreover, formation damage caused by polymer flooding can also be evaluated by comparison of the interpreted permeability with initial layered permeability before polymer flooding. Comparison of the analysis of numerical solution based on flow mechanism with observed polymer flooding field test data highlights the potential for the application of this interpretation method in formation evaluation and enhanced oil recovery (EOR).

  20. Numerical Well Testing Interpretation Model and Applications in Crossflow Double-Layer Reservoirs by Polymer Flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents numerical well testing interpretation model and analysis techniques to evaluate formation by using pressure transient data acquired with logging tools in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. A well testing model is established based on rheology experiments and by considering shear, diffusion, convection, inaccessible pore volume (IPV, permeability reduction, wellbore storage effect, and skin factors. The type curves were then developed based on this model, and parameter sensitivity is analyzed. Our research shows that the type curves have five segments with different flow status: (I wellbore storage section, (II intermediate flow section (transient section, (III mid-radial flow section, (IV crossflow section (from low permeability layer to high permeability layer, and (V systematic radial flow section. The polymer flooding field tests prove that our model can accurately determine formation parameters in crossflow double-layer reservoirs by polymer flooding. Moreover, formation damage caused by polymer flooding can also be evaluated by comparison of the interpreted permeability with initial layered permeability before polymer flooding. Comparison of the analysis of numerical solution based on flow mechanism with observed polymer flooding field test data highlights the potential for the application of this interpretation method in formation evaluation and enhanced oil recovery (EOR.

  1. An Interactive Microsoft(registered tm) Excel Program for Tracking a Single Evaporating Droplet in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Marek, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    Droplet interaction with a high temperature gaseous crossflow is important because of its wide application in systems involving two phase mixing such as in combustion requiring quick mixing of fuel and air with the reduction of pollutants and for jet mixing in the dilution zone of combustors. Therefore, the focus of this work is to investigate dispersion of a two-dimensional atomized and evaporating spray jet into a two-dimensional crossflow. An interactive Microsoft Excel program for tracking a single droplet in crossflow that has previously been developed will be modified to include droplet evaporation computation. In addition to the high velocity airflow, the injected droplets are also subjected to combustor temperature and pressure that affect their motion in the flow field. Six ordinary differential equations are then solved by 4th-order Runge-Kutta method using Microsoft Excel software. Microsoft Visual Basic programming and Microsoft Excel macrocode are used to produce the data and plot graphs describing the droplet's motion in the flow field. This program computes and plots the data sequentially without forcing the user to open other types of plotting programs. A user's manual on how to use the program is included.

  2. Numerical Study of Crossflow Enhanced Microfiltration of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid; Priezjev, Nikolai; Tarabara, Volodymyr

    2012-11-01

    The effective separation of dilute oil-in-water mixtures involves high flux of water through a porous membrane while maintaining high rejection rate of the oil phase. In this study, the effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity on rejection of oil droplets and thin oil films by pores of different cross-section are investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that the presence of crossflow increases the efficiency of microfiltration by sweeping the dispersed phase away from the pore entrance at the membrane surface and thus enhancing overall water flux. With further increasing crossflow velocity, however, the shape of the droplet becomes strongly deformed near the pore entrance; and, at sufficiently high transmembrane pressures, the droplet breaks up into two fragments, one of which penetrates into the pore. The dynamics of an oil droplet near the pore entrance and the critical pressure of permeation are studied as a function of the oil viscosity, ratio of drop to pore radii, surface tension, and contact angle.

  3. Ignition, Flame Structure and Near-Wall Burning in Transverse Hydrogen Jets in Supersonic Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Mirko; Godfrey Mungal, M.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2010-11-01

    The work aims at investigating near-wall ignition and flame structure in transverse underexpanded hydrogen jets in high-enthalpy supersonic crossflows generated in an expansion tube. Crossflow conditions are held fixed at M=2.4, p=40 kPa and T 1400 K, while jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios J in the range 0.3-5.0 are considered. Schlieren and OH^* chemiluminescence imaging are used to characterize flow structure, ignition and flame penetration, while the instantaneous reaction zone is identified with planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH on side- and plan-view planes. The upstream separation length is found to scale as J^0.44D (D jet diameter). Similarly, the ignition point xig strongly depends on J: xig tends to a limiting value of ˜22D as J->0, and the flame is anchored in the upstream recirculation region and lee-side of the jet for J>3. Flame penetration is well described by the traditional form k(x/DJ)^m where both k and m are found to depend on J but these parameters reach a limiting value of k 1 and m 0.3 for J>2. The roles of the unsteady bow shock, the separation and recirculation regions on the near-wall ignition, stabilization and mixing at large J are discussed.

  4. Cross-flow turbines: progress report on physical and numerical model studies at large laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, Martin; Bachant, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) applications. A research focus is on accurately predicting device performance and wake evolution to improve turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction. Experiments were carried with large laboratory-scale cross-flow turbines D O (1 m) using a turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. Several turbines of varying solidity were employed, including the UNH Reference Vertical Axis Turbine (RVAT) and a 1:6 scale model of the DOE-Sandia Reference Model 2 (RM2) turbine. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of cross-flow turbines and compared with experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Supported by NSF-CBET Grant 1150797, Sandia National Laboratories.

  5. Large-eddy simulations and vortex structures of turbulent jets in crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using the method of large-eddy simulation, the 3-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow with stream-wise and transverse arrangements of nozzle are simulated, emphasizing on the dynamical process of generation and evolution of vortex structures in these flows. The results show that the basic vortex structures in literatures, such as the counter-rotating vortex pair, leading-edge vortices, lee-side vortices, hanging vortices, kidney vortices and anti-kidney vortices, are not independent physical substances, but local structures of the basic vortex structure of turbulent jets in crossflow-the 3-D stretching vortex rings originating from the orifice of the nozzle, which is discovered in this study. Therefore, the most important large-scale structures of turbulent jets in crossflow are unified to the 3-D vortex rings which stretch and twist in stream-wise and swing in transverse directions. We also found that the shedding frequencies of vortex rings are much lower than the one corresponding to the appearance of leading-edge and lee-side vortices in the turbulent jets.

  6. Large-eddy simulations and vortex structures of turbulent jets in crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hui; WU ChuiJie

    2007-01-01

    Using the method of large-eddy simulation,the 3-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow with stream-wise and transverse arrangements of nozzle are simulated,emphasizing on the dynamical process of generation and evolution of vortex structures in these flows.The results show that the basic vortex structures in literatures,such as the counter-rotating vortex pair,leading-edge vortices,lee-side vortices,hanging vortices,kidney vortices and anti-kidney vortices,are not independent physical substances,but local structures of the basic vortex structure of turbulent jets in crossflow-the 3-D stretching vortex rings originating from the orifice of the nozzle,which is discovered in this study.Therefore,the most important large-scale structures of turbulent jets in crossflow are unified to the 3-D vortex rings which stretch and twist in stream-wise and swing in transverse directions.We also found that the shedding frequencies of vortex rings are much lower than the one corresponding to the appearance of leading-edge and lee-side vortices in the turbulent jets.

  7. Air-bubbling, hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, K; Sode, K; Karube, I

    1990-05-01

    Continuous asymmetric reduction of dyhydrooxoisophorone (DOIP) to 4-hydroxy-2,2,6-trimethylcyclo-hexanone (4-HTMCH) was achieved by a thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NK86-0151. Three reactors were used: an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration, an air-lift reactor, and a CSTR with PAA immobilized cells. The maximum cell concentration of 11.1 g dry wt L(-1) was obtained in an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor, while in the other reactors the cell densities were between 3.5 and 4.1 g dry wt L(-1) The optimum bleed ratio was 0.1 at the dilution rate 0.3 h(-1) in the hollow-fiber reactor. The highest viable cell concentration was maintained in the dilution range of 0.4-0.7 h(-1) by a combination of proper cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration. The maximum volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH reached 826 mg L(-1) h(-1) at the dilution rate 0.54 h(-1). This value was 4 and 2 times higher than those in the air-lift reactor and CSTR, respectively. The increasing viable cell concentration increased the volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH. A cell free product solution was continuously obtained by cross-flow filtration.

  8. Numerical experiments on transition control in wall-bounded shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biringen, S.; Caruso, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a numerical simulation of transition control in plane channel and boundary layer flows. The analysis is based on a pseudo-spectral/finite difference semi-implicit solution procedure employed to numerically integrate the time-dependent, three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a doubly periodic domain. In the channel flow, it was found that the active periodic suction/blowing method was effective in controlling strongly three-dimensional disturbances. In the boundary layer, the preliminary analysis indicated that in the early stages, passive control by suction is as effective as active control to suppress instabilities. The current work is focused on a detailed comparison of active and passive control by suction/blowing in the boundary layer.

  9. Locust Control in Transition: The Loss and Reinvention of Collective Action in Post-Soviet Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazbek Toleubayev

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The inability to organize collective action for pest control can lead to severe problems. This paper focuses on the locust management system in Kazakhstan since the formation of the Soviet State. During the Transition Period after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Plant Protection Service disintegrated. The principles of central planning were replaced with individualistic approaches with little state involvement in pest control activities or pesticide regulation. The financial and ideological reasons for dismantling the existing pest control system did not recognize the potential impact that policy-induced changes in agro-ecological conditions and control practices would have on pest development. Nature hit back at the induced institutional change that occurred in the Kazakh pest control system: an extremely harmful locust plague took the country by surprise between 1998 and 2001. This paper examines from an interdisciplinary perspective the co-evolution of locust populations, land use systems, knowledge about locusts, campaigns against them, and institutions in Soviet times and in the Transition Period. It argues the need for collective action theory to extend its present focus from local level institutions for resource management to higher level social-technical systems.

  10. Magnetic self-assembly of microparticle clusters in an aqueous two-phase microfluidic cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Niki; Jones, Steven G.; Moon, Byeong-Ui; Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2015-11-01

    We present a technique that self-assembles paramagnetic microparticles on the interface of aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) fluids in a microfluidic cross-flow. A co-flow of the ATPS is formed in the microfluidic cross channel as the flows of a dilute dextran (DEX) phase, along with a flow-focused particle suspension, converges with a dilute polyethylene glycol (PEG) phase. The microparticles arrive at the liquid-liquid interface and self-assemble into particle clusters due to forces on the particles from an applied external magnetic field gradient, and the interfacial tension of the ATPS. The microparticles form clusters at the interface, and once the cluster size grows to a critical value, the cluster passes through the interface. We control the size of the self-assembled clusters, as they pass through the interface, by varying the strength of the applied magnetic field gradient and the ATPS interfacial tension. We observe rich assembly dynamics, from the formation of Pickering emulsions to clusters that are completely encapsulated inside DEX phase droplets. We anticipate that this microparticle self-assembly method may have important biotechnological applications that require the controlled assembly of cells into clusters.

  11. Winter to Spring Transition in Europe 48-45 degrees N: From Temperature Control by Advection to Control by Insolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Ardizzone, J.; Atlas, R.; Hu, H.; Jusem, J. C.; Starr, D.

    1999-01-01

    As established in previous studies, and analyzed further herein for the years 1988-1998, warm advection from the North Atlantic is the predominant control of the surface-air temperature in northern-latitude Europe in late winter. This thesis is supported by the substantial correlation Cti between the speed of the southwesterly surface winds over the eastern North Atlantic, as quantified by a specific Index Ina, and the 2-meter level temperature Ts over central Europe (48-54 deg N; 5-25 deg E), for January, February and early March. In mid-March and subsequently, the correlation Cti drops drastically (quite often it is negative). The change in the relationship between Ts and Ina marks a transition in the control of the surface-air temperature. As (a) the sun rises higher in the sky, (b) the snows melt (the surface absorptivity can increase by a factor of 3.0), (c) the ocean-surface winds weaken, and (d) the temperature difference between land and ocean (which we analyze) becomes small, absorption of insolation replaces the warm advection as the dominant control of the continental temperature. We define the onset of spring by this transition, which evaluated for the period of our study occurs at pentad 16 (Julian Date 76, that is, March 16). The control by insolation means that the surface is cooler under cloudy conditions than under clear skies. This control produces a much smaller interannual variability of the surface temperature and of the lapse rate than prevailing in winter, when the control is by advection. Regional climatic data would be of greatest value for agriculture and forestry if compiled for well-defined seasons. For continental northern latitudes, analysis presented here of factors controlling the surface temperature appears an appropriate tool for this task.

  12. Transitional care for the highest risk patients: findings of a randomised control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Hock Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interventions to prevent readmissions of patients at highest risk have not been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a randomised controlled trial to determine if a post-discharge transitional care programme can reduce readmissions of such patients in Singapore.Methods: We randomised 840 patients with two or more unscheduled readmissions in the prior 90 days and Length of stay, Acuity of admission, Comorbidity of patient, Emergency department utilisation score ≥10 to the intervention programme (n = 419 or control (n = 421. Patients allocated to the intervention group received post-discharge surveillance by a multidisciplinary integrated care team and early review in the clinic. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with at least one unscheduled readmission within 30 days after discharge.Results: We found no statistically significant reduction in readmissions or emergency department visits in patients on the intervention group compared to usual care. However, patients in the intervention group reported greater patient satisfaction (p < 0.001.Conclusion: Any beneficial effect of interventions initiated after discharge is small for high-risk patients with multiple comorbidity and complex care needs. Future transitional care interventions should focus on providing the entire cycle of care for such patients starting from time of admission to final transition to the primary care setting.Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov, no NCT02325752

  13. Molecular wave-packet dynamics on laser-controlled transition states

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Andreas; Cörlin, Philipp; Sperl, Alexander; Schönwald, Michael; Mizuno, Tomoya; Sansone, Giuseppe; Senftleben, Arne; Ullrich, Joachim; Feuerstein, Bernold; Pfeifer, Thomas; Moshammer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling the electronic as well as ro-vibrational motion and, thus, the entire chemical dynamics in molecules is the ultimate goal of ultrafast laser and imaging science. In photochemistry, laser-induced dissociation has become a valuable tool for modification and control of reaction pathways and kinetics. Here, we present a pump-probe study of the dissociation dynamics of H$_2^+$ using ultrashort extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and near-infrared (IR) laser pulses. The reaction kinematics can be controlled by varying the pump-probe delay. We demonstrate that the nuclear motion through the transition state can be reduced to isolated pairs of initial vibrational states. The dynamics is well reproduced by intuitive semi-classical trajectories on a time-dependent potential curve. From this most fundamental scenario we gain insight in the underlying mechanisms which can be applied as design principles for molecular quantum control, particularly for ultrafast reactions involving protons.

  14. Mechanisms controlling the modes of the sinking slab into the transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusta, Roberto; Goes, Saskia; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    It is generally accepted that subducting slabs can either sink into the lower mantle, lie down in the mantle transition zone, or even stagnate beneath it. Several studies have looked at correlations between subduction zone parameters and the ability of the slabs to penetrate into the lower mantle. These studies have suggested that the key parameters to control whether slabs stagnate or penetrate are trench motions, slab strength, buoyant features and/or the overriding plate. For example, there is evidence that older lithospheres show significant trench retreat, and tend to lie down flat above the transition zone (northwest Pacific), whereas younger lithospheres, less able to drive trench retreat, tend to sink into the lower mantle (central America). Moreover, numerical modelling studies have shown further correlations with parameters that cannot be directly observed. For example, slab penetration is inhibited by density and viscosity increases associated with post-spinel phase transition. Numerical modelling has been one of the key tools to investigate slab penetration, and a lot of insight has been gained from these studies. But most of these studies assume (statistical) steady ­state scenarios, in which slab stagnation or slab penetration is more or less a permanent feature. However, on Earth different modes of slab - transition zone interaction probably need to be able to change in time from penetrating to stagnant and also vice versa. In this study, using 2D self-consistent numerical subduction models, we test plausible mechanisms which may trigger different modes of slab deformation in the transition zone and may explain both spatial and temporal variability.

  15. A Control Strategy for Mode Transition with Gear Shifting in a Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyuhyun Sim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mode transition from electric propulsion mode to hybrid propulsion mode is important with regard to the power management strategy of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs. This is because mode transitions can occur frequently depending on the power management strategies and driving cycles, and because inadequate mode transitions worsen the fuel efficiency and drivability. A pre-transmission parallel PHEV uses a clutch between the internal combustion engine (ICE and the electric motor (EM to connect or disconnect the power source of the ICE for a mode transition. The mode transition requires additional energy consumption for clutch speed synchronization, and is accompanied by a drivetrain shock due to clutch engagement. This paper proposes a control strategy for the mode transition with gear-shifting to resolve the problems of energy consumption and drivetrain shock. Through the development of a PHEV performance simulator, we analyze the mode transition characteristics and propose a control strategy considering the vehicle acceleration and gear state. The control strategy reduces the duration required for the mode transition by moving the start time of the mode transition. This helps to improve energy efficiency while maintaining adequate drivability.

  16. Controlling the transition of bright and dark states via scanning dressing field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peiying; Zheng, Huaibin; Zhang, Yiqi; Sun, Jia; Li, Changbiao; Huang, Gaoping; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-03-01

    We report the transitions between the bright and dark states of singly-dressed four-wave mixing (FWM) and doubly-dressed FWMs, and the corresponding probe transmissions by scanning the dressing field frequency detuning in a five-level atomic system. Moreover, doubly-dressed six-wave mixing with avoided-crossing plots and triple-dressed eight-wave mixing with the comparison of scanning probe field and dressing field are studied. Such controlled transitions of the nonlinear optical signals can be realizable not only in atomic vapors but also in solid medium. The investigations maybe have potential applications in optical communication, quantum information processing and optoelectronic devices, and maybe also provide a sensitive probe method to study the dressing effect.

  17. Nonlinear optimal control of bypass transition in a boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dandan; Papadakis, George

    2016-11-01

    Bypass transition is observed in a flat-plate boundary-layer flow when high levels of free stream turbulence are present. This scenario is characterized by the formation of streamwise elongated streaks inside the boundary layer, their break down into turbulent spots and eventually fully turbulent flow. In the current work, we perform DNS simulations of control of bypass transition in a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. A non-linear optimal control algorithm is developed that employs the direct-adjoint approach to minimise a quadratic cost function based on the deviation from the Blasius velocity profile. Using the Lagrange variational approach, the distribution of the blowing/suction control velocity is found by solving iteratively the non-linear Navier-Stokes and its adjoint equations in a forward/backward loop. The optimisation is performed over a finite time horizon during which the Lagrange functional is to be minimised. Large values of optimisation horizon result in instability of the adjoint equations. The results show that the controller is able to reduce the turbulent kinetic energy of the flow in the region where the objective function is defined and the velocity profile is seen to approach the Blasius solution. Significant drag reduction is also achieved.

  18. A Separated Approach to Control of Markov Jump Nonlinear Systems With General Transition Probabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mouquan; Park, Ju H; Ye, Dan

    2016-09-01

    This paper is devoted to the control of Markov jump nonlinear systems with general transition probabilities (TPs) allowed to be known, uncertain, and unknown. With the help of the S-procedure to dispose the system nonlinearities and the TP property to eliminate the coupling between unknown TP and Lyapunov variable, an extended bounded real lemma for the considered system to be stochastically stable with the prescribed H∞ performance is established in the framework of linear matrix inequalities. To handle the nonlinearity incurred by uncertain TP for controller synthesis, a separated method is proposed to decouple the interconnection between Lyapunov variables and controller gains. A numerical example is given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Degree of Rate Control: How Much the Energies of Intermediates and Transition States Control Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegelmann, Carsten; Andreasen, Anders; Campbell, Charles T.

    2009-01-01

    electronic or steric control on the relative energies of the key species. Since these key species are the ones whose relative energies most strongly influence the net reaction rate, they also identify the species whose energetics must be most accurately measured or calculated to achieve an accurate kinetic...

  20. Some Results on the Analysis of Stochastic Processes with Uncertain Transition Probabilities and Robust Optimal Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyong Li; Seong-Cheol Kang; I. Ch. Paschalidis

    2007-09-01

    This paper investigates stochastic processes that are modeled by a finite number of states but whose transition probabilities are uncertain and possibly time-varying. The treatment of uncertain transition probabilities is important because there appears to be a disconnection between the practice and theory of stochastic processes due to the difficulty of assigning exact probabilities to real-world events. Also, when the finite-state process comes as a reduced model of one that is more complicated in nature (possibly in a continuous state space), existing results do not facilitate rigorous analysis. Two approaches are introduced here. The first focuses on processes with one terminal state and the properties that affect their convergence rates. When a process is on a complicated graph, the bound of the convergence rate is not trivially related to that of the probabilities of individual transitions. Discovering the connection between the two led us to define two concepts which we call 'progressivity' and 'sortedness', and to a new comparison theorem for stochastic processes. An optimality criterion for robust optimal control also derives from this comparison theorem. In addition, this result is applied to the case of mission-oriented autonomous robot control to produce performance estimate within a control framework that we propose. The second approach is in the MDP frame work. We will introduce our preliminary work on optimistic robust optimization, which aims at finding solutions that guarantee the upper bounds of the accumulative discounted cost with prescribed probabilities. The motivation here is to address the issue that the standard robust optimal solution tends to be overly conservative.

  1. Interface control document between PUREX/UO{sub 3} Plant Transition and Solid Waste Disposal Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-30

    This interface control document (ICD) between PUREX/UO{sub 3} Plant Transition (PPT) and Solid Waste Disposal Division (SWD) establishes at a top level the functional responsibilities of each division where interfaces exist between the two divisions. Since the PUREX Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions operate autonomously, it is important that each division has a clear understanding of the other division`s expectations regarding these interfaces. This ICD primarily deals with solid wastes generated by the PPT. In addition to delineating functional responsibilities, the ICD includes a baseline description of those wastes that will require management as part of the interface between the divisions. The baseline description of wastes includes waste volumes and timing for use in planning the proper waste management capabilities: the primary purpose of this ICD is to ensure defensibility of expected waste stream volumes and Characteristics for future waste management facilities. Waste descriptions must be as complete as-possible to ensure adequate treatment, storage, and disposal capability will exist. The ICD also facilitates integration of existing or planned waste management capabilities of the PUREX. Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions. The ICD does not impact or affect the existing processes or procedures for shipping, packaging, or approval for shipping wastes by generators to the Solid Waste Division.

  2. Anticipatory control of motion-to-force transitions with the fingertips adapts optimally to task difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Flor A; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    Moving our fingertips toward objects to produce well-directed forces immediately upon contact is fundamental to dexterous manipulation. This apparently simple motion-to-force transition in fact involves a time-critical, predictive switch in control strategy. Given that dexterous manipulation must accommodate multiple mechanical conditions, we investigated whether and how this transition adapts to task difficulty. Eight adults (19-39 yr) produced ramps of isometric vertical fingertip force against a rigid surface immediately following a tapping motion. By changing target surface friction and size, we defined an easier (sandpaper, 11 mm diam) versus a more difficult (polished steel, 5 mm diam) task. As in prior work, we assembled fine-wire electromyograms from all seven muscles of the index finger into a seven-dimensional vector defining the full muscle coordination pattern-and quantified its temporal evolution as its alignment with a reference coordination pattern vector for steady-state force production. As predicted by numerical optimizations to neuromuscular delays, our empirical and sigmoidal nonlinear regression analyses show that the coordination pattern transitions begin sooner for the more difficult tasks than for the easier tasks ( approximately 120 ms, P 0.7 in most cases). Importantly, the force vector following contact had smaller directional error (P optimization to counteract neuromuscular delays and noise to enable this fundamental element of dexterous manipulation.

  3. Application of transitional care model in cancer pain management after discharge:a randomized controlled trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Wang; Xian-Cui Wu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine any benefits of applying a transitional care model in the continuum of cancer pain management, especially after patients' discharge from the hospital. Methods: A total of 156 eligible participants were recruited and randomly assigned into intervention or control groups. The control group received standard care, while the intervention group received extra, specialized transitional care of pain management. Outcomes were measured at weeks 0 and 2e4 and included demographic data, the Brief Pain Inventory, Global Quality of Life Scale, and Satisfaction Degree of Nursing Service. Adequacy of analgesia and severity of pain were assessed with the Pain Management Index and interview findings. Results: After 2e4 weeks of intervention, there was a significant difference in the change in average pain score between intervention and control groups (P <0.05). Reductions in pain scores were significantly greater in the intervention group than in the control group (difference:0.98, P<0.05). Regarding pain management outcomes, there was a significantly better condition in the intervention group compared with the control group;in the intervention group, 79%of patients had adequate opioids, whereas in the control group, only 63% of patients reported having adequate opioids. Furthermore, there was a signif-icant difference between the two groups in quality of life (QOL) scores (P<0.05);the intervention group had significantly higher quality of life than the control group (difference: 1.06). Finally, there was a significant difference in the degree of satisfaction with the home nursing service;the intervention group had a significantly higher degree of satisfaction with the home nursing service in three aspects:quality, content, and attitude of service. Conclusions: The application of a transitional care model in cancer pain management after discharge could help patients to improve their cancer pain management knowledge and analgesics compliance. In

  4. Infection control systems in transition: the challenges for post-Soviet Bloc countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ider, B-E; Adams, J; Morton, A; Whitby, M; Clements, A

    2012-04-01

    Just two decades ago, 30 of today's countries in Europe and Asia had socialist governments under Soviet dominance or direct administration. Intensive health system reforms have altered infection control in many of these countries. However, much of the literature from these countries is difficult to access by international scientists. To summarize existing infection control policies and practices in post-Soviet Bloc countries. In addition to PubMed and Google search engines, we explored local websites and grey literature. In total, 192 references published in several languages were reviewed. Infection control in these countries is in the midst of transition. Three groups of countries were identified. First, Eastern European and Baltic countries building surveillance systems for specific pathogens and antibiotic use; second, European post-Soviet Bloc countries focusing on the harmonization of recently established infection control infrastructure with European surveillance programmes; third, countries such as those formerly in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Mongolia and post-conflict Eastern European countries that are in the first stages of reform. Poor commitment, resource scarcity and shortages of expertise were identified. Underreporting of official infection control statistics is widespread. Guidance from international organizations has been crucial in initiating and developing contemporary infection control programmes. More support from the international community will be needed for the third group of countries, where infection control has remained a neglected issue. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of buoyancy on turbulent nonpremixed jet flames in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxx, Isaac G.

    An experimental research study was conducted to investigate what effect buoyancy had on the mean and instantaneous flow-field characteristics of turbulent jet-flames in crossflow (JFICF). The study used an experimental technique wherein a series of normal-gravity, hydrogen-diluted propane JFICF were compared with otherwise identical ones in low-gravity. Experiments were conducted at the University of Texas Drop Tower Facility, a new microgravity science laboratory built for this study at the University of Texas at Austin. Two different diagnostic techniques were employed, high frame-rate digital cinematographic imaging and planar laser Mie scattering (PLMS). The flame-luminosity imaging revealed significant elongation and distortion of the large-scale luminous structure of the JFICF. This was seen to affect the flametip oscillation and burnout characteristics. Mean and root-mean-square (RMS) images of flame-luminosity were computed from the flame-luminosity image sequences. These were used to compare visible flame-shapes, flame chord-lengths and jet centerline-trajectories of the normal- and low-gravity flames. In all cases the jet-centerline penetration and mean luminous flame-width were seen to increase with decreasing buoyancy. The jet-centerline trajectories for the normal-gravity flames were seen to behave differently to those of the low-gravity flames. This difference led to the conclusion that the jet transitions from a momentum-dominated forced convection limit to a buoyancy-influenced regime when it reaches xiC ≈ 3, where xiC is the Becker and Yamazaki (1978) buoyancy parameter based on local flame chord-length. The mean luminous flame-lengths showed little sensitivity to buoyancy or momentum flux ratio. Consistent with the flame-luminosity imaging experiments, comparison of the instantaneous PLMS flow-visualization images revealed substantial buoyancy-induced elongation and distortion of the large-scale shear-layer vortices in the flow. This effect

  6. Factors controlling inter-catchment variation of mean transit time with consideration of temporal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenchao; Yamanaka, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    The catchment transit time, a lumped descriptor reflecting both time scale and spatial structure of catchment hydrology can provide useful insights into chemical/nuclear pollution risks within a catchment. Despite its importance, factors controlling spatial variation of mean transit time (MTT) are not yet well understood. In this study, we estimated time-variant MTTs for about ten years (2003-2012) in five mesoscale sub-catchments of the Fuji River catchment, central Japan, to establish the factors controlling their inter-catchment variation with consideration of temporal variability. For this purpose, we employed a lumped hydrological model that was calibrated and validated by hydrometric and isotopic tracer observations. Temporal variation patterns of estimated MTT were similar in all sub-catchments, but with differing amplitudes. Inter-catchment variation of MTT was greater in dry periods than wet periods, suggesting spatial variation of MTT is controlled by water 'stock' rather than by 'flow'. Although the long-term average MTT (LAMTT) in each catchment was correlated with mean slope, coverage of forest (or conversely, other land use types), coverage of sand-shale conglomerate, and groundwater storage, the multiple linear regression revealed that inter-catchment variation of LAMTT is principally controlled by the amount of groundwater storage. This is smaller in mountainous areas covered mostly by forests and greater in plain areas with less forest coverage and smaller slope. This study highlights the topographic control of MTT via groundwater storage, which might be a more important factor in mesoscale catchments, including both mountains and plains, rather than in smaller catchments dominated by mountainous topography.

  7. Experimental Study on Coupled Cross-Flow and in-Line Vortex-Induced Vibration of Flexible Risers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hai-yan; LOU Min

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we study the coupled cross-flow and in-line vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a fixedly mounted flexible pipe, which is free to move in cross-flow (Y-) and in-line (X-) direction in a fluid flow where the mass and natural frequencies are precisely the same in both X- and Y-direction. The fluid speed varies from low to high with the corresponding vortex shedding frequency varying from below the first natural frequency to above the second natural frequency of the flexible pipe. Particular emphasis was placed on the investigation of the relationship between in-line and cross-flow vibration. The experimental results analyzed by using these measurements exhibits several valuable features.

  8. WIND TUNNEL EVALUATION FOR CONTROL TRANSITION FROM ELEVATOR TO STABILATOR OF SMALL UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZULHILMY SAHWEE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Faulty control surface actuator in a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (sUAV could be overcome with a few techniques. Redundant actuators, analytical redundancy or combination of both are normally used as fault accommodation techniques. In this paper, the accommodation technique of faulty elevator actuator is presented. This technique uses a standby control surface as temporary control reallocation. Wind tunnel measurement facility is set up for the experimental validation and it is compared with FoilSim software. Flat plate airfoil which was used as horizontal stabilizer, is simulated using numerical model and it is validated using the wind tunnel test. Then, a flat airfoil is designed to be used as stabilator for the recovery of faulty elevator actuator. Results show the different deflection angle is needed when transferring from one control surface to another. From the analysis, the proposed method could be implemented without affecting the pitch stability during control surface transition. The alternate control surface accommodation technique proves to be promising for higher reliability sUAV in the case of a faulty on-board actuator.

  9. Hydrogenation-controlled phase transition on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides and their unique physical and catalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanju; Pan, Hui; Kwok, Chi Tat

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been widely used from nanodevices to energy harvesting/storage because of their tunable physical and chemical properties. In this work, we systematically investigate the effects of hydrogenation on the structural, electronic, magnetic, and catalytic properties of 33 TMDs based on first-principles calculations. We find that the stable phases of TMD monolayers can transit from 1T to 2H phase or vice versa upon the hydrogenation. We show that the hydrogenation can switch their magnetic and electronic states accompanying with the phase transition. The hydrogenation can tune the magnetic states of TMDs among non-, ferro, para-, and antiferro-magnetism and their electronic states among semiconductor, metal, and half-metal. We further show that, out of 33 TMD monolayers, 2H-TiS2 has impressive catalytic ability comparable to Pt in hydrogen evolution reaction in a wide range of hydrogen coverages. Our findings would shed the light on the multi-functional applications of TMDs.

  10. Modeling of fluidelastic instability in tube bundle subjected to two-phase cross-flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawadogo, T.P.; Mureithi, N.W.; Azizian, R.; Pettigrew, M.J. [Ecole Polytechnique, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, BWC/AECL/NSERC Chair of Fluid-Structure Interaction, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Tube arrays in steam generators and heat exchangers operating in two-phase cross-flow are subjected sometimes to strong vibration due mainly to turbulence buffeting and fluidelastic forces. This can lead to tube damage by fatigue or fretting wear. A computer implementation of a fluidelastic instability model is proposed to determine with improved accuracy the fluidelastic forces and hence the critical instability flow velocity. Usually the fluidelastic instability is 'predicted', using the Connors relation with K=3. While the value of K can be determined experimentally to get an accurate prediction of the instability, the Connors relation does not allow good estimation of the fluid forces. Consequently the RMS value of the magnitude of vibration of the tube bundle, necessary to evaluate the work rate and the tube wear is only poorly estimated. The fluidelastic instability analysis presented here is based on the quasi-steady model, originally developed for single phase flow. The fluid forces are expressed in terms of the quasi-static drag and lift force coefficients and their derivatives which are determined experimentally. The forces also depend on the tube displacement and velocity. In the computer code ABAQUS, the fluid forces are provided in the user subroutines VDLOAD or VUEL. A typical simulation of the vibration of a single flexible tube within an array in two phase cross-flow is done in ABAQUS and the results are compared with the experimental measurements for a tube with similar physical properties. For a cantilever tube, in two phase cross-flow of void fraction 60%, the numerical critical flow velocity was 2.0 m/s compared to 1.8 m/s obtained experimentally. The relative error was 5% compared to 26.6% for the Connors relation with K=3. The simulation of the vibration of a typical tube in a steam generator is also presented. The numerical results show good agreement with experimental measurements. (author)

  11. Baleen Hydrodynamics and Morphology of Cross-Flow Filtration in Balaenid Whale Suspension Feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Werth

    Full Text Available The traditional view of mysticete feeding involves static baleen directly sieving particles from seawater using a simple, dead-end flow-through filtration mechanism. Flow tank experiments on bowhead (Balaena mysticetus baleen indicate the long-standing model of dead-end filtration, at least in balaenid (bowhead and right whales, is not merely simplistic but wrong. To recreate continuous intraoral flow, sections of baleen were tested in a flume through which water and buoyant particles circulated with variable flow velocity. Kinematic sequences were analyzed to investigate movement and capture of particles by baleen plates and fringes. Results indicate that very few particles flow directly through the baleen rack; instead much water flows anteroposteriorly along the interior (lingual side of the rack, allowing items to be carried posteriorly and accumulate at the posterior of the mouth where they might readily be swallowed. Since water flows mainly parallel to rather than directly through the filter, the cross-flow mechanism significantly reduces entrapment and tangling of minute items in baleen fringes, obviating the need to clean the filter. The absence of copepods or other prey found trapped in the baleen of necropsied right and bowhead whales supports this hypothesis. Reduced through-baleen flow was observed with and without boundaries modeling the tongue and lips, indicating that baleen itself is the main if not sole agent of crossflow. Preliminary investigation of baleen from balaenopterid whales that use intermittent filter feeding suggests that although the biomechanics and hydrodynamics of oral flow differ, cross-flow filtration may occur to some degree in all mysticetes.

