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Sample records for cross bridges contribute

  1. Bridge Crossing Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-07

    support the durability testing of Military Bridging and Gap Crossing Equipment. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Bridge Crossing Simulator Trilateral Design... Trilateral Design and Test Code for Military Bridging and Gap Crossing Equipment (TDTC) 1* is derived based on the number of samples the test bridge...Automotive and Armaments Command TARDEC U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center TDTC Trilateral Design and Test Code

  2. Crossing borders via mental bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Dirk

    administration, and in specific on the attempt to initiate and promote cross-border regional integration via the building of mental bridges between Danish and German parts of the Femern Belt Region. Here one of the first projects aiming primarily at building mental bridges in the Femern Belt Region...

  3. 33 CFR 118.90 - Bridges crossing channel obliquely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridges crossing channel... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.90 Bridges crossing channel obliquely. Bridges crossing a body of water at an angle other than 90° with the axis of the channel shall be lighted in...

  4. Bridge over troubled water: Guidance crosses | Amundson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is based on a keynote presentation at an international conference where the focus was cross-over career guidance. Simon and Garfunkel's popular song, "Bridge over troubled water", was used as a metaphor for exploring the cross-over theme. Some of the concepts under consideration included the working ...

  5. Contributions of Diesel Truck Emissions to Indoor Elemental Carbon Concentrations in Home Proximate to Ambassador Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambassador Bridge, connecting Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, is the busiest international commercial vehicle crossing in North America, with a large percentage of heavy duty diesel trucks. This study seeks to examine the contribution of diesel truck traffic across Ambass...

  6. Landslide stabilization measures for a bridge crossing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, B.S.; Walter, D.J.; McRoberts, E.C. [AMEC Earth and Environmental Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    A primary road was financed and constructed in 2003 by CNRL to provide access to its Horizon oil sands mine in northern Alberta. The road included a two lane, 50 metre high, 262 metre long bridge over the MacKay River near the town of Fort MacKay. The site of the bridge crossing was constrained by requirements that it bypass Aboriginal territory. The only available crossing site was near a river valley slope that had previously undergone deep-seated slope failure. The roadway design accounted for the possibility that future slope failures could occur at the bridge site. In response to safety concerns, the design assumed that valley slopes were in a near-failure state and remedial measures were taken to stabilize the slope. This paper discussed the specific geotechnical issues concerning the bridge abutments and the proposed methodology for dealing with them in a timely manner that would not affect the overall project schedule for the multi-billion dollar project. Risks were identified along with the requirements for long term monitoring. Back-analysis of the south valley slopes and an examination of weak clay materials in the north and south slopes indicated that slope stabilization measures would not be needed on the northern slope. However, a shear key and mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) wall was needed to stabilize the south valley slope. 3 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  7. Field performance of timber bridges. 4, Graves Crossing stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. P. Wacker; M. A. Ritter

    The Graves Crossing bridge was constructed October 1991 in Antrim County, Michigan, as part of the demonstration timber bridge program sponsored by the USDA Forest Service. The bridge is a two-span continuous, stress-laminated deck superstructure and it is 36-ft long and 26-ft wide. The bridge is one of the first stress-laminated deck bridges to be built of sawn lumber...

  8. International Contribution to the Highway Agency's Bridge Related Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowak, A. S.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    The objective of this paper is to summarize recent contributions of international experts to the research program sponsored by the Highways Agency. An efficient management of existing bridges requires methodology for an accurate evaluation of the actual loads and load carrying capacity and predic...... of reliability models for analysis of bridges subjected to corrosion and fatigue, and reliability-based optimization of maintenance strategies for bridges....

  9. Cross-frame connection details for skewed steel bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-30

    This report documents a research investigation on connection details and bracing layouts for stability : bracing of steel bridges with skewed supports. Cross-frames and diaphragms play an important role in stabilizing : steel girders, particularly du...

  10. Bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zant, W.

    2017-01-01

    We estimate to what extent bridges in Mozambique lead to transport cost reductions and attribute these reductions to key determinants, in particular road distance, road quality and crossing borders. For identification we exploit the introduction of a road bridge over the Zambezi river, in August

  11. Altered cross-bridge properties in skeletal muscle dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz eGuellich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Force and motion generated by skeletal muscle ultimately depends on the cyclical interaction of actin with myosin. This mechanical process is regulated by intracellular Ca2+ through the thin filament-associated regulatory proteins i.e.; troponins and tropomyosin. Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic affections characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of the skeletal muscle as a consequence of loss of muscle tissue which directly reduces the number of potential myosin cross-bridges involved in force production. Mutations in genes responsible for skeletal muscle dystrophies have been shown to modify the function of contractile proteins and cross-bridge interactions. Altered gene expression or RNA splicing or post-translational modifications of contractile proteins such as those related to oxidative stress, may affect cross-bridge function by modifying key proteins of the excitation-contraction coupling. Micro-architectural change in myofilament is another mechanism of altered cross-bridge performance. In this review, we provide an overview about changes in cross-bridge performance in skeletal muscle dystrophies and discuss their ultimate impacts on striated muscle function.

  12. Bridging the Gap: Possible Roles and Contributions of Representational Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L. Hubbard

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory for the position of a moving target is often displaced in the direction of anticipated motion, and this has been referred to as representational momentum. Such displacement might aid spatial localization by bridging the gap between perception and action, and might reflect a second-order isomorphism between subjective consequences of environmentally invariant physical principles and the functional architecture of mental representation that can be modulated by an observer’s expectations (e.g., that a moving target will change its heading or by the presence of nontarget stimuli (e.g., landmarks. Representational momentum and related types of displacement reflect properties of the world and properties of mental representation, and so a consideration of representational momentum and related types of displacement contribute an important component of contemporary psychophysics, and also broaden the reach of psychophysics to include numerous topics not usually considered within psychophysics (e.g., naive physics, boundary extension, flash-lag effect, aesthetics, mental imagery.

  13. Contributions of diesel truck emissions to indoor elemental carbon concentrations in homes in proximity to Ambassador Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Lisa K.; Barzyk, Timothy M.; Vette, Alan F.; Croghan, Carry; Williams, Ronald W.

    Ambassador Bridge, connecting Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, is the busiest international commercial vehicle crossing in North America, with a large percentage of heavy duty diesel trucks. This study seeks to examine the contribution of diesel truck traffic across Ambassador Bridge to indoor exposure patterns of elemental carbon (EC), a common surrogate for diesel exhaust particles, in homes in close proximity to the bridge. We also aim to understand the relative importance of home ventilation characteristics and wind speed. Measurements were collected as part of the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS). Residential indoor and outdoor EC measurements were collected over five consecutive 24 h periods in both the summer and winter at 16 homes in close proximity to Ambassador Bridge. Ambient concentrations and meteorological data were collected at a central-site monitor, and home air exchange rates were estimated using a perfluorocarbon tracer. The contributions of ambient concentrations and Ambassador Bridge, and potential effect modification by wind speed and home ventilation status were quantified with regression analyses. Both ambient concentrations and the percentage of time a home was downwind from the bridge were associated with an increase in indoor concentrations. Ambient concentrations significantly contributed to indoor concentrations regardless of wind speed category but were a greater influence in home experiencing calm winds. The effect of the percent of time downwind variable on indoor levels was only significant in homes where the ventilation status was high. The distance a home was from the bridge tollbooth complex was not significantly associated with indoor concentrations. We conclude that diesel traffic emissions related to Ambassador Bridge may have an impact on indoor EC exposures. Given that people spend the majority of their time indoors, it is important to evaluate the impact of traffic-related pollution in the home

  14. Optimal cross-sectional sampling for river modelling with bridges: An information theory-based method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridolfi, E.; Napolitano, F., E-mail: francesco.napolitano@uniroma1.it [Sapienza Università di Roma, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Edile e Ambientale (Italy); Alfonso, L. [Hydroinformatics Chair Group, UNESCO-IHE, Delft (Netherlands); Di Baldassarre, G. [Department of Earth Sciences, Program for Air, Water and Landscape Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden)

    2016-06-08

    The description of river topography has a crucial role in accurate one-dimensional (1D) hydraulic modelling. Specifically, cross-sectional data define the riverbed elevation, the flood-prone area, and thus, the hydraulic behavior of the river. Here, the problem of the optimal cross-sectional spacing is solved through an information theory-based concept. The optimal subset of locations is the one with the maximum information content and the minimum amount of redundancy. The original contribution is the introduction of a methodology to sample river cross sections in the presence of bridges. The approach is tested on the Grosseto River (IT) and is compared to existing guidelines. The results show that the information theory-based approach can support traditional methods to estimate rivers’ cross-sectional spacing.

  15. Commercial border crossing and wait time measurement at Laredo World Trade Bridge and the Colombia-Solidarity Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This research is to establish a baseline and on-going measurement of border crossing times and : delay by measuring travel times for commercial trucks crossing the port of entry (POE) from : Mexico into Texas at the Laredo World Trade Bridge and the ...

  16. Micromechanical model of cross-over fibre bridging - Prediction of mixed mode bridging laws

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Gamstedt, E.K.; Østergaard, Rasmus Christian

    2008-01-01

    The fracture resistance of fibre composites can be greatly enhanced by crack bridging. In situ observations of mixed mode crack growth in a unidirectional carbon-fibre/epoxy composite reveal crack bridging by single fibres and by beam-like ligaments consisting of several fibres. Based...... on the observed bridging mechanism, a micromechanical model is developed for the prediction of macroscopic mixed mode bridging laws (stress-opening laws). The model predicts a high normal stress for very small openings, decreasing rapidly with increasing normal and tangential crack opening displacements....... In contrast, the shear stress increases rapidly, approaching a constant value with increasing normal and tangential openings. The solutions for the bridging laws and the resulting toughening due to the bridging stresses are obtained in closed analytical form....

  17. Automated Erosion System to Protect Highway Bridge Crossings at Abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    A new instrument (Photo-Electronic Erosion Pin, or PEEP) was examined in collecting field data and remotely monitoring bank erosion near bridge abutments during floods. The performance of PEEPs was evaluated through a detailed field study to determin...

  18. Thick-to-Thin Filament Surface Distance Modulates Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Drosophila Flight Muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Miller, Mark S. (IIT); (Vermont); (BU)

    2012-09-19

    The demembranated (skinned) muscle fiber preparation is widely used to investigate muscle contraction because the intracellular ionic conditions can be precisely controlled. However, plasma membrane removal results in a loss of osmotic regulation, causing abnormal hydration of the myofilament lattice and its proteins. We investigated the structural and functional consequences of varied myofilament lattice spacing and protein hydration on cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle, using x-ray diffraction to compare the lattice spacing of dissected, osmotically compressed skinned fibers to native muscle fibers in living flies. Osmolytes of different sizes and exclusion properties (Dextran T-500 and T-10) were used to differentially alter lattice spacing and protein hydration. At in vivo lattice spacing, cross-bridge attachment time (t{sub on}) increased with higher osmotic pressures, consistent with a reduced cross-bridge detachment rate as myofilament protein hydration decreased. In contrast, in the swollen lattice, t{sub on} decreased with higher osmotic pressures. These divergent responses were reconciled using a structural model that predicts t{sub on} varies inversely with thick-to-thin filament surface distance, suggesting that cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment are modulated more by myofilament lattice geometry than protein hydration. Generalizing these findings, our results suggest that cross-bridge cycling rates slow as thick-to-thin filament surface distance decreases with sarcomere lengthening, and likewise, cross-bridge cycling rates increase during sarcomere shortening. Together, these structural changes may provide a mechanism for altering cross-bridge performance throughout a contraction-relaxation cycle.

  19. Effect of modified bridge exercise on trunk muscle activity in healthy adults: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Oh; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2017-09-09

    This is a cross-sectional study. University research laboratory. Fifteen healthy adults (mean age: 27.47 years) volunteered for this study. The individuals performed standard bridge exercise and modified bridge exercises with right leg-lift (single-leg-lift bridge exercise, single-leg-lift bridge exercise on an unstable surface, and single-leg-lift hip abduction bridge exercise). During the bridge exercises, electromyography of the rectus abdominis, internal oblique, erector spinae, and multifidus muscles was recorded using a wireless surface electromyography system. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (exercise by side) with post hoc pairwise comparisons using Bonferroni correction was used to compare the electromyography data collected from each muscle. Bilateral internal oblique muscle activities showed significantly greater during single-leg-lift bridge exercise (95% confidence interval: right internal oblique=-8.99 to -1.08, left internal oblique=-6.84 to -0.10), single-leg-lift bridge exercise on an unstable surface (95% confidence interval: right internal oblique=-7.32 to -1.78, left internal oblique=-5.34 to -0.99), and single-leg-lift hip abduction bridge exercise (95% confidence interval: right internal oblique=-17.13 to -0.89, left internal oblique=-8.56 to -0.60) compared with standard bridge exercise. Bilateral rectus abdominis showed greater electromyography activity during single-leg-lift bridge exercise on an unstable surface (95% confidence interval: right rectus abdominis=-9.33 to -1.13, left rectus abdominis=-4.80 to -0.64) and single-leg-lift hip abduction bridge exercise (95% confidence interval: right rectus abdominis=-14.12 to -1.84, left rectus abdominis=-6.68 to -0.16) compared with standard bridge exercise. In addition, the right rectus abdominis muscle activity was greater during single-leg-lift hip abduction bridge exercise compared with single-leg-lift bridge exercise on an unstable surface (95% confidence interval=-7.51 to

  20. Formaldehyde cross-linking and structural proteomics: Bridging the gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Savita; Ding, Xuan; Kast, Juergen

    2015-11-01

    Proteins are dynamic entities constantly moving and altering their structures based on their functions and interactions inside and outside the cell. Formaldehyde cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry can accurately capture interactions of these rapidly changing biomolecules while maintaining their physiological surroundings. Even with its numerous established uses in biology and compatibility with mass spectrometry, formaldehyde has not yet been applied in structural proteomics. However, formaldehyde cross-linking is moving toward analyzing tertiary structure, which conventional cross-linkers have already accomplished. The purpose of this review is to describe the potential of formaldehyde cross-linking in structural proteomics by highlighting its applications, characteristics and current status in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Crossing the Water: Spiritual Growth in "Bridge to Terabithia" and "Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Trudelle

    2011-01-01

    The author analyses two award-winning juvenile novels, "Bridge to Terabithia" by Katherine Paterson and "Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy" by Gary Schmidt. Each novel portrays a deep friendship between a boy and girl who cross a stream (or river) into a world that includes fantasy, play, closeness to nature and animals, and a sense of the…

  2. A study of cross-bridge kelvin resistor structures for reliable measurement of low contact resistances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavitski, N.; Klootwijk, J.H.; van Zeijl, H.W.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The parasitic factors that strongly influence the measurement accuracy of Cross-Bridge Kelvin Resistor (CBKR) structures for low specific contact resistances (�?c) have been extensively discussed during last few decades and the minimum of the �?c value, which could be accurately extracted, was

  3. Crossing the digital divide: the contribution of information technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crossing the digital divide: the contribution of information technology to the professional performance of malaria researchers in Africa. ... retrieve information, obtain documents, write proposals, and prepare papers for publication; and to determine the contribution of this intervention to their professional performance.

  4. Bathymetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers near St. Louis, Missouri, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Bathymetric surveys were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers in the vicinity of 12 bridges at 7 highway crossings near St. Louis, Missouri, in October 2010. A multibeam echo sounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches ranging from 3,280 to 4,590 feet long and extending across the active channel of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. These bathymetric scans provide a snapshot of the channel conditions at the time of the surveys and provide characteristics of scour holes that may be useful in the development of predictive guidelines or equations for scour holes. These data also may be used by the Missouri Department of Transportation to assess the bridges for stability and integrity issues with respect to bridge scour.

  5. Crossing the digital divide: the contribution of information technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crossing the digital divide: the contribution of information technology to the professional performance of ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES. African Health Sciences ... MIMCom makes possible enhanced access to the Internet and to medical literature.

  6. Crossing Bridges

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    will be dealt with in a future issue of Resonance. GENERAL I ARTICLE. This is a famous formula discovered by Euler (and independently by Descartes). How does this help us show that there are no more regular figures? Well, regular figures have the property that all faces and all vertices are identical. The number of edges.

  7. The Frank-Starling mechanism involves deceleration of cross-bridge kinetics and is preserved in failing human right ventricular myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Canan, Benjamin D; Elnakish, Mohammad T; Davis, Jonathan P; Chung, Jae-Hoon; Fedorov, Vadim V; Binkley, Philip F; Higgins, Robert S D; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-12-15

    Cross-bridge cycling rate is an important determinant of cardiac output, and its alteration can potentially contribute to reduced output in heart failure patients. Additionally, animal studies suggest that this rate can be regulated by muscle length. The purpose of this study was to investigate cross-bridge cycling rate and its regulation by muscle length under near-physiological conditions in intact right ventricular muscles of nonfailing and failing human hearts. We acquired freshly explanted nonfailing (n = 9) and failing (n = 10) human hearts. All experiments were performed on intact right ventricular cardiac trabeculae (n = 40) at physiological temperature and near the normal heart rate range. The failing myocardium showed the typical heart failure phenotype: a negative force-frequency relationship and β-adrenergic desensitization (P myocardium in the right ventricles. We found that there exists a length-dependent regulation of cross-bridge cycling kinetics in human myocardium. Decreasing muscle length accelerated the rate of cross-bridge reattachment (ktr) in both nonfailing and failing myocardium (P myocardium at each respective length (P > 0.05), indicating that this regulatory mechanism is preserved in heart failure. Length-dependent assessment of twitch kinetics mirrored these findings; normalized dF/dt slowed down with increasing length of the muscle and was virtually identical in diseased tissue. This study shows for the first time that muscle length regulates cross-bridge kinetics in human myocardium under near-physiological conditions and that those kinetics are preserved in the right ventricular tissues of heart failure patients. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. No Bridge Too High: Infants Decide Whether to Cross Based on the Probability of Falling not the Severity of the Potential Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretch, Kari S.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Do infants, like adults, consider both the probability of falling and the severity of a potential fall when deciding whether to cross a bridge? Crawling and walking infants were encouraged to cross bridges varying in width over a small drop-off, a large drop-off, or no drop-off. Bridge width affects the probability of falling, whereas drop-off…

  9. Carbodiimide cross-linking of amniotic membranes in the presence of amino acid bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jui-Yang

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the carbodiimide cross-linking of amniotic membrane (AM) in the presence of amino acid bridges. The biological tissues were treated with glycine, lysine, or glutamic acid and chemically cross-linked to examine the role of amino acid types in collagenous biomaterial processing. Results of zeta potential measurements showed that the use of uncharged, positively and negatively charged amino acids dictates the charge state of membrane surface. Tensile strength and water content measurements demonstrated that the addition of lysine molecules to the cross-linking system can increase the cross-linking efficiency and dehydration degree while the introduction of glutamic acid in the AM samples decreases the number of cross-links per unit mass of chemically modified tissue collagen. The differences in the cross-linking density further determined the thermal and biological stability by differential scanning calorimetry and in vitro degradation tests. As demonstrated in matrix permeability studies, the improved formation of covalent cross-linkages imposed by lysine facilitated construction of stronger cross-linking structures. In contrast, the added glycine molecules were insufficient to enhance the resistances of the proteinaceous matrices to thermal denaturation and enzymatic degradation. The cytocompatibility of these biological tissue membranes was evaluated by using human corneal epithelial cell cultures. Results of cell viability, metabolic activity, and pro-inflammatory gene expression level showed that the AM materials cross-linked with carbodiimide in the presence of different types of amino acids are well tolerated without evidence of detrimental effect on cell growth. In addition, the amino acid treated and carbodiimide cross-linked AM implants had good biocompatibility in the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye model. Our findings suggest that amino acid type is a very important engineering parameter to mediate

  10. Bridging consent: from toll bridges to lift bridges?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knoppers Bartha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to share human biological samples, associated data and results across disease-specific and population-based human research biobanks is becoming increasingly important for research into disease development and translation. Although informed consent often does not anticipate such cross-domain sharing, it is important to examine its plausibility. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of bridging consent between disease-specific and population-based research. Comparative analyses of 1 current ethical and legal frameworks governing consent and 2 informed consent models found in disease-specific and population-based research were conducted. Discussion Ethical and legal frameworks governing consent dissuade cross-domain data sharing. Paradoxically, analysis of consent models for disease-specific and population-based research reveals such a high degree of similarity that bridging consent could be possible if additional information regarding bridging was incorporated into consent forms. We submit that bridging of consent could be supported if current trends endorsing a new interpretation of consent are adopted. To illustrate this we sketch potential bridging consent scenarios. Summary A bridging consent, respectful of the spirit of initial consent, is feasible and would require only small changes to the content of consents currently being used. Under a bridging consent approach, the initial data and samples collection can serve an identified research project as well as contribute to the creation of a resource for a range of other projects.

  11. Long-term outcomes for cross-arch stabilizing bridges in periodontal maintenance patients--a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardal, Oystein; Linden, Gerard J

    2010-03-01

    Cross-arch bridges are used to stabilize teeth for patients with reduced periodontal support. Little is known about technical or biological complications, whether teeth and implants can be combined in this type of bridge and the long-term effects on tooth loss. All patients treated in a specialist periodontal practice who received cross-arch stabilizing bridgework and were subsequently maintained for at least 7 years were included in the study. The patients were selected from all patients who underwent initial periodontal therapy after 1986 in a Norwegian periodontal practice. The bridges were assessed for biological and technical complications. Bridges retained by teeth or by a combination of teeth and implants were included in the study. Ninety-four rigid fixed bridges (77 teeth supported, 17 teeth and implant supported) in 80 patients (46 females, 34 males) were observed for an average of 10 years (range 7-22 years). In four patients, a bridge became loose and had to be re-cemented, and in one case the metal framework of a bridge fractured and the bridge had to be remade. In total, eight abutment teeth were lost from five patients but no implant abutments were lost. Overall, a higher rate of tooth loss was observed for patients provided with stabilizing bridges compared with control maintenance patients not treated with bridgework (pperiodontal patients as part of their periodontal maintenance therapy had few complications and were associated with low rates of abutment tooth loss. Combining teeth and implants did not affect the performance of these bridges.

  12. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  13. Crystal structures of two cross-bridged chromium(III tetraazamacrocycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Prior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of dichlorido(4,10-dimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazabicyclo[5.5.2]tetradecanechromium(III hexafluoridophosphate, [CrCl2(C12H26N4]PF6, (I, has monoclinic symmetry (space group P21/n at 150 K. The structure of the related dichlorido(4,11-dimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecanechromium(III hexafluoridophosphate, [CrCl2(C14H30N4]PF6, (II, also displays monoclinic symmetry (space group P21/c at 150 K. In each case, the CrIII ion is hexacoordinate with two cis chloride ions and two non-adjacent N atoms bound cis equatorially and the other two non-adjacent N atoms bound trans axially in a cis-V conformation of the macrocycle. The extent of the distortion from the preferred octahedral coordination geometry of the CrIII ion is determined by the parent macrocycle ring size, with the larger cross-bridged cyclam ring in (II better able to accommodate this preference and the smaller cross-bridged cyclen ring in (I requiring more distortion away from octahedral geometry.

  14. Faster cross-bridge detachment and increased tension cost in human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with the R403Q MYH7 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witjas-Paalberends, E Rosalie; Ferrara, Claudia; Scellini, Beatrice; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Montag, Judith; Tesi, Chiara; Stienen, Ger J M; Michels, Michelle; Ho, Carolyn Y; Kraft, Theresia; Poggesi, Corrado; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2014-08-01

    The first mutation associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the R403Q mutation in the gene encoding β-myosin heavy chain (β-MyHC). R403Q locates in the globular head of myosin (S1), responsible for interaction with actin, and thus motor function of myosin. Increased cross-bridge relaxation kinetics caused by the R403Q mutation might underlie increased energetic cost of tension generation; however, direct evidence is absent. Here we studied to what extent cross-bridge kinetics and energetics are related in single cardiac myofibrils and multicellular cardiac muscle strips of three HCM patients with the R403Q mutation and nine sarcomere mutation-negative HCM patients (HCMsmn). Expression of R403Q was on average 41 ± 4% of total MYH7 mRNA. Cross-bridge slow relaxation kinetics in single R403Q myofibrils was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than in HCMsmn myofibrils (0.47 ± 0.02 and 0.30 ± 0.02 s(-1), respectively). Moreover, compared to HCMsmn, tension cost was significantly higher in the muscle strips of the three R403Q patients (2.93 ± 0.25 and 1.78 ± 0.10 μmol l(-1) s(-1) kN(-1) m(-2), respectively) which showed a positive linear correlation with relaxation kinetics in the corresponding myofibril preparations. This correlation suggests that faster cross-bridge relaxation kinetics results in an increase in energetic cost of tension generation in human HCM with the R403Q mutation compared to HCMsmn. Therefore, increased tension cost might contribute to HCM disease in patients carrying the R403Q mutation. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  15. Comparative in vivo stability of copper-64-labeled cross-bridged and conventional tetraazamacrocyclic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, C Andrew; Sun, Xiankai; Niu, Weijun; Weisman, Gary R; Wong, Edward H; Rheingold, Arnold L; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2004-03-11

    The increased use of copper radioisotopes in radiopharmaceutical applications has created a need for bifunctional chelators (BFCs) that form stable radiocopper complexes and allow covalent attachment to biological molecules. The chelators most commonly utilized for labeling copper radionuclides to biomolecules are analogues of 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,4,8,11-tetraacetic acid (TETA); however, recent reports have communicated the instability of the radio-Cu(II)-TETA complexes in vivo. A class of bicyclic tetraazamacrocycles, the ethylene "cross-bridged" cyclam (CB-cyclam) derivatives, form highly kinetically stable complexes with Cu(II) and therefore may be less susceptible to transchelation than their nonbridged analogues in vivo. Herein we report results on the relative biological stabilities and identification of the resulting radiolabeled metabolites of a series of (64)Cu-labeled macrocyclic complexes. Metabolism studies in normal rat liver have revealed that the (64)Cu complex of 4,11-bis(carboxymethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecane ((64)Cu-CB-TE2A) resulted in significantly lower values of protein-associated (64)Cu than (64)Cu-TETA [13 +/- 6% vs 75 +/- 9% at 4 h]. A similar trend was observed for the corresponding cyclen derivatives, with the (64)Cu complex of 4,10-bis(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazabicyclo[5.5.2]tetradecane ((64)Cu-CB-DO2A) undergoing less transchelation than the (64)Cu complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid ((64)Cu-DOTA) [61 +/- 14% vs 90.3 +/- 0.5% protein associated (64)Cu at 4 h]. These data indicate that the structurally reinforcing cross-bridge enhances in vivo stability by reducing metal loss to protein in both the cyclam and cyclen cross-bridged (64)Cu complexes and that (64)Cu-CB-TE2A is superior to (64)Cu-CB-DO2A in that regard. These findings further suggest that a bifunctional chelator derivative of CB-TE2A is a highly desirable alternative for labeling copper radionuclides to

  16. DNA Cross-Bridging Shapes a Single Nucleus from a Set of Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwer, Matthias; Schneider, Maximilian W G; Hoefler, Rudolf; Schmalhorst, Philipp S; Jude, Julian G; Zuber, Johannes; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2017-08-24

    Eukaryotic cells store their chromosomes in a single nucleus. This is important to maintain genomic integrity, as chromosomes packaged into separate nuclei (micronuclei) are prone to massive DNA damage. During mitosis, higher eukaryotes disassemble their nucleus and release individualized chromosomes for segregation. How numerous chromosomes subsequently reform a single nucleus has remained unclear. Using image-based screening of human cells, we identified barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) as a key factor guiding membranes to form a single nucleus. Unexpectedly, nuclear assembly does not require BAF's association with inner nuclear membrane proteins but instead relies on BAF's ability to bridge distant DNA sites. Live-cell imaging and in vitro reconstitution showed that BAF enriches around the mitotic chromosome ensemble to induce a densely cross-bridged chromatin layer that is mechanically stiff and limits membranes to the surface. Our study reveals that BAF-mediated changes in chromosome mechanics underlie nuclear assembly with broad implications for proper genome function. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Why has reversal of the actin-myosin cross-bridge cycle not been observed experimentally?

    KAUST Repository

    Loiselle, D. S.

    2010-02-04

    We trace the history of attempts to determine whether the experimentally observed diminution of metabolic energy expenditure when muscles lengthen during active contraction is consistent with reversibility of biochemical reactions and, in particular, with the regeneration of ATP. We note that this scientific endeavor has something of a parallel flavor to it, with both early and more recent experiments exploiting both isolated muscle preparations and exercising human subjects. In tracing this history from the late 19th century to the present, it becomes clear that energy can be (at least transiently) stored in a muscle undergoing an eccentric contraction but that this is unlikely to be due to the regeneration of ATP. A recently developed, thermodynamically constrained model of the cross-bridge cycle provides additional insight into this conclusion. Copyright © 2010 the American Physiological Society.

  18. An entrancing tale of cross-disciplinary bridge building and burning in ethnopsychophysiomusicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Janata

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Having a paper accepted for publication is challenging, even under the best of circumstances, as when reporting an incremental finding in a field that is one’s home discipline. The process becomes considerably more difficult when venturing into foreign disciplines in which methodological conventions and assumptions may differ from those one is familiar with. Provocative topics may further exacerbate the reticence of reviewers and editors to welcome cross-disciplinary research to a journal’s pages. Here, a pair of papers, one of which describes a study of possible physiological correlates of music- induced trance states, and the other which describes the challenging journey to get the research performed and published, provide a case study for examining whether epistemological divides can be bridged in the face of editorial obstinacy.

  19. Cross-Bridge Kelvin resistor structures for reliable measurement of low contact resistances and contact interface characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavitski, N.; Klootwijk, J.H.; van Zeijl, H.W.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The parasitic factors that strongly influence the measurement accuracy of Cross-Bridge Kelvin Resistor (CBKR) structures for low specific contact resistances (�?�c) have been extensively discussed during last few decades and the minimum of the �?�c value, which could be accurately extracted, was

  20. Crossing Boundaries and Bridging Gaps: Thoughts on Relationships Between Ethnomusicology And Music Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Clayton

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Judith Becker’s contribution highlights the timely issue of interdisciplinary interaction between ethnomusicology and music psychology, with its attendant opportunities and difficulties. My response aims to first of all place this issue in the historical context of disciplinary development and differentiation. As for the present-day situation, I argue that for interdisciplinary engagement to be productive, bridges need to be built between pockets of interest on both sides of the disciplinary divide. The difficulties faced by Becker do not in my view suggest that there is no appetite on the psychology side of the divide for interdisciplinary exchange, although they do highlight some of the barriers to such communication.

  1. Assessment of the ``cross-bridge''-induced interaction of red blood cells by optical trapping combined with microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander V.

    2017-09-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is an intrinsic property of the blood that has a direct effect on the blood viscosity and circulation. Nevertheless, the mechanism behind the RBC aggregation has not been confirmed and is still under investigation with two major hypotheses, known as "depletion layer" and "cross-bridging." We aim to ultimately understand the mechanism of the RBC aggregation and clarify both models. To measure the cell interaction in vitro in different suspensions (including plasma, isotonic solution of fibrinogen, isotonic solution of fibrinogen with albumin, and phosphate buffer saline) while moving the aggregate from one solution to another, an approach combining optical trapping and microfluidics has been applied. The study reveals evidence that RBC aggregation in plasma is at least partly due to the cross-bridging mechanism. The cell interaction strength measured in the final solution was found to be significantly changed depending on the initial solution where the aggregate was formed.

  2. Assessment of the "cross-bridge"-induced interaction of red blood cells by optical trapping combined with microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander V

    2017-09-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is an intrinsic property of the blood that has a direct effect on the blood viscosity and circulation. Nevertheless, the mechanism behind the RBC aggregation has not been confirmed and is still under investigation with two major hypotheses, known as “depletion layer” and “cross-bridging.” We aim to ultimately understand the mechanism of the RBC aggregation and clarify both models. To measure the cell interaction in vitro in different suspensions (including plasma, isotonic solution of fibrinogen, isotonic solution of fibrinogen with albumin, and phosphate buffer saline) while moving the aggregate from one solution to another, an approach combining optical trapping and microfluidics has been applied. The study reveals evidence that RBC aggregation in plasma is at least partly due to the cross-bridging mechanism. The cell interaction strength measured in the final solution was found to be significantly changed depending on the initial solution where the aggregate was formed.

  3. A Metabolite-Sensitive, Thermodynamically Constrained Model of Cardiac Cross-Bridge Cycling: Implications for Force Development during Ischemia

    KAUST Repository

    Tran, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    We present a metabolically regulated model of cardiac active force generation with which we investigate the effects of ischemia on maximum force production. Our model, based on a model of cross-bridge kinetics that was developed by others, reproduces many of the observed effects of MgATP, MgADP, Pi, and H(+) on force development while retaining the force/length/Ca(2+) properties of the original model. We introduce three new parameters to account for the competitive binding of H(+) to the Ca(2+) binding site on troponin C and the binding of MgADP within the cross-bridge cycle. These parameters, along with the Pi and H(+) regulatory steps within the cross-bridge cycle, were constrained using data from the literature and validated using a range of metabolic and sinusoidal length perturbation protocols. The placement of the MgADP binding step between two strongly-bound and force-generating states leads to the emergence of an unexpected effect on the force-MgADP curve, where the trend of the relationship (positive or negative) depends on the concentrations of the other metabolites and [H(+)]. The model is used to investigate the sensitivity of maximum force production to changes in metabolite concentrations during the development of ischemia.

  4. Bridge pier foundation evaluation using cross-hole seismic tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchibabu, B.; Sandeep, N.; Sivaram, Y. V.; Jha, P. C.; Khan, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    An ambitious project connecting Jammu and Srinagar through a railway link in tectonically active and geologically complex Himalayan Mountain terrain is under progress. Under this project, the world's highest (359 m) railway arch-bridge is under construction across the River Chenab in the northern territory of India. This mega engineering structure has a two-fold ribbed arch design, comprising of steel girders. During the excavation for one of the concrete pillars on the right abutment, wide open joints and weak/shear zones were noticed. The width of these joints varies from 30 to 50 cm, trending along N170° with a dip of 65°. The foundation area of this pillar is 13 m × 24 m and on the cut slopes of the right bank of Chenab River. These exposed joints and weak zones were treated with consolidation grouting to strengthen the foundation area. To delineate the extent of these joints and weak zones below the foundation level, seismic tomography was carried out in five boreholes drilled for this purpose to cover the 300 sq-m area. The results of cross-hole seismic tomography reveals the presence of three low velocity (≤ 2600 m/s) anomalous zones below the foundation area. This also ascertained the efficacy of grouting in consolidating the joints and weak zones. Later, rock-mass quality (Q) was determined based on the relationship between the P-wave velocity and the Q-value (Barton, 2002) to infer the support system for the slope stabilization below the foundation. 3-D visualization of the seismic velocity demarcates the extent of weak or untreated zones. This methodology facilitates to update the design parameters according to Q-values during the construction stage and estimate the required level of reinforcement and support system. Similar methodology can be applicable in other areas under same site conditions.

  5. Force enhancement after stretch in mammalian muscle fiber: no evidence of cross-bridge involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocella, Marta; Cecchi, Giovanni; Bagni, Maria Angela; Colombini, Barbara

    2014-12-15

    Stretching of activated skeletal muscles induces a force increase above the isometric level persisting after stretch, known as residual force enhancement (RFE). RFE has been extensively studied; nevertheless, its mechanism remains debated. Unlike previous RFE studies, here the excess of force after stretch, termed static tension (ST), was investigated with fast stretches (amplitude: 3-4% sarcomere length; duration: 0.6 ms) applied at low tension during the tetanus rise in fiber bundles from flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) mouse muscle at 30°C. ST was measured at sarcomere length between 2.6 and 4.4 μm in normal and N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS)-added (10 μM) Tyrode solution. The results showed that ST has the same characteristics and it is equivalent to RFE. ST increased with sarcomere length, reached a peak at 3.5 μm, and decreased to zero at ∼4.5 μm. At 4 μm, where active force was zero, ST was still 50% of maximum. BTS reduced force by ∼75% but had almost no effect on ST. Following stimulation, ST developed earlier than force, with a time course similar to internal Ca(2+) concentration: it was present 1 ms after the stimulus, at zero active force, and peaked at ∼3-ms delay. At 2.7 μm, activation increased the passive sarcomere stiffness by a factor of ∼7 compared with the relaxed state All our data indicate that ST, or RFE, is independent of the cross-bridge presence and it is due to the Ca(2+)-induced stiffening of a sarcomeric structure identifiable with titin. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Learning in Support of Governance: Theories, Methods, and a Framework to Assess How Bridging Organizations Contribute to Adaptive Resource Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice I. Crona

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Humanity faces increasingly intractable environmental problems characterized by high uncertainty, complexity, and swift change. Natural resource governance must therefore involve continuous production and use of new knowledge to adapt to highly complex, rapidly changing social-ecological systems to ensure long-term sustainable development. Bridging and boundary organizations have been proposed as potentially powerful means of achieving these aims by promoting cooperation among actors from the science, policy, and management sectors. However, despite substantial investments of time, capital, and human resources, little agreement exists about definitions and measures of knowledge production and how this is achieved in bridging organizations and there is only meager understanding of how knowledge production and its use are shaped by social interactions, socio-political environments, and power relations. New concepts, methods, and metrics for conceptualizing and measuring learning in support of natural resource governance and testing the conditions under which it can be achieved are therefore badly needed. This paper presents an attempt at a holistic framework to address this, drawing on theory, methods, and metrics from three research areas: knowledge utilization, boundary organizations, and stakeholder theory. Taken together, these provide a solid conceptual and methodological toolkit for conducting cross-case comparisons aimed at understanding the social environmental conditions under which learning in such organizations does and does not occur. We use empirical data to show how the framework can be applied and discuss some of the practical considerations and important challenges that emerge. We close with a general discussion and an agenda for future research to promote discussion around the topic of how to erect systematic comparisons of learning in support of adaptive natural resource governance as it occurs in bridging organizations.

  7. Sign Languages: Contribution to Neurolinguistics from Cross-Modal Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie

    2010-12-01

    Using sign language research as an example, we argue that both the cross-linguistic descriptive approach to data, advocated by Evans and Levinson (2009), as well as abstract ('formal') analyses are necessary steps towards the development of "neurolinguistic primitives" for investigating how human languages are instantiated in the brain.

  8. Contributions of the cross phase to the plasma transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chan-Yong; Min, Byunghoon; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2017-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the resistive-drift plasma turbulence are performed in order to look into the effects of the E × B fluxes on the cross phase between the electric potential and the particle density. As the electrons become more adiabatic, it is found that the spectrum of the particle transport shifts away from the spectra of the energies. It is because the cross phases of the larger-scale (k{ρ }s\\ll 1) fluctuations, {ρ }s being the ion gyro-radius defined by the electron temperature instead of the ion temperature, where most energies reside come to be vanishingly small in correspondence to the level of adiabaticity. The cross phase in the scale k{ρ }s< 1 is predominantly determined by the electron diamagnetic drift and the resistive current as the plasma is closer to be adiabatic. Advective parts of the E × B fluxes are found to reduce the cross phase and their effect is more pronounced as k{ρ }s≥slant 1.

  9. Simple Program to Investigate Hysteresis Damping Effect of Cross-Ties on Cables Vibration of Cable-Stayed Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagis G. Papadopoulos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A short computer program, fully documented, is presented, for the step-by-step dynamic analysis of isolated cables or couples of parallel cables of a cable-stayed bridge, connected to each other and possibly with the deck of the bridge, by very thin pretensioned wires (cross-ties and subjected to variation of their axial forces due to traffic or to successive pulses of a wind drag force. A simplified SDOF model, approximating the fundamental vibration mode, is adopted for every individual cable. The geometric nonlinearity of the cables is taken into account by their geometric stiffness, whereas the material nonlinearities of the cross-ties include compressive loosening, tensile yielding, and hysteresis stress-strain loops. Seven numerical experiments are performed. Based on them, it is observed that if two interconnected parallel cables have different dynamic characteristics, for example different lengths, thus different masses, weights, and geometric stiffnesses, too, or if one of them has a small additional mass, then a single pretensioned very thin wire, connecting them to each other and possibly with the deck of the bridge, proves effective in suppressing, by its hysteresis damping, the vibrations of the cables.

  10. Bridging Informatics and Earth Science: a Look at Gregory Leptoukh's Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    With the tragic passing this year of Gregory Leptoukh, the Earth and Space Sciences community lost a tireless participant in--and advocate for--science informatics. Throughout his career at NASA, Dr. Leptoukh established a theme of bridging the gulf between the informatics and science communities. Nowhere is this more evident than his leadership in the development of Giovanni (GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure). Giovanni is an online tool that serves to hide the often-complex technical details of data format and structure, making science data easier to explore and use by Earth scientists. To date Giovanni has been acknowledged as a contributor in 500-odd scientific articles. In recent years, Leptoukh concentrated his efforts on multi-sensor data inter-comparison, merging and fusion. This work exposed several challenges at the intersection of data and science. One of these was the ease with which a naive user might generate spurious comparisons, a potential hazard that was the genesis of the Multi-sensor Data Synergy Advisor (MDSA). The MDSA uses semantic ontologies and inference rules to organize knowledge about dataset quality and other salient characteristics in order to advise users on potential caveats for comparing or merging two datasets. Recently, Leptoukh also led the development of AeroStat, an online Giovanni instance to investigate aerosols via statistics from station and satellite comparisons and merged maps of data from more than one instrument. Aerostat offers a neural net based bias adjustment to harmonize the data by removing systematic offsets between datasets before merging. These examples exhibit Leptoukh's talent for adopting advanced computer technologies in the service of making science data more accessible to researchers. In this, he set an example that is at once both vital and challenging for the ESSI community to emulate.

  11. Kinetic coupling of phosphate release, force generation and rate-limiting steps in the cross-bridge cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Robert; Tesi, Chiara

    2017-08-01

    A basic goal in muscle research is to understand how the cyclic ATPase activity of cross-bridges is converted into mechanical force. A direct approach to study the chemo-mechanical coupling between P i release and the force-generating step is provided by the kinetics of force response induced by a rapid change in [P i ]. Classical studies on fibres using caged-P i discovered that rapid increases in [P i ] induce fast force decays dependent on final [P i ] whose kinetics were interpreted to probe a fast force-generating step prior to P i release. However, this hypothesis was called into question by studies on skeletal and cardiac myofibrils subjected to P i jumps in both directions (increases and decreases in [P i ]) which revealed that rapid decreases in [P i ] trigger force rises with slow kinetics, similar to those of calcium-induced force development and mechanically-induced force redevelopment at the same [P i ]. A possible explanation for this discrepancy came from imaging of individual sarcomeres in cardiac myofibrils, showing that the fast force decay upon increase in [P i ] results from so-called sarcomere 'give'. The slow force rise upon decrease in [P i ] was found to better reflect overall sarcomeres cross-bridge kinetics and its [P i ] dependence, suggesting that the force generation coupled to P i release cannot be separated from the rate-limiting transition. The reasons for the different conclusions achieved in fibre and myofibril studies are re-examined as the recent findings on cardiac myofibrils have fundamental consequences for the coupling between P i release, rate-limiting steps and force generation. The implications from P i -induced force kinetics of myofibrils are discussed in combination with historical and recent models of the cross-bridge cycle.

  12. Understanding and controlling wind-induced vibrations of bridge cables: Results from the Femern Crossing research project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgakis, Christos T.; Jakobsen, J. B.; Koss, Holger

    of the project has been the establishment of novel vibration mitigation schemes that could be readily, economically, and effectively implemented on a cable-supported bridge that might form part of the fixed link. In support of the proposed research, Femern A/S commissioned a new climatic wind tunnel, designed......Following the successful completion of the Storebælt and Øresund Crossings, the Danish Ministry of Transport appointed Femern A/S to be in charge of preparation, investigations and planning in relation to the establishment of a fixed link across the Fehmarnbelt. To further investigate the causes...