  12. Controlled photon emission and Raman transition experiments with a single trapped atom

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, M P A; Beugnon, J; Browaeys, A; Darquié, B; Dingjan, J; Grangier, P; Messin, G; Sortais, Y

    2005-01-01

    We present recent results on the coherent control of an optical transition in a single rubidium atom, trapped in an optical tweezer. We excite the atom using resonant light pulses that are short (4 ns) compared with the lifetime of the excited state (26 ns). By varying the intensity of the laser pulses, we can observe an adjustable number of Rabi oscillations, followed by free decay once the light is switched off. To generate the pulses we have developed a novel laser system based on frequency doubling a telecoms laser diode at 1560 nm. By setting the laser intensity to make a pi-pulse, we use this coherent control to make a high quality triggered source of single photons. We obtain an average single photon rate of 9600 s-1 at the detector. Measurements of the second-order temporal correlation function show almost perfect antibunching at zero delay. In addition, we present preliminary results on the use of Raman transitions to couple the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of our trapped atom. This will ...

  13. Investigations on controlled transition development in a laminar separation bubble by means of LDA and PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, M.; Rist, U.; Wagner, S. [Institut fuer Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70550, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    When a laminar boundary layer separates because of an adverse streamwise pressure gradient, the flow is subject to increased instability with respect to small-amplitude disturbances. Laminar-turbulent transition occurs under a rapid three-dimensional (3D) development within the separated shear layer. When the following turbulent boundary layer reattaches, a laminar separation bubble is formed. To allow controlled measurements, a small-amplitude Tollmien-Schlichting wave (TS wave) was introduced into the boundary layer without (case I) and with (case II) spanwise forcing of steady 3D disturbances. Combined application of laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) demonstrates the suitability of both measurement techniques to capture the development of unsteady, periodic phenomena. The transition mechanism occurring in the flow field under consideration is discussed, and results obtained by controlled measurements are compared to direct numerical simulations (DNS) and predictions from linear stability theory (LST). Flow visualizations and stereoscopic PIV measurements give better insight into the 3D breakdown of the separated shear layer. (orig.)

  14. Manipulating shear-induced non-equilibrium transitions in colloidal films by feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezirov, Tarlan A; Gerloff, Sascha; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2015-01-14

    Using Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations we investigate non-equilibrium transitions of sheared colloidal films under controlled shear stress σxz. In our approach the shear rate [small gamma, Greek, dot above] is a dynamical variable, which relaxes on a time scale τc such that the instantaneous, configuration-dependent stress σxz(t) approaches a pre-imposed value. Investigating the dynamics under this "feedback-control" scheme we find unique behavior in regions where the flow curve σxz([small gamma, Greek, dot above]) of the uncontrolled system is monotonic. However, in non-monotonic regions our method allows to select between dynamical states characterized by different in-plane structure and viscosities. Indeed, the final state strongly depends on τc relative to an intrinsic relaxation time of the uncontrolled system. The critical values of τc are estimated on the basis of a simple model.

  15. Reliable Sampled-Data Control of Fuzzy Markovian Systems with Partly Known Transition Probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, R.; Kaviarasan, B.; Kwon, O. M.; Rathika, M.

    2016-08-01

    This article presents a fuzzy dynamic reliable sampled-data control design for nonlinear Markovian jump systems, where the nonlinear plant is represented by a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model and the transition probability matrix for Markov process is permitted to be partially known. In addition, a generalised as well as more practical consideration of the real-world actuator fault model which consists of both linear and nonlinear fault terms is proposed to the above-addressed system. Then, based on the construction of an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and the employment of convex combination technique together with free-weighting matrices method, some sufficient conditions that promising the robust stochastic stability of system under consideration and the existence of the proposed controller are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which can be easily solved by any of the available standard numerical softwares. Finally, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the validity of the proposed methodology.

  16. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak

    2016-02-24

    In this study, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M′2M′′C2 and M′2M′′2C3 – where M′ and M′′ are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, and Ti. The M′ atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M′′ atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M′ atomic layers sandwich the middle M′′–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. This finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.

  17. Cross-flow blowing of a two-dimensional stationary arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, T. K.

    1971-01-01

    It is demonstrated in an analysis that the electrons emitted from the cathode undergo collisions with the heavy particles and are deflected in the flow direction by the component of a collisional force associated with the relative difference in flow velocities between electrons and heavy particles. The resultant motion of the electrons describing the arc is thus caused by a combined action of the collisional force that results from the externally applied electric field. An expression is given which enables computation of the arc shape to be made provided the velocity distribution of the cross-flow and the distribution of the externally applied electric field are prescribed.

  18. Final Report: Pilot-scale Cross-flow Filtration Test - Envelope A + Entrained Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-06-27

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company.This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. This plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  19. Cross-flow turbines: physical and numerical model studies towards improved array simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cross-flow, or vertical-axis turbines, show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow turbines. Numerical simulations are generally better suited to explore the turbine array design parameter space, as physical model studies of large arrays at large model scale would be expensive. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries, the turbines' interaction with the energy resource needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Most models in use today, e.g. actuator disk, are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. Experiments were carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier--Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An

  20. Experiment on fluidelastic instability of loosely supported tube arrays in crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1994-06-01

    A tube array supported by baffle plates in crossflow may be subjected to fluidelastic instability in the tube-support-plate-inactive mode. An experimental study is presented to characterize the tube motion. Three series of tests were performed to measure tube displacements as a function of flow velocity for different clearances. The motion was examined by root-mean-square values of tube displacements, power spectral densities, phase planes, Poincare maps, and Lyapunov exponents. The experimental data agree reasonably well with the analytical model, based on the unsteady flow theory.

  1. Experiment on fluidelastic instability of loosely supported tube arrays in crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1993-06-01

    A tube array supported by baffle plates in crossflow may be subjected to fluidelastic instability in the tube-support-plate-inactive mode. An experimental study is presented to characterize the tube motion. Three series of tests were performed to measure tube displacements as a function of flow velocity for different clearances. The motion was examined by root-mean-square values of tube displacements, power spectral densities, phase planes, Poincare maps, and Lyapunov exponents. The experimental data agree reasonably well with the analytical model, based on the unsteady flow theory.

  2. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CROSS-FLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

    2011-01-12

    In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing cross-flow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Cross-flow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the cross-flow filter axial flowrate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and cross-flow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed

  3. Synthesis and control of morphology, stoichiometry, and composition of transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, Matthew Isaac

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an important class of materials that have found uses in diverse applications, such as heterogeneous catalysts, sensors, and high temperature superconductors, due to their complex surface chemistry and high mobility of lattice oxygen atoms. Point defects such as oxygen and metal atom vacancies significantly perturb the electronic structure of TMOs and profoundly impact their electrical, optical, ferroelectric, photocatalytic, and other functional properties. As a result, significant research is being done to develop synthesis techniques that can produce metal oxides with controllable material properties. In this thesis, the use of hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) was studied with the aim of precisely controlling the morphology, stoichiometry, and composition of TMOs. With molybdenum oxide as the model system, the control of morphology and stoichiometry was achieved by modulation of deposition parameters, such as filament power and gas phase composition. The study of HWCVD of MoOx led to the development of phase diagrams for the dependence of morphology and stoichiometry on deposition parameters. The knowledge gained studying the HWCVD of MoOx was then shown to translate to the deposition of other binary metal oxides by using tungsten, nickel, and vanadium metal filaments to synthesize their respective transition metal oxides. Additionally, NiMoO4 was synthesized as a proof-of-concept to show that HWCVD can be used to make ternary oxides. Nitridation of samples in an ammonia atmosphere was conducted to explore the potential for conversion of HWCVD grown TMOs to their respective metal nitrides, which are also reported to have catalytic properties. To examine the quality of TMOs grown by HWCVD, samples were electrochemically tested for their electrochromic properties and photoactivity with respect to splitting of water.

  4. Synthesis Study on Transitions in Signal Infrastructure and Control Algorithms for Connected and Automated Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, H. M. Abdul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Young, Stan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sperling, Joshua [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beck, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Documenting existing state of practice is an initial step in developing future control infrastructure to be co-deployed for heterogeneous mix of connected and automated vehicles with human drivers while leveraging benefits to safety, congestion, and energy. With advances in information technology and extensive deployment of connected and automated vehicle technology anticipated over the coming decades, cities globally are making efforts to plan and prepare for these transitions. CAVs not only offer opportunities to improve transportation systems through enhanced safety and efficient operations of vehicles. There are also significant needs in terms of exploring how best to leverage vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology, vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) technology and vehicle-to-everything (V2X) technology. Both Connected Vehicle (CV) and Connected and Automated Vehicle (CAV) paradigms feature bi-directional connectivity and share similar applications in terms of signal control algorithm and infrastructure implementation. The discussion in our synthesis study assumes the CAV/CV context where connectivity exists with or without automated vehicles. Our synthesis study explores the current state of signal control algorithms and infrastructure, reports the completed and newly proposed CV/CAV deployment studies regarding signal control schemes, reviews the deployment costs for CAV/AV signal infrastructure, and concludes with a discussion on the opportunities such as detector free signal control schemes and dynamic performance management for intersections, and challenges such as dependency on market adaptation and the need to build a fault-tolerant signal system deployment in a CAV/CV environment. The study will serve as an initial critical assessment of existing signal control infrastructure (devices, control instruments, and firmware) and control schemes (actuated, adaptive, and coordinated-green wave). Also, the report will help to identify the future needs for the signal

  5. 层流翼型三维边界层横流驻波精确测量方法研究%On the Accurate Measurement Method of Standing Cross-flow for Three-dimensional Laminar Airfoil Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马彪; 白存儒; 杨广珺; 李栋

    2011-01-01

    Laminar flow control (LFC) of swept-back wing is a complex but very significant topic for drag reduction. The study of standing cross-flow has a great significance for LFC. For this reason, the experimental method of standing cross-flow measurement was analyzed and studied by using hot wire anemometer and sublimation method in a low turbulence wind tunnel. Corresponding technical details about the setup of hot wire anemometer system and process of sublimation surface spray are elaborated in this paper. The velocity profile curve in boundary layer, the image of sublimation result, the distance between standing waves and the wedge transition line were obtained in experiment. Synthetical analysis of experimental results shows that there is a high agreement between hot wire anemometer and sublimation method. This indicates that flow state in a 3-D boundary layer can be measured conveniently by hot wire anemometer; that at a suitable angle, the hot wire anemometer support does not impact the measurement; that hot wire probe has less effect on flow in boundary layer. So the results measured by hot wire anemometer may be regarded as actual flow in boundary layer. Analysis of experimental data shows that the combination of hot wire anemometer and sublimation method is a very effective method.%后掠机翼的层流控制对于气动减阻有着重要的意义,同时也是非常复杂的研究课题.而对横流驻波的研究是实现层流翼型的一个关健.为此,本文分析并研究了在低湍流度风洞中,采用热线风速仪(CTA)与表面升华法相结合研究由横流不稳定性产生的驻波及其对转捩影响的实验技术,阐述了该实验中架设热线测量系统与升华法表面喷涂的相关技术与细节.实验得到了边界层内的速度剖面图、升华法图形、驻波间距和楔形转捩线.实验结果的综合分析表明热线和升华法一致性很高.说明通过热线风速仪可以方便地测得三维边界层内的流动

  6. Recent advances in controlled synthesis of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides via vapour deposition techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yumeng

    2014-10-20

    In recent years there have been many breakthroughs in two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, among which the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) attract significant attention owing to their unusual properties associated with their strictly defined dimensionalities. TMD materials with a generalized formula of MX2, where M is a transition metal and X is a chalcogen, represent a diverse and largely untapped source of 2D systems. Semiconducting TMD monolayers such as MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and WS2 have been demonstrated to be feasible for future electronics and optoelectronics. The exotic electronic properties and high specific surface areas of 2D TMDs offer unlimited potential in various fields including sensing, catalysis, and energy storage applications. Very recently, the chemical vapour deposition technique (CVD) has shown great promise to generate high-quality TMD layers with a scalable size, controllable thickness and excellent electronic properties. Wafer-scale deposition of mono to few layer TMD films has been obtained. Despite the initial success in the CVD synthesis of TMDs, substantial research studies on extending the methodology open up a new way for substitution doping, formation of monolayer alloys and producing TMD stacking structures or superlattices. In this tutorial review, we will introduce the latest development of the synthesis of monolayer TMDs by CVD approaches.

  7. An Interactive Excel Program for Tracking a Single Droplet in Crossflow Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Marek, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Spray jet in crossflow has been a subject of research because of its wide application in systems involving pollutant dispersion, jet mixing in the dilution zone of combustors, and fuel injection strategies. The focus of this work is to investigate dispersion of a 2-dimensional atomized spray jet into a 2-dimensional crossflow. A quick computational method is developed using available software. The spreadsheet can be used for any 2D droplet trajectory problem where the drop is injected into the free stream eventually coming to the free stream conditions. During the transverse injection of a spray into high velocity airflow, the droplets (carried along and deflected by a gaseous stream of co-flowing air) are subjected to forces that affect their motion in the flow field. Based on the Newton's Second Law of motion, four ordinary differential equations were used. These equations were then solved by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method using Excel software. Visual basic programming and Excel macrocode to produce the data facilitate Excel software to plot graphs describing the droplet's motion in the flow field. This program computes and plots the data sequentially without forcing users to open other types of plotting programs. A user's manual on how to use the program is also included in this report.

  8. On the stability of plane Couette-Poiseuille flow with uniform cross-flow

    CERN Document Server

    Guha, Anirban

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the linear stability of plane Couette-Poiseuille flow in the presence of a cross-flow. The base flow is characterised by the cross flow Reynolds number, $R_{inj}$ and the dimensionless wall velocity, $k$. Squire's transformation may be applied to the linear stability equations and we therefore consider 2D (spanwise-independent) perturbations. Corresponding to each dimensionless wall velocity, $k\\in[0,1]$, two ranges of $R_{inj}$ exist where unconditional stability is observed. In the lower range of $R_{inj}$, for modest $k$ we have a stabilisation of long wavelengths leading to a cut-off $R_{inj}$. This lower cut-off results from skewing of the velocity profile away from a Poiseuille profile, shifting of the critical layers and the gradual decrease of energy production. Cross-flow stabilisation and Couette stabilisation appear to act via very similar mechanisms in this range, leading to the potential for robust compensatory design of flow stabilisation using either mechanism. As...

  9. Boundary Layer Skin Friction in the Vicinity of Multiple Jets in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sean; Plesniak, Michael

    2000-11-01

    Multiple jets in crossflow are commonly used for gas turbine film cooling and other industrial applications. Various flow structures, such as the pair(s) of counter-rotating vortices, influence the jet trajectory, separation and reattachment phenomena, and ultimately the surface skin friction and heat transfer. This study utilized a single row of five "short" injection hole jets separated in the spanwise direction by three jet diameters, which were injected into a crossflow at a 90-degree inclination. When short holes are used, i.e. L/D = 1 or less, the external flowfield is influenced by the flow within the holes and supply plenum, especially by separation events. A Fringe Imaging Skin Friction (FISF) technique was employed to investigate the effect of velocity ratio (0.5 to 1.0) and plenum flow direction on the skin friction in the boundary layer between and downstream of the injection holes. Interference fringes produced by a thin oil film deposited on the surface were imaged by a digital camera/frame grabber and processed to infer the skin friction distributions. Correlation between the skin friction distributions and other reported flow characteristics, and their relation to film cooling effectiveness, will be discussed.

  10. Investigation of Helical Cross-Flow Axis Hydrokinetic Turbines, Including Effects of Waves and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin

    2011-11-01

    A new test bed for hydrokinetic turbines was used to evaluate different cross-flow axis turbines, and investigate effects of waves and turbulence. Turbine thrust (drag) and mechanical power were measured in a tow tank with cross section 3.7 x 2.4m at speeds of 0.6-1.5 m/s for a Gorlov Helical Turbine (GHT) and a Lucid spherical helical turbine (LST). GHT performance was also measured in progressive waves of various periods, grid turbulence, and in a cylinder wake. Overall, the GHT performs with higher power and thrust coefficients than the LST. A 2nd law, or kinetic exergy efficiency, defined as the fraction of kinetic energy removed from the flow that is converted to usable shaft work, was measured. The distribution of energy into shaft work and turbulent kinetic energy in the wake can affect environmental transport processes and performance of turbines arrays. Progressive waves generally enhance performance of the GHT, but can lead to stall at higher tip speed ratios compared to the steady case. Grid turbulence delays dynamic stall and enables operation at lower tip speed ratios, while not decreasing maximum power coefficient. Performance in a cylinder wake is highly dependent on the cylinder's cross-stream location, ranging from benign to detrimental. The experimental observations provide insight into the physical principles of operation of cross-flow axis turbines.

  11. Computational study of liquid-gas cross-flow within structured packing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavalle, Gianluca; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    Absorption columns used in the carbon capture processes and filled with structured packings are crucial to foster the exchanges and the transfers between the absorber liquid and the flue gas. However, flow reversal can occur under special flow conditions, resulting in a dramatic drop of the technological performances. We investigate numerically the liquid-gas pattern within a cross-flow packing cell. The cell is a complex geometry with two connected channels, where the two phases flow co- or counter-currently. We show that an increase of both the gas speed and the liquid load leads to an increase of the pressure drop. Particular focus is also given to the analysis of flow repartition and flooding delay. We reveal that tilting the unit cell helps to delay the flooding and extends the operational capability. The pressure drop of the cross-flow unit cell is also compared to the Mellapak packing which is widely used in carbon capture applications. Finally, we support this study by performing numerical simulations on simpler geometries by means of a low-dimensional film-gas model, in order to investigate the two-phase dynamics and predict the flooding onset with a low computational cost. The authors gratefully acknowledge EPSRC Grant No. EP/M001482/1.

  12. PIV measurement of the vertical cross-flow structure over tube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, C.; Cheong, K. H.; Monji, H.; Matsui, G.

    Shell and tube heat exchangers are among the most commonly used types of heat exchangers. Shell-side cross-flow in tube bundles has received considerable attention and has been investigated extensively. However, the microscopic flow structure including velocity distribution, wake, and turbulent structure in the tube bundles needs to be determined for more effective designs. Therefore, in this study, in order to clarify the detailed structure of cross-flow in tube bundles with particle image velocimetry (PIV), experiments were conducted using two types of model; in-line and staggered bundles with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5, containing 20 rows of five 15 mm O.D. tubes in each row. The velocity data in the whole flow field were measured successfully by adjusting the refractive index of the working fluid to that of the tube material. The flow features were characterized in different tube bundles with regards to the velocity vector field, vortex structure, and turbulent intensity.

  13. A NUMERICAL PRESSURE TRANSIENT MODEL FOR MULTILAYERED GAS RESERVOIRS WITH PSEUDOSTEADY STATE FORMATION CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Reservoir deposition occurs over geologic periods of time. Although reservoirs are assumed to be homogenous for simplicity of analysis, most reservoirs are heterogeneous in nature. Some common forms of hetergeneity are the presence of layers and the presence of different zones of fluids and/or rock in the formation. A modified semi-permeable model for multi-layered gas reservoirs with pseudo-steady state interlayer crossflow was developed. The model accounted for the effect of skin and wellbore storage, considers all layers open to a single well, which flows at constant total rate. This new numerical solution was proved to be computationally very efficient, and it has been validated by comparing the results with those of some simple, well known models in the well testing literature. The effects of the reservoir parameters such as permeability, vertical permeability, skin, wellbore storage on the wellbore response, pressure and layer production rate were investigated. Numerical solutions of the problem for the modified semi-permeable model were used to find the structure of crossflow in typical cases.

  14. Influence of cross-flow on the entrainment of bending plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Graham; Mastin, Larry; Steven, Solovitz; Cal, Raul

    2016-11-01

    Volcanic eruption columns inject high concentrations of ash into the atmosphere. Some of this ash is carried downwind forming ash clouds in the atmosphere that are hazardous for private and commercial aviation. Current models rely on inputs such as plume height, duration, eruption rate, and meteorological wind fields. Eruption rate is estimated from plume height using relations that depend on the rate of air entrainment into the plume, which is not well quantified. A wind tunnel experiment has been designed to investigate these models by injecting a vertical air jet into a cross-flow. The ratio of the cross-flow and jet velocities is varied to simulate a weak plume, and flow response is measured using particle image velocimetry. The plumes are characterized and profile data is examined to measure the growth of weak plumes and the entrainment velocity along its trajectory. This allows for the study of the flow field, mean, and second order moments, and obtain information to improve models of volcanic ash concentrations in the atmosphere.

  15. New challenge of tuberculosis control in shanghai;urgent need to help internal migrants in the period of economic transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan Shaokang; Liu xiaoyun; Tang Shenglan; Squire S B; Zheng Ni

    2003-01-01

    @@ RATIONALE: Increasing internal migration from rural areas to cities in the period of economic transition in China has lead to changes in disease pattern and health service provision, including tuberculosis control. Tuberculosis control in migrants, being one forth population in Shanghai, is very important and urgent.

  16. H-infinity based integrated flight/propulsion control design for a STOVL aircraft in transition flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay; Mattern, Duane L.; Bright, Michelle; Ouzts, Peter

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents results from an application of H(infinity) control design methodology to a centralized integrated flight/propulsion control (IFPC) system design for a supersonic STOVL fighter aircraft in transition flight. The overall design methodology consists of a centralized IFPC design with controller partitioning. Design and evaluation vehicle models are summarized, and insight is provided into formulating the H(infinity) control problem such that it reflects the IFPC design objective. The H(infinity) controller is shown to provide decoupled command tracking for the design model. The controller order could be significantly reduced by modal residualization of the fast controller modes without any deterioration in performance.

  17. Pressure controlled transition into a self-induced topological superconducting surface state

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2014-02-07

    Ab-initio calculations show a pressure induced trivial-nontrivial-trivial topological phase transition in the normal state of 1T-TiSe2. The pressure range in which the nontrivial phase emerges overlaps with that of the superconducting ground state. Thus, topological superconductivity can be induced in protected surface states by the proximity effect of superconducting bulk states. This kind of self-induced topological surface superconductivity is promising for a realization of Majorana fermions due to the absence of lattice and chemical potential mismatches. For appropriate electron doping, the formation of the topological superconducting surface state in 1T-TiSe 2 becomes accessible to experiments as it can be controlled by pressure.

  18. Sleep–Wake Transition in Narcolepsy and Healthy Controls Using a Support Vector Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie B; Sorensen, Helge B D; Kempfner, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    transformation and were given as input to a support vector machine classifier. The classification algorithm was assessed by hold-out validation and 10-fold cross-validation. The data used to validate the classifier were derived from polysomnographic recordings of 47 narcoleptic patients (33 with cataplexy and 14...... without cataplexy) and 15 healthy controls. Compared with manual scorings, an accuracy of 90% was achieved in the hold-out validation, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 95%. Sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 88%, respectively. The 10-fold cross-validation procedure...... yielded an accuracy of 88%, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 92%, a sensitivity of 87%, and a specificity of 87%. Narcolepsy with cataplexy patients experienced significantly more sleep-wake transitions during night than did narcolepsy without cataplexy patients (P = 0...

  19. Performance of the Priority Control Strategies for Bus Rapid Transit: Comparative Study from Scenario Microsimulation Using VISSIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bus rapid transit (BRT has a great potential to improve the service level of transit system and has been implemented in many Chinese cities. However, the priority it can provide to buses has not been explored fully. Therefore, this study mainly investigated two advanced control strategies (signal priority using advanced detection and transit speed control. Signal priority using advanced detection is a strategy which detects one cycle ahead of buses’ arrival in order to adapt a more flexible control algorithm to provide signal priority for buses. Another is transit speed control, which provides priority at intersections for buses by controlling the speed of them and predicting their arrival at certain intersection. These two advanced strategies were modeled and evaluated using simulation software VISSIM and presented better performance than other three scenarios (base case, exclusive bus lane, and conventional transit signal priority. Only the eastbound direction would be researched as its traffic flow and bus volume are much larger than those of the other direction. Data used in this model was collected in Yingtan City. It is also shown that both the operation of BRT and the efficiency of private traffic can be much improved by applying the two strategies proposed above.

  20. Estimation of Transitional Probabilities of Discrete Event Systems from Cross-Sectional Survey and its Application in Tobacco Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Chen, Xinguang

    2010-02-01

    In order to find better strategies for tobacco control, it is often critical to know the transitional probabilities among various stages of tobacco use. Traditionally, such probabilities are estimated by analyzing data from longitudinal surveys that are often time-consuming and expensive to conduct. Since cross-sectional surveys are much easier to conduct, it will be much more practical and useful to estimate transitional probabilities from cross-sectional survey data if possible. However, no previous research has attempted to do this. In this paper, we propose a method to estimate transitional probabilities from cross-sectional survey data. The method is novel and is based on a discrete event system framework. In particular, we introduce state probabilities and transitional probabilities to conventional discrete event system models. We derive various equations that can be used to estimate the transitional probabilities. We test the method using cross-sectional data of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. The estimated transitional probabilities can be used in predicting the future smoking behavior for decision-making, planning and evaluation of various tobacco control programs. The method also allows a sensitivity analysis that can be used to find the most effective way of tobacco control. Since there are much more cross-sectional survey data in existence than longitudinal ones, the impact of this new method is expected to be significant.

  1. Transition to propofol after sevoflurane anesthesia to prevent emergence agitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costi, David; Ellwood, James; Wallace, Andrew; Ahmed, Samira; Waring, Lynne; Cyna, Allan

    2015-05-01

    Emergence agitation (EA) is a common behavioral disturbance after sevoflurane anesthesia in children. Propofol 1 mg · kg(-1) bolus at the end of sevoflurane anesthesia has had mixed results in reducing the incidence of EA, whereas propofol infusion throughout anesthesia maintenance seems effective but is more complex to administer. If a simple, short transition to propofol anesthesia was found to be effective in reducing EA, this could enhance the recovery of children following sevoflurane anesthesia. We therefore aimed to determine whether transition to propofol over 3 min at the end of sevoflurane anesthesia reduces the incidence of EA in children. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, 230 children aged 1-12 years, undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans under sevoflurane anesthesia were randomized to receive either propofol 3 mg · kg(-1) over 3 min (propofol group), or no propofol (control group), at the end of sevoflurane anesthesia. EA was assessed by a blinded assessor using the Pediatric Emergence Anesthesia Delirium (PAED) scale and the Watcha scale until 30 min after emergence. EA on the PAED scale was defined as a PAED score >12. EA on the Watcha scale was defined as a score ≥ 3. Times to emergence, postanesthesia care unit (PACU) discharge, and discharge home were also recorded. Data were analyzed for 218 children. The incidence of EA was lower in the propofol group on both PAED (29% vs 7%; relative risk = 0.25; 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.52; P propofol group. Preplanned subgroup analyses for midazolam premedication, preexisting cognitive or behavioral disturbance, and age group did not alter our findings. Emergence time and time in PACU were both increased by a mean of 8 min in the propofol group (P propofol at the end of sevoflurane anesthesia reduces the incidence of EA and improves the quality of emergence. There is a small increase in recovery time, but no delay in discharge home. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Model of orbital populations for voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy in transition-metal thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Lukashev, Pavel V.; Jaswal, Sitaram S.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2017-07-01

    Voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) is an efficient way to manipulate the magnetization states in nanomagnets and is promising for low-power spintronic applications. The underlying physical mechanism for VCMA is known to involve a change in the d orbital occupation on the transition-metal interface atoms with an applied electric field. However, a simple qualitative picture of how this occupation controls the magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) and even why in certain cases the MCA has the opposite sign remains elusive. In this paper, we exploit a simple model of orbital populations to elucidate a number of features typical for the interface MCA, and the effect of the electric field on it, for 3 d transition-metal thin films used in magnetic tunnel junctions. We find that in all considered cases, including the Fe(001) surface, clean F e1 -xC ox(001 ) /MgO interface, and oxidized Fe(001)/MgO interface, the effects of alloying and the electric field enhance the MCA energy with electron depletion, which is largely explained by the occupancy of the minority-spin dx z ,y z orbitals. However, the hole-doped Fe(001) exhibits an inverse VCMA in which the MCA enhancement is achieved when electrons are accumulated at the Fe (001)/MgO interface with the applied electric field. In this regime, we predict a significantly enhanced VCMA that exceeds 1 pJ/Vm. Realizing this regime experimentally may be favorable for the practical purpose of voltage-driven magnetization reversal.

  3. Investigating the Complexity of Transitioning Separation Assurance Tools into NextGen Air Traffic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Ashley Nicole; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Homola, Jeffrey; Morey, Susan; Cabrall, Christopher; Mercer, Joey; Prevot, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In a study, that introduced ground-based separation assurance automation through a series of envisioned transitional phases of concept maturity, it was found that subjective responses to scales of workload, situation awareness, and acceptability in a post run questionnaire revealed as-predicted results for three of the four study conditions but not for the third, Moderate condition. The trend continued for losses of separation (LOS) where the number of LOS events were far greater than expected in the Moderate condition. To offer an account of why the Moderate condition was perceived to be more difficult to manage than predicted, researchers examined the increase in amount and complexity of traffic, increase in communication load, and increased complexities as a result of the simulation's mix of aircraft equipage. Further analysis compared the tools presented through the phases, finding that controllers took advantage of the informational properties of the tools presented but shied away from using their decision support capabilities. Taking into account similar findings from other studies, it is suggested that the Moderate condition represented the first step into a "shared control" environment, which requires the controller to use the automation as a decision making partner rather than just a provider of information. Viewed in this light, the combination of tools offered in the Moderate condition was reviewed and some tradeoffs that may offset the identified complexities were suggested.

  4. Electrically controllable liquid crystal random lasers below the Fréedericksz transition threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Rong; Lin, Jia-De; Huang, Bo-Yuang; Lin, Shih-Hung; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Yeh, Hui-Chen

    2011-01-31

    This investigation elucidates for the first time electrically controllable random lasers below the threshold voltage in dye-doped liquid crystal (DDLC) cells with and without adding an azo-dye. Experimental results show that the lasing intensities and the energy thresholds of the random lasers can be decreased and increased, respectively, by increasing the applied voltage below the Fréedericksz transition threshold. The below-threshold-electric-controllability of the random lasers is attributable to the effective decrease of the spatial fluctuation of the orientational order and thus of the dielectric tensor of LCs by increasing the electric-field-aligned order of LCs below the threshold, thereby increasing the diffusion constant and decreasing the scattering strength of the fluorescence photons in their recurrent multiple scattering. This can result in the decrease in the lasing intensity of the random lasers and the increase in their energy thresholds. Furthermore, the addition of an azo-dye in DDLC cell can induce the range of the working voltage below the threshold for the control of the random laser to reduce.

  5. Substrate Lattice-Guided Seed Formation Controls the Orientation of 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Aljarb, Areej

    2017-08-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDCs) semiconductors are important for next-generation electronics and optoelectronics. Given the difficulty in growing large single crystals of 2D TMDC materials, understanding the factors affecting the seed formation and orientation becomes an important issue for controlling the growth. Here, we systematically study the growth of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayer on c-plane sapphire with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to discover the factors controlling their orientation. We show that the concentration of precursors, i.e., the ratio between sulfur and molybdenum oxide (MoO3), plays a key role in the size and orientation of seeds, subsequently controlling the orientation of MoS2 monolayers. High S/MoO3 ratio is needed in the early stage of growth to form small seeds that can align easily to the substrate lattice structures while the ratio should be decreased to enlarge the size of the monolayer at the next stage of the lateral growth. Moreover, we show that the seeds are actually crystalline MoS2 layers as revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. There exist two preferred orientations (0° or 60°) registered on sapphire, confirmed by our density functional theory (DFT) simulation. This report offers a facile technique to grow highly aligned 2D TMDCs and contributes to knowledge advancement in growth mechanism.

  6. Controlling thermal emission with refractory epsilon-near-zero metamaterials via topological transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, P. N.; Molesky, S.; Petrov, A. Yu; Störmer, M.; Krekeler, T.; Lang, S.; Ritter, M.; Jacob, Z.; Eich, M.

    2016-01-01

    Control of thermal radiation at high temperatures is vital for waste heat recovery and for high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion. Previously, structural resonances utilizing gratings, thin film resonances, metasurfaces and photonic crystals were used to spectrally control thermal emission, often requiring lithographic structuring of the surface and causing significant angle dependence. In contrast, here, we demonstrate a refractory W-HfO2 metamaterial, which controls thermal emission through an engineered dielectric response function. The epsilon-near-zero frequency of a metamaterial and the connected optical topological transition (OTT) are adjusted to selectively enhance and suppress the thermal emission in the near-infrared spectrum, crucial for improved TPV efficiency. The near-omnidirectional and spectrally selective emitter is obtained as the emission changes due to material properties and not due to resonances or interference effects, marking a paradigm shift in thermal engineering approaches. We experimentally demonstrate the OTT in a thermally stable metamaterial at high temperatures of 1,000 °C. PMID:27263653

  7. The challenges of transitioning from linear to high-order overlay control in advanced lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, M.; Izikson, P.; Tien, D.; Huang, C. K.; Robinson, J. C.; Eichelberger, B.

    2008-03-01

    In the lithography section of the ITRS 2006 update, at the top of the list of difficult challenges appears the text "overlay of multiple exposures including mask image placement". This is a reflection of the fact that today overlay is becoming a major yield risk factor in semiconductor manufacturing. Historically, lithographers have achieved sufficient alignment accuracy and hence layer to layer overlay control by relying on models which define overlay as a linear function of the field and wafer coordinates. These linear terms were easily translated to correctibles in the available exposure tool degrees of freedom on the wafer and reticle stages. However, as the 45 nm half pitch node reaches production, exposure tool vendors have begun to make available, and lithographers have begun to utilize so called high order wafer and field control, in which either look up table or high order polynomial models are modified on a product by product basis. In this paper, the major challenges of this transition will be described. It will include characterization of the sources of variation which need to be controlled by these new models and the overlay and alignment sampling optimization problem which needs to be addressed, while maintaining the ever tightening demands on productivity and cost of ownership.

  8. Controlling thermal emission with refractory epsilon-near-zero metamaterials via topological transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, P. N.; Molesky, S.; Petrov, A. Yu; Störmer, M.; Krekeler, T.; Lang, S.; Ritter, M.; Jacob, Z.; Eich, M.

    2016-06-01

    Control of thermal radiation at high temperatures is vital for waste heat recovery and for high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion. Previously, structural resonances utilizing gratings, thin film resonances, metasurfaces and photonic crystals were used to spectrally control thermal emission, often requiring lithographic structuring of the surface and causing significant angle dependence. In contrast, here, we demonstrate a refractory W-HfO2 metamaterial, which controls thermal emission through an engineered dielectric response function. The epsilon-near-zero frequency of a metamaterial and the connected optical topological transition (OTT) are adjusted to selectively enhance and suppress the thermal emission in the near-infrared spectrum, crucial for improved TPV efficiency. The near-omnidirectional and spectrally selective emitter is obtained as the emission changes due to material properties and not due to resonances or interference effects, marking a paradigm shift in thermal engineering approaches. We experimentally demonstrate the OTT in a thermally stable metamaterial at high temperatures of 1,000 °C.

  9. Teaching Mass Transfer and Filtration Using Crossflow Reverse Osmosis and Nanofiltration: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Unit Operations Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, Daniel; McCutcheon, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A crossflow reverse osmosis (RO) system was built for a senior-level chemical engineering unit operations laboratory course. Intended to teach students mass transfer fundamentals related to membrane separations, students tested several commercial desalination membranes, measuring water flux and salt rejections at various pressures, flow rates, and…

  10. Teaching Mass Transfer and Filtration Using Crossflow Reverse Osmosis and Nanofiltration: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Unit Operations Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, Daniel; McCutcheon, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A crossflow reverse osmosis (RO) system was built for a senior-level chemical engineering unit operations laboratory course. Intended to teach students mass transfer fundamentals related to membrane separations, students tested several commercial desalination membranes, measuring water flux and salt rejections at various pressures, flow rates, and…

  11. Pilot-scale crossflow-microfiltration and pasturization to remove spores of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) from milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    HTST pasteurization of milk is generally ineffective against spore-forming bacteria such as Bacillus anthracis (BA) but is lethal to its vegetative cells. Crossflow microfiltration (MF), using ceramic membranes with a pore diameter of 1.4 um, has been shown to physically remove somatic cells, vegeta...

  12. A Riding-through Technique for Seamless Transition between Islanded and Grid-Connected Modes of Droop-Controlled Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Shang-hung; Lee, Tzung-Lin; Kuo, Chun-Yi;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a seamless transition method for a droop-controlled inverter. The droop control is suitable to make the inverter work as a voltage source in both islanded and grid-connected modes, however, the transfer between theses modes can result in a big inrush current that may damage...... the system. The proposed method allows the droop-controlled inverter to improve the transient response when transferring between modes, by detecting the inrush current, activating a current control loop during transients, and then transferring back to droop-controlled mode smoothly by using a virtual...... inductance loop. In addition, a local phase-locked-loop (PLL) is proposed to align the inverter voltage with the grid in order to reduce the transient current during the transition. Therefore, the droop-controlled inverter is able to operate in both grid-connected and islanded modes, providing as well...

  13. Circuits and methods for determination and control of signal transition rates in electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, David Kay

    2016-04-12

    A charge/discharge input is for respectively supplying charge to, or drawing charge from, an electrochemical cell. A transition modifying circuit is coupled between the charge/discharge input and a terminal of the electrochemical cell and includes at least one of an inductive constituent, a capacitive constituent and a resistive constituent selected to generate an adjusted transition rate on the terminal sufficient to reduce degradation of a charge capacity characteristic of the electrochemical cell. A method determines characteristics of the transition modifying circuit. A degradation characteristic of the electrochemical cell is analyzed relative to a transition rate of the charge/discharge input applied to the electrochemical cell. An adjusted transition rate is determined for a signal to be applied to the electrochemical cell that will reduce the degradation characteristic. At least one of an inductance, a capacitance, and a resistance is selected for the transition modifying circuit to achieve the adjusted transition rate.

  14. Field-control, phase-transitions, and life’s emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargi eMitra-Delmotte

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Instances of critical-like characteristics in living systems at each organizational level (bio-molecules to ecosystems as well as the spontaneous emergence of computation (Langton, do suggest the relevance of self-organized criticality (SOC. But extrapolating complex bio-systems to life’s origins, brings up a paradox: how could simple organics-- lacking the ‘soft matter’ response properties of today’s complex bio-molecules--have dissipated energy from primordial reactions (eventually reducing CO2 in a controlled manner for their ‘ordering’? Nevertheless, a causal link of life’s macroscopic irreversible dynamics to the microscopic reversible laws of statistical mechanics is indicated via the ‘functional-takeover’ of a soft magnetic scaffold by organics (c.f. Cairns-Smith’s crystal-scaffold. A field-controlled structure offers a mechanism for bootstrapping-- bottom-up assembly with top-down control: its super-paramagnetic colloidal components obey reversible dynamics, but its dissipation of magnetic (H-field energy for aggregation breaks time-reversal symmetry. The responsive adjustments of the controlled (host mineral system to environmental changes would bring about mutual coupling between random organic sets supported by it; here the generation of long-range correlations within organic (guest networks could include SOC-like mechanisms. And, such cooperative adjustments enable the selection of the functional configuration by altering the inorganic dipolar network’s capacity to assist a spontaneous process. A non-equilibrium dynamics could now drive the kinetically-oriented system (trimming the phase-space via sterically-coupled organics towards a series of phase-transitions with appropriate organic replacements taking-over its functions. Where available, experiments are cited in support of these speculations and for designing appropriate tests.

  15. Fluctuations in spo0A transcription control rare developmental transitions in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Mirouze

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylated Spo0A is a master regulator of stationary phase development in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis, controlling the formation of spores, biofilms, and cells competent for transformation. We have monitored the rate of transcription of the spo0A gene during growth in sporulation medium using promoter fusions to firefly luciferase. This rate increases sharply during transient diauxie-like pauses in growth rate and then declines as growth resumes. In contrast, the rate of transcription of an rRNA gene decreases and increases in parallel with the growth rate, as expected for stable RNA synthesis. The growth pause-dependent bursts of spo0A transcription, which reflect the activity of the spo0A vegetative promoter, are largely independent of all known regulators of spo0A transcription. Evidence is offered in support of a "passive regulation" model in which RNA polymerase stops transcribing rRNA genes during growth pauses, thus becoming available for the transcription of spo0A. We show that the bursts are followed by the production of phosphorylated Spo0A, and we propose that they represent initial responses to stress that bring the average cell closer to the thresholds for transition to bimodally expressed developmental responses. Measurement of the numbers of cells expressing a competence marker before and after the bursts supports this hypothesis. In the absence of ppGpp, the increase in spo0A transcription that accompanies the entrance to stationary phase is delayed and sporulation is markedly diminished. In spite of this, our data contradicts the hypothesis that sporulation is initiated when a ppGpp-induced depression of the GTP pool relieves repression by CodY. We suggest that, while the programmed induction of sporulation that occurs in stationary phase is apparently provoked by increased flux through the phosphorelay, bet-hedging stochastic transitions to at least competence are induced by bursts in transcription.

  16. Changes in neural mechanisms of cognitive control during the transition from late adolescence to young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroude, Kim; Jolles, Jelle; Croiset, Gerda; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2013-07-01

    The transition from late adolescence to young adulthood is marked by anatomical maturation of various brain regions. In parallel, defining life changes take place, such as entrance into college. Up till now research has not focused on functional brain differences during this particular developmental stage. The current cross-sectional fMRI study investigates age differences in cognitive control by comparing late adolescents, 18-19 years old, with young adults, 23-25 years old. Seventy-four male and female medical students carried out a combined cognitive and emotional Stroop task. Overall, lateral frontoparietal and medial parietal activation was observed during cognitive interference resolution. Young adults showed stronger activation in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus and middle cingulate, compared to late adolescents. During emotional interference resolution, the left precentral and postcentral gyrus were involved across age and sex. The dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and precuneus were activated more in young adults than in late adolescents. No sex-related differences were found in this homogeneous sample. The results suggest that the neural bases of cognitive control continue to change between late adolescence and young adulthood.

  17. Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides: Growth Mechanism, Controllability, and Scalability

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan

    2017-07-06

    Recently there have been many research breakthroughs in two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, boron nitride (h-BN), black phosphors (BPs), and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). The unique electrical, optical, and thermal properties in 2D materials are associated with their strictly defined low dimensionalities. These materials provide a wide range of basic building blocks for next-generation electronics. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has shown great promise to generate high-quality TMDC layers with scalable size, controllable thickness, and excellent electronic properties suitable for both technological applications and fundamental sciences. The capability to precisely engineer 2D materials by chemical approaches has also given rise to fascinating new physics, which could lead to exciting new applications. In this Review, we introduce the latest development of TMDC synthesis by CVD approaches and provide further insight for the controllable and reliable synthesis of atomically thin TMDCs. Understanding of the vapor-phase growth mechanism of 2D TMDCs could benefit the formation of complicated heterostructures and novel artificial 2D lattices.

  18. Dynamical scalability and control of totally connected spin networks across quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Óscar L.; Quiroga, Luis; Rodríguez, Ferney J.; Johnson, Neil F.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamical quantum phase crossings of spin networks have recently received increased attention thanks to their relation to adiabatic quantum computing, and their feasible realizations using ultra-cold atomic and molecular systems with a highly tunable degree of connectivity. Dynamical scaling of spatially distributed systems like Ising models have been widely studied, and successfully related to well-known theories like the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The case of totally connected networks such as the Dicke Model and Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick Model, however, is known to exhibit a breakdown of these frameworks. Our analysis overcomes the lack of spatial correlation structure by developing a general approach which (i) is valid regardless the connectivity of the system, (ii) goes beyond critical exponents, and (iii) provides a time-resolved picture of dynamical scaling. By treating these models as a method for macroscopic quantum control of their subsystems, we have found microscopic signatures of the dynamical scaling as well as instances of dynamical enhancement of distinctive quantum properties such as entanglement and coherence. Our results yield novel prescriptions for the fields of quantum simulations and quantum control, and deepen our fundamental understanding of phase transitions.

  19. The care transitions innovation (C-TraIn) for socioeconomically disadvantaged adults: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Honora; Michaels, Leann; Chan, Benjamin; Kansagara, Devan

    2014-11-01

    Despite growing emphasis on transitional care to reduce costs and improve quality, few studies have examined transitional care improvements in socioeconomically disadvantaged adults. It is important to consider these patients separately as many are high-utilizers, have different needs, and may have different responses to interventions. To evaluate the impact of a multicomponent transitional care improvement program on 30-day readmissions, emergency department (ED) use, transitional care quality, and mortality. Clustered randomized controlled trial conducted at a single urban academic medical center in Portland, Oregon. Three hundred eighty-two hospitalized low-income adults admitted to general medicine or cardiology who were uninsured or had public insurance. Multicomponent intervention including (1) transitional nurse coaching and education, including home visits for highest risk patients; (2) pharmacy care, including provision of 30 days of medications after discharge for those without prescription drug coverage; (3) post-hospital primary care linkages; (4) systems integration and continuous quality improvement. Primary outcomes included 30-day inpatient readmission and ED use. Readmission data were obtained using state-wide administrative data for all participants (insured and uninsured). Secondary outcomes included quality (3-item Care Transitions Measure) and mortality. Research staff administering questionnaires and assessing outcomes were blinded. There was no significant difference in 30-day readmission between C-TraIn (30/209, 14.4 %) and control patients (27/173, 16.1 %), p = 0.644, or in ED visits between C-TraIn (51/209, 24.4 %) and control (33/173, 19.6 %), p = 0.271. C-TraIn was associated with improved transitional care quality; 47.3 % (71/150) of C-TraIn patients reported a high quality transition compared to 30.3 % (36/119) control patients, odds ratio 2.17 (95 % CI 1.30-3.64). Zero C-TraIn patients died in the 30-day post-discharge period

  20. Polymorphism control of superconductivity and magnetism in Cs(3)C(60) close to the Mott transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganin, Alexey Y; Takabayashi, Yasuhiro; Jeglic, Peter; Arcon, Denis; Potocnik, Anton; Baker, Peter J; Ohishi, Yasuo; McDonald, Martin T; Tzirakis, Manolis D; McLennan, Alec; Darling, George R; Takata, Masaki; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Prassides, Kosmas

    2010-07-08

    The crystal structure of a solid controls the interactions between the electronically active units and thus its electronic properties. In the high-temperature superconducting copper oxides, only one spatial arrangement of the electronically active Cu(2+) units-a two-dimensional square lattice-is available to study the competition between the cooperative electronic states of magnetic order and superconductivity. Crystals of the spherical molecular C(60)(3-) anion support both superconductivity and magnetism but can consist of fundamentally distinct three-dimensional arrangements of the anions. Superconductivity in the A(3)C(60) (A = alkali metal) fullerides has been exclusively associated with face-centred cubic (f.c.c.) packing of C(60)(3-) (refs 2, 3), but recently the most expanded (and thus having the highest superconducting transition temperature, T(c); ref. 4) composition Cs(3)C(60) has been isolated as a body-centred cubic (b.c.c.) packing, which supports both superconductivity and magnetic order. Here we isolate the f.c.c. polymorph of Cs(3)C(60) to show how the spatial arrangement of the electronically active units controls the competing superconducting and magnetic electronic ground states. Unlike all the other f.c.c. A(3)C(60) fullerides, f.c.c. Cs(3)C(60) is not a superconductor but a magnetic insulator at ambient pressure, and becomes superconducting under pressure. The magnetic ordering occurs at an order of magnitude lower temperature in the geometrically frustrated f.c.c. polymorph (Néel temperature T(N) = 2.2 K) than in the b.c.c.-based packing (T(N) = 46 K). The different lattice packings of C(60)(3-) change T(c) from 38 K in b.c.c. Cs(3)C(60) to 35 K in f.c.c. Cs(3)C(60) (the highest found in the f.c.c. A(3)C(60) family). The existence of two superconducting packings of the same electronically active unit reveals that T(c) scales universally in a structure-independent dome-like relationship with proximity to the Mott metal-insulator transition

  1. Long-Time Performance of a Stainless Steel Crossflow Filter with Simulated Hanford Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Billing, Justin M.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2015-10-01

    The long-time (>100 hours of operation) flux was measured for a set of tests where slurry waste simulant was separated and continuously recycled in a stainless steel crossflow filter. The tests were conducted at various constant axial velocities and transmembrane pressures. In all five tests, the flux continued to decay at long times and did not reach a steady-state. The long-time slope of the decay was unaffected by the axial velocity, and larger transmembrane pressure resulted in a larger slope. The experimental results are compared to theoretical predictions of the time to initiate cake formation and the time to reach steady-state, both of which do not imply long-time phenomena would be expected. A more reasonable match between theory and experiment was achieved using a model based on the principles of dead-end filtration.

  2. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS RESEARCH ON PRESSURE LOSS OF CROSS-FLOW PERFORATED MUFFLER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiaodong; ZHOU Yiqi; FANG Jianhua; MAN Xiliang; ZHAO Zhengxu

    2007-01-01

    The pressure loss of cross-flow perforated muffler has been computed with the procedure of physical modeling, simulation and data processing. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to investigate the relations of porosities, flow velocity and diameter of the holes with the pressure loss. Accordingly, some preliminary results have been obtained that pressure loss increases with porosity descent as nearly a hyperbolic trend, rising flow velocity of the input makes the pressure loss increasing with parabola trend, diameter of holes affects little about pressure loss of the muffler. Otherwise, the holes on the perforated pipes make the air flow gently and meanly,which decreases the air impact to the wall and pipes in the muffler. A practical perforated muffler is used to illustrate the available of this method for pressure loss computation, and the comparison shows that the computation results with the method of CFD has reference value for muffler design.

  3. Analysis of radiative heat transfer impact in cross-flow tube and fin heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanuszkiewicz-Drapała, Małgorzata; Bury, Tomasz; Widziewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-03-01

    A cross-flow, tube and fin heat exchanger of the water - air type is the subject of the analysis. The analysis had experimental and computational form and was aimed for evaluation of radiative heat transfer impact on the heat exchanger performance. The main element of the test facility was an enlarged recurrent segment of the heat exchanger under consideration. The main results of measurements are heat transfer rates, as well as temperature distributions on the surface of the first fin obtained by using the infrared camera. The experimental results have been next compared to computational ones coming from a numerical model of the test station. The model has been elaborated using computational fluid dynamics software. The computations have been accomplished for two cases: without radiative heat transfer and taking this phenomenon into account. Evaluation of the radiative heat transfer impact in considered system has been done by comparing all the received results.

  4. Thermal-hydraulic performance of oval tubes in a cross-flow of air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Ala

    2005-06-01

    The thermal-hydraulic performance of five oval tubes is experimentally investigated and compared with that for a circular tube in a cross-flow of air. The range of Reynolds numbers ReD is approximately between 1,000 and 11,000. The nominal axis ratios R (major axis/minor axis) for three of the investigated oval tubes are 2, 3, and 4. Two other configurations of oval tubes are also tested, an oval tube R=3 with two wires soldered on its upper and lower top positions, and a cut-oval tube. The performance of the tubes is corrected for the effects of area blockage and turbulence intensity. The measurement results show that the mean Nusselt numbers NuD for the oval tubes are close to that for the circular tube for ReDthermal-hydraulic performance is indicated by the ratio NuD/Cd, which shows a better combined performance for the oval tubes.

  5. Review:Progress in research on mixing techniques for transverse injection flow fields in supersonic crossflows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei HUANG; Li YAN

    2013-01-01

    The transverse injection flow field has an important impact on the flowpath design of scramjet engines.At present a combination of the transverse injection scheme and any other flame holder has been widely employed in hypersonic propulsion systems to promote the mixing process between the fuel and the supersonic freestream;combustion efficiency has been improved thereby,as well as engine thrust.Research on mixing techniques for the transverse injection flow field is summarized from four aspects,namely the jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio,the geometric configuration of the injection port,the number of injection ports,and the injection angle.In conclusion,urgent investigations of mixing techniques of the transverse injection flow field are proposed,especially data mining in the quantitative analytical results for transverse injection flow field,based on results from multi-objective design optimization theory.

  6. An Experimental Study on the Mixing of Inclined Heated Jets with a Cold Crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.S.Chen; Y.R.Cheng

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study is presented for the mixing of one-and dual-line heated jets injected at 60° angle with x-axis into a cold crossflow in a rectangular channel.Measurements of the mean temperature,velocity,and turbulence intensity together with the flow visualization were performed.Self-similar forms for the dimensionless vertical temperature profiles were found.Parametric variations characterizing the mixing processes of the temperature and velocity fields were examined and correlated in terms of the momentum flux ratio and downstream distance.Results show that both the thermal and velocity penetration depths increase with increasing momentum flux ratio and downstream distance.The turbulence intensity is strong within the region of jet half-width,and the maximum value occurs at a point close to the jet velocity trajectory.

  7. Convective Heat Transfer Characteristics of the Elliptic Cylinder with Axis Ratio 4 : 1 in Crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Shou-liang; LI Qing-ling; WANG Ru-zhu

    2005-01-01

    The heat transfer features around the elliptic cylinder of axis ratio 4: 1 in crossflow were investigated experimentally within a wide range of Reynolds number. By means of heat-mass transfer analogy and the naphthalene sublimation technique, the local heat transfer distribution and the mean heat transfer coefficient are clarified.The result shows that the mean heat transfer coefficient is higher than that of a circular cylinder in most Reynolds number range regarded, and this superiority turns to be more significant with the increase of flow speed. Moreover, the effect of axis ratio on mean heat transfer coefficient was investigated tentatively. The oil-lampblack technique was employed to enable visualization of the flow pattern around the cylinder and on the cylinder wall.

  8. Continuous Processing of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Suspensions via Dynamic Cross-Flow Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursch, Johannes; Hohl, Roland; Toschkoff, Gregor; Dujmovic, Diana; Brozio, Jörg; Krumme, Markus; Rasenack, Norbert; Khinast, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Over the last years, continuous manufacturing has created significant interest in the pharmaceutical industry. Continuous filtration at low flow rates and high solid loadings poses, however, a significant challenge. A commercially available, continuously operating, dynamic cross-flow filtration device (CFF) is tested and characterized. It is shown that the CFF is a highly suitable technology for continuous filtration. For all tested model active pharmaceutical ingredients, a material-specific strictly linear relationship between feed and permeate rate is identified. Moreover, for each tested substance, a constant concentration factor is reached. A one-parameter model based on a linear equation is suitable to fully describe the CFF filtration performance. This rather unexpected finding and the concentration polarization layer buildup is analyzed and a basic model to describe the observed filtration behavior is developed.

  9. Spanwise mass transfer variations on a cylinder in 'nominally' uniform crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayle, R. E.; Marziale, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mass transfer experiments on a circular cylinder in a 'nominally' uniform crossflow are described. Experiments were conducted at the tunnel's turbulence level and with a woven-wire turbulence screen. In both cases spanwise and circumferential mass transfer measurements were made. Without the turbulence screen, the results were found to be spanwise independent and agreed quite well with both theory and the result of others. In addition to the mass transfer measurements, spanwise traverse measurements of the mean velocity and turbulence quantities in the incident flow were made and showed that the screen produced a small-amplitude spanwise periodic perturbation in the incident flow. Although this perturbation was only one quarter of a percent in the mean velocity and buried in the stream's turbulence, disproportionately large spanwise variations of 15 percent were found in the mass transfer rate.

  10. Characterization of the selectivity of microsieves using a cross-flow microfiltration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Gutierrez-Rivera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Filtration through membranes is a process largely employed in the food and chemical industry to separate particles. Sieves present some advantages in relation to conventional membranes such as high homogeneity in the pore sizes, smooth surfaces, straight-through pores, etc. In this paper we compare the selectivity in the exclusion of particles by size of sieves with circular and slit pores with the same porosity. The selectivity was investigated by filtering a mixture of rutin in water in a cross-flow filtration system. The particle-size distribution of the rutin solution was measured before and after microfiltration. The results showed a high efficiency in the size exclusion of particles for microsieves with circular pores. The filtration through a commercial membrane (net filter with similar characteristics was also characterized for comparison.

  11. Spatial heterogeneity of biofouling under different cross-flow velocities in reverse osmosis membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, N.M.

    2016-09-06

    The spatially heterogeneous distribution of biofouling in spiral wound membrane systems restricts (i) the water distribution over the membrane surface and therefore (ii) the membrane-based water treatment. The objective of the study was to assess the spatial heterogeneity of biofilm development over the membrane fouling simulator (MFS) length (inlet and outlet part) at three different cross-flow velocities (0.08, 0.12 and 0.16 m/s). The MFS contained sheets of membrane and feed spacer and simulated the first 0.20 m of spiral-wound membrane modules where biofouling accumulates the most in practice. In-situ non-destructive oxygen imaging using planar optodes was applied to determine the biofilm spatially resolved activity and heterogeneity.

  12. Mathematical models of membrane fouling in cross-flow micro-filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Jimena Ortíz Jerez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The greatest difficulty arising during cross-flow micro-filtration is the formation of a cake layer on the membrane sur-face (also called fouling, thereby affecting system performance. Fouling has been related to permeate flux decay re-sulting from changes in operating variables. Many articles have been published in an attempt to explain this phe-nomenon but it has not yet been fully understood because it depends on specific solution/membrane interactions and differing parameters. This work was aimed at presenting an analytical review of recently published mathematical models to explain fouling. Although the reviewed models can be adjusted to any type of application, a simple “con-centration polarisation” model is advisable in the particular case of tropical fruit juices for describing the insoluble solids being deposited on membrane surface.

  13. Computer programs to predict induced effects of jets exhausting into a crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, S. C., Jr.; Mendenhall, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    A user's manual for two computer programs was developed to predict the induced effects of jets exhausting into a crossflow. Program JETPLT predicts pressures induced on an infinite flat plate by a jet exhausting at angles to the plate and Program JETBOD, in conjunction with a panel code, predicts pressures induced on a body of revolution by a jet exhausting normal to the surface. Both codes use a potential model of the jet and adjacent surface with empirical corrections for the viscous or nonpotential effects. This program manual contains a description of the use of both programs, instructions for preparation of input, descriptions of the output, limitations of the codes, and sample cases. In addition, procedures to extend both codes to include additional empirical correlations are described.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Cross-Flow Axis Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines, Including Effects of Waves and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2011-12-01

    A new test bed for Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines at the Center for Ocean Renewable Energy at the University of New Hampshire (UNH-CORE) was used to evaluate the performance of different cross-flow axis hydrokinetic turbines, and investigate the effects of waves and turbulence on these devices. The test bed was designed and built to operate in the UNH tow and wave tank, which has a cross section of 3.67m (width) x 2.44m (depth). In the present configuration, tow speeds of up to 3 m/s can be achieved for smaller turbine models, and up to 1.5 m/s for large turbine models with low gear ratio. It features a flap style wave maker at one end that is capable of producing waves with 1-5 s periods up to 0.4 m wave height. Turbine thrust (drag) and mechanical power output (torque, angular velocity) were measured at tow speeds of 0.6-1.5 m/s for two cross-flow axis MHK turbines: a Gorlov Helical Turbine (GHT) and a Lucid spherical turbine (LST). Both were provided by Lucid Energy Technologies, LLP, and have frontal areas of 1.3 (GHT) and 1.0 (LST) square meters, respectively. GHT performance was also measured in progressive waves of various periods, grid turbulence, and in the wake of a cylinder, installed upstream at various cross-stream locations. Overall, the GHT performs with higher power and thrust (drag) coefficients than the LST. A 2nd law efficiency, or kinetic exergy efficiency, was defined to calculate what fraction of the kinetic energy removed from the flow is converted to usable shaft work by each turbine. The exergy efficiency varies with tip speed ratio but approaches 90% for the optimum operating conditions for each turbine. The fraction of kinetic energy removed from the fluid that is not converted to shaft work is redistributed into turbulent kinetic energy in the wake. Quantifying the kinetic energy flowing out of the turbine is important for modeling of environmental transport processes and for predicting performance when turbines are used in arrays

  15. LES of an inclined jet into a supersonic cross-flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrante, Antonino; Matheou, Georgios; Dimotakis, Paul E; Stephens, Mike; Adams, Paul; Walters, Richard; Hand, Randall

    2008-01-01

    This short article describes flow parameters, numerical method, and animations of the fluid dynamics video LES of an Inclined Jet into a Supersonic Cross-Flow (http://hdl.handle.net/1813/11480). Helium is injected through an inclined round jet into a supersonic air flow at Mach 3.6. The video shows 2D contours of Mach number and magnitude of density gradient, and 3D iso-surfaces of Helium mass-fraction and vortical structures. Large eddy simulation with the sub-grid scale (LES-SGS) stretched vortex model of turbulent and scalar transport captures the main flow features: bow shock, Mach disk, shear layers, counter-rotating vortices, and large-scale structures.

  16. LES of turbulent jet in cross-flow: Part 1 – A numerical validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavar, Dalibor; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of a LES based numerical simulation of the turbulent jet-in-cross-flow (JICF) flowfield, with Reynolds number based on cross-flow velocity and jet diameter Re=2400 and jet-to-cross-flow velocity ratio of R=3.3. The JICF flow case has been investigated in great detail......, involving conduction of two independent precursor simulations, prior to the main JICF simulation, as the considered case has turbulent inflow conditions on both jet and cross-stream side. The LES results are directly compared to pointwise Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) measurements, showing a very good...... agreement on the level of various statistical quantities in all flow regions but the immediate jet-to-cross-flow exhaustion zone. Several LES computations involving grids of up to 15million grid points have been conducted, showing no improvement in the agreement between numerical results and measurements...

  17. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-guo; Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-01

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma = 2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d AIAA J. 46, 2674-2686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 1360-1366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  18. Experimental researches on mass and heat transfer in new typical cross-flow rotating packed bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Haihui; ZENG Yingying; GAO Wenshuai

    2006-01-01

    New typical cross-flow Rotating Packed Bed(RPB)called multi-pulverizing RPB was manufactured.There is enough void in multi-pulverizing RPB,where liquid easily flows and is repeatedly pulverized by light packing,which decreases the material consumed,lightens the weight,and compacts the structure.Mass and heat transfer property in the new type PRB were studied by two experimental models.In the mass transfer model,the axial fan pumping gas press is only 100 Pa,mass transfer coefficient and volumetric mass transfer coefficient are similar to countercurrent RPB,which are an order quantity lager than that in the conventional packed tower.In the heat transfer experiment,the axial fan pumping gas press is only 120 Pa;volumetric heatwhich especially suits the treatment of large gas flow and lower gas pressure drop.

  19. Investigation of Blade Angle of an Open Cross-Flow Runner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Iio, Shouichiro; Veerapun, Salisa; Uchiyama, Tomomi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a nano-hydraulic turbine utilizing drop structure in irrigation channels or industrial waterways. This study was focused on an open-type cross-flow turbine without any attached equipment for cost reduction and easy maintenance. In this study, the authors used an artificial indoor waterfall as lab model. Test runner which is a simple structure of 20 circular arc-shaped blades sandwiched by two circular plates was used The optimum inlet blade angle and the relationship between the power performance and the flow rate approaching theoretically and experimentally were investigated. As a result, the optimum inlet blade angle due to the flow rate was changed. Additionally, allocation rate of power output in 1st stage and 2nd stage is changed by the blade inlet angle.

  20. Analysis of radiative heat transfer impact in cross-flow tube and fin heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanuszkiewicz-Drapała Małgorzata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A cross-flow, tube and fin heat exchanger of the water – air type is the subject of the analysis. The analysis had experimental and computational form and was aimed for evaluation of radiative heat transfer impact on the heat exchanger performance. The main element of the test facility was an enlarged recurrent segment of the heat exchanger under consideration. The main results of measurements are heat transfer rates, as well as temperature distributions on the surface of the first fin obtained by using the infrared camera. The experimental results have been next compared to computational ones coming from a numerical model of the test station. The model has been elaborated using computational fluid dynamics software. The computations have been accomplished for two cases: without radiative heat transfer and taking this phenomenon into account. Evaluation of the radiative heat transfer impact in considered system has been done by comparing all the received results.

  1. Performance assessment of a small wind turbine with crossflow runner by numerical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragomirescu, A. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Department of Hydraulics, Hydraulic Machinery and Environmental Engineering, Splaiul Independentei 313, 060042 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-03-15

    Most of the classical wind turbines are not able to start at wind speeds as low as 2-3 m/s. Other turbines, like Savonius, have a low maximum efficiency, which renders them useless in poor wind conditions. Therefore, new turbine designs are required to harvest wind power even when the wind speed is low. A wind turbine having a crossflow runner, similar to the Banki water turbine, is studied numerically in this work in order to estimate its performance. The results obtained suggest that this turbine has a considerable high starting torque and its maximum power coefficient is comparable to those of horizontal axis wind turbines. Based on the results obtained, some improvements of the design are proposed in order to further increase turbine performance. (author)

  2. Improving Ambient Wind Environments of a Cross-flow Wind Turbine near a Structure by using an Inlet Guide Structure and a Flow Deflector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadakazu TANINO; Shinichiro NAKAO; Genki UEBAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    A cross-flow wind turbine near a structure was tested for the performance. The results showed that the performance of a cross-flow wind turbine near a structure was up to 30% higher than the one without a structure.In addition, we tried to get higher performance of a cross-flow wind turbine by using an Inlet Guide Structure and a Flow Deflector. An Inlet Guide Structure was placed on the edge of a structure and a Flow Deflector was set near a cross-flow wind turbine and can improve ambient wind environments of the wind turbine, the maximum power coefficients were about 15 to 40% higher and the tip speed ratio range showing the high power coefficient was wide and the positive gradients were steep apparently.

  3. Numerical study of a M-cycle cross-flow heat exchanger for indirect evaporative cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Changhong [Department of the Built Environment, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); School of Civil Engineering, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Zhao, Xudong; Smith, Stefan [Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Riffat, S.B. [Department of the Built Environment, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, numerical analyses of the thermal performance of an indirect evaporative air cooler incorporating a M-cycle cross-flow heat exchanger has been carried out. The numerical model was established from solving the coupled governing equations for heat and mass transfer between the product and working air, using the finite-element method. The model was developed using the EES (Engineering Equation Solver) environment and validated by published experimental data. Correlation between the cooling (wet-bulb) effectiveness, system COP and a number of air flow/exchanger parameters was developed. It is found that lower channel air velocity, lower inlet air relative humidity, and higher working-to-product air ratio yielded higher cooling effectiveness. The recommended average air velocities in dry and wet channels should not be greater than 1.77 m/s and 0.7 m/s, respectively. The optimum flow ratio of working-to-product air for this cooler is 50%. The channel geometric sizes, i.e. channel length and height, also impose significant impact to system performance. Longer channel length and smaller channel height contribute to increase of the system cooling effectiveness but lead to reduced system COP. The recommend channel height is 4 mm and the dimensionless channel length, i.e., ratio of the channel length to height, should be in the range 100 to 300. Numerical study results indicated that this new type of M-cycle heat and mass exchanger can achieve 16.7% higher cooling effectiveness compared with the conventional cross-flow heat and mass exchanger for the indirect evaporative cooler. The model of this kind is new and not yet reported in literatures. The results of the study help with design and performance analyses of such a new type of indirect evaporative air cooler, and in further, help increasing market rating of the technology within building air conditioning sector, which is currently dominated by the conventional compression refrigeration technology. (author)

  4. The development of a porous silicon nitride crossflow filter; Final report, September 1988--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in developing a permeable form of silicon nitride for application to ceramic crossflow filters for use in advanced coal-fired electric power plants. The program was sponsored by the Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center and consisted of a design analysis and material development phase and a filter manufacture and demonstration phase. The crossflow filter design and operating requirements were defined. A filter design meeting the requirements was developed and thermal and stress analyses were performed. Material development efforts focused initially on reaction-bonded silicon nitride material. This approach was not successful, and the materials effort was refocused on the development of a permeable form of sintered silicon nitride (SSN). This effort was successful. The SSN material was used for the second phase of the program, filter manufacture and evaluation. Four half-scale SAN filter modules were fabricated. Three of the modules were qualified for filter performance tests. Tests were performed on two of the three qualified modules in the High-Temperature, High-Pressure facility at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The first module failed on test when it expanded into the clamping device, causing dust leakage through the filter. The second module performed well for a cumulative 150-hr test. It displayed excellent filtration capability during the test. The blowback pulse cleaning was highly effective, and the module apparently withstood the stresses induced by the periodic pulse cleaning. Testing of the module resumed, and when the flow of combustion gas through the filter was doubled, cracks developed and the test was concluded.

  5. A Riding-through Technique for Seamless Transition between Islanded and Grid-Connected Modes of Droop-Controlled Inverters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Hung Hu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a seamless transition method for a droop-controlled inverter. The droop control is suitable to make the inverter work as a voltage source in both islanded and grid-connected modes, however, the transfer between theses modes can result in a big inrush current that may damage the system. The proposed method allows the droop-controlled inverter to improve the transient response when transferring between modes, by detecting the inrush current, activating a current control loop during transients, and then transferring back to droop-controlled mode smoothly by using a virtual inductance loop. In addition, a local phase-locked-loop (PLL is proposed to align the inverter voltage with the grid in order to reduce the transient current during the transition. Therefore, the droop-controlled inverter is able to operate in both grid-connected and islanded modes, providing as well a smooth transition between them, requiring neither synchronization signals nor grid-side information. The control algorithm and design procedure are presented. Experimental results from a laboratory prototype validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Resilience of Greek Youth at an Educational Transition Point: The Role of Locus of Control and Coping Strategies as Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontopoulou, Sophia

    2006-01-01

    Variable--and person--focused approaches were applied to study the resilient outcomes of 326 Greek male and female 1st year university students at a major educational transition point. Results indicated that resilience was related to both cognitive and behavioural psychosocial resources in late adolescence. Locus of control emerged as an important…

  7. Gradient fiber electrospinning of layered scaffolds using controlled transitions in fiber diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Casey P; Newton, Scott T; Bowlin, Gary L; Haas, Thomas W; Simpson, David G

    2013-07-01

    We characterize layered, delamination resistant, tissue engineering scaffolds produced by gradient electrospinning using computational fluid dynamics, measurements of fiber diameter with respect to dynamic changes in polymer concentration, SEM analysis, and materials testing. Gradient electrospinning delivers a continuously variable concentration of polymer to the electrospinning jet, resulting in scaffolds that exhibit controlled transitions in fiber diameter across the Z-axis. This makes it possible to produce scaffolds that exhibit very different fiber sizes and material properties on opposing surfaces while eliminating the boundary layers that lead to delamination failures. In materials testing bi-layered laminated electrospun scaffolds (layer 1 = electrospinning fabricated with fibers of this type on opposing surfaces fracture and fail as unified, and mechanically integrated, structures. Gradient electrospinning also eliminates the anisotropic strain properties observed in scaffolds composed of highly aligned fibers. In burst testing, scaffolds composed of aligned fibers produced using gradient electrospinning exhibit superior material properties with respect to scaffolds composed of random or aligned fibers produced from a single polymer concentration or as bi-layered, laminated structures.