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 24 (WODSTH00190024) on Town Highway 19, crossing North Bridgewater Brook, Woodstock, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODSTH00190024 on Town Highway 19 crossing North Bridgewater Brook, Woodstock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D.

  14. Bridge Building Potential in Cross-Cultural Learning: A Mixed Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienties, Bart; Johan, Novie; Jindal-Snape, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Although many international students experience transitional issues, most research assumes that these issues will disappear over time with increased interaction. Using principles of social network theory, this study addressed why some students become bridge builders between international and host students, while others primarily interact with…

  15. Breakage-fusion-bridge cycles and large insertions contribute to the rapid evolution of accessory chromosomes in a fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Daniel; Zala, Marcello; McDonald, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are a major driver of eukaryotic genome evolution, affecting speciation, pathogenicity and cancer progression. Changes in chromosome structure are often initiated by mis-repair of double-strand breaks in the DNA. Mis-repair is particularly likely when telomeres are lost or when dispersed repeats misalign during crossing-over. Fungi carry highly polymorphic chromosomal complements showing substantial variation in chromosome length and number. The mechanisms driving chromosome polymorphism in fungi are poorly understood. We aimed to identify mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangements in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. We combined population genomic resequencing and chromosomal segment PCR assays with electrophoretic karyotyping and resequencing of parents and offspring from experimental crosses to show that this pathogen harbors a highly diverse complement of accessory chromosomes that exhibits strong global geographic differentiation in numbers and lengths of chromosomes. Homologous chromosomes carried highly differentiated gene contents due to numerous insertions and deletions. The largest accessory chromosome recently doubled in length through insertions totaling 380 kb. Based on comparative genomics, we identified the precise breakpoint locations of these insertions. Nondisjunction during meiosis led to chromosome losses in progeny of three different crosses. We showed that a new accessory chromosome emerged in two viable offspring through a fusion between sister chromatids. Such chromosome fusion is likely to initiate a breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle that can rapidly degenerate chromosomal structure. We suggest that the accessory chromosomes of Z. tritici originated mainly from ancient core chromosomes through a degeneration process that included BFB cycles, nondisjunction and mutational decay of duplicated sequences. The rapidly evolving accessory chromosome complement may serve as a cradle for adaptive evolution in

  16. Enhanced biological stability of collagen porous scaffolds by using amino acids as novel cross-linking bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lie; Gao, Changyou; Mao, Zhengwei; Zhou, Jie; Shen, Jiacong

    2004-07-01

    Collagen porous scaffolds have been widely employed as a dermal equivalent to induce fibroblasts infiltration and dermal regeneration. To eliminate the disadvantageous drawback of the fast degradation speed, a cross-linking method was adopted by using a water-soluble carbodiimide, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDAC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the presence of amino acids (glycin, glutamic acid or lysine), which function as cross-linking bridge between collagen molecular chains. In vitro assessment of the biological stability of the cross-linked collagen scaffolds found that the collagenase biodegradation degree was greatly decreased when lysine was added, resulting in a more biological stable scaffold. On the other hand, the biodegradation degree was accelerated compared with the purely cross-linked when glutamic acid was added, while less influenced by glycin addition. By comparing the biodegradation degree of the scaffolds added with amino acids and their model compounds, i.e. adipic acid and hexane diamine, the key factor influencing the biological stability was further investigated. The results indicated that the crucial factor is dependent on the ratio of amino groups to carboxyl groups in the cross-linking system. At optimal ratio the lowest biodegradation degree is achieved. Scanning electron microscopy measurements prove that the three-dimensional structure of the scaffolds was largely preserved. Preliminary in vitro culture of fibroblasts in the collagen scaffold cross-linked with EDAC/NHS in the presence of lysine has shown that the original good cytocompatibility of collagen was retained.

  17. Contexts in tourism and leisure studies : a cross-cultural contribution to the production of knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platenkamp, V.

    2007-01-01

    In this PhD an attempt has been made to deliver a cross-cultural contribution to the production of knowledge in tourism and leisure studies. The necessity of this attempt originates in: thegrowing cultural complexity in a globalising world. From a cross-cultural

  18. Air toxics exposure from vehicle emissions at a U.S. border crossing: Buffalo Peace Bridge Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, John; Lwebuga-Mukasa, Jamson; Vallarino, Jose; Melly, Steve; Chillrud, Steve; Baker, Joel; Minegishi, Taeko

    2011-07-01

    The Peace Bridge in Buffalo, New York, which spans the Niagara River at the east end of Lake Erie, is one of the busiest U.S. border crossings. The Peace Bridge plaza on the U.S. side is a complex of roads, customs inspection areas, passport control areas, and duty-free shops. On average 5000 heavy-duty diesel trucks and 20,000 passenger cars traverse the border daily, making the plaza area a potential "hot spot" for emissions from mobile sources. In a series of winter and summer field campaigns, we measured air pollutants, including many compounds considered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA*) as mobile-source air toxics (MSATs), at three fixed sampling sites: on the shore of Lake Erie, approximately 500 m upwind (under predominant wind conditions) of the Peace Bridge plaza; immediately downwind of (adjacent to) the plaza; and 500 m farther downwind, into the community of west Buffalo. Pollutants sampled were particulate matter (PM) Peace Bridge plaza using portable instruments and Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking. The study was designed to assess differences in upwind and downwind concentrations of MSATs, in areas near the Peace Bridge plaza on the U.S. side of the border. The Buffalo Peace Bridge Study featured good access to monitoring locations proximate to the plaza and in the community, which are downwind with the dominant winds from the direction of Lake Erie and southern Ontario. Samples from the lakeside Great Lakes Center (GLC), which is upwind of the plaza with dominant winds, were used to characterize contaminants in regional air masses. On-site meteorologic measurements and hourly truck and car counts were used to assess the role of traffic on UFP counts and pPAH concentrations. The array of parallel and perpendicular residential streets adjacent to the plaza provided a grid on which to plot the spatial patterns of UFP counts and pPAH concentrations to determine the extent to which traffic emissions from the Peace Bridge plaza

  19. Crossing the Evidence Chasm: Building Evidence Bridges from Process Changes to Clinical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, David C.; Bu, Davis; Pan, Eric; Middleton, Blackford

    2007-01-01

    Objective Although demand for information about the effectiveness and efficiency of health care information technology grows, large-scale resource-intensive randomized controlled trials of health care information technology remain impractical. New methods are needed to translate more commonly available clinical process measures into potential impact on clinical outcomes. Design The authors propose a method for building mathematical models based on published evidence that provides an evidence bridge between process changes and resulting clinical outcomes. This method combines tools from systematic review, influence diagramming, and health care simulations. Measurements The authors apply this method to create an evidence bridge between retinopathy screening rates and incidence of blindness in diabetic patients. Results The resulting model uses changes in eye examination rates and other evidence-based population parameters to generate clinical outcomes and costs in a Markov model. Conclusion This method may serve as an alternative to more expensive study designs and provide useful estimates of the impact of health care information technology on clinical outcomes through changes in clinical process measures. PMID:17329720

  20. Radar-based dynamic testing of the cable-suspended bridge crossing the Ebro River at Amposta, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, Carmelo [Politecnico di Milano, Dept. of Architecture, Built environment and Construction engineering (ABC), Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Luzi, Guido [Centre Tecnòlogic de Telecomunicacions de Catalunya (CTTC), Division of Geomatics, Av. Gauss, 7 E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2014-05-27

    Microwave remote sensing is the most recent experimental methodology suitable to the non-contact measurement of deflections on large structures, in static or dynamic conditions. After a brief description of the radar measurement system, the paper addresses the application of microwave remote sensing to ambient vibration testing of a cable-suspended bridge. The investigated bridge crosses the Ebro River at Amposta, Spain and consists of two steel stiffening trusses and a series of equally spaced steel floor beams; the main span is supported by inclined stay cables and two series of 8 suspension cables. The dynamic tests were performed in operational conditions, with the sensor being placed in two different positions so that the response of both the steel deck and the arrays of suspension elements was measured. The experimental investigation confirms the simplicity of use of the radar and the accuracy of the results provided by the microwave remote sensing as well as the issues often met in the clear localization of measurement points.

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 49 (WODSTH00990049) on Town Highway 99, crossing Gulf Brook, Woodstock, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODSTH00990049 on Town Highway 99 crossing the Gulf Brook, Woodstock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (CABOTH00410037) on Town Highway 41, crossing the Winooski River, Cabot, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CABOTH00410037 on Town Highway 41 crossing the Winooski River (also referred to as Coit’s Pond Brook), Cabot, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  3. Developing the evidence base for families living with parental psychiatric disabilities: crossing the bridge while we're building it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Joanne; Friesen, Barbara J

    2014-09-01

    For this special issue, the latest research findings on the topic of families living with parental psychiatric disabilities were solicited and compiled, to inform policymakers and practitioners with the best research available, while informing researchers about new developments in the field. The creative efforts of practitioners on the ground who strategically cobble together service responses for parents and families, as well as the extraordinary efforts of parents, adult children, young carers, and advocates who continue to bring attention to family issues in psychiatric rehabilitation, are applauded. These things are happening as we build the evidence base. That is, we are "crossing the bridge" to evidence-based practice while we are "building it." This is not without its challenges, in policy, practice, or research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. E2 contributions to backward (e,e`) cross sections in heavy deformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dingfelder, M.; Nojarov, R.; Faessler, A. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    1995-08-01

    It is shown that E2 transitions to the rotational band of low lying M1 excitations in heavy deformed nuclei contribute to the M1 (e,e`) cross section at backward angles even at low incident energies of 50 MeV. The agreement with experiment is improved considerably, especially for intermediate transferred momenta, after taking the E2 contributions into account. (author).

  5. Bridging Spaces: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Promoting Positive Online Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyt, Ilka

    2013-01-01

    The globalization of online courses has transformed online learning into cross-cultural learning spaces. Students from non-English backgrounds are enrolling in credit-bearing courses and must adjust their thinking and writing to adapt to online practices. Online courses have as their aim the construction of knowledge, but students' perceptions of…

  6. Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri River in and into Missouri during summer flooding, July-August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas and Missouri Departments of Transportation, in the vicinity of 36 bridges at 27 highway crossings of the Missouri River between Brownville, Nebraska and St. Louis, Missouri, from July 13 through August 3, 2011, during a summer flood. A multibeam echo sounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches ranging from 1,350 to 1,860 feet and extending across the active channel of the Missouri River. These bathymetric scans provide a "snapshot" of the channel conditions at the time of the surveys and provide characteristics of scour holes that may be useful in the development of predictive guidelines or equations for scour holes. These data also may be used by the Kansas and Missouri Departments of Transportation to assess the bridges for stability and integrity issues with respect to bridge scour during floods. Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of water, in extremely shallow water, or surrounded by debris rafts. Scour holes were present at most piers for which bathymetry could be obtained, except at piers on channel banks, those near or embedded in lateral or longitudinal spur dikes, and those on exposed bedrock outcrops. Scour holes observed at the surveyed bridges were examined with respect to depth and shape. Although exposure of parts of foundational support elements was observed at several piers, at most sites the exposure likely can be considered minimal compared to the overall substructure that remains buried in bed material; however, there were several notable exceptions where the bed material thickness between the bottom of the scour hole and bedrock was less than 6 feet. Such substantial exposure of usually buried substructural elements may warrant special observation in future flood events. Previous bathymetric surveys had been done at several of the sites

  7. Study on the measures of tunnels side-crossing bridge based on sheltering effects of isolation piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian; Liu, Jun yan; Liu, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Based on the transit line 3, we studied the effect of the bridge piles crossed closely from the side by the shield tunnel. Using the three-dimensional finite element numerical analysis software Midas GTS/NX, we analyzed the effect of shield tunnel on pile deformation, statistics are obtained that under the condition of pile, subgrade reinforcement and ground changes. The calculation results show that in the condition of reinforcement, the new tunnel shield crossing through the pile caused longitudinal disturbance of the tunnel surrounding strata along the tunnel, where the soil over the area is within a certain range of pile and settlement deformation of surface subsidence occurs, changing the surface roughly to the shape of “V”. The maximum value appears above the shield tunnel and the value is high. In combination with engineering geology, hydrogeology and environment factors, this paper adopted isolation pile reinforcement to the pile, and the simulated results show that, pile settlement was significantly reduced under the condition of pile reinforcement. The calculation results show the rationality of the reinforcement scheme to a certain extent, which provides a theoretical basis for the similar tunnel.

  8. Cross-Cultural Understanding Through Youth Sports: Bridging the Tolerance Gap Through Youth Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig M. Ross

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The USPORT-Kyrgyzstan project was an ambitious initiative of public diplomacy, sports diplomacy, cross-cultural exchange, in-country grassroots projects, and international cooperation. The project consisted of three phrases which included youth recreational sport programming, youth leadership and development training, and youth tolerance training. Overall, it proved to be an extremely effective form of intervention that provided youth in this region of the Middle East with many positive and constructive youth sports and leadership development opportunities.

  9. Trojan Horse Transit Contributes to Blood-Brain Barrier Crossing of a Eukaryotic Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Tirado, Felipe H; Onken, Michael D; Cooper, John A; Klein, Robyn S; Doering, Tamara L

    2017-01-31

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the central nervous system (CNS) by restricting the passage of molecules and microorganisms. Despite this barrier, however, the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans invades the brain, causing a meningoencephalitis that is estimated to kill over 600,000 people annually. Cryptococcal infection begins in the lung, and experimental evidence suggests that host phagocytes play a role in subsequent dissemination, although this role remains ill defined. Additionally, the disparate experimental approaches that have been used to probe various potential routes of BBB transit make it impossible to assess their relative contributions, confounding any integrated understanding of cryptococcal brain entry. Here we used an in vitro model BBB to show that a "Trojan horse" mechanism contributes significantly to fungal barrier crossing and that host factors regulate this process independently of free fungal transit. We also, for the first time, directly imaged C. neoformans-containing phagocytes crossing the BBB, showing that they do so via transendothelial pores. Finally, we found that Trojan horse crossing enables CNS entry of fungal mutants that cannot otherwise traverse the BBB, and we demonstrate additional intercellular interactions that may contribute to brain entry. Our work elucidates the mechanism of cryptococcal brain invasion and offers approaches to study other neuropathogens. The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans invades the brain, causing a meningoencephalitis that kills hundreds of thousands of people each year. One route that has been proposed for this brain entry is a Trojan horse mechanism, whereby the fungus crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) as a passenger inside host phagocytes. Although indirect experimental evidence supports this intriguing mechanism, it has never been directly visualized. Here we directly image Trojan horse transit and show that it is regulated independently of free fungal entry, contributes

  10. Bathymetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri River in Kansas City, Missouri, using a multibeam echo sounder, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bathymetric surveys were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, on the Missouri River in the vicinity of nine bridges at seven highway crossings in Kansas City, Missouri, in March 2010. A multibeam echo sounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches that ranged from 1,640 to 1,800 feet long and extending from bank to bank in the main channel of the Missouri River. These bathymetric scans will be used by the Missouri Department of Transportation to assess the condition of the bridges for stability and integrity with respect to bridge scour. Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of the water or in extremely shallow water, and one pier that was surrounded by a large debris raft. A scour hole was present at every pier for which bathymetric data could be obtained. The scour hole at a given pier varied in depth relative to the upstream channel bed, depending on the presence and proximity of other piers or structures upstream from the pier in question. The surveyed channel bed at the bottom of the scour hole was between 5 and 50 feet above bedrock. At bridges with drilled shaft foundations, generally there was exposure of the upstream end of the seal course and the seal course often was undermined to some extent. At one site, the minimum elevation of the scour hole at the main channel pier was about 10 feet below the bottom of the seal course, and the sides of the drilled shafts were evident in a point cloud visualization of the data at that pier. However, drilled shafts generally penetrated 20 feet into bedrock. Undermining of the seal course was evident as a sonic 'shadow' in the point cloud visualization of several of the piers. Large dune features were present in the channel at nearly all of the surveyed sites, as were numerous smaller dunes and many ripples. Several of the sites are on or near bends in the river

  11. Bridging Cultural Borders: American Students’ Pedagogical Cross-Cultural Experiences in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Greene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In exploring the best practices for preparing new teachers to meet the challenges of the changing demographics present in contemporary classrooms, cross-cultural internship experiences emerge as an important component to teacher training curriculums. The authors present information based on the experiences of American student teachers spending three weeks teaching English and American Culture in Szent István’s Practice School, making presentations to local clubs, churches, libraries, and traveling throughout Hungary. This exchange program presented a great opportunity for the authors to conduct a study related to exploring the impact of the student teaching abroad experience in their teaching dispositions as well as in developing an understanding of working within a culturally and linguistically diverse environment.

  12. [Repair of soft tissue defects of lower extremity by using cross-bridge contralateral distally based posterior tibial artery perforator flaps or peroneal artery perforator flaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Cunyi; Ruan, Hongjiang; Cai, Peihua; Liu, Shen; Li, Fengfeng; Zeng, Bingfang

    2011-07-01

    To discuss the feasibility of repairing soft tissue defects of lower extremity with a distally based posterior tibial artery perforator cross-bridge flap or a distally based peroneal artery perforator cross-bridge flap. Between August 2007 and February 2010, 15 patients with soft tissue defect of the legs or feet were treated. There were 14 males and 1 female with a mean age of 33.9 years (range, 25-48 years). The injury causes included traffic accident in 8 cases, crush injury by machine in 4 cases, and crush injury by heavy weights in 3 cases. There was a scar (22 cm x 8 cm at size) left on the ankle after the skin graft in 1 patient (after 35 months of traffic accident). And in the other 14 patients, the defect locations were the ankle in 1 case, the upper part of the lower leg in 1 case, and the lower part of the lower leg in 12 cases; the defect sizes ranged from 8 cm x 6 cm to 26 cm x 15 cm; the mean interval from injury to admission was 14.8 days (range, 4-28 days). Defects were repaired with distally based posterior tibial artery perforator cross-bridge flaps in 9 cases and distally based peroneal artery perforator cross-bridge flaps in 6 cases, and the flap sizes ranged from 10 cm x 8 cm to 28 cm x 17 cm. The donor sites were sutured directly, but a split-thickness skin graft was used in the middle part. The pedicles of all flaps were cut at 5-6 weeks postoperatively. Distal mild congestion and partial necrosis at the edge of the skin flap occurred in 2 cases and were cured after dressing change, and the other flaps survived. After cutting the pedicles, all flaps survived, and wounds of recipient sites healed by first intention. Incisions of the donor sites healed by first intention, and skin graft survived. Fifteen patients were followed up 7-35 months with an average of 19.5 months. The color and texture of the flaps were similar to these of the recipient site. According to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score

  13. Energy system contributions and determinants of performance in sprint cross-country skiing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E; Björklund, G; Holmberg, H-C

    2017-01-01

    To improve current understanding of energy contributions and determinants of sprint-skiing performance, 11 well-trained male cross-country skiers were tested in the laboratory for VO2max , submaximal gross efficiency (GE), maximal roller skiing velocity, and sprint time-trial (STT) performance...... contribution was 18 ± 5%, with an accumulated O2 deficit of 45 ± 13 mL/kg. Block-wise multiple regression revealed that VO2 , O2 deficit, and GE explained 30%, 15%, and 53% of the variance in STT time, respectively (all P skiing...

  14. Improved PET Imaging of uPAR expression using new Cu-64-labeled cross-bridged peptide ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Hosseini, Masood; Madsen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The correlation between uPAR expression, cancer cell invasion and metastases is now well-established and has prompted the development of a number of uPAR PET imaging agents, which could potentially identify cancer patients with invasive and metastatic lesions. In the present study, we synthesized......, the more stable of the new uPAR PET tracers, (64)Cu-CB-TE2A-PA-AE105, exhibits a significantly reduced liver uptake compared to (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 as well as (64)Cu-CB-TE2A-AE105, (p...... and characterized two new cross-bridged (64)Cu-labeled peptide conjugates for PET imaging of uPAR and performed a head-to-head comparison with the corresponding and more conventionally used DOTA conjugate. Based on in-source laser-induced reduction of chelated Cu(II) to Cu(I), we now demonstrate the following...... ranking with respect to the chemical inertness of their complexed Cu ions: DOTA-AE105 95%) were achieved in all cases by incubation at 95ºC. In vivo, they display identical tumor uptake after 1h, but differ significantly after 22 hrs, where the DOTA-AE105 uptake remains surprisingly high. Importantly...

  15. Kinetics of a single cross-bridge in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy heart muscle measured by reverse Kretschmann fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettikolla, Prasad; Calander, Nils; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Borejdo, Julian

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a serious heart disease that often leads to a sudden cardiac death of young athletes. It is believed that the alteration of the kinetics of interaction between actin and myosin causes FHC by making the heart to pump blood inefficiently. We set out to check this hypothesis ex vivo. During contraction of heart muscle, a myosin cross-bridge imparts periodic force impulses to actin. The impulses are analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of fluorescently labeled actin. To minimize observation volume and background fluorescence, we carry out FCS measurements in surface plasmon coupled emission mode in a reverse Kretschmann configuration. Fluorescence is a result of near-field coupling of fluorophores excited in the vicinity of the metal-coated surface of a coverslip with the surface plasmons propagating in the metal. Surface plasmons decouple on opposite sides of the metal film and emit in a directional manner as far-field p-polarized radiation. We show that the rate of changes of orientation is significantly faster in contracting cardiac myofibrils of transgenic mice than wild type. These results are consistent with the fact that mutated heart muscle myosin translates actin faster in in vitro motility assays.

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (CHELTH00440045) on Town Highway 44, crossing first Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHELTH00440045 on town highway 44 crossing the First Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Chelsea. The 32.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have low to moderate woody vegetation coverage except for the upstream right bank, which is grass covered. The immediate vicinity of the site is suburban and the overbank areas are occupied by houses, driveways, and lawn areas. The upstream right bank area is a dirt parking lot for a small auto repair garage. In the study area, the First Branch White River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel (D50 is 43.1 mm or 0.141 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 17, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 44 crossing of the First Branch White Riveris a 31-ft-long, two-lane

  17. Bridging Cultures and Crossing Academic Divides: Teaching the Americas in the New Millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Akbar Gilliam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available African Diaspora Studies and Latin American (and Latino Studies are traditionally seen as two distinct disciplines, each having its own perspective, each having its particular areas of concern.  Some scholars, however, see each of these fields of study as complementary, and take the position that neither field can be fully understood or appreciated without including the history, culture and theoretical framework of the other.  I make this argument based on four factors: 1 Over 90% of the Africans brought to the Americas as slaves were sent to Latin America  2 A documented shared history for more than 500 years 3 A trend toward interdisciplinarity and multicultural perspective among scholars in the two fields  4 The shared political genesis of Black Studies and Latino Studies in the 1960s and 1970s. As someone who teaches Spanish language, and researches Afro-Hispanic writers and themes, I welcomed the challenge to enhance an existing Latin American and Latino Studies course with a curriculum to more fully reflect the development of the modern Americas as both a clash and combination of African, Native American (indigenous, and European peoples: their bloodlines, cultures, languages, faith traditions, and political struggles.  This course is called “Founding Myths and Cultural Conquest in Latin America.”  It is one of two courses prerequisite to a major or minor in Latin American and Latino Studies, and is now regularly cross-listed in the African and Black Diaspora Studies Program. Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso

  18. 77 FR 38881 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Two New Ohio River Bridge Crossings in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Two New Ohio River... a proposed highway project, the Louisville-Southern Indiana Ohio River Bridges Project, which would provide a new Ohio River Bridge carrying Interstate 65 (I-65) between Louisville, Kentucky and...

  19. Lewis-acid-promoted stoichiometric and catalytic oxidations by manganese complexes having cross-bridged cyclam ligand: a comprehensive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Wang, Yujuan; Lv, Yanzong; Chen, Zhuqi; Mei, Fuming; Xiong, Hui; Yin, Guochuan

    2013-05-06

    Redox-inactive metal ions have been recognized to be able to participate in redox metal-ion-mediated biological and chemical oxidative events; however, their roles are still elusive. This work presents how the redox-inactive metal ions affect the oxidative reactivity of a well-investigated manganese(II) with its corresponding manganese(IV) complexes having cross-bridged cyclam ligand. In dry acetone, the presence of these metal ions can greatly accelerate stoichiometric oxidations of triphenylphosphine and sulfides by the manganese(IV) complexes through electron transfer or catalytic sulfoxidations by the corresponding manganese(II) complexes with PhIO. Significantly, the rate enhancements are highly Lewis-acid strength dependent on added metal ions. These metal ions like Al(3+) can also promote the thermodynamic driving force of the Mn(IV)-OH moiety to facilitate its hydrogen abstraction from ethylbenzene having a BDE(CH) value of 85 kcal/mol, while it is experimentally limited to 80 kcal/mol for Mn(IV)-OH alone. Adding Al(3+) may also improve the manganese(II)-catalyzed olefin epoxidation with PhIO. However, compared with those in electron transfer, improvements in hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer are minor. The existence of the interaction between Lewis acid and the manganese(IV) species was evidenced by the blue shift of the characteristic absorbance of the manganese(IV) species from 554 to 537 nm and by converting its EPR signal at g = 2.01 into a hyperfine 6-line signal upon adding Al(3+) (I = 5/2). Cyclic voltammograms of the manganese(IV) complexes reveal that adding Lewis acid would substantially shift its potential to the positive direction, thus enhancing its oxidizing capability.

  20. Myosin cross-bridges do not form precise rigor bonds in hypertrophic heart muscle carrying troponin T mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midde, K; Dumka, V; Pinto, J R; Muthu, P; Marandos, P; Gryczynski, I; Gryczynski, Z; Potter, J D; Borejdo, J

    2011-09-01

    Distribution of orientations of myosin was examined in ex-vivo myofibrils from hearts of transgenic (Tg) mice expressing Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) troponin T (TnT) mutations I79N, F110I and R278C. Humans are heterozygous for sarcomeric FHC mutations and so hypertrophic myocardium contains a mixture of the wild-type (WT) and mutated (MUT) TnT. If mutations are expressed at a low level there may not be a significant change in the global properties of heart muscle. In contrast, measurements from a few molecules avoid averaging inherent in the global measurements. It is thus important to examine the properties of only a few molecules of muscle. To this end, the lever arm of one out of every 60,000 myosin molecules was labeled with a fluorescent dye and a small volume within the A-band (~1 fL) was observed by confocal microscopy. This volume contained on average 5 fluorescent myosin molecules. The lever arm assumes different orientations reflecting different stages of acto-myosin enzymatic cycle. We measured the distribution of these orientations by recording polarization of fluorescent light emitted by myosin-bound fluorophore during rigor and contraction. The distribution of orientations of rigor WT and MUT myofibrils was significantly different. There was a large difference in the width and of skewness and kurtosis of rigor distributions. These findings suggest that the hypertrophic phenotype associated with the TnT mutations can be characterized by a significant increase in disorder of rigor cross-bridges. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Single molecule fluorescence image patterns linked to dipole orientation and axial position: application to myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivatable fluorescent probes developed specifically for single molecule detection extend advantages of single molecule imaging to high probe density regions of cells and tissues. They perform in the native biomolecule environment and have been used to detect both probe position and orientation.Fluorescence emission from a single photoactivated probe captured in an oil immersion, high numerical aperture objective, produces a spatial pattern on the detector that is a linear combination of 6 independent and distinct spatial basis patterns with weighting coefficients specifying emission dipole orientation. Basis patterns are tabulated for single photoactivated probes labeling myosin cross-bridges in a permeabilized muscle fiber undergoing total internal reflection illumination. Emitter proximity to the glass/aqueous interface at the coverslip implies the dipole near-field and dipole power normalization are significant affecters of the basis patterns. Other characteristics of the basis patterns are contributed by field polarization rotation with transmission through the microscope optics and refraction by the filter set. Pattern recognition utilized the generalized linear model, maximum likelihood fitting, for Poisson distributed uncertainties. This fitting method is more appropriate for treating low signal level photon counting data than χ(2 minimization.Results indicate that emission dipole orientation is measurable from the intensity image except for the ambiguity under dipole inversion. The advantage over an alternative method comparing two measured polarized emission intensities using an analyzing polarizer is that information in the intensity spatial distribution provides more constraints on fitted parameters and a single image provides all the information needed. Axial distance dependence in the emission pattern is also exploited to measure relative probe position near focus. Single molecule images from axial scanning fitted

  2. Simulating Bridge Crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    available products does not constitu’e official endorsement or approval of the use of such products . Product names are being utied for identification... Product Assurance and Test Reid Activity ATT’N: AMSEL-ED ATTN: AMXQA Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703-5000 Lexington. KY 40511-5105 Commander I Director US Army...Commander I HQ, US Army CECOM US Army Enginneer School ap.d Center ATTN: AMSEfI,-LG-JA ATTN: ATSE-DAC-LC Ft. Monm,.ith, NJ 0770,-5010 Canadlaa Liaison

  3. How did the spider cross the river? Behavioral adaptations for river-bridging webs in Caerostris darwini (Araneae: Araneidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Gregorič

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interspecific coevolution is well described, but we know significantly less about how multiple traits coevolve within a species, particularly between behavioral traits and biomechanical properties of animals' "extended phenotypes". In orb weaving spiders, coevolution of spider behavior with ecological and physical traits of their webs is expected. Darwin's bark spider (Caerostris darwini bridges large water bodies, building the largest known orb webs utilizing the toughest known silk. Here, we examine C. darwini web building behaviors to establish how bridge lines are formed over water. We also test the prediction that this spider's unique web ecology and architecture coevolved with new web building behaviors. METHODOLOGY: We observed C. darwini in its natural habitat and filmed web building. We observed 90 web building events, and compared web building behaviors to other species of orb web spiders. CONCLUSIONS: Caerostris darwini uses a unique set of behaviors, some unknown in other spiders, to construct its enormous webs. First, the spiders release unusually large amounts of bridging silk into the air, which is then carried downwind, across the water body, establishing bridge lines. Second, the spiders perform almost no web site exploration. Third, they construct the orb capture area below the initial bridge line. In contrast to all known orb-weavers, the web hub is therefore not part of the initial bridge line but is instead built de novo. Fourth, the orb contains two types of radial threads, with those in the upper half of the web doubled. These unique behaviors result in a giant, yet rather simplified web. Our results continue to build evidence for the coevolution of behavioral (web building, ecological (web microhabitat and biomaterial (silk biomechanics traits that combined allow C. darwini to occupy a unique niche among spiders.

  4. How did the spider cross the river? Behavioral adaptations for river-bridging webs in Caerostris darwini (Araneae: Araneidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorič, Matjaž; Agnarsson, Ingi; Blackledge, Todd A; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2011-01-01

    Interspecific coevolution is well described, but we know significantly less about how multiple traits coevolve within a species, particularly between behavioral traits and biomechanical properties of animals' "extended phenotypes". In orb weaving spiders, coevolution of spider behavior with ecological and physical traits of their webs is expected. Darwin's bark spider (Caerostris darwini) bridges large water bodies, building the largest known orb webs utilizing the toughest known silk. Here, we examine C. darwini web building behaviors to establish how bridge lines are formed over water. We also test the prediction that this spider's unique web ecology and architecture coevolved with new web building behaviors. We observed C. darwini in its natural habitat and filmed web building. We observed 90 web building events, and compared web building behaviors to other species of orb web spiders. Caerostris darwini uses a unique set of behaviors, some unknown in other spiders, to construct its enormous webs. First, the spiders release unusually large amounts of bridging silk into the air, which is then carried downwind, across the water body, establishing bridge lines. Second, the spiders perform almost no web site exploration. Third, they construct the orb capture area below the initial bridge line. In contrast to all known orb-weavers, the web hub is therefore not part of the initial bridge line but is instead built de novo. Fourth, the orb contains two types of radial threads, with those in the upper half of the web doubled. These unique behaviors result in a giant, yet rather simplified web. Our results continue to build evidence for the coevolution of behavioral (web building), ecological (web microhabitat) and biomaterial (silk biomechanics) traits that combined allow C. darwini to occupy a unique niche among spiders.

  5. State's First Bridge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Article with details on the state's first bridge that crossed the Noxubee River adjacent to the Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Boundary. Details also included...

  6. Real-Virtual contributions to the inclusive Higgs cross-section at N3LO

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Dulat, Falko; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    We compute the contributions to the N3LO inclusive Higgs boson cross-section from the square of one-loop amplitudes with a Higgs boson and three QCD partons as external states. Our result is a Taylor expansion in the dimensional regulator epsilon, where the coefficients of the expansion are analytic functions of the ratio of the Higgs boson mass and the partonic center of mass energy and they are valid for arbitrary values of this ratio. We also perform a threshold expansion around the limit of soft-parton radiation in the final state. The expressions for the coefficients of the threshold expansion are valid for arbitrary values of the dimension. As a by-product of the threshold expansion calculation, we have developed a soft expansion method at the integrand level by identifying the relevant soft and collinear regions for the loop-momentum.

  7. Three-body collision contributions to recombination and collision-induced dissociation. 1: Cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, R.T.; Walker, R.B.; Kendrick, B.K.

    1998-04-10

    Atomic and molecular recombination and collision-induced dissociation (CID) reactions comprise two of the most fundamental types of chemical reactions. They are important in all gas phase chemistry; for example, about half of the 196 reactions identified as important in combustion chemistry are recombination or CID reactions. Many of the current chemical kinetics textbooks and kinetics papers treat atomic and molecular recombination and CID as occurring only via sequences of two-body collisions. Actually, there is considerable evidence from experiment and classical trajectory calculations for contributions by true three-body collisions to the recombination of atomic and diatomic radicals, and that evidence is reviewed. Then, an approximate quantum method treating both two-body and three-body collisions simultaneously and on equal footing is used to calculate cross sections for the reaction Ne{sub 2} + H {rightleftharpoons} Ne + Ne + H. The results provide clear quantum evidence that direct three-body collisions do contribute significantly to recombination and CID.

  8. Railroad Bridges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Bridges-Rail in the United States According to The National Bridge Inspection Standards published in the Code of Federal Regulations (23 CFR 650.3), a bridge isA...

  9. Myocardial Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sudden Cardiac Arrest Valve Disease Vulnerable Plaque Myocardial Bridge Related terms: myocardium, coronary arteries, myocardial ischemia Your ... surface of the heart. What is a myocardial bridge? A myocardial bridge is a band of heart ...

  10. Impact of cross-tie design on the in-plane stiffness and local mode formation of cable networks on cable-stayed bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Javaid; Cheng, Shaohong; Ghrib, Faouzi

    2016-02-01

    Suppressing unfavorable stay cable vibrations using cross-ties is becoming more popular on cable-stayed bridges though the mechanics of the formed cable network is yet fully understood. In practice, the main task in designing cross-ties or cable networks is to choose the cross-tie installation location, stiffness and number based on the main cable properties in the network. To have a more comprehensive picture of how to choose these design parameters to achieve higher in-plane network stiffness while minimizing the number of excited local modes, it is imperative to examine dynamic behavior of cable networks with general configurations. In the current study, an analytical model of a general cable network consisting of multiple main cables interconnected by multiple lines of transverse flexible cross-ties will be developed. A new term, defined as the local mode cluster, will be introduced to assess the severity of local mode excitation. Criteria for identifying the presence of local mode cluster will be proposed. A parametric study will be conducted to evaluate the impact of cross-tie installation location, stiffness and number on the network modal response. Results obtained from the present study will provide deeper insight into the selection of these system parameters to achieve the combined benefits of increasing network in-plane stiffness and minimizing the excitation of local modes.

  11. The antigens contributing to the serological cross-reactions of Proteus antisera with Klebsiella representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palusiak, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Proteus sp. and Klebsiella sp. mainly cause infections of the urinary and respiratory tracts or wounds in humans. The representatives of both genera produce virulence factors like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or outer membrane proteins (OMPs) having much in common in the structures and/or functions. To check how far this similarity is revealed in the serological cross-reactivity, the bacterial masses of 24 tested Klebsiella sp. strains were tested in ELISA with polyclonal rabbit antisera specific to the representatives of 79 Proteus O serogroups. The strongest reacting systems were selected to Western blot, where the majority of Klebsiella masses reacted in a way characteristic for electrophoretic patterns of proteins. The strongest reactions were obtained for proteins of near 67 and 40 kDa and 12.5 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins samples of one Proteus sp. and one Klebsiella sp. strain showed the GroEL like protein of a sequence GI number 2980926 to be similar for both strains. In Western blot some Klebsiella sp. masses reacted similarly to the homologous Proteus LPSs. The LPS contribution in the observed reactions of the high molecular-mass LPS species was confirmed for Klebsiella oxytoca 0.062. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Barriers and Bridges to Positive Cross-Ethnic Relations: African American and White Parent Socialization Beliefs and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jill V.

    2001-01-01

    Using interviews and focus groups, lower and middle socioeconomic status (SES) African American parents and middle SES white parents discussed their objectives regarding cross-ethnic relations and how they helped their children forge positive cross-ethnic relations. The groups relied on different methods to promote socialization. Parents' efforts…

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 32 (FERRTH00190032) on Town Highway 19, crossing the South Slang Little Otter Creek, Ferrisburgh, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure FERRTH00190032 on Town Highway 19 crossing the South Slang Little Otter Creek (Hawkins Slang Brook), Ferrisburg, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Champlain section of the St. Lawrence Valley physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 8.00-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of wetlands upstream and downstream of the bridge with trees and pasture on the wide flood plains. In the study area, the South Slang Little Otter Creek has a meandering channel with essentially no channel slope, an average channel top width of 932 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from clay to sand. Sieve analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the sample is coarse silt and clay and thus a medium grain size by use of sieve analysis was indeterminate. The median grain size was assumed to be a course silt with a size (D50) of 0.061mm (0.0002 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 2, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 19 crossing of the South Slang Little Otter Creek is a 45-ft-long, twolane bridge consisting of one 42-foot concrete box-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 11, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face

  14. Impact of Cross-Tie Properties on the Modal Behavior of Cable Networks on Cable-Stayed Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behaviour of cable networks is highly dependent on the installation location, stiffness, and damping of cross-ties. Thus, these are the important design parameters for a cable network. While the effects of the former two on the network response have been investigated to some extent in the past, the impact of cross-tie damping has rarely been addressed. To comprehend our knowledge of mechanics associated with cable networks, in the current study, an analytical model of a cable network will be proposed by taking into account both cross-tie stiffness and damping. In addition, the damping property of main cables in the network will also be considered in the formulation. This would allow exploring not only the effectiveness of a cross-tie design on enhancing the in-plane stiffness of a constituted cable network, but also its energy dissipation capacity. The proposed analytical model will be applied to networks with different configurations. The influence of cross-tie stiffness and damping on the modal response of various types of networks will be investigated by using the corresponding undamped rigid cross-tie network as a reference base. Results will provide valuable information on the selection of cross-tie properties to achieve more effective cable vibration control.

  15. Impact of Cross-Tie Properties on the Modal Behavior of Cable Networks on Cable-Stayed Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Javaid; Cheng, Shaohong; Ghrib, Faouzi

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic behaviour of cable networks is highly dependent on the installation location, stiffness, and damping of cross-ties. Thus, these are the important design parameters for a cable network. While the effects of the former two on the network response have been investigated to some extent in the past, the impact of cross-tie damping has rarely been addressed. To comprehend our knowledge of mechanics associated with cable networks, in the current study, an analytical model of a cable network will be proposed by taking into account both cross-tie stiffness and damping. In addition, the damping property of main cables in the network will also be considered in the formulation. This would allow exploring not only the effectiveness of a cross-tie design on enhancing the in-plane stiffness of a constituted cable network, but also its energy dissipation capacity. The proposed analytical model will be applied to networks with different configurations. The influence of cross-tie stiffness and damping on the modal response of various types of networks will be investigated by using the corresponding undamped rigid cross-tie network as a reference base. Results will provide valuable information on the selection of cross-tie properties to achieve more effective cable vibration control.