  8. Techniques of control of the transit of power by FACTS-series devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziane-Khodja, A.; Adli, M.; Fettous, M. [Bejaia Targa Univ., Bejaia (Algeria). Electrical Engineering Lab

    2007-07-01

    Flexible alternative current transmission system (FACTS) devices are used in power systems to reinforce safety and improve power transmission. FACTS technology enables operators to increase the power capacity of existing equipment by maintaining or improving the essential trading margins to the network stability. The paper described the contribution of FACTS-series systems in improving power transmission. FACTS-series devices include the thyristor controlled series capacitor (TCSC), static synchronous series compensator (SSSC), and unified power flow conditioner (UPFC). The paper demonstrated the capacity of these devices to increase power transmission while improving the margins of exploitation without reaching the stability limit of the networks. FACT-series devices have minimal impact on the environment, and can be quickly implemented at low cost. Digital simulations were performed to analyze the properties of FACTS devices installed on simple circuits with 1 line, 2 lines and then on a wider network. The simulation provided an opportunity to analyze the operation of the series compensators according to their internal parameters and to show their influences on power transit in the lines. It was concluded that the compensators optimize the capacities of energy transfer and the sharing of loads between the parallel circuits while preserving the network stability under various operating conditions. 3 refs., 4 tabs., 13 figs.

  9. Deconvolution of complex differential scanning calorimetry profiles for protein transitions under kinetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Núñez, Citlali; Vera-Robles, L Iraís; Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Hernández-Arana, Andrés

    2016-09-15

    A frequent outcome in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments carried out with large proteins is the irreversibility of the observed endothermic effects. In these cases, DSC profiles are analyzed according to methods developed for temperature-induced denaturation transitions occurring under kinetic control. In the one-step irreversible model (native → denatured) the characteristics of the observed single-peaked endotherm depend on the denaturation enthalpy and the temperature dependence of the reaction rate constant, k. Several procedures have been devised to obtain the parameters that determine the variation of k with temperature. Here, we have elaborated on one of these procedures in order to analyze more complex DSC profiles. Synthetic data for a heat capacity curve were generated according to a model with two sequential reactions; the temperature dependence of each of the two rate constants involved was determined, according to the Eyring's equation, by two fixed parameters. It was then shown that our deconvolution procedure, by making use of heat capacity data alone, permits to extract the parameter values that were initially used. Finally, experimental DSC traces showing two and three maxima were analyzed and reproduced with relative success according to two- and four-step sequential models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective-area growth and controlled substrate coupling of transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersch, Brian M.; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Zhang, Kehao; Bhimanapati, Ganesh R.; Piasecki, Aleksander F.; Labella, Michael, III; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2017-06-01

    Developing a means for true bottom-up, selective-area growth of two-dimensional (2D) materials on device-ready substrates will enable synthesis in regions only where they are needed. Here, we demonstrate seed-free, site-specific nucleation of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with precise control over lateral growth by utilizing an ultra-thin polymeric surface functionalization capable of precluding nucleation and growth. This polymer functional layer (PFL) is derived from conventional photoresists and lithographic processing, and is compatible with multiple growth techniques, precursors (metal organics, solid-source) and TMDs. Additionally, we demonstrate that the substrate can play a major role in TMD transport properties. With proper TMD/substrate decoupling, top-gated field-effect transistors (FETs) fabricated with selectively-grown monolayer MoS2 channels are competitive with current reported MoS2 FETs. The work presented here demonstrates that substrate surface engineering is key to realizing precisely located and geometrically-defined 2D layers via unseeded chemical vapor deposition techniques.

  11. Factors Controlling the Distribution of Transitional Metal Elements in Marine Hydrogenic Ferromanganese Crusts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xuejun; YAO De; LIN Xuehui; ZHAI Shikui

    2009-01-01

    A series of selective dissolution experiments were conducted on the hydrogemc ferromanganese crusts collected near Line Island to study the geochemistry of Mn, Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Ti. Despite of the fact that the very close intergrowth between amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides and δ-MnO2 exists in the hydrogenic ferromanganese crusts, there is no isomorphous substitution between iron and manganese. This is because the two elements in oxides have different crystal chemistry and geochemistry, such assertion being in agreement with the results of selective dissolution experiments. Transitional metal elements such as Cu, Co, Ni and Ti are enriched in different phases, i.e. Ni and Co are incorporated into δ-MnO2 while Cu and T1 are incorporated into ferric oxyhy-droxides. The distributions of the elements in amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides and δ-MnO2 are controlled by the existing states of the elements in the seawater and the crystal chemistry and geochenustry of these elements/ions in oxides.

  12. Sub-circuits of a gene regulatory network control a developmental epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Lindsay R; McClay, David R

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a fundamental cell state change that transforms epithelial to mesenchymal cells during embryonic development, adult tissue repair and cancer metastasis. EMT includes a complex series of intermediate cell state changes including remodeling of the basement membrane, apical constriction, epithelial de-adhesion, directed motility, loss of apical-basal polarity, and acquisition of mesenchymal adhesion and polarity. Transcriptional regulatory state changes must ultimately coordinate the timing and execution of these cell biological processes. A well-characterized gene regulatory network (GRN) in the sea urchin embryo was used to identify the transcription factors that control five distinct cell changes during EMT. Single transcription factors were perturbed and the consequences followed with in vivo time-lapse imaging or immunostaining assays. The data show that five different sub-circuits of the GRN control five distinct cell biological activities, each part of the complex EMT process. Thirteen transcription factors (TFs) expressed specifically in pre-EMT cells were required for EMT. Three TFs highest in the GRN specified and activated EMT (alx1, ets1, tbr) and the 10 TFs downstream of those (tel, erg, hex, tgif, snail, twist, foxn2/3, dri, foxb, foxo) were also required for EMT. No single TF functioned in all five sub-circuits, indicating that there is no EMT master regulator. Instead, the resulting sub-circuit topologies suggest EMT requires multiple simultaneous regulatory mechanisms: forward cascades, parallel inputs and positive-feedback lock downs. The interconnected and overlapping nature of the sub-circuits provides one explanation for the seamless orchestration by the embryo of cell state changes leading to successful EMT.

  13. Controllable Synthesis of Band Gap-Tunable and Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Han eSu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The electronic and optical properties of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD materials are directly governed by their energy gap; thus, the band gap engineering has become an important topic recently. Theoretical and some experimental results have indicated that these monolayer TMD alloys exhibit direct-gap properties and remain stable at room temperature, making them attractive for optoelectronic applications. Here we systematically compared the two approaches of forming MoS2xSe2(1-x monolayer alloys: selenization of MoS2 and sulfurization of MoSe2. The optical energy gap of as-grown CVD MoS2 can be continuously modulated from 1.86 eV (667 nm to 1.57 eV (790 nm controllable by the reaction temperature. Spectroscopic and microscopic evidences show that the Mo-S bonds can be replaced by the Mo-Se bonds in a random and homogeneous manner. By contrast, the replacement of Mo-Se by Mo-S does not randomly occur in the MoSe2 lattice, where the reaction preferentially occurs along the crystalline orientation of MoSe2 and thus the MoSe2/MoS2 biphases are easily observed in the alloys, which makes the optical band gap of these alloys distinctly different. Therefore, the selenization of metal disulfide is preferred and the proposed synthetic strategy opens up a simple route to control the atomic structure as well as optical properties of monolayer TMD alloys.

  14. Abrupt transitions in the NAO control of explosive North Atlantic cyclone development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómara, Iñigo; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Belén; Zurita-Gotor, Pablo; Ulbrich, Sven; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2016-11-01

    Explosive cyclones are intense extra-tropical low pressure systems featuring large deepening rates. In the Euro-Atlantic sector, they are a major source of life-threatening weather impacts due to their associated strong wind gusts, heavy precipitation and storm surges. The wintertime variability of the North Atlantic cyclonic activity is primarily modulated by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In this study, we investigate the interannual and multi-decadal variability of explosive North Atlantic cyclones using track density data from two reanalysis datasets (NCEP and ERA-40) and a control simulation of an atmosphere/ocean coupled General Circulation Model (GCM—ECHAM5/MPIOM1). The leading interannual and multi-decadal modes of variability of explosive cyclone track density are characterized by a strengthening/weakening pattern between Newfoundland and Iceland, which is mainly modulated by the NAO at both timescales. However, the NAO control of interannual cyclone variability is not stationary in time and abruptly fluctuates during periods of 20-25 years long both in NCEP and ECHAM5/MPIOM1. These transitions are accompanied by structural changes in the leading mode of explosive cyclone variability, and by decreased/enhanced baroclinicity over the sub-polar/sub-tropical North Atlantic. The influence of the ocean is apparently important for both the occurrence and persistence of such anomalous periods. In the GCM, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation appears to influence the large-scale baroclinicity and explosive cyclone development over the North Atlantic. These results permit a better understanding of explosive cyclogenesis variability at different climatic timescales and might help to improve predictions of these hazardous events.

  15. The control of magnetism near metal-to-insulator transitions of VO2 nano-belts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, SS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available changes near the metal-insulator phase transition of VO(sub2) produces magnetoelastic anisotropy. We observe intrinsic paramagnetic centres (PM-C) both at the near film surface and bulk/deep PM-C that are affected by the metal-insulator phase transition...

  16. Isotopic evidence of multiple controls on atmospheric oxidants over climate transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Lei; Murray, Lee T.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Lin, Pu; Fu, Qiang; Schauer, Andrew J.; Alexander, Becky

    2017-06-01

    The abundance of tropospheric oxidants, such as ozone (O3) and hydroxyl (OH) and peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2), determines the lifetimes of reduced trace gases such as methane and the production of particulate matter important for climate and human health. The response of tropospheric oxidants to climate change is poorly constrained owing to large uncertainties in the degree to which processes that influence oxidants may change with climate and owing to a lack of palaeo-records with which to constrain levels of atmospheric oxidants during past climate transitions. At present, it is thought that temperature-dependent emissions of tropospheric O3 precursors and water vapour abundance determine the climate response of oxidants, resulting in lower tropospheric O3 in cold climates while HOx (= OH + HO2 + RO2) remains relatively buffered. Here we report observations of oxygen-17 excess of nitrate (a proxy for the relative abundance of atmospheric O3 and HOx) from a Greenland ice core over the most recent glacial-interglacial cycle and for two Dansgaard-Oeschger events. We find that tropospheric oxidants are sensitive to climate change with an increase in the O3/HOx ratio in cold climates, the opposite of current expectations. We hypothesize that the observed increase in O3/HOx in cold climates is driven by enhanced stratosphere-to-troposphere transport of O3, and that reactive halogen chemistry is also enhanced in cold climates. Reactive halogens influence the oxidative capacity of the troposphere directly as oxidants themselves and indirectly via their influence on O3 and HOx. The strength of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport is largely controlled by the Brewer-Dobson circulation, which may be enhanced in colder climates owing to a stronger meridional gradient of sea surface temperatures, with implications for the response of tropospheric oxidants and stratospheric thermal and mass balance. These two processes may represent important, yet relatively

  17. Numerical Simulation of Transient 3-D Turbulent Heated Jet into Crossflow in a Thick-Wall T-Junction Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Hailing; Chen Tingkuan; Luo Yushan; Wang Haijun

    2001-01-01

    The present work is to investigate the transient three-dimensional heated turbulent jet into crossflow in a thick wall T-junction pipe using CFD package. Two cases with the jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 0.05 and 0.5 are computed, with a finite-volume method utilizing k-ε turbulent model. Comparison of the steady-state computations with measured data shows good qualitative agreement. Transient process of injection is simulated to examine the thermal shock on the T-junction component. Temporal temperature of the component is acquired by thermal coupling with the fluid. Via analysis of the flow and thermal characteristics, factors causing the thermal shock are studied. Optimal flow rates are discussed to reduce the thermal shock.

  18. Oil droplet behavior at a pore entrance in the presence of crossflow: Implications for microfiltration of oil-water dispersions

    CERN Document Server

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid; Priezjev, Nikolai V

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of an oil droplet pinned at the entrance of a micropore and subject to clossflow-induced shear is investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that in the absence of crossflow, the critical transmembrane pressure required to force the droplet into the pore is in excellent agreement with a theoretical prediction based on the Young-Laplace equation. With increasing shear rate, the critical pressure of permeation increases, and at sufficiently high shear rates the oil droplet breaks up into two segments. The results of numerical simulations indicate that droplet breakup at the pore entrance is facilitated at lower surface tension, higher oil-to-water viscosity ratio and larger droplet size but is insensitive to the value of the contact angle. Using simple force and torque balance arguments, an estimate for the increase in critical pressure due to crossflow and the breakup capillary number is obtained and validated for different viscosity ratios, surface tension coefficien...

  19. Detailed flow and force measurements in a rotated triangular tube bundle subjected to two-phase cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Zhang, C.; Mureithi, N. W.; Pamfil, D.

    2005-05-01

    Two-phase cross-flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers. A detailed knowledge of the characteristics of two-phase cross-flow in tube bundles is required to understand and formulate flow-induced vibration parameters such as damping, fluidelastic instability, and random excitation due to turbulence. An experimental program was undertaken with a rotated-triangular array of cylinders subjected to air/water flow to simulate two-phase mixtures. The array is made of relatively large diameter cylinders (38 mm) to allow for detailed two-phase flow measurements between cylinders. Fiber-optic probes were developed to measure local void fraction. Local flow velocities and bubble diameters or characteristic lengths of the two-phase mixture are obtained by using double probes. Both the dynamic lift and drag forces were measured with a strain gauge instrumented cylinder.

  20. Membrane fouling control by ultrasound in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Pengzhe; WEN Xianghua; HUANG Xia

    2007-01-01

    In this study,ultrasound was used to control the membrane fouling online in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AMBR).Short-term running experiments were carried out under different operating conditions to explore feasible ultrasonic parameters.The experimental results indicated that when the crossflow velocity was more than 1.0 m/s,membrane fouling could be controlled effectively only by hydrodynamic methods without ultrasound.When ultrasound was applied,an ultrasonic power range of 60-150 W was suitable for the membrane fouling control in the experimental system.The experimental results showed that the membrane fouling was controlled so well that membrane filtration resistance(ΣR) could stay at 5×1011 m-1 for more than a week with the crossflow velocity of 0.75 m/s,which equaled the effect of crossflow velocity of more than 1.0 m/s without ultrasound.

  1. Quantum phase transition of light in a 1-D photon-hopping-controllable resonator array

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Chun-Wang; Deng, Zhi-Jiao; Dai, Hong-Yi; Chen, Ping-Xing; Li, Cheng-Zu

    2011-01-01

    We give a concrete experimental scheme for engineering the insulator-superfluid transition of light in a one-dimensional (1-D) array of coupled superconducting stripline resonators. In our proposed architecture, the on-site interaction and the photon hopping rate can be tuned independently by adjusting the transition frequencies of the charge qubits inside the resonators and at the resonator junctions, respectively, which permits us to systematically study the quantum phase transition of light in a complete parameter space. By combining the techniques of photon-number-dependent qubit transition and fast read-out of the qubit state using a separate low-Q resonator mode, the statistical property of the excitations in each resonator can be obtained with a high efficiency. An analysis of the various decoherence sources and disorders shows that our scheme can serve as a guide to coming experiments involving a small number of coupled resonators.

  2. Stereodynamic control of star-epoxy/anhydride crosslinking actuated by liquid-crystalline phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Jean-Mathieu; Mija, Alice; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas

    2017-02-07

    The epoxy/anhydride copolymerization kinetics of an original star-epoxy monomer (TriaEP) was explored in dynamic heating mode using a series of isoconversional methods. Negative values of the apparent activation energy (Eα) related to an anti-Arrhenius behavior were observed. The transition from Arrhenius to anti-Arrhenius behavior and vice versa depending on the Eα of polymerization was correlated with the dynamics of mesophasic fall-in/fall-out events, physically induced transition (PIT) and chemically induced transition (CIT). This self-assembly phenomenon induces the generation of an anisotropic crosslinked architecture exhibiting both nematic discotic (ND) and nematic columnar (NC) organization. Particular emphasis was placed on evaluating the juxtaposition/contribution of the liquid-crystalline transitions to crosslinking, considering both the reaction dynamics and the macromolecular vision.

  3. Violation of the transit-time limit toward generation of ultrashort electron bunches with controlled velocity chirp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seok-Gy; Shin, Dongwon; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-09-01

    Various methods to generate ultrashort electron bunches for the ultrafast science evolved from the simple configuration of two-plate vacuum diodes to advanced technologies such as nanotips or photocathodes excited by femtosecond lasers. In a diode either in vacuum or of solid-state, the transit-time limit originating from finite electron mobility has caused spatiotemporal bunch-collapse in ultrafast regime. Here, we show for the first time that abrupt exclusion of transit-phase is a more fundamental origin of the bunch-collapse than the transit-time limit. We found that by significantly extending the cathode-anode gap distance, thereby violating the transit-time limit, the conventional transit-time-related upper frequency barrier in diodes can be removed. Furthermore, we reveal how to control the velocity chirp of bunches leading to ballistic bunch-compression. Demonstration of 0.707 THz-, 46.4 femtosecond-bunches from a 50 μm-wide diode in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations shows a way toward simple and compact sources of ultrafast electron bunches for diverse ultrafast sciences.

  4. Promoting a Positive Middle School Transition: A Randomized-Controlled Treatment Study Examining Self-Concept and Self-Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Vitor Alexandre; Marchante, Marta; Jimerson, Shane R

    2017-03-01

    The middle school transition is a salient developmental experience impacting adolescents around the world. This study employed a randomized-controlled treatment design, with randomization at the school level, to investigate the impact of a school adjustment program for middle school transition and potential gender differences. Participants included 1147 students (M age = 9.62; SD = 0.30, 45.7 % girls), who were assessed at four time points during the transition, regarding five dimensions of self-concept (academic, social, emotional, physical and family) and self-esteem. Parallel growth curves were employed to analyze the evolution of self-concept. Following the transition to middle school, students reported lower levels of self-concept (academic, emotional and physical) and self-esteem, while participation in the intervention led to increases in self-esteem and gains in social self-concept. No gender differences were found. These results provide preliminary evidence supporting such interventions in early middle school transitions.

  5. Measuring Armenia's progress on the Tobacco Control Scale: an evaluation of tobacco control in an economy in transition, 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movsisyan, Narine K; Connolly, Gregory N

    2014-02-27

    This study aimed to measure the 5-year progress in the implementation of WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) in Armenia by applying the Tobacco Control Scale, a rapid assessment tool developed to assess the strength of tobacco control policies in Europe. Armenia, an economy in transition, has extreme smoking rates among men (62.5%) despite acceding to FCTC in 2004. However, little research has been carried out to evaluate Armenia's progress in tobacco control. The Tobacco Control Scale total score was estimated for Armenia using the original methodology; however, a different source of data was used in estimating the subscores on tobacco price and tobacco control spending. Armenia's total score on Tobacco Control Scale has considerably improved from 2005 to 2009, mostly due to larger health warnings and advertising ban, and increased public spending on tobacco control. The scores for smoke-free public places, advertising ban, health warnings and treatment categories were below the European average in 2005 and 2007, while the price score was higher. Neither total tobacco control score nor any of its components showed a significant predictive value in a simple regression analysis using the total score and subscores as predictors for log-transformed per capita tobacco consumption. Higher than the European average price score for Armenia cannot be explained by the concept of affordability alone and may reflect a measurement error due to peculiarities of transition economies. The applicability of the Tobacco Control Scale could be limited to countries with mature economies, but not to transition countries such as Armenia with different social, political and economic environment. The scale modification, such as an adjustment for the policy enforcement and the effectiveness of public tobacco control spending along with alternative measures of affordability would be warranted to enhance its applicability in low-income and middle-income countries.

  6. Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: Effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2014-03-01

    Biofilm formation causes performance loss in spiral-wound membrane systems. In this study a microfiltration membrane was used in experiments to simulate fouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules without the influence of concentration polarization. The resistance of a microfiltration membrane is much lower than the intrinsic biofilm resistance, enabling the detection of biofilm accumulation in an early stage. The impact of biofilm accumulation on the transmembrane (biofilm) resistance and feed channel pressure drop as a function of the crossflow velocity (0.05 and 0.20ms-1) and feed spacer presence was studied in transparent membrane biofouling monitors operated at a permeate flux of 20Lm-2h-1. As biodegradable nutrient, acetate was dosed to the feed water (1.0 and 0.25mgL-1 carbon) to enhance biofilm accumulation in the monitors. The studies showed that biofilm formation caused an increased transmembrane resistance and feed channel pressure drop. The effect was strongest at the highest crossflow velocity (0.2ms-1) and in the presence of a feed spacer. Simulating conditions as currently applied in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis installations (crossflow velocity 0.2ms-1 and standard feed spacer) showed that the impact of biofilm formation on performance, in terms of transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop, was strong. This emphasized the importance of hydrodynamics and feed spacer design. Biomass accumulation was related to the nutrient load (nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity). Reducing the nutrient concentration of the feed water enabled the application of higher crossflow velocities. Pretreatment to remove biodegradable nutrient and removal of biomass from the membrane elements played an important part to prevent or restrict biofouling. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Laminar Film Boiling Heat Transfer on a Horizontal Cylinder Submerged in an Upward Crossflow of Saturated Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    茂地, 徹; 川江, 信治; 金丸, 邦康; 山田, 岹

    1988-01-01

    An analysis was made of the steady-state, forced convection film boiling heat transfer on an isothermal horizontal cylinder submerged in an upward crossflow of saturated liquids in the gravitational field. The boundary-layer equations of momentum and of energy for the laminar vapor film, including both the inertia force in the former and the convection term in the latter, were solved using an integral method. The analytical solution was obtained for the integrated boundary-layer equations. A ...

  8. Dynamics of the flowfield generated by the interaction of twin inclined jets of variable temperatures with an oncoming crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhouane, A.; Mahjoub Saïd, N.; Mhiri, H.; Bournot, H.; Le Palec, G.

    2014-02-01

    The present paper examines the common configuration of "twin inclined jets in crossflow" that is widely present in several industrial and academic, small and large-scale applications. It is particularly found in aerodynamic and engineering applications like VTOL aircrafts, the combustion mixing process and other chemical chambers. It can also be found in some domestic applications like chimney stacks or water discharge piping systems in rivers and seas. The twin jets considered in this work are elliptic as inclined with a 60° angle and arranged inline with the oncoming crossflow according to a jet spacing of three diameters. They are examined experimentally in a wind tunnel. The corresponding data is tracked by means of the particle image velocimetry technique in order to obtain the different instantaneous and mean dynamic features (different velocity components, vortices, etc.). The same case is numerically reproduced by the resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations by means of the finite volume method together with the Reynolds stress model second order turbulent closure model. A non-uniform mesh system tightened close to the emitting nozzles is also adopted. The comparison of the measured and calculated data gave a satisfying agreement. Further assumptions are adopted later in order to improve the examined configuration: a non-reactive fume is injected within the discharged jets and the jets' temperature is varied with reference to a constant mainstream temperature. Our aim is to evaluate precisely the impact of this temperature difference on the flow field, particularly on the dynamics of the jets in a crossflow. This parameter, namely the temperature difference, proved mainly to accelerate the discharged jet plumes in the direction of the main flow, which enhanced the mixing, particularly in the longitudinal direction. The mixing in the other directions was also increased due to the weaker density of the jets, which enabled them to progress relatively

  9. Exercise mitigates mitochondrial permeability transition pore and quality control mechanisms alterations in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Inês O; Passos, Emanuel; Diogo, Cátia V; Rocha-Rodrigues, Sílvia; Santos-Alves, Estela; Oliveira, Paulo J; Ascensão, António; Magalhães, José

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial quality control and apoptosis have been described as key components in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH); exercise is recognized as a nonpharmacological strategy to counteract NASH-associated consequences. We aimed to analyze the effect of voluntary physical activity (VPA) and endurance training (ET) against NASH-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and mitochondrial and cellular quality control deleterious alterations. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into standard-diet sedentary (SS, n = 16), standard-diet VPA (n = 8), high-fat diet sedentary (HS, n = 16), and high-fat diet VPA (n = 8). After 9 weeks of diet treatment, half of the SS and HS groups were engaged in an ET program for 8 weeks, 5 days/week, 1 h/day. Liver mPTP susceptibility through osmotic swelling, mPTP-related proteins (cyclophilin D, Sirtuin3, Cofilin-1), markers of mitochondrial biogenesis ((mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator protein (PGC-1α)), dynamics (Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), Dynamin related protein 1, and Optic atrophy 1)), auto/mitophagy (Beclin-1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, p62, PINK1, and Parkin), and apoptotic signaling (Bax, Bcl-2) and caspases-like activities were assessed. HS animals showed an increased susceptibility to mPTP, compromised expression of Tfam, Mfn1, PINK1, and Parkin and an increase in Bax content (HS vs. SS). ET and VPA improved biogenesis-related proteins (PGC-1α) and autophagy signaling (Beclin-1 and Beclin-1/Bcl-2 ratio) and decreased apoptotic signaling (caspases 8 activity, Bax content, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio). However, only ET decreased mPTP susceptibility and positively modulated Bcl-2, Tfam, Mfn1, Mfn2, PINK1, and Parkin content. In conclusion, exercise reduces the increased susceptibility to mPTP induced by NASH and promotes the increase of auto/mitophagy and mitochondrial

  10. On the Nonlinear Evolution of a Stationary Cross-Flow Vortex in a Fully Three-Dimensional Boundary Layer Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear stability of a fully three-dimensional boundary layer flow in an incompressible fluid and derive an equation governing the nonlinear development of a stationary cross-flow vortex. The amplitude equation is a novel integro-differential equation which has spatial derivatives of the amplitude occurring in the kernal function. It is shown that the evolution of the cross-flow vortex is strongly coupled to the properties of an unsteady wall layer which is in fact driven by an unknown slip velocity, proportional to the amplitude of the cross-flow vortex. The work is extended to obtain the corresponding equation for rotating disk flow. A number of special cases are examined and the numerical solution for one of cases, and further analysis, demonstrates the existence of finite-distance as well as focussing type singularities. The numerical solutions also indicate the presence of a new type of nonlinear wave solution for a certain set of parameter values.

  11. Water flow experiments and analyses on the cross-flow type mercury target model with the flow guide plates

    CERN Document Server

    Haga, K; Kaminaga, M; Hino, R

    2001-01-01

    A mercury target is used in the spallation neutron source driven by a high-intensity proton accelerator. In this study, the effectiveness of the cross-flow type mercury target structure was evaluated experimentally and analytically. Prior to the experiment, the mercury flow field and the temperature distribution in the target container were analyzed assuming a proton beam energy and power of 1.5 GeV and 5 MW, respectively, and the feasibility of the cross-flow type target was evaluated. Then the average water flow velocity field in the target mock-up model, which was fabricated from Plexiglass for a water experiment, was measured at room temperature using the PIV technique. Water flow analyses were conducted and the analytical results were compared with the experimental results. The experimental results showed that the cross-flow could be realized in most of the proton beam path area and the analytical result of the water flow velocity field showed good correspondence to the experimental results in the case w...

  12. Automating the Transition Between Sensorless Motor Control Methods for the NASA Glenn Research Center Flywheel Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrmann, Elizabeth A.; Kenny, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been working to advance the technology necessary for a flywheel energy storage system for the past several years. Flywheels offer high efficiency, durability, and near-complete discharge capabilities not produced by typical chemical batteries. These characteristics show flywheels to be an attractive alternative to the more typical energy storage solutions. Flywheels also offer the possibility of combining what are now two separate systems in space applications into one: energy storage, which is currently provided by batteries, and attitude control, which is currently provided by control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) or reaction wheels. To date, NASA Glenn research effort has produced the control algorithms necessary to demonstrate flywheel operation up to a rated speed of 60,000 RPM and the combined operation of two flywheel machines to simultaneously provide energy storage and single axis attitude control. Two position-sensorless algorithms are used to control the motor/generator, one for low (0 to 1200 RPM) speeds and one for high speeds. The algorithm allows the transition from the low speed method to the high speed method, but the transition from the high to low speed method was not originally included. This leads to a limitation in the existing motor/generator control code that does not allow the flywheels to be commanded to zero speed (and back in the negative speed direction) after the initial startup. In a multi-flywheel system providing both energy storage and attitude control to a spacecraft, speed reversal may be necessary.

  13. Transverse alignment of fibers in a periodically sheared suspension: An absorbing phase transition with a slowly-varying control parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Alexandre; Filippidi, Emmanouela; Guazzelli, Elisabeth; Pine, David

    2011-11-01

    Shearing fibers and polymer solutions tends to align particles with the flow direction. Here, we report that neutrally buoyant non-Brownian fibers subjected to oscillatory shear are observed to align perpendicular to the flow. This alignment occurs over a finite range of strain amplitudes and is governed by a subtle interplay between fiber orientation and short-range interactions through an athermal (non-equilibrium) process known as random organization. For a given strain amplitude and concentration, the mean field orientation defines a time-dependant control parameter that can drive the suspension through an absorbing phase transition. The slow drift of the control parameter does not influence the class of the transition. The measured critical threshold and exponents are consistent with the one reported for sphere suspensions. This work was supported by the NSF through the NYU MRSEC, Award DMR:0820341. Additional support was provided by a Lavoisier Fellowship (AF) and from the Onassis Foundation (EF).

  14. Estimation of k-ε parameters using surrogate models and jet-in-crossflow data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefantzi, Sophia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Ray, Jaideep [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Arunajatesan, Srinivasan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a Bayesian method that can be used to calibrate computationally expensive 3D RANS (Reynolds Av- eraged Navier Stokes) models with complex response surfaces. Such calibrations, conditioned on experimental data, can yield turbulence model parameters as probability density functions (PDF), concisely capturing the uncertainty in the parameter estimates. Methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimate the PDF by sampling, with each sample requiring a run of the RANS model. Consequently a quick-running surrogate is used instead to the RANS simulator. The surrogate can be very difficult to design if the model's response i.e., the dependence of the calibration variable (the observable) on the parameter being estimated is complex. We show how the training data used to construct the surrogate can be employed to isolate a promising and physically realistic part of the parameter space, within which the response is well-behaved and easily modeled. We design a classifier, based on treed linear models, to model the "well-behaved region". This classifier serves as a prior in a Bayesian calibration study aimed at estimating 3 k - ε parameters ( C μ, C ε2 , C ε1 ) from experimental data of a transonic jet-in-crossflow interaction. The robustness of the calibration is investigated by checking its predictions of variables not included in the cal- ibration data. We also check the limit of applicability of the calibration by testing at off-calibration flow regimes. We find that calibration yield turbulence model parameters which predict the flowfield far better than when the nomi- nal values of the parameters are used. Substantial improvements are still obtained when we use the calibrated RANS model to predict jet-in-crossflow at Mach numbers and jet strengths quite different from those used to generate the ex- perimental (calibration) data. Thus the primary reason for poor predictive skill of RANS, when using nominal

  15. Estimation of k-e parameters using surrogate models and jet-in-crossflow data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefantzi, Sophia; Ray, Jaideep; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; Dechant, Lawrence

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a Bayesian method that can be used to calibrate computationally expensive 3D RANS (Reynolds Av- eraged Navier Stokes) models with complex response surfaces. Such calibrations, conditioned on experimental data, can yield turbulence model parameters as probability density functions (PDF), concisely capturing the uncertainty in the parameter estimates. Methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimate the PDF by sampling, with each sample requiring a run of the RANS model. Consequently a quick-running surrogate is used instead to the RANS simulator. The surrogate can be very difficult to design if the model's response i.e., the dependence of the calibration variable (the observable) on the parameter being estimated is complex. We show how the training data used to construct the surrogate can be employed to isolate a promising and physically realistic part of the parameter space, within which the response is well-behaved and easily modeled. We design a classifier, based on treed linear models, to model the "well-behaved region". This classifier serves as a prior in a Bayesian calibration study aimed at estimating 3 k [?] e parameters ( C u , C e 2 , C e 1 ) from experimental data of a transonic jet-in-crossflow interaction. The robustness of the calibration is investigated by checking its predictions of variables not included in the cal- ibration data. We also check the limit of applicability of the calibration by testing at off-calibration flow regimes. We find that calibration yield turbulence model parameters which predict the flowfield far better than when the nomi- nal values of the parameters are used. Substantial improvements are still obtained when we use the calibrated RANS model to predict jet-in-crossflow at Mach numbers and jet strengths quite different from those used to generate the ex- perimental (calibration) data. Thus the primary reason for poor predictive skill of RANS, when using nominal values of the turbulence model

  16. Using a Semiconductor-to-Metal Transition to Control Optical Transmission through Subwavelength Hole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. U. Donev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple configuration in which the extraordinary optical transmission effect through subwavelength hole arrays in noble-metal films can be switched by the semiconductor-to-metal transition in an underlying thin film of vanadium dioxide. In these experiments, the transition is brought about by thermal heating of the bilayer film. The surprising reverse hysteretic behavior of the transmission through the subwavelength holes in the vanadium oxide suggest that this modulation is accomplished by a dielectric-matching condition rather than plasmon coupling through the bilayer film. The results of this switching, including the wavelength dependence, are qualitatively reproduced by a transfer matrix model. The prospects for effecting a similar modulation on a much faster time scale by using ultrafast laser pulses to trigger the semiconductor-to-metal transition are also discussed.

  17. Control of metal-insulator transition in (EDO-TTF)2SbF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Shao, Xiangfeng; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Moreac, Alain; Ameline, Jean-Claude; Collet, Eric; Uruichi, Mikio; Yakushi, Kyuya

    2009-02-01

    We have examined the temperature dependence of optical reflectance spectra of (EDO-TTF)2SbF6 salt, and succeeded to detect the thermal hysteresis by the reflectance spectra. In order to investigate high pressure effects on the metal-insulator transition of SbF6 salt, we have performed Raman experiments under pressures up to 6 kbar. Drastic changes in the frequencies of charge sensitive C=C stretching modes suggested the pressure-induced reentrant metal-insulator-metal transition at room temperature.

  18. The Problem of Formation of Personal and Social Controls in the Period of Transition from Childhood to Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulimina O.V.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the formation of personal and social controls in the crisis period of transition from childhood to adulthood. We describe the essence of the transitional period in adolescence and in young adulthood, when normative social situation of development is completed and starts the space defined by the individual situation of development. We reveal the specificity of personal regulation, emphasize the importance of developing mechanisms for self-regulation and its highest level, self-determination. As personal regulators, we discuss freedom, responsibility, meaningfulness of own live. We provide the results of the study of personal development trajectories by E.R. Kaliteevskaya and D.A. Leontiev, describe the personality approach of J. Loevinger. Social controls are revealed through the concept of social identity, its structure. We describe the main approaches to the understanding of social identity in Russian and foreign psychology. In conclusion, we propose a possible solution to the problem of optimal formation of personal and social controls in the period of transition from childhood to adulthood

  19. Gain self-scheduled H∞ control for morphing aircraft in the wing transition process based on an LPV model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Ting; Wang Lixin; Ai Junqiang

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates gain self-scheduled H∞ robust control system design for a tailless folding-wing morphing aircraft in the wing shape varying process.During the wing morphing phase,the aircraft's dynamic response will be governed by time-varying aerodynamic forces and moments.Nonlinear dynamic equations of the morphing aircraft are linearized by using Jacobian linearization approach,and a linear parameter varying (LPV) model of the morphing aircraft in wing folding is obtained.A multi-loop controller for the morphing aircraft is formulated to guarantee stability for the wing shape transition process.The proposed controller uses a set of inner-loop gains to provide stability using classical techniques,whereas a gain self-scheduled H∞ outer-loop controller is devised to guarantee a specific level of robust stability and performance for the time-varying dynamics.The closed-loop simulations show that speed and altitude vary slightly during the whole wing folding process,and they converge rapidly after the process ends.This proves that the gain self-scheduled H∞ robust controller can guarantee a satisfactory dynamic performance for the morphing aircraft during the whole wing shape transition process.Finally,the flight control system's robustness for the wing folding process is verified according to uncertainties of the aerodynamic parameters in the nonlinear model.

  20. Control design for robust tracking and smooth transition in power systems with battery/supercapacitor hybrid energy storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hoeguk; Wang, Haifeng; Hu, Tingshu

    2014-12-01

    This paper considers some control design problems in a power system driven by battery/supercapacitor hybrid energy storage devices. The currents in the battery and the supercapacitor are actively controlled by two bidirectional buck-boost converters. Two control objectives are addressed in this paper: one is to achieve robust tracking of two reference variables, the battery current and the load voltage, the other is to achieve smooth transition of these variables during load switch. Based on the state-space averaged model we newly developed, the control design problems are converted into numerically efficient optimization problems with linear matrix inequality (LMI) constraints. An experimental system is constructed to validate the control design methods.

  1. Enzymatic treatment for controlling irreversible membrane fouling in cross-flow humic acid-fed ultrafiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chien-Hwa [Department of Civil and Environment Engineering, Nanya Institute of Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Fang, Lung-Chen; Lateef, Shaik Khaja [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chung-Hsin, E-mail: chunghsinwu@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien Kung Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, Cheng-Fang [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    Exploring reasonable ways to remove foulant is of great importance in order to allow sustainable operation of ultrafiltration (UF) membranes in water/wastewater treatment technology. Compounds of organic and inorganic origin largely contribute to irreversible fouling. This study attempted to remove problem of UF membrane fouling by using four different enzymes including {alpha}-amylase, lipase, cellulase and protease. This investigation showed that none of the above mentioned enzymes was found to be effective for the removal of foulant when used alone. However, when these enzymes were used in combination with NaOH and citric acid, about 90% cleaning was achieved. The addition of non-ionic surfactant to the enzymatic solution appears to increase the efficiency of flux recovery by reducing the adhesion of foulant species to the membrane surface through the decrease of contact angle. Field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were employed to qualitatively illustrate the foulant characteristics. The surface roughness through AFM was used to explain the potential mechanism for the enzymatic cleaning.

  2. H-infinity based integrated flight-propulsion control design for a STOVL aircraft in transition flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay; Mattern, Duane L.; Bright, Michelle M.; Ouzts, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from an application of H-infinity control design methodology to a centralized integrated flight/propulsion control (IFPC) system design for a supersonic Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft in transition flight. The overall design methodology consists of a centralized IFPC controller design with controller partitioning. Only the feedback controller design portion of the methodology is addressed. Design and evaluation vehicle models are summarized, and insight is provided into formulating the H-infinity control problem such that it reflects the IFPC design objectives. The H-infinity controller is shown to provide decoupled command tracking for the design model. The controller order could be significantly reduced by modal residualization of the fast controller modes without any deterioration in performance. A discussion is presented of the areas in which the controller performance needs to be improved, and ways in which these improvements can be achieved within the framework of an H-infinity based linear control design.

  3. Bandgap Control via Structural and Chemical Tuning of Transition Metal Perovskite Chalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shanyuan; Huyan, Huaixun; Liu, Yang; Yeung, Matthew; Ye, Kevin; Blankemeier, Louis; Orvis, Thomas; Sarkar, Debarghya; Singh, David J; Kapadia, Rehan; Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2017-03-01

    Transition metal perovskite chalcogenides are a new class of versatile semiconductors with high absorption coefficient and luminescence efficiency. Polycrystalline materials synthesized by an iodine-catalyzed solid-state reaction show distinctive optical colors and tunable bandgaps across the visible range in photoluminescence, with one of the materials' external efficiency approaching the level of single-crystal InP and CdSe.

  4. Quantum phase transition of light as a control of the entanglement between interacting quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barragan, Angela; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Mondragon-Shem, Ian

    We study coupled quantum dots arranged in a photonic crystal, interacting with light which undergoes a quantum phase transition. At the mean-field level for the infinite lattice, we compute the concurrence of the quantum dots as a measure of their entanglement. We find that this quantity smoothly

  5. Innovative cross-flow membrane system for volume reduction of mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, W. [SpinTek Membrane Systems, Huntington Beach, CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    In this task, SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., and the Institute of Gas Technology are completing engineering development leading to a full-scale demonstration of the SpinTek ST-II High Shear Rotary Membrane Filtration System (ST-II) under a Program Research and Development Agreement (PRDA) with the Federal Energy Technology Center-Morgantown. The SpinTek ST-II technology will be scaled-up, and a two-stage ST-II system will be designed, constructed, and operated on both surrogate and actual feed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility (LRWTF). Results from these studies on both surrogate and actual wastewater streams will also be used by LANL personnel to produce a model for determining the applicability and economics of the SpinTek ST-II system to other DOE waste and process streams. The ST-II is a unique, compact cross-flow membrane system having several advantages in performance and cost compared to currently available systems. Staff at LANL have performed pilot-scale testing with the SpinTek technology to evaluate its feasibility for enhanced radionuclide removal from wastewater at its 5- to 8-million-gallon-per-year LRWTF. Recent data have shown the system`s capabilities to remove radionuclides from the waste stream at concentration factors greater than 2000:1, and performance has exceeded both conventional and all other advanced technologies examined.

  6. On the use of the periodicity condition in cross-flow tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beladjine Boumedienne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of measurements and numerical predictions of turbulent cross-flow through an in-line 7×7 bundle configuration with a constant transverse and longitudinal pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.44. The experiments are conducted to measure the pressure around tubes, using DPS differential pressure scanner with air flow, in square channel at a Reynolds number of 35000 based on the gap velocity and the tube diameter. The commercial ANSYS FLUENT is used to solve the unsteady Reynolds–Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS equations. The primary aim of the present study is to search for a turbulent model that could serve as an engineering design tool at a relatively low computational cost. The performances of the Spalart-Allmaras, the RNG k-ε, the Shear Stress Transport k-ω and the second moment closure RSM models are evaluated by comparing their simulation results against experimental data. The second objective is to verify the validity of the periodicity assumption taken account in the most previous numerical works by considering the filled bundle geometry. The CFD results show that the Spalart-Allmaras model on the fine mesh are comparable to the experiments while the periodicity statement did not produce consistently the flow behavior in the 7×7 tube bundle configuration.

  7. High Performance Computation of a Jet in Crossflow by Lattice Boltzmann Based Parallel Direct Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulation (DNS of a round jet in crossflow based on lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is carried out on multi-GPU cluster. Data parallel SIMT (single instruction multiple thread characteristic of GPU matches the parallelism of LBM well, which leads to the high efficiency of GPU on the LBM solver. With present GPU settings (6 Nvidia Tesla K20M, the present DNS simulation can be completed in several hours. A grid system of 1.5 × 108 is adopted and largest jet Reynolds number reaches 3000. The jet-to-free-stream velocity ratio is set as 3.3. The jet is orthogonal to the mainstream flow direction. The validated code shows good agreement with experiments. Vortical structures of CRVP, shear-layer vortices and horseshoe vortices, are presented and analyzed based on velocity fields and vorticity distributions. Turbulent statistical quantities of Reynolds stress are also displayed. Coherent structures are revealed in a very fine resolution based on the second invariant of the velocity gradients.

  8. Performance of a Cross-Flow Humidifier with a High Flux Water Vapor Transport Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Johnson, W. B.; Berg, F.; Kadylak, D.

    2015-09-30

    Water vapor transport (WVT) flux across a composite membrane that consists of a very thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layer sandwiched between two expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microporous layers is investigated. Static and dynamic tests are conducted to measure WVT flux for different composite structures; a transport model shows that the underlying individual resistances for water diffusion in the gas phase and microporous and ionomer layers and for interfacial kinetics of water uptake at the ionomer surface are equally important under different conditions. A finite-difference model is formulated to determine water transport in a full-scale (2-m2 active membrane area) planar cross-flow humidifier module assembled using pleats of the optimized composite membrane. In agreement with the experimental data, the modeled WVT flux in the module increases at higher inlet relative humidity (RH) of the wet stream and at lower pressures, but the mass transfer effectiveness is higher at higher pressures. The model indicates that the WVT flux is highest under conditions that maintain the wet stream at close to 100% RH while preventing the dry stream from becoming saturated. The overall water transport is determined by the gradient in RH of the wet and dry streams but is also affected by vapor diffusion in the gas layer and the microporous layer.

  9. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configurations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  10. Reducing cross-flow vibrations of underflow gates: experiments and numerical studies

    CERN Document Server

    Erdbrink, C D; Sloot, P M A

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study is combined with numerical modelling to investigate new ways to reduce cross-flow vibrations of hydraulic gates with underflow. A rectangular gate section placed in a flume was given freedom to vibrate in the vertical direction. Holes in the gate bottom enabled leakage flow through the gate to enter the area directly under the gate which is known to play a key role in most excitation mechanisms. For submerged discharge conditions with small gate openings the vertical dynamic support force was measured in the reduced velocity range 1.5 < Vr < 10.5 for a gate with and without holes. The leakage flow through the holes significantly reduced vibrations. This attenuation was most profound in the high stiffness region at 2 < Vr < 3.5. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were performed with the Finite Element Method to assess local velocities and pressures for both gate types. A moving mesh covering both solid and fluid domain allowed free gate movement and two-way fluid-structure ...

  11. Energy extraction from ocean currents using straight bladed cross-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Dudhgaonkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Harvesting marine renewable energy remains to be a prime focus of researchers across the globe both in environmental and in commercial perspectives. India is blessed with a long coastline, and the seas around Indian peninsula offer ample potential to tap various ocean energy forms. National Institute of Ocean Technology carries out research and various ocean energy technologies, out of which harnessing kinetic energy in seawater currents is one. This article presents the open sea trials recently carried out on National Institute of Ocean Technology’s cross-flow hydrokinetic ocean current turbine in South Andaman. The turbine was designed to generate 100 W electricity at 1.2 m/s current speed and was built in-house. The turbine was initially tested in a seawater channel and then was deployed in Macpherson Strait in Andaman. It was fitted below a floating platform designed especially for this purpose, and the performance of the turbine was continuously logged inside an on-board data acquisition system. The trials were successful and in line with computations.

  12. Heat transfer enhancement in cross-flow heat exchangers using oval tubes and multiple delta winglets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, S.; Maurya, D.; Biswas, G.; Eswaran, V. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    A three-dimensional study of laminar flow and heat transfer in a channel with built-in oval tube and delta winglets is carried out through the solution of the complete Navier-Stokes and energy equations using a body-fitted grid and a finite-volume method. The geometrical configuration represents an element of a gas-liquid fin-tube cross-flow heat exchanger. The size of such heat exchangers can be reduced through enhancement of transport coefficients on the air (gas) side, which are usually small compared to the liquid side. In a suggested strategy, oval tubes are used in place of circular tubes, and delta-winglet type vortex generators in various configuration's are mounted on the fin-surface. An evaluation of the strategy is attempted in this investigation. The investigation is carried out for different angles of attack of the winglets to the incoming flow for the case of two winglet pairs. The variation of axial location of the winglets is also considered for one pair of winglets mounted in common-flow-down configuration. The structures of the velocity field and the heat transfer characteristics have been presented. The results indicate that vortex generators in conjunction with the oval tube show definite promise for the improvement of fin-tube heat exchangers. (author)

  13. Application of Cross-Flow Filtration Technique in Purification and Concentration of Juice from Vietnamese Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynh Cang Mai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is to offer a 1st insight in the use of membrane process for the purification and concentration of Vietnamese fruit juices: cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale Line., dragon fruit (Cactus hémiépiphytes, pineapple (Ananas comosus, pomelo (Citrus grandis L., and gac aril oil (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng.. On a laboratory scale, the effect of different operating parameters such as trans-membrane pressures (TMP, temperature and membrane pore sizes on permeate flux was determined in order to optimize process conditions that would ensure acceptable flux with adequate juice quality. The quality of the samples coming from the ultrafiltration (UF process was evaluated in terms of: total soluble solids (TSS, suspended solids (SS, and vitamin C. For example, the purification process of cashew apple juice by cross-flow filtration was optimized at 0.5 μm membrane pore size, 2.5 bars TMP, and 60 min filtration time. Besides, this technique was applied to enhance carotenoids concentration from gac oil. Optimum conditions for a high permeate flux and a good carotenoids retention are 5 nm, 2 bars, and 40 °C of membrane pore size, TMP, and temperature, respectively. Carotenoids were concentrated higher than that in feeding oil.

  14. On the use of the periodicity condition in cross-flow tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beladjine, Boumedienne; Aounallah, Mohammed; Belkadi, Mustapha; Aadjlout, Lahouari; Imine, Omar

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements and numerical predictions of turbulent cross-flow through an in-line 7×7 bundle configuration with a constant transverse and longitudinal pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.44. The experiments are conducted to measure the pressure around tubes, using DPS differential pressure scanner with air flow, in square channel at a Reynolds number of 35000 based on the gap velocity and the tube diameter. The commercial ANSYS FLUENT is used to solve the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The primary aim of the present study is to search for a turbulent model that could serve as an engineering design tool at a relatively low computational cost. The performances of the Spalart-Allmaras, the RNG k-ɛ, the Shear Stress Transport k-ω and the second moment closure RSM models are evaluated by comparing their simulation results against experimental data. The second objective is to verify the validity of the periodicity assumption taken account in the most previous numerical works by considering the filled bundle geometry. The CFD results show that the Spalart-Allmaras model on the fine mesh are comparable to the experiments while the periodicity statement did not produce consistently the flow behavior in the 7×7 tube bundle configuration.

  15. Carotenoids concentration of Gac (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng.) fruit oil using cross-flow filtration technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Huỳnh Cang; Truong, Vinh; Debaste, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    Gac (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng.) fruit, a traditional fruit in Vietnam and other countries of eastern Asia, contains an oil rich in carotenoids, especially lycopene and β-carotene. Carotenoids in gac fruit oil were concentrated using cross-flow filtration. In total recycle mode, effect of membrane pore size, temperature, and transmembrane pressure (TMP) on permeate flux and on retention coefficients has been exploited. Resistance of membrane, polarization concentration, and fouling were also analyzed. Optimum conditions for a high permeate flux and a good carotenoids retention are 5 nm, 2 bars, and 40 °C of membrane pore size, TMP, and temperature, respectively. In batch mode, retentate was analyzed through index of acid, phospholipids, total carotenoids content (TCC), total antioxidant activity, total soluble solids, total solid content, color measurement, and viscosity. TCC in retentate is higher 8.6 times than that in feeding oil. Lipophilic antioxidant activities increase 6.8 times, while hydrophilic antioxidant activities reduce 40%. The major part of total resistance is due to polarization (55%) while fouling and intrinsic membrane contribute about 30% and 24%, respectively. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Effects of Reynolds Number on the Energy Conversion and Near-Wake Dynamics of a High Solidity Vertical-Axis Cross-Flow Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bachant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were performed with a large laboratory-scale high solidity cross-flow turbine to investigate Reynolds number effects on performance and wake characteristics and to establish scale thresholds for physical and numerical modeling of individual devices and arrays. It was demonstrated that the performance of the cross-flow turbine becomes essentially R e -independent at a Reynolds number based on the rotor diameter R e D ≈ 10 6 or an approximate average Reynolds number based on the blade chord length R e c ≈ 2 × 10 5 . A simple model that calculates the peak torque coefficient from static foil data and cross-flow turbine kinematics was shown to be a reasonable predictor for Reynolds number dependence of an actual cross-flow turbine operating under dynamic conditions. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements in the near-wake showed subtle differences over the range of R e investigated. However, when transport terms for the streamwise momentum and mean kinetic energy were calculated, a similar R e threshold was revealed. These results imply that physical model studies of cross-flow turbines should achieve R e D ∼ 10 6 to properly approximate both the performance and wake dynamics of full-scale devices and arrays.

  17. Control of boundary layer transition location and plate vibration in the presence of an external acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestrello, L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The experiment is aimed at controlling the boundary layer transition location and the plate vibration when excited by a flow and an upstream sound source. Sound has been found to affect the flow at the leading edge and the response of a flexible plate in a boundary layer. Because the sound induces early transition, the panel vibration is acoustically coupled to the turbulent boundary layer by the upstream radiation. Localized surface heating at the leading edge delays the transition location downstream of the flexible plate. The response of the plate excited by a turbulent boundary layer (without sound) shows that the plate is forced to vibrate at different frequencies and with different amplitudes as the flow velocity changes indicating that the plate is driven by the convective waves of the boundary layer. The acoustic disturbances induced by the upstream sound dominate the response of the plate when the boundary layer is either turbulent or laminar. Active vibration control was used to reduce the sound induced displacement amplitude of the plate.

  18. Rapid and controllable a-Si:H-to-nc-Si:H transition induced by a high-density plasma route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H. P.; Xu, M.; Xu, S.; Xu, L. X.; Ji, H.; Xiao, S. Q.; Feng, Y. Y.

    2017-09-01

    The low-temperature rapid solid phase crystallization route of amorphous silicon is fundamentally and technologically significant. Micrometer thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were exposed to a low-frequency inductively coupled hydrogen plasma under a low substrate temperature of 300 °C. The plasma treated a-Si:H was completely crystallized within half an hour. The evolution of microstructures, optical and electric properties with respect to plasma exposure duration deterministically demonstrates that the present low-temperature rapid crystallization process enables the controllable phase transition from amorphous to nanocrystalline (nc) silicon. The crystallization mechanism is discussed in terms of the unique characteristics of low-frequency inductively coupled plasma (LFICP) and the LFICP-grown precursor a-Si:H film itself. The crucial role of hydrogen atoms in the phase transition is also discussed.

  19. Semiconductor-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide nanostructures on silicon substrate: Applications for thermal control of spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leahu, G. L., E-mail: roberto.livoti@uniroma1.it; Li Voti, R., E-mail: roberto.livoti@uniroma1.it; Larciprete, M. C., E-mail: roberto.livoti@uniroma1.it; Belardini, A., E-mail: roberto.livoti@uniroma1.it; Mura, F., E-mail: roberto.livoti@uniroma1.it; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base ed Applicate per l' Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 16 00161 Roma (Italy); Fratoddi, I. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale A. Moro, Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-19

    We present a detailed infrared study of the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) in a vanadium dioxide (VO2) film deposited on silicon wafer. The VO2 phase transition is studied in the mid-infrared (MIR) region by analyzing the transmittance and the reflectance measurements, and the calculated emissivity. The temperature behaviour of the emissivity during the SMT put into evidence the phenomenon of the anomalous absorption in VO2 which has been explained by applying the Maxwell Garnett effective medium approximation theory, together with a strong hysteresis phenomenon, both useful to design tunable thermal devices to be applied for the thermal control of spacecraft. We have also applied the photothermal radiometry in order to study the changes in the modulated emissivity induced by laser. Experimental results show how the use of these techniques represent a good tool for a quantitative measurement of the optothermal properties of vanadium dioxide based structures.

  20. Observer-based robust finite time H∞ sliding mode control for Markovian switching systems with mode-dependent time-varying delay and incomplete transition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lijun; Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Dandan

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the problem of robust finite time H∞ sliding mode control for a class of Markovian switching systems. The system is subjected to the mode-dependent time-varying delay, partly unknown transition rate and unmeasurable state. The main difficulty is that, a sliding mode surface cannot be designed based on the unknown transition rate and unmeasurable state directly. To overcome this obstacle, the set of modes is firstly divided into two subsets standing for known transition rate subset and unknown one, based on which a state observer is established. A component robust finite-time sliding mode controller is also designed to cope with the effect of partially unknown transition rate. It is illustrated that the reachability, finite-time stability, finite-time boundedness, finite-time H∞ state feedback stabilization of sliding mode dynamics can be ensured despite the unknown transition rate. Finally, the simulation results verify the effectiveness of robust finite time control problem.

  1. Wetting controlled phase transitions in two-dimensional systems of colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Tamir; Ipsen, John Hjorth; Tejero, T.F.

    1998-01-01

    The phase behavior of disk colloids, embedded in a two-dimensional fluid matrix that undergoes a first-order phase transition, is studied in the complete wetting regime where the thermodynamically metastable fluid phase is stabilized at the surface of the disks. In dilute collections of disks......, the tendency to minimize the extent of the fluid-fluid interface and the extent of the unfavorable wetting phase in the system gives rise to aggregation phenomena and to separation of large domains of disks that have the characteristics of bulk colloidal phases. The conditions for phase transitions among...... cluster gas, liquid, and solid phases of the disk colloids are determined from the corresponding values of the disk chemical potential within an analytic representation of the grand partition function for the excess energy associated with a gas of disk clusters in the low-disk-density limit. The wetting...

  2. Can symmetry transitions of complex fields enable 3-d control of fluid vorticity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Solis, Kyle Jameson [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Methods of inducing vigorous noncontact fluid flow are important to technologies involving heat and mass transfer and fluid mixing, since they eliminate the need for moving parts, pipes and seals, all of which compromise system reliability. Unfortunately, traditional noncontact flow methods are few, and have limitations of their own. We have discovered two classes of fields that can induce fluid vorticity without requiring either gravity or a thermal gradient. The first class we call Symmetry-Breaking Rational Fields. These are triaxial fields comprised of three orthogonal components, two ac and one dc. The second class is Rational Triad Fields, which differ in that all three components are alternating. In this report we quantify the induced vorticity for a wide variety of fields and consider symmetry transitions between these field types. These transitions give rise to orbiting vorticity vectors, a technology for non-contact, non-stationary fluid mixing.

  3. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Sun, Nian, E-mail: n.sun@neu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Peng, Bin; Liu, Ming, E-mail: mingliu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Budil, David [Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  4. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Peng, Bin; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  5. Strain controlled ferromagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition and vacancy formation energy of defective graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajun; Sahoo, Mpk; Wang, Jie

    2016-09-23

    Single vacancy (SV)-induced magnetism in graphene has attracted much attention motivated by its potential in achieving new functionalities. However, a much higher vacancy formation energy limits its direct application in electronic devices and the dependency of spin interaction on the strain is unclear. Here, through first-principles density-functional theory calculations, we investigate the possibility of strain engineering towards lowering vacancy formation energy and inducing new magnetic states in defective graphene. It is found that the SV-graphene undergoes a phase transition from an initial ferromagnetic state to a ferrimagnetic state under a biaxial tensile strain. At the same time, the biaxial tensile strain significantly lowers the vacancy formation energy. The charge density, density of states and band theory successfully identify the origin and underlying physics of the transition. The predicted magnetic phase transition is attributed to the strain driven spin flipping at the C-atoms nearest to the SV-site. The magnetic semiconducting graphene induced by defect and strain engineering suggests an effective way to modulate both spin and electronic degrees of freedom in future spintronic devices.

  6. Strain controlled ferromagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition and vacancy formation energy of defective graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajun; Sahoo, MPK; Wang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Single vacancy (SV)-induced magnetism in graphene has attracted much attention motivated by its potential in achieving new functionalities. However, a much higher vacancy formation energy limits its direct application in electronic devices and the dependency of spin interaction on the strain is unclear. Here, through first-principles density-functional theory calculations, we investigate the possibility of strain engineering towards lowering vacancy formation energy and inducing new magnetic states in defective graphene. It is found that the SV-graphene undergoes a phase transition from an initial ferromagnetic state to a ferrimagnetic state under a biaxial tensile strain. At the same time, the biaxial tensile strain significantly lowers the vacancy formation energy. The charge density, density of states and band theory successfully identify the origin and underlying physics of the transition. The predicted magnetic phase transition is attributed to the strain driven spin flipping at the C-atoms nearest to the SV-site. The magnetic semiconducting graphene induced by defect and strain engineering suggests an effective way to modulate both spin and electronic degrees of freedom in future spintronic devices.

  7. Using Dynamic Covalent Chemistry To Drive Morphological Transitions: Controlled Release of Encapsulated Nanoparticles from Block Copolymer Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Renhua; Derry, Matthew J; Mable, Charlotte J; Ning, Yin; Armes, Steven P

    2017-06-07

    Dynamic covalent chemistry is exploited to drive morphological order-order transitions to achieve the controlled release of a model payload (e.g., silica nanoparticles) encapsulated within block copolymer vesicles. More specifically, poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PGMA-PHPMA) diblock copolymer vesicles were prepared via aqueous polymerization-induced self-assembly in either the presence or absence of silica nanoparticles. Addition of 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) to such vesicles results in specific binding of this reagent to some of the pendent cis-diol groups on the hydrophilic PGMA chains to form phenylboronate ester bonds in mildly alkaline aqueous solution (pH ∼ 10). This leads to a subtle increase in the effective volume fraction of this stabilizer block, which in turn causes a reduction in the packing parameter and hence induces a vesicle-to-worm (or vesicle-to-sphere) morphological transition. The evolution in copolymer morphology (and the associated sol-gel transitions) was monitored using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, oscillatory rheology, and small-angle X-ray scattering. In contrast to the literature, in situ release of encapsulated silica nanoparticles is achieved via vesicle dissociation at room temperature; moreover, the rate of release can be fine-tuned by varying the solution pH and/or the APBA concentration. Furthermore, this strategy also works (i) for relatively thick-walled vesicles that do not normally exhibit stimulus-responsive behavior and (ii) in the presence of added salt. This novel molecular recognition strategy to trigger morphological transitions via dynamic covalent chemistry offers considerable scope for the design of new stimulus-responsive copolymer vesicles (and hydrogels) for targeted delivery and controlled release of cargoes. In particular, the conditions used in this new approach are relevant to liquid laundry formulations, whereby enzymes require

  8. Effects of pacifier use on transition to full breastfeeding and sucking skills in preterm infants: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Vildan; Aytekin, Aynur

    2017-07-01

    To determine the effects of pacifier use on transition to full breastfeeding and sucking skills in preterm infants. Feeding problems in preterm infants cause delays in hospital discharge, extend mother-infant reunification and increase medical cost. Nutritive sucking skills of preterm infants may develop by improving non-nutritive sucking skills and increasing sucking experiences. A prospective, randomised controlled trial conducted in the Eastern Turkey. Seventy infants were randomised into two groups: a pacifier group (n = 34) and a control group (n = 36). Pacifier use was applied in the preterm infants in the pacifier group, up to switching to full breastfeeding. The infants in the control group did not use pacifiers. Data were collected by a researcher using the Preterm Infant Introductory Information Form, the Preterm Infant Monitoring Form and the LATCH Breastfeeding Assessment Tool. For the study, ethics committee approval, official permission and written informed consents of the families were obtained. The time to transition to full breastfeeding (123·06 ± 66·56 hours) and the time to discharge (434·50 ± 133·29 hours) in the pacifier group were significantly shorter compared to the control group (167·78 ± 91·77 and 593·63 ± 385·32 hours, respectively) (p preterm infants receiving complementary feeding. Pacifier use may be recommended to accelerate transition to full breastfeeding and to improve the sucking skills in preterm infants who were fed by both oral route and complementary feeding in the neonatal intensive care units. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Experimental study on revolving cross-flow microfiltration of highly viscous liquids%高黏度液体错流旋转微滤实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Experimental investigation of the microfiltration (MF) using a revolving cross-flow membrane filter was performed under the condition of constant pressure difference, and different flat membranes made of polyvi-nylidene fluoride (PVDF, 0.1 μm), cellulose acetate (CA, 0.22 μm), sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES, 0.22 μm) and polyamide (PA, 0.45 μm), respectively, were used in filtration experiments. The dependence of the filtrate mass of the cross-flow MF on time was measured on-line. The experimental results showed that the effect of the cross-flow on high viscosity medium was more significant than that on the low viscosity one.

  10. Simplified Heat and Mass Transfer Model for Cross-Flow and Countercurrent Flow Packed Bed Tower Dehumidifiers with a Liquid Desiccant System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Cheng Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is developed using the Matlab/Simulink platform to investigate heat and mass transfer performance of cross-flow and counterflow dehumidifiers with Lithium Chloride (LiCl solution. In the liquid desiccant dehumidifier, the orthogonal polynomial basis is used to simulate the combined processes of heat and mass transfer. The temperature profiles on cross-flow and countercurrent flow dehumidifiers are demonstrated. The resultant counter flow air changes the temperature profile of the LiCl solution in the longitudinal direction because of the drag forces. In addition, when inlet airflow rate reaches 15 kg·s−1, the temperature effect becomes less obvious and may be reasonably negligible. Under these conditions, the air changes the design factor and determines the interfacial temperature. It is demonstrated that the mathematical model can be of great value in the design and improvement of cross-flow and countercurrent flow dehumidifiers.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of Fuel Jets Injected into a High-Temperature Subsonic Crossflow: High-Data-Rate Laser Diagnostic Investigation under Steady and Oscillatory Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucht, Robert [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Anderson, William [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-01-23

    An investigation of subsonic transverse jet injection into a subsonic vitiated crossflow is discussed. The reacting jet in crossflow (RJIC) system investigated as a means of secondary injection of fuel in a staged combustion system. The measurements were performed in test rigs featuring (a) a steady, swirling crossflow and (b) a crossflow with low swirl but significant oscillation in the pressure field and in the axial velocity. The rigs are referred to as the steady state rig and the instability rig. Rapid mixing and chemical reaction in the near field of the jet injection is desirable in this application. Temporally resolved velocity measurements within the wake of the reactive jets using 2D-PIV and OH-PLIF at a repetition rate of 5 kHz were performed on the RJIC flow field in a steady state water-cooled test rig. The reactive jets were injected through an extended nozzle into the crossflow which is located in the downstream of a low swirl burner (LSB) that produced the swirled, vitiated crossflow. Both H2/N2 and natural gas (NG)/air jets were investigated. OH-PLIF measurements along the jet trajectory show that the auto-ignition starts on the leeward side within the wake region of the jet flame. The measurements show that jet flame is stabilized in the wake of the jet and wake vortices play a significant role in this process. PIV and OH–PLIF measurements were performed at five measurement planes along the cross- section of the jet. The time resolved measurements provided significant information on the evolution of complex flow structures and highly transient features like, local extinction, re-ignition, vortex-flame interaction prevalent in a turbulent reacting flow. Nanosecond-laser-based, single-laser-shot coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements of temperature and H2 concentraiton were also performed. The structure and dynamics of a reacting transverse jet injected into a vitiated oscillatory crossflow presents a unique opportunity for

  12. Transition in Gas Turbine Control System Architecture: Modular, Distributed, and Embedded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Controls systems are an increasingly important component of turbine-engine system technology. However, as engines become more capable, the control system itself becomes ever more constrained by the inherent environmental conditions of the engine; a relationship forced by the continued reliance on commercial electronics technology. A revolutionary change in the architecture of turbine-engine control systems will change this paradigm and result in fully distributed engine control systems. Initially, the revolution will begin with the physical decoupling of the control law processor from the hostile engine environment using a digital communications network and engine-mounted high temperature electronics requiring little or no thermal control. The vision for the evolution of distributed control capability from this initial implementation to fully distributed and embedded control is described in a roadmap and implementation plan. The development of this plan is the result of discussions with government and industry stakeholders

  13. Large-Scale Synthesis of Transition-Metal-Doped TiO2 Nanowires with Controllable Overpotential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bin; Chen, HaoMing; Liu, Chong; Andrews, Sean; Han, Chris; Yang, Peidong

    2013-03-13

    Practical implementation of one-dimensional semiconductors into devices capable of exploiting their novel properties is often hindered by low product yields, poor material quality, high production cost, or overall lack of synthetic control. Here, we show that a molten-salt flux scheme can be used to synthesize large quantities of high-quality, single-crystalline TiO2 nanowires with controllable dimensions. Furthermore, in situ dopant incorporation of various transition metals allows for the tuning of optical, electrical, and catalytic properties. With this combination of control, robustness, and scalability, the molten-salt flux scheme can provide high-quality TiO2 nanowires to satisfy a broad range of application needs from photovoltaics to photocatalysis.

  14. State transitions and feedback mechanisms control hydrology in the constructed catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Gerwin, Werner; Hinz, Christoph; Zaplata, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Landscapes and ecosystems are complex systems with many feedback mechanisms acting between the various abiotic and biotic components. The knowledge about these interacting processes is mainly derived from mature ecosystems. The initial development of ecosystem complexity may involve state transitions following catastrophic shifts, disturbances or transgression of thresholds. The Chicken Creek catchment was constructed in 2005 in the mining area of Lusatia/Germany to study processes and feedback mechanisms during ecosystem evolution. The hillslope-shaped 6 ha site has defined boundary conditions and well-documented inner structures. The dominating substrate above the underlying clay layer is Pleistocene sandy material representing mainly the lower C horizon of the former landscape. Since 2005, the unrestricted, unmanaged development of the catchment was intensively monitored. During the ten years since then, we observed characteristic state transitions in catchment functioning driven by feedbacks between original substrate properties, surface structures, soil development and vegetation succession. Whereas surface runoff induced by surface crusting and infiltration dominated catchment hydrology in the first years, the impact of vegetation on hydrological pathways and groundwater levels became more and more evident during the last years. Discharge from the catchment changed from episodic events driven by precipitation and surface runoff to groundwater driven. This general picture is overlain by spatial patterns and single episodic events of external drivers. The scientific value of the Chicken Creek site with known boundary conditions and structure information could help in disentangling general feedback mechanisms between hydrologic, pedogenic, biological and geomorphological processes as well as a in gaining a more integrative view of succession and its drivers during the transition from initial, less complex systems to more mature ecosystems. Long-term time series

  15. Failure mode transition in AHSS resistance spot welds. Part I. Controlling factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouranvari, M., E-mail: mpouranvari@yahoo.com [Young Researchers Club, Dezful Branch, Islamic Azad University, Dezful (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Marashi, S.P.H. [Mining and Metallurgical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Interfacial to pullout failure mode transition for AHSS RSWs is studied. {yields} An analytical mode is proposed to predict failure mode of AHSS RSWs. {yields} Hardness characteristics of RSWs plays key role in the failure mode transition. - Abstract: Failure mode of resistance spot welds is a qualitative indicator of weld performance. Two major types of spot weld failure are pull-out and interfacial fracture. Interfacial failure, which typically results in reduced energy absorption capability, is considered unsatisfactory and industry standards are often designed to avoid this occurrence. Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) spot welds exhibit high tendency to fail in interfacial failure mode. Sizing of spot welds based on the conventional recommendation of 4t{sup 0.5} (t is sheet thickness) does not guarantee the pullout failure mode in many cases of AHSS spot welds. Therefore, a new weld quality criterion should be found for AHSS resistance spot welds to guarantee pull-out failure. The aim of this paper is to investigate and analyze the transition between interfacial and pull-out failure modes in AHSS resistance spot welds during the tensile-shear test by the use of analytical approach. In this work, in the light of failure mechanism, a simple analytical model is presented for estimating the critical fusion zone size to prevent interfacial fracture. According to this model, the hardness ratio of fusion zone to pull-out failure location and the volume fraction of voids in fusion zone are the key metallurgical factors governing type of failure mode of AHSS spot welds during the tensile-shear test. Low hardness ratio and high susceptibility to form shrinkage voids in the case of AHSS spot welds appear to be the two primary causes for their high tendency to fail in interfacial mode.