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8 (STAMVT01000008) on State Highway 100, crossing the North Branch of the Hoosic River, Stamford, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure STAMVT01000008 on Vermont Highway 100 crossing the North Branch of the Hoosic River, Stamford, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  17. Muscle weakness in TPM3-myopathy is due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling in slow fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Michaela; Cooper, Sandra T.; Marston, Steve B.; Nowak, Kristen J.; McNamara, Elyshia; Mokbel, Nancy; Ilkovski, Biljana; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Rendu, John; de Winter, Josine M.; Klinge, Lars; Beggs, Alan H.; North, Kathryn N.; Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in TPM3, encoding α-tropomyosinslow, cause a congenital myopathy characterized by generalized muscle weakness. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mechanism of muscle dysfunction in 12 TPM3-myopathy patients. We confirm that slow myofibre hypotrophy is a diagnostic hallmark of TPM3-myopathy, and is commonly accompanied by skewing of fibre-type ratios (either slow or fast fibre predominance). Patient muscle contained normal ratios of the three tropomyosin isoforms and normal fibre-type expression of myosins and troponins. Using 2D-PAGE, we demonstrate that mutant α-tropomyosinslow was expressed, suggesting muscle dysfunction is due to a dominant-negative effect of mutant protein on muscle contraction. Molecular modelling suggested mutant α-tropomyosinslow likely impacts actin–tropomyosin interactions and, indeed, co-sedimentation assays showed reduced binding of mutant α-tropomyosinslow (R168C) to filamentous actin. Single fibre contractility studies of patient myofibres revealed marked slow myofibre specific abnormalities. At saturating [Ca2+] (pCa 4.5), patient slow fibres produced only 63% of the contractile force produced in control slow fibres and had reduced acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Importantly, due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity, at sub-saturating [Ca2+] (pCa 6, levels typically released during in vivo contraction) patient slow fibres produced only 26% of the force generated by control slow fibres. Thus, weakness in TPM3-myopathy patients can be directly attributed to reduced slow fibre force at physiological [Ca2+], and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Fast myofibres are spared; however, they appear to be unable to compensate for slow fibre dysfunction. Abnormal Ca2+-sensitivity in TPM3-myopathy patients suggests Ca2+-sensitizing drugs may represent a useful treatment for this condition. PMID:26307083

  18. Bacteriocin protein BacL1 of Enterococcus faecalis targets cell division loci and specifically recognizes L-Ala2-cross-bridged peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurushima, Jun; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriocin 41 (Bac41) is produced from clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and consists of two extracellular proteins, BacL1 and BacA. We previously reported that BacL1 protein (595 amino acids, 64.5 kDa) is a bacteriolytic peptidoglycan D-isoglutamyl-L-lysine endopeptidase that induces cell lysis of E. faecalis when an accessory factor, BacA, is copresent. However, the target of BacL1 remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the targeting specificity of BacL1. Fluorescence microscopy analysis using fluorescent dye-conjugated recombinant protein demonstrated that BacL1 specifically localized at the cell division-associated site, including the equatorial ring, division septum, and nascent cell wall, on the cell surface of target E. faecalis cells. This specific targeting was dependent on the triple repeat of the SH3 domain located in the region from amino acid 329 to 590 of BacL1. Repression of cell growth due to the stationary state of the growth phase or to treatment with bacteriostatic antibiotics rescued bacteria from the bacteriolytic activity of BacL1 and BacA. The static growth state also abolished the binding and targeting of BacL1 to the cell division-associated site. Furthermore, the targeting of BacL1 was detectable among Gram-positive bacteria with an L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridging peptidoglycan, including E. faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not among bacteria with alternate peptidoglycan structures, such as Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus aureus, or Listeria monocytogenes. These data suggest that BacL1 specifically targets the L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridged peptidoglycan and potentially lyses the E. faecalis cells during cell division. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Bacteriocin Protein BacL1 of Enterococcus faecalis Targets Cell Division Loci and Specifically Recognizes l-Ala2-Cross-Bridged Peptidoglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurushima, Jun; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishizaka, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriocin 41 (Bac41) is produced from clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and consists of two extracellular proteins, BacL1 and BacA. We previously reported that BacL1 protein (595 amino acids, 64.5 kDa) is a bacteriolytic peptidoglycan d-isoglutamyl-l-lysine endopeptidase that induces cell lysis of E. faecalis when an accessory factor, BacA, is copresent. However, the target of BacL1 remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the targeting specificity of BacL1. Fluorescence microscopy analysis using fluorescent dye-conjugated recombinant protein demonstrated that BacL1 specifically localized at the cell division-associated site, including the equatorial ring, division septum, and nascent cell wall, on the cell surface of target E. faecalis cells. This specific targeting was dependent on the triple repeat of the SH3 domain located in the region from amino acid 329 to 590 of BacL1. Repression of cell growth due to the stationary state of the growth phase or to treatment with bacteriostatic antibiotics rescued bacteria from the bacteriolytic activity of BacL1 and BacA. The static growth state also abolished the binding and targeting of BacL1 to the cell division-associated site. Furthermore, the targeting of BacL1 was detectable among Gram-positive bacteria with an l-Ala-l-Ala-cross-bridging peptidoglycan, including E. faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not among bacteria with alternate peptidoglycan structures, such as Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus aureus, or Listeria monocytogenes. These data suggest that BacL1 specifically targets the l-Ala-l-Ala-cross-bridged peptidoglycan and potentially lyses the E. faecalis cells during cell division. PMID:25368300

  20. Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers near St. Louis, Missouri, May 23–27, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2017-09-26

    Bathymetric and velocimetric data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, near 13 bridges at 8 highway crossings of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers in the greater St. Louis, Missouri, area from May 23 to 27, 2016. A multibeam echosounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches ranging from 1,640 to 1,970 feet longitudinally and extending laterally across the active channel from bank to bank during low to moderate flood flow conditions. These bathymetric surveys indicate the channel conditions at the time of the surveys and provide characteristics of scour holes that may be useful in the development of predictive guidelines or equations for scour holes. These data also may be useful to the Missouri Department of Transportation as a low to moderate flood flow comparison to help assess the bridges for stability and integrity issues with respect to bridge scour during floods.Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of water, and scour holes were observed at most surveyed piers. The observed scour holes at the surveyed bridges were examined with respect to shape and depth.The frontal slope values determined for scour holes observed in the current (2016) study generally are similar to recommended values in the literature and to values determined for scour holes in previous bathymetric surveys. Several of the structures had piers that were skewed to primary approach flow, as indicated by the scour hole being longer on the side of the pier with impinging flow, and some amount of deposition on the leeward side, as typically has been observed at piers skewed to approach flow; however, at most skewed piers in the current (2016) study, the scour hole was deeper on the leeward side of the pier. At most of these piers, the angled approach flow was the result of a deflection or contraction of flow caused by a spur dike

  1. Investigation and Taguchi Optimization of Microbial Fuel Cell Salt Bridge Dimensional Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Dhrupad; Barua, Parimal Bakul; Dey, Nabendu; Nath, Sumitro; Thakuria, Mrinmay; Mallick, Synthia

    2018-01-01

    One major problem of two chamber salt bridge microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is the high resistance offered by the salt bridge to anion flow. Many researchers who have studied and optimized various parameters related to salt bridge MFC, have not shed much light on the effect of salt bridge dimensional parameters on the MFC performance. Therefore, the main objective of this research is to investigate the effect of length and cross sectional area of salt bridge and the effect of solar radiation and atmospheric temperature on MFC current output. An experiment has been designed using Taguchi L9 orthogonal array, taking length and cross sectional area of salt bridge as factors having three levels. Nine MFCs were fabricated as per the nine trial conditions. Trials were conducted for 3 days and output current of each of the MFCs along with solar insolation and atmospheric temperature were recorded. Analysis of variance shows that salt bridge length has significant effect both on mean (with 53.90% contribution at 95% CL) and variance (with 56.46% contribution at 87% CL), whereas the effect of cross sectional area of the salt bridge and the interaction of these two factors is significant on mean only (with 95% CL). Optimum combination was found at 260 mm salt bridge length and 506.7 mm2 cross sectional area with 4.75 mA of mean output current. The temperature and solar insolation data when correlated with each of the MFCs average output current, revealed that both external factors have significant impact on MFC current output but the correlation coefficient varies from MFC to MFC depending on salt bridge dimensional parameters.

  2. Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri River between Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri, April-May, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Bathymetric and velocimetric data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, in the vicinity of 10 bridges at 9 highway crossings of the Missouri River between Lexington and Washington, Missouri, from April 22 through May 2, 2013. A multibeam echosounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches ranging from 1,640 to 1,840 feet longitudinally and extending laterally across the active channel between banks and spur dikes in the Missouri River during low- to moderate-flow conditions. These bathymetric surveys indicate the channel conditions at the time of the surveys and provide characteristics of scour holes that may be useful in the development of predictive guidelines or equations for scour holes. These data also may be useful to the Missouri Department of Transportation to assess the bridges for stability and integrity issues with respect to bridge scour during floods. Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of water or in very shallow water (less than about 6 feet). Scour holes were present at most piers for which bathymetry could be obtained, except at piers on channel banks, near or embedded in lateral or longitudinal spur dikes, and on exposed bedrock outcrops. Scour holes observed at the surveyed bridges were examined with respect to depth and shape. Although exposure of parts of foundational support elements was observed at several piers, at most sites the exposure likely can be considered minimal compared to the overall substructure that remains buried in channel-bed material; however, there were several notable exceptions where the bed material thickness between the bottom of the scour hole and bedrock was less than 6 feet. Such substantial exposure of usually buried substructural elements may warrant special observation in future flood events. Previous bathymetric surveys had been done at all of the

  3. Enhanced drug encapsulation and extended release profiles of calcium-alginate nanoparticles by using tannic acid as a bridging cross-linking agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulateefeh, Samer R; Taha, Mutasem O

    2015-01-01

    Calcium alginate nanoparticles (NPs) suffer from sub-optimal stability in bio-relevant media leading to low drug encapsulation efficiency and uncontrolled release profiles. To sort out these drawbacks, a novel approach is proposed herein based on introducing tannic acid into these NPs to act as a bridging cross-linking aid agent. Calcium-alginate NPs were prepared by the ionotropic gelation method and loaded with diltiazem hydrochloride as a model drug. These NPs were characterized in terms of particle size, zeta potential, and morphology, and results were explained in accordance with Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The incorporation of tannic acid led to more than four folds increase in drug encapsulation efficiency (i.e. from 15.3% to 69.5%) and reduced burst drug release from 44% to around 10% within the first 30 min. These findings suggest the possibility of improving the properties of Ca-alginate NPs by incorporating cross-linking aid agents under mild conditions.

  4. Causal Attributions for Health and Illness: A Cross-Cultural Contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruchovitch, Evely

    Researchers investigated the causal attributions for health and illness among 96 Brazilian elementary school students. Subjects were interviewed individually and their causal attributions were assessed through 14 true-false items (e.g. people stay well because they are lucky). The findings suggest that there may be more cross-cultural similarities…

  5. Calculation of gamma induced displacement cross-sections of iron considering positron contribution and using standard damage model

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuya, K

    2003-01-01

    The displacement cross-section of iron was calculated for gamma-ray irradiation with the energy range of 1 to 15 MeV, which corresponds to radiation fields in fission reactors. Three gamma-material interactions, Compton scattering, pair production and photoelectric effect were considered. The displacements induced by both electrons and positrons were included. For damage function the modified Kinchin-Pease model with the displacement energy of 40 eV was applied, which are used as the standard damage model in neutron-induced displacement calculations. The standard damage model gave a lower cross-section by a factor of 1.3 compared to Kinchin-Pease model, and the exact treatment of positron contribution gave a lower cross-section by a factor 1.1 compared to an approximation treating positrons as electrons. The present cross-section was lower by a factor of 1.1-2.0 than the cross-sections previously proposed in the literatures. (author)

  6. Joining Forces: A Study of Multinational Corporations' Sustainability Contributions to a Cross-Sector Social Partnership

    OpenAIRE

    Backman, Malin; Jangsell, Klas; Lönnqvist, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cross-sector social partnership (CSSP) is a joint effort that utilizes resources from different sectors to solve social issues, such as poverty, pandemics and environmental degradation. According to the United Nations, the environmental tipping point of global warming is soon reached, and to avoid this irreversible situation, the collaboration between state and non-state actors is a requirement. With extended resources gained from different sectors, the outcome of the CSSP is grea...

  7. Myocardial Bridging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myocardial bridging is rare. Myocardial bridges are most commonly localized in the middle segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The anatomic features of the bridges vary significantly. Alterations of the endothelial morphology and the vasoactive agents impact on the progression of atherosclerosis of myocardial bridging. Patients may present with chest pain, myocardial infarction, arrhythmia and even sudden death. Patients who respond poorly to the medical treatment with β-blockers warrant a surgical intervention. Myotomy is a preferred surgical procedure for the symptomatic patients. Coronary stent deployment has been in limited use due to the unsatisfactory long-term results.

  8. College Graduation Rates for Minority Students in a Selective Technical University: Will Participation in a Summer Bridge Program Contribute to Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Terrence E.; Gaughan, Monica; Hume, Robert; Moore, S. Gordon, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    There are many approaches to solving the problem of underrepresentation of some racial and ethnic groups and women in scientific and technical disciplines. Here, the authors evaluate the association of a summer bridge program with the graduation rate of underrepresented minority (URM) students at a selective technical university. They demonstrate…

  9. Crystallographic Characterization of Stepwise Changes in Ligand Conformations as Their Internal Topology Changes and Two Novel Cross-Bridged Tetraazamacrocyclic Copper(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubin, Timothy J.; McCormick, James M.; Alcock, Nathaniel W.; Clase, Howard J.; Busch, Daryle H.

    1999-10-04

    The parallel syntheses of two new cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic complexes whose ligands are derived from 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (cyclam = 14N4) and rac-1,4,8,11-tetraaza-5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethylcyclotetradecane (tetB = 14N4Me(6)) have been characterized through the crystal structure determination of every stepwise intermediate ligand in the multistep ligand syntheses. These structures show that although the final ligand skeletons are nearly identical, the immediate precursors differ greatly because of the six additional methyl groups of the 14N4Me(6) macrocycle. The inversion from one diastereomer to another of the tetracycle derived from rac-14N4Me(6) has been chemically induced through the successive addition of methyl groups to the reactive tertiary nitrogens, and the novel heterocycles produced have been crystallographically characterized with one showing a conformation not previously known for these systems. The structures of the two copper(II) complexes have significant geometrical differences, and accordingly, their electrochemical and spectroscopic properties are compared. The complexes exhibit remarkable kinetic stability under harsh conditions.

  10. The Role of Parvalbumin, Sarcoplasmatic Reticulum Calcium Pump Rate, Rates of Cross-Bridge Dynamics, and Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Current on Peripheral Muscle Fatigue: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Verena

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of the excitation-contraction pathway, which has previously been validated for slow-twitch and fast-twitch skeletal muscles, is employed to investigate key biophysical processes leading to peripheral muscle fatigue. Special emphasis hereby is on investigating how the model's original parameter sets can be interpolated such that realistic behaviour with respect to contraction time and fatigue progression can be obtained for a continuous distribution of the model's parameters across the muscle units, as found for the functional properties of muscles. The parameters are divided into 5 groups describing (i) the sarcoplasmatic reticulum calcium pump rate, (ii) the cross-bridge dynamics rates, (iii) the ryanodine receptor calcium current, (iv) the rates of binding of magnesium and calcium ions to parvalbumin and corresponding dissociations, and (v) the remaining processes. The simulations reveal that the first two parameter groups are sensitive to contraction time but not fatigue, the third parameter group affects both considered properties, and the fourth parameter group is only sensitive to fatigue progression. Hence, within the scope of the underlying model, further experimental studies should investigate parvalbumin dynamics and the ryanodine receptor calcium current to enhance the understanding of peripheral muscle fatigue. PMID:27980606

  11. Effects of surface roughness and cross-sectional distortions on the wind-induced response of bridge cables in dry conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoni, Giulia; Georgakis, Christos T.

    drag and lift coefficients. The present study focuses on the dynamic response of a full-scale yawed bridge cable section model, for varying Reynolds numbers and wind angles-of-attack. Tests results show that the in-plane aerodynamic damping of the bridge cable section, and the overall dynamic response......Theoretical and experimental investigations to date assumed that bridge stay cables can be modelled as ideal circular cylinders and that their aerodynamic coefficients are invariant with wind angle-of-attack. These changes are neglected when the potential for bridge cable instability is evaluated...

  12. Cross-reactive Carbohydrate Determinant Contributes to the False Positive IgE Antibody to Peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komei Ito

    2005-01-01

    Conclusions: Social education about the features of peanut allergy is needed in Japan. Anti-CCD IgE antibody was suggested to be one of the mechanisms contributing to the false positive detection of peanut IgE. Detection of anti-HRP or anti-bromelain IgE can be a useful tool to recognize the presence of anti-CCD antibodies.

  13. Bridging cross-cultural gaps: monitoring herbal use during chemotherapy in patients referred to integrative medicine consultation in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Limor; Lev, Efraim; Schiff, Elad; Linn, Shai; Ben-Arye, Eran

    2014-10-01

    The high prevalence of the use of traditional herbs among patients with cancer is a cause for concern with regard to potentially adverse interactions with conventional oncology treatments. In this study, we explore herbal use among patients with cancer in northern Israel who are referred by their health care providers to complementary and traditional medicine (CTM) consultations provided to them within the conventional oncology department. The study's objectives were to identify which herbs patients use and to examine the scope of current research on the efficacy and safety regarding the identified herbs. Herbal use by patients receiving oncology care was assessed prospectively from July 2009 to July 2012 by integrative physicians (IPs) trained in herbal medicine. Historical, ethnobotanical, basic research, and clinical data regarding the identified herbs were explored by using a keyword search in PubMed and Middle Eastern ethnohistorical literature. Disclosure of herbal use was reported by 154 of the 305 patients (50.5 %) interviewed by IPs. The use of 85 single herbs and 30 different herbal formulas was documented during the initial or follow-up IP assessments. Patients reported 14 quality of life-associated indications for herbal use. The ten most prevalent herbs displaying in vitro/in vivo anticancer activity and nine other herbs were preliminarily assessed concerning potential risks, safety, and interaction with chemotherapy. Herbal use by patients with cancer in northern Israel is widespread and calls for further study in order to address issues of safety and effectiveness. We recommend constructing a multinational and multidisciplinary team of researchers with ethnopharmacological and clinical expertise that will explore the use of herbs among patients with cancer in a cross-cultural perspective attuned with patients' affinity to traditional herbal medicine.

  14. Morphological aspects of myocardial bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almira Lujinović

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although some myocardial bridges can be asymptomatic, their presence often causes coronary disease either through direct compression of the “tunnel” segment or through stimulation and accelerated development of atherosclerosis in the segment proximally to the myocardial bridge. The studied material contained 30 human hearts received from the Department of Anatomy. The hearts were preserved 3 to 5 days in 10% formalin solution. Thereafter, the fatty tissue was removed and arterial blood vessels prepared by careful dissection with special reference to the presence of the myocardial bridges. Length and thickness of the bridges were measured by the precise electronic caliper. The angle between the myocardial bridge fibre axis and other axis of the crossed blood vessel was measured by a goniometer. The presence of the bridges was confirmed in 53.33% of the researched material, most frequently (43.33% above the anterior interventricular branch. The mean length of the bridges was 14.64±9.03 mm and the mean thickness was 1.23±1.32 mm. Myocardial bridge fibres pass over the descending blood vessel at the angle of 10-90 degrees. The results obtained on a limited sample suggest that the muscular index of myocardial bridge is the highest for bridges located on RIA, but that the difference is not significant in relation to bridges located on other branches. The results obtained suggest that bridges located on other branches, not only those on RIA, could have a great contractive power and, consequently, a great compressive force, which would be exerted on the wall of a crossed blood vessel.

  15. Airway inflammation contributes to health status in COPD: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauffman Henk F

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by irreversible airflow limitation and airway inflammation, accompanied by decreased health status. It is still unknown which factors are responsible for the impaired health status in COPD. We postulated that airway inflammation negatively contributes to health status in COPD. Methods In 114 COPD patients (99 male, age: 62 ± 8 yr, 41 [31–55] pack-years, no inhaled or oral corticosteroids, postbronchodilator FEV1: 63 ± 9% pred, FEV1/IVC: 48 ± 9% we obtained induced sputum and measured health status (St. George's respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ, postbronchodilator FEV1, hyperinflation (RV/TLC, and airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine (PC20. Sputum was induced by hypertonic saline and differential cell counts were obtained in 102 patients. Results Univariate analysis showed that SGRQ total and symptom score were positively associated with % sputum macrophages (r = 0.20, p = 0.05; and r = 0.20, p = 0.04, respectively. Multiple regression analysis confirmed these relationships, providing significant contributions of % sputum macrophages (B = 0.25, p = 0.021 and RV/TLC (B = 0.60, p = 0.002 to SGRQ total score. Furthermore, SGRQ symptom score was associated with % sputum macrophages (B = 0.30, p = 0.03 and RV/TLC (B = 0.48, p = 0.044, whilst SGRQ activity score was associated with % sputum macrophages (B = 0.46, p = 0.002, RV/TLC (B = 0.61, p = 0.015, and PC20 (B = -9.3, p = 0.024. Current smoking and FEV1 were not significantly associated with health status in the multiple regression analysis. Conclusion We conclude that worse health status in COPD patients is associated with higher inflammatory cell counts in induced sputum. Our findings suggest that airway inflammation and hyperinflation independently contribute to impaired health status in COPD. This may provide a rationale for anti-inflammatory therapy in this disease.

  16. Social support contributes to resilience among physiotherapy students: a cross sectional survey and focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bíró, Éva; Veres-Balajti, Ilona; Kósa, Karolina

    2016-06-01

    The present study, taking a resource-oriented approach to mental health, aimed at investigating mental resilience and its determinants among undergraduate physiotherapy students using quantitative and qualitative tools. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey supplemented by 2 focus groups. One university in Hungary. 130 physiotherapy students at years 1, 2, and 3. Sense of coherence, a measure of dynamic self-esteem, as well as social support from family and peers were used to assess mental well-being. A screening instrument for psychological morbidity and perceived stress were used as deficiency-oriented approaches. Student opinions were gathered on positive and negative determinants of mental health. Resilience was lower [mean difference 4.8 (95% CI -3.4; 13.1)], and the occurrence of psychological morbidity (32.5% vs. 0%) was higher among female compared to male students. However, the proportion of students fully supported by their peers was higher among females (63% vs. 37.5%). Female students, unlike their male counterparts, experienced higher stress compared to their peers in the general population. Social support declined as students progressed in their studies though this proved to be the most important protective factor for their mental well-being. Results were fed back to the course organizers recommending the implementation of an evidence-based method to improve social support as delineated by the Guide to Community Preventive Services of the US the outcomes of which are to be seen in the future. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bridge Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper bridge management systems are discussed with special emphasis on management systems for reinforced concrete bridges. Management systems for prestressed concrete bridges, steel bridges, or composite bridges can be developed in a similar way....

  18. Monopicolinate cross-bridged cyclam combining very fast complexation with very high stability and inertness of its copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luís M P; Halime, Zakaria; Marion, Ronan; Camus, Nathalie; Delgado, Rita; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Tripier, Raphaël

    2014-05-19

    The synthesis of a new cross-bridged 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (cb-cyclam) derivative bearing a picolinate arm (Hcb-te1pa) was achieved by taking advantage of the proton sponge properties of the starting constrained macrocycle. The structure of the reinforced ligand as well as its acid-base properties and coordination properties with Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) was investigated. The X-ray structure of the free ligand showed a completely preorganized conformation that lead to very fast copper(II) complexation under mild conditions (instantaneous at pH 7.4) or even in acidic pH (3 min at pH 5) at room temperature and that demonstrated high thermodynamic stability, which was measured by potentiometry (at 25 °C and 0.10 M in KNO3). The results also revealed that the complex exists as a monopositive copper(II) species in the intermediate pH range. A comparative study highlighted the important selectivity for Cu(2+) over Zn(2+). The copper(II) complex was synthesized and investigated in solution using different spectroscopic techniques and DFT calculations. The kinetic inertness of the copper(II) complex in acidic medium was evaluated by spectrophotometry, revealing the very slow dissociation of the complex. The half-life of 96 days, in 5 M HClO4, and 465 min, in 5 M HCl at 25 °C, show the high kinetic stability of the copper(II) chelate compared to that of the corresponding complexes of other macrocyclic ligands. Additionally, cyclic voltammetry experiments underlined the perfect electrochemical inertness of the complex as well as the quasi-reversible Cu(2+)/Cu(+) redox system. The coordination geometry of the copper center in the complex was established in aqueous solution from UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies.

  19. Expression of tropomyosin-κ induces dilated cardiomyopathy and depresses cardiac myofilament tension by mechanisms involving cross-bridge dependent activation and altered tropomyosin phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Chehade N; Warren, Chad M; Rajan, Sudarsan; de Tombe, Pieter P; Wieczorek, David F; Solaro, R John

    2011-03-01

    Tropomyosin-kappa (TPM1-κ) is a newly discovered tropomyosin (TM) isoform that is exclusively expressed in the human heart and generated by an alternative splicing of the α-TM gene. We reported that TPM1-κ expression was increased in the hearts of patients with chronic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). To increase our understanding of the significance of this shift in isoform population, we generated transgenic (TG) mice expressing TPM1-κ in the cardiac compartment where TPM1-κ replaces 90% of the native TM. We previously showed that there was a significant inhibition of the ability of strongly bound cross-bridges to induce activation of TG myofilaments (Rajan et al., Circulation 121:410-418, 2010). Here, we compared the force-Ca(2+) relations in detergent extracted (skinned) fiber bundles isolated from non-transgenic (NTG) and TG-TPM1-κ hearts at two sarcomere lengths (SLs). Our data demonstrated a significant decrease in the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the myofilaments from TG-TPM1-κ hearts with no change in the maximum developed tension, length-dependent activation, and the ratio of ATPase rate to tension. There was also no difference in the affinity and cooperativity of Ca(2+)-binding to troponin in thin filaments reconstituted with either TPM1-κ or α-TM. We also compared protein phosphorylation in NTG and TG-TPM1-κ myofilaments. There was a decrease in the total phosphorylation of TPM1-κ compared to α-TM, but no significant change in other major sarcomeric proteins. Our results identify a novel mode of myofilament desensitization to Ca(2+) associated with a DCM linked switch in TM isoform population.

  20. Bridging history and social psychology: what, how and why.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glăveanu, Vlad; Yamamoto, Koji

    2012-12-01

    This special issue aims to bridge history and social psychology by bringing together historians and social psychologists in an exercise of reading and learning from each other's work. This interdisciplinary exercise is not only timely but of great importance for both disciplines. Social psychologists can benefit from engaging with historical sources by being able to contextualise their findings and enrich their theoretical models. It is not only that all social and psychological phenomena have a history but this history is very much part of present-day and future developments. On the other hand historians can enhance their analysis of historical sources by drawing upon the conceptual tools developed in social psychology. They can "test" these tools and contribute to their validation and enrichment from completely different perspectives. Most important, as contributions to this special issue amply demonstrate, psychology's "historical turn" has the potential to shed a new light on striking, yet underexplored, similarities between contemporary public spheres and their pre-modern counterparts. This issue thereby calls into question the dichotomy between traditional and de-traditionalized societies-a distinction that lies at the heart of many social psychology accounts of the world we live in. The present editorial will introduce and consider this act of bridging history and social psychology by focusing on three main questions: What is the bridge made of? How can the two disciplines be bridged? and Why we cross this interdisciplinary bridge? In the end a reflection on the future of this collaboration will be offered.

  1. The contributing factors to poor sleep experiences in according to the university students: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Insaf; Cınar, Nursan; Dede, Cemile

    2012-06-01

    Sleep problems among university students are common; however, the contributing factors to poor sleep experiences are still unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine the contributing factors to poor sleep experiences in university students. The study was cross-sectional, and the students completed self-report, anonymous questionnaires provided during an in-class survey. This is a single center study. A descriptive survey was conducted randomly on 256 university students in Turkey. The instruments for data collection consisted of the demographic data, and the contributing factors to poor sleep. The most frequent self-reported cause to poor sleep experiences in according to the university students were exposure psychological problems (67.2%), stress (64.8%), exposure to tobacco smoke in the sleeping room (63,7%), pain (62,9%), having family problems (62,5%), being patient (55,1%), air quality of the room (55,1%), strenuous physical activity (53,9%), fatigue (53,5%), sadness (53,1%), noise that caused by other people in the room (52.0%), room scents (sweat, perfume, humidity, naphthalene, etc.) (53.1%), depression (51, 6 %), anxiety, and tension (51, 1%). Students should be encouraged to solve psychological problems, to suitable stress-relieving measures, to follow sleep hygiene practice and adequate time management for academic and social activities.

  2. The contributing factors to poor sleep experiences in according to the university students: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insaf Altun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep problems among university students are common; however, the contributing factors to poor sleep experiences are still unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine the contributing factors to poor sleep experiences in university students. Materials and Methods: The study was cross-sectional, and the students completed self-report, anonymous questionnaires provided during an in-class survey. This is a single center study. A descriptive survey was conducted randomly on 256 university students in Turkey. The instruments for data collection consisted of the demographic data, and the contributing factors to poor sleep. Results: The most frequent self-reported cause to poor sleep experiences in according to the university students were exposure psychological problems (67.2%, stress (64.8%, exposure to tobacco smoke in the sleeping room (63,7%, pain (62,9%, having family problems (62,5%, being patient (55,1%, air quality of the room (55,1%, strenuous physical activity (53,9%, fatigue (53,5%, sadness (53,1%, noise that caused by other people in the room (52.0%, room scents (sweat, perfume, humidity, naphthalene, etc. (53.1%, depression (51, 6 %, anxiety, and tension (51, 1%. Conclusion: Students should be encouraged to solve psychological problems, to suitable stress-relieving measures, to follow sleep hygiene practice and adequate time management for academic and social activities.

  3. Effects of surface roughness and cross-sectional distortion on the wind-induced response of bridge cables in dry conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoni, G.; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2015-01-01

    by local alterations of their inherent surface roughness and shape. Small deviations from ideal circularity result in significant changes in the static drag and lift coefficients with Reynolds number. The present study focuses on the wind-induced response of a full-scale yawed bridge cable section model......, for varying Reynolds numbers and wind angles-of-attack. Using passive-dynamic wind tunnel tests, it is shown that the in-plane aerodynamic damping of a bridge cable section, and the overall dynamic response, is strongly affected by changes in the wind angle-of-attack. Using the drag and lift coefficients......Theoretical and experimental investigations to date have assumed that bridge stay cables can be modelled as ideal circular cylinders and that their aerodynamic coefficients are invariant with wind angle-of-attack. On the other hand it has been demonstrated that bridge cables are characterised...

  4. Istanbul Bridge Conference 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Gülkan, Polat; Mahmoud, Khaled

    2016-01-01

      The book includes peer-reviewed contributions selected from presentations given at the Istanbul Bridge Conference 2014, held from August 11 – 13 in Istanbul, Turkey. It reports on the current challenges in bridge engineering faced by professionals around the globe, giving a special emphasis to recently developed techniques, innovations and opportunities. The book covers key topics in the field, including modeling and analysis methods; construction and erection techniques; design for extreme events and condition assessment and structural health monitoring. There is a balanced presentation of theory, research and practice. This book, which provides the readers with a comprehensive and timely reference guide on current practices in bridge engineering, is intended for professionals, academic researchers and students alike.

  5. Aerodynamics of the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi: how a bluff body cross-sectional shape contributes to gliding performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Daniel; Socha, John J; Cardwell, Nicholas D; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-02-01

    A prominent feature of gliding flight in snakes of the genus Chrysopelea is the unique cross-sectional shape of the body, which acts as the lifting surface in the absence of wings. When gliding, the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi morphs its circular cross-section into a triangular shape by splaying its ribs and flattening its body in the dorsoventral axis, forming a geometry with fore-aft symmetry and a thick profile. Here, we aimed to understand the aerodynamic properties of the snake's cross-sectional shape to determine its contribution to gliding at low Reynolds numbers. We used a straight physical model in a water tunnel to isolate the effects of 2D shape, analogously to studying the profile of an airfoil of a more typical flyer. Force measurements and time-resolved (TR) digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) were used to determine lift and drag coefficients, wake dynamics and vortex-shedding characteristics of the shape across a behaviorally relevant range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. The snake's cross-sectional shape produced a maximum lift coefficient of 1.9 and maximum lift-to-drag ratio of 2.7, maintained increases in lift up to 35 deg, and exhibited two distinctly different vortex-shedding modes. Within the measured Reynolds number regime (Re=3000-15,000), this geometry generated significantly larger maximum lift coefficients than many other shapes including bluff bodies, thick airfoils, symmetric airfoils and circular arc airfoils. In addition, the snake's shape exhibited a gentle stall region that maintained relatively high lift production even up to the highest angle of attack tested (60 deg). Overall, the cross-sectional geometry of the flying snake demonstrated robust aerodynamic behavior by maintaining significant lift production and near-maximum lift-to-drag ratios over a wide range of parameters. These aerodynamic characteristics help to explain how the snake can glide at steep angles and over a wide range of angles of attack

  6. National Bridge Inventory (NBI) Bridges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The NBI is a collection of information (database) describing the more than 600,000 of the Nation's bridges located on public roads, including Interstate Highways,...

  7. How Do Different Cognitive and Linguistic Variables Contribute to Reading in Arabic? A Cross-Sectional Study from First to Sixth Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Ibrahim A.; Khateb, Asaid; Ibrahim, Raphiq; Taha, Haitham

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of linguistic and cognitive variables to reading processes might vary depending on the particularities of the languages studied. This view is thought to be particularly true for Arabic which is a diglossic language and has particular orthographic and morpho-syntactic systems. This cross-sectional study examined the contribution of…

  8. The contribution of lifestyle factors to depressive symptoms: A cross-sectional study in Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Qi, Juan; Yang, Yi; Wen, Xiaozhong

    2016-11-30

    It is well known that some lifestyle factors are related to depression, but their cumulative contribution to the depression remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the importance of multiple lifestyle factors in contributing to depressive symptoms among Chinese college students. Between September and December in 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional study among 1907 Chinese college students from Guangzhou, Southern China. College students completed self-administered questionnaires and reported their lifestyle factors including sleep quality and duration, Internet use, smoking, drinking, exercise, outdoor activity or sunlight exposure, and eating breakfast. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms were defined as the CES-D score ≥16. Among all the students, 29.7% reported mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms. Higher quality and longer duration of sleep, more exercises, more outdoor activities or sunlight exposures, and eating breakfast daily were associated with a lower CES-D score, which could explain 11.3% of variance of the CES-D score, after adjusting for socio-demographics, family history, interpersonal relationship, and academic characteristics using hierarchical multivariable linear regression. These associations were comparable between males and females. The protective role of healthy lifestyles should be considered in intervention programs for improving mental health among college students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The contribution of traditional healers' clinics to public health care system in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhan Wubet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethiopian people have been using traditional medicine since time immemorial with 80% of its population dependent on traditional medicines. However, the documentation of traditional healers' clinics contribution to modern public health system in cosmopolitan cities is scanty. Studies conducted so far are limited and focused on the perceptions and practices of modern and traditional health practitioners about traditional medicine. Thus, a cross sectional study was conducted from February to May 2010 to assess the contribution of traditional healers' clinics to public health care system in Addis Ababa. Materials and methods Ten traditional healers who were willing to participate in the study and 306 patients who were visiting these traditional healers' clinics were interviewed using two types of semi-structured questionnaires. Data were summarized using percentages, tables and bar chart. Results The diseases mostly treated by traditional healers were wound, inflammation, herpes zoster, hemorrhoids, fracture, paralysis, back-pain, liver diseases, cancer and eczema. This study showed that traditional healers' clinics considerably contribute to public health care in Addis Ababa. Fifty two percent of patients reported that traditional healers' clinics were their first choice when they faced health problems. The reasons for visiting these clinics were 175 (57.2% efficacy, 109 (35.6% dissatisfaction with modern medicine, 10 (3.3% dissatisfaction with modern medicine and efficacy, 6 (2.0% cost and 6 (2.0% dissatisfaction and cost. Females (55.2%, young age (20-40 years, 65.0%, never married (56.9%, orthodox (73.9%, Amhara (52.3%, educational status above grade 12 (34.6% and government employees (29.4% were frequent visitors. Healers reported that there was no form of cooperation with modern health professionals. The reasons were lack of motivation to collaborate and communicate with modern health service workers. Family based

  10. Building Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The report Building Bridges adresses the questions why, how and for whom academic audience research has public value, from the different points of view of the four working groups in the COST Action IS0906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies – “New Media Genres, Media Literacy and Trust...... in the Media”, “Audience Interactivity and Participation”, “The Role of Media and ICT Use for Evolving Social Relationships” and “Audience Transformations and Social Integration”. Building Bridges is the result of an ongoing dialogue between the Action and non-academic stakeholders in the field of audience...

  11. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  12. Daily intake of dairy products in Brazil and contributions to nutrient intakes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Mary M; Barraj, Leila M; Toth, Lindsey D; Harkness, Laura S; Bolster, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    Dairy products are sources of protein and micronutrients important in a healthy diet. The purpose of the present analysis was to estimate consumption of dairy products by Brazilians and identify contributions of dairy products to nutrient intakes. Dairy consumption data were obtained from 24 h dietary records. Dairy products were defined as milk (including flavoured), cheese and yoghurt. Estimates of dairy product intakes were generated for all individuals, individuals in urban and rural households and for age groups 10-18 years, 19-59 years and ≥60 years. Contributions to nutrient intakes were estimated for the total sample and sub-populations. Nationwide cross-sectional survey, 2008-2009. Nationally representative sample of individuals aged ≥10 years in the Individual Food Intake survey, a component of the Brazilian Household Budget Survey (n 34 003). Among individuals aged ≥10 years, per capita intake of dairy products was 142 (se 2.1) g/d. Dairy product intake was higher among individuals in urban compared with rural areas and among groups 10-18 years and ≥60 years compared with adults aged 19-59 years. Dairy products accounted for 6.1% of daily energy intake, 7.3% of protein, 16.9% of saturated fat, 11.1% and 4.3% of total and added sugars, respectively, and 10.2-37.9% of daily Ca, vitamin D, P, vitamin A and K. Dairy products were substantial contributors to daily intakes of selected nutrients of concern in Brazil, although mean daily dairy product consumption was less than a typical portion. Education efforts in Brazil to raise awareness about the nutritional role of dairy foods may serve to improve overall diet quality.

  13. Bridging the divide between fire safety research and fighting fire safely: How do we convey research innovation to contribute more effectively to wildland firefighter safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore Ted Adams; Bret W. Butler; Sara Brown; Vita Wright; Anne Black

    2017-01-01

    Creating a safe workplace for wildland firefighters has long been at the centre of discussion for researchers and practitioners. The goal of wildland fire safety research has been to protect operational firefighters, yet its contributions often fall short of potential because much is getting lost in the translation of peer-reviewed results to potential and intended...

  14. Mathematical bridges

    CERN Document Server

    Andreescu, Titu; Tetiva, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Building bridges between classical results and contemporary nonstandard problems, Mathematical Bridges embraces important topics in analysis and algebra from a problem-solving perspective. Blending old and new techniques, tactics and strategies used in solving challenging mathematical problems, readers will discover numerous genuine mathematical gems throughout that will heighten their appreciation of the inherent beauty of mathematics. Most of the problems are original to the authors and are intertwined in a well-motivated exposition driven by representative examples. The book is structured to assist the reader in formulating and proving conjectures, as well as devising solutions to important mathematical problems by making connections between various concepts and ideas from different areas of mathematics. Instructors and educators teaching problem-solving courses or organizing mathematics clubs, as well as motivated mathematics students from high school juniors to college seniors, will find Mathematical Bri...

  15. Planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, A.D.; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Skieller, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    Until now, the planar Hall effect has been studied in samples with cross-shaped Hall geometry. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the planar Hall effect can be observed for an exchange-biased ferromagnetic material in a Wheatstone bridge topology and that the sensor signal can...... Hall effect bridge sensors....

  16. Medication Adherence Contributes to an Improved Quality of Life in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfian, Sofa D; Sukandar, Hadyana; Lestari, Keri; Abdulah, Rizky

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with a high prevalence world wide. This disease has also been reported to affect the quality of life (QOL) of the patient and their family due to its chronic nature and multi organ involvement. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between adherence to prescribed diabetes medication and diabetes-specific QOL in patients attending Secondary Health Care Facility in Bandung City, Indonesia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Secondary Health Care Facility in Bandung City, Indonesia. Data were collected between February and April 2014 using consecutive sampling. Adherence was assessed using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale while diabetes-specific-QOL was assessed using the Diabetes 39 instrument. The results showed that among the patients, 49.4% exhibited low adherence, 29.7% exhibited medium adherence, and 20.9% exhibited high adherence to diabetes medication. Diabetes-specific QOL proved to be highly affected in the sexual functioning domain. Social-burden domain scores were better than overall QOL scores. There was a significant association between adherence and diabetes-specific QOL (p = 0.009) using The Kruskall-Wallis test of significance. The results of the post hoc Mann-Whitney tests (high vs medium adherence, p = 0.084; medium vs low adherence, p = 0.86; and high vs low adherence, p = 0.001) indicated that higher adherence to prescribed diabetes medication contributed to an improved QOL. Multiple regression analysis showed that the predictors of diabetes-specific QOL were adherence and patient income. Adherence to prescribed medication showed a positive effect on diabetes-specific QOL in patients. Patients with a high adherence to medication had an improved QOL. This result is important not only in developing intervention programs for patients but also in improving their QOL through sustainable health promotion.

  17. Contributions of Racial and Sociobehavioral Homophily to Friendship Stability and Quality among Same-Race and Cross-Race Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kristina L.; Dashiell-Aje, Ebony; Menzer, Melissa M.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Oh, Wonjung; Bowker, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined how racial and sociobehavioral similarities were associated with friendship stability and friendship quality. Cross-race friends were not significantly similar to each other in peer-nominated shyness/withdrawal, victimization, exclusion, and popularity/sociability. Relative to same-race friends, cross-race friends were…

  18. Practice write-ups: an assessment instrument that contributes to bridging the differences between theory and practice for student nurses through the development of core skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, K J

    1997-02-01

    Nurse education currently faces two major challenges. The first involves deciding the best way to increase the skill level of practitioners and the second involves determining how this can be achieved within a culture of lifetime learning. Each of these challenges needs to be confronted as early as possible and preferably at undergraduate level. Practice write-ups (PWUs) enable students to demonstrate competence in a range of core nursing skills. Although PWUs are essentially an assessment instrument, they are underlined by an educational commitment to encourage students to be reflective in their practice. In doing so students should be able to question existing strategies for implementing care and decide whether care is appropriate and contributing to the well-being of the patient.

  19. Cross-cultural and cross-temporal explanations of drinking behavior: contributions from epidemiology, life-span developmental psychology and the sociology of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartka, E; Fillmore, K M

    1989-12-01

    A review is presented of the contributions to understanding historical and cultural variation in drinking practices from three disciplines--epidemiology, life-span developmental psychology and the sociology of aging. It is concluded that while these disciplines have made major methodological contributions to understanding these variations, theory is lacking. Reasons for the paucity of theory and the lack of hypotheses are advanced, as are frameworks in which to test competitive hypotheses across temporal and cultural boundaries.

  20. Salt-bridge energetics in halophilic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Nayek

    Full Text Available Halophilic proteins have greater abundance of acidic over basic and very low bulky hydrophobic residues. Classical electrostatic stabilization was suggested as the key determinant for halophilic adaptation of protein. However, contribution of specific electrostatic interactions (i.e. salt-bridges to overall stability of halophilic proteins is yet to be understood. To understand this, we use Adaptive-Poison-Boltzmann-Solver Methods along with our home-built automation to workout net as well as associated component energy terms such as desolvation energy, bridge energy and background energy for 275 salt-bridges from 20 extremely halophilic proteins. We then perform extensive statistical analysis on general and energetic attributes on these salt-bridges. On average, 8 salt-bridges per 150 residues protein were observed which is almost twice than earlier report. Overall contributions of salt-bridges are -3.0 kcal mol-1. Majority (78% of salt-bridges in our dataset are stable and conserved in nature. Although, average contributions of component energy terms are equal, their individual details vary greatly from one another indicating their sensitivity to local micro-environment. Notably, 35% of salt-bridges in our database are buried and stable. Greater desolvation penalty of these buried salt-bridges are counteracted by stable network salt-bridges apart from favorable equal contributions of bridge and background terms. Recruitment of extensive network salt-bridges (46% with a net contribution of -5.0 kcal mol-1 per salt-bridge, seems to be a halophilic design wherein favorable average contribution of background term (-10 kcal mol-1 exceeds than that of bridge term (-7 kcal mol-1. Interiors of proteins from halophiles are seen to possess relatively higher abundance of charge and polar side chains than that of mesophiles which seems to be satisfied by cooperative network salt-bridges. Overall, our theoretical analyses provide insight into halophilic

  1. Bridge resource program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The mission of Rutgers Universitys Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation (CAIT) Bridge Resource Program (BRP) is to provide bridge engineering support to the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT)s Bridge Engineering an...

  2. Aerodynamics of the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi: how a bluff body cross-sectional shape contributes to gliding performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holden, Daniel; Socha, John J; Cardwell, Nicholas D; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-01-01

    .... When gliding, the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi morphs its circular cross-section into a triangular shape by splaying its ribs and flattening its body in the dorsoventral axis, forming a geometry...

  3. T-section glulam timber bridge modules : modeling and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul A. Morgan; Steven E. Taylor; Michael A. Ritter; John M. Franklin

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling, and testing of two portable timber bridges, each consisting of two noninterconnected longitudinal glued-laminated timber (glulam) deck panels 1.8 m (6 ft) wide. One bridge is 12.2 m (40 ft) long while the other bridge is 10.7 m (35 ft) long. The deck panels are fabricated in a unique double-tee cross section. The bridges...

  4. 75 FR 39555 - Environmental Impact Statement; Fort Hamer Bridge, Manatee County, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... River Road. We request your comments on environmental concerns related to a new bridge over the Manatee... SECURITY Coast Guard Environmental Impact Statement; Fort Hamer Bridge, Manatee County, FL AGENCY: Coast... Guard announces its intent to prepare an EIS for a proposed new bridge (Fort Hamer Bridge) crossing over...