  16. Desired Control of Mutually Delay-Coupled Diode Lasers near Phase-flip Transition Regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pramod

    2013-01-01

    We investigate zero-lag synchronization (ZLS) between delay-coupled diode lasers system with mutual optical injection in a face-to-face configuration. We observed numerical evidence of such ZLS without using any relay element or mediating laser. In addition, simulation also demonstrate that this kind of robust ZLS occurs around the phase flip transition regimes where in-phase and anti-phase oscillations coexist due to delayed coupling induced modulation of the phase-amplitude coupling factor {\\alpha}. Our finding could be implemented in highly secured optical communication network as well as the understanding of the occurrence of such ZLS in the neural network functionality.

  17. Urban Rail Transit Cost Control%城市轨道交通工程造价控制措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建群

    2011-01-01

    As a kind of large capacity,fast and environmental transportation,rail transit has been widely used in big cities worldwide.Now,subway construction in our big cities has entered in a big wave.This paper analyzed and researched the problems that too high rail transit project cost,low initiative and poor measure of cost control,etc.Then,this paper presented the project cost overall process control idea and corresponding control measures in each stage.%轨道交通作为一种大运量、快捷、环保的交通工具,在全世界范围内的大城市已经广泛应用,目前我国各大城市进入地铁建设高潮期。此文针对全国轨道交通工程造价过高、造价控制的主动性不强及措施不利等问题进行分析与研究,提出工程造价全过程控制理念和各阶段控制造价的相应措施。

  18. Roles of water and solids composition in the control of glass transition and stickiness of milk powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silalai, Nattiga; Roos, Yrjö H

    2010-06-01

    Plasticization and glass transition of amorphous components in food powders often result in stickiness and caking. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of milk powders was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a viscometer method was used to determine sticky-point temperatures. Water sorption isotherms were established for varying solids compositions. Lactose contents were analyzed by high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD) and proteins were identified using SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis. Solids composition and water affected both the T(g) and stickiness behavior. Stickiness was governed by carbohydrates and water plasticization. At low protein contents, precrystallization of lactose decreased the sticky point temperature, but increasing protein content in all milk powders decreased stickiness at all water activities. The results showed that glass transition can be used to describe time-dependent stickiness and crystallization phenomena, and it can be used as a parameter to control and reduce stickiness of dairy solids with various compositions.

  19. Doping controlled superconductor-insulator transition in Bi2Sr2-xLaxCaCu2O8+delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seongshik; Crane, Trevis A; Van Harlingen, D J; Eckstein, J N

    2006-03-17

    We show that the doping-controlled superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) in a high critical temperature cuprate system (Bi(2)Sr(2-x)La(x)CaCu(2)O(8+delta)) exhibits a fundamentally different behavior than is expected from conventional SIT. At the critical doping, the sheet resistance seems to diverge in the zero-temperature limit. Above the critical doping, the transport is universally scaled by a two-component conductance model. Below, it continuously evolves from weakly to strongly insulating behavior. The two-component conductance model suggests that a collective electronic phase-separation mechanism may be responsible for this unconventional SIT behavior.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Formation and Transport in Cross-Flowing Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanneck Wielhorski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations on confined bubble trains formed by cross-flowing streams are carried out with the numerical code THETIS which is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF method and has been developed for two phase flow studies and especially for a gas-liquid system. The surface tension force, which needs particular attention in order to determine the shape of the interface accurately, is computed using the Continuum Surface Force model (CSF. Through the coupling of a VOF-PLIC technique (Piecewise-Linear Interface Calculation and a smoothing function of adjustable thickness, the Smooth Volume of Fluid technique (SVOF is intended to capture accurately strong interface distortion, rupture or reconnection with large density and viscosity contrasts between phases. This approach is extended by using the regular VOF-PLIC technique, while applying a smoothing procedure affecting both physical characteristics averaging and surface tension modeling. The front-capturing strategy is extended to gas injection. We begin by introducing the main physical phenomena occurring during bubble formation in microfluidic systems. Then, an experimental study performed in a cylindrical T-junction for different wetting behaviors is presented. For the wetting configuration, Cartesian 2D numerical simulations concerning the gas-liquid bubble production performed in a T-junction with rectangular, planar cross sections are shown and compared with experimental measurements. Finally, the results obtained of bubble break-up mechanism, shape, transport and pressure drop along the channel will be presented, discussed and compared to some experimental and numerical outcomes given in the literature.

  1. Tuning a RANS k-e model for jet-in-crossflow simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefantzi, Sophia; Ray, Jaideep; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; DeChant, Lawrence Justin

    2013-09-01

    We develop a novel calibration approach to address the problem of predictive ke RANS simulations of jet-incrossflow. Our approach is based on the hypothesis that predictive ke parameters can be obtained by estimating them from a strongly vortical flow, specifically, flow over a square cylinder. In this study, we estimate three ke parameters, C%CE%BC, Ce2 and Ce1 by fitting 2D RANS simulations to experimental data. We use polynomial surrogates of 2D RANS for this purpose. We conduct an ensemble of 2D RANS runs using samples of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) and regress Reynolds stresses to the samples using a simple polynomial. We then use this surrogate of the 2D RANS model to infer a joint distribution for the ke parameters by solving a Bayesian inverse problem, conditioned on the experimental data. The calibrated (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) distribution is used to seed an ensemble of 3D jet-in-crossflow simulations. We compare the ensemble's predictions of the flowfield, at two planes, to PIV measurements and estimate the predictive skill of the calibrated 3D RANS model. We also compare it against 3D RANS predictions using the nominal (uncalibrated) values of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1), and find that calibration delivers a significant improvement to the predictive skill of the 3D RANS model. We repeat the calibration using surrogate models based on kriging and find that the calibration, based on these more accurate models, is not much better that those obtained with simple polynomial surrogates. We discuss the reasons for this rather surprising outcome.

  2. Analysis and reconstruction of a pulsed jet in crossflow by multi-plane snapshot POD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernet, Romain; Thomas, Lionel; David, Laurent [Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, CNRS, Laboratoire d' Etudes Aerodynamiques (LEA), SP2MI, Teleport 2, Boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, Futuroscope Chasseneui (France)

    2009-10-15

    In this work, snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is used to study a pulsed jet in crossflow where the velocity fields are extracted from stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) results. The studied pulsed jet is characterized by a frequency f=1 Hz, a Reynolds number Re{sub j}= 500 (based on the mean jet velocity U{sub j}=1.67 cm/s and a mean velocity ratio of R=1). Pulsed jet and continuous jet are compared via mean velocity field trajectory and Q criterion. POD results of instantaneous, phase-averaged and fluctuating velocity fields are presented and compared in this paper. Snapshot POD applied on one plane allows us to distinguish an organization of the first spatial eigenmodes. A distinction between natural modes and pulsed modes is achieved with the results obtained by the pulsed and unforced jet. Secondly, the correlation tensor is established with four parallel planes (multi-plane snapshot POD) for the evaluation of volume spatial modes. These resulting modes are interpolated and the volume velocity field is reconstructed with a minimal number of modes for all the times of the pulsation period. These reconstructions are compared to orthogonal measurements to the transverse jet in order to validate the obtained three-dimensional velocity fields. Finally, this POD approach for the 3D flow field reconstruction from experimental data issued from planes parallel to the flow seems capable to extract relevant information from a complex three-dimensional flow and can be an alternative to tomo-PIV for large volume of measurement. (orig.)

  3. Analysis and reconstruction of a pulsed jet in crossflow by multi-plane snapshot POD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet, Romain; Thomas, Lionel; David, Laurent

    2009-10-01

    In this work, snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is used to study a pulsed jet in crossflow where the velocity fields are extracted from stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) results. The studied pulsed jet is characterized by a frequency f = 1 Hz, a Reynolds number Re j = 500 (based on the mean jet velocity {overline{U}j} = 1.67 cm/s and a mean velocity ratio of R = 1). Pulsed jet and continuous jet are compared via mean velocity field trajectory and Q criterion. POD results of instantaneous, phase-averaged and fluctuating velocity fields are presented and compared in this paper. Snapshot POD applied on one plane allows us to distinguish an organization of the first spatial eigenmodes. A distinction between “natural modes” and “pulsed modes” is achieved with the results obtained by the pulsed and unforced jet. Secondly, the correlation tensor is established with four parallel planes (multi-plane snapshot POD) for the evaluation of volume spatial modes. These resulting modes are interpolated and the volume velocity field is reconstructed with a minimal number of modes for all the times of the pulsation period. These reconstructions are compared to orthogonal measurements to the transverse jet in order to validate the obtained three-dimensional velocity fields. Finally, this POD approach for the 3D flow field reconstruction from experimental data issued from planes parallel to the flow seems capable to extract relevant information from a complex three-dimensional flow and can be an alternative to tomo-PIV for large volume of measurement.

  4. Mixing characteristics of a transverse jet injection into supersonic crossflows through an expansion wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoyang; Wang, Zhenguo; Wang, Hongbo; Sun, Mingbo

    2016-12-01

    Mixing characteristics of a transverse jet injection into supersonic crossflows through an expansion plate are investigated using large eddy simulation (LES), where the expansion effects on the mixing are analyzed emphatically by comparing to the flat-plate counterpart. An adaptive central-upwind weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme along with multi-threaded and multi-process MPI/OpenMP parallel is adopted to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the calculations. Progressive mesh refinement study is performed to assess the grid resolution and solution convergence. Statistic results obtained are compared to the experimental data and recently performed classical numerical simulation, which validates the reliability of the present LES codes. Firstly, the jet mixing mechanisms in the flowfield with expansion plate are revealed. It indicates that the large-scale vortices in the windward side of jet plume induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability contribute to the mixing in the near-field, while the entrainment by the counter-rotating vortices and molecular diffusion dominate the mixing process in the far-field. Furthermore, the effects of wall expansion on the flow and mixing characteristics are discussed. The boundary layer across the expansion corner is relaminarized and the profiles of streamwise velocity are distinctly changed. Then the separation region ahead of jet plume is more close to the wall, and the breaking process of large-scale vortices in the windward side of jet plume starts earlier. However, the favorable pressure gradient generated by wall expansion reduces the mixing efficiency and brings a greater total pressure loss.

  5. LDA-measurements of jets in crossflow for effusion cooling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, K.M.B. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Thermo and Fluid Dynamics

    2002-07-01

    There is a need for better cooling of hot parts in gas turbines. Film cooling and effusion cooling are often used in parts where there is a great heat load. However, modern numerical methods cannot predict heat transfer on film-cooled walls, where there are many rows of holes. There is thus a great need for better understanding of the topology of the flow field, the way in which different vortices interact in multiple row film cooling (effusion cooling) and how fluid packages with different densities affect the flow. Laser-Doppler anemometry was used here to examine the flow field of an oblique jet in a crossflow. The jet was located in the third row of holes. The operational parameters used in this investigation were Re{sub d} = 6000, U{sub jet}/U{sub 0} = 0.8, T{sub jet}/T{sub 0} = 1 and {rho}{sub jet}/{rho}{sub 0} = 1, and the injection hole was slanted at an angle of 30 . One major finding in LDA measurements in the wake was the two counter-rotating foci close to the wall. In the foci shown here, the mean velocity field changed dramatically from 0 m/s to 10 m/s in only 0.4 mm. This is of the same magnitude as the wall gradient in a flat-plate boundary layer with the same free stream velocity. All Reynolds stresses are presented in several planes for the global flow field of the jet. (orig.)

  6. Conditional averaging on volumetric velocity fields for analysis of the pseudo-periodic organization of jet-in-crossflow vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Cambonie, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric velocimetry measurements have been performed on a round jet in crossflow (JICF). Two kind of conditional averaging process are presented : a global conditional average (GCA) and a local conditional average (LCA). Vortices crossing the JICF symmetry plane are used to quantify the jet pseudo-periodicity leading to the GCA and LCA definitions. Because they make possible to improve the velocity field resolution as well as to significantly reduce the experimental noise, these conditional averages are an interesting and efficient way to study the instantaneous swirling structures of this instantaneous flow.

  7. Epigenetic Control of Macrophage Shape Transition towards an Atypical Elongated Phenotype by Histone Deacetylase Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cabanel

    Full Text Available Inflammatory chronic pathologies are complex processes characterized by an imbalance between the resolution of the inflammatory phase and the establishment of tissue repair. The main players in these inflammatory pathologies are bone marrow derived monocytes (BMDMs. However, how monocyte differentiation is modulated to give rise to specific macrophage subpopulations (M1 or M2 that may either maintain the chronic inflammatory process or lead to wound healing is still unclear. Considering that inhibitors of Histone Deacetylase (HDAC have an anti-inflammatory activity, we asked whether this enzyme would play a role on monocyte differentiation into M1 or M2 phenotype and in the cell shape transition that follows. We then induced murine bone marrow progenitors into monocyte/macrophage differentiation pathway using media containing GM-CSF and the HDAC blocker, Trichostatin A (TSA. We found that the pharmacological inhibition of HDAC activity led to a shape transition from the typical macrophage pancake-like shape into an elongated morphology, which was correlated to a mixed M1/M2 profile of cytokine and chemokine secretion. Our results present, for the first time, that HDAC activity acts as a regulator of macrophage differentiation in the absence of lymphocyte stimuli. We propose that HDAC activity down regulates macrophage plasticity favoring the pro-inflammatory phenotype.

  8. Postural control of typical developing boys during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin, Deschamps; Filip, Staes; Kathelijne, Peerlinck; Kristel, Van Geet; Cedric, Hermans; Sebastien, Lobet

    2017-02-01

    Literature is lacking information about postural control performance of typically developing children during a transition task from double-leg stance to single-leg stance. The purpose of the present study was therefore to evaluate the clinical feasibility of a transition task in typical developing age groups as well as to study the correlation between associated balance measures and age.Thirty-three typically developing boys aged 6-20 years performed a standard transition task from DLS to SLS with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC). Balance features derived from the center of pressure displacement captured by a single force platform were correlated with age on the one hand and considered for differences in the perspective of limb dominance on the other hand.All TDB (typically developing boys) were able to perform the transition task with EO. With respect to EC condition, all TDB from the age group 6-7 years and the youngest of the age group 8-12 years (N = 4) were unable to perform the task. No significant differences were observed between the balance measures of the dominant and non-dominant limbs.With respect to EO condition, correlation analyses indicated that time to new stability point (TNSP) as well as the sway measure after this TNSP were correlated with age (p < 0.0001). For the EC condition, only the anthropometrically scaled sway measure was found to be correlated (p = 0.03).

  9. WIND TUNNEL EVALUATION FOR CONTROL TRANSITION FROM ELEVATOR TO STABILATOR OF SMALL UAV

    OpenAIRE

    ZULHILMY SAHWEE; AINA SURIANI MAHMOOD; NAZARUDDIN ABD. RAHMAN; KHAIRUL SALLEH MOHAMED SAHARI

    2017-01-01

    Faulty control surface actuator in a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (sUAV) could be overcome with a few techniques. Redundant actuators, analytical redundancy or combination of both are normally used as fault accommodation techniques. In this paper, the accommodation technique of faulty elevator actuator is presented. This technique uses a standby control surface as temporary control reallocation. Wind tunnel measurement facility is set up for the experimental validation and it is compared...

  10. Power-controlled transition from standard to negative refraction in reorientational soft matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardi, Armando; Alberucci, Alessandro; Kravets, Nina; Buchnev, Oleksandr; Assanto, Gaetano

    2014-11-25

    Refraction at a dielectric interface can take an anomalous character in anisotropic crystals, when light is negatively refracted with incident and refracted beams emerging on the same side of the interface normal. In soft matter subject to reorientation, such as nematic liquid crystals, the nonlinear interaction with light allows tuning of the optical properties. We demonstrate that in such material a beam of light can experience either positive or negative refraction depending on input power, as it can alter the spatial distribution of the optic axis and, in turn, the direction of the energy flow when traveling across an interface. Moreover, the nonlinear optical response yields beam self-focusing and spatial localization into a self-confined solitary wave through the formation of a graded-index waveguide, linking the refractive transition to power-driven readdressing of copolarized guided-wave signals, with a number of output ports not limited by diffraction.

  11. Optically and thermally controlled terahertz metamaterial via transition between direct and indirect electromagnetically induced transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawei Sui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This passage presents a design of tunable terahertz metamaterials via transition between indirect and direct electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT effects by changing semiconductor InSb’s properties to terahertz wave under optical and thermal stimuli. Mechanical model and its electrical circuit model are utilized in analytically calculating maximum transmission of transparency window. Simulated results show consistency with the analytical expressions. The results show that the metamaterials hold 98.4% modulation depth at 189 GHz between 300 K, σInSb =256000 S/m, and 80 K, σInSb =0.0162 S/m conditions , 1360 ps recovery time of the excited electrons in InSb under optical stimulus at 300 K mainly considering the direct EIT effect, and minimum bandwidth 1 GHz.

  12. Neutral Pion Transition Form Factor Measurement and Run Control at the NA62 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lurkin, Nicolas; Goudzovski, Evgueni

    The measurement of the 0 electromagnetic transition form factor (TFF) slope a is performed in the time-like region of momentum transfer using a sample of 1.1 $10^6$ $\\pi^0 \\to e^+ e^- \\gamma$ Dalitz decays collected at the NA62-RK experiment in 2007. The event selection, the fit procedure and the study of the systematic ffects are presented. The final result obtained $a = (3.68 \\pm 0.51stat \\pm 0.25syst) \\times 10^{-2} $ is the most precise to date and represents the first evidence of a non-zero $\\pi^0$ TFF slope with more than 3 $\\sigma$ significance. The NA62 experiment based at the CERN SPS is currently taking data and aims at measuring the branching fraction of the $K \\to \\pi \

  13. Topology of the landscape of optimally controlled transitions in a multilevel system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Madigoe, RJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available that full control is not possible in a practical experiment and this study will investigate the influence of experimental and other limitations on the control landscape. Depending on the outcome of the investigation, the applicability of various optimisation...

  14. Hybrid Switching Controller Design for the Maneuvering and Transit of a Training Ship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomera Mirosław

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the design of a hybrid controller used to control the movement of a ship in different operating modes, thereby improving the performance of basic maneuvers. This task requires integrating several operating modes, such as maneuvering the ship at low speeds, steering the ship at different speeds in the course or along the trajectory, and stopping the ship on the route. These modes are executed by five component controllers switched on and off by the supervisor depending on the type of operation performed. The desired route, containing the coordinates of waypoints and tasks performed along consecutive segments of the reference trajectory, is obtained by the supervisory system from the system operator. The former supports switching between component controllers and provides them with new set-points after each change in the reference trajectory segment, thereby ensuring stable operation of the entire hybrid switching controller.

  15. SAS-4 Protein in Trypanosoma brucei Controls Life Cycle Transitions by Modulating the Length of the Flagellum Attachment Zone Filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiqing; Zhou, Qing; Li, Ziyin

    2015-12-18

    The evolutionarily conserved centriole/basal body protein SAS-4 regulates centriole duplication in metazoa and basal body duplication in flagellated and ciliated organisms. Here, we report that the SAS-4 homolog in the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, TbSAS-4, plays an unusual role in controlling life cycle transitions by regulating the length of the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) filament, a specialized cytoskeletal structure required for flagellum adhesion and cell morphogenesis. TbSAS-4 is concentrated at the distal tip of the FAZ filament, and depletion of TbSAS-4 in the trypomastigote form disrupts the elongation of the new FAZ filament, generating cells with a shorter FAZ associated with a longer unattached flagellum and repositioned kinetoplast and basal body, reminiscent of epimastigote-like morphology. Further, we show that TbSAS-4 associates with six additional FAZ tip proteins, and depletion of TbSAS-4 disrupts the enrichment of these FAZ tip proteins at the new FAZ tip, suggesting a role of TbSAS-4 in maintaining the integrity of this FAZ tip protein complex. Together, these results uncover a novel function of TbSAS-4 in regulating the length of the FAZ filament to control basal body positioning and life cycle transitions in T. brucei.

  16. Numerical heat and mass transfer analysis of a cross-flow indirect evaporative cooler with plates and flat tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, K. J.; Xu, J.; Cui, X.; Ng, K. C.; Islam, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    In this study the performance of an indirect evaporative cooling system (IECS) of cross-flow configuration is numerically investigated. Considering the variation of water film temperature along the flowing path and the wettability of the wet channel, a two-dimensional theoretical model is developed to comprehensively describe the heat and mass transfer process involved in the system. After comparing the simulation results with available experimental data from literature, the deviation within ±5 % proves the accuracy and reliability of the proposed mathematical model. The simulation results of the plate type IECS indicate that the important parameters, such as dimension of plates, air properties, and surface wettability play a great effect on the cooling performance. The investigation of flow pattern shows that cross-flow configuration of primary air with counter-flow of secondary air and water film has a better cooling performance than that of the parallel-flow pattern. Furthermore, the performance of a novel flat tube working as the separating medium is numerically investigated. Simulation results for this novel geometry indicate that the tube number, tube long axis and short axis length as well as tube length remarkably affect its cooling performance.

  17. Ultrasonic assisted cross-flow ultrafiltration of starch and cellulose nanocrystals suspensions: characterization at multi-scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Pignon, F; Gondrexon, N; Sztucki, M; Romdhane, A; Guillet, A; Aurousseau, M

    2015-06-25

    This study investigates for the first time the behaviors of starch and cellulose nanocrystals (SNC and CNC) suspensions which are simultaneously subjected to pressure, shear flow and ultrasound (US) during cross-flow ultrafiltration. This multi-forces process was characterized from macro-scales to nano-scales, with a custom designed "SAXS Cross-Flow US-coupled Filtration Cell". In addition, rheological behaviors of SNC samples at different concentrations/temperatures have been investigated. In both cases (ultrafiltration of SNC and CNC suspensions), better performances were observed with US. The in-situ SAXS measurements revealed that for SNC suspensions, no structure change occurred at the length scales range from 10 to 60nm in this multi-forces process, while CNC particles exhibited an ordered arrangement within the concentrated layer during the same process. SNC particles accumulated on the membrane surface forming a "fragile" concentrated layer which was removed very quickly by subsequent applied US. In contrary, the CNC particles accumulation was very severe, the additional ultrasonic force led to a disruption but not a totally removal of the CNC concentrated layer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Jet Injection Angle and Number of Jets on Mixing and Emissions From a Reacting Crossflow at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.John, D.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The mixing of air jets into hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone is an important step in staged combustion. Often referred to as "quick quench," the mixing occurs with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. An experiment has been designed to simulate and study this process, and the effect of varying the entry angle (0 deg, 22.5 deg and 45 deg from normal) and number of the air jets (7, 9, and 11) into the main flow, while holding the jet-to-crossflow mass-low ratio, MR, and momentum-flux ratio, J, constant (MR = 2.5;J = 25). The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from orifices equally spaced around the perimeter. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture to a module containing air jet injection tubes that can be changed to vary orifice geometry. Species concentrations of O2, CO, CO2, NO(x) and HC were obtained one duct diameter upstream (in the rich zone), and primarily one duct radius downstream. From this information, penetration of the jet, the spatial extent of chemical reaction, mixing, and the optimum jet injection angle and number of jets can be deduced.

  19. The use of dead-end and cross-flow nanofiltration to purify prebiotic oligosaccharides from reaction mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair S. Grandison

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanofiltration (NF of model sugar solutions and commercial oligosaccharide mixtures were studied in both dead-end and cross-flow modes. Preliminary trials, with a dead-end filtration cell, demonstrated the feasibility of fractionating monosaccharides from disaccharides and oligosaccharides in mixtures, using loose nanofiltration (NF-CA-50, NF-TFC-50 membranes. During the nanofiltration purification of a commercial oligosaccharide mixture, yields of 19% (w w-1 for the monosaccharides and 88% (w w-1 for di, and oligosaccharides were obtained for the NF-TFC-50 membrane after four filtration steps, indicating that removal of the monosaccharides is possible, with only minor losses of the oligosaccharide content of the mixture. The effects of pressure, feed concentration, and filtration temperature were studied in similar experiments carried out in a cross-flow system, in full recycle mode of operation. The rejection rates of the sugar components increased with increasing pressure, and decreased with both increasing total sugar concentration in the feed and increasing temperature. Continuous diafiltration (CD purification of model sugar solutions and commercial oligosaccharide mixtures using NF-CA-50 (at 25oC and DS-5-DL (at 60oC membranes, gave yield values of 14 to 18% for the monosaccharide, 59 to 89% for the disaccharide and 81 to 98% for the trisaccharide present in the feed. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of cross flow nanofiltration in the purification of oligosaccharide mixtures from the contaminant monosaccharides.

  20. I-F starting method with smooth transition to EMF based motion-sensorless vector control of PM synchronous motor/generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Teodorescu, Remus; Fatu, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel hybrid motion- sensorless control system for permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) using a new robust start-up method called I-f control, and a smooth transition to emf-based vector control. The I-f method is based on separate control of id, iq currents with the r......This paper proposes a novel hybrid motion- sensorless control system for permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) using a new robust start-up method called I-f control, and a smooth transition to emf-based vector control. The I-f method is based on separate control of id, iq currents...... transition from I-f to emf sensorless vector control when the frequency reaches a certain level, and back. The PMSM rotor position and speed are extracted by using a PLL state-observer from the estimated rotor-flux, which is based on an equivalent integrator in close- loop with a PI speed......-adaptive compensator to eliminate dc-offset and phase-delay. Digital simulations for PMSM start-up with full load torque are presented for different initial rotor-positions. The transitions from I-f to emf motion-sensorless vector control and back as well, at very low-speeds, are fully validated by experimental...

  1. Controlling Rashba spin orbit coupling in polar two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Qun-Fang; Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wang, Ji-Qing; Wan, Xian-gang; Duan, Chun-Gang; Chu, J H

    2016-01-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) group of materials MXY (M=Mo, W, X(not equal to)Y=S, Se, Te) are two-dimensional polar semiconductors with Rashba spin orbit coupling (SOC). Setting WSeTe as an example and using density functional theory calculations, we investigate the influence of biaxial strain and electric field on Rashba SOC in MXY monolayer. The orbital analysis reveals that Rashba spin splitting around Gamma point occurs mainly through the SOC matrix elements between the W-dz2 and -dxz/yz orbitals, and those between the Se-pz and -px/y orbitals. We find the change of local electric field between Se and W atoms arising from the mirror symmetry breaking plays the critical role in forming the large Rashba SOC, and through a relatively small compressive/tensile strain (from -2% to 2%), a large tunability of Rashba SOC can be obtained due to the modified W-Se bonding interaction. In addition, we also explore the influence of electric field on Rashba SOC in WSeTe, which can impact the charge d...

  2. New insights into the transport processes controlling the sulfate-methane-transition-zone near methane vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sébastien; Ruffine, Livio

    2016-05-01

    Over the past years, several studies have raised concerns about the possible interactions between methane hydrate decomposition and external change. To carry out such an investigation, it is essential to characterize the baseline dynamics of gas hydrate systems related to natural geological and sedimentary processes. This is usually treated through the analysis of sulfate-reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we model sulfate reduction coupled with AOM as a two-dimensional (2D) problem including, advective and diffusive transport. This is applied to a case study from a deep-water site off Nigeria’s coast where lateral methane advection through turbidite layers was suspected. We show by analyzing the acquired data in combination with computational modeling that a two-dimensional approach is able to accurately describe the recent past dynamics of such a complex natural system. Our results show that the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ) is not a vertical barrier for dissolved sulfate and methane. We also show that such a modeling is able to assess short timescale variations in the order of decades to centuries.

  3. Remote control, umbilical cord and beyond: the mobile phone as a transitional object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribak, Rivka

    2009-03-01

    This paper investigates mobile phone use as a medium of inter-generational communication. Research on teenage mobile phone use has tended to focus on its peer group functionality. In this paper, the mobile phone is examined as a transitional object in parent-teen interrelationships. Specifically, drawing on ethnographic work conducted in Israel among teenagers between 2000 and 2006, the paper focuses on mobile telephones as physical objects that can connect people and mediate relationships. It is shown that, for parents and their teenage children, the mobile phone is important more for the possibility of communication and less for the text or voice conversation it actually carries. Analysis focuses also on the role of the mobile phone in enabling inter-generational distance and intimacy, attending to the complicated ways in which the mobile phone is employed by parents and their teenage children. It is argued that the analysis of mobile phone practices needs to take directly into account the specific cultural contexts of production and consumption, as culture, technology and family mutually shape one another.

  4. Controlling water pollution in developing and transition countries--lessons from three successful cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathuria, Vinish

    2006-03-01

    The policy prescription for solving environmental problems of developing countries and countries-in-transition (CIT) is slowly getting polarized into two viewpoints. One group of researchers and policy advocates including multilateral organizations upholds extensive use of market based instruments (MBIs) in these countries. The other group argues that institutions need to be built first or the policy makers should select the incremental or tiered approach taking into account the existing capabilities. The group also insists that the financial, institutional and political constraints make environmental regulation in these countries more problematic than in industrialized countries. In the short-run, the immediate needs of the developing countries can be addressed effectively by learning lessons from the difficulties encountered by a few successful cases and accordingly evolving an appropriate policy instrument. In this paper an attempt has been made to highlight three such cases from three different parts of the world--Malaysia (Asia-pacific), Poland (Eastern Europe) and Colombia (Latin America). The paper looks into what policy instruments led to a fall in water pollution levels in these countries and what role did MBIs play in this pollution mitigation? The case studies suggest that it is a combination of instruments--license fee, standards, charge and subsidies--reinforced by active enforcement that led to an overall improvement in environment compliance.

  5. Transitions in insect respiratory patterns are controlled by changes in metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, H L; Bradley, T J

    2010-05-01

    We examined the respiratory patterns of Rhodnius prolixus and Gromphadorhina portentosa as metabolic rates varied with temperature to determine whether insects transition from discontinuous (DGC), cyclical and continuous respiration as a response to increasing aerobic demand. Using flow through respirometry we: (1) determined the effects of temperature on metabolic rate; (2) objectively defined periods of spiracular closure; (3) observed whether there was a correlation between metabolic rate and length of spiracular closure. At low temperatures both species exhibit lengthy periods of spiracular closure reflecting a discontinuous respiratory pattern. As metabolic rate increased, periods of spiracular closure decreased and insects displayed a more cyclical pattern of respiration. As metabolic rates increased even further under the highest experimental temperatures, periods of spiracular closure decreased even more and a continuous respiratory pattern was employed by both species. Our results suggest that the three described respiratory patterns in insects are not distinct but are instead a continuum of respiratory responses driven by the metabolic demand experienced by the insect.

  6. Transitioning Resolution Responsibility between the Controller and Automation Team in Simulated NextGen Separation Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrall, C.; Gomez, A.; Homola, J.; Hunt, S..; Martin, L.; Merccer, J.; Prevott, T.

    2013-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research effort on separation assurance and functional allocation in NextGen, a controller- in-the-loop study with ground-based automation was conducted at NASA Ames' Airspace Operations Laboratory in August 2012 to investigate the potential impact of introducing self-separating aircraft in progressively advanced NextGen timeframes. From this larger study, the current exploratory analysis of controller-automation interaction styles focuses on the last and most far-term time frame. Measurements were recorded that firstly verified the continued operational validity of this iteration of the ground-based functional allocation automation concept in forecast traffic densities up to 2x that of current day high altitude en-route sectors. Additionally, with greater levels of fully automated conflict detection and resolution as well as the introduction of intervention functionality, objective and subjective analyses showed a range of passive to active controller- automation interaction styles between the participants. Not only did the controllers work with the automation to meet their safety and capacity goals in the simulated future NextGen timeframe, they did so in different ways and with different attitudes of trust/use of the automation. Taken as a whole, the results showed that the prototyped controller-automation functional allocation framework was very flexible and successful overall.

  7. Experimental study of Counter-Rotating Vortex Pair Trajectories induced by a Round Jet in Cross-Flow at Low Velocity Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Cambonie, T; Aider, J -L

    2013-01-01

    Circular flush Jets In Cross-Flow were experimentally studied in a water tunnel using Volumetric Particle Tracking Velocimetry, for a range of jet to cross-flow velocity ratios, r, from 0.5 to 3, jet exit diameters $d$ from 0.8 cm to 1 cm and cross-flow boundary layer thickness delta from 1 to 2.5 cm. The analysis of the 3D mean velocity fields allows for the definition, computation and study of Counter-rotating Vortex Pair trajectories. The influences of r, d and delta were investigated. A new scaling based on momentum ratio r_m taking into account jet and cross-flow momentum distributions is introduced based on the analysis of jet trajectories published in the literature. Using a rigorous scaling quality factor Q to quantify how well a given scaling successfully collapses trajectories, we show that the proposed scaling also improves the collapse of CVP trajectories, leading to a final scaling law for these trajectories.

  8. Turbulent stresses in a direct contact condensation jet in cross-flow in a duct with implications for particle break-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clerx, N.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the turbulent mixing and heating caused by a (superheated) steam jet injected into a turbulent cross-flow of water in a square channel. The velocity field in the mid plane of the channel has been measured by means of particle image velocimetry

  9. Large-scaled simulation on the coherent vortex evolution of a jet in a cross-flow based on lattice Boltzmann method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangguan Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Large eddy simulation (LES is performed on a jet issued normally into a cross-flow using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM and multiple graphic processing units (multi-GPUs to study the flow characteristics of jets in cross-flow (JICF. The simulation with 8 1.50´10 grids is fulfilled with 6 K20M GPUs. With large-scaled simulation, the secondary and tertiary vortices are captured. The features of the secondary vortices and the tertiary vortices reveal that they have a great impact on the mixing between jet flow and cross-flow. The qualitative and quantitative results also indicate that the evolution mechanism of vortices is not constant, but varies with different situations. The hairpin vortex under attached jet regime originates from the boundary layer vortex of cross-flow. While, the origin of hairpin vortex in detached jet is the jet shear-layer vortex. The mean velocities imply the good ability of LBM to simulate JICF and the large loss of jet momentum in detached jet caused by the strong penetration. Besides, in our computation, a high computational performance of 1083.5 MLUPS is achieved.

  10. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE MIXING OF UNSORTED SEDIMENT PARTICLES DISCHARGED INTO A CROSS-FLOW BY MULTIPHASE PARTICLE-IN-CELL (MP-PIC) METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie GU; Chiwai LI; Hong YANG; Yong ZHAN

    2007-01-01

    The mixing characteristics of dredged sediments of variable size discharged into cross-flow are studied by an Eulerian-Lagrangian method. A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model has been developed by using the modified k-ε parameterization for the turbulence in fluid phase/water and a Lagrangian method for the solid phase/sediments. In the model the wake turbulence induced by sediments has been included as additional source and sink terms in the k-ε model; and the trajectories of the sediments are tracked by the Lagrangian method in which the sediment drift velocities in cross-flow are computed by a multiphase particle-in-cell (MP-PIC) method and the diffusion process is approximated by a random walk model. The hydrodynamic behavior of dumped sediment cloud is governed by the total buoyancy on the cloud, the drag force on each particle and velocity of cross-flow. The cross-flow destroys more or less the double vortices occurred in stagnant ambience and dominates the longitudinal movement of sediment cloud. The computed results suggest satisfactory agreement by comparison with the experimental results of laboratory.

  11. Turbulent stresses in a direct contact condensation jet in cross-flow in a duct with implications for particle break-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clerx, N.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Kuerten, J.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the turbulent mixing and heating caused by a (superheated) steam jet injected into a turbulent cross-flow of water in a square channel. The velocity field in the mid plane of the channel has been measured by means of particle image velocimetry

  12. Comparison of an ultrasonic nebulizer with a cross-flow nebulizer for selenium speciation by ion-chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jons, O.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) with a cross-flow nebulizer (CFN) for selenium speciation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection. The influence of instrumental parameters as well as composition of the solvent on the selenium...

  13. Independent Control of Optical and Explosive Properties: Pyrazole-Tetrazine Complexes of First Row Transition Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Thomas W; Chavez, David E; Hanson, Susan K; Scharff, R Jason; Scott, Brian L; Veauthier, Jacqueline M; Wu, Ruilian

    2015-08-17

    Complexes of 3-amino-6-(3,5-dimethylpyrazole)tetrazine) (NH2TzDMP, 1) and 3-(3,3'-dinitroazetidine)-6-(3,5-dimethylpyrazole)tetrazine) (DNAZTzDMP, 2) with first row transition metal centers were synthesized. Reactions of Fe(II)(H2O)6(BF4)2 and Fe(NO3)3·9H2O with 1 and 2 both led to complexes of the form [(RTzDMP)3Fe]X2 (X = BF4, R = NH2 (3), DNAZ (4); X = NO3, R = NH2 (5), DNAZ (6)), which showed intense MLCT bands in the visible region of the spectrum. Ligands 1 and 2 also reacted with Cu(II)(NO3)2·5/2H2O to form [(RTzDMP)2Cu(NO3)][NO3] (R = NH2 (7), DNAZ (8)) in addition to reacting with Cu(I)(CH3CN)4(PF6) to form [(RTzDMP)2Cu][PF6] (R = NH2 (9), DNAZ (10)). Lastly reactions of 1 and 2 with Co(NO3)2·6H2O and Ni(NO3)2·6H2O led to [(NH2TzDMP)2Co(H2O) (NO3)][NO3] (11), [(DNAZTzDMP)2Co(H2O)2][NO3]2 (12), [(NH2TzDMP)3Ni][NO3]2 (13), and [(DNAZTzDMP)2Ni(H2O)2][NO3]2 (14). The complexes display rich electrochemical and photophysical properties that are unaffected by derivation with explosive groups.

  14. Numerical Study of Active Flow Control for a Transitional Highly-Loaded Low-Pressure Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Count Using Vortex Generator Jet Separation Control,” ASME Paper GT-2002-30602, Jun. 2002. [16] Eulitz, F. and Engel , K., “Numerical Investigation of...Around a Low Pressure Turbine Blade,” Direct and Large-Eddy Simulation IV, ERCOFTAC Series Vol. 8 , edited by B. J. Guerts, R. Friedrich , and O

  15. Weed Control Strategies for Organic Peanut Production and Transition: A Lesson in Basic Agronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic peanut production is difficult and costly. The only production inputs that consistently improved weed management in organic peanut production were modified production practices and intense cultivation with a tine weeder. Research trials evaluated row patterns, seeding rates...

  16. Selective darkening of degenerate transitions for implementing quantum controlled-NOT gates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, P.C.; Ashhab, S.; Lupascu, A.; DiCarlo, L.; Nori, F.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the selective darkening method for implementing quantum controlled-NOT (CNOT) gates. This method, which we have recently proposed and demonstrated, consists of driving two transversely coupled quantum bits (qubits) with a driving field that is resonant with one o

  17. Control of Transitional and Turbulent Flows Using Plasma-Based Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Phenomena. Int. Jnl. for Num. Methods in Eng., 45:1849–1869, 1999.19P. Alpert . Implicit Filtering in Conjunction with Explicit Filtering. J. Comp. Phys...Flat Plate. NASA CR-187068, 1991.30D. Greenblatt, K.B. Paschal, C.S. Yao, and J. Harris . A separation control cfd validation test case part 2. zero

  18. Relation of Perinatal Risk and Early Parenting to Executive Control at the Transition to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Caron A. C.; Woodward, Lianne J.

    2015-01-01

    Executive control (EC) develops rapidly during the preschool years and is central to academic achievement and functional outcome. Although children with perinatal adversity are at known risk for EC impairments, little is known about the underlying nature of these impairments or the mechanisms that contribute to their development over time. Drawing…

  19. Controlling Enantioselectivity in Additions to Cyclic Oxocarbenium Ions via Transition Metal Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Mary P; Maity, Prantik

    2012-01-01

    Controlling enantioselectivity in additions to oxocarbenium ions remains a challenge in asymmetric catalysis. By catalytically generating a chiral organometallic intermediate, a copper acetylide, we have developed a novel approach for additions of carbon nucleophiles to cyclic oxocarbenium ions in high enantioselectivities and yields.

  20. Modeling how shark and dolphin skin patterns control transitional wall-turbulence vorticity patterns using spatiotemporal phase reset mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Hellum, Aren M.

    2014-10-01

    Many slow-moving biological systems like seashells and zebrafish that do not contend with wall turbulence have somewhat organized pigmentation patterns flush with their outer surfaces that are formed by underlying autonomous reaction-diffusion (RD) mechanisms. In contrast, sharks and dolphins contend with wall turbulence, are fast swimmers, and have more organized skin patterns that are proud and sometimes vibrate. A nonlinear spatiotemporal analytical model is not available that explains the mechanism underlying control of flow with such proud patterns, despite the fact that shark and dolphin skins are major targets of reverse engineering mechanisms of drag and noise reduction. Comparable to RD, a minimal self-regulation model is given for wall turbulence regeneration in the transitional regime--laterally coupled, diffusively--which, although restricted to pre-breakdown durations and to a plane close and parallel to the wall, correctly reproduces many experimentally observed spatiotemporal organizations of vorticity in both laminar-to-turbulence transitioning and very low Reynolds number but turbulent regions. We further show that the onset of vorticity disorganization is delayed if the skin organization is treated as a spatiotemporal template of olivo-cerebellar phase reset mechanism. The model shows that the adaptation mechanisms of sharks and dolphins to their fluid environment have much in common.

  1. Storage dynamics in hydropedological units control hillslope connectivity, runoff generation, and the evolution of catchment transit time distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, D; Birkel, C; Dick, J; Geris, J; Soulsby, C

    2014-02-01

    We examined the storage dynamics and isotopic composition of soil water over 12 months in three hydropedological units in order to understand runoff generation in a montane catchment. The units form classic catena sequences from freely draining podzols on steep upper hillslopes through peaty gleys in shallower lower slopes to deeper peats in the riparian zone. The peaty gleys and peats remained saturated throughout the year, while the podzols showed distinct wetting and drying cycles. In this region, most precipitation events are 80% of flow, even in large events, reflecting the displacement of water from the riparian soils that has been stored in the catchment for >2 years. These riparian areas are the key zone where different source waters mix. Our study is novel in showing that they act as "isostats," not only regulating the isotopic composition of stream water, but also integrating the transit time distribution for the catchment. Hillslope connectivity is controlled by small storage changes in soil unitsDifferent catchment source waters mix in large riparian wetland storageIsotopes show riparian wetlands set the catchment transit time distribution.

  2. Photoperiodic control of sugar release during the floral transition: What is the role of sugars in the florigenic signal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Marchena, M Isabel; Romero, José M; Valverde, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Florigen is a mobile signal released by the leaves that reaching the shoot apical meristem (SAM), changes its developmental program from vegetative to reproductive. The protein FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) constitutes an important element of the florigen, but other components such as sugars, have been also proposed to be part of this signal. (1-5) We have studied the accumulation and composition of starch during the floral transition in Arabidopsis thaliana in order to understand the role of carbon mobilization in this process. In A. thaliana and Antirrhinum majus the gene coding for the Granule-Bound Starch Synthase (GBSS) is regulated by the circadian clock (6,7) while in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the homolog gene CrGBSS is controlled by photoperiod and circadian signals. (8,9) In a recent paper(10) we described the role of the central photoperiodic factor CONSTANS (CO) in the regulation of GBSS expression in Arabidopsis. This regulation is in the basis of the change in the balance between starch and free sugars observed during the floral transition. We propose that this regulation may contribute to the florigenic signal and to the increase in sugar transport required during the flowering process.

  3. Conjecture with water and rheological control for subducting slab in the mantle transition zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fumiko Tajima; Masaki Yoshida; Eiji Ohtani

    2015-01-01

    Seismic observations have shown structural variation near the base of the mantle transition zone (MTZ) where subducted cold slabs, as visualized with high seismic speed anomalies (HSSAs), flatten to form stagnant slabs or sink further into the lower mantle. The different slab behaviors were also accompanied by variation of the“660 km”discontinuity depths and low viscosity layers (LVLs) beneath the MTZ that are suggested by geoid inversion studies. We address that deep water transport by subducted slabs and dehydration from hydrous slabs could affect the physical properties of mantle minerals and govern slab dynamics. A systematic series of three-dimensional numerical simulation has been conducted to examine the effects of viscosity reduction or contrast between slab materials on slab behaviors near the base of the MTZ. We found that the viscosity reduction of subducted crustal material leads to a sepa-ration of crustal material from the slab main body and its transient stagnation in the MTZ. The once trapped crustal materials in the MTZ eventually sink into the lower mantle within 20e30 My from the start of the plate subduction. The results suggest crustal material recycle in the whole mantle that is consistent with evidence from mantle geochemistry as opposed to a two-layer mantle convection model. Because of the smaller capacity of water content in lower mantle minerals than in MTZ minerals, dehydration should occur at the phase transformation depth, w660 km. The variation of the disconti-nuity depths and highly localized low seismic speed anomaly (LSSA) zones observed from seismic P waveforms in a relatively high frequency band (w1 Hz) support the hypothesis of dehydration from hydrous slabs at the phase boundary. The LSSAs which correspond to dehydration induced fluids are likely to be very local, given very small hydrogen (Hþ) diffusivity associated with subducted slabs. The image of such local LSSA zones embedded in HSSAs may not be necessarily captured

  4. Conjecture with water and rheological control for subducting slab in the mantle transition zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Tajima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic observations have shown structural variation near the base of the mantle transition zone (MTZ where subducted cold slabs, as visualized with high seismic speed anomalies (HSSAs, flatten to form stagnant slabs or sink further into the lower mantle. The different slab behaviors were also accompanied by variation of the “660 km” discontinuity depths and low viscosity layers (LVLs beneath the MTZ that are suggested by geoid inversion studies. We address that deep water transport by subducted slabs and dehydration from hydrous slabs could affect the physical properties of mantle minerals and govern slab dynamics. A systematic series of three-dimensional numerical simulation has been conducted to examine the effects of viscosity reduction or contrast between slab materials on slab behaviors near the base of the MTZ. We found that the viscosity reduction of subducted crustal material leads to a separation of crustal material from the slab main body and its transient stagnation in the MTZ. The once trapped crustal materials in the MTZ eventually sink into the lower mantle within 20–30 My from the start of the plate subduction. The results suggest crustal material recycle in the whole mantle that is consistent with evidence from mantle geochemistry as opposed to a two-layer mantle convection model. Because of the smaller capacity of water content in lower mantle minerals than in MTZ minerals, dehydration should occur at the phase transformation depth, ∼660 km. The variation of the discontinuity depths and highly localized low seismic speed anomaly (LSSA zones observed from seismic P waveforms in a relatively high frequency band (∼1 Hz support the hypothesis of dehydration from hydrous slabs at the phase boundary. The LSSAs which correspond to dehydration induced fluids are likely to be very local, given very small hydrogen (H+ diffusivity associated with subducted slabs. The image of such local LSSA zones embedded in HSSAs may not

  5. Modular construction of oxide structures--compositional control of transition metal coordination environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenailleau, Christophe; Allix, Mathieu; Claridge, John B; Hervieu, Maryvonne; Thomas, Michael F; Hirst, James P; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2008-06-18

    -site cations are also partially ordered over three distinct sites: 8-coordinate between the Sp layers, 10-coordinate between Tp and O layers, and 12-coordinate between Sp and O layers. Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetometry, and variable-temperature neutron diffraction show that the material undergoes two magnetic transitions at approximately 700 and 255 K.

  6. Controlled synthesis of multi-shelled transition metal oxide hollow structures through one-pot solution route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Wang; Yi-Jun Yang; Ying Ma; Jian-Nian Yao

    2013-01-01

    As one type of promising candidates fot environmental and energy-related systems,multi-shelled transition metal oxide hollow structures (MS-TMOHSs) have drawn great scientific and technical interest in the past few years.This article highlights recent advances in one-pot solution synthesis of MS-TMOHSs.We begin it with an overview of synthetic strategies that have been exploited to achieve these peculiar structures.We then focus on one-pot solution approaches in the following four sections:i) soft templates directed growth; ii) Ostwald ripening; iii) controlled etching; and iv) gas bubble assisted growth.After giving a brief discussion on the unique properties and applications of these multi-shelled hollow structures,we conclude this review with the general challenges and the potential future directions of this exciting area of research.

  7. Development and Deployment of a Full-Scale Cross-Flow Filtration System for Treatment of Liquid Low-Level Waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, T.E.

    2000-05-12

    A full-scale modular solid/liquid separation (SLS) system was designed, fabricated, installed, and successfully deployed for treatment of liquid low-level waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The SLS module, utilizing cross-flow filtration, was operated as part of an integrated tank waste pretreatment system (otherwise known as the Wastewater Triad) to remove suspended solids and prevent fouling of ion-exchange materials and heat exchange surfaces. The information gained from this testing was used to complete design specifications for the full-scale modular SLS system in May 1997. The contract for detailed design and fabrication of the system was awarded to NUMET in July 1997, and the design was completed in January 1998. Fabrication began in March 1998, and the completed system was delivered to ORNL on December 29, 1998. Installation of the system at the MVST facility was completed in May 1999. After completing an operational readiness assessment, approval was given to commence hot operations on June 7, 1999. Operations involving two of the eight MVSTs were performed safely and with very little unscheduled downtime. Filtration of supernatant from tank W-31 was completed on June 24, 1999 and W-26 processing was completed on August 20, 1999. The total volume processed during these two campaigns was about 45,000 gal. The suspended solids content of the liquid processed from tank W-31 was lower than expected, resulting in higher-than-expected filtrate production for nearly the entire operation. The liquid processed from tank W-26 was higher in suspended solids content, and filtrate production was lower, but comparable to the rates expected based on the results of previous pilot-scale, single-element filtration tests. The quality of the filtrate consistently met the requirements for feed to the downstream ion-exchange and evaporation processes. From an equipment and controls standpoint, the modular system (pumps

  8. Urbanicity and Paediatric Bacteraemia in Ghana-A Case-Control Study within a Rural-Urban Transition Zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sothmann

    Full Text Available Systemic bacterial infections are a major cause of paediatric febrile illness in sub-Saharan Africa. Aim of this study was to assess the effects of social and geographical determinants on the risk of bacteraemia in a rural-urban transition zone in Ghana.Children below 15 years of age with fever were recruited at an outpatient department in the suburban belt of Kumasi, Ghana's second largest city. Blood was taken for bacterial culture and malaria diagnostics. The socio-economic status of participants was calculated using Principle Component Analysis. A scale, based on key urban characteristics, was established to quantify urbanicity for all communities in the hospital catchment area. A case-control analysis was conducted, where children with and without bacteraemia were cases and controls, respectively.Bacteraemia was detected in 72 (3.1% of 2,306 hospital visits. Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS; n = 24; 33.3% and Salmonella typhi (n = 18; 25.0% were the most common isolates. Logistic regression analysis showed that bacteraemia was negatively associated with urbanicity (odds ratio [OR] = 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.7-1.0 and socio-economic status (OR = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.6-0.9. Both associations were stronger if only NTS infections were used as cases (OR = 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3-0.8 and OR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-1.0, respectively.The results of this study highlight the importance of individual as well as community factors as independent risk factors for invasive bacterial infection (IBI and especially NTS. Epidemiological data support physicians, public health experts and policy makers to identify disease prevention and treatment needs in order to secure public health in the transitional societies of developing countries.

  9. Control of sleep-to-wake transitions via fast aminoacid and slow neuropeptide transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueiro, Thiago; de Lecea, Luis; Huerta, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    The Locus Coeruleus (LC) modulates cortical, subcortical, cerebellar, brainstem and spinal cord circuits and it expresses receptors for neuromodulators that operate in a time scale of several seconds. Evidences from anatomical, electrophysiological and optogenetic experiments have shown that LC neurons receive input from a group of neurons called Hypocretins (HCRTs) that release a neuropeptide called hypocretin. It is less known how these two groups of neurons can be coregulated using GABAergic neurons. Since the time scales of GABAA inhibition is several orders of magnitude faster than the hypocretin neuropeptide effect, we investigate the limits of circuit activity regulation using a realistic model of neurons. Our investigation shows that GABAA inhibition is insufficient to control the activity levels of the LCs. Despite slower forms of GABAA can in principle work, there is not much plausibility due to the low probability of the presence of slow GABAA and lack of robust stability at the maximum firing frequencies. The best possible control mechanism predicted by our modeling analysis is the presence of inhibitory neuropeptides that exert effects in a similar time scale as the hypocretin/orexin. Although the nature of these inhibitory neuropeptides has not been identified yet, it provides the most efficient mechanism in the modeling analysis. Finally, we present a reduced mean-field model that perfectly captures the dynamics and the phenomena generated by this circuit. This investigation shows that brain communication involving multiple time scales can be better controlled by employing orthogonal mechanisms of neural transmission to decrease interference between cognitive processes and hypothalamic functions. PMID:25598695

  10. Transforming growth factor alpha controls the transition from hypertrophic cartilage to bone during endochondral bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Shirine E; Pest, Michael A; Kim, Gunwoo; Ohora, Sara N; Qin, Ling; Beier, Frank

    2012-07-01

    We have recently identified transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) as a novel growth factor involved in the joint disease osteoarthritis. The role of TGFα in normal cartilage and bone physiology however, has not been well defined. The objective of this study was to determine the role of TGFα in bone development through investigation of the Tgfa knockout mouse. The gross skeletons as well as the cartilage growth plates of Tgfa knockout mice and their control littermates were examined during several developmental stages ranging from newborn to ten weeks old. Knockout mice experienced skeletal growth retardation and expansion of the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate. These phenotypes were transient and spontaneously resolved by ten weeks of age. Tgfa knockout growth plates also had fewer osteoclasts along the cartilage/bone interface. Furthermore, knockout mice expressed less RUNX2, RANKL, and MMP13 mRNA in their cartilage growth plates than controls did. Tgfa knockout mice experience a delay in bone development, specifically the conversion of hypertrophic cartilage to true bone. The persistence of the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate appears to be mediated by a decrease in MMP13 and RANKL expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes and a resulting reduction in osteoclast recruitment. Overall, TGFα appears to be an important growth factor regulating the conversion of cartilage to bone during the process of endochondral ossification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Controlling Electronic Transitions in Fullerene van der Waals Aggregates via Supramolecular Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saunak; Herrmann-Westendorf, Felix; Schacher, Felix H; Täuscher, Eric; Ritter, Uwe; Dietzek, Benjamin; Presselt, Martin

    2016-08-24

    Morphologies crucially determine the optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductors. Therefore, hierarchical and supramolecular approaches have been developed for targeted design of supramolecular ensembles of organic semiconducting molecules and performance improvement of, e.g., organic solar cells (OSCs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). We demonstrate how the photonic properties of fullerenes change with the formation of van der Waals aggregates. We identified supramolecular structures with broadly tunable absorption in the visible spectral range and demonstrated how to form aggregates with targeted visible (vis) absorption. To control supramolecular structure formation, we functionalized the C60-backbone with polar (bis-polyethylene glycol malonate-MPEG) tails, thus yielding an amphiphilic fullerene derivative that self-assembles at interfaces. Aggregates of systematically tuned size were obtained from concentrating MPEGC60 in stearic acid matrices, while different supramolecular geometries were provoked via different thin film preparation methods, namely spin-casting and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) deposition from an air-water interface. We demonstrated that differences in molecular orientation in LB films (C2v type point group aggregates) and spin-casting (stochastic aggregates) lead to huge changes in electronic absorption spectra due to symmetry and orientation reasons. These differences in the supramolecular structures, causing the different photonic properties of spin-cast and LB films, could be identified by means of quantum chemical calculations. Employing supramolecular assembly, we propounded that molecular symmetry in fullerene aggregates is extremely important in controlling vis absorption to harvest photons efficiently, when mixed with a donor molecule, thus improving active layer design and performance of OSCs.

  12. Gate control of spin-polarized conductance in alloyed transitional metal nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkov, Ilia N.; Brovko, Oleg O.; Rungger, Ivan; Stepanyuk, Valeri S.

    2017-03-01

    To date, endeavors in nanoscale spintronics are dominated by the use of single-electron or single-spin transistors having at their heart a semiconductor, metallic, or molecular quantum dot whose localized states are non-spin-degenerate and can be controlled by an external bias applied via a gate electrode. Adjusting the bias of the gate one can realign those states with respect to the chemical potentials of the leads and thus tailor the spin-polarized transmission properties of the device. Here we show that similar functionality can be achieved in a purely metallic junction comprised of a metallic magnetic chain attached to metallic paramagnetic leads and biased by a gate electrode. Our ab initio calculations of electron transport through mixed Pt-Fe (Fe-Pd and Fe-Rh) atomic chains suspended between Pt (Pd and Rh) electrodes show that spin-polarized confined states of the chain can be shifted by the gate bias causing a change in the relative contributions of majority and minority channels to the nanocontact's conductance. As a result, we observe strong dependence of conductance spin polarization on the applied gate potential. In some cases the spin polarization of conductance can even be reversed in sign upon gate potential application, which is a remarkable and promising trait for spintronic applications.

  13. Epigenetic game theory: How to compute the epigenetic control of maternal-to-zygotic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Gosik, Kirk; Xing, Sujuan; Jiang, Libo; Sun, Lidan; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Wu, Rongling

    2017-03-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming is thought to play a critical role in maintaining the normal development of embryos. How the methylation state of paternal and maternal genomes regulates embryogenesis depends on the interaction and coordination of the gametes of two sexes. While there is abundant research in exploring the epigenetic interactions of sperms and oocytes, a knowledge gap exists in the mechanistic quantitation of these interactions and their impact on embryo development. This review aims at formulating a modeling framework to address this gap through the integration and synthesis of evolutionary game theory and the latest discoveries of the epigenetic control of embryo development by next-generation sequencing. This framework, named epigenetic game theory or epiGame, views embryogenesis as an ecological system in which two highly distinct and specialized gametes coordinate through either cooperation or competition, or both, to maximize the fitness of embryos under Darwinian selection. By implementing a system of ordinary differential equations, epiGame quantifies the pattern and relative magnitude of the methylation effects on embryogenesis by the mechanisms of cooperation and competition. epiGame may gain new insight into reproductive biology and can be potentially applied to design personalized medicines for genetic disorder intervention.

  14. FY2000 FRED Test Report - Final Report on the Crossflow Filter Optimization with 5.6M Sodium Salt Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.R.

    2001-04-04

    The Filtration Research Engineering Demonstration (FRED) at the University of South Carolina ran a test campaign to confirm the utility of crossflow filtration for use with the MST sorption as a strontium-actinide removal technology that is expected to be coupled with the ion exchange and solvent extraction process alternatives. FRED has a Mott Metallurgical 7 tube filter with individual tubes 10 ft long and 3/4 inch o.d. having a nominal pore size of 0.5 microns. The blend sludge consisted of a 50/50 wt percent mixture of sludge simulants of SRS Tank 40H and Tank 8F simulated sludges previously manufactured at FRED. Monosodium Titanate (MST) was blended with the 50/50 sludge mixture in a proportion of 0.9167 MST-to-Sludge ratio to provide the solids loadings analyzed in this test.

  15. Numerical simulation of liquid metal turbulent heat transfer from an inline tube bundle in cross-flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey G. Abramov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of the numerical simulation of turbulent flow field and heat transfer of liquid metal in cross-flow over inline tube bundles consisting of smooth round tubes are presented. Computations have been performed with CFD-code ANSYS Fluent on the base of a two-dimensional unsteady RANS formulation using the SST turbulence model by Menter and assuming constant physical properties of a fluid with the Prandtl number equal to 0.023. The Reynolds number ranged from 26,200 to 52,400. Instantaneous and time-averaged velocity and temperature fields obtained for bundles of different intertube spacing with a variation of the bundle width (number of tube rows in the cross direction were analyzed. Integral characteristics of heat transfer were compared with the experimental data.

  16. Numerical simulations of transverse liquid jet to a supersonic crossflow using a pure two-fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A pure two-fluid model was used for investigating transverse liquid jet to a supersonic crossflow. The well-posedness problem of the droplet phase governing equations was solved by applying an equation of state in the kinetic theory. A k-ε-kp turbulence model was used to simulate the turbulent compressible multiphase flow. Separation of boundary layer in front of the liquid jet was predicted with a separation shock induced. A bow shock was found to interact with the separation shock in the simulation result, and the adjustment of shock structure caused by the interaction described the whipping phenomena. The predicted penetration height showed good agreement with the empirical correlations. In addition, the turbulent kinetic energies of both the gas and droplet phases were presented for comparison, and effects of the jet-to-air momentum flux ratio and droplet diameter on the penetration height were also examined in this work.

  17. Pseudo-2D model of a cross-flow membrane humidifier for a PEM fuel cell under multiphase conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalet, C.; Diny, M. [Peugeot Citroen Automobile, Carrieres sous Poissy (France). Fuel Cell Program; Maranzana, G.; Lottin, O.; Dillet, J. [Nancy Univ., Vanoeuvre les Nancy (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique

    2009-07-01

    Membrane dehydration can reduce the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, excessive water at the inlet of the fuel cells can flood cathodes. An understanding of the coupled mass and heat transfer processes involved in membrane humidifiers is needed in order to successfully manage water in PEMFCs. This paper discussed a pseudo-2D model of a cross-flow membrane humidifier for PEMFCs. The model was used to test correlations of the water transport coefficient through a Nafion 115 membrane. The study showed that results obtained using the model differed from experimental results. The effects of inlet operating conditions, flow rates, and temperature on the performance of a planar membrane humidifier under both single- and multi-phase conditions were also investigated.

  18. Evaluation of the performance of the cross-flow air classifier in manufactured sand processing via CFD-DEM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, H. A.; Irassar, E. F.; Barbosa, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    Manufactured sands are particulate materials obtained as by product of rock crushing. Particle sizes in the sand can be as high as 6 mm and as low as a few microns. The concrete industry has been increasingly using these sands as fine aggregates to replace natural sands. The main shortcoming is the excess of particles smaller than element modelling (DEM) were used for the assessment. Results show that the correct classification set up improves the size distribution of the raw materials. The cross-flow air classification is found to be influenced by the particle size distribution and the turbulence inside the chamber. The classifier can be re-designed to work at low inlet velocities to produce manufactured sand for the concrete industry.

  19. Heat transfer from combustion gases to a single row of closely spaced tubes in a swirl crossflow Stirling engine heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, C. P.; Back, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental program to determine the heat-transfer characteristics of a combustor and heat-exchanger system in a hybrid solar receiver which utilizes a Stirling engine. The system consists of a swirl combustor with a crossflow heat exchanger composed of a single row of 48 closely spaced curved tubes. In the present study, heat-transfer characteristics of the combustor/heat-exchanger system without a Stirling engine have been studied over a range of operating conditions and output levels using water as the working fluid. Nondimensional heat-transfer coefficients based on total heat transfer have been obtained and are compared with available literature data. The results show significantly enhanced heat transfer for the present geometry and test conditions. Also, heat transfer along the length of the tubes is found to vary, the effect depending upon test condition.

  20. Vegetation controls on weathering intensity during the last deglacial transition in southeast Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Sarah J; McGlue, Michael M; Ellis, Geoffrey S; Lézine, Anne-Marie; Cohen, Andrew S; Vincens, Annie

    2014-01-01

    Tropical climate is rapidly changing, but the effects of these changes on the geosphere are unknown, despite a likelihood of climatically-induced changes on weathering and erosion. The lack of long, continuous paleo-records prevents an examination of terrestrial responses to climate change with sufficient detail to answer questions about how systems behaved in the past and may alter in the future. We use high-resolution records of pollen, clay mineralogy, and particle size from a drill core from Lake Malawi, southeast Africa, to examine atmosphere-biosphere-geosphere interactions during the last deglaciation (∼ 18-9 ka), a period of dramatic temperature and hydrologic changes. The results demonstrate that climatic controls on Lake Malawi vegetation are critically important to weathering processes and erosion patterns during the deglaciation. At 18 ka, afromontane forests dominated but were progressively replaced by tropical seasonal forest, as summer rainfall increased. Despite indication of decreased rainfall, drought-intolerant forest persisted through the Younger Dryas (YD) resulting from a shorter dry season. Following the YD, an intensified summer monsoon and increased rainfall seasonality were coeval with forest decline and expansion of drought-tolerant miombo woodland. Clay minerals closely track the vegetation record, with high ratios of kaolinite to smectite (K/S) indicating heavy leaching when forest predominates, despite variable rainfall. In the early Holocene, when rainfall and temperature increased (effective moisture remained low), open woodlands expansion resulted in decreased K/S, suggesting a reduction in chemical weathering intensity. Terrigenous sediment mass accumulation rates also increased, suggesting critical linkages among open vegetation and erosion during intervals of enhanced summer rainfall. This study shows a strong, direct influence of vegetation composition on weathering intensity in the tropics. As climate change will likely

  1. Vegetation controls on weathering intensity during the last deglacial transition in southeast Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Sarah J.; McGlue, Michael M.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lézine, Anne-Marie; Cohen, Andrew S.; Vincens, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Tropical climate is rapidly changing, but the effects of these changes on the geosphere are unknown, despite a likelihood of climatically-induced changes on weathering and erosion. The lack of long, continuous paleo-records prevents an examination of terrestrial responses to climate change with sufficient detail to answer questions about how systems behaved in the past and may alter in the future. We use high-resolution records of pollen, clay mineralogy, and particle size from a drill core from Lake Malawi, southeast Africa, to examine atmosphere-biosphere-geosphere interactions during the last deglaciation (~18–9 ka), a period of dramatic temperature and hydrologic changes. The results demonstrate that climatic controls on Lake Malawi vegetation are critically important to weathering processes and erosion patterns during the deglaciation. At 18 ka, afromontane forests dominated but were progressively replaced by tropical seasonal forest, as summer rainfall increased. Despite indication of decreased rainfall, drought-intolerant forest persisted through the Younger Dryas (YD) resulting from a shorter dry season. Following the YD, an intensified summer monsoon and increased rainfall seasonality were coeval with forest decline and expansion of drought-tolerant miombo woodland. Clay minerals closely track the vegetation record, with high ratios of kaolinite to smectite (K/S) indicating heavy leaching when forest predominates, despite variable rainfall. In the early Holocene, when rainfall and temperature increased (effective moisture remained low), open woodlands expansion resulted in decreased K/S, suggesting a reduction in chemical weathering intensity. Terrigenous sediment mass accumulation rates also increased, suggesting critical linkages among open vegetation and erosion during intervals of enhanced summer rainfall. This study shows a strong, direct influence of vegetation composition on weathering intensity in the tropics. As climate change will likely impact

  2. Dynamical control of the spin transition inside the thermal hysteresis loop of a spin-crossover single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukheddaden, Kamel, E-mail: kbo@physique.uvsq.fr [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St-Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Sy, Mouhamadou; Paez-Espejo, Miguel [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St-Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Slimani, Ahmed [Laboratoire des matériaux ferroélectriques, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Route de la Soukra km 3.5 BP 1171, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Varret, François [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St-Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France)

    2016-04-01

    We have succeeded to achieve experimentally, using an adapted optical microscopy setup, the reversible control of the front transformation between the low-spin (LS)–high-spin (HS) interface in the spin-crossover (SC) single crystal [{Fe(NCSe)(py)_2}{sub 2}(m-bpypz)] undergoing a first-order transition at 112 K with a 7 K hysteresis width. For that, we first generate a phase separation state (a HS/LS interface at equilibrium) inside the hysteresis loop by tuning the light intensity of the microscope. In the second step, this intensity is monitored in such a way to drive, through a photo-heating process, the interface motion. This photo-control is found to be reversible, accurate and requiring a very small amount of energy. In addition the integrity of the crystal is maintained even after a large number of cycling. The experimental observations, are well described as a reaction diffusion process accounting for the front propagation and the photo-heating effects.

  3. Separating xylose from glucose using spiral wound nanofiltration membrane: Effect of cross-flow parameters on sugar rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roli, N. F. M.; Yussof, H. W.; Seman, M. N. A.; Saufi, S. M.; Mohammad, A. W.

    2016-11-01

    A solution model consisted of two different monosaccharides namely xylose and glucose were separated using a pilot scale spiral wound cross-flow system. This system was equipped by a commercial spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) membrane, Desal-5 DK, having a molecular weight cut off (MWCO) of 150-300 g mol-1. The aim of this present work is to investigate the effect of the cross-flow parameters: the trans-membrane pressure (TMP) and the feed concentration (C0) on the xylose separation from glucose. The filtration experiments were carried out in total reflux mode with different feed concentration of 2, 5, and 10 g/L at different TMP of 5,8 and 10 bar. The performances of the NF membrane were evaluated by measuring the permeate flux and sugar rejection for each experiment. All the samples were quantified using a high performance liquid chromatography equipped by a fractive index detector. The experimental results indicated an increase in pressure from 5 to 10 bar which was a notable increase to the permeate fluxes from 2.66 × 10-3 to 4.14 × 10-3L m-2s-1. Meanwhile, an increase in the C0 increases the xylose rejection. At TMP of 10 bar and C0 of 5 g/L, the observed xylose rejection and glucose rejection were measured at 67.19% and 91.82%, respectively. The lower rejection in xylose than glucose suggested that larger glucose molecule were not able to easily pass through the membrane compared to the smaller xylose molecule. The results of this phenomena proved that NF with spiral wound configuration has the potential to separate xylose from glucose, which is valuable to the purification of xylose in xylose production as an alternative to chromatographic processes.

  4. High flux film and transition boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, L. C.

    1993-02-01

    An investigation was conducted on the potential for altering the boiling curve through effects of high velocity and high subcooling. Experiments using water and Freon-113 flowing over cylindrical electrical heaters in crossflow were made to see how velocity and subcooling affect the boiling curve, especially the film and transition boiling regions. We sought subcooling levels down to near the freezing points of these two liquids to prove the concept that the critical heat flux and the minimum heat flux could be brought together, thereby averting the transition region altogether. Another emphasis was to gain insight into how the various boiling regions could be represented mathematically on various parts of the heating surface. Motivation for the research grew out of a realization that the effects of very high subcooling and velocity might be to avert the transition boiling altogether so that the unstable part of the boiling curve would not limit the application of high flux devices to temperatures less than the burnout temperatures. Summaries of results from the study are described. It shows that the potential for averting the transition region is good and points the way to further research that is needed to demonstrate the potential.