  5. Rugby versus Soccer in South Africa: Content Familiarity Contributes to Cross-Cultural Differences in Cognitive Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malda, Maike; van de Vijver, Fons J. R.; Temane, Q. Michael

    2010-01-01

    In this study, cross-cultural differences in cognitive test scores are hypothesized to depend on a test's cultural complexity (Cultural Complexity Hypothesis: CCH), here conceptualized as its content familiarity, rather than on its cognitive complexity (Spearman's Hypothesis: SH). The content familiarity of tests assessing short-term memory,…

  6. A Cross-Cultural Perspective of Teachers' Perceptions: What Contributions Are Exchanged between Cooperating Teachers and Student Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinard, Linda M.; Miron, Louis; Ariav, Tamar; Botzer, Iris; Conroy, Judy; Laycock, Kathy; Yule, Kathy

    The University of California Irvine (UCI) and Beit Berl College (BBC) in Israel developed an action research project with cooperating teachers at their Professional Development Schools. This paper examines perceptions of UCI and BBC cooperating teachers within each culture and across cultures regarding: (1) contributions teachers provide to…

  7. 2n megagametophyte formed via SDR contributes to tetraploidization in polyembryonic 'Nadorcott' tangor crossed by citrus allotetraploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kai-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Pei; Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Liang, Wu-Jun; Xu, Qiang; Grosser, Jude W; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2014-10-01

    2 n megagametophyte formation plays an important role in polyploidization in polyembryonic citrus and is valuable for plant improvement. Tetraploid plants are frequently observed in the seedlings of diploid polyembryonic citrus genotypes. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation of tetraploids are still indistinct when apomictic citrus genotypes are used as female parent to cross with tetraploids. Herein, 54 tetraploid progenies, which were unexpectedly obtained previously from four 2x × 4x crosses using polyembryonic 'Nadorcott' tangor as seed parent, were analyzed by 22 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, aiming to reveal their genetic origin and the mechanism underlying 2n megagametophyte formation. The results showed that 13 tetraploids from all these four crosses were doubled diploids as indicated by their identical SSR allelic profile with their female parent; while the remaining 41 tetraploids apparently exhibited paternally derived alleles, which confirmed their zygotic origin. Furthermore, the genotyping of all hybrids indicated that all of them arose from 2n megagametophytes. Based on the genotypes of 2n megagametophytes, the analysis of maternal heterozygosity restitution (HR) for each marker showed that it varied from 0.00 to 87.80 % with a mean value of 40.89 %. In addition, it was observed that 13 markers displayed a lower rate than 50 %. On the basis of the above results, it can be speculated that the second division restitution (SDR) is the mechanism underlying the 2n megagametophyte formation in 'Nadorcott' tangor. The elucidation of the mechanism of 2n megagametophyte formation will be of great help to optimize further sexual hybridization for polyploids in citrus.

  8. Order $\\alpha_s^{2}$ contributions to the Drell-Yan cross section at fixed target energies

    OpenAIRE

    Rijken, P. J.; van Neerven, W. L.

    1994-01-01

    {}From the literature one infers that the bulk of the order $\\alpha_{s}$ corrections to the Drell-Yan cross sections $d\\sigma/dm$ and $m^{3}d^{2}\\sigma/dmdx_{F}$ is constituted by the soft plus virtual gluon part of the coefficient function. In the case of $d\\sigma/dm$ it can be shown that at fixed target energies the effect of the exact order $\\alpha_{s}^{2}$ corrected coefficient function is very well approximated by its soft plus virtual gluon part. Since the complete order $\\alpha_{s}^{2}...

  9. Bridging boundaries: CORBA in perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Vinny; Baker, Sean; Nixon, Paddy

    1997-01-01

    peer-reviewed peer-reviewed applications that cross the boundaries of different computing machines, operating systems, and programming languages are increasingly the norm. As a result, the need for what might be called ???bridging technologies??? to develop software that works across heterogeneous environments has become more compelling. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture is one such technology that is both robust and commercially available. CORBA essentially describes...

  10. Bridging boundaries: CORBA in perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Vinny

    1997-01-01

    PUBLISHED pplications that cross the boundaries of different computing machines, operating systems, and programming languages are increasingly the norm. As a result, the need for what might be called ?bridging technologies? to develop software that works across heterogeneous environments has become more compelling. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture is one such technology that is both robust and commercially available. CORBA essentially describes how client app...

  11. The role of nonlinear torsional contributions on the stability of flexural-torsional oscillations of open-cross section beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Egidio, Angelo; Contento, Alessandro; Vestroni, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    An open-cross section thin-walled beam model, already developed by the authors, has been conveniently simplified while maintaining the capacity of accounting for the significant nonlinear warping effects. For a technical range of geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the beam, the response is characterized by the torsional curvature prevailing over the flexural ones. A Galerkin discretization is performed by using a suitable expansion of displacements based on shape functions. The attention is focused on the dynamic response of the beam to a harmonic force, applied at the free end of the cantilever beam. The excitation is directed along the symmetry axis of the beam section. The stability of the one-component oscillations has been investigated using the analytical model, showing the importance of the internal resonances due to the nonlinear warping coupling terms. Comparison with the results provided by a computational finite element model has been performed. The good agreement among the results of the analytical and the computational models confirms the effectiveness of the simplified model of a nonlinear open-cross section thin-walled beam and overall the important role of the warping and of the torsional elongation in the study of the one-component dynamic oscillations and their stability.

  12. Bonds and bridges : social and poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Narayan, Deepa

    1999-01-01

    Using the lens of social capital-especially bridging or cross-cutting ties that cut across social groups and between social groups and government-provides new insights into policy design. Solidarity within social groups creates ties (bonding social capital) that bring people and resources together. In unequal societies, ties that cut across groups (bridging social capital) are essential for social cohesion and for poverty reduction. The nature of interaction between state and society is chara...

  13. Neuroimmune Cross Talk in the Gut. Neuroendocrine and neuroimmune pathways contribute to the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Dervla

    2016-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain, bloating, and disturbed bowel habit, symptoms that impact the quality of life of sufferers. The pathophysiological changes underlying this multifactorial condition are complex and include increased sensitivity to luminal and mucosal factors, resulting in altered colonic transit and visceral pain. Moreover, dysfunctional communication in the bidirectional signaling axis between the brain and the gut, which involves efferent and afferent branches of the peripheral nervous system, circulating endocrine hormones, and local paracrine and neurocrine factors, including immune and perhaps even microbial signaling molecules, has a role to play in this disorder. This minireview will examine recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBS and assess how cross talk between hormones, immune, and microbe-derived factors and their neuromodulatory effects on peripheral nerves may underlie IBS symptomatology. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Steel framing strategies for highly skewed bridges to reduce/eliminate distortion near skewed supports : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    In the past, bridges were aligned normal to crossing roads or obstacles in order to simplify bridge construction. However, the continuing expansion of the interstate system has challenged engineers to provide more horizontal clearance, reduce right-o...

  15. Non-coplanar compact configurations of nuclei and non-compound-nucleus contribution in the fusion cross section of the 12C+93Nb reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sahila; Hemdeep, Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2016-02-01

    Background: In our earlier study of the 12C+93Nb→*105Ag reaction at three near- and below-barrier energies (Ec .m .=41.097 , 47.828, and 54.205 MeV), using the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) with various nuclear interaction potentials (the Blocki et al. pocket formula and others derived from the Skyrme energy density formalism) for compact, coplanar (Φc=00 ) nuclei, we found a large non-compound-nucleus (nCN) contribution in the measured fusion cross section of this reaction. Purpose: In the present work, we look for the effect of using non-coplanar, compact configurations (Φc≠00 ), in the Blocki et al. pocket formula of the nuclear proximity potential, on the non-compound-nucleus (nCN) contribution, using the DCM. Methods: Allowing the Φ degree of freedom in the DCM formalism, we calculate the compound-nucleus (CN) and nCN cross sections. The only parameter of the DCM is the neck-length parameter Δ R , which also fits the empirically determined nCN cross section nearly exactly, under the assumption of considering it like a quasifission process where the fragment preformation factor P0=1 . Results: With the Φ degree of freedom included, at the higher two energies the nCN cross section gets enhanced, and hence the pure CN cross section is decreased, since the calculated (total) fusion cross section is fitted to experimental data. The parameter Δ R for the nCN contribution is smaller, and hence the reaction time larger, than for the CN decay process. Also, the contributing angular momentum ℓmax value increases in going from Φc=00 to Φc≠00 for both the CN and nCN processes. The intermediate mass fragments (IMFs), measured up to mass 13 in this reaction, are shown extended up to mass 16, and the fusion-fission (f f ) region is identified as A /2 ±16 , the same as for the Φc=00 case. Conclusions: As a result of enhanced nCN cross section due to Φc≠00 , the CN fusion probability PCN for *105Ag changes its behavior from an increasing to a

  16. Relative contribution of different muscle energy consumption processes in an energy-based muscle load sharing cost function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikooyan, A.A.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Westerhoff, P.; Bergmann, G.; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the relative contributions of two muscle energy consumption processes (the detachment of cross-bridges and calcium-pumping) incorporated in a recently developed muscle load sharing cost function, namely the energy-based criterion, by using in vivo measured

  17. Nuclear quadrupole spin dynamics: How weak RF pulses and double resonance cross-relaxation contribute to explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, David

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a type of radio-frequency (rf) spectroscopy which can detect quadrupolar nuclei (I > 1/2), such as nitrogen, in crystalline solids. NQR spectroscopy is useful for the detection of the many types of explosives containing 14N, however it suffers from a low signal to noise ratio (SNR) particularly in samples with long spin-lattice relaxation times. To improve the SNR the nuclear quadrupole spin dynamics are exploited in two limiting cases: systems with long spin relaxation times and systems where the excitation power is limited. The former is addressed through double resonance effects and the latter through spin echoes created by weak rf pulses. The double resonance effect occurs in samples that also contain a second faster relaxing nuclear species, such as 1H in ammonium nitrate. In this sample an 1H-14N double resonance can be created between the species that improves the SNR. While the focus is on the common case of solids containing both nitrogen and hydrogen, the theory is generally applicable to solids containing spin-1 and spin-1/2 nuclei. A model of this system is developed that treats the motionally averaged secular dipolar Hamiltonian as a perturbation of the combined quadrupole and Zeeman Hamiltonians. This model reveals three types of double resonance conditions, involving static and rf fields, and predicts expressions for the cross-relaxation rate (Wd) between the two species. Using this cross-relaxation rate, in addition to the hydrogen and nitrogen autorelaxation rates, expressions governing the relaxation back to equilibrium in a spin-1/2 and spin-1 system are determined. The three different types of double resonance conditions are created experimentally; one of them for the first time in any system and another for the first time in a solid. Under these double resonance conditions, the increase in Wd and improvements in SNR are explored both theoretically and experimentally using ammonium nitrate. The second effect

  18. The contribution of european projects in the cross-border management of drinking water: between hydrodynamics and vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calligaris, Chiara; Cucchi, Franco; Turpaud, Philippe; Ravbar, Nataša; Petrič, Metka; Urbanc, Janko; Zini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The Classical Karst Region represents an evolved binary karst hydrostructure located across NE Italy and SW Slovenia. Its deeply karstified limestones and dolomitic limestones swallow rainfall in a network of caves and fractures through the epikarst and vadose zones. In the phreatic zone, horizontal or sub-horizontal conduits quickly convey water to the springs. The aquifer is also recharged by the input of three rivers. Along its SE edge in Slovenia, the Reka River sinks entirely into the Škocjan caves. Along its NW edge, the Isonzo/Soča and Vipacco/Vipava rivers recharge the aquifer in a more diffuse manner as the input is supplied by porous aquifers alimented by riverbed leakages. The hydrostructure is drained by numerous springs situated NW of the plateau along its SE facing edge, between Monfalcone and Duino. The common average discharge of the Timavo spring is about 35.5 m3/s. The Reka-Timavo aquifer has attracted the attention of researchers for the last 200 years due to the increasing need for good quality drinking water. Water withdrawn in this area is guaranteed drinking water for the inhabitants of the Classical Karst. This water is supplied by AcegasApsAmga and Kra\\vski Vodovod delivering to more than 250.000 inhabitants. Since World War II, the Classical Karst Region has been politically divided. Consequently this area has been studied and managed separately for almost 70 years. Only recently has a collaboration between researchers of both countries begun. Within this framework is the 3-year Hydrokarst Project funded by the European Union which focussed on the joint protection and management of the cross border aquifer through the analysis of groundwater dynamics. The structuring and implementation of a shared geodatabase has allowed for the hydrochemical, hydrogeological and hydrodynamic characterisation of the aquifer. A second step consisted of the elaboration of a joint hydrogeological map. Thirdly, vulnerability mapping has allowed for the

  19. Advance directives in the Netherlands: an empirical contribution to the exploration of a cross-cultural perspective on advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijmen, Matthijs P S; Rurup, Mette L; Pasman, H Roeline W; Kaspers, Pam J; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2010-03-01

    This study focuses on ADs in the Netherlands and introduces a cross-cultural perspective by comparing it with other countries. A questionnaire was sent to a panel comprising 1621 people representative of the Dutch population. The response was 86%. 95% of the respondents didn't have an AD, and 24% of these were not familiar with the idea of drawing up an AD. Most of those familiar with ADs knew about the Advanced Euthanasia Directive (AED, 64%). Both low education and the presence of a religious conviction that plays an important role in one's life increase the chance of not wanting to draw up an AD. Also not having experienced a request for euthanasia from someone else, and the inconceivability of asking for euthanasia yourself, increase the chance of not wanting to draw up an AD. This study shows that the subjects of palliative care and end-of-life-decision-making were very much dominated by the issue of euthanasia in the Netherlands. The AED was the best known AD; and factors that can be linked to euthanasia play an important role in whether or not people choose to draw up an AD. This differentiates the Netherlands from other countries and, when it comes to ADs, the global differences between countries and cultures are still so large that the highest possible goals, at this moment in time, are observing and possibly learning from other cultural settings.

  20. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidants Contribute to Selected Sleep Quality and Cardiometabolic Health Relationships: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagasabai, Thirumagal; Ardern, Chris I

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is vital for cardiometabolic health, but a societal shift toward poor sleep is a prominent feature of many modern cultures. Concurrently, factors such as diet and lifestyle have also changed and may mediate the relationship between sleep quality and cardiometabolic health. Objectives were to explore (1) the interrelationship and (2) mediating effect of inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidants on sleep quality and cardiometabolic health. Cross-sectional data from the US National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey 2005-06 (≥20 y; N = 2,072) was used. Cardiometabolic health was defined as per the Joint Interim Statement; overall sleep quality was determined from six sleep habits and categorized as good, fair, poor, and very poor. Fair quality sleepers had optimal inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidant levels. Inflammation was above the current clinical reference range across all sleep quality categories, while oxidative stress was only within the clinical reference range for fair sleep quality. Selected sleep quality-cardiometabolic health relationships were mediated by inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidants and were moderated by sex. Our results provide initial evidence of a potential role for inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidants in the pathway between poor sleep quality-cardiometabolic decline. Further prospective research is needed to confirm our results.

  1. The strategic role of cross-sectoral research in the design of hospitals: the contribution of TESIS* research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Del Nord

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The design of buildings, such as hospitals where the complexity concerns as much the interpretation of the requirements framework as their required permeability to the ever accelerated dynamics of bio-technological innovations proposed by the market, requires continuous research which in- creasingly goes beyond the boundaries of the architectural discipline as it is currently codified. Constant dialogue with what scientific research produces in the international sphere and with culturally differentiated approaches becomes an imperative for those – professionals or institutions – wishing to operate with real time up-dating in order to increase the performance quality of their products. Scientific organizations that set themselves these objectives cannot disregard the constraints imposed by this scenario, with the consequent require- ment to actively position themselves in international networks which, with their constant cross-sectoral production, fuel the debate on foreseeable trends and the implications that all this determines with regard to design. The following article seeks to represent the coordinates of this new operating scenario of scientific research, highlighting the methods and the operating practices put in place by the TESIS Interuniversity Centre for Re- search of Florence.

  2. Bridge vehicle impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Bridges in New York State have been experiencing close to 200 bridge hits a year. These : accidents are attributed to numerous factors including: improperly stored equipment on trucks; : violation of vehicle posting signs; illegal commercial vehicles...

  3. Movable bridge maintenance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Movable bridges have particular maintenance issues, which cost considerably more than those of fixed bridges, : mostly because of the complex interaction of the mechanical, electrical and structural components. In order to track : maintenance and ope...

  4. Bridging the Evaluation Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Wouters

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Paul Wouters’ essay is concerned with bridging the gap between what we value in our academic work and how we are assessed in formal evaluation exercises. He reflects on the recent evaluation of his own center, and reminds us that it is productive to see evaluations not as the (obviously impossible attempt to produce a true representation of past work, but rather as the exploration and performance of “who one wants to be.” Reflecting on why STS should do more than just play along to survive in the indicator game, he suggests that our field should contribute to changing its very rules. In this endeavor, the attitude and sensibilities developed in our field may be more important than any specific theoretical concepts or methodologies.

  5. Cable Supported Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    Cable supported bridges in the form of suspension bridges and cable-stayed bridges are distinguished by their ability to overcome large spans.The book concentrates on the synthesis of cable supported bridges, covering both design and construction aspects. The analytical part covers simple methods...... to quantify the different structural configurations and allows a preliminary optimization of the main structure.Included are the most recent advances in structural design, corrosion protection of cables, aerodynamic safety, and erection procedures....

  6. Abdominal adiposity contributes to adverse glycemic control and albuminuria in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengyi; Ding, Lin; Huang, Xiaolin; Chen, Ying; Sun, Wanwan; Lin, Lin; Huang, Ya; Wang, Po; Peng, Kui; Lu, Jieli; Chen, Yuhong; Xu, Min; Wang, Weiqing; Bi, Yufang; Xu, Yu; Ning, Guang

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal adipose tissue plays an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. However, few data have suggested its role in the prognosis of diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the association between waist-hip ratio (WHR), glycemic control, and early nephropathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1709 previously- and newly-diagnosed diabetic patients nested in a cohort study consisting of 10 375 participants aged ≥40 years in Shanghai, China. General characteristics through questionnaire, anthropometric measures, and biochemical results were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS v20.0. Each quartile increase in WHR was significantly associated with a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 126 mg/dl [OR (95% CI):1.18 (1.06-1.30)], an HbA1c ≥ 7.0% [1.21 (1.08-1.35)], and a HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5 [1.30 (1.16-1.46)] after multivariable adjustments. WHR was not associated with a 2h PG ≥ 200mg/dl [1.13 (0.97-1.31)]. The risk for increased albuminuria (UACR ≥10.18mg/g) was also significantly associated with higher WHR after adjustment for HbA1c [1.14 (1.02-1.27)]. However, no significant relationship was seen between WHR and an estimated glomerular filtration rate albuminuria were found (P values for interaction <0.05). These data demonstrated an independent role of abdominal adipose tissue in glycemic control and renal complications of type 2 diabetes. Interventions aiming to reduce abdominal adipose tissue may have additional benefits. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. The contribution of prescription chart design and familiarity to prescribing error: a prospective, randomised, cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallentire, Victoria R; Hale, Rebecca L; Dewhurst, Neil G; Maxwell, Simon R J

    2013-10-01

    Initiatives to standardise hospital paper-based prescription charts are underway in various countries in an effort to reduce prescribing errors. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which prescribing error rates are influenced by prescription chart design and familiarity. In this prospective, randomised, cross-over study, Foundation Year 1 doctors working in five Scottish National Health Service (NHS) Boards participated in study sessions during which they were asked to prescribe lists of medications for five fictional patients using a different design of paper prescription chart for each patient. Each doctor was timed completing each set of prescriptions, and each chart was subsequently assessed against a predefined list of possible errors. A mixed modelling approach using three levels of variables (design of and familiarity with a chart, prescribing speed and individual prescriber) was employed. A total of 72 Foundation Year 1 doctors participated in 10 data-collection sessions. Differences in prescription chart design were associated with significant variations in the rates of prescribing error. The charts from NHS Highland and NHS Grampian produced significantly higher error rates than the other three charts. Participants who took longer to complete their prescriptions made significantly fewer errors, but familiarity with a chart did not predict error rate. This study has important implications for prescription chart design and prescribing education. The inverse relationship between the time taken to complete a prescribing task and the rate of error emphasises the importance of attention to detail and workload as factors in error causation. Further work is required to identify the characteristics of prescription charts that are protective against errors.

  8. Child diarrhoea and nutritional status in rural Rwanda: a cross-sectional study to explore contributing environmental and demographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharoy, Sheela S; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Cox, Kris; Clemence, Zachary; Mfura, Leodomir; Wendt, Ronald; Boisson, Sophie; Crossett, Erin; Grépin, Karen A; Jack, William; Condo, Jeanine; Habyarimana, James; Clasen, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    To explore associations of environmental and demographic factors with diarrhoea and nutritional status among children in Rusizi district, Rwanda. We obtained cross-sectional data from 8847 households in May-August 2013 from a baseline survey conducted for an evaluation of an integrated health intervention. We collected data on diarrhoea, water quality, and environmental and demographic factors from households with children <5, and anthropometry from children <2. We conducted log-binomial regression using diarrhoea, stunting and wasting as dependent variables. Among children <5, 8.7% reported diarrhoea in the previous 7 days. Among children <2, stunting prevalence was 34.9% and wasting prevalence was 2.1%. Drinking water treatment (any method) was inversely associated with caregiver-reported diarrhoea in the previous 7 days (PR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.68-0.91). Improved source of drinking water (PR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.73-0.87), appropriate treatment of drinking water (PR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.80-0.96), improved sanitation facility (PR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.97), and complete structure (having walls, floor and roof) of the sanitation facility (PR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.50-0.84) were inversely associated with stunting. None of the exposure variables were associated with wasting. A microbiological indicator of water quality was not associated with diarrhoea or stunting. Our findings suggest that in Rusizi district, appropriate treatment of drinking water may be an important factor in diarrhoea in children <5, while improved source and appropriate treatment of drinking water as well as improved type and structure of sanitation facility may be important for linear growth in children <2. We did not detect an association with water quality. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Principles of Bridge Reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Nowak, Andrzej S.

    The paper gives a brief introduction to the basic principles of structural reliability theory and its application to bridge engineering. Fundamental concepts like failure probability and reliability index are introduced. Ultimate as well as serviceability limit states for bridges are formulated......, and as an example the reliability profile and a sensitivity analyses for a corroded reinforced concrete bridge is shown....

  10. Building the Clinical Bridge: An Australian Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Wallis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nursing effectiveness science includes primary, secondary, and translational, clinically focused research activities which aim to improve patient or client outcomes. It is imperative, for the successful conduct of a program of nursing effectiveness science, that a clinical bridge is established between academic and healthcare service facilities. An Australian example of the development of a robust clinical bridge through the use of jointly funded positions at the professorial level is outlined. In addition, an analysis of the practical application of Lewin’s model of change management and the contribution of both servant and transformational leadership styles to the bridge building process is provided.

  11. The cross-cutting contribution of the end of neglected tropical diseases to the sustainable development goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, Mathieu; Molyneux, David H; Lindsay, Steve W; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Engels, Dirk

    2017-04-04

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for an integrated response, the kind that has defined Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) efforts in the past decade.NTD interventions have the greatest relevance for SDG3, the health goal, where the focus on equity, and its commitment to reaching people in need of health services, wherever they may live and whatever their circumstances, is fundamentally aligned with the target of Universal Health Coverage. NTD interventions, however, also affect and are affected by many of the other development areas covered under the 2030 Agenda. Strategies such as mass drug administration or the programmatic integration of NTD and WASH activities (SDG6) are driven by effective global partnerships (SDG17). Intervention against the NTDs can also have an impact on poverty (SDG1) and hunger (SDG2), can improve education (SDG4), work and economic growth (SDG8), thereby reducing inequalities (SDG10). The community-led distribution of donated medicines to more than 1 billion people reinforces women's empowerment (SDG5), logistics infrastructure (SDG9) and non-discrimination against disability (SDG16). Interventions to curb mosquito-borne NTDs contribute to the goals of urban sustainability (SDG11) and resilience to climate change (SDG13), while the safe use of insecticides supports the goal of sustainable ecosystems (SDG15). Although indirectly, interventions to control water- and animal-related NTDs can facilitate the goals of small-scale fishing (SDG14) and sustainable hydroelectricity and biofuels (SDG7).NTDs proliferate in less developed areas in countries across the income spectrum, areas where large numbers of people have little or no access to adequate health care, clean water, sanitation, housing, education, transport and information. This scoping review assesses how in this context, ending the epidemic of the NTDs can impact and improve our prospects of attaining the SDGs.

  12. Polymeric salt bridges for conducting electric current in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepodd, Timothy J [Livermore, CA; Tichenor, Mark S [San Diego, CA; Artau, Alexander [Humacao, PR

    2009-11-17

    A "cast-in-place" monolithic microporous polymer salt bridge for conducting electrical current in microfluidic devices, and methods for manufacture thereof is disclosed. Polymeric salt bridges are formed in place in capillaries or microchannels. Formulations are prepared with monomer, suitable cross-linkers, solvent, and a thermal or radiation responsive initiator. The formulation is placed in a desired location and then suitable radiation such as UV light is used to polymerize the salt bridge within a desired structural location. Embodiments are provided wherein the polymeric salt bridges have sufficient porosity to allow ionic migration without bulk flow of solvents therethrough. The salt bridges form barriers that seal against fluid pressures in excess of 5000 pounds per square inch. The salt bridges can be formulated for carriage of suitable amperage at a desired voltage, and thus microfluidic devices using such salt bridges can be specifically constructed to meet selected analytical requirements.

  13. THE MODERN DECISIONS ABOUT CONSTRUCTIONS OF BRIDGE FLOOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Sakharova

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is dealt with the changes introduced into the code of regulations «Bridges and pipes» developed as alternative to SNiP 2.05.03-84* related to the bridge floor of bridge structures: the possibility of refusing sidewalks, the change in road and sidewalk cross falls, the building of road pavement structures with the placement of asphalt concrete coating over waterproofing, and the drainage system construction.

  14. Some Investigations Performed for the Bridge Over Jiu at Aninoasa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răcănel Ionuţ Radu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The carrying structure of the bridge over the Jiu River at Aninoasa consists in two parallel concrete arches with variable height of the cross section, sustaining a concrete deck through vertical concrete hangers. In the time period passed since the bridge was erected, some structural elements shown damages. In order to establish the technical state of the bridge, a technical appraisement was performed and according to this, the most exposed elements to the risk of failure are the hangers.

  15. Measuring the stress-bridging law of a heterogeneous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. (Cheng)

    2002-01-01

    In this investigation, fracture experiments on a high explosive material (PBX 9501) were conducted using the digital image correlation technique. From the experimental measurement, we are able to determine quantitatively the stress-bridging law (or decohesion law), which characterizes the relationship between the bridging stress and the opening displacement cross the bridging zone. The plastic bonded HMX (PBX) high explosives are composed of the energetic crystal (HMX) and a polymeric binder. Previous experimental observations showed that the fracture process in the sugar mock, a simulant of the PBX 9501 high explosive, is very different from that in brittle solids, even though the high explosive material PBX 9501 is quite brittle under tension. A close examination of the fracture surface revealed that before crack initiation and propagation, a very large damage region is developed ahead of the crack tip. Since such a damage region is very narrow, it can be modeled as a stress bridging zone. Due to the presence of the sizable bridging zone, conventional fracture mechanics is no longer applicable. Stress bridging has to be considered explicitly in order to understand of fracture processes in the PBX 9501 high explosive and the sugar mock. The model, which explicitly incorporates stress-bridging mechanism, is shown in Fig.1. In describing the model, one would need the following quantities, bridging zone length R, bridging stress {sigma}(x{sub 1}), bridging-zone opening displacement {sigma}(x{sub 1}), and the critical stress, {sigma}{sub C}, at which bridging zone starts to develop. Among these quantities, the key element for the bridging model is the relationship between the bridging stress {sigma} and the opening displacement cross the bridging zone {sigma}, i.e., {sigma}({delta}), or the stress-bridging law that can only be determined through experimental measurement. In this study, fracture experiments on PBX 9501 high explosive using the digital image correlation

  16. Perception, signaling and cross-talk of jasmonates and the seminal contributions of the Daoxin Xie's lab and the Chuanyou Li's lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasternack, Claus

    2014-05-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses and in development. The most active JA compound is (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile, a JA conjugate with isoleucine. Biosynthesis, metabolism and key components of perception and signal transduction have been identified and numerous JA-induced gene expression data collected. For JA-Ile perception, the SCF(COI1)-JAZ co-receptor complex has been identified and crystalized. Activators such as MYC2 and repressors such as JAZs including their targets were found. Involvement of JA-Ile in response to herbivores and pathogens and in root growth inhibition is among the most studied aspects of JA-Ile signaling. There are an increasing number of examples, where JA-Ile shows cross-talk with other plant hormones. Seminal contributions in JA/JA-Ile research were given by Daoxin Xie's lab and Chuanyou Li's lab, both in Beijing. Here, characterization was done regarding components of the JA-Ile receptor, such as COI1 (JAI1) and SCF, regarding activators (MYCs, MYBs) and repressors (JAV1, bHLH IIId's) of JA-regulated gene expression, as well as regarding components of auxin biosynthesis and action, such as the transcription factor PLETHORA active in the root stem cell niche. This overview reflects the work of both labs in the light of our present knowledge on biosynthesis, perception and signal transduction of JA/JA-Ile and its cross-talk to other hormones.

  17. Toward A Research Framework to Bridge Cross-platform Error Characterization of Spaceborne Passive/Active Sensors using NOAA/NSSL Ground Radar-based National Mosaic QPE Products over CONUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstetter, P.; Hong, Y.; Gourley, J. J.; Cao, Q.; Schwaller, M.; Petersen, W. A.; Zhang, J.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Maggioni, V.; Seyyedi, H.; Chen, S.

    2012-12-01

    A characterization of the error associated to satellite rainfall estimates arises as major information for applications in evolving from deterministic to probabilistic frameworks. We focus here on the error structure of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) and Microwave Imager (TMI) quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) at ground, a major issue for applications of derived products in rainfall estimation from space, water budget studies and hydrological modeling. Due to the variety of sources of error in spaceborne QPE the problem is addressed by comparison of satellite QPEs with reference values derived from ground-based measurements using NOAA/NSSL Ground Radar-based National Mosaic QPE (NMQ). Investigations have been carried out at fine scale (e.g. instantaneous and 5 km for PR) on the basis of several month data samples that explore the effects of regional climatology of the southern part of US. A significant effort has been carried out to derive a trustworthy reference rainfall from bias-corrected NMQ at fine spatial and temporal scales. A comparison framework has been developed to examine the consistency of the ground and space-based sensors in term of precipitation detection, characterization (e.g. convective, stratiform) and quantification. Specific error factors for passive (e.g. surface conditions for TMI) and active (e.g. attenuation of the radar signal, non uniform beam filling for PR) sensors are investigated. Systematic biases and random errors quantified at the satellite estimation scale are useful for satellite-based rainfall products. This cross-platform error characterization will ultimately act as a bridge to intercalibrate active and passive microwave measurements from the GPM core satellite to the constellation satellites.

  18. Strengthening of a railway bridge with NSMR and CFRP tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Bennitz, Anders; Danielsson, Georg

    2008-01-01

    flexural strength of the slab transverse to the tracks. NSMR bars are positioned in the concrete cover on the underside of the bridge, while the new system is inserted in holes drilled through the bridge, in the cross direction and located in the upper part of the bridge slab. In connection......Strengthening of structures with CFRP is today considered an accepted method to upgrade concrete structures. In this paper two different CFRP strengthening systems are combined to give extended service life to a Swedish double-trough-double-track railway bridge, constructed in concrete with a 10...

  19. Evaluation of a bridge using simplified element modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duffey, T.A. [New Mexico Highlands Univ., Las Vegas, NM (United States)

    1995-02-01

    An experimental-numerical comparison of the forced and ambient vibrations Of a multi-span composite plate-girder bridge was performed. The bridge was modeled using a finite element program at three levels of complexity, including a simple 250 DOF model that utilizes a single beam element to represent the entire bridge cross section. Difficulties encountered in the development of the simple model are discussed. The dynamic properties predicted by the simple model were consistent with these measured on the bridge and computed using more detailed finite element models.

  20. [Composite (etched) bridge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, H J; van Pelt, A W

    1996-11-01

    An adhesive or resin-bonded bridge is a tooth saving construction for the replacement of a lost tooth, especially when the abutment teeth are relatively sound. In this article an overview is presented of the different types of resin-bonded bridges, their advantages and disadvantages and their indications. The direct methods are very suited for the immediate replacement of a lost anterior tooth. The all composite adhesive bridge has a survival rate that is surprisingly good.

  1. Investigation of Aerodynamic Interference of Double Deck Bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitek, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division. Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC); Bojanowski, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division. Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC); Lottes, S. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division. Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC)

    2016-05-01

    Construction of a twin bridge can be a cost effective and minimally disruptive way to increase capacity when an existing bridge is not near the end of its service life. With ever growing vehicular traffic, when demand approaches the capacity of many existing roads and bridges. Remodeling a structure with an insufficient number of lanes can be a good solution in case of smaller and less busy bridges. Closing down or reducing traffic on crossings of greater importance for the construction period, however, can result in major delays and revenue loss for commerce and transportation as well as increasing the traffic load on alternate route bridges. Multiple-deck bridges may be the answer to this issue. A parallel deck can be built next to the existing one, without reducing the flow. Additionally, a new bridge can be designed as a twin or multi-deck structure. Several such structures have been built throughout the United States, among them: - The New NY Bridge Project - the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing, - SR-182 Columbia River Bridge, - The Thaddeus Kosciusko Bridge (I-87), - The Allegheny River Bridge, Pennsylvania, which carries I76, - Fred Hartman Bridge, TX, see Figure 1.2. With a growing number of double deck bridges, additional, more detailed, studies on the interaction of such bridge pairs in windy conditions appears appropriate. Aerodynamic interference effects should be examined to assure the aerodynamic stability of both bridges. There are many studies on aerodynamic response of single deck bridges, but the literature on double-deck structures is not extensive. The experimental results from wind tunnels are still limited in number, as a parametric study is required, they can be very time consuming. Literature review shows that some investigation of the effects of gap-width and angle of wind incidence has been done. Most of the CFD computational studies that have been done were limited to 2D simulations. Therefore, it is desirable to investigate twin decks

  2. Bridging the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer Overgaard, Majken; Broeng, Jes; Jensen, Monika Luniewska

    Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures.......Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures....

  3. Cross-cutting ties, organizational density, and new firm formation in the US biotech industry, 1994-1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bae, J.; Wezel, F.C.; Koo, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the role of cooperative relations among incumbents in the formation of new firms. We argue that cooperative interfirm relations that bridge geographically remote and diverse sources of knowledge—cross-cutting ties—contribute to new firm formation. Employing data on state-level

  4. Myocardial bridges: a prospective forensic autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micić-Labudović, Jelena; Atanasijević, Tatjana; Popović, Vesna; Mihailović, Zoran; Nikolić, Slobodan; Puzović, Dragana

    2015-01-01

    When the coronary artery, located subepicardially, submerges into the myocardium and appears again subepicardially after a short intramural course, it represents an embedded coronary artery, while the part of the myocardium above is a myocardial bridge. We investigated the frequency of the embedded left coronary artery (LAD) in the autopsy material considering the descending branch of the LAD to be the most important one in the nourishment of the myocardium and myocardial bridges to be the most frequent in its area, as well as clinically important. A prospective autopsy study of 975 cases was performed, including both, natural (21.33%) and violent (78.67%) deaths. The sample consisted of 74.56% males and 25.44%females. In order to discover myocardyal bridges and their characteristics, the hearts were examined by both transverse cuts and longitudinal openings of the LAD. Myocardial bridge was found in 78 cases (8.00%), more commonly in males (9.35%) than females (4.03%).The average length of the myocardial bridge was 21.85±16.10mm and thickness 3.744±1.48 mm. The common localization of the myocardial bridge was the proximal half of the LAD (89.74%).The upper part of the artery, proximal to the bridge, was a common site of atherosclerotic changes. Myocardial bridge was found in 12.50% of natural deaths, but in 13.38% out of all cases of sudden cardiac deaths. Therefore, the presence of the myocardial bridge by itself is not predominant, but it is certainly a contributing factor to a sudden cardiac death.

  5. Short-term evaluation of a bridge cable using acoustic emission sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Varina-Enon Bridge carries I-295 across the James River and crosses over the shipping channel that leads to the Richmond (Virginia) Marine Terminal. The bridge is a cable-stayed bridge that was opened to traffic in July 1990. It has 150 ft of ver...

  6. Bridge health monitoring metrics : updating the bridge deficiency algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    As part of its bridge management system, the Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) must decide how best to spend its bridge replacement funds. In making these decisions, ALDOT managers currently use a deficiency algorithm to rank bridges that ...

  7. Crossing Digital Bridges for Global Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Candy; Bates, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    The international fantasy world that Walt Disney has developed, and others like it, are designed to create a global community experience for amusement park visitors. Disney's portrayal of many nations--their colorful dress, musical traditions, and unique native cuisine--is many students' only "foreign travel" and the experience may leave them with…

  8. Wind tunnel test of musi VI bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permata, Robby; Andika, Matza Gusto; Syariefatunnisa, Risdhiawan, Eri; Hermawan, Budi; Noordiana, Indra

    2017-11-01

    Musi VI Bridge is planned to cross the Musi River in Palembang City, South Sumatera Province, Indonesia. The main span is a steel arch type with 200 m length and side span length is 75 m. Finite element analysis results showed that the bridge has frequency ratio for torsional and heaving mode (torsional frequency/heaving frequency)=1.14. This close to unity value rises concern about aerodynamic behaviour and stability of the bridge deck under wind loading. Sectional static and free vibration wind tunnel test were performed to clarify this phenomena in B2TA3 facility in Serpong, Indonesia. The test followed the draft of Guide of Wind Tunnel Test for Bridges developed by Indonesian Ministry of Public Works. Results from wind tunnel testing show that the bridge is safe from flutter instability and no coupled motion vibration observed. Therefore, low value of frequency ratio has no effect to aerodynamic behaviour of the bridge deck. Vortex-induced vibration in heaving mode occurred in relatively low wind velocity with permissible maximum amplitude value.

  9. Precast Pearl-Chain concrete arch bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2015-01-01

    A Pearl-Chain Bridge is a closed-spandrel arch bridge consisting of a number of straight pre-fabricated so called Super-Light Deck elements put together in an arch shape by post-tensioning cables. Several Pearl-Chain arches can be positioned adjacent to each other by a crane to achieve a bridge...... the technology was used. We also study other important components and details in the Pearl-Chain Bridge concept and review the effects of different types of loads. A theoretical case study of a circular 30 m span Pearl-Chain Bridge is presented showing the influence of a number of parameters: The number of post......-tensioning cables, the rise to span ratio, the height of the filling, and the height of the Super-Light Decks. We find that Pearl-Chain Bridges can be adjusted to resist specific moment loads by changing the normal force in the arch cross section by altering the above parameters. It is also found that the negative...

  10. Ambient Modal Testing of the Vestvej Bridge using Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune; Rytter, A.

    concerning application of vibration based inspection of bridges. The data analysis process of ambient vribration testing of bridges has traditionally been based on auto and cross spectral densities estimated using an FFT algorithm. In the pre-analysis state the spectral densities are all averaged to obtain......This paper presents an ambient vibration study of the Vestvej Bridge. The bridge is a typically Danish two-span concrete bridge which crosses a highway. The purpose of the study is to perform a pre-investigation of the dynamic behavior to obtain information for the design of a demonstration project...... the averaged spectral densities(ASD). From the ASD the eigenfrequencies of the structure can be identified. This information can be used in the main analysis, where alle modal parameters are extracted from the spectral densities. Due to long cabling and low response levels (small ambient loads) the response...

  11. Ambient Modal Testing of the Vestvej Bridge using Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune; Rytter, A.

    1998-01-01

    concerning application of vibration based inspection of bridges. The data analysis process of ambient vribration testing of bridges has traditionally been based on auto and cross spectral densities estimated using an FFT algorithm. In the pre-analysis state the spectral densities are all averaged to obtain......This paper presents an ambient vibration study of the Vestvej Bridge. The bridge is a typically Danish two-span concrete bridge which crosses a highway. The purpose of the study is to perform a pre-investigation of the dynamic behavior to obtain information for the design of a demonstration project...... the averaged spectral densities(ASD). From the ASD the eigenfrequencies of the structure can be identified. This information can be used in the main analysis, where alle modal parameters are extracted from the spectral densities. Due to long cabling and low response levels (small ambient loads) the response...

  12. Toward Better Understanding of Turbulence Effects on Bridge Aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyang Cao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the trend of variable cross-sections for long-span bridges from truss-stiffened to quasi-streamlined, and then to multiple-box cross-section geometries, the importance of aeroelastic performance is becoming increasingly significant in wind-resistant design. This article shows that there is clearly insufficient qualitative as well as quantitative understanding of turbulence effects on bridge aerodynamics, particularly the mechanisms behind them. Although turbulence might help the stabilization of long-span bridges, and is thus not a conclusive parameter in wind-resistant design, turbulence effects on the aerodynamic and aeroelastic behaviors of a bridge need to be better understood because interaction between a bridge and turbulence always exists. This article also briefly introduces a newly developed multiple-fan wind tunnel that is designed to control turbulence to assist the study of turbulence effects.

  13. Measurement of the photon electroproduction cross section at JLAB with the goal of performing a Rosenbluth separation of the DVCS contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Arguello, Alejandro Marti [Univ. of Paris, Orsay (France). Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2014-07-11

    experiment is the isolation of the contribution from the term coming form the DVCS from the interference term, resulting from the BH contribution. This isolation is known as "Rosenbluth Separation". The work presented in this thesis focuses on the analysis of the data stored by the electromagnetic calorimeter, employed for the detection of real photons. There is also a a theoretical introduction to the study of the nucleon structure, reviewing the concepts of form factors and parton distributions through elastic and inelastic processes. The computation of the photon leptoproduction cross section is described in detail, as well as the goals of experiment E07-007. This thesis also describes the analysis of the data stored by the electromagnetic calorimeter, with the purpose of obtaining the kinematic variables of the real photons resulting from DVCS reactions. Finally, it describes the selection of events from stored data, the applied cuts to kinematical variables and the background subtraction. Also, the process of extraction of the necessary observables for computing the photon leptoproduction cross section is described, along with the main steps followed to perform the Monte Carlo simulation used in this computation. The resulting cross sections are shown at the end of this thesis.

  14. Covered Bridge Security Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett Phares; Terry Wipf; Ryan Sievers; Travis Hosteng

    2013-01-01

    The design, construction, and use of covered timber bridges is all but a lost art in these days of pre-stressed concrete, high-performance steel, and the significant growth both in the volume and size of vehicles. Furthermore, many of the existing covered timber bridges are preserved only because of their status on the National Registry of Historic Places or the...

  15. Bridges Expansion Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-01-01

    The survey is concerned with the expansion joints, used in bridge constructions to compensate medium and significant operational linear and spatial displacements between adjacent spans or between bridge span and pier. The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting the modern demands imposed to expansion joints.

  16. Students design composite bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stark, J.W.B.; Galjaard, J.C.; Brekelmans, J.W.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of recent research on steel-concrete composite bridge design by students of Delft University of Technology doing their master's thesis. Primary objective of this research was to find possibilities for application of steel-concrete composite bridges in the Netherlands,

  17. Bridge the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on photo projects organised for teenage refugees by the Society for Humanistic Photography (Berlin, Germany). These projects, named Bridge the Gap I (2015), and Bridge the Gap II (2016), were carried out in Berlin and brought together teenagers with refugee and German...

  18. Virtual Bridge Design Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    This design/problem-solving activity challenges students to design a replacement bridge for one that has been designated as either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The Aycock MS Technology/STEM Magnet Program Virtual Bridge Design Challenge is an authentic introduction to the engineering design process. It is a socially relevant…

  19. Linguistic Barriers and Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The influence of language on social capital in low-skill and ethnically diverse workplaces has thus far received very limited attention within the sociology of work. As the ethnically diverse workplace is an important social space for the construction of social relations bridging different social...... communication related to collaboration and ‘small talk’ may provide linguistic bridges to social capital formation....

  20. Long Span Bridges in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    is found in Scandinavia - the 1210 m span of the Höga Kusten Bridge in Sweden.The Kvarnsund Bridge in Norway was at the completion in 1991 the longest cable-stayed bridge in the world, and the span of 530 m is still thge longest for cable-stayed bridges in concrete. The Øresund Bridge with its sapn of 490...... m is the longest among cable-stayed bridges for both road and railway traffic....

  1. Fractal-like kinetics of intracellular enzymatic reactions: a chemical framework of endotoxin tolerance and a possible non-specific contribution of macromolecular crowding to cross-tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, Catalin; Olteanu, Mircea; Flondor, Paul; Calin, George A

    2013-09-14

    The response to endotoxin (LPS), and subsequent signal transduction lead to the production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by innate immune cells. Cells or organisms pretreated with endotoxin enter into a transient state of hyporesponsiveness, referred to as endotoxin tolerance (ET) which represents a particular case of negative preconditioning. Despite recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of ET, there is no consensus yet on the primary mechanism responsible for ET and for the more complex cases of cross tolerance. In this study, we examined the consequences of the macromolecular crowding (MMC) and of fractal-like kinetics (FLK) of intracellular enzymatic reactions on the LPS signaling machinery. We hypothesized that this particular type of enzyme kinetics may explain the development of ET phenomenon. Our aim in the present study was to characterize the chemical kinetics framework in ET and determine whether fractal-like kinetics explains, at least in part, ET. We developed an ordinary differential equations (ODE) mathematical model that took into account the links between the MMC and the LPS signaling machinery leading to ET. We proposed that the intracellular fractal environment (MMC) contributes to ET and developed two mathematical models of enzyme kinetics: one based on Kopelman's fractal-like kinetics framework and the other based on Savageau's power law model. Kopelman's model provides a good image of the potential influence of a fractal intracellular environment (MMC) on ET. The Savageau power law model also partially explains ET. The computer simulations supported the hypothesis that MMC and FLK may play a role in ET. The model highlights the links between the organization of the intracellular environment, MMC and the LPS signaling machinery leading to ET. Our FLK-based model does not minimize the role of the numerous negative regulatory factors. It simply draws attention to the fact that macromolecular crowding can

  2. Sustainable Bridge Infrastructure Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safi, Mohammed; Du, Guangli; Simonsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a flexible but systematic approach for integrating lifecycle aspects into bridge investment decisions is a major obstacle hindering the procurement of sustainable bridge infrastructures. This paper addresses this obstacle by introducing a holistic approach that agencies could use to p...... to procure the most “sustainable” (lifecycle-efficient) bridge through a fair design-build (D-B) tendering process, considering all the main aspects: life-cycle cost (LCC), service life-span, aesthetic demands and environmental impacts (LCA).......The lack of a flexible but systematic approach for integrating lifecycle aspects into bridge investment decisions is a major obstacle hindering the procurement of sustainable bridge infrastructures. This paper addresses this obstacle by introducing a holistic approach that agencies could use...

  3. Finite element model updating of multi-span steel-arch-steel-girder bridges based on ambient vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tsung-Chin; Gao, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Chia-Sheng; Zhu, Guan-Rong; Su, Yu-Min

    2017-04-01

    The three-span steel-arch-steel-girder Jiaxian Bridge was newly constructed in 2010 to replace the former one that has been destroyed by Typhoon Sinlaku (2008, Taiwan). It was designed and built to continue the domestic service requirement, as well as to improve the tourism business of the Kaohsiung city government, Taiwan. This study aimed at establishing the baseline model of Jiaxian Bridge for hazardous scenario simulation such as typhoons, floods and earthquakes. Necessities of these precaution works were attributed to the inherent vulnerability of the sites: near fault and river cross. The uncalibrated baseline bridge model was built with structural finite element in accordance with the blueprints. Ambient vibration measurements were performed repeatedly to acquire the elastic dynamic characteristics of the bridge structure. Two frequency domain system identification algorithms were employed to extract the measured operational modal parameters. Modal shapes, frequencies, and modal assurance criteria (MAC) were configured as the fitting targets so as to calibrate/update the structural parameters of the baseline model. It has been recognized that different types of structural parameters contribute distinguishably to the fitting targets, as this study has similarly explored. For steel-arch-steel-girder bridges in particular this case, joint rigidity of the steel components was found to be dominant while material properties and section geometries relatively minor. The updated model was capable of providing more rational elastic responses of the bridge superstructure under normal service conditions as well as hazardous scenarios, and can be used for manage the health conditions of the bridge structure.

  4. Bridge technology report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. As LANs have proliferated, new technologies and system concepts have come to the fore. One of the key issues is how to interconnect networks. One means of interconnection is to use a 'bridge'. Other competing technologies are repeaters, routers, and gateways. Bridges permit traffic isolation, connect network segments together and operate at the MAC layer. Further, because they operate at the MAC layer, they can handle a variety of protocols such as TCP/IP, SNA, and X.25. This report focuses on the specific technology of bridging two netw

  5. Sustainable Bridge Infrastructure Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safi, Mohammed; Du, Guangli; Simonsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a flexible but systematic approach for integrating lifecycle aspects into bridge investment decisions is a major obstacle hindering the procurement of sustainable bridge infrastructures. This paper addresses this obstacle by introducing a holistic approach that agencies could use to p...... to procure the most “sustainable” (lifecycle-efficient) bridge through a fair design-build (D-B) tendering process, considering all the main aspects: life-cycle cost (LCC), service life-span, aesthetic demands and environmental impacts (LCA)....

  6. Running Safety of Trains under Vessel-Bridge Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongle Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize the sensor placement of the health monitoring system, the dynamic behavior of the train-bridge system subjected to vessel-collision should be studied in detail firstly. This study thus focuses on the characteristics of a train-bridge system under vessel-bridge collision. The process of the vessel-bridge collision is simulated numerically with a reliable finite element model (FEM. The dynamic responses of a single car and a train crossing a cable-stayed bridge are calculated. It is shown that the collision causes significant increase of the train’s lateral acceleration, lateral wheelset force, wheel unloading rate, and derailment coefficient. The effect of the collision on the train’s vertical acceleration is much smaller. In addition, parametric studies with various train’s positions, ship tonnage, and train speed are performed. If the train is closer to the vessel-bridge collision position or the ship tonnage is larger, the train will be more dangerous. There is a relatively high probability of running danger at a low speed, resulting from longer stay of the train on the bridge. The train’s position, the ship tonnage, and the train speed must be considered when determining the most adverse conditions for the trains running on bridges under vessel-bridge collision.

  7. Measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic nanobeads using planar Hall effect bridge sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, T.

    2013-01-01

    We compare measurements of the Brownian relaxation response of magnetic nanobeads in suspension using planar Hall effect sensors of cross geometry and a newly proposed bridge geometry. We find that the bridge sensor yields six times as large signals as the cross sensor, which results in a more...

  8. Developments and Prospects of Long-Span High-Speed Railway Bridge Technologies in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunquan Qin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid developments of the high-speed railway in China, a great number of long-span bridges have been constructed in order to cross rivers and gorges. At present, the longest main span of a constructed high-speed railway bridge is only 630 m. The main span of Hutong Yangtze River Bridge and of Wufengshan Yangtze River Bridge, which are under construction, will be much longer, at 1092 m each. In order to overcome the technical issues that originate from the extremely large dead loading and the relatively small structural stiffness of long-span high-speed railway bridges, many new technologies in bridge construction, design, materials, and so forth have been developed. This paper carefully reviews progress in the construction technologies of multi-function combined bridges in China, including combined highway and railway bridges and multi-track railway bridges. Innovations and practices regarding new types of bridge and composite bridge structures, such as bridges with three cable planes and three main trusses, inclined main trusses, slab-truss composite sections, and steel-concrete composite sections, are introduced. In addition, investigations into high-performance materials and integral fabrication and erection techniques for long-span railway bridges are summarized. At the end of the paper, prospects for the future development of long-span high-speed railway bridges are provided.

  9. Fractal-like kinetics of intracellular enzymatic reactions: a chemical framework of endotoxin tolerance and a possible non-specific contribution of macromolecular crowding to cross-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The response to endotoxin (LPS), and subsequent signal transduction lead to the production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by innate immune cells. Cells or organisms pretreated with endotoxin enter into a transient state of hyporesponsiveness, referred to as endotoxin tolerance (ET) which represents a particular case of negative preconditioning. Despite recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of ET, there is no consensus yet on the primary mechanism responsible for ET and for the more complex cases of cross tolerance. In this study, we examined the consequences of the macromolecular crowding (MMC) and of fractal-like kinetics (FLK) of intracellular enzymatic reactions on the LPS signaling machinery. We hypothesized that this particular type of enzyme kinetics may explain the development of ET phenomenon. Method Our aim in the present study was to characterize the chemical kinetics framework in ET and determine whether fractal-like kinetics explains, at least in part, ET. We developed an ordinary differential equations (ODE) mathematical model that took into account the links between the MMC and the LPS signaling machinery leading to ET. We proposed that the intracellular fractal environment (MMC) contributes to ET and developed two mathematical models of enzyme kinetics: one based on Kopelman’s fractal-like kinetics framework and the other based on Savageau’s power law model. Results Kopelman’s model provides a good image of the potential influence of a fractal intracellular environment (MMC) on ET. The Savageau power law model also partially explains ET. The computer simulations supported the hypothesis that MMC and FLK may play a role in ET. Conclusion The model highlights the links between the organization of the intracellular environment, MMC and the LPS signaling machinery leading to ET. Our FLK-based model does not minimize the role of the numerous negative regulatory factors. It simply draws attention to

  10. Uncovering the Pathogenic Landscape of Helminth (Opisthorchis viverrini Infections: A Cross-Sectional Study on Contributions of Physical and Social Environment and Healthcare Interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyuan Ong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections have proven recalcitrant to control by chemotherapy in many parts of Southeast Asia and indeed farther afield. This study isolates and examines the influence of different aspects of the physical and social environment, and uneven intervention effort contributing to the pathogenic landscape of human Opisthorchis viverrini infections.A cross-sectional survey, involving 632 participants, was conducted in four villages in northeast Thailand to examine the impact on prevalence and parasite burden of the reservoir dam environment, socio-economic, demographic, and behavioral factors, and health center intervention efforts. Formalin-ether concentration technique was used for diagnoses, and multivariate models were used for analyses.The importance attributed to O. viverrini infections varied among health centers in the four study villages. Villages where O. viverrini infections were not prioritized by the health centers as the healthcare focus were at a higher risk of infection (prevalence with odds ratio (risk factor of 5.73 (3.32-10.27 and p-value < 0.01. Priority of healthcare focus, however, did not appear to influence behavior, as the consumption of raw fish, the main source of O. viverrini infections in the study area, was 11.4% higher in villages that prioritized O. viverrini infections than those that did not (p-value = 0.01. Landscape variation, notably proximity to reservoir, affects vulnerability of local population to infection. Infection intensity was higher in population located closer to the reservoir with risk ratio of 2.09 (1.12-4.02 and p-value < 0.01. Patterns of infection intensities among humans were found to match fish infection intensity, where higher infection intensities were associated with fish obtained from the reservoir waterbody type (p-value = 0.023.This study demonstrated the importance of environmental influence and healthcare focus as risk factors of infections in addition to the socio

  11. The Cultural Bridge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edith A.

    1993-01-01

    Offers a cultural bridge model that would enhance the health care of the American Indian population. Suggests that transcultural nursing should transcend the realm of thought and become an integrated part of daily practice. (Author)

  12. Bridged Race Population Estimates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Population estimates from "bridging" the 31 race categories used in Census 2000, as specified in the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) race and ethnicity...

  13. Bridging history and social psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Yamamoto, Koji

    2012-01-01

    This special issue aims to bridge history and social psychology by bringing together historians and social psychologists in an exercise of reading and learning from each other’s work. This interdisciplinary exercise is not only timely but of great importance for both disciplines. Social psycholog......This special issue aims to bridge history and social psychology by bringing together historians and social psychologists in an exercise of reading and learning from each other’s work. This interdisciplinary exercise is not only timely but of great importance for both disciplines. Social...... psychologists can benefit from engaging with historical sources by being able to contextualise their findings and enrich their theoretical models. It is not only that all social and psychological phenomena have a history but this history is very much part of present-day and future developments. On the other...... hand historians can enhance their analysis of historical sources by drawing upon the conceptual tools developed in social psychology. They can “test” these tools and contribute to their validation and enrichment from completely different perspectives. Most important, as contributions to this special...

  14. Nonlinear seismic analysis of continuous RC bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čokić Miloš M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear static analysis, known as a pushover method (NSPA is oftenly used to study the behaviour of a bridge structure under the seismic action. It is shown that the Equivalent Linearization Method - ELM, recommended in FEMA 440, is appropriate for the response analysis of the bridge columns, with different geometric characteristics, quantity and distribution of steel reinforcement. The subject of analysis is a bridge structure with a carriageway plate - a continuous beam with three spans, with the 24 + 40 + 24 m range. Main girder is made of prestressed concrete and it has a box cross section of a constant height. It is important to study the behaviour, not only in the transverse, but also in the longitudinal direction of the bridge axis, when analysing the bridge columns exposed to horizontal seismic actions. The columns were designed according to EN1992, parts 1 and 2. Seismic action analysis is conducted according to EN 1998: 2004 standard. Response spectrum type 1, for the ground type B, was applied and the analysis also includes 20% of traffic load. The analysis includes the values of columns displacement and ductility. To describe the behaviour of elements under the earthquake action in both - longitudinal and transverse direction, pushover curves were formed.

  15. Forward Affect Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonshtein, Udi; Torem, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a modification of the affect bridge technique. The Forward Affect Bridge enables practitioners to create and maintain hope when it is missing. Hope is relevant for diminishing avoidance and being involved with necessary activities. The main idea is to build up a positive atmosphere in the here and now (relying on rapport), to amplify it, and to project it forward. By using clinical vignettes, the authors illustrate these techniques.

  16. Bridges Expansion Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The survey is concerned with the expansion joints, used in bridge constructions to compensate medium and significant operational linear and spatial displacements between adjacent spans or between bridge span and pier. The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting the modern demands imposed to expansion joints.

  17. Dynamic characteristics of old railway steel bridges in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Maha M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic response of existing railway bridges is influenced by many factors including structural properties, railway traffic speed, and train-to-bridge frequency. Excessive vibrations cause passengers’ discomfort, rail elements deterioration, higher derailment risks, fatigue deformation problems, stress amplification, and eventually high maintenance costs. In such cases, applied remedies include limiting traffic speed or changing bridge mass or stiffness. Traffic induced vibrations can also be mitigated by enhancing structural damping through application of Tuned Mass Dampers. Egypt has one of the oldest railway transportation network with several steel bridges crossing the Nile River, in addition to several canals. In a running project, dynamic properties of selective bridges on the Egyptian railway networks infrastructures are investigated through extensive field testing. The considered bridges cover a wide range of structural properties including simply-supported and continuous bridges, spans ranging between 40 to 90 m, single and double track lines, and open timber bridges. Field tests results are studied; hence, key factors affecting bridge dynamic characteristics are discussed and highlighted. Moreover, results are compared with those extracted from finite element analyses. The project aims at evaluating the possibility of excessive vibration problems while considering different values of train velocities. In the current study, focus is given to two example bridges. Field and numerical results are exhibited and discussed. Eventually, possibility of excessive vibration problems are determined considering different values of train velocities. It was observed that available formulas in current design codes do not capture warping and torsional modes that present fundamental modes for truss bridges. In addition, existing railway bridges do not satisfy serviceability limit states when considering high speed trains.

  18. Multidisciplinarity, Interdisciplinarity, and Bridging Disciplines: A Matter of Process

    OpenAIRE

    Dawn Youngblood

    2007-01-01

    Bridging disciplines have much to teach regarding how to combine analytical tools to tackle problems and questions that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. This article explores interdisciplinary aspects of two long established bridging disciplines--geography and anthropology--in order to consider what the relatively young undertaking labeled “interdisciplinary studies” can learn from their long existence. It considers the fallacy of nomothetic claim as well as the fruitful production ...

  19. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps...

  20. 47 CFR 80.1007 - Bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone installation. 80.1007 Section 80.1007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND... Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1007 Bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone installation. Use of the bridge-to-bridge...

  1. Bridging the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlberg, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    The fixed link between Denmark and Sweden connects two busy cities and a large international airport with many of its travelers and employees. 18,000 vehicles and 160 passenger trains transport each day more than 70,000 people across the combined road and rail Øresund Bridge and through the Øresund...... Tunnel, approximately 25,000 of them critical to the regional work market. Even though the risk analysis states that the likelihood of a long-term closure (100C days) is very low Danish and Swedish transport authorities have demanded that the infrastructure operator conducts a survey of the preparedness...... in its final report to the Danish and Swedish transport authorities while drawing upon experiences from two recent comparable cases of infrastructure disruptions: The Champlain Bridge (2009) and the Forth Road Bridge (2015)....

  2. Development of bridge girder movement criteria for accelerated bridge construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    End diaphragms connect multiple girders to form a bridge superstructure system for effective resistance to earthquake loads. Concrete : girder bridges that include end diaphragms consistently proved to perform well during previous earthquake events. ...

  3. Measurement of the $s$-channel Single Top Quark Cross Section at the CDF Experiment and Contributions to the Evidence of $H\\rightarrow bb$ at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    In this thesis, we present the measurement of the s-channel single top quark production cross section. In the cross section measurement we use data generated by protonantiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF Run II detector. The total data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1.

  4. BUILDING A BETTER GLUTEAL BRIDGE: ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HIP MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG BRIDGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehecka, B J; Edwards, Michael; Haverkamp, Ryan; Martin, Lani; Porter, Kambry; Thach, Kailey; Sack, Richard J; Hakansson, Nils A

    2017-08-01

    Gluteal strength plays a role in injury prevention, normal gait patterns, eliminating pain, and enhancing athletic performance. Research shows high gluteal muscle activity during a single-leg bridge compared to other gluteal strengthening exercises; however, prior studies have primarily measured muscle activity with the active lower extremity starting in 90 ° of knee flexion with an extended contralateral knee. This standard position has caused reports of hamstring cramping, which may impede optimal gluteal strengthening. The purpose of this study was to determine which modified position for the single-leg bridge is best for preferentially activating the gluteus maximus and medius. Cross-Sectional. Twenty-eight healthy males and females aged 18-30 years were tested in five different, randomized single-leg bridge positions. Electromyography (EMG) electrodes were placed on subjects' gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris of their bridge leg (i.e., dominant or kicking leg), as well as the rectus femoris of their contralateral leg. Subjects performed a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for each tested muscle prior to performing five different bridge positions in randomized order. All bridge EMG data were normalized to the corresponding muscle MVIC data. A modified bridge position with the knee of the bridge leg flexed to 135 ° versus the traditional 90 ° of knee flexion demonstrated preferential activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius compared to the traditional single-leg bridge. Hamstring activation significantly decreased (p bridge by flexing the active knee to 135 ° instead of 90 ° minimizes hamstring activity while maintaining high levels of gluteal activation, effectively building a bridge better suited for preferential gluteal activation. 3.

  5. Steel plate girder diaphragm and cross-bracing loads : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Steel bridge designs are integrated so that every : component contributes to structural integrity, : including the concrete bridge deck, which : connects to the girders and makes the structure : rigid. Until the deck is completed and the : concrete i...

  6. Electronic and exchange coupling in a cross-conjugated D-B-A biradical: mechanistic implications for quantum interference effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Martin L; Shultz, David A; Stasiw, Daniel E; Habel-Rodriguez, Diana; Stein, Benjamin; Boyle, Paul D

    2013-10-02

    A combination of variable-temperature EPR spectroscopy, electronic absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been performed on Tp(Cum,Me)Zn(SQ-m-Ph-NN) (1-meta) a donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) biradical that possesses a cross-conjugated meta-phenylene (m-Ph) bridge and a spin singlet ground state. The experimental results have been interpreted in the context of detailed bonding and excited-state computations in order to understand the excited-state electronic structure of 1-meta. The results reveal important excited-state contributions to the ground-state singlet-triplet splitting in this cross-conjugated D-B-A biradical that contribute to our understanding of electronic coupling in cross-conjugated molecules and specifically to quantum interference effects. In contrast to the conjugated isomer, which is a D-B-A biradical possessing a para-phenylene bridge, admixture of a single low-lying singly excited D → A type configuration into the cross-conjugated D-B-A biradical ground state makes a negligible contribution to the ground-state magnetic exchange interaction. Instead, an excited state formed by a Ph-NN (HOMO) → Ph-NN (LUMO) one-electron promotion configurationally mixes into the ground state of the m-Ph bridged D-A biradical. This results in a double (dynamic) spin polarization mechanism as the dominant contributor to ground-state antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the SQ and NN spins. Thus, the dominant exchange mechanism is one that activates the bridge moiety via the spin polarization of a doubly occupied orbital with phenylene bridge character. This mechanism is important, as it enhances the electronic and magnetic communication in cross-conjugated D-B-A molecules where, in the case of 1-meta, the magnetic exchange in the active electron approximation is expected to be J ~ 0 cm(-1). We hypothesize that similar superexchange mechanisms are common to all cross-conjugated D-B-A triads. Our results are compared to

  7. Bridge-Vehicle Impact Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Bridges in New York State have been experiencing close to 200 bridge hits a year. These : accidents are attributed to numerous factors including: improperly stored equipment on trucks; : violation of vehicle posting signs; illegal commercial vehicles...

  8. Existing Steel Railway Bridges Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vičan Josef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes general principles and basis of evaluation of existing railway bridges based on the concept of load-carrying capacity determination. Compared to the design of a new bridge, the modified reliability level for existing bridges evaluation should be considered due to implementation of the additional data related to bridge condition and behaviour obtained from regular inspections. Based on those data respecting the bridge remaining lifetime, a modification of partial safety factors for actions and materials could be respected in the bridge evaluation process. A great attention is also paid to the specific problems of determination of load-caring capacity of steel railway bridges in service. Recommendation for global analysis and methodology for existing steel bridge superstructure load-carrying capacity determination are described too.

  9. Colorado statewide historic bridge inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the Colorado statewide historic bridge inventory was to document and evaluate the National : Register of Historic Places eligibility all on-system highway bridges and grade separation structures built in : Colorado between 1959 and 196...

  10. Strengthening bridges using composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this research project is to outline methodologies for using Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composites to strengthen and rehabilitate reinforced concrete bridge elements. : Infrastructure deterioration and bridge strengthening techniq...

  11. Virginia Bridge Information Systems Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report presents the results of applied data mining of legacy bridge databases, focusing on the Pontis and : National Bridge Inventory databases maintained by the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT). Data : analysis was performed using a...

  12. Uncontrolled concrete bridge parapet cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Ohio Department of Transportation has recently identified the problem of wide-spread premature cracking of concrete bridge : parapets throughout its District 12 region (Northeast Ohio). Many of the bridge decks that contain these prematurely crac...

  13. What Contributes to the Activeness of Ethnic Minority Patients with Chronic Illnesses Seeking Allied Health Services? A Cross-Sectional Study in Rural Western China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangfeng Tang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Actively seeking health services lies at the core of effective models of chronic disease self-management and contributes to promoting the utilization of allied health services (AHS. However, the use of AHS by ethnic minority Chinese, especially the elderly living in rural areas, has not received much attention. This study, therefore, aims to explore the association between personal characteristics and the activeness of ethnic minority patients with chronic diseases in rural areas of western China seeking AHS. A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect data on the socio-demographic and economic characteristics, health knowledge level and health communication channels of the sampled patients. A logistic regression model was used to examine the association of these predictors with the activeness of the surveyed patients in seeking AHS. A total of 1078 ethnic minorities over 45 years old who had chronic conditions were randomly selected from three western provinces in China and were interviewed in 2014. It is found that the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS is the most salient predictor affecting the activeness of Chinese ethnic minorities in seeking AHS. The probability is 8.51 times greater for those insured with NCMS to actively seek AHS than those without (95% Confidence Interval (CI 4.76–15.21; p < 0.001. Moreover, participants between 60 and 70 years old and those who have five to six household members are more likely to seek AHS compared with other social groups (Odds Ratio (OR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.28–2.97, p = 0.007; OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.15–2.36, p = 0.002. However, the activeness of patients seeking AHS is lower for those who have better household economic conditions. Besides socio-demographic predictors, the Chinese ethnic minorities’ activeness in seeking AHS is clearly associated with the communication channels used for receiving health information, which include direct communication with doctors (OR = 5.18, 95% CI 3.58–7

  14. Developing green bridge rating system using Simos’ procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Marzouk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development principles have been implemented in various sectors including construction. Proper development and operation of infrastructure projects, such as bridges and highways, can contribute significantly to the mission of sustainable development. In this respect, there is little existing work on appropriate methods to assess the sustainability performance of bridge projects. This paper introduces a key-list of gathered important criteria that affect the sustainability of bridge projects. Various construction industry standards have been reviewed in order to decide the criteria that influence sustainability of bridge projects. The initial list of criteria has been identified by unstructured interviews. Then, structured interviews and questionnaire survey have been conducted to identify the final list that is deemed important in rating green bridges. Various construction industry standards have been reviewed to decide on the criteria that influence sustainability of bridge projects. Final criteria results from this paper are used to develop a green bridge rating system to achieve sustainable development. Degree of importance and weights of these criteria are determined using Simos’ procedure. Five classes of bridges are proposed to judge their status with respect to sustainability, with these being Non-Green, Certified, Green, total Green, and Evergreen.

  15. Building a Straw Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching Science, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This project is for a team of students (groups of two or three are ideal) to design and construct a model of a single-span bridge, using plastic drinking straws as the building material. All steps of the design, construction, testing and critiquing stages should be recorded by students in a journal. Students may like to include labelled diagrams,…

  16. Bridge the Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Mel; Cufaude, Jeffrey B.

    1989-01-01

    This document consists of two paired articles: the first, "Preparing Faculty Out of Class Experiences," by Mel Klein, and the second, "Help Advisers Be More Than Ghost Signatures," by Jeffrey B. Calfaude. Each article shares insights on how faculty advisers "bridge the gap" between students and faculty. When faculty members are asked to advise…

  17. Bridging the gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Astronomy is flourishing in China, with impressive achievements in instrument design and construction matched by a higher international research profile. Yet there remains a mismatch between the facilities available and those needed to progress. Sue Bowler wonders how the country will bridge the gap.

  18. Quantum Bidding in Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiq Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantum methods allow us to reduce communication complexity of some computational tasks, with several separated partners, beyond classical constraints. Nevertheless, experimental demonstrations of this have thus far been limited to some abstract problems, far away from real-life tasks. We show here, and demonstrate experimentally, that the power of reduction of communication complexity can be harnessed to gain an advantage in a famous, immensely popular, card game—bridge. The essence of a winning strategy in bridge is efficient communication between the partners. The rules of the game allow only a specific form of communication, of very low complexity (effectively, one has strong limitations on the number of exchanged bits. Surprisingly, our quantum technique does not violate the existing rules of the game (as there is no increase in information flow. We show that our quantum bridge auction corresponds to a biased nonlocal Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt game, which is equivalent to a 2→1 quantum random access code. Thus, our experiment is also a realization of such protocols. However, this correspondence is not complete, which enables the bridge players to have efficient strategies regardless of the quality of their detectors.

  19. Bridge over troubled water?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Nannestad, Peter; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2008-01-01

    The problem of integrating non-Western immigrants into Western welfare states is the focus of this paper. To address this issue, we suggest a social capital approach in which we apply the conceptual pair of bridging social capital (BR), which connects an individual to the broader social structure...

  20. Bridging the Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Colin

    2009-01-01

    The political context of the conversion of the Historic Tramway Bridge, adjacent to Sandon Point in Bulli (NSW, Australia), and how this was exploited to serve predetermined ends, illustrates that technologies can be designed to have particular social (and political) effects. Through reflection on this relatively small engineering project, this…

  1. Revised Rules for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Jensen, F. M.; Middleton, C.

    This paper is based on research performed for the Highway Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: Concrete Bridges" It contains details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability profiles....... These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for Concrete Bridges....

  2. Application of Economic Indicators to Asses the Bridges of Rehablitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitoňák Martin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to point out the advantage of Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA and its economic indicators to assess a rehabilitation of bridges. The paper includes short example of assessment of the project economic efficiency in which economic indicators are applied in order to evaluate of two technology project variants of bridge object rehabilitation. It quantifies and compares the economic results of alternative 1 with the monolithic prestress construction and alternative 2, with the composite steel - concrete bridge. The contribution reflects the current practice of economic analysis recommended by the Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development.

  3. Application of Economic Indicators to Asses the Bridges of Rehablitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoňák, Martin; Valuch, Milan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to point out the advantage of Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) and its economic indicators to assess a rehabilitation of bridges. The paper includes short example of assessment of the project economic efficiency in which economic indicators are applied in order to evaluate of two technology project variants of bridge object rehabilitation. It quantifies and compares the economic results of alternative 1 with the monolithic prestress construction and alternative 2, with the composite steel - concrete bridge. The contribution reflects the current practice of economic analysis recommended by the Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development.

  4. Fatigue analysis and life prediction of composite highway bridge decks under traffic loading

    OpenAIRE

    Leitão,Fernando N.; Silva,José Guilherme S. da; Andrade,Sebastião A. L. de

    2013-01-01

    Steel and composite (steel-concrete) highway bridges are currently subjected to dynamic actions of variable magnitude due to convoy of vehicles crossing on the deck pavement. These dynamic actions can generate the nucleation of fractures or even their propagation on the bridge deck structure. Proper consideration of all of the aspects mentioned pointed our team to develop an analysis methodology with emphasis to evaluate the stresses through a dynamic analysis of highway bridge decks includin...

  5. Natural canopy bridges effectively mitigate tropical forest fragmentation for arboreal mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Tremaine; Carrasco-Rueda, Farah; Alonso, Alfonso; Kolowski, Joseph; Deichmann, Jessica L

    2017-06-20

    Linear infrastructure development and resulting habitat fragmentation are expanding in Neotropical forests, and arboreal mammals may be disproportionately impacted by these linear habitat clearings. Maintaining canopy connectivity through preservation of connecting branches (i.e. natural canopy bridges) may help mitigate that impact. Using camera traps, we evaluated crossing rates of a pipeline right-of-way in a control area with no bridges and in a test area where 13 bridges were left by the pipeline construction company. Monitoring all canopy crossing points for a year (7,102 canopy camera nights), we confirmed bridge use by 25 mammal species from 12 families. With bridge use beginning immediately after exposure and increasing over time, use rates were over two orders of magnitude higher than on the ground. We also found a positive relationship between a bridge's use rate and the number of species that used it, suggesting well-used bridges benefit multiple species. Data suggest bridge use may be related to a combination of bridge branch connectivity, multiple connections, connectivity to adjacent forest, and foliage cover. Given the high use rate and minimal cost, we recommend all linear infrastructure projects in forests with arboreal mammal populations include canopy bridges.

  6. Effects of bridge construction on songbirds and small mammals at Blennerhassett Island, Ohio River, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Joshua A; Angus, Norse B; Anderson, James T

    2013-09-01

    Construction of man-made objects such as roads and bridges may have impacts on wildlife depending on species or location. We investigated songbirds and small mammals along the Ohio River, WV, USA at a new bridge both before and after construction and at a bridge crossing that was present throughout the study. Comparisons were made at each site over three time periods (1985-1987 [Phase I] and 1998-2000 [Phase II] [pre-construction], 2007-2009 [Phase III] [post-construction]) and at three distances (0, 100, 300 m) from the bridge or proposed bridge location. Overall, 70 songbirds and 10 small mammals were detected during the study. Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and rock pigeons (Columba livia) showed high affinity for bridges (P 0.05). Species richness and diversity for songbirds and small mammals did not differ before and after bridge construction (P > 0.05). We found that most species sampled did not respond to the bridge crossing, and believe that the bridge is not causing any measurable negative density impacts to the species we investigated. The new bridge does provide habitat for exotic rock pigeons that are adjusted to man-made structures for nesting.

  7. Bridge the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on photo projects organised for teenage refugees by the Society for Humanistic Photography (Berlin, Germany). These projects, named Bridge the Gap I (2015), and Bridge the Gap II (2016), were carried out in Berlin and brought together teenagers with refugee and German-majorit...... was produced – and sometimes not produced - within the projects. The importance of memory work in the context of refugee resettlement is often overlooked, but is particularly relevant when cultural encounters are organised in museums and exhibition galleries.......-majority backgrounds to experiment with digital photography and create joint exhibitions. Drawing on concepts from memory studies, such as travelling memory and multidirectional memory, the author examines the projects as interventions in German and Berlin memory cultures, and examines how multidirectional memory...

  8. Bridging Classroom Language Ethnography

    OpenAIRE

    Grenfell, Michael James

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED Paper #5: Bridging Classroom Language Ethnography, New Literacy Studies and Bourdieu?s Social Philosophy: Principles and Practice The purpose of this paper is to analyze and synthesize the various ways that classroom language ethnography, NLS, and Bourdieu?s social philosophy, were integrated. The goal of the analysis and synthesis is to provide a fresh perspective and fruitful insights on literacy in all its manifestations that provides the foundations for a more robust...

  9. Contributions of major smoking-related diseases to reduction in life expectancy associated with smoking in Chinese adults: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a prominent risk factor for a wide range of diseases. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of smoking on deaths from major smoking-related diseases (neoplasms, vascular diseases and respiratory diseases) in Chinese adults by estimating the potential gains in life expectancy (LE) that would accrue from eliminating deaths from these diseases, and to determine the contribution of each disease to the reduction in LE associated with smoking. Methods Two cohorts of Chinese smokers and non-smokers were constructed from a retrospective national mortality survey that had been conducted in 1989–1991 and included one million all-cause deaths among adults during 1986–1988 in 103 geographical regions. For each cohort, potential gains in LE by eliminating deaths from each major smoking-related disease were estimated. The contributions of each disease to smoking-associated reduction in LE were assessed using the LE decomposition approach. Results Among the major smoking-related diseases, it was estimated that elimination of vascular diseases would provide the greatest potential gain in LE (years), regardless of smoking status. The gains for smokers versus non-smokers in populations of urban men, urban women, rural men and rural women aged 35 years were 3.5 vs. 4.3, 3.8 vs. 4.1, 2.4 vs. 3.0, and 2.6 vs. 2.9 years, respectively. Respiratory diseases contributed most to smoking-associated LE reductions in urban women, rural men and rural women of 43.6%, 46.4%, and 62.9%, respectively. In urban men, neoplasms contributed most to smoking-associated LE reduction, their contribution being estimated as 45.8%. Conclusions Respiratory disease has the greatest influence on the LE reduction associated with smoking. Thus, smoking prevention could significantly reduce deaths from respiratory disease and improve LE. PMID:24321034

  10. Sunshine Skyway Bridge monitoring phase I : system assessment and integration recommendations [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    At over five miles long, the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, crossing Tampa Bay where it meets the Gulf of Mexico, is one of the worlds longest cable-stayed bridges. The pier-supported approaches rise to meet the center section where cables radiating from...

  11. Structural health monitoring in end-of-life prediction for steel bridges subjected to fatigue cracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, T.; Courage, W.M.G.; Maljaars, J.; Meerveld, H. van; Paulissen, J.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Slobbe, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a monitoring and modelling methodology to assess the current and future conditions of steel bridges subjected to fatigue cracking. Steel bridges are subjected to fatigue cracking as a result of fluctuating stresses caused by the crossing of heavy vehicles. Specifically for

  12. Study on seismic behaviour of integral concrete bridges with different skew angles through fragility curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Reza ُُShiravand

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bridges are key elements in urban transportation system and should be designed to sustain earthquake induced damages to be utilized after earthquake. Extensive damages during last earthquakes highlighted the importance of seismic assessment and damage estimation of bridges. Skewness is one of the primary parameters effects on seismic behavior of bridges. Skew bridges are defined as bridges with skew angle piers and abutments. In these bridges, the piers have some degrees of skewness due to construction restrictions, such as those caused by crossing a waterway, railway line or road. This paper aims to investigate seismic behavior of skew concrete bridges using damage criteria and estimate probability of piers damage with fragility curves. To this end, three types of concrete bridges with two, three and four spans and varying skew angles of 00 ,100, 200 and 300 are modeled with finite element software. Seismic responses of bridge piers under 10 earthquake ground motion records are calculated using incremental dynamic analysis. Following, damage criteria proposed by Mackie and Stojadinovic are used to define damage limits of bridge piers in four damage states of slight, moderate, extensive and complete and bridge fragility curves are developed. The results show that increasing skew angles increases the probability of damage occurrence, particularly in extensive and complete damage states.

  13. Lifestyle-Related Factors Contributing to Decline in Knee Extension Strength among Elderly Women: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumi Kojima

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional and 4-year longitudinal cohort study aimed to clarify how various lifestyle-related variables affect knee extension strength in elderly Japanese women. The participants were community-dwelling women (n = 575 living in the Itabashi Ward of Tokyo, Japan aged 75-85 years at baseline (in 2008 who returned for a follow-up examination 4 years later (in 2012. Maximum isometric knee extension strength in the dominant leg was measured during comprehensive medical check-ups at baseline and follow-up. Interviews with participants included questions on their history of 11 diseases and lifestyle-related factors such as physical activity as well as dietary, smoking, and drinking habits. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses yielded inconsistent results regarding the associations between lifestyle-related factors and knee extension strength. While going out more frequently and regular physical exercise positively affected baseline knee extension strength, they did not affect knee extension strength in the longitudinal analysis. The longitudinal analysis revealed that more frequent intake of soy products or green and yellow vegetables at baseline decreased age-related knee extension strength decline. The inconsistent results from the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses indicate that conducting both types of analyses is crucial for researching this type of subject. The present study demonstrates that the age-related decline in muscle strength is lower in those who frequently eat soy products or green and yellow vegetables. Thus, recommending higher intake of soy products, and green and yellow vegetables for the elderly might help maintain their muscle health.

  14. Lifestyle-Related Factors Contributing to Decline in Knee Extension Strength among Elderly Women: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Narumi; Kim, Miji; Saito, Kyoko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Yoshida, Yuko; Hirano, Hirohiko; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takao; Kim, Hunkyung

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional and 4-year longitudinal cohort study aimed to clarify how various lifestyle-related variables affect knee extension strength in elderly Japanese women. The participants were community-dwelling women (n = 575) living in the Itabashi Ward of Tokyo, Japan aged 75-85 years at baseline (in 2008) who returned for a follow-up examination 4 years later (in 2012). Maximum isometric knee extension strength in the dominant leg was measured during comprehensive medical check-ups at baseline and follow-up. Interviews with participants included questions on their history of 11 diseases and lifestyle-related factors such as physical activity as well as dietary, smoking, and drinking habits. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses yielded inconsistent results regarding the associations between lifestyle-related factors and knee extension strength. While going out more frequently and regular physical exercise positively affected baseline knee extension strength, they did not affect knee extension strength in the longitudinal analysis. The longitudinal analysis revealed that more frequent intake of soy products or green and yellow vegetables at baseline decreased age-related knee extension strength decline. The inconsistent results from the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses indicate that conducting both types of analyses is crucial for researching this type of subject. The present study demonstrates that the age-related decline in muscle strength is lower in those who frequently eat soy products or green and yellow vegetables. Thus, recommending higher intake of soy products, and green and yellow vegetables for the elderly might help maintain their muscle health.

  15. Myofilament dysfunction contributes to impaired myocardial contraction in the infarct border zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimkunas, Rafael; Makwana, Om; Spaulding, Kimberly; Bazargan, Mona; Khazalpour, Michael; Takaba, Kiyoaki; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Lovett, David H; Simpson, Paul C; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Baker, Anthony J

    2014-10-15

    After myocardial infarction, a poorly contracting nonischemic border zone forms adjacent to the infarct. The cause of border zone dysfunction is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the myofilament mechanisms involved in postinfarction border zone dysfunction. Two weeks after anteroapical infarction of sheep hearts, we studied in vitro isometric and isotonic contractions of demembranated myocardium from the infarct border zone and a zone remote from the infarct. Maximal force development (Fmax) of the border zone myocardium was reduced by 31 ± 2% versus the remote zone myocardium (n = 6/group, P < 0.0001). Decreased border zone Fmax was not due to a reduced content of contractile material, as assessed histologically, and from myosin content. Furthermore, decreased border zone Fmax did not involve altered cross-bridge kinetics, as assessed by muscle shortening velocity and force development kinetics. Decreased border zone Fmax was associated with decreased cross-bridge formation, as assessed from muscle stiffness in the absence of ATP where cross-bridge formation should be maximized (rigor stiffness was reduced 34 ± 6%, n = 5, P = 0.011 vs. the remote zone). Furthermore, the border zone myocardium had significantly reduced phosphorylation of myosin essential light chain (ELC; 41 ± 10%, n = 4, P < 0.05). However, for animals treated with doxycycline, an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, rigor stiffness and ELC phosphorylation were not reduced in the border zone myocardium, suggesting that doxycycline had a protective effect. In conclusion, myofilament dysfunction contributes to postinfarction border zone dysfunction, myofilament dysfunction involves impaired cross-bridge formation and decreased ELC phosphorylation, and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition may be beneficial for limiting postinfarct border zone dysfunction.

  16. Bridge Suture for Successful McDonald Emergency Cerclage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Hori, Yoshiaki; Shirafuji, Aya; Kato, Mitsunori; Kato, Jyun; Kobayashi, Hiroto; Tsuchida, Toru; Fukae, Tsukasa

    2017-01-01

    To create awareness about a surgical technique termed bridge suture, which is performed as a pretreatment before a McDonald cerclage is performed on an emergency to treat severe cervical insufficiency. Procedures for bridge suture were reviewed in detail and outcomes of 16 patients treated with bridge suture followed by McDonald cerclage were evaluated retrospectively. Using the bridge suture, the edges of uterine cervix were temporarily sutured and the external uterine os was closed, while the hourglass-shaped fetal membranes were concomitantly confined within the cervix; subsequently, a McDonald cerclage was performed. Over a 22-year period, 16 patients with a dilated cervix and bulging fetal membranes were treated using the technique of bridge suture followed by an emergency cerclage. The mean gestational age at cerclage was 22.5 weeks; the mean gestational age at delivery was 30.7 weeks; and the mean interval between cerclage and delivery was 8.2 weeks. In 15 out of 16 cases, cerclage was performed without encountering any complications. No maternal complications, including cervical laceration, were observed. The mean body weight of 17 neonates, including that of a twin, was 1,516 g and of them, 15 neonates survived. The important outcome of bridge suture is the replacement of fetal membranes back into the uterine cavity before McDonald's cerclage is performed. Pretreatment with bridge suture may facilitate the performance of a successful emergency cerclage and contribute to good maternal and neonatal outcomes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Contributions of major smoking-related diseases to reduction in life expectancy associated with smoking in Chinese adults: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Wei; Jiang, Jingmei; Li, Junyao; Zeng, Xianjia; Zou, Xiaonong; Wu, Yanping; Chen, Yuanli; Zhao, Ping; Hou, Lei; Pang, Haiyu; Liu, Boqi

    2013-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a prominent risk factor for a wide range of diseases. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of smoking on deaths from major smoking-related diseases (neoplasms, vascular diseases and respiratory diseases) in Chinese adults by estimating the potential gains in life expectancy (LE) that would accrue from eliminating deaths from these diseases, and to determine the contribution of each disease to the reduction in LE associated with smoking. Methods Two co...

  18. Fatigue-Prone Details in Steel Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Heshmati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the results of a comprehensive investigation including more than 100 fatigue damage cases, reported for steel and composite bridges. The damage cases are categorized according to types of detail. The mechanisms behind fatigue damage in each category are identified and studied. It was found that more than 90% of all reported damage cases are of deformation-induced type and generated by some kind of unintentional or otherwise overlooked interaction between different load-carrying members or systems in the bridge. Poor detailing, with unstiffened gaps and abrupt changes in stiffness at the connections between different members were also found to contribute to fatigue cracking in many details.

  19. Simulation of multivariate diffusion bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Mogens; Finch, Samuel; Sørensen, Michael

    We propose simple methods for multivariate diffusion bridge simulation, which plays a fundamental role in simulation-based likelihood and Bayesian inference for stochastic differential equations. By a novel application of classical coupling methods, the new approach generalizes a previously...... proposed simulation method for one-dimensional bridges to the mulit-variate setting. First a method of simulating approzimate, but often very accurate, diffusion bridges is proposed. These approximate bridges are used as proposal for easily implementable MCMC algorithms that produce exact diffusion bridges....... The new method is much more generally applicable than previous methods. Another advantage is that the new method works well for diffusion bridges in long intervals because the computational complexity of the method is linear in the length of the interval. In a simulation study the new method performs well...