  5. Effects of home telemonitoring on transitions between frailty states and death for older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upatising B

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Benjavan Upatising,1 Gregory J Hanson,2 Young L Kim,3 Stephen S Cha,4 Yuehwern Yih,1 Paul Y Takahashi21School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA; 4Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USABackground: Two primary objectives when caring for older adults are to slow the decline to a worsened frailty state and to prevent disability. Telemedicine may be one method of improving care in this population. We conducted a secondary analysis of the Tele-ERA study to evaluate the effect of home telemonitoring in reducing the rate of deterioration into a frailty state and death in older adults with comorbid health problems.Methods: This trial involved 205 adults over the age of 60 years with a high risk of hospitalization and emergency department visits. For 12 months, the intervention group received usual medical care and telemonitoring case management, and the control group received usual care alone. The primary outcome was frailty, which was based on five criteria, ie, weight loss, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, and slow gait speed. Participants were classified as frail if they met three or more criteria; prefrail if they met 1–2 criteria; and not frail if they met no criteria. Both groups were assessed for frailty at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. Frailty transition analyses were performed using a multiple logistic regression method. Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate each frailty criteria for mortality and to compute unadjusted hazard ratios associated with being telemonitored, respectively. A retrospective power analysis was computed.Results: During the first 6 months, 19 (25% telemonitoring participants declined in frailty status or died, compared with 17 (19% in usual care (odds ratio

  6. Cornerstone program for transition-age youth with serious mental illness: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Munson, Michelle R.; Cole, Andrea; Stanhope, Victoria; Marcus, Steven C.; McKay, Mary; Jaccard, James; Ben-David, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    Background Transition-age youth have elevated rates of mental disorders, and they often do not receive services. This is a serious public health concern, as mental health conditions persist into adulthood. Continuing to engage this population has been a pervasive challenge for the mental health care system worldwide. Few mental health interventions have been developed for transition-age youth, and even fewer have been found to be effective over the transition to adulthood. Cornerstone, a theo...

  7. Effects of wall cooling and angle of attack on boundary layer transition on sharp cones at free stream Mach 7.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateer, G. G.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted on 5 deg and 15 deg half-angle sharp cones at wall-to-total-temperature ratios of 0.08 to 0.4, and angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The results indicate that (1) transition Reynolds numbers decrease with decreasing temperature ratio, (2) local transition Reynolds numbers decrease from the windward to the leeward side of the model, and (3) transition data on the windward ray of cones can be correlated in terms of the crossflow velocity gradient, momentum thickness Reynolds number, local Mach number, and cone half-angle.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial for Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech Comparing Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment and the Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme-Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McCabe, Patricia; Ballard, Kirrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This randomized controlled trial compared the experimental Rapid Syllable Transition (ReST) treatment to the Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme-Third Edition (NDP3; Williams & Stephens, 2004), used widely in clinical practice in Australia and the United Kingdom. Both programs aim to improve speech motor planning/programming for children…

  9. Child Effortful Control as a Mediator of Parenting Practices on Externalizing Behavior: Evidence for a Sex-Differentiated Pathway across the Transition from Preschool to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyein; Olson, Sheryl L.; Sameroff, Arnold J.; Sexton, Holly R.

    2011-01-01

    An explanatory model for children's development of disruptive behavior across the transition from preschool to school was tested. It was hypothesized that child effortful control would mediate the effects of parenting on children's externalizing behavior and that child sex would moderate these relations. Participants were 241 children (123 boys)…

  10. The controlled excitation of forbidden transitions in the two-photon spectrum of strontium by using collisions and electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.; Connerade, J.-P.

    2007-11-01

    We present experimental results involving controlled configuration mixing in two-photon spectroscopy of highly-excited states by exploiting a weak external electric field and collisions. The method has allowed new extensions to high members of the two-photon forbidden J = 3 odd-parity 5snf 1F 3 and the J = 0, even-parity 5sns 1S 0 Rydberg series of neutral strontium to be observed. We achieve resonant two-photon transverse excitation of a high density atomic jet by using a narrow bandwidth tunable dye laser in a heat pipe setup with sensitive ionization detection. Experimental term values are extended for the 5sns 1S 0 series up to n = 46. By suitable exploitation of the composition and pressure of the buffer gases in conjunction with the electric field strength in the excitation region and the exciting laser beam intensity we have also extended observations up to n = 44 for the 5snf 1F 3 series and up to n = 46 for the 5snp 1P 1 series. Our results demonstrate a novel and remarkably simple experimental method to access high Rydberg states to which transitions are forbidden from the ground state by parity and other selection rules.

  11. Metal-insulator transition of valence-controlled VO2 thin film prepared by RF magnetron sputtering using oxygen radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Takaaki; Shimazu, Yuichi; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Minohara, Makoto; Sakai, Enju; Horiba, Koji; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Tohru

    2016-06-01

    We have prepared b-axis-oriented VO2 thin films by RF magnetron sputtering using oxygen radicals as the reactive gas. The VO2 thin films consist of a mixed-valence V3+/V4+ state formed by oxygen vacancies. The V3+ ratio strongly depends on the film thickness and the oxygen partial pressure of the radical gun during deposition. The lattice constant of the b-axis increases and the metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature decreases with decreasing V3+ ratio, although the VO2 thin films with a high V3+ ratio of 42% do not exhibit MIT. The bandwidths and spectral weights of V 3d a1g and \\text{e}\\text{g}σ bands at around the Fermi level, which correspond to the insulating phase at 300 K, are smaller in the VO2 thin films with a low V3+ ratio. These results indicate that the control of the mixed-valence V3+/V4+ state is important for the MIT of b-axis-oriented VO2 thin films.

  12. Tead2 expression levels control the subcellular distribution of Yap and Taz, zyxin expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepenbruck, Maren; Waldmeier, Lorenz; Ivanek, Robert; Berninger, Philipp; Arnold, Phil; van Nimwegen, Erik; Christofori, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    The cellular changes during an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) largely rely on global changes in gene expression orchestrated by transcription factors. Tead transcription factors and their transcriptional co-activators Yap and Taz have been previously implicated in promoting an EMT; however, their direct transcriptional target genes and their functional role during EMT have remained elusive. We have uncovered a previously unanticipated role of the transcription factor Tead2 during EMT. During EMT in mammary gland epithelial cells and breast cancer cells, levels of Tead2 increase in the nucleus of cells, thereby directing a predominant nuclear localization of its co-factors Yap and Taz via the formation of Tead2-Yap-Taz complexes. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and next generation sequencing in combination with gene expression profiling revealed the transcriptional targets of Tead2 during EMT. Among these, zyxin contributes to the migratory and invasive phenotype evoked by Tead2. The results demonstrate that Tead transcription factors are crucial regulators of the cellular distribution of Yap and Taz, and together they control the expression of genes critical for EMT and metastasis.

  13. Mass-transit management: a handbook for small cities. Third edition, revised, February 1988. Part 2. Management and control. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smerk, G.M.; Henriksson, L.; McDaniel, K.; Perreault, R.; Stark, S.

    1988-02-01

    The purpose of the revised handbook is to provide information for the management of mass transit in cities operating 101 buses or fewer. A modern, systematic approach to the management of transit firms was worked into the material to improve conventional practices of the transit industry. The small-cities handbook consists of 4 separate volumes/parts. Part 1: Goals, Support and Finance--includes chapters on establishing goals and objectives, understanding the consumer, gaining public support and action, institutionalizing transit as an integral part of the community, and financing transit. Part 2: Management and Control--focuses on management and the control and information devices needed for effective management. Part 3: Operations--covers important areas of day-to-day operations coordinated as the product element in the marketing mix. Part 4: Marketing--addresses promotional activities and the marketing program. The handbook promotes concepts such as results-oriented management, marketing, management-by-objectives. It provides recommendations for policy-making bodies as well as management.

  14. In Situ Formed Phase Transited Drug Delivery System of Ketoprofen for Achieving Osmotic, Controlled and Level A In Vitro In Vivo Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    A dry process induced phase transited, non disintegrating, controlled release, in situ formed asymmetric membrane capsular system for poorly water soluble drug, ketoprofen, was developed and evaluated both in vitro and in vivo for osmotic and controlled release of the drug. In situ formed asymmetric membrane capsules were prepared using fabricated glass capsule holders via dry, phase inversion process. Effect of varying osmotic pressure of the dissolution medium on drug release was studied. M...

  15. Study of two-phase flow regime identification in horizontal tube bundles under vertical upward cross-flow condition using wavelet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinghua HUANG; Li WANG; Feng JIA

    2008-01-01

    A wavelet-transform based approach for flow regime identification in horizontal tube bundles under vertical upward cross-flow condition was presented. Tests on two-phase flow pattern of R 134a were conducted under low mass velocity and flow boiling conditions over Time series of differential pressure fluctuations were mea-sured and analyzed with discrete wavelet transform. Different time-scale characteristics in bubbly flow, churn flow and annular flow were analyzed. The wavelet energy distributions over scales were found to be appropriate for flow regime identification. Based on the wavelet energy distribution over characteristic scales, a criterion of flow regime identification was proposed. The comparison with experiment results show that it is feasible to use the dis-crete wavelet transform as the tool of flow regime iden-tification in horizontal tube bundles under vertical upward cross-flow condition.

  16. Forced Convection Film Boiling Heat Transfer from a Horizontal Cylinder to Liquid Cross-flowing Upward : 1st Report, Saturated Liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Takehiro; Nishikawa, Kaneyasu; Shigechi, Tooru

    1981-01-01

    Forced convection film boiling heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder to saturated liquid cross-flowing upward is analyzed based on the two-phase boundary-layer theory. Numerical solution of the conservation equations is determined by means of the integral method of boundary-layer for water, ethanol and hexane under the atmospheric pressure. The velocity profile, separation point of the boundary-layer, thickness of the boundary-layer, distribution of the heat transfer coefficients and avera...

  17. Forced Convection Film Boiling Heat Transfer from a Horizontal Cylinder to Liquid Cross-flowing Upward : 2nd Report, Subcooled Liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Shigechi, Tooru; Ito, Takehiro; Nishikawa, Kaneyasu

    1983-01-01

    Forced convection film boiling heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder to a subcooled liquid cross-flowing upward is analysed based on the two-phase boundary-layer theory. Numerical solution of the conservation equations is determined for subcooled water, ethanol and hexane under the atmospheric pressure by the method similar to that of the first report for saturated liquid. The velocity profile, the separation point in the vapor film, the thickness of the boundary-layer and the average Nuss...

  18. Heat transfer characteristics of air cross-flow for in-line arrangement of spirally corrugated tube and smooth tube bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Guo-dong; ZHOU Qiang-tai; TIAN Mao-cheng; CHENG Lin; YU Xiao-li

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study on heat transfer and resistance coefficients of linearly arranged smooth and spirally corrugated tube bundles in cross-flow was performed. The heat transfer and resistance coefficients are presented in this paper with transverse and longitudinal tube-pitch and tube geometries taken into account. The experiment's results can provide technical guidelines for application to horizontal air preheater with arranged in-line spirally corrugated tube bundles, especially to the air preheater for CFBCBs (Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion Boilers).

  19. Experimental studies on the stability and transition of 3-dimensional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke-Kowsky, P.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional unstable boundary layers were investigated as to their characteristic instabilities, leading to turbulence. Standing cross-flow instabilities and traveling waves preceding the transition were visualized with the hydrogen bubble technique in the boundary layer above the wall of a swept cylinder. With the sublimation method and hot film technique, a model consisting of a swept flat plate with a pressure-inducing displacement body in the 1 m wind tunnel was studied. Standing waves and traveling waves in a broad frequency are observed. The boundary layer of this model is close to the assumptions of the theory.

  20. Calibration of the 7—Equation Transition Model for High Reynolds Flows at Low Mach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonia, S.; Leble, V.; Steijl, R.; Barakos, G.

    2016-09-01

    The numerical simulation of flows over large-scale wind turbine blades without considering the transition from laminar to fully turbulent flow may result in incorrect estimates of the blade loads and performance. Thanks to its relative simplicity and promising results, the Local-Correlation based Transition Modelling concept represents a valid way to include transitional effects into practical CFD simulations. However, the model involves coefficients that need tuning. In this paper, the γ—equation transition model is assessed and calibrated, for a wide range of Reynolds numbers at low Mach, as needed for wind turbine applications. An aerofoil is used to evaluate the original model and calibrate it; while a large scale wind turbine blade is employed to show that the calibrated model can lead to reliable solutions for complex three-dimensional flows. The calibrated model shows promising results for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows, even if cross-flow instabilities are neglected.

  1. The microtubule destabilizing protein stathmin controls the transition from dividing neuronal precursors to postmitotic neurons during adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekhoorn, Karin; van Dis, Vera; Goedknegt, Erika; Sobel, André; Lucassen, Paul J; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2014-12-01

    The hippocampus is one of the two areas in the mammalian brain where adult neurogenesis occurs. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be involved in hippocampal physiological functions as well as pathophysiological conditions. Microtubules (MTs), providing intracellular transport, stability, and transmitting force, are indispensable for neurogenesis by facilitating cell division, migration, growth, and differentiation. Although there are several examples of MT-stabilizing proteins regulating different aspects of adult neurogenesis, relatively little is known about the function of MT-destabilizing proteins. Stathmin is such a MT-destabilizing protein largely restricted to the CNS, and in contrast to its developmental family members, stathmin is also expressed at significant levels in the adult brain, notably in areas involved in adult neurogenesis. Here, we show an important role for stathmin during adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the mouse hippocampus. After carefully mapping stathmin expression in the adult dentate gyrus (DG), we investigated its role in hippocampal neurogenesis making use of stathmin knockout mice. Although hippocampus development appears normal in these animals, different aspects of adult neurogenesis are affected. First, the number of proliferating Ki-67+ cells is decreased in stathmin knockout mice, as well as the expression of the immature markers Nestin and PSA-NCAM. However, newborn cells that do survive express more frequently the adult marker NeuN and have a more mature morphology. Furthermore, our data suggest that migration in the DG might be affected. We propose a model in which stathmin controls the transition from neuronal precursors to early postmitotic neurons.

  2. Controlling magnetism of MoS2 sheets by embedding transition-metal atoms and applying strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yungang; Su, Qiulei; Wang, Zhiguo; Deng, Huiqiu; Zu, Xiaotao

    2013-11-14

    Prompted by recent experimental achievement of transition metal (TM) atoms substituted in MoS2 nanostructures during growth or saturating existing vacancies (Sun et al., ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 3506; Deepak et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 12549), we explored, via density functional theory, the magnetic properties of a series of 3d TM atoms substituted in a MoS2 sheet, and found that Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn substitutions can induce magnetism in the MoS2 sheet. The localizing unpaired 3d electrons of TM atoms respond to the introduction of a magnetic moment. Depending on the species of TM atoms, the substituted MoS2 sheet can be a metal, semiconductor or half-metal. Remarkably, the applied elastic strain can be used to control the strength of the spin-splitting of TM-3d orbitals, leading to an effective manipulation of the magnetism of the TM-substituted MoS2 sheet. We found that the magnetic moment of the Mn- and Fe-substituted MoS2 sheets can monotonously increase with the increase of tensile strain, while the magnetic moment of Co-, Ni-, Cu- and Zn-substituted MoS2 sheets initially increases and then decreases with the increase of tensile strain. An instructive mechanism was proposed to qualitatively explain the variation of magnetism with elastic strain. The finding of the magnetoelastic effect here is technologically important for the fabrication of strain-driven spin devices on MoS2 nanostructures, which allows us to go beyond the current scope limited to the spin devices within graphene and BN-based nanostructures.

  3. Selective arterial embolization for control of haematuria secondary to advanced or recurrent transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2014-05-02

    Haematuria is a common symptom in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. We report our experience of selective pelvic embolization using gelfoam as an embolic agent to treat intractable haematuria in these patients.

  4. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods for the production of arbovirus antigens inactivated by binary ethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Teck F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods have been developed and standardised for the safe and reproducible production of inactivated arbovirus antigens which are appropriate for use in diagnostic serological applications. Methods To optimise the maximum titre of growth during the propagation of arboviruses, the multiplicity of infection and choice of cell line were investigated using stocks of Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus grown in both mosquito and mammalian cell lines. To standardise and improve the efficacy of the inactivation of arboviral suspensions, stocks of Ross River virus, Barmah Forest virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus and Alfuy virus were chemically inactivated using binary ethylenimine at a final concentration of 3 mM. Aliquots were then taken at hourly intervals and crude inactivation rates were determined for each virus using a plaque assay. To ensure complete inactivation, the same aliquots were each passaged 3 times in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells and the presence of viral growth was detected using an immunofluorescent assay. For larger quantities of viral suspensions, centrifugation on an isopycnic sucrose density gradient or cross-flow filtration was used to produce concentrated, pure antigens or partially concentrated, semi-purified antigens respectively. Results The results of the propagation experiments suggested that the maximum viral titres obtained for both Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus were affected by the incubation period and choice of cell line, rather than the use of different multiplicity of infection values. Results of the binary ethylenimine inactivation trial suggested that standardised periods of 5 or 8 hours would be suitable to ensure effective and complete inactivation for a number of different arboviral antigens. Conclusion Two methods used to prepare inactivated arbovirus antigens have been

  5. Using the developed cross-flow filtration chip for collecting blood plasma under high flow rate condition and applying the immunoglobulin E detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hung, Chia-Wei; Wu, Chun-Han; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a cross-flow filtration chip for separating blood cells (white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets) and obtaining blood plasma from human blood. Our strategy is to flow the sample solution in parallel to the membrane, which can generate a parallel shear stress to remove the clogging microparticles on the membrane, so the pure sample solution is obtained in the reservoir. The cross-flow filtration chip includes a cross-flow layer, a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane, and a reservoir layer. The three layers are packaged in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) frame to create the cross-flow filtration chip. Various dilutions of the blood sample (original, 2 × , 3 × , 5 × , and 10×), pore sizes with different diameters (1 µm, 2 µm, 4 µm, 7 µm, and 10 µm), and different flow rates (1 mL/min, 3 mL/min, 5 mL/min, 7 mL/min, and 10 mL/min) are tested to determine their effects on filtration percentage. The best filtration percentage is 96.2% when the dilution of the blood sample is 10 × , the diameter of pore size of a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane is 2 µm, and the flow rate is 10 mL/min. Finally, for the clinical tests of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentration, the cross-flow filtration chip is used to filter the blood of the allergy patients to obtain the blood plasma. This filtered blood plasma is compared with that obtained using the conventional centrifugation based on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results reveal that these two blood separation methods have similar detection trends. The proposed filtration chip has the advantages of low cost, short filtration time, and easy operation and thus can be applied to the separation of microparticles, cells, bacteria, and blood.

  6. Api5 contributes to E2F1 control of the G1/S cell cycle phase transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Garcia-Jove Navarro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The E2f transcription factor family has a pivotal role in controlling the cell fate in general, and in particular cancer development, by regulating the expression of several genes required for S phase entry and progression through the cell cycle. It has become clear that the transcriptional activation of at least one member of the family, E2F1, can also induce apoptosis. An appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators appears to be necessary to modulate E2F1 transcriptional activity, and thus cell fate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, we show that Api5, already known as a regulator of E2F1 induced-apoptosis, is required for the E2F1 transcriptional activation of G1/S transition genes, and consequently, for cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Api5 appears to be a cell cycle regulated protein. Removal of Api5 reduces cyclin E, cyclin A, cyclin D1 and Cdk2 levels, causing G1 cell cycle arrest and cell cycle delay. Luciferase assays established that Api5 directly regulates the expression of several G1/S genes under E2F1 control. Using protein/protein and protein/DNA immunoprecipitation studies, we demonstrate that Api5, even if not physically interacting with E2F1, contributes positively to E2F1 transcriptional activity by increasing E2F1 binding to its target promoters, through an indirect mechanism. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results described here support the pivotal role of cell cycle related proteins, that like E2F1, may act as tumor suppressors or as proto-oncogenes during cancer development, depending on the behavior of their positive and negative regulators. According to our findings, Api5 contributes to E2F1 transcriptional activation of cell cycle-associated genes by facilitating E2F1 recruitment onto its target promoters and thus E2F1 target gene transcription.

  7. Assessment of subgrid-scale models with a large-eddy simulation-dedicated experimental database: The pulsatile impinging jet in turbulent cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baya Toda, Hubert; Cabrit, Olivier; Truffin, Karine; Bruneaux, Gilles; Nicoud, Franck

    2014-07-01

    Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) in complex geometries and industrial applications like piston engines, gas turbines, or aircraft engines requires the use of advanced subgrid-scale (SGS) models able to take into account the main flow features and the turbulence anisotropy. Keeping this goal in mind, this paper reports a LES-dedicated experiment of a pulsatile hot-jet impinging a flat-plate in the presence of a cold turbulent cross-flow. Unlike commonly used academic test cases, this configuration involves different flow features encountered in complex configurations: shear/rotating regions, stagnation point, wall-turbulence, and the propagation of a vortex ring along the wall. This experiment was also designed with the aim to use quantitative and nonintrusive optical diagnostics such as Particle Image Velocimetry, and to easily perform a LES involving a relatively simple geometry and well-controlled boundary conditions. Hence, two eddy-viscosity-based SGS models are investigated: the dynamic Smagorinsky model [M. Germano, U. Piomelli, P. Moin, and W. Cabot, "A dynamic subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model," Phys. Fluids A 3(7), 1760-1765 (1991)] and the σ-model [F. Nicoud, H. B. Toda, O. Cabrit, S. Bose, and J. Lee, "Using singular values to build a subgrid-scale model for large eddy simulations," Phys. Fluids 23(8), 085106 (2011)]. Both models give similar results during the first phase of the experiment. However, it was found that the dynamic Smagorinsky model could not accurately predict the vortex-ring propagation, while the σ-model provides a better agreement with the experimental measurements. Setting aside the implementation of the dynamic procedure (implemented here in its simplest form, i.e., without averaging over homogeneous directions and with clipping of negative values to ensure numerical stability), it is suggested that the mitigated predictions of the dynamic Smagorinsky model are due to the dynamic constant, which strongly depends on the mesh resolution

  8. DNS of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, L.; Choudhari, M.; Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed to examine laminar to turbulent transition due to high-frequency secondary instability of stationary crossflow vortices in a subsonic swept-wing boundary layer for a realistic natural-laminar-flow airfoil configuration. The secondary instability is introduced via inflow forcing and the mode selected for forcing corresponds to the most amplified secondary instability mode that, in this case, derives a majority of its growth from energy production mechanisms associated with the wall-normal shear of the stationary basic state. An inlet boundary condition is carefully designed to allow for accurate injection of instability wave modes and minimize acoustic reflections at numerical boundaries. Nonlinear parabolized stability equation (PSE) predictions compare well with the DNS in terms of modal amplitudes and modal shape during the strongly nonlinear phase of the secondary instability mode. During the transition process, the skin friction coefficient rises rather rapidly and the wall-shear distribution shows a sawtooth pattern that is analogous to the previously documented surface flow visualizations of transition due to stationary crossflow instability. Fully turbulent features are observed in the downstream region of the flow.

  9. Denosumab and teriparatide transitions in postmenopausal osteoporosis (the DATA-Switch study): extension of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Benjamin Z; Tsai, Joy N; Uihlein, Alexander V; Wallace, Paul M; Lee, Hang; Neer, Robert M; Burnett-Bowie, Sherri-Ann M

    2015-09-19

    Unlike most chronic diseases, osteoporosis treatments are generally limited to a single drug at a fixed dose and frequency. Nonetheless, no approved therapy is able to restore skeletal integrity in most osteoporotic patients and the long-term use of osteoporosis drugs is controversial. Thus, many patients are treated with the sequential use of two or more therapies. The DATA study showed that combined teriparatide and denosumab increased bone mineral density more than either drug alone. Discontinuing teriparatide and denosumab, however, results in rapidly declining bone mineral density. In this DATA-Switch study, we aimed to assess the changes in bone mineral density in postmenopausal osteoporotic women who transitioned between treatments. This randomised controlled trial (DATA-Switch) is a preplanned extension of the denosumab and teriparatide administration study (DATA), in which 94 postmenopausal osteoporotic women were randomly assigned to receive 24 months of teriparatide (20 mg daily), denosumab (60 mg every 6 months), or both drugs. In DATA-Switch, women originally assigned to teriparatide received denosumab (teriparatide to denosumab group), those originally assigned to denosumab received teriparatide (denosumab to teriparatide group), and those originally assigned to both received an additional 24 months of denosumab alone (combination to denosumab group). Bone mineral density at the spine, hip, and wrist were measured 6 months, 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months after the drug transitions as were biochemical markers of bone turnover. The primary endpoint was the percent change in posterior-anterior spine bone mineral density over 4 years. Between-group changes were assessed by one-way analysis of variance in our modified intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00926380. Between Sept 27, 2011, and Jan 28, 2013, eligible women from the DATA study were enrolled into DATA-Switch. Of 83 potential enrollees

  10. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  11. A structural approach to control of transitional waves of nonlinear diffusion-reaction systems: Theory and possible applications to bio-medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kardashov

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has considered a novel approach to structural recognition and control of nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems (systems with density dependent diffusion. The main consistence of the approach is interactive variation of the nonlinear diffusion and sources structural parameters that allows to implement a qualitative control and recognition of transitional system conditions (transients. The method of inverse solutions construction allows formulating the new analytic conditions of compactness and periodicity of the transients that is also available for nonintegrated systems. On the other hand, using of energy conservations laws, allows transfer to nonlinear dynamics models that gives the possiblity to apply the modern deterministic chaos theory (particularly the Feigenboum's universal constants and scenario of chaotic transitions.

  12. H2 Control for the Continuous-Time Markovian Jump Linear Uncertain Systems with Partly Known Transition Rates and Input Quantization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Gang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For a class of continuous-time Markovian jump linear uncertain systems with partly known transition rates and input quantization, the H2 state-feedback control design is considered. The elements in the transition rates matrix include completely known, boundary known, and completely unknown ones. First, an H2 cost index for Markovian jump linear uncertain systems is introduced; then by introducing a new matrix inequality condition, sufficient conditions are formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs for the H2 control of the Markovian jump linear uncertain systems. Less conservativeness is achieved than the result obtained with the existing technique. Finally, a numerical example is given to verify the validity of the theoretical results.

  13. Concerning the interaction of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a three-dimensional boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassom, Andrew P.; Hall, Philip

    1990-01-01

    Recently there has been much work devoted to considering some of the many and varied interaction mechanisms which may be operative in three-dimensional boundary layer flows. This paper is concerned with resonant triads of crossflow vortices. The effects of interactions upon resonant triads is examined where each member of the triad has the property of being linearly neutrally stable so that the importance of the interplay between modes can be relatively easily assessed. Modes within the boundary layer flow above a rotating disc are investigated because of the similarity between this disc flow and many important practical flows and, secondly, because the selected flow is an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations which makes its theoretical analysis especially attractive. It is demonstrated that the desired triads of linearly neutrally stable modes can exist within the chosen boundary layer flow. Evolution equations are obtained to describe the development of the amplitudes of these modes once the interaction mechanism is accounted for. It is found that the coefficients of the interaction terms within the evolution equations are, in general, given by quite intricate expressions although some elementary numerical work shows that the evaluation of these coefficients is practicable. The basis of the work lends itself to generalization to more complicated boundary layers, and effects of detuning or non-parallelism could be provided for within the asymptotic framework.

  14. Cross-Flow VIV-Induced Fatigue Damage of Deepwater Steel Catenary Riser at Touch-Down Point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王坤鹏; 唐文勇; 薛鸿祥

    2014-01-01

    A prediction model of the deepwater steel catenary riser VIV is proposed based on the forced oscillation test data, taking into account the riser-seafloor interaction for the cross-flow VIV-induced fatigue damage at touch-down point (TDP). The model will give more reasonable simulation of SCR response near TDP than the previous pinned truncation model. In the present model, the hysteretic riser-soil interaction model is simplified as the linear spring and damper to simulate the seafloor, and the damping is obtained according to the dissipative power during one periodic riser-soil interaction. In order to validate the model, the comparison with the field measurement and the results predicted by Shear 7 program of a full-scale steel catenary riser is carried out. The main induced modes, mode frequencies and response amplitude are in a good agreement. Furthermore, the parametric studies are carried out to broaden the understanding of the fatigue damage sensitivity to the upper end in-plane offset and seabed characteristics. In addition, the fatigue stress comparison at TDP between the truncation riser model and the present full riser model shows that the existence of touch-down zones is very important for the fatigue damage assessment of steel catenary riser at TDP.

  15. Experimental Study of Membrane Fouling during Crossflow Microfiltration of Yeast and Bacteria Suspensions: Towards an Analysis at the Microscopic Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ines Ben; Ennouri, Monia; Lafforgue, Christine; Schmitz, Philippe; Ayadi, Abdelmoneim

    2013-05-10

    Microfiltration of model cell suspensions combining macroscopic and microscopic approaches was studied in order to better understand microbial membrane fouling mechanisms. The respective impact of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and Escherichia coli bacteria on crossflow microfiltration performances was investigated using a multichannel ceramic 0.2 µm membrane. Pure yeast suspensions (5 µm ovoid cells) and mixtures of yeast and bacteria (1 to 2.5 µm rod shape cells) were considered in order to analyse the effect of interaction between these two microorganisms on fouling reversibility. The resistances varied significantly with the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms. Membrane fouling with pure yeast suspension was mainly reversible. For yeast and bacteria mixed suspensions (6 g L-1 yeast concentration) the increase in bacteria from 0.15 to 0.30 g L-1 increased the percentage of normalized reversible resistance. At 10 g L-1 yeast concentration, the addition of bacteria tends to increase the percentage of normalized irreversible resistance. For the objective of performing local analysis of fouling, an original filtration chamber allowing direct in situ observation of the cake by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was designed, developed and validated. This device will be used in future studies to characterize cake structure at the microscopic scale.

  16. Experimental Study of Membrane Fouling during Crossflow Microfiltration of Yeast and Bacteria Suspensions: Towards an Analysis at the Microscopic Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoneim Ayadi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Microfiltration of model cell suspensions combining macroscopic and microscopic approaches was studied in order to better understand microbial membrane fouling mechanisms. The respective impact of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and Escherichia coli bacteria on crossflow microfiltration performances was investigated using a multichannel ceramic 0.2 µm membrane. Pure yeast suspensions (5 µm ovoid cells and mixtures of yeast and bacteria (1 to 2.5 µm rod shape cells were considered in order to analyse the effect of interaction between these two microorganisms on fouling reversibility. The resistances varied significantly with the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms. Membrane fouling with pure yeast suspension was mainly reversible. For yeast and bacteria mixed suspensions (6 g L−1 yeast concentration the increase in bacteria from 0.15 to 0.30 g L−1 increased the percentage of normalized reversible resistance. At 10 g L−1 yeast concentration, the addition of bacteria tends to increase the percentage of normalized irreversible resistance. For the objective of performing local analysis of fouling, an original filtration chamber allowing direct in situ observation of the cake by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM was designed, developed and validated. This device will be used in future studies to characterize cake structure at the microscopic scale.

  17. INFLUENCE OF RESIDENCE-TIME DISTRIBUTION ON A SURFACE-RENEWAL MODEL OF CONSTANT-PRESSURE CROSS-FLOW MICROFILTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work examines the influence of the residence-time distribution (RTD of surface elements on a model of cross-flow microfiltration that has been proposed recently (Hasan et al., 2013. Along with the RTD from the previous work (Case 1, two other RTD functions (Cases 2 and 3 are used to develop theoretical expressions for the permeate-flux decline and cake buildup in the filter as a function of process time. The three different RTDs correspond to three different startup conditions of the filtration process. The analytical expressions for the permeate flux, each of which contains three basic parameters (membrane resistance, specific cake resistance and rate of surface renewal, are fitted to experimental permeate flow rate data in the microfiltration of fermentation broths in laboratory- and pilot-scale units. All three expressions for the permeate flux fit the experimental data fairly well with average root-mean-square errors of 4.6% for Cases 1 and 2, and 4.2% for Case 3, respectively, which points towards the constructive nature of the model - a common feature of theoretical models used in science and engineering.

  18. Anthocyanin and flavonoid production from Perilla frutescens: pilot plant scale processing including cross-flow microfiltration and reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Linghua; Lozano, Yves; Bombarda, Isabelle; Gaydou, Emile; Li, Bin

    2006-06-14

    Extraction and concentration at a pilot plant scale of anthocyanins and flavonoids from Perilla frutescens var. frutescens harvested in the Guangzhou area of China were investigated. The study of extraction efficiency using mineral acids and organic acids showed that 0.01 mol/L nitric acid was the most suitable to extract flavonoids from this slightly red leaf cultivar. The red extract contained 12 mg/L (as cyanidin equivalent) anthocyanins and other flavones. The multistep process included cross-flow microfiltration (CFM) with a ceramic type membrane, reverse osmosis (RO), and rotating evaporation (RE). The filtration fluxes were high and constant for CFM (150 L/h/m2 at 0.6 b) and for RO (22 L/h/m2 at 40 b). The red extract was concentrated 9.4 times by RO and then 5.4 times by RE. It contained 422 mg/L anthocyanins, representing 77% of the total extracted anthocyanin. The proportion of flavonoids was found unchanged during processing. The concentrated extract showed a pH of 2.7, and its free acidity was found to be 46% of the acidity added for extraction, because of the buffering capacity of the extract. At the concentration level reached, a crystallized deposit occurred and was identified as tartrate.

  19. Producing monodisperse drug-loaded polymer microspheres via cross-flow membrane emulsification: the effects of polymers and surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Robert F; Rogers, W Benjamin; McClendon, Mark T; Crocker, John C

    2010-09-21

    Cross-flow membrane emulsification (XME) is a method for producing highly uniform droplets by forcing a fluid through a small orifice into a transverse flow of a second, immiscible fluid. We investigate the feasibility of using XME to produce monodisperse solid microspheres made of a hydrolyzable polymer and a hydrophobic drug, a model system for depot drug delivery applications. This entails the emulsification of a drug and polymer-loaded volatile solvent into water followed by evaporation of the solvent. We use a unique side-view visualization technique to observe the details of emulsion droplet production, providing direct information regarding droplet size, dripping frequency, wetting of the membrane surface by the two phases, neck thinning during droplet break off, and droplet deformation before and after break off. To probe the effects that dissolved polymers, surfactants, and dynamic interfacial tension may have on droplet production, we compare our results to a polymer and surfactant-free fluid system with closely matched physical properties. Comparing the two systems, we find little difference in the variation of particle size as a function of continuous phase flow rate. In contrast, at low dripping frequencies, dynamic interfacial tension causes the particle size to vary significantly with drip frequency, which is not seen in simple fluids. No effects due to shear thinning or fluid elasticity are detected. Overall, we find no significant impediments to the application of XME to forming highly uniform drug-loaded microspheres.

  20. A simple analytical method to estimate all exit parameters of a cross-flow air dehumidifier using liquid desiccant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassuoni, M M

    2014-03-01

    The dehumidifier is a key component in liquid desiccant air-conditioning systems. Analytical solutions have more advantages than numerical solutions in studying the dehumidifier performance parameters. This paper presents the performance results of exit parameters from an analytical model of an adiabatic cross-flow liquid desiccant air dehumidifier. Calcium chloride is used as desiccant material in this investigation. A program performing the analytical solution is developed using the engineering equation solver software. Good accuracy has been found between analytical solution and reliable experimental results with a maximum deviation of +6.63% and -5.65% in the moisture removal rate. The method developed here can be used in the quick prediction of the dehumidifier performance. The exit parameters from the dehumidifier are evaluated under the effects of variables such as air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and air to desiccant flow rates. The results show that hot humid air and desiccant concentration have the greatest impact on the performance of the dehumidifier. The moisture removal rate is decreased with increasing both air inlet temperature and desiccant temperature while increases with increasing air to solution mass ratio, inlet desiccant concentration, and inlet air humidity ratio.