  20. Towards Sustainable Construction: Life Cycle Assessment of Railway Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Guangli

    Since last few decades, the increased pressure from the environmental issues of natural resource depletion, global warming and air pollution have posed a great challenge worldwide. Among all the industrial fields, bridge infrastructures and their belonged construction sector contribute to a wide....... The life cycle assessment (LCA) method has been verified as a systematic tool, which enables the fully assessment and complete comparison for the environmental impact among different bridge options through a life cycle manner. The study presented in this thesis is focused on railway bridges, as the LCA...... performance. However, the environmental profile of the structure is though very case specific; one cannot draw a general conclusion for a certain type of bridge without performing the LCA study. The case study has found that the impact of material manufacture phase is mostly identified significant among...

  1. Steel framing strategies for highly skewed bridges to reduce/eliminate distortion near skewed supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Different problems in straight skewed steel I-girder bridges are often associated with the methods used for detailing the cross-frames. Use of theoretical terms to describe these detailing methods and absence of complete and simplified design approac...

  2. IceBridge ZLS Dynamic Gravity Meter Time-Registered L1B Vertical Accelerations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The IceBridge ZLS Dynamic Gravity Meter Time-Registered L1B Vertical Accelerations (IGZLS1B) data set contains vertical, cross body, and along body acceleration...

  3. MODERN ASPECTS OF BRIDGES MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Kazakevych

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The major concepts of the elaboration and realization of the bridge construction monitoring systemic approach are presented in this paper. The main peculiarity of the bridge monitoring modern aspect is pointed out here, namely, the transition from the demands of providing the reliability to the demands of providing the whole complex of the structure consumer qualities. The criteria of diagnostics of the bridge exploitation reliability as the fundamental aim of monitoring are formulated here.

  4. Bridging the Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The view from the top of Hoover Dam looking south over the Colorado River was breathtaking! My friend and I stood there in silence, taking it all in. I had visited Hoover Dam on many occasions, but this visit was the first time I had seen the arch bridge that carries US Route 93 over the river and joins Nevada and Arizona states. It was a beautiful day, the temperature was perfect, and there was a slight breeze coming from Lake Mead behind us as we took in the view.

  5. Bridging the Emissions Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Blok, K.

    2012-01-01

    The analyses in Chapters 2 and 3 of this report concluded that the emissions gap in 2020 will likely be between 8 and 13 GtCO2e. The chapters also estimated the difference between BaU emissions in 2020 and the emissions level consistent with a “likely” chance of staying within the 2°C target to be 14 GtCO2e. This chapter explores the potential for bridging this gap using a sector policy approach. Firstly, the chapter provides a summary and update of the estimated emission reduction potential ...

  6. Bridging biometrics and forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yanjun; Osadciw, Lisa Ann

    2008-02-01

    This paper is a survey on biometrics and forensics, especially on the techniques and applications of face recognition in forensics. This paper describes the differences and connections between biometrics and forensics, and bridges each other by formulating the conditions when biometrics can be applied in forensics. Under these conditions, face recognition, as a non-intrusive and non-contact biometrics, is discussed in detail as an illustration of applying biometrics in forensics. The discussion on face recognition covers different approaches, feature extractions, and decision procedures. The advantages and limitations of biometrics in forensic applications are also addressed.

  7. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which do...

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of fracture critical bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Two-girder steel bridges are classified as fracture critical bridges based on the definition given in the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications. In a fracture critical bridge a failure of a tension member leads to collapse of the bridge. However, ...

  9. Environmental life cycle assessment comparison between two bridge types: reinforced concrete bridge and steel composite bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Guangli; Karoumi, Raid

    2013-01-01

    The concept of sustainable construction has attracted an increased attention. Bridge infrastructures and their belonged construction activities consume considerable material and energy, which is responsible for large environmental burdens. However, the environmental assessment of bridges has...... not been integrated into the decision-making process. This paper presents a systematic LCA method for quantifying the environmental impacts for bridges. The comparison study is performed between a reinforced concrete bridge and a steel bridge as an alternative design, with several key maintenance and EOL...... scenarios outlined. LCA study is performed with the ReCiPe methodology with life cycle inventories data from public database. Five selected mid-point level impact categories and the energy consumption are presented. The result shows that the steel bridge has a better environmental performance due...

  10. The contribution of snacks to dietary intake and their association with eating location among Norwegian adults - results from a cross-sectional dietary survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, Jannicke B; Løken, Elin B; Wandel, Margareta; Andersen, Lene F

    2015-04-12

    Snack consumption has been reported to increase over recent decades. Little is known about possible associations between snack composition and snack eating location. In the present study, we aimed to describe the contribution of snacks to dietary intake in Norwegian adults and to investigate whether the composition of snacks differed according to where they were eaten. Dietary data were collected in 2010 and 2011 using two telephone administered 24 h recalls about four weeks apart. In total, 1787 participants aged 18-70 years completed two recalls. The recorded eating locations were at home, other private household, work/school, restaurant/cafe/fast-food outlet and travel/meeting. Snacks contributed to 17% and 21% of the energy intake in men and women, respectively. Compared with main meals, snacks had a higher fiber density (g/MJ) and contained a higher percentage of energy from carbohydrates, added sugars and alcohol, while the percentages of energy from fat and protein were lower. The top five energy-contributing food groups from snacks were cakes, fruits, sugar/sweets, bread and alcoholic beverages. Snacks were mostly eaten at home (58% of all snacks) or at work/school (23% of all snacks). Snacks consumed at work/school contained less energy, had a higher percentage of energy from carbohydrates and had lower percentages of energy from added sugars, alcohol and fat than snacks consumed at home. Snacks consumed during visits to private households and at restaurants/cafe/fast-food outlets contained more energy, had a higher percentage of energy from fat and had a lower fiber density than snacks consumed at home. We conclude that snacks are an important part of the diet and involve the consumption of both favorable and less favorable foods. Snacks eaten at home or at work/school were generally healthier than snacks consumed during visits to other private households or at restaurants/cafe/fast-food outlets. Nutritional educators should recommend healthy snack

  11. Vortex-Induced Vibration of a Cable-Stayed Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of a cable-stayed bridge that consists of a simply supported four-cable-stayed deck beam and two rigid towers, subjected to a distributed vortex shedding force on the deck beam with a uniform rectangular cross section, is studied in this work. The cable-stayed bridge is modeled as a continuous system, and the distributed vortex shedding force on the deck beam is modeled using Ehsan-Scanlan’s model. Orthogonality conditions of exact mode shapes of the linearized undamped cable-stayed bridge model are employed to convert coupled governing partial differential equations of the original cable-stayed bridge model with damping to a set of ordinary differential equations by using Galerkin method. The dynamic response of the cable-stayed bridge is calculated using Runge-Kutta-Felhberg method in MATLAB for two cases with and without geometric nonlinear terms. Convergence of the dynamic response from Galerkin method is investigated. Numerical results show that the geometric nonlinearities of stay cables have significant influence on vortex-induced vibration of the cable-stayed bridge. There are different limit cycles in the case of neglecting the geometric nonlinear terms, and there are only one limit cycle and chaotic responses in the case of considering the geometric nonlinear terms.

  12. DRAFT MODEL FOR CREATING A FINANCIAL INDICATORS OF BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Strelcova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a problem of developing, defining and applying budgetary indicators of engineering constructions, and particularly bridges. It is a draft of a Model for development of budgetary indicators of bridge construction in the pre-investment phase of a project. It could, according to classification and evaluation in terms of criteria and search for the most accurate valuation unit of complex structures such as bridge construction, serve investors and public administration authorities for rapid investment planning and professional control of completed buildings. Such a unique tool has never been developed in the Czech Republic so far. Bridges as buildings complement any landscape and in the outer parts of cities, they often establish a viewpoint. They belong among important parts of any highway or expressway. Without them, it would be impossible to establish grade-separated crossings with other roads - roads, railway lines or sections of rivers. They are also important in overcoming obstacles of natural and artificial character such as deep valleys, lakes, or steep mountainsides. The aim of the paper is to analyse a current state of the valuation of bridges and the subsequent establishment and validation of the Model for the development of budgetary indicators of the bridge construction.

  13. Cross talk between AT1 receptors and Toll-like receptor 4 in microglia contributes to angiotensin II-derived ROS production in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancardi, Vinicia Campana; Stranahan, Alexis M; Krause, Eric G; de Kloet, Annette D; Stern, Javier E

    2016-02-01

    ANG II is thought to increase sympathetic outflow by increasing oxidative stress and promoting local inflammation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. However, the relative contributions of inflammation and oxidative stress to sympathetic drive remain poorly understood, and the underlying cellular and molecular targets have yet to be examined. ANG II has been shown to enhance Toll-like receptor (TLR)4-mediated signaling on microglia. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine whether ANG II-mediated activation of microglial TLR4 signaling is a key molecular target initiating local oxidative stress in the PVN. We found TLR4 and ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA expression in hypothalamic microglia, providing molecular evidence for the potential interaction between these two receptors. In hypothalamic slices, ANG II induced microglial activation within the PVN (∼65% increase, P < 0.001), an effect that was blunted in the absence of functional TLR4. ANG II increased ROS production, as indicated by dihydroethidium fluorescence, within the PVN of rats and mice (P < 0.0001 in both cases), effects that were also dependent on the presence of functional TLR4. The microglial inhibitor minocycline attenuated ANG II-mediated ROS production, yet ANG II effects persisted in PVN single-minded 1-AT1a knockout mice, supporting the contribution of a non-neuronal source (likely microglia) to ANG II-driven ROS production in the PVN. Taken together, these results support functional interactions between AT1 receptors and TLR4 in mediating ANG II-dependent microglial activation and oxidative stress within the PVN. More broadly, our results support a functional interaction between the central renin-angiotensin system and innate immunity in the regulation of neurohumoral outflows from the PVN. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. 47 CFR 80.163 - Operator requirements of the Bridge-to-Bridge Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operator requirements of the Bridge-to-Bridge... Requirements § 80.163 Operator requirements of the Bridge-to-Bridge Act. Each ship subject to the Bridge-to-Bridge Act must have on board a radio operator who holds a restricted radiotelephone operator permit or...

  15. 47 CFR 80.331 - Bridge-to-bridge communication procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bridge-to-bridge communication procedure. 80..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.331 Bridge-to-bridge communication procedure. (a) Vessels subject to the Bridge-to-Bridge Act transmitting on the designated navigational frequency must conduct...

  16. Field performance of timber bridges. 7, Connell Lake stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. E. Hislop; M. A. Ritter

    The Connell Lake bridge was constructed in early 1991 on the Tongass National Forest, Alaska, as a demonstration bridge under the Timber Bridge Initiative. The bridge is a stress-laminated deck structure with an approximate 36-ft length and 18-ft width and is the first known stress-laminated timber bridge constructed in Alaska. Performance of the bridge was monitored...

  17. Can Integrated Watershed Management Contribute to Improvement of Public Health? A Cross-Sectional Study from Hilly Tribal Villages in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S. Nerkar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Tribal people living in hilly areas suffer from water scarcity in many parts of the world, including India. Water scarcity adversely impacts all aspects of life, including public health. Implementation of an Integrated Watershed Management Programme (IWMP can help solve the problems arising out of water scarcity in such areas. However, the knowledge about and views of the water scarcity sufferers on the public health implications of IWMP have not been well documented. This cross-sectional study was performed in six purposively selected tribal villages located in Maharashtra, India. In three of the villages IWMP had been implemented (IWMV, but not in the other three (NWMV. The head of each household in all villages was interviewed using a questionnaire covering various public health aspects relevant to the villages. A total of 286/313 (92% households participated in the study. Compared to NWMV, respondents in IWMV experienced significantly lesser prolonged water scarcity (OR = 0.39, had greater number of toilets (OR = 6.95, cultivated more variety of crops (OR = 2.61, had lower migration (OR = 0.59, higher number of girls continuing education (OR = 3.04 and better utilized modern healthcare facilities in the antenatal, natal and postnatal period (OR = 3.75, 2.57, 4.88 respectively. Thus, tribal people in IWMP-implemented villages reported advantages in many aspects of public health.

  18. Contributing influences of work environment on sleep quantity and quality of nursing assistants in long-term care facilities: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; McEnany, Geoffry Phillips; Gore, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The effect of shift work on nurses' sleep is well-studied, but there are other challenging aspects of health care work that might also affect the sleep of direct caregivers. This study examined the influence of the long-term care work environment on sleep quantity and quality of nursing assistants. A cross-sectional survey collected data from 650 nursing assistants in 15 long-term care facilities; 46% reported short sleep duration and 23% reported poor sleep quality. A simple additive index of the number of beneficial work features (up to 7) was constructed for analysis with Poisson regression. With each unit increase of beneficial work features, nursing assistants were 7% less likely to report short sleep duration and 17% less likely to report poor sleep quality. These results suggest that effective workplace interventions should address a variety of work stressors, not only work schedule arrangements, in order to improve nursing assistants' sleep health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Can integrated watershed management contribute to improvement of public health? A cross-sectional study from hilly tribal villages in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerkar, Sandeep S; Pathak, Ashish; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Tamhankar, Ashok J

    2015-02-27

    Tribal people living in hilly areas suffer from water scarcity in many parts of the world, including India. Water scarcity adversely impacts all aspects of life, including public health. Implementation of an Integrated Watershed Management Programme (IWMP) can help solve the problems arising out of water scarcity in such areas. However, the knowledge about and views of the water scarcity sufferers on the public health implications of IWMP have not been well documented. This cross-sectional study was performed in six purposively selected tribal villages located in Maharashtra, India. In three of the villages IWMP had been implemented (IWMV), but not in the other three (NWMV). The head of each household in all villages was interviewed using a questionnaire covering various public health aspects relevant to the villages. A total of 286/313 (92%) households participated in the study. Compared to NWMV, respondents in IWMV experienced significantly lesser prolonged water scarcity (OR=0.39), had greater number of toilets (OR=6.95), cultivated more variety of crops (OR=2.61), had lower migration (OR=0.59), higher number of girls continuing education (OR=3.04) and better utilized modern healthcare facilities in the antenatal, natal and postnatal period (OR=3.75, 2.57, 4.88 respectively). Thus, tribal people in IWMP-implemented villages reported advantages in many aspects of public health.

  20. Salt-bridge networks within globular and disordered proteins: characterizing trends for designable interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sankar; Mukharjee, Debasish

    2017-07-01

    There has been considerable debate about the contribution of salt bridges to the stabilization of protein folds, in spite of their participation in crucial protein functions. Salt bridges appear to contribute to the activity-stability trade-off within proteins by bringing high-entropy charged amino acids into close contacts during the course of their functions. The current study analyzes the modes of association of salt bridges (in terms of networks) within globular proteins and at protein-protein interfaces. While the most common and trivial type of salt bridge is the isolated salt bridge, bifurcated salt bridge appears to be a distinct salt-bridge motif having a special topology and geometry. Bifurcated salt bridges are found ubiquitously in proteins and interprotein complexes. Interesting and attractive examples presenting different modes of interaction are highlighted. Bifurcated salt bridges appear to function as molecular clips that are used to stitch together large surface contours at interacting protein interfaces. The present work also emphasizes the key role of salt-bridge-mediated interactions in the partial folding of proteins containing long stretches of disordered regions. Salt-bridge-mediated interactions seem to be pivotal to the promotion of "disorder-to-order" transitions in small disordered protein fragments and their stabilization upon binding. The results obtained in this work should help to guide efforts to elucidate the modus operandi of these partially disordered proteins, and to conceptualize how these proteins manage to maintain the required amount of disorder even in their bound forms. This work could also potentially facilitate explorations of geometrically specific designable salt bridges through the characterization of composite salt-bridge networks. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  1. Existence of Torsional Solitons in a Beam Model of Suspension Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benci, Vieri; Fortunato, Donato; Gazzola, Filippo

    2017-11-01

    This paper studies the existence of solitons, namely stable solitary waves, in an idealized suspension bridge. The bridge is modeled as an unbounded degenerate plate, that is, a central beam with cross sections, and displays two degrees of freedom: the vertical displacement of the beam and the torsional angles of the cross sections. Under fairly general assumptions, we prove the existence of solitons. Under the additional assumption of large tension in the sustaining cables, we prove that these solitons have a nontrivial torsional component. This appears relevant for security since several suspension bridges collapsed due to torsional oscillations.

  2. Design of piles for integral abutment bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    More and more, integral abutment bridges are being used in place : of the more traditional bridge designs with expansion releases. In : this study, states which use integral abutment bridges were surveyed : to determine their current practice in the ...

  3. Developing deterioration models for Nebraska bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Nebraska Bridge Management System (NBMS) was developed in 1999 to assist in optimizing budget allocation for : the maintenance, rehabilitation and replacement needs of highway bridges. This requires the prediction of bridge : deterioration to calcula...

  4. Monitoring bridge scour using fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The scouring process excavates and carries away materials from the bed and banks of streams, and from : around the piers and abutments of bridges. Scour undermines bridges and may cause bridge failures due to : structural instability. In the last 30 ...

  5. Faster bridge construction using precast substructures : brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Bridge replacement often requires road closures and detours that frustrate road users. It remains a key goal of Wisconsin DOT to reduce construction-related road use interruptions. This will be a challenge with bridges: Bridge inspections in 2007 ide...

  6. Some risk factors for reproductive failures and contribution of Toxoplasma gondii infection in sheep and goats of Central Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremedhin, Endrias Zewdu; Agonafir, Abebe; Tessema, Tesfaye Sisay; Tilahun, Getachew; Medhin, Girmay; Vitale, Maria; Di Marco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-01

    Reproductive failure has a negative impact on animal production, health and welfare and ultimately rural economies. In Ethiopia, the factors affecting small ruminant reproductive efficiency are inadequately investigated. A cross-sectional survey was done from November, 2010 to May, 2011 to investigate risk factors of reproductive failures including Toxoplasma gondii infection. Analysis of 1372 sera (787 sheep and 585 goats) from 409 flocks using ELISA showed high flock (59.7%) and animal (31.8%) level T. gondii seroprevalence. An overall 24.9% (341/1372) annual abortion rate (19.6% in sheep and 32.0% in goats) was recorded. Animal level T. gondii seroprevalence was significantly associated with abortion in Ambo and Ada'a-Liben districts (Odds ratio [OR] = 2.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42, 3.76; P = 0.001). Questionnaire survey on 199 households of Ambo, Ada'a-Liben and Fentale districts revealed high flock level abortion (57.5%), still birth (28.9%) and neonatal losses (47.9%), which are significantly different between study districts (Pfailures. In the final Zero inflated Poisson regression model number of abortions was significantly higher in goat than in sheep flocks (Incidence risk ratio [IRR] = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.87; P = 0.012). It is also significantly higher in pastoral (IRR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.16, 2.83; P = 0.008) and agro-pastoral production systems (IRR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.32, 2.86; P = 0.001) than in sedentary production system. Prevention of toxoplasmosis, improved husbandry practices and further epidemiological studies to identify causes of reproductive failures are recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The violin bridge as filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2006-07-01

    The violin bridge filter role was investigated using modal and acoustic measurements on 12 quality-rated violins combined with systematic bridge rocking frequency f(rock) and wing mass decrements deltam on four bridges for two other violins. No isolated bridge resonances were observed; bridge motions were complex (including a "squat" mode near 0.8 kHz) except for low frequency rigid body pivot motions, all more or less resembling rocking motion at higher frequencies. A conspicuous broad peak near 2.3 kHz in bridge driving point mobility (labeled BH) was seen for good and bad violins. Similar structure was seen in averaged bridge, bridge feet, corpus mobilities and averaged radiativity. No correlation between violin quality and BH driving point, averaged corpus mobility magnitude, or radiativity was found. Increasing averaged-over-f(rock) deltam(g) from 0 to 0.12 generally increased radiativity across the spectrum. Decreasing averaged-over-deltam f(rock) from 3.6 to 2.6 kHz produced consistent decreases in radiativity between 3 and 4.2 kHz, but only few-percent decreases in BH frequency. The lowest f(rock) values were accompanied by significantly reduced radiation from the Helmholtz A0 mode near 280 Hz; this, combined with reduced high frequency output, created overall radiativity profiles quite similar to "bad" violins among the quality-rated violins.

  8. Crashworthy railing for timber bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Ritter; Ronald K. Faller; Sheila Rimal. Duwadi

    1999-01-01

    Bridge railing systems in the United States have historically beers designed based on static load criteria given in the American Association of State Highway and Transportation 0fficials (AASHTO) Standard Specifications for Highway Bridges. In the past decade, full-scale vehicle crash testing has been recognized as a more appropriate and reliable method of evaluating...

  9. Fatigue tests on aluminium bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2004-01-01

    Traffic bridges are subjected to variable loads and should therefore be checked on fatigue. Especially low weight materials, like aluminium, are sensitive to fatigue, because the variable load is a substantial part of the total load. This paper shows the structural design of an aluminium bridge

  10. Steel-soil composite bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Guangli; Pettersson, Lars; Karoumi, Raid

    2017-01-01

    viability, while their environmental performance is overlooked. Today’s designers are urged to seek new design options to reduce the environmental burdens. Sweden owns more than 24574 bridges and most of them are short spans. Among them, the slab frame bridge (CFB) is a common solution. Soil steel composite...

  11. Vulnerability of bridges to fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuliani, Luisa; Crosti, C.; Gentili, F.

    2012-01-01

    Even if recent effort in developing methodology and measures for design structures against fire and explosions has been mostly focused on buildings, bridges can also be very sensitive to those actions, as witnesses by some recent bridge accidents, which caused major economic losses and also endan...

  12. Bridges Dynamic Parameters Identification Based On Experimental and Numerical Method Comparison in Regard with Traffic Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkošková, Katarína; Papán, Daniel; Papánová, Zuzana

    2017-10-01

    The technical seismicity negatively affects the environment, buildings and structures. Technical seismicity means seismic shakes caused by force impulse, random process and unnatural origin. The vibration influence on buildings is evaluated in the Eurocode 8 in Slovak Republic, however, the Slovak Technical Standard STN 73 0036 includes solution of the technical seismicity. This standard also classes bridges into the group of structures that are significant in light of the technical seismicity – the group “U”. Using the case studies analysis by FEM simulation and comparison is necessary because of brief norm evaluation of this issue. In this article, determinate dynamic parameters by experimental measuring and numerical method on two real bridges are compared. First bridge, (D201 – 00) is Scaffold Bridge on the road I/11 leading to the city of Čadca and is situated in the city of Žilina. It is eleven – span concrete road bridge. The railway is the obstacle, which this bridge spans. Second bridge (M5973 Brodno) is situated in the part of Žilina City on the road of I/11. It is concrete three – span road bridge built as box girder. The computing part includes 3D computational models of the bridges. First bridge (D201 – 00) was modelled in the software of IDA Nexis as the slab – wall model. The model outputs are natural frequencies and natural vibration modes. Second bridge (M5973 Brodno) was modelled in the software of VisualFEA. The technical seismicity corresponds with the force impulse, which was put into this model. The model outputs are vibration displacements, velocities and accelerations. The aim of the experiments was measuring of the vibration acceleration time record of bridges, and there was need to systematic placement of accelerometers. The vibration acceleration time record is important during the under – bridge train crossing, about the first bridge (D201 – 00) and the vibration acceleration time domain is important during

  13. Ohio River Bridges: Partial Cane Run Watershed Relocation Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gavelek, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The Ohio River Bridges design-build project, at just under $2 billion, is one the nation’s largest transportation projects. The project consists of six sections. Section 3, the Indiana approach to the downtown crossing, consists of 21 bridges, 25 ramps, 1.3 miles of I-65 widening, & US-31 reconfiguration in a dense, urban setting. Section 3 is located in a complicated hydraulic scenario involving a flood wall and an urban stream, Cane Run, with a history of flooding problems. It became eviden...

  14. Bridging regional innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis

    2013-01-01

    to assess the progress of integration in the regions, as well as the effect of cross-border innovation policies. Consequently, important questions are left unanswered, including the central research question of this paper: does the sudden removal of significant physical barriers directly impacts......The topics of regional innovation systems (RIS) and cross-border regions attract increasing attention, but few studies combine the themes. Further, the existing empirical studies of cross-border innovation and knowledge creation analyse one case at one point in time, thus, making it difficult...... collaboration activity in cross-border innovation systems? This paper examines regional integration in the Oresund Region over time. It deals with a specific part of the RIS, as it analyses research collaboration between actors from the Danish and Swedish sides, with a specific emphasis on the biotech industry...

  15. Bridging knowledge capital with tourism destination stakeholders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejrum, Lone Møller; Madsen, Jan Halberg; d'Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    process for the bachelor students at the IHM programme is according to the Problem Based Learning (PBL) principles to ensure the students’ motivation. Thus the students are participating in finding and defining the challenges and problems for the destination combining their theoretical knowledge...... individual interviews, focus group discussions and ethnographic observations. Findings/recommendations: - This is a conceptual paper that focuses on investigating the cooperation between hospitality knowledge institutions and destination stakeholders focusing on the specific case of the Italian destination...... Campi Flegrei. The ambition of this paper is to give a contribution to destination management and development theories and to explore the outcome of bridging knowledge institutions with destination stakeholders....

  16. Electrothermally Tunable Bridge Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2016-12-05

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of an in-plane clamped-clamped microbeam, bridge, and resonator compressed by a force due to electrothermal actuation. We demonstrate that a single resonator can be operated at a wide range of frequencies. The microbeam is actuated electrothermally, by passing a DC current through it. We show that when increasing the electrothermal voltage, the compressive stress inside the microbeam increases, which leads eventually to its buckling. Before buckling, the fundamental frequency decreases until it drops to very low values, almost to zero. After buckling, the fundamental frequency increases, which is shown to be as high as twice the original resonance frequency. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and to simulation results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results.

  17. Design without thermal bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maltseva Irina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of the article is on the quality design and implementation of the thermal insulation of buildings. Shells of buildings consist not only of conventional structures (wall, roof, ceiling, but also of edges, corners, joints and places of disruption of the outer thermal insulation shell integrity (due to through passage of pipelines, ventilation ducts and etc.. In all these places, heat losses are generally increased in comparison with conventional surfaces. Some of them are easily taken into account by calculation, using a special method proposed by the authors. Other thermal bridges due to unfavorable structural details can be avoided by observing the rules and recommendations that are classified and discussed in detail in this article.

  18. Looking Beyond the Bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Elke; Rosholm, Michael

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of the stepping-stone effect of temporary agency employment on unemployed workers. Using the timing-of-events approach, we not only investigate whether agency employment is a bridge into regular employment but also analyze its effect on post-unemployment wages...... and job stability for unemployed Danish workers. We find evidence of large positive treatment effects, particularly for immigrants. There is also some indication that higher treatment intensity increases the likelihood of leav-ing unemployment for regular jobs. Our results show that agency employment...... is even more effective in tight labor markets, where firms use agency employment primarily to screen po-tential candidates for permanent posts. Finally, our results suggest that agency employment may improve subsequent match quality in terms of wages and job duration....

  19. Value of Power Doppler and Gray-Scale US in the Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Contribution of Cross-Sectional Area just before the Tunnel Inlet as Compared with the Cross-Sectional Area at the Tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akcar, Nevbahar; Ozkan, Serhat; Mehmetoglu, Ozlem; Calisir, Cuneyt; Adapinar, Baki [Osmangazi University Hospital, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan)

    2010-12-15

    To determine the value of gray-scale and power Doppler ultrasonography in the evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Median nerves at the carpal tunnel were evaluated by using gray-scale and power Doppler ultrasonography and by using accepted and new criteria in 42 patients with CTS (62 wrists) confirmed by electromyogram and 33 control subjects. We evaluated the cross-sectional area of the nerve just proximal to the tunnel inlet (CSAa), and at mid level (CSAb). We then calculated the percentage area increase of CSAb, and area difference (CSAb-CSAa). We measured two dimensions of the nerve at the distal level to calculate the flattening ratio. The power Doppler ultrasonography was used to assess the number of vessels, which proceeded to give a score according to the vessel number, and lastly evaluated the statistical significance by comparing the means of patients with control subjects by the Student t test for independent samples. Sensitivities and specificities were determined for sonographic characteristics mentioned above. We obtained the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to assess the optimal cut-off values for the diagnosis of CTS. A statistically significant difference was found between patients and the control group for mean CSAb, area difference, percentage area increase, and flattening ratio (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.05, respectively). From the ROC curve we obtained optimal cut-off values of 11 mm{sup 2} for CSAb, 3.65 for area difference, 50% for the percentage of area increase, and 2.6 for the flattening ratio. The mean number of vessels obtained by power Doppler ultrasonography from the median nerve was 1.2. We could not detect vessels from healthy volunteers. Mean CSAbs related to vascularity intensity scores were as follows: score 0: 12.3 {+-} 2.8 mm{sup 2}, score 1: 12.3 {+-} 3.1 mm{sup 2}, score 2: 14.95 {+-} 3.5 mm{sup 2}, score 3: 19.3 {+-} 3.8 mm{sup 2}. The mean PI value in vessels of the median nerve was 4

  20. Added value of integrated bridge systems for shore applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, R.R.; Heijden, W.F.M. van der

    1997-01-01

    As a result of fast developments in information and communication technology and the trend to reduce costs, the way of operating modem vessels will change. The introduction of integrated bridge systems contributes to solving the problem of the different 'islands of information' as can be seen in the

  1. Quasi-Static Condensation of Aeroelastic Suspension Bridge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Randi N.; Krenk, Steen; N. Svendsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    . The present contribution demonstrates the application of quasi-static condensation to long suspension bridges as well as introduces an extension of the method to include the full aeroelastic system. This includes considerations on reduction of external wind loading as well as motion-induced forces....

  2. Bridging the Relationship Gap: Connecting with Children Facing Adversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langworthy, Sara E.

    2015-01-01

    Relationships play an important role in human development, especially in the first years of life. "Bridging the Relationship Gap" provides tools and encouragement to be the strong, positive, and nurturing adult these children need in order to thrive. Learn more about the factors that contribute to the achievement and relationship gap…

  3. Building Bridges: Linking political leaders and policy experts in Africa

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-05-01

    May 1, 2017 ... Building Bridges was conceived as a safe and constructive space for African leaders to foster a systematic and sustained dialogue about critical development issues in ... LeAD Campus develops the skills of current and future African leaders to contribute to sustainable and inclusive growth in the continent.

  4. Compiling a Bidirectional Dictionary Bridging English and the Sotho ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    languages/Nguni languages/Afrikaans dictionary of this magnitude is a use- ful contribution in the complete absence of dictionaries bridging African lan- guages with each other and could be improved by simultaneous treatment of the target languages. Consider the following attempt to improve CMD's articles for the lemmas ...

  5. Bridge Creek IMW database - Bridge Creek Restoration and Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The incised and degraded habitat of Bridge Creek is thought to be limiting a population of ESA-listed steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss). A logical restoration approach...

  6. Compilation of accelerated bridge construction (ABC) bridges : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Development of accelerated bridge construction (ABC) technologies has been occurring across the country, many times in : isolation. Although FHWA and others have worked to facilitate communication between these efforts, there was not a : comprehensiv...

  7. Thermal bridges of modern windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Møller, Eva B.; Nielsen, Anker

    2013-01-01

    With its focus on reduced energy consumption, contemporary housing construction requires a highly insulated and airtight building envelope with as few thermal bridges as possible.Windows must be carefully designed, as thermal bridges can lead to surface condensation or mold growth, even...... if the window has an U-factor of 1 W/(m2·K) or lower. This paper describes the development of modern, energy efficient Danish windows with reduced thermal bridges. It focuses on materials, geometry, and sealing of window panes based on a literature review. Examples of modern windows are presented. Experience...

  8. Reliability Assessment of Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Middleton, C. R.

    This paper is partly based on research performed for the Highways Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: concrete bridges". It contains the details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability...... profiles. These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for concrete bridges. This paper is to some extend based on Thoft-Christensen et. al. [1996], Thoft-Christensen [1996] et. al. and Thoft-Christensen [1996]....

  9. Complex Testing of the Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Adrijana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the process of examining bridges. AB road bridge, founded on the columns by the Karpoš system and damaged due to erosive action of the river, is given as an example. The first tests of the bridge are conducted on the impact load of V 300, because of the appearance of longitudinal cracks. The results of the columns testing are presented in this paper, as well as the rehabilitation measures thus increasing the load capacity of the column.

  10. Effective Sealing and Monitoring of Small Movement Expansion Joints in Connecticut Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    One in nine bridges in the United States is rated as structurally deficient by the 2013 Infrastructure Report Card published by the American Society of Civil Engineers. One of the primary degradation factors that contribute to compromising the struct...

  11. A bridge monitoring tool based on bridge and vehicle accelerations

    OpenAIRE

    Hester, David; González, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Previous research on damage detection based on the response of a structure to a moving load has reported decay in accuracy with increasing load speed. Using a 3D vehicle – bridge interaction model, this paper shows that the area under the filtered acceleration response of the bridge increases with increasing damage, even at highway load speeds. Once a datum reading is established, the area under subsequent readings can be monitored and compared with the baseline reading, if an increase is obs...

  12. Economical bridge solutions based on innovative composite dowels and integrated abutments ecobridge

    CERN Document Server

    Băncilă, Radu

    2015-01-01

    This book is an outcome of the research project “ECOBRIDGE – Demonstration of ECOnomical BRIDGE solutions based on innovative composite dowels and integrated abutments – RFCS – CT 2010-00024”, which has been co-funded by the Research Fund for Coal and Steel (R.F.C.S.) of the European Community. The main topics of the book are the following: design of integral bridges, innovative composite dowels for the shear transmission, construction of bridges, structural analysis of bridges and monitoring. The book joins the technical experience and the contributions of the involved research partners. The technical content of all the papers is present-day in the field of the design, construction and monitoring of innovative composite bridges. The efficient design and construction improve and consolidate the market position of steel construction and steel producing industry. In addition, the advanced forms of construction are contributing to savings in material and energy consumption for the structure during prod...

  13. Real-time seismic monitoring of the integrated cape girardeau bridge array and recorded earthquake response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the state of the art, real-time and broad-band seismic monitoring network implemented for the 1206 m [3956 ft] long, cable-stayed Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge in Cape Girardeau (MO), a new Mississippi River crossing, approximately 80 km from the epicentral region of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. The bridge was designed for a strong earthquake (magnitude 7.5 or greater) during the design life of the bridge. The monitoring network comprises a total of 84 channels of accelerometers deployed on the superstructure, pier foundations and at surface and downhole free-field arrays of the bridge. The paper also presents the high quality response data obtained from the network. Such data is aimed to be used by the owner, researchers and engineers to assess the performance of the bridge, to check design parameters, including the comparison of dynamic characteristics with actual response, and to better design future similar bridges. Preliminary analyses of ambient and low amplitude small earthquake data reveal specific response characteristics of the bridge and the free-field. There is evidence of coherent tower, cable, deck interaction that sometimes results in amplified ambient motions. Motions at the lowest tri-axial downhole accelerometers on both MO and IL sides are practically free from any feedback from the bridge. Motions at the mid-level and surface downhole accelerometers are influenced significantly by feedback due to amplified ambient motions of the bridge. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  14. The stories of two bridges in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Public participation in bridge building was promoted by un habitat in the village of Mankrong. The neighbouring village did not participate in the construction of their bridge. The first flooding washed the second bridge down while the "participative bridge" stood up....

  15. Heavy Vehicles on Minor Highway Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Enevoldsen, I.

    Vibration of a bridge structure due to the passage of vehicles is an important consideration in the design of bridges. Further, a common problem in bridge engineering practice in these years is the upgrading of minor highway bridges (=5-20 m) to carry heavier loads partly due to a tendency of hea...

  16. Structural monitoring of a highway bridge using passive noise recordings from street traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvermoser, Johannes; Hadziioannou, Céline; Stähler, Simon C

    2015-12-01

    Structural damage on bridges presents a hazard to public safety and can lead to fatalities. This article contributes to the development of an alternative monitoring system for civil structures, based on passive measurements of seismic elastic waves. Cross-correlations of traffic noise recorded at geophone receiver pairs were found to be sufficiently stable for comparison and sensitive to velocity changes in the medium. As such velocity variations could be caused by damage, their detection would be valuable in structural health monitoring systems. A method, originally introduced for seismological applications and named Passive Image Interferometry, was used to quantify small velocity fluctuations in the medium and thereby observe structural changes. Evaluation of more than 2 months of continuous geophone recordings at a reinforced concrete bridge yielded velocity variations Δv/v in the range of -1.5% to +2.1%. The observed fluctuations correlate with associated temperature time series with a striking resemblance which is remarkable for two completely independent data sets. Using a linear regression approach, a relationship between temperature and velocity variations of on average 0.064% °C(-1) can be identified. This value corresponds well to other studies on concrete structures.

  17. Interstate-35 bridge instrumentation renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    An updated, accelerometer-based, sensor and data acquisition system was installed and verified on the I-35 Walnut Creek Bridge in Purcell, Oklahoma. The data collection system also includes a microwave communication system to move sensor and video da...

  18. Caltrans bridge inspection aerial robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) project resulted in the development of a twin-motor, : single duct, electric-powered Aerobot designed of carrying video cameras up to 200 feet in elevation to enable : close inspection of bridges...

  19. Energy harvesting on highway bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A concept for harvesting energy from the traffic-induced loadings on a highway bridge using piezoelectric : materials to generate electricity was explored through the prototype stage. A total of sixteen lead-zirconate : titanate (PZT) Type 5A piezoel...

  20. Milton-Madison Bridge Project

    OpenAIRE

    Hetrick, Kevin; Bunselmeier, Jason

    2013-01-01

    INDOT will provide a brief introduction to the Madison Milton Ohio River Bridge Project, discuss the project development process, the design/build procurement and the construction during this presentation.

  1. Preventative maintenance program for bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinets (KYTC) bridge inventory is rapidly aging. As such, the Cabinet : needs to identify and implement relevant preventative maintenance (PM) actions to extend the useful : service lives of those structures. Maintena...

  2. Bridge Aesthetics and Structural Honesty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In bridges the overall form must be chosen with due respect to the transmission of forces if efficient structures shall be created, The design must therefore be governed by experienced structural engineers - in some cases assisted by aesthetic advisers on specific issues. Some basic requirements ...... decisive for choosing the form of trusses, arches and cable-stayed bridges are outlined, and several examples show bridges designed without giving priority to the structural aspects.......In bridges the overall form must be chosen with due respect to the transmission of forces if efficient structures shall be created, The design must therefore be governed by experienced structural engineers - in some cases assisted by aesthetic advisers on specific issues. Some basic requirements...

  3. GFRP reinforced concrete bridge decks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    This report investigates the application of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rebars in concrete bridge decks as a potential replacement or supplement to conventional steel rebars. Tests were conducted to determine the material properties of the ...

  4. We Must Be Bridge Builders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Robert C.

    1982-01-01

    Higher education, and trustees in particular, must be "bridge builders" among academe, government, and business communities. Trustees must also be the mediators and a reconciling force when the public and independent campuses lose sight of their common cause. (MLW)

  5. VEXAG's Venus Bridge Focus Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, J. A.

    2017-11-01

    VEXAG’s Venus Bridge Focus Group is investigating whether viable Venus missions can be conducted within a $200M cost-cap. Progress reports on mission concept studies of combined in situ and orbiter missions will be presented.

  6. Construction of Daiichi Tamagawa bridge; Daiichi Tamagawa kyoryo no seko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, O.; Tsuyoshi, T. [East Japan Railway Company, Tokyo (Japan); Ota, T.; Sato, S. [Tekken Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-30

    This paper describes the construction of Daiichi Tamagawa Bridge for JR Tazawako Line, which was reconstructed with the Akita Shinkansen Project apart from the existing line. This bridge is a three-span continuous PC cable stayed bridge. To avoid operation accidents due to snow and ice, independent two-column type with a height of 11 m without beam was employed for the main tower. For the construction of upper part, overhang election construction method was adopted, which can be applied all the year round. The main girder has a single box cross section, and a width of 5.5 m and a beam height of 2.3 m. This was also constructed by the overhang construction method. To reduce the construction period, the main tower was constructed by the precast block construction method. The whole bridge was divided into six blocks by considering the hoist performance of cranes. Reinforcement against bearing pressure and cleavage due to the cable tensile force was conducted by adopting saddle structure for the main tower. Oblique members were jointed with the main girder using lateral beams projected from lateral side of girder. Totally seven PC cables were used for each oblique member. Measurements and management during the overhang construction were also described. The construction was over without problems in August, 1996. This bridge is under test operation using test run vehicles. 2 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Evaluating the performance of skewed prestressed concrete bridge after strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Ali; Zonglin, Wang

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this paper are to explain the application of repairing and strengthening methods on the damaged members of the bridge structure, to analyze the static and dynamic structural response under static and dynamic loads after strengthening, and to evaluate the structural performance after application of strengthening method. The repairing and strengthening methods which are used in this study include treatment of the cracks, thickening the web of box girder along the bridge length and adding internal pre-stressing tendons in the thickening web, and construct reinforced concrete cross beams (diaphragms) between two box girders. The results of theoretical analysis of static and dynamic structural responses after strengthening show that the tensile stresses are decreased and become less than the allowable limit values in the codes. The values of vertical deflection are decreased after strengthening. The values of natural frequencies after strengthening are increased, indicating that the strengthening method is effective to reduce the vibration of the bridge structure. Therefore, the strengthening methods are effective to improve the bearing capacity and elastic working state of the bridge structure and to increase the service life of the bridge structure.

  8. Tresfjord Bridge - a human friendly and traffic efficient structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Kristian B.; Anta Magerøy Tønnessen, Aja; Toverud, Lars I.

    2017-09-01

    The E136 Tresfjord Bridge opened in October 2015, and crosses the Tresfjorden on the west coast of Norway. It is a concrete bridge with a total length of 1290 m, consisting of 19 viaduct spans, 60 m each, and a FCM (free cantilever method) main span of 160 m. The E136 is one of the most important transportation routes in the county of Møre and Romsdal and starts in Ålesund, and passes along Tresfjorden to Åndalsnes. The existing road is very narrow with speed limit of 60 km/h and characterizes by many accidents involving cars and people. The traffic flow is approximately ca 2500 vehicles a day, of this is 25% heavy vehicles. Those transport fresh salmon from the breeders in the fjords along the coast. To try to decrease the transportation time is very important for the fresh salmon. The bridge reduces the distance between Ålesund and Åndalsnes by 13 km. The speed limit is now 80 km/h, and with much less risk for accidents since there are separate lanes for cars and pedestrians over the whole bridge. This means that the bridge represents a human friendly and traffic efficient structure to the benefit for the people and the region.

  9. Urban Climate Change Resilience as a Teaching Tool for a STEM Summer Bridge Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, B.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Socha, A.; Corsi, F.

    2015-12-01

    Community colleges have been identified as important gateways for the United States' scientific workforce development. However, students who begin their higher education at community colleges often face barriers to developing the skills needed for higher-level STEM careers, including basic training in mathematics, programming, analytical problem solving, and cross-disciplinary communication. As part of the Business Higher Education Forum's Undergraduate STEM Interventions in Industry (USI2) Consortium, we are developing a summer bridge program for students in STEM fields transferring from community college to senior (4-year) colleges at the City University of New York. Our scientific research on New York City climate change resilience will serve as the foundation for the bridge program curriculum. Students will be introduced to systems thinking and improve their analytical skills through guided problem-solving exercises using the New York City Climate Change Resilience Indicators Database currently being developed by the CUNY Environmental Crossroads Initiative. Students will also be supported in conducting an introductory, independent research project using the database. The interdisciplinary nature of climate change resilience assessment will allow students to explore topics related to their STEM field of interest (i.e. engineering, chemistry, and health science), while working collaboratively across disciplines with their peers. We hope that students that participate in the bridge program will continue with their research projects through their tenure at senior colleges, further enhancing their academic training, while actively contributing to the study of urban climate change resilience. The effectiveness of this approach will be independently evaluated by NORC at the University of Chicago, as well as through internal surveying and long-term tracking of participating student cohorts.

  10. 76 FR 66775 - Emergency Temporary Closure of the I-64 Sherman-Minton Bridge Over the Ohio River Between Indiana...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ...-Minton Bridge over the Ohio River between Indiana and Kentucky for an indefinite period of time due to... Sherman-Minton Bridge over the Ohio River between Indiana and Kentucky which the Indiana Governor closed... eastbound to I-65 southbound to cross the Ohio River and rejoin I-64 eastbound in Kentucky. The KYTC is...

  11. Bulb-T beams with self-consolidating concrete on the Route 33 bridge over the Pamunkey River in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the bulb-T beams made with self-consolidating concrete (SCC) used in the Route 33 Bridge over the Pamunkey River at West Point, Virginia. Before the construction of the bridge, two test beams with SCC similar in cross section to ...

  12. Analysis of Investment Feasibility to Pedestrian Bridge in Muara Teweh - Jingah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laode Abd. Rahman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to analyze the needs of the construction of the Crossing Bridge of Muara Teweh - Jingah. The type of the research including the applied research was research concerning the application of theory to solve certain problems. The location of this research was at the Bridge Crossing of Muara Teweh - Jingah in North Barito District. Data analysis technique was feasibility study. The result of the research showed that 1 the construction of the Crossing Bridge of Muara Teweh - Jingah is needed to reduce the traffic density the traffic of the daily transportation in the development area has an effort to balance the traffic volume with road capacity in order to avoid LOS decrease and increase peoples prosperity level 2 the celebration of the construction of Muara Teweh - Jingah Crossing Bridge in terms of technical and economic and cultural aspects is stated to have fulfilled the feasibility 3 the feasibility of bridge development in terms of economic and cultural aspects is fulfilled because the value of BCR is greater than 1.0 and interest rate that is applicable is equal to 12 in 2015. Finally the bridge construction is feasible to be implemented.

  13. Development of inspection robots for bridge cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hae-Bum; Kim, Se-Hoon; Wu, Liuliu; Lee, Jong-Jae

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the bridge cable inspection robot developed in Korea. Two types of the cable inspection robots were developed for cable-suspension bridges and cable-stayed bridge. The design of the robot system and performance of the NDT techniques associated with the cable inspection robot are discussed. A review on recent advances in emerging robot-based inspection technologies for bridge cables and current bridge cable inspection methods is also presented.

  14. Development of Inspection Robots for Bridge Cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Bum Yun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the bridge cable inspection robot developed in Korea. Two types of the cable inspection robots were developed for cable-suspension bridges and cable-stayed bridge. The design of the robot system and performance of the NDT techniques associated with the cable inspection robot are discussed. A review on recent advances in emerging robot-based inspection technologies for bridge cables and current bridge cable inspection methods is also presented.

  15. The Deformation of Overburden Soil and Interaction with Pile Foundations of Bridges Induced by Normal Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang-Chun; Li, Chien-Hung; Chan, Pei-Chen; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2017-04-01

    According to the investigations of well-known disastrous earthquakes in recent years, ground deformation induced by faulting is one of the causes for engineering structure damages in addition to strong ground motion. Most of structures located on faulting zone has been destroyed by fault offset. Take the Norcia Earthquake in Italy (2016, Mw=6.2) as an example, the highway bridge in Arquata crossing the rupture area of the active normal fault suffered a quantity of displacement which causing abutment settlement, the piers of bridge fractured and so on. However, The Seismic Design Provisions and Commentary for Highway Bridges in Taiwan, the stating of it in the general rule of first chapter, the design in bridges crossing active fault: "This specification is not applicable of making design in bridges crossing or near active fault, that design ought to the other particular considerations ".This indicates that the safty of bridges crossing active fault are not only consider the seismic performance, the most ground deformation should be attended. In this research, to understand the failure mechanism and the deformation characteristics, we will organize the case which the bridges subjected faulting at home and abroad. The processes of research are through physical sandbox experiment and numerical simulation by discrete element models (PFC3-D). The normal fault case in Taiwan is Shanchiao Fault. As above, the research can explore the deformation in overburden soil and the influences in the foundations of bridges by normal faulting. While we can understand the behavior of foundations, we will make the bridge superstructures into two separations, simple beam and continuous beam and make a further research on the main control variables in bridges by faulting. Through the above mentioned, we can then give appropriate suggestions about planning considerations and design approaches. This research presents results from sandbox experiment and 3-D numerical analysis to simulate

  16. Vehicle Signal Analysis Using Artificial Neural Networks for a Bridge Weigh-in-Motion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungkon; Lee, Jungwhee; Park, Min-Seok; Jo, Byung-Wan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the procedures for development of signal analysis algorithms using artificial neural networks for Bridge Weigh-in-Motion (B-WIM) systems. Through the analysis procedure, the extraction of information concerning heavy traffic vehicles such as weight, speed, and number of axles from the time domain strain data of the B-WIM system was attempted. As one of the several possible pattern recognition techniques, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was employed since it could effectively include dynamic effects and bridge-vehicle interactions. A number of vehicle traveling experiments with sufficient load cases were executed on two different types of bridges, a simply supported pre-stressed concrete girder bridge and a cable-stayed bridge. Different types of WIM systems such as high-speed WIM or low-speed WIM were also utilized during the experiments for cross-checking and to validate the performance of the developed algorithms.

  17. Vehicle Signal Analysis Using Artificial Neural Networks for a Bridge Weigh-in-Motion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Seok Park

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the procedures for development of signal analysis algorithms using artificial neural networks for Bridge Weigh-in-Motion (B-WIM systems. Through the analysis procedure, the extraction of information concerning heavy traffic vehicles such as weight, speed, and number of axles from the time domain strain data of the B-WIM system was attempted. As one of the several possible pattern recognition techniques, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN was employed since it could effectively include dynamic effects and bridge-vehicle interactions. A number of vehicle traveling experiments with sufficient load cases were executed on two different types of bridges, a simply supported pre-stressed concrete girder bridge and a cable-stayed bridge. Different types of WIM systems such as high-speed WIM or low-speed WIM were also utilized during the experiments for cross-checking and to validate the performance of the developed algorithms.

  18. Risk Assessment for Bridges Safety Management during Operation Based on Fuzzy Clustering Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Hanyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, large span and large sea-crossing bridges are built, bridges accidents caused by improper operational management occur frequently. In order to explore the better methods for risk assessment of the bridges operation departments, the method based on fuzzy clustering algorithm is selected. Then, the implementation steps of fuzzy clustering algorithm are described, the risk evaluation system is built, and Taizhou Bridge is selected as an example, the quantitation of risk factors is described. After that, the clustering algorithm based on fuzzy equivalence is calculated on MATLAB 2010a. In the last, Taizhou Bridge operation management departments are classified and sorted according to the degree of risk, and the safety situation of operation departments is analyzed.

  19. Bridges and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-15

    the Trilateral Design and Test Code, paragraph 4.2.11, refers to a 15-percent impact factor for bending moment and deflection for crossing vehicle...speeds of 25 km/hr (15 mph). Since the BCS is equipped with both strain and load control features, the impact factor of each vehicle load and speed...can be determined. BCS testing to date has revealed that wheeled vehicle impact factors are approximately 10 percent and tracked vehicle impact

  20. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have bridge...

  1. [Neuroscience and education: towards the construction of interactive bridges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarós, Sol; Lipina, Sebastián J; Segretin, M Soledad; Hermida, M Julia; Jorge, Jorge A

    The debates on the potential interdisciplinary association between neuroscience and education began approximately three decades ago. In order for the integration of neuroscientific and educational knowledge to impact on learning and teaching it would imply the consideration of the emergence of several cognitive and emotional processes during development, and the possibility to influence them through specific interventions. AIM. To examine epistemological and methodological implications and bridging requirements in the interaction between neuroscience, cognitive psychology and education. A dynamic interdisciplinary bridging consists in the identification and reduction of different epistemological, methodological, technological and practical gaps between those disciplines. Furthermore, the consideration of complex phenomena, such as human development and learning processes in terms of multiple levels of analysis, may contribute to the enrichment of a critical dialogue, but also to generate genuine integrated interventions. Historical and current conceptual perspectives attempting to bridge neuroscience and education are described. At present, interdisciplinary efforts between neuroscience and education are at a preliminary stage. In this context, bridging requires conceptual and methodological approaches that consider the complexity of developmental and learning phenomena and the participation of actors from different fields, instead of unique bridges. This paper intends to consider several basic principles aimed at developing a dynamic integration that assesses the complexity of development, learning and teaching processes.

  2. Ex post socio-economic assessment of the Oresund Bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, M.Aa.; Rich, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents an ex post socio-economic assessment of the Oresund Bridge conducted ten years after the opening in July 2000. The study applies historical micro data to re construct the travel pattern with no bridge in place and compare this to the current situation. To complete the socio......-economic assessment, the consumer benefits including all freight and passenger modes, are compared with the cost profile of the bridge. The monetary contributions are extrapolated to a complete 50 year period. It is revealed that the bridge from 2000–2010 generated a consumer surplus of €2 billion in 2000 prices...... discounted at 3.5% p.a., which should be compared with a total construction cost of approximately €4 billion. Seen over the 50 year period and by assuming a medium growth scenario the bridge is expected to generate an internal rate of return in the magnitude of 9% corresponding to a benefit-cost rate of 2...

  3. Multiple Bistability in Quinonoid-Bridged Diiron(II) Complexes: Influence of Bridge Symmetry on Bistable Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Margarethe; Rechkemmer, Yvonne; Breitgoff, Frauke D; Marx, Raphael; Neugebauer, Petr; Frank, Uta; van Slageren, Joris; Sarkar, Biprajit

    2016-11-21

    Quinonoid bridges are well-suited for generating dinuclear assemblies that might display various bistable properties. In this contribution we present two diiron(II) complexes where the iron(II) centers are either bridged by the doubly deprotonated form of a symmetrically substituted quinonoid bridge, 2,5-bis[4-(isopropyl)anilino]-1,4-benzoquinone (H2L2') with a [O,N,O,N] donor set, or with the doubly deprotonated form of an unsymmetrically substituted quinonoid bridge, 2-[4-(isopropyl)anilino]-5-hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone (H2L5') with a [O,O,O,N] donor set. Both complexes display temperature-induced spin crossover (SCO). The nature of the SCO is strongly dependent on the bridging ligand, with only the complex with the [O,O,O,N] donor set displaying a prominent hysteresis loop of about 55 K. Importantly, only the latter complex also shows a pronounced light-induced spin state change. Furthermore, both complexes can be oxidized to the mixed-valent iron(II)-iron(III) form, and the nature of the bridge determines the Robin and Day classification of these forms. Both complexes have been probed by a battery of electrochemical, spectroscopic, and magnetic methods, and this combined approach is used to shed light on the electronic structures of the complexes and on bistability. The results presented here thus show the potential of using the relatively new class of unsymmetrically substituted bridging quinonoid ligands for generating intriguing bistable properties and for performing site-specific magnetic switching.

  4. 47 CFR 80.309 - Watch required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watch required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act. 80... Safety Watches § 80.309 Watch required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act. In addition to the watch requirement contained in § 80.148, all vessels subject to the Bridge-to-Bridge Act must keep a watch on the designated...

  5. Tsunamis: bridging science, engineering and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kânoğlu, U; Titov, V; Bernard, E; Synolakis, C

    2015-10-28

    Tsunamis are high-impact, long-duration disasters that in most cases allow for only minutes of warning before impact. Since the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami, there have been significant advancements in warning methodology, pre-disaster preparedness and basic understanding of related phenomena. Yet, the trail of destruction of the 2011 Japan tsunami, broadcast live to a stunned world audience, underscored the difficulties of implementing advances in applied hazard mitigation. We describe state of the art methodologies, standards for warnings and summarize recent advances in basic understanding, and identify cross-disciplinary challenges. The stage is set to bridge science, engineering and society to help build up coastal resilience and reduce losses. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. Long-Term Structural Health Monitoring System for a High-Speed Railway Bridge Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, You-Liang; Wang, Gao-Xin; Sun, Peng; Wu, Lai-Yi; Yue, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nanjing Dashengguan Bridge, which serves as the shared corridor crossing Yangtze River for both Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway and Shanghai-Wuhan-Chengdu railway, is the first 6-track high-speed railway bridge with the longest span throughout the world. In order to ensure safety and detect the performance deterioration during the long-time service of the bridge, a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system has been implemented on this bridge by the application of modern techniques in sensing, testing, computing, and network communication. The SHM system includes various sensors as well as corresponding data acquisition and transmission equipment for automatic data collection. Furthermore, an evaluation system of structural safety has been developed for the real-time condition assessment of this bridge. The mathematical correlation models describing the overall structural behavior of the bridge can be obtained with the support of the health monitoring system, which includes cross-correlation models for accelerations, correlation models between temperature and static strains of steel truss arch, and correlation models between temperature and longitudinal displacements of piers. Some evaluation results using the mean value control chart based on mathematical correlation models are presented in this paper to show the effectiveness of this SHM system in detecting the bridge's abnormal behaviors under the varying environmental conditions such as high-speed trains and environmental temperature.

  7. Long-Term Structural Health Monitoring System for a High-Speed Railway Bridge Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lai-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Nanjing Dashengguan Bridge, which serves as the shared corridor crossing Yangtze River for both Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway and Shanghai-Wuhan-Chengdu railway, is the first 6-track high-speed railway bridge with the longest span throughout the world. In order to ensure safety and detect the performance deterioration during the long-time service of the bridge, a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system has been implemented on this bridge by the application of modern techniques in sensing, testing, computing, and network communication. The SHM system includes various sensors as well as corresponding data acquisition and transmission equipment for automatic data collection. Furthermore, an evaluation system of structural safety has been developed for the real-time condition assessment of this bridge. The mathematical correlation models describing the overall structural behavior of the bridge can be obtained with the support of the health monitoring system, which includes cross-correlation models for accelerations, correlation models between temperature and static strains of steel truss arch, and correlation models between temperature and longitudinal displacements of piers. Some evaluation results using the mean value control chart based on mathematical correlation models are presented in this paper to show the effectiveness of this SHM system in detecting the bridge's abnormal behaviors under the varying environmental conditions such as high-speed trains and environmental temperature. PMID:26451387

  8. The contribution of travel-related urban zones, cycling and pedestrian networks and green space to commuting physical activity among adults - a cross-sectional population-based study using geographical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Opas, Tomi E; Borodulin, Katja; Valkeinen, Heli; Stenholm, Sari; Kunst, Anton E; Abel, Thomas; Härkänen, Tommi; Kopperoinen, Leena; Itkonen, Pekka; Prättälä, Ritva; Karvonen, Sakari; Koskinen, Seppo

    2016-08-11

    The current political agenda aims to promote active environments and physical activity while commuting to work, but research on it has provided mixed results. This study examines whether the proximity of green space and people's residence in different travel-related urban zones contributes to commuting physical activity. Population-based cross-sectional health examination survey, Health 2011 study, and geographical information system (GIS) data were utilized. The GIS data on green space and travel-related urban zones were linked to the individuals of the Health 2011 study, based on their home geocoordinates. Commuting physical activity was self-reported. Logistic regression models were applied, and age, gender, education, leisure-time and occupational physical activity were adjusted. Analyses were limited to those of working age, living in the core-urban areas of Finland and having completed information on commuting physical activity (n = 2 098). Home location in a pedestrian zone of a main centre (odds ratio = 1.63; 95 % confidence interval = 1.06-2.51) or a pedestrian zone of a sub-centre (2.03; 1.09-3.80) and higher proportion of cycling and pedestrian networks (3.28; 1.71-6.31) contributed to higher levels of commuting physical activity. The contribution remained after adjusting for all the environmental attributes and individuals. Based on interaction analyses, women living in a public transport zone were almost two times more likely to be physically active while commuting compared to men. A high proportion of recreational green space contributed negatively to the levels of commuting physical activity (0.73; 0.57-0.94) after adjusting for several background factors. Based on interaction analyses, individuals aged from 44 to 54 years and living in sub-centres, men living in pedestrian zones of sub-centres, and those individuals who are physically inactive during leisure-time were less likely to be physically active while commuting. Good pedestrian

  9. The contribution of travel-related urban zones, cycling and pedestrian networks and green space to commuting physical activity among adults – a cross-sectional population-based study using geographical information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi E. Mäki-Opas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current political agenda aims to promote active environments and physical activity while commuting to work, but research on it has provided mixed results. This study examines whether the proximity of green space and people’s residence in different travel-related urban zones contributes to commuting physical activity. Methods Population-based cross-sectional health examination survey, Health 2011 study, and geographical information system (GIS data were utilized. The GIS data on green space and travel-related urban zones were linked to the individuals of the Health 2011 study, based on their home geocoordinates. Commuting physical activity was self-reported. Logistic regression models were applied, and age, gender, education, leisure-time and occupational physical activity were adjusted. Analyses were limited to those of working age, living in the core-urban areas of Finland and having completed information on commuting physical activity (n = 2 098. Results Home location in a pedestrian zone of a main centre (odds ratio = 1.63; 95 % confidence interval = 1.06–2.51 or a pedestrian zone of a sub-centre (2.03; 1.09–3.80 and higher proportion of cycling and pedestrian networks (3.28; 1.71–6.31 contributed to higher levels of commuting physical activity. The contribution remained after adjusting for all the environmental attributes and individuals. Based on interaction analyses, women living in a public transport zone were almost two times more likely to be physically active while commuting compared to men. A high proportion of recreational green space contributed negatively to the levels of commuting physical activity (0.73; 0.57–0.94 after adjusting for several background factors. Based on interaction analyses, individuals aged from 44 to 54 years and living in sub-centres, men living in pedestrian zones of sub-centres, and those individuals who are physically inactive during leisure-time were less

  10. 76 FR 57910 - Regulated Navigation Area; Route 24 Bridge Construction, Tiverton and Portsmouth, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a regulated navigation area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Sakonnet River under and surrounding construction of the new Route 24 bridge that crosses the Sakonnet River between Tiverton and Portsmouth, Rhode Island. This rule implements certain safety measures including establishment of a temporary channel beneath the bridge, speed restrictions, and suspension of all vessel traffic within the RNA during construction operations that could pose an imminent hazard to vessels operating in the area. This rule is necessary to provide for the safety of life on the navigable waters during construction of the Route 24 bridge over the main channel of the Sakonnet River.

  11. Evaluation of streambed scour at bridges over tidal waterways in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Jeffrey S.; Schauer, Paul V.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for streambed scour was evaluated at 41 bridges that cross tidal waterways in Alaska. These bridges are subject to several coastal and riverine processes that have the potential, individually or in combination, to induce streambed scour or to damage the structure or adjacent channel. The proximity of a bridge to the ocean and water-surface elevation and velocity data collected over a tidal cycle were criteria used to identify the flow regime at each bridge, whether tidal, riverine, or mixed, that had the greatest potential to induce streambed scour. Water-surface elevations measured through at least one tide cycle at 32 bridges were correlated to water levels at the nearest tide station. Asymmetry of the tidal portion of the hydrograph during the outgoing tide at 12 bridges indicated that riverine flows were stored upstream of the bridge during the tidal exchange. This scenario results in greater discharges and velocities during the outgoing tide compared to those on the incoming tide. Velocity data were collected during outgoing tides at 10 bridges that experienced complete flow reversals, and measured velocities during the outgoing tide exceeded the critical velocity required to initiate sediment transport at three sites. The primary risk for streambed scour at most of the sites considered in this study is from riverine flows rather than tidal fluctuations. A scour evaluation for riverine flow was completed at 35 bridges. Scour from riverine flow was not the primary risk for six tidally-controlled bridges and therefore not evaluated at those sites. Field data including channel cross sections, a discharge measurement, and a water-surface slope were collected at the 35 bridges. Channel instability was identified at 14 bridges where measurable scour and or fill were noted in repeated surveys of channel cross sections at the bridge. Water-surface profiles for the 1-percent annual exceedance probability discharge were calculated by using the Hydrologic

  12. Impact of Plastic Hinge Properties on Capacity Curve of Reinforced Concrete Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Shatarat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pushover analysis is becoming recently the most practical tool for nonlinear analysis of regular and irregular highway bridges. The nonlinear behaviour of structural elements in this type of analysis can be modeled through automated-hinge or user-defined hinge models. The nonlinear properties of the user-defined hinge model for existing highway bridges can be determined in accordance with the recommendations of the Seismic Retrofit Manual by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA-SRM. Finite element software such as the software SAP2000 offers a simpler and easier approach to determine the nonlinear hinge properties through the automated-hinge model which are determined automatically from the member material and cross section properties. However, the uncertainties in using the automated-hinge model in place of user-defined hinge model have never been addressed, especially for existing and widened bridges. In response to this need, pushover analysis was carried out for four old highway bridges, of which two were widened using the same superstructure but with more attention to seismic detailing requirements. The results of the analyses showed noticeable differences in the capacity curves obtained utilizing the user-defined and automated-hinge models. The study recommends that bridge design manuals clearly ask bridge designers to evaluate the deformation capacities of existing bridges and widened bridges using user-defined hinge model that is determined in accordance with the provisions of the FHWA-SRM.

  13. Hydraulic and sediment characteristics at the North Channel Bridge, Jamaica Bay, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staubitz, W.W.; Wolcott, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Data were collected during the spring of 1984 in the vicinity of North Channel Bridge in Jamaica Bay, New York to define the hydraulic regime and the physical characteristics and chemical quality of bottom sediments. The data were used in a semiquantitative analysis to predict the effects of bridge replacement and the attendant resuspension of bottom sediments, on the hydraulics and quality of water and bottom sediments. The bay-bottom configuration at the bridge site was defined, and continuous tidal stage and tidal velocity data were collected for about a month. In addition, eight bottom-sediment samples were collected near the bridge and analyzed. Results of the hydraulic analysis show that the proposed bridge should not have any measurable effect on the net water transport at the bridge cross section. The sediment data indicate that bottom sediments are relatively unpolluted in the vicinity of the bridge. Seventy-five percent of the resuspended bottom sediments will probably settle within 186 m of the bridge during an average ebb tide. Metals and nutrients released from the sediments to the water column are expected to be diluted far below detection limits. The extra oxygen demand exerted by the resuspended bottom sediments is also expected to be far less than ambient biochemical oxygen demand of the water column. (USGS)

  14. The dual cycle bridge detection of piezoresistive triaxial accelerometer based on MEMS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanting, Zhang; Changde, He; Hui, Zhang; Yuping, Li; Yongping, Zhang; Chunhui, Du; Wendong, Zhang

    2014-06-01

    A cycle bridge detection method, which uses a piezoresistive triaxial accelerometer, has been described innovatively. This method just uses eight resistors to form a cycle detection bridge, which can detect the signal of the three directions for real time. It breaks the law of the ordinary independent Wheatstone bridge detection method, which uses at least 12 resistors and each four resistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge to detect the output signal from a specific direction. In order to verify the feasibility of this method, the modeling and simulating of the sensor structure have been conducted by ANSYS, then the dual cycle bridge detection method and independent Wheatstone bridge detection method are compared, the result shows that the former method can improve the sensitivity of the sensor effectively. The sensitivity of the x, y-axis used in the former method is two times that of the sensor used in the latter method, and the sensitivity of the z-axis is four times. At the same time, it can also reduce the cross-axis coupling degree of the sensor used in the dual cycle bridge detection method. In addition, a signal amplifier circuit and adder circuit have been provided. Finally, the test result of the “eight-beams/mass” triaxial accelerometer, which is based on the dual cycle bridge detection method and the related circuits, have been provided. The results of the test and the theoretical analysis are consistent, on the whole.

  15. Creep and shrinkage effects on integral abutment bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuswamy, Sivakumar

    Integral abutment bridges provide bridge engineers an economical design alternative to traditional bridges with expansion joints owing to the benefits, arising from elimination of expensive joints installation and reduced maintenance cost. The superstructure for integral abutment bridges is cast integrally with abutments. Time-dependent effects of creep, shrinkage of concrete, relaxation of prestressing steel, temperature gradient, restraints provided by abutment foundation and backfill and statical indeterminacy of the structure introduce time-dependent variations in the redundant forces. An analytical model and numerical procedure to predict instantaneous linear behavior and non-linear time dependent long-term behavior of continuous composite superstructure are developed in which the redundant forces in the integral abutment bridges are derived considering the time-dependent effects. The redistributions of moments due to time-dependent effects have been considered in the analysis. The analysis includes nonlinearity due to cracking of the concrete, as well as the time-dependent deformations. American Concrete Institute (ACI) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) models for creep and shrinkage are considered in modeling the time dependent material behavior. The variations in the material property of the cross-section corresponding to the constituent materials are incorporated and age-adjusted effective modulus method with relaxation procedure is followed to include the creep behavior of concrete. The partial restraint provided by the abutment-pile-soil system is modeled using discrete spring stiffness as translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Numerical simulation of the behavior is carried out on continuous composite integral abutment bridges and the deformations and stresses due to time-dependent effects due to typical sustained loads are computed. The results from the analytical model are compared with the

  16. Constraint Ornstein-Uhlenbeck bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolo, Alain

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck bridge process (i.e., the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process conditioned to start and end at fixed points) constraints to have a fixed area under its path. We present both anticipative (in this case, we need the knowledge of the future of the path) and non-anticipative versions of the stochastic process. We obtain the anticipative description thanks to the theory of generalized Gaussian bridges while the non-anticipative representation comes from the theory of stochastic control. For this last representation, a stochastic differential equation is derived which leads to an effective Langevin equation. Finally, we extend our theoretical findings to linear bridge processes.

  17. Evaluation of Fluoride Retention Due to Most Commonly Consumed Estuarine Fishes Among Fish Consuming Population of Andhra Pradesh as a Contributing Factor to Dental Fluorosis: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganta, Shravani; Yousuf, Asif; Nagaraj, Anup; Pareek, Sonia; Sidiq, Mohsin; Singh, Kushpal; Vishnani, Preeti

    2015-06-01

    Fluoride in drinking water is known for both beneficial and detrimental effects on health. The principal sources of fluoride include water, some species of vegetation, certain edible marine animals, dust and industrial processes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fluoride retention of most commonly consumed estuarine fishes among fish consuming population of Andhra Pradesh. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the amount of fluoride retention due to ten most commonly consumed estuarine fishes as a contributing factor to Fluorosis by SPADNS Spectrophotometric method. The presence and severity of dental fluorosis among fish consuming population was recorded using Community Fluorosis Index. Statistical analysis was done using MedCalc v12.2.1.0 software. For Sea water fishes, the fluoride levels in bone were maximum in Indian Sardine (4.22 ppm). Amongst the river water fishes, the fluoride levels in bone were maximum in Catla (1.51 ppm). Also, the mean total fluoride concentrations of all the river fishes in skin, muscle and bone were less (0.86 ppm) as compared to the sea water fishes (2.59 ppm). It was unveiled that sea fishes accumulate relatively large amounts of Fluoride as compared to the river water fishes. The mean Community Fluorosis Index was found to be 1.06 amongst a sampled fish consuming population. Evaluation by Community Index for Dental fluorosis (CFI) suggested that fluorosis is of medium public health importance. It was analysed that bone tends to accumulate more amount of fluoride followed by muscle and skin which might be due to the increased permeability and chemical trapping of fluoride inside the tissues. The amount of fluoride present in the fishes is directly related to the severity of fluorosis amongst fish consuming population, suggesting fishes as a contributing factor to fluorosis depending upon the dietary consumption.

  18. Example of dynamic analysis of orthotropic steel bridge plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvijić Radomir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents brief dynamic analysis of one typical steel bridge orthotropic plate. Geometry and load data are adopted according to recommendations from the literature. Calculation is preformed using the Finite element method where the commercial software package Abaqus is used. Dynamic load due to vehicle crossing is modeled via six weighted rigid plates with dimensions equal to the contact surface between the wheel and the plate. Obtained results suggest that the main impact on the structural response comes from the speed of the vehicle. Influence of the crossing of the second vehicle was negligible in presented analysis.

  19. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  20. Bridging the Vector Calculus Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corinne

    2003-05-01

    As with Britain and America, mathematicians and physicists are separated from each other by a common language. In a nutshell, mathematics is about functions, but physics is about things. For the last several years, we have led an NSF-supported effort to "bridge the vector calculus gap" between mathematics and physics. The unifying theme we have discovered is to emphasize geometric reasoning, not (just) algebraic computation. In this talk, we will illustrate the language differences between mathematicians and physicists, and how we are trying reconcile them in the classroom. For further information about the project go to: http://www.physics.orst.edu/bridge

  1. Original Contributions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, there is a big change in this pattern during the second period for reasons we can only speculate on and cannot verify at this stage of our analysis. Further cross- correlation with other qualitative and quantitative data will most certainly enable verification and more informed conclusions pertaining to the patterns ...

  2. Morphometry of the osteodural bridge and the myodural bridge of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The osteodural bridge, the connective tissue between the axis and dura can be measured radiographically. The aim of the study was therefore to determine if there is a relationship between their lengths. Thirty formalin fixed cadavers were meticulously dissected at the department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi, ...

  3. Laboratory and field testing of an accelerated bridge construction demonstration bridge : US Highway 6 bridge over Keg Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The US Highway 6 Bridge over Keg Creek outside of Council Bluffs, Iowa is a demonstration bridge site chosen to put into practice : newly-developed Accelerated Bridge Construction (ABC) concepts. One of these new concepts is the use of prefabricated ...

  4. An Expert System for Concrete Bridge Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brito, J. de; Branco, F. A.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    The importance of bridge repair versus new bridge construction has risen in recent decades due to high deterioration rates that have been observed in these structures. Budgets both for building new bridges and keeping the existing ones are always limited. To help rational decision-making, bridge...... management systems are presently being implemented by bridge authorities in several countries. The prototype of an expert system for concrete bridge management is presented in this paper, with its functionality relying on two modules. The inspection module relies on a periodic acquisition of field...... information complemented by a knowledge-based interactive system, BRIDGE-1. To optimize management strategies at the headquarters, the BRIDGE-2 module was implemented, including three submodules: inspection strategy, maintenance and repair....

  5. Meeting Environmental Requirements after a Bridge Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This report is intended to assist transportation and environmental professionals in the event of a bridge collapse or similar emergency. It analyzes the environmental review process in five cases of bridge reconstruction following collapse in Florida...

  6. Risk Mitigation for Highway and Railway Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Performance of the transportation network strongly depends on the performance of bridges. Bridges constitute a vital part of the transportation infrastructure system and they are vulnerable to extreme events such as natural disasters (i.e., hurricane...

  7. Mechanisms involved in symptomatic myocardial bridging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, A. J. C.; Jessurun, G. A. J.; Tio, R. A.

    Background. In patients with extensive myocardial bridging, evaluation of its clinical significance remains a challenge. Hypothesis. Sequential invasive testing is feasible and gives more insight into the pathophysiological mechanism of bridging-related angina. Methods. Twelve patients with chest

  8. Developing county bridge repair and retrofit techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Oklahoma rated first in the Nation in the percentage of bridges that are structurally deficient or : functionally obsolete. According to Federal Highway Administration data, Oklahoma uses : approximately 23,250 bridges maintained by state, County, Ci...

  9. Forensic testing of a double tee bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report describes an investigation to quantify the behavior of precast, prestressed concrete double-tee bridge : girders made with lightweight concrete. As part of the investigation, three bridge girders were salvaged from a : decommissioned brid...

  10. Microfluidic Wheatstone bridge for rapid sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyeri, Melikhan; Ranka, Mikhil; Sittipolkul, Natawan; Schroeder, Charles M

    2011-12-21

    We developed a microfluidic analogue of the classic Wheatstone bridge circuit for automated, real-time sampling of solutions in a flow-through device format. We demonstrate precise control of flow rate and flow direction in the "bridge" microchannel using an on-chip membrane valve, which functions as an integrated "variable resistor". We implement an automated feedback control mechanism in order to dynamically adjust valve opening, thereby manipulating the pressure drop across the bridge and precisely controlling fluid flow in the bridge channel. At a critical valve opening, the flow in the bridge channel can be completely stopped by balancing the flow resistances in the Wheatstone bridge device, which facilitates rapid, on-demand fluid sampling in the bridge channel. In this article, we present the underlying mechanism for device operation and report key design parameters that determine device performance. Overall, the microfluidic Wheatstone bridge represents a new and versatile method for on-chip flow control and sample manipulation.

  11. Research on Collapse Process of Cable-Stayed Bridges under Strong Seismic Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to present the collapse process and failure mechanism of long-span cable-stayed bridges under strong seismic excitations, a rail-cum-road steel truss cable-stayed bridge was selected as engineering background, the collapse failure numerical model of the cable-stayed bridge was established based on the explicit dynamic finite element method (FEM, and the whole collapse process of the cable-stayed bridge was analyzed and studied with three different seismic waves acted in the horizontal longitudinal direction, respectively. It can be found from the numerical simulation analysis that the whole collapse failure process and failure modes of the cable-stayed bridge under three different seismic waves are similar. Furthermore, the piers and the main pylons are critical components contributing to the collapse of the cable-stayed bridge structure. However, the cables and the main girder are damaged owing to the failure of piers and main pylons during the whole structure collapse process, so the failure of cable and main girder components is not the main reason for the collapse of cable-stayed bridge. The analysis results can provide theoretical basis for collapse resistance design and the determination of critical damage components of long-span highway and railway cable-stayed bridges in the research of seismic vulnerability analysis.

  12. The Wien Bridge Oscillator Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2006-01-01

    A tutorial in which the Wien bridge family of oscillators is defined and investigated. Oscillators which do not fit into the Barkhausen criterion topology may be designed. A design procedure based on initial complex pole quality factor is reported. The dynamic transfer characteristic...

  13. Architectural engineering of FRP bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.E.P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP's) in architectural and structural bridge design. The challenges and opportunities that come with this relatively new material are discussed. An inventory is made of recent engineers' solutions in FRP, followed by a discussion on

  14. Official English: Bridge or Barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashen, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the official English movement in the United States. Provides suggestions for groups that really want to help immigrants acquire English, by building bridges and not barriers. These include the following: (1) joining private and charitable organizations in helping make English-as-a-Second-Language classes available; (2) support libraries;…

  15. Accelerated bridge paint test program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    The accelerated bridge paint (AB-Paint) program evaluated a new Sherwin-Williams two-coat, : fast-curing paint system. The system is comprised of an organic zinc-rich primer (SW Corothane I : Galvapac One-Pack Zinc-Rich Primer B65 G11) and a polyurea...

  16. Exodermic bridge deck performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    In 1998, the Wisconsin DOT completed a two"leaf bascule bridge in Green Bay with an exodermic deck system. The exodermic deck consisted of 4.5"in thick cast"in"place reinforced concrete supported by a 5.19"in tall unfilled steel grid. The concrete an...

  17. Intercellular bridges in vertebrate gastrulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Caneparo

    Full Text Available The developing zebrafish embryo has been the subject of many studies of regional patterning, stereotypical cell movements and changes in cell shape. To better study the morphological features of cells during gastrulation, we generated mosaic embryos expressing membrane attached Dendra2 to highlight cellular boundaries. We find that intercellular bridges join a significant fraction of epiblast cells in the zebrafish embryo, reaching several cell diameters in length and spanning across different regions of the developing embryos. These intercellular bridges are distinct from the cellular protrusions previously reported as extending from hypoblast cells (1-2 cellular diameters in length or epiblast cells (which were shorter. Most of the intercellular bridges were formed at pre-gastrula stages by the daughters of a dividing cell maintaining a membrane tether as they move apart after mitosis. These intercellular bridges persist during gastrulation and can mediate the transfer of proteins between distant cells. These findings reveal a surprising feature of the cellular landscape in zebrafish embryos and open new possibilities for cell-cell communication during gastrulation, with implications for modeling, cellular mechanics, and morphogenetic signaling.

  18. Detection of Ultrafine Anaphase Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizard, Anna H; Nielsen, Christian F; Hickson, Ian D

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafine anaphase bridges (UFBs) are thin DNA threads linking the separating sister chromatids in the anaphase of mitosis. UFBs are thought to form when topological DNA entanglements between two chromatids are not resolved prior to anaphase onset. In contrast to other markers of defective...

  19. Field performance of timber bridges. 5, Little Salmon Creek stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. A. Ritter; J. A. Kainz; G. J. Porter

    The Little Salmon Creek bridge was constructed in November 1988 on the Allegheny National Forest in Pennsylvania. The bridge is a simple span, single-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure that is approximately 26-ft long and 16-ft wide. The bridge is unique in that it is the first known stress-laminated timber bridge to be constructed of hardwood lumber. The...

  20. Field performance of timber bridges. 6, Hoffman Run stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. A. Ritter; P. D. Hilbrich Lee; G. J. Porter

    The Hoffman Run bridge, located just outside Dahoga, Pennsylvania, was constructed in October 1990. The bridge is a simple-span, single-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure that is approximately 26 ft long and 16 ft wide. It is the second stress-laminated timber bridge to be constructed of hardwood lumber in Pennsylvania. The performance of the bridge was...

  1. 77 FR 53251 - Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... Rehabilitation AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Section 1114 of the... used in new Federal-aid bridge construction and bridge rehabilitation projects. As part of the SAFETEA... bridge construction and bridge rehabilitation projects. Data on Federal-aid and non-Federal-aid highway...

  2. Designing timber bridge superstructures : a comparison of U.S. and Canadian bridge codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Scott Groenier; James P. Wacker

    2008-01-01

    Several changes relating to timber bridges have been incorporated into the AASHTO-LRFD Bridge Design Specifications recently. In addition, the Federal Highway Administration is strongly encouraging an LRFD-based design approach for all new bridges in the United States. The Bridge Design Code in Canada was one of the first to adopt the limit states design philosophy,...

  3. Bridge Programs in Illinois: Results of the 2010 Illinois Bridge Status Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. L.; Harmon, T.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides a summary of major results of the Illinois Bridge Status Survey, administered online between April and June 2010. The purpose of the survey was to understand the extent to which bridge programs are being implemented in Illinois, as well as to build an online directory of bridge programs. Bridge programs are an emerging…

  4. Hydrodynamic forces on inundated bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    The hydrodynamic forces experienced by an inundated bridge deck have great importance in the design of bridges. Specifically, the drag force, lift force, and the moment acting on the bridge deck under various levels of inundation and a range of flow ...

  5. Spread prestressed concrete slab beam bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    TxDOT uses prestressed slab beam bridges for short-span bridges ranging from approximately 3050 ft in : length. These bridges have precast, pretensioned slab beams placed immediately adjacent to one another : with a cast-in-place slab made composi...

  6. 49 CFR 236.713 - Bridge, movable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bridge, movable. 236.713 Section 236.713 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Bridge, movable. That section of a structure bridging a navigable waterway so designed that it may be...

  7. Science as a Common Language in a Globalised World - Scientific Collaboration Promoting Progress, Building Bridges

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2003-01-01

    International scientific collaboration and co-operation can accelerate the progress of science, help build bridges between diverse societies, and foster the development of science and technology in non-industrialised countries. This is possible because science is a common language (although the progress of science is often influenced by non-scientific factors). I shall describe examples of the role that scientific collaboration can play in bridge building and in conflict resolution. I shall then present a proposal for "Bridge Building Fellowships" which would contribute to strengthening scientific capacity in developing countries by helping to stem the brain drain and providing a basis for collaborations with scientists in industrialised countries.

  8. The Akashi Kaikyo Bridge and the Storebælt Bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    With the completion of the Akashi Kaikyo Bridge and the Storebælt East Bridge the development of the suspension bridge technology in the 20th century has manifested itself in two impressive structures. With the present echnology may bridges of similar (and also more modest) dimensions will undoub......With the completion of the Akashi Kaikyo Bridge and the Storebælt East Bridge the development of the suspension bridge technology in the 20th century has manifested itself in two impressive structures. With the present echnology may bridges of similar (and also more modest) dimensions...... will undoubtedly be built far into the next century. For bridges going beyond the spans of existing bridges it is, however, likely that new concepts will be developed....

  9. REVIEW: Oxytocin: Crossing the bridge between basic science and pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viero, Cedric; Shibuya, Izumi; Kitamura, Naoki; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Katoh, Akiko; Ueta, Yoichi; Zingg, Hans H; Chvatal, Alexandr; Sykova, Eva; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2010-10-01

    Is oxytocin the hormone of happiness? Probably not. However, this small nine amino acid peptide is involved in a wide variety of physiological and pathological functions such as sexual activity, penile erection, ejaculation, pregnancy, uterus contraction, milk ejection, maternal behavior, osteoporosis, diabetes, cancer, social bonding, and stress, which makes oxytocin and its receptor potential candidates as targets for drug therapy. In this review, we address the issues of drug design and specificity and focus our discussion on recent findings on oxytocin and its heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptor OTR. In this regard, we will highlight the following topics: (i) the role of oxytocin in behavior and affectivity, (ii) the relationship between oxytocin and stress with emphasis on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, (iii) the involvement of oxytocin in pain regulation and nociception, (iv) the specific action mechanisms of oxytocin on intracellular Ca²(+) in the hypothalamo neurohypophysial system (HNS) cell bodies, (v) newly generated transgenic rats tagged by a visible fluorescent protein to study the physiology of vasopressin and oxytocin, and (vi) the action of the neurohypophysial hormone outside the central nervous system, including the myometrium, heart and peripheral nervous system. As a short nine amino acid peptide, closely related to its partner peptide vasopressin, oxytocin appears to be ideal for the design of agonists and antagonists of its receptor. In addition, not only the hormone itself and its binding to OTR, but also its synthesis, storage and release can be endogenously and exogenously regulated to counteract pathophysiological states. Understanding the fundamental physiopharmacology of the effects of oxytocin is an important and necessary approach for developing a potential pharmacotherapy. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Oxytocin: Crossing the Bridge between Basic Science and Pharmacotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viero, Cedric; Shibuya, Izumi; Kitamura, Naoki; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Katoh, Akiko; Ueta, Yoichi; Zingg, Hans H; Chvatal, Alexandr; Sykova, Eva; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2010-01-01

    Is oxytocin the hormone of happiness? Probably not. However, this small nine amino acid peptide is involved in a wide variety of physiological and pathological functions such as sexual activity, penile erection, ejaculation, pregnancy, uterus contraction, milk ejection, maternal behavior, osteoporosis, diabetes, cancer, social bonding, and stress, which makes oxytocin and its receptor potential candidates as targets for drug therapy. In this review, we address the issues of drug design and specificity and focus our discussion on recent findings on oxytocin and its heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptor OTR. In this regard, we will highlight the following topics: (i) the role of oxytocin in behavior and affectivity, (ii) the relationship between oxytocin and stress with emphasis on the hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenal axis, (iii) the involvement of oxytocin in pain regulation and nociception, (iv) the specific action mechanisms of oxytocin on intracellular Ca2+ in the hypothalamo neurohypophysial system (HNS) cell bodies, (v) newly generated transgenic rats tagged by a visible fluorescent protein to study the physiology of vasopressin and oxytocin, and (vi) the action of the neurohypophysial hormone outside the central nervous system, including the myometrium, heart and peripheral nervous system. As a short nine amino acid peptide, closely related to its partner peptide vasopressin, oxytocin appears to be ideal for the design of agonists and antagonists of its receptor. In addition, not only the hormone itself and its binding to OTR, but also its synthesis, storage and release can be endogenously and exogenously regulated to counteract pathophysiological states. Understanding the fundamental physiopharmacology of the effects of oxytocin is an important and necessary approach for developing a potential pharmacotherapy. PMID:20626426

  11. ESTIMATION OF ECONOMIC EXPEDIENCY OF «BRIDGE-PRE-BRIDGE TERRITORY» SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lapko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers principles that form «Bridge-Pre-Bridge Territory» system. The method is proposed for calculation of expenses on technical research for development of projects on usage of pre-bridge territories. Usage of site class number for natural conditions makes it possible to estimate investment attractiveness of «Bridge-Pre-Bridge Territory» system.

  12. Implementation of Bridge Management System on Interurban Bridge in Maluku Province

    OpenAIRE

    Erwin Marasabessy

    2015-01-01

    Bridges as transport infrastructures play a vital role in smoothing traffic flows. The success of a bridge in playing its role and serving its function depends on its management. The Directorate General of Highways of the Ministry of Public Work has used a system to manage bridges known as the Bridge Management System (BMS). The system allows a systematic plan and provides a uniform procedure for all bridge operation activities on the national and provincial level. Data from Implementation Ag...

  13. Survival analysis on bridges for modeling bridge replacement and evaluating bridge performance

    OpenAIRE

    Beng, Si Soon; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    A sustainable civil infrastructure is a prerequisite for achieving sustainability in infrastructure development. However, the finite lifetime of infrastructure indicates a latent mass-maintenance problem in some countries which had experienced mass-construction of infrastructure during high economic growth. To achieve optimal infrastructure management for overcoming this mass-maintenance problem, life prediction of infrastructure is indispensable. Hence, in this research, bridg...

  14. A contribuição de estudos transversais na área da linguagem com enfoque em afasia Contribution of cross-section studies in the language area with focus on aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Ibelli Sitta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: um dos delineamentos mais empregados na pesquisa epidemiológica consiste no estudo transversal. Este consiste em uma ferramenta de grande utilidade para a descrição de características da população e para a identificação de grupos de risco. Considerando a afasia uma desintegração da linguagem, é necessário compreender as dissociações e comprometimentos pertinentes. OBJETIVO: analisar estudos epidemiológicos de caráter transversal que focam alterações em pacientes afásicos adultos para investigação das suas principais manifestações. CONCLUSÃO: estudos transversais mostram meios de buscar compreender como esta modificação de saúde abrange os sinais e sintomas relacionados. Considerando que a linguagem por ser um meio de comunicação privilegiado, para o afásico, a perda desse instrumento torna-se uma fonte de isolamento e de solidão. Assim, a identificação de indivíduos portadores de afasia pode contribuir ao diagnóstico preciso, corroborando a compreensão dos achados fonoaudiológicos em linguagem e no auxílio à reabilitação. Porém, estas evidências científicas deverão ser efetivadas em conjunto aos estudos longitudinais para dar suporte à criação de novas técnicas e estratégias de recuperação para os lesionados cerebrais favorecendo a melhora da comunicação e consequente interatividade.BACKGROUND: one of the most widely delineations used in epidemiological research is the cross-sectional study. It consists of a very useful tool for describing characteristics of the population and identifying risk groups. Considering aphasia as a disintegration of language, it is necessary to understand the dissociations and relevant commitments. PURPOSE: to analyze epidemiological studies that analyzed cross-sectional changes in adult aphasic patients in order to investigate their main manifestations. CONCLUSION: the cross-sectional studies show ways to understand how this change in health covers signs and

  15. Long-Term Structural Health Monitoring System for a High-Speed Railway Bridge Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Liang Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanjing Dashengguan Bridge, which serves as the shared corridor crossing Yangtze River for both Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway and Shanghai-Wuhan-Chengdu railway, is the first 6-track high-speed railway bridge with the longest span throughout the world. In order to ensure safety and detect the performance deterioration during the long-time service of the bridge, a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM system has been implemented on this bridge by the application of modern techniques in sensing, testing, computing, and network communication. The SHM system includes various sensors as well as corresponding data acquisition and transmission equipment for automatic data collection. Furthermore, an evaluation system of structural safety has been developed for the real-time condition assessment of this bridge. The mathematical correlation models describing the overall structural behavior of the bridge can be obtained with the support of the health monitoring system, which includes cross-correlation models for accelerations, correlation models between temperature and static strains of steel truss arch, and correlation models between temperature and longitudinal displacements of piers. Some evaluation results using the mean value control chart based on mathematical correlation models are presented in this paper to show the effectiveness of this SHM system in detecting the bridge’s abnormal behaviors under the varying environmental conditions such as high-speed trains and environmental temperature.

  16. Fatigue analysis and life prediction of composite highway bridge decks under traffic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando N. Leitão

    Full Text Available Steel and composite (steel-concrete highway bridges are currently subjected to dynamic actions of variable magnitude due to convoy of vehicles crossing on the deck pavement. These dynamic actions can generate the nucleation of fractures or even their propagation on the bridge deck structure. Proper consideration of all of the aspects mentioned pointed our team to develop an analysis methodology with emphasis to evaluate the stresses through a dynamic analysis of highway bridge decks including the action of vehicles. The design codes recommend the application of the curves S-N associated to the Miner's damage rule to evaluate the fatigue and service life of steel and composite (steel-concrete bridges. In this work, the developed computational model adopted the usual mesh refinement techniques present in finite element method simulations implemented in the ANSYS program. The investigated highway bridge is constituted by four longitudinal composite girders and a concrete deck, spanning 40.0m by 13.5m. The analysis methodology and procedures presented in the design codes were applied to evaluate the fatigue of the bridge determining the service life of the structure. The main conclusions of this investigation focused on alerting structural engineers to the possible distortions, associated to the steel and composite bridge's service life when subjected to vehicle's dynamic actions.

  17. Modeling the tidal dynamic changes induced by the bridge in Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pin; Li, Guangxue; Qiao, Lulu; Chen, Xueen; Shi, Jinghao; Gao, Fei; Wang, Nan; Yue, Shuhong

    2014-08-01

    Cross-bay bridge is familiar in the world. However, few works have been conducted on the environment change due to bridge construction. Jiaozhou Bay (JZB) Bridge, Qingdao was built in 2011, with the length of 26.75 km and total piers length accounting for 10% of the bridge length. A numerical model was established with actual pier size, gap and location, thus fine grids, to study the tidal dynamics change due to the bridge pier construction. In the model, piers were recognized as islands to simulate the actual tidal condition. Model results indicated that the tidal current changed obviously around the piers while unobvious 200 m far from the piers. Although tiny impact due to a single pier, accumulated blockage effect of the whole bridge could induce the tidal change in the bay entrance. Due to the bridge construction, the difference of tidal elevation between the inside water and outside water increased. Whereas, both tidal current and residual current decreased significantly in the bay entrance. During spring tide, tidal prism decreased by 1.7% induced by the pier blockage effect, which equals to 140 times more than the piers bulk in the tidal range.

  18. Strengthening Bridges with Prestressed CFRP Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwowski, Tomasz; Żółtowski, Piotr

    2012-06-01

    Limitation of bridge's carrying bearing capacity due to aging and deterioration is a common problem faced by road administration and drivers. Rehabilitation of bridges including strengthening may be applied in order to maintain or upgrade existing bridge parameters. The case studies of strengthening of two small bridges with high modulus prestressed CFRP strips have been presented in the paper. The first one - reinforced concrete slab bridge - and the other - composite steel-concrete girder bridge - have been successfully upgraded with quite new technology. In both cases the additional CFRP reinforcement let increasing of bridge carrying capacity from 15 till 40 metric tons. The CFRP strip prestressing system named Neoxe Prestressing System (NPS), developed by multi-disciplinary team and tested at full scale in Rzeszow University of Technology, has been also described in the paper.

  19. Heavy Vehicles on Minor Highway Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Enevoldsen, I.

    of heavier trucks moving at larger speeds, and partly because the authorities want to permit transportation of special heavy goods at a larger part of the road net. These needs will in many cases cause the strengthening of the bridges becomes necessary. In order to keep the expenses of such strengthening......Vibration of a bridge structure due to the passage of vehicles is an important consideration in the design of bridges. Further, a common problem in bridge engineering practice in these years is the upgrading of minor highway bridges (=5-20 m) to carry heavier loads partly due to a tendency...... the numerical models for the mathematical models of the vehicles and the bridge from which the load amplification factors can be estimated assuming that the dynamic parameters of the vehicles and the modal parameters of the bridge are known....

  20. Multidisciplinarity, Interdisciplinarity, and Bridging Disciplines: A Matter of Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Youngblood

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bridging disciplines have much to teach regarding how to combine analytical tools to tackle problems and questions that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. This article explores interdisciplinary aspects of two long established bridging disciplines--geography and anthropology--in order to consider what the relatively young undertaking labeled “interdisciplinary studies” can learn from their long existence. It considers the fallacy of nomothetic claim as well as the fruitful production of solutions by viewing process (methodology, not domain (academic turf, as the key to interdisciplinary success. Staking claim to interdisciplinarity is shown to be unproductive while finding the need for interdisciplinary approaches and following the mandates of that need strengthens both the disciplines and interdisciplinary studies.

  1. APPLICATION OF ULTRA-HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE TO PEDESTRIAN CABLE-STAYED BRIDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHI-DONG LEE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC, which enables reducing the cross sectional dimension of the structures due to its high strength, is expected in the construction of the super-long span bridges. Unlike conventional concrete, UHPC experiences less variation of material properties such as creep and drying shrinkage and can reduce uncertainties in predicting time-dependent behavior over the long term. This study describes UHPC’s material characteristics and benefits when applied to super-long span bridges. A UHPC girder pedestrian cable-stayed bridge was designed and successfully constructed. The UHPC reduced the deflections in both the short and long term. The cost analysis demonstrates a highly competitive price for UHPC. This study indicates that UHPC has a strong potential for application in the super-long span bridges.

  2. A salt-bridge structure in solution revealed by 2D-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Domingos, Sérgio R; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Woutersen, Sander

    2014-08-14

    Salt bridges are important interactions for the stability of protein conformations, but up to now it has been difficult to determine salt-bridge geometries in solution. Here we characterize the spatial structure of a salt bridge between guanidinium (Gdm(+)) and acetate (Ac(-)) using two-dimensional vibrational (2D-IR) spectroscopy. We find that as a result of salt bridge formation there is a significant change in the infrared response of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), and cross peaks between them appear in the 2D-IR spectrum. From the 2D-IR spectrum we determine the relative orientation of the transition-dipole moments of the vibrational modes of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), as well as the coupling between them.

  3. Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds Bridge Display Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R. Michael [Remote Measurements & Research Company, Seattle, WA (United States); Lewis, Ernie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-09-01

    At the beginning of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Marine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Study (GCSS) Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) experiment, we recognized that the crew on the ship’s bridge would like to see a display of the meteorological data that was being collected. While a display on the bridge would be marginally useful to the science, it was decided to make a display for the bridge. A display was programmed in Lab View and a personal computer (PC) was set up in the bridge. This remained in operation until the ship went to dry dock for upgrades and service. Part of the upgrade was a new meteorological system for the ship. After this time there was no need for the ARM display and so it was not re-installed for the remainder of the program.

  4. Application of FBG sensors in strengthening and maintenance monitoring of old bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Li-na; Huang, Jun; Yang, Yan

    2009-10-01

    The various fiber Bragg grating(FBG)sensors such as FBG force rings, differential FBG displacement cells, FBG strain sensors and FBG temperature sensors had been used to monitor the strengthening and maintenance process of the continuous concrete beam bridges and the continuous concrete rigid frame bridges which are the part of Wuhan Second Yangtze River Bridge. In the strengthening and maintenance process, the tension force of the external prestressed tendons, the cracks change and intensity of cross sections had been monitored to insure the instruction safety, study the effect of strengthening and maintenance, and verify the design theories of strengthening and maintenance. Also the reference state criterion for long-term bridge health monitoring had been provided according to the monitoring results.

  5. Melanoma and immunotherapy bridge 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Nanda, Vashisht G. Y.; Peng, Weiyi; Hwu, Patrick; Davies, Michael A.; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Fattore, Luigi; Malpicci, Debora; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Croce, Carlo M.; Mancini, Rita; Spranger, Stefani; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wang, Yangyang; FERRONE, SOLDANO

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents MELANOMA BRIDGE 2015 KEYNOTE SPEAKER PRESENTATIONS Molecular and immuno-advances K1 Immunologic and metabolic consequences of PI3K/AKT/mTOR activation in melanoma Vashisht G. Y. Nanda, Weiyi Peng, Patrick Hwu, Michael A. Davies K2 Non-mutational adaptive changes in melanoma cells exposed to BRAF and MEK inhibitors help the establishment of drug resistance Gennaro Ciliberto, Luigi Fattore, Debora Malpicci, Luigi Aurisicchio, Paolo Antonio Ascierto, Carlo M. Croce, Rita Mancin...

  6. Inspection Strategies for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1989-01-01

    In this paper an optimal inspection strategy for concrete bridges based on periodic routine and detailed inspections is presented. The failure mode considered is corrosion of the reinforcement due to chlorides. A simple modelling of the corrosion and of the inspection strategy is presented....... The optimal inspection strategy is determined from an optimization problem, where the design variables are time intervals between detailed inspections and the concrete cover. The strategy is illustrated on a simple structure, namely a reinforced concrete beam....

  7. Severe ASR damaged concrete bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonio Barbosa, Ricardo; Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and University of Southern Denmark (SDU) have conducted several full-scale experiments with severe ASR deteriorated bridges. This paper presents few and preliminary results from both the shear tests and the measuring of the material properties. The shear test...... show that the shear capacity is almost unaffected of ASR despite significant reduction in compressive concrete strength. Furthermore, measurements show a significant tensile reinforcement strain developed due to ASR expansion....

  8. Electronic shearography for bridge inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathi, Debashis; Maji, Arup K.

    1995-04-01

    Electronic shearography (ES) is a laser based non-destructive testing method that has the potential to be developed into a commercial bridge monitoring technique. The primary advantage of ES over other similar techniques like electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) is its decreased sensitivity to in-plane rigid body movement and vibrations. Bridge inspection with ES has proven to be a daunting task so far. The main problem has been the inability of the method to handle the large deflections and vibrations that might be expected in a typical bridge subjected to normal service loads. Earlier research has shown that the extent of in-plane movement that can be tolerated by the system is dependent on the speckle size. The speckle size also affects the fringe quality by imposing resolution requirements on the imaging device. This article shall undertake the study of speckle size as a function of the focal length of the imaging lens, object distance and illumination wavelength using high resolution holographic film and a high magnification optical microscope.

  9. Agri-environmental collaboratives as bridging organisations in landscape management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Katrin

    2015-09-15

    In recent years, landscape and its management has become a focus of policies and academic conceptualisation. Landscape is understood as a concept of interconnected natural and human systems. Its management must take into account the dynamic interdependencies and diverging interests of various stakeholders at different levels. Bridging organisations can provide an arena for trust-building, conflict resolution, learning and collaboration between relevant stakeholders. This paper draws on two strands of literature - landscape governance and co-management of social-ecological systems - to investigate the contributions of agri-environmental collaboratives (AEC) to sustainable landscape management. Based on data from 41 interviews with key informants and AEC members in Germany and the Netherlands, six fields of contributions were identified: policy implementation and service provision; coordination and mediation; awareness raising and behaviour change; care for 'everyday' landscapes; maintenance and protection of landscapes (including species and habitats); and income generation and economic benefits. Some of the contributions evolve around the specific role of AEC as bridging organisations, but other contributions such as economic benefits emerge beyond this analytical lens. The paper therefore emphasises holistic, bottom up assessment of AEC contributions and argues that governments should support such organisations through i) funding for facilitators and ii) funding for impact monitoring and data management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Real-Time Seismic Monitoring of Thenewcape Girardeau (mo) Bridge and Recorded Earthquake Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    çelebi, Mehmet

    This paper introduces the state of the art, real-time and broad-band seismic monitoring network implemented for the 1206 m [3956 ft] long, cable-stayed Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge in Cape Girardeau (MO), a new Mississippi River crossing, approximately 80 km from the epicentral region of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. Design of the bridge accounted for the possibility of a strong earthquake (magnitude 7.5 or greater) during the design life of the bridge. The monitoring network consists of a superstructure and two free-field arrays and comprises a total of 84 channels of accelerometers deployed on the superstructure, pier foundations and free-field in the vicinity of the bridge. The paper also introduces the high quality response data obtained from the network. Such data is aimed to be used by the owner, researchers and engineers to (1) assess the performance of the bridge, (2) check design parameters, including the comparison of dynamic characteristics with actual response, and (3) better design future similar bridges. Preliminary analyses of low-amplitude ambient vibration data and that from a small earthquake reveal specific response characteristics of this new bridge and the free-field in its proximity. There is coherent tower-cabledeck interaction that sometimes results in amplified ambient motions. Also, while the motions at the lowest (tri-axial) downhole accelerometers on both MO and IL sides are practically free-from any feedback from the bridge, the motions at the middle downhole and surface accelerometers are significantly influenced by amplified ambient motions of the bridge.

  11. FEATURES OF DESIGN OF TIED-ARCH BRIDGES WITH FLEXIBLE INCLINED SUSPENSION HANGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Samosvat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Investigation and analysis of the hanger arrangement and the structural stability of a Network arch bridge – a tied-arch bridge with inclined hangers that cross each other at least twice. It is also necessary to make a comparative analysis with other types of hanger arrangements. Methodology. The authors in their research investigated a large number of parameters to determine their influence in the force distribution in the arch. Eventually they determined optimal values for all parameters. These optimal values allowed developing a design guide that leads to optimal arch design. When solving this problem, the authors used three-dimensional finite element models and the objective was to determine the most suitable solution for a road bridge, with a span of 100 meters, consisting of two inclined steel arches, located on a road with two traffic lanes, subjected to medium traffic. The virtual prototype of the model is performed by finite element simulator Midas Civil. Findings. In this study, for the bridge deck, a concrete tie appears to be the best solution considering the structural behavior of network arches, but economic advantages caused by easier erection may lead to steel or a composite bridge deck as better alternatives. Design requirements and local conditions of each particular bridge project will decide the most economic deck design.Originality. To ensure passenger comfort and the stability and continuity of the track, deformations of bridges are constricted. A network arch is a stiff structure with small deflections and therefore suitable to comply with such demands even for high speed railway traffic.
A network arch bridge with a concrete tie usually saves more than half the steel required for tied arches with vertical hangers and concrete ties. Practical value. Following the study design advice given in this article leads to savings of about 60 % of structural steel compared with conventional tied arch bridges with

  12. Road Bridges and Culverts, Bridge dataset only includes bridges maintained by Johnson County Public Works in the unincorporated areas, Published in Not Provided, Johnson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Road Bridges and Culverts dataset current as of unknown. Bridge dataset only includes bridges maintained by Johnson County Public Works in the unincorporated areas.

  13. Building Bridges to Integrate Care (BRIDGES): Incubating Health Service Innovation across the Continuum of Care for Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Onil; Schull, Michael; Shojania, Kaveh; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Naglie, Gary; Webster, Fiona; Brandao, Ricardo; Mohammed, Tamara; Christian, Jennifer; Hawker, Gillian; Wilson, Lynn; Levinson, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Integrating care for people with complex needs is challenging. Indeed, evidence of solutions is mixed, and therefore, well-designed, shared evaluation approaches are needed to create cumulative learning. The Toronto-based Building Bridges to Integrate Care (BRIDGES) collaborative provided resources to refine and test nine new models linking primary, hospital and community care. It used mixed methods, a cross-project meta-evaluation and shared outcome measures. Given the range of skills required to develop effective interventions, a novel incubator was used to test and spread opportunities for system integration that included operational expertise and support for evaluation and process improvement.

  14. Thermal bridges - calculations, thermal bridge values and impact on energy consumption; Kuldebroer - Beregning, kuldebroverdier og innvirkning paa energibruk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Thue, Jan Vincent; Blom, Peter; Dalehaug, Arvid; Aurlien, Tormod; Grynning, Steinar; Uvsloekk, Sivert

    2008-07-01

    This report presents the following: Definition of thermal bridge; Possible consequences of thermal bridges; Methods to decide thermal bridge value, inclusive by numerical calculation; Thermal bridge values for different constructions; A proposal for dynamic Thermal bridge atlas. The project report shows thermal bridge values for different constructions such as window insertion, transition between wall/ceiling, wall/floor, corners and ridge. Thermal bridge values for different kind of floor such as concrete, LECA and hollow core. (AG). refs., figs., tabs

  15. Horizontal bridges in polar dielectric liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woisetschlaeger, Jakob [Graz University of Technology, Experimental Turbomachinery Research and Optical Measurement Group, Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery and Machine Dynamics, Graz (Austria); Wexler, Adam D.; Fuchs, Elmar C. [Wetsus, Center of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Holler, Gert [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Electrical Measurement and Measurement Signal Processing, Graz (Austria); Eisenhut, Mathias [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Graz (Austria); Gatterer, Karl [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Graz (Austria)

    2012-01-15

    When a high-voltage direct-current is applied to two beakers filled with polar liquid dielectrica like water or methanol, a horizontal bridge forms between the two beakers. By repeating a version of Pellat's experiment, it is shown that a horizontal bridge is stable by the action of electrohydrodynamic pressure. Thus, the static and dynamic properties of the phenomenon called a 'floating water bridge' can be explained by the gradient of Maxwell pressure, replenishing the liquid within the bridge against any drainage mechanism. It is also shown that a number of liquids can form stable and long horizontal bridges. The stability of such a connection, and the asymmetry in mass flow through such bridges caused by the formation of ion clouds in the vicinity of the electrodes, is also discussed by two further experiments. (orig.)

  16. Multiscale probabilistic modeling of a crack bridge in glass fiber reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rypla R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces a probabilistic approach to simulating the crack bridging effects of chopped glass strands in cement-based matrices and compares it to a discrete rigid body spring network model with semi-discrete representation of the chopped strands. The glass strands exhibit random features at various scales, which are taken into account by both models. Fiber strength and interface stress are considered as random variables at the scale of a single fiber bundle while the orientation and position of individual bundles with respect to a crack plane are considered as random variables at the crack bridge scale. At the scale of the whole composite domain, the distribution of fibers and the resulting number of crack-bridging fibers is considered. All the above random effects contribute to the variability of the crack bridge performance and result in size-dependent behavior of a multiply cracked composite.

  17. Railway bridge defects and degradation mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Bień, J.; Jakubowski, K.; Kamiński, T.; Kmita, J.; Kmita, P.; Cruz, Paulo J.S.; Maksymowicz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Development of cooperation within European Union stimulates intensive integration between all components of European transportation system. One of the important fields of integration is railway bridge engineering, a part of railway transportation system. Proposed classification of degradation mechanisms against their effects as bridge structure defects can be a basis for the unified assessment of bridge condition. Presented terminology and classifications elaborated in the European research p...

  18. Bridge windshield design to avoid aeroelastic phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Ogueta Gutiérrez, Mikel; Franchini Longhi, Sebastian Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Since in 1940 the Tacoma Narrows Bridge was destroyed by the wind, aeroelastic instabilities have been recognized as one of the most challenging aspects of bridge design. They can produce long-term fatigue failure through vortex induced vibrations, or sudden collapse through self-excited flutter. These vibrations may also cause discomfort for the users and temporary closure of the bridge. Wind tunnel studies are a very helpful tool to understand these phenomena. By means of them, the critical...

  19. Bridge engineering handbook construction and maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Fah

    2014-01-01

    Over 140 experts, 14 countries, and 89 chapters are represented in the second edition of the Bridge Engineering Handbook. This extensive collection highlights bridge engineering specimens from around the world, contains detailed information on bridge engineering, and thoroughly explains the concepts and practical applications surrounding the subject.Published in five books: Fundamentals, Superstructure Design, Substructure Design, Seismic Design, and Construction and Maintenance, this new edition provides numerous worked-out examples that give readers step-by-step design procedures, includes c

  20. Measurement of Deflection Line on Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Rudolf; Štroner, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Prestressed concrete bridges are very sensitive to the increase in long-term deflections. Reliable forecasts of deflections of bridge structures during construction and durability are crucial for achieving good durability. The main results of measurements are the changes of the deflection line of the bridge structures, which places special demands on the measurement procedure. Results from measurements are very useful for the improvement of mathematical prediction methods of behaviour of long span prestressed concrete structures.

  1. Monitoring of air pollution levels related to Charilaos Trikoupis Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarigiannis, D A; Handakas, E J; Kermenidou, M; Zarkadas, I; Gotti, A; Charisiadis, P; Makris, K; Manousakas, M; Eleftheriadis, K; Karakitsios, S P

    2017-12-31

    Charilaos Trikoupis bridge is the longest cable bridge in Europe that connects Western Greece with the rest of the country. In this study, six air pollution monitoring campaigns (including major regulated air pollutants) were carried out from 2013 to 2015 at both sides of the bridge, located in the urban areas of Rio and Antirrio respectively. Pollution data were statistically analyzed and air quality was characterized using US and European air quality indices. From the overall campaign, it was found that air pollution levels were below the respective regulatory thresholds, but once at the site of Antirrio (26.4 and 52.2μg/m(3) for PM2.5 and ΡΜ10, respectively) during the 2nd winter period. Daily average PM10 and PM2.5 levels from two monitoring sites were well correlated to gaseous pollutant (CO, NO, NO2, NOx and SO2) levels, meteorological parameters and factor scores from Positive Matrix Factorization during the 3-year period. Moreover, the elemental composition of PM10 and PM2.5 was used for source apportionment. That analysis revealed that major emission sources were sulfates, mineral dust, biomass burning, sea salt, traffic and shipping emissions for PM10 and PM2.5, for both Rio and Antirrio. Seasonal variation indicates that sulfates, mineral dust and traffic emissions increased during the warm season of the year, while biomass burning become the dominant during the cold season. Overall, the contribution of the Charilaos Trikoupis bridge to the vicinity air pollution is very low. This is the result of the relatively low daily traffic volume (~10,000 vehicles per day), the respective traffic fleet composition (~81% of the traffic fleet are private vehicles) and the speed limit (80km/h) which does not favor traffic emissions. In addition, the strong and frequent winds further contribute to the rapid dispersion of the emitted pollutants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. SSI-bridge : soil bridge interaction during long-duration earthquake motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The seismic response of a complete soil-bridge system during shallow, crustal and subduction zone earthquakes is the topic of this report. Specifically, the effects of earthquake duration on the seismic performance of soil-bridge systems are examined...

  3. Development of a precast bridge deck overhang system for the rock creek bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Precast, prestressed panels are commonly used at interior beams for bridges in Texas. The use of these : panels provides ease of construction, sufficient capacity, and good economy for the construction of : bridges in Texas. Current practice for the ...

  4. Evaluation of the Buena Vista IBRD bridge : a furthering of accelerated bridge construction in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The need to construct bridges that last longer, are less expensive, and take less time to build has increased. The importance of accelerated bridge construction (ABC) technologies has been realized by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the...

  5. A doubly 2,6-pyridylene-bridged porphyrin-perylene-porphyrin triad.

    OpenAIRE

    IKEDA, SHIN; Aratani, Naoki; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A doubly 2, 6-pyridylene-bridged porphyrin-perylene-porphyrin triad was synthesized via Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction, which captures a tetrakis(3-pyridyl)porphyrin guest in a 2 : 1 manner to form a supramolecular complex that undergoes photo-induced electron transfer.

  6. Contributions lexicographiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Bezlaj

    1955-12-01

    Full Text Available Dans les »Novice« du 6 avril 1859, p. 108, Fr. Pohorski (probablement un pseudonyme d'un auteur inconnu publia des matériaux lexicographiques sous le title »Quelques mots rares de Pohorje en Styrie«. Cette contribution passa inaperçue et Pleteršnik ne cite dans son dictionnaire que quelques-uns de ces mots qu'il a tirés d'une autre source. Dans un passé plus récent, J. Kelemina prit dans ce recueil le nom commun tega, teha »chalet de montagne«, die Taie en all. Carinth (Slovenski etnograf VI-VIII 323  *tegia, (prérom. Attegia (Meyer-Lübke, REW 761 et sot »chemin de montagne« (SR VIII 88, ce qui pourrait venir, après avoir passé par le roman, de (prérom.

  7. Review of Energy Harvesters Utilizing Bridge Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Ullah Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For health monitoring of bridges, wireless acceleration sensor nodes (WASNs are normally used. In bridge environment, several forms of energy are available for operating WASNs that include wind, solar, acoustic, and vibration energy. However, only bridge vibration has the tendency to be utilized for embedded WASNs application in bridge structures. This paper reports on the recent advancements in the area of vibration energy harvesters (VEHs utilizing bridge oscillations. The bridge vibration is narrowband (1 to 40 Hz with low acceleration levels (0.01 to 3.8 g. For utilization of bridge vibration, electromagnetic based vibration energy harvesters (EM-VEHs and piezoelectric based vibration energy harvesters (PE-VEHs have been developed. The power generation of the reported EM-VEHs is in the range from 0.7 to 1450000 μW. However, the power production by the developed PE-VEHs ranges from 0.6 to 7700 μW. The overall size of most of the bridge VEHs is quite comparable and is in mesoscale. The resonant frequencies of EM-VEHs are on the lower side (0.13 to 27 Hz in comparison to PE-VEHs (1 to 120 Hz. The power densities reported for these bridge VEHs range from 0.01 to 9539.5 μW/cm3 and are quite enough to operate most of the commercial WASNs.

  8. A Polish approach to FRP bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwowski, Tomasz; Rajchel, Mateusz

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents initial results of a new approach to FRP composite bridge construction that is presently being developed and tested in Poland. The concept combines lightweight concrete with FRP composites to create a durable highly optimised structure. The paper describes the bridge system itself and presents the research results on its development. The basic design is presented together with research results on its development: FEM analysis and a range of static test results of full-scale bridge beam experiments. The paper finishes with some test results of a full scale bridge that was constructed near Rzeszow in December 2015.

  9. A data management infrastructure for bridge monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seongwoon; Byun, Jaewook; Kim, Daeyoung; Sohn, Hoon; Bae, In Hwan; Law, Kincho H.

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses a data management infrastructure framework for bridge monitoring applications. As sensor technologies mature and become economically affordable, their deployment for bridge monitoring will continue to grow. Data management becomes a critical issue not only for storing the sensor data but also for integrating with the bridge model to support other functions, such as management, maintenance and inspection. The focus of this study is on the effective data management of bridge information and sensor data, which is crucial to structural health monitoring and life cycle management of bridge structures. We review the state-of-the-art of bridge information modeling and sensor data management, and propose a data management framework for bridge monitoring based on NoSQL database technologies that have been shown useful in handling high volume, time-series data and to flexibly deal with unstructured data schema. Specifically, Apache Cassandra and Mongo DB are deployed for the prototype implementation of the framework. This paper describes the database design for an XML-based Bridge Information Modeling (BrIM) schema, and the representation of sensor data using Sensor Model Language (SensorML). The proposed prototype data management framework is validated using data collected from the Yeongjong Bridge in Incheon, Korea.

  10. Nanoclusters a bridge across disciplines

    CERN Document Server

    Jena, Purusottam

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive book on Nanoclusters comprises sixteen authoritative chapters written by leading researchers in the field. It provides insight into topics that are currently at the cutting edge of cluster science, with the main focus on metal and metal compound systems that are of particular interest in materials science, and also on aspects related to biology and medicine. While there are numerous books on clusters, the focus on clusters as a bridge across disciplines sets this book apart from others. Delivers cutting edge coverage of cluster science Covers a broad range of topics in

  11. Detecting global bridges in networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Pablo; Morini, Matteo; Karsai, Márton; Venturini, Tommaso; Vespignani, Alessandro; Jacomy, Mathieu; Cointet, Jean-Philippe; Mercklé, Pierre; Fleury, Eric

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The identification of nodes occupying important positions in a network structure is crucial for the understanding of the associated real-world system. Usually, betweenness centrality is used to evaluate a node capacity to connect different graph regions. However, we argue here that this measure is not adapted for that task, as it gives equal weight to “local” centers (i.e. nodes of high degree central to a single region) and to “global” bridges, which connect different...

  12. A bridge to advanced mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Sentilles, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    This helpful workbook-style ""bridge"" book introduces students to the foundations of advanced mathematics, spanning the gap between a practically oriented calculus sequence and subsequent courses in algebra and analysis with a more theoretical slant. Part 1 focuses on logic and number systems, providing the most basic tools, examples, and motivation for the manner, method, and concerns of higher mathematics. Part 2 covers sets, relations, functions, infinite sets, and mathematical proofs and reasoning. Author Dennis Sentilles also discusses the history and development of mathematics as well a

  13. Field performance of timber bridges. 9, Big Erick`s stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. A. Kainz; J. P. Wacker; M. Nelson

    The Big Erickas bridge was constructed during September 1992 in Baraga County, Michigan. The bridge is 72 ft long, 16 ft wide, and consists of three simple spans: two stress-laminated deck approach spans and a stress-laminated box center span. The bridge is unique in that it is one of the first known stress-laminated timber bridge applications to use Eastern Hemlock...

  14. Bridge characterization and structural health monitoring: a suspension bridge case study

    OpenAIRE

    Houel, Adrien; Orcesi, André; LECONTE, Renaud

    2012-01-01

    Detecting and assessing the severity of structural damage is one major objective when monitoring a bridge. In particular, when some degradation phenomena threaten the bridge safety, the goal can be to assess monitoring critical components, which allows checking a safety threshold is not reached until some repair/rehabilitation actions are performed. This paper describes an overall monitoring-based decision process, illustrated with the case of a suspension bridge in France, the Teil Bridge ne...

  15. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  16. 23 CFR 650.409 - Evaluation of bridge inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaluation of bridge inventory. 650.409 Section 650.409... Evaluation of bridge inventory. (a) Sufficiency rating of bridges. Upon receipt and evaluation of the bridge inventory, a sufficiency rating will be assigned to each bridge by the Secretary in accordance with the...

  17. 33 CFR 115.50 - Application for bridge permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application for bridge permits... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.50 Application for bridge permits. (a) Approval of plans. An application for authorization to construct a bridge across navigable waters...

  18. Finite element of multilayer surfacing systems on orthotropic steel bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Liu, X.; Scarpas, A.; Tzimiris, G.

    2013-01-01

    Light weight orthotropic steel bridge decks have been widely utilized for bridges in seismic zones, movable bridges and long span bridges. In the last three decades, severe problems were reported in relation to asphaltic surfacing materials on orthotropic steel deck bridges. Earlier investigations

  19. Interaction Behavior between Thrust Faulting and the National Highway No. 3 - Tianliao III bridge as Determined using Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. H.; Wu, L. C.; Chan, P. C.; Lin, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    The National Highway No. 3 - Tianliao III Bridge is located in the southwestern Taiwan mudstone area and crosses the Chekualin fault. Since the bridge was opened to traffic, it has been repaired 11 times. To understand the interaction behavior between thrust faulting and the bridge, a discrete element method-based software program, PFC, was applied to conduct a numerical analysis. A 3D model for simulating the thrust faulting and bridge was established, as shown in Fig. 1. In this conceptual model, the length and width were 50 and 10 m, respectively. Part of the box bottom was moveable, simulating the displacement of the thrust fault. The overburden stratum had a height of 5 m with fault dip angles of 20° (Fig. 2). The bottom-up strata were mudstone, clay, and sand, separately. The uplift was 1 m, which was 20% of the stratum thickness. In accordance with the investigation, the position of the fault tip was set, depending on the fault zone, and the bridge deformation was observed (Fig. 3). By setting "Monitoring Balls" in the numerical model to analyzes bridge displacement, we determined that the bridge deck deflection increased as the uplift distance increased. Furthermore, the force caused by the loading of the bridge deck and fault dislocation was determined to cause a down deflection of the P1 and P2 bridge piers. Finally, the fault deflection trajectory of the P4 pier displayed the maximum displacement (Fig. 4). Similar behavior has been observed through numerical simulation as well as field monitoring data. Usage of the discrete element model (PFC3D) to simulate the deformation behavior between thrust faulting and the bridge provided feedback for the design and improved planning of the bridge.

  20. Advanced bridge safety initiative : FRP flexural retrofit for concrete slab bridges - task 4 deliverables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Concrete slab bridges are being examined as part of the MaineDOT Advanced Bridge Safety Initiative. Under Tasks : 1 3 a finite element analysis program is developed, validated and applied to twenty bridges. : Task 4 investigates and develops a no...

  1. 76 FR 55160 - Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... Rehabilitation AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Section 1114 of the... used in new Federal-aid bridge construction and bridge rehabilitation projects. As part of the SAFETEA... rehabilitation projects. Data on Federal-aid and non-Federal-aid highway bridges are included in the report for...

  2. 75 FR 62181 - Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... Rehabilitation AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Section 1114 of the... materials used in new Federal-aid bridge construction and bridge rehabilitation projects. As part of the... rehabilitation projects. Data on Federal-aid and non-Federal-aid highway bridges are included in the report for...

  3. Bridge Workshop : Enhancing Bridge Performance, February 21-22, 2008, Reston, Virginia : workshop report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivas Alampalli; Sheila Rimal Duwadi; Reagan Sentelle Herman; Danielle D. Kleinhans; Khaled Mahmoud; James C. Ray; James P. Wacker; Nur Yazdani

    2008-01-01

    The participants to the workshop were given the charge to discuss (1) bridge design issues including best practices in design and detailing that could be used to improve durability, extend service life and prevent premature deterioration, (2) performance measures needed to better determine bridge condition, (3) technologies that could be used to monitor bridge life and...

  4. Field performance of timber bridges. 15, Pueblo County, Colorado, stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. E. Hislop

    The Pueblo County 204B bridge was constructed in March 1990 in Pueblo, Colorado, as a demonstration bridge under the USDA Forest Service Timber Bridge Initiative. The stress-laminated deck superstructure is approximately 10 m long, 9 m wide, and 406 mm deep, with a skew of 10 degrees. Performance monitoring was conducted for 3 years, beginning at...

  5. 49 CFR 236.312 - Movable bridge, interlocking of signal appliances with bridge devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Movable bridge, interlocking of signal appliances with bridge devices. 236.312 Section 236.312 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Interlocking Standards § 236.312 Movable bridge, interlocking of signal...

  6. Light-weight aluminium bridges and bridge decks. An overview of recent applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Soetens, F.; Kluyver, D. de

    2008-01-01

    The last decades have shown a large increase in the application of aluminium alloys for light-weight bridges. For bridge construction, aluminium alloys have some specific advantages, but also some points of attention. This paper deals with some recent projects of aluminium bridges, and for these

  7. A bridge with a view, a view with a bridge : Identifying design considerations for bridges to strengthen regional identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.E.P.; van der Hoeven, F.D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses design considerations for creating high quality infrastructural artefacts with an emphasis on bridges. The authors pursue a design study and analysis approach to highlight the specifics of infrastructure design for regional identity, based on their own work on a bridge

  8. Listening to Students: Building Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Shira; Armillas-Tiseyra, Magali; Kuerbis, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    "Cross-disciplinary" has become a buzzword in academia. Here the authors offer a student-based perspective on the benefits of cross-disciplinary discussion, based on their experience in New York University's Graduate Forum. Founded ten years ago by Catharine Stimpson, then dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Science (GSAS), the forum…

  9. Effect of barrier layer on switching polarity of ZrO2-based conducting-bridge random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Sridhar; Simanjuntak, Firman Mangasa; Tsai, Tsung-Ling; Lin, Chun-An; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2017-09-01

    In this study, metal diffusion barrier-dependent switching polarity in ZrO2-based conducting-bridge random access memory was investigated. The device without the barrier layer (BL) exhibited nonpolar switching characteristics. However, inserting TiW BL resulted in positive reset failure. This phenomenon depends on the size and shape of the conducting bridge and also on the defects that contribute to the formation and rupture of the bridge. Consequently, the properties of the conducting bridge govern the device switching performance. Cu- and oxygen vacancy-based conducting bridge during N-Set for a device with and without the BL was proposed. The effect of the insertion of BL on the switching performance was also discussed. The absence of BL resulted in switching instability and poor nonvolatility. By contrast, a device with BL exhibited enhanced uniformity and nonvolatility, and the retention was more than 105 s at 200 °C.

  10. Snow bridge over crevasses, a poorly understood structure on glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Ogier, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Crevasses are one of the most symbolic landforms for mountaineering. They form when ice creep is not fast enough to allow the shape of the glacier to adjust to the constraints; ruptures thus occur. These fractures, up to tens of meters deep in temperate glaciers, may be marginal, longitudinal or transverse depending on their position. In the accumulation zone throughout the year, or in the ablation zone when the snow cover is present, snow bridges can form and hide the crevasses. So covered, a crevasse can be easily crossed by climbers and skiers but it also causes a significant hazard in case of bridge rupture. Many accidents result from such failure, although a large part of them does not take a tragic turn. On the very frequented French side of the Mont Blanc massif, 170 mountaineers died during the summers of the period 2003-2012, of whom only 3% due to a break of snow bridges. In winter, skiers are not roped together along itineraries such as the very popular Vallée Blanche, making them much more vulnerable. Apart from the assessment of the danger by guides and climbers, we know almost nothing about those fragile ice/snow structures. To (i) acquire first data, (ii) transcribe the empirical knowledge of practitioners, and (iii) establish the foundation for a research project, an online survey was conducted in Summer and Fall 2014. About 200 questionnaires were completed. They include information about accident sites (especially topography), snow and weather conditions, characteristics of the incriminated bridges and crevasses, factors and modes of break, indices of crevasse presence below the snow surface, and risk management from practitioners. Main results of this preliminary study will be presented.

  11. The structure of salt bridges between Arg(+) and Glu(-) in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu(-)) and arginine (Arg(+)) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu(-) and Arg(+), which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu(-)⋯Arg(+) salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  12. Using weigh-in-motion data to determine bridge dynamic amplification factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalin Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic component of bridge traffic loading is commonly taken into account with a Dynamic Amplification Factor (DAF – the ratio between the maximum dynamic and static load effects on a bridge. In the design codes, this factor is generally higher than in reality. While this is fine for new bridges that must account for various risks during their life-time, it imposes unnecessary conservativism into assessment of the existing well defined bridges. Therefore, analysis of existing bridges should apply more realistic DAF values. One way of obtaining them experimentally is by bridge weigh-in-motion (B-WIM measurements, which use an existing instrumented bridge or culvert to weigh all crossing vehicles at highway speeds. The B-WIM system had been equipped with two methods of obtaining an approximation to the static response of the. The first method uses the sum of influence lines. This method relies on accurate axle identification, the failure of which can have a large influence on the DAF value. The other method uses a pre-determined low-pass filter to remove the dynamic component of the measured signal; however an expert is needed to set the filter parameters. A new approach that tries to eliminate these two drawbacks has been developed. In this approach the parameters for the filter are determined automatically by fitting the filtered response to the sum of the influence lines. The measurement of DAF on a typical bridge site agrees with experiments performed in the ARCHES [1] project: dynamic amplification decreases as static loading increases.

  13. Field Testing and Load Rating of a Short-Span Thermoplastic Bridge System, Bridge T-8519

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    33 mm x 12 mm). Cable Length: 10 ft (3 m) standard, any length available. Material: Aluminum Circuit: Full Wheatstone bridge with four active 350Ω...ER D C/ G SL T R- 10 -4 8 Field Testing and Load Rating of a Short-Span Thermoplastic Bridge System, Bridge T-8519 G eo te ch ni ca l a...unlimited. ERDC/GSL TR-10-48 November 2010 Field Testing and Load Rating of a Short-Span Thermoplastic Bridge System, Bridge T-8519 Brett

  14. Development of improved connection details for adjacent prestressed member bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Adjacent prestressed member girder bridges are economical systems for short spans and generally come in two types: adjacent box beam bridges and adjacent voided slab bridges. Each type provides the advantages of having low clearances because of their...

  15. Implementation of sustainability in bridge design, construction and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of this research is to develop a framework for more sustainable design and construction : processes for new bridges, and sustainable maintenance practices for existing bridges. The framework : includes a green rating system for bridges. The...

  16. Real time assessment of dynamic loads on bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Highway bridges are an important class of civil structures that are subject to continuously : acting and varying dynamic loads due to traffic. A large number of highway bridges in the US : (bridges on interstate highways or state highways which have ...

  17. 0-6722 : spread prestressed concrete slab beam bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation uses : precast prestressed concrete slab beam bridges for : shorter-span bridges of approximately 3050 ft in : length. Conventional slab beam bridges have slab : beams placed immediately adjacent to one anoth...

  18. Design aids of NU I-girders bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Precast prestressed concrete I-Girder bridges have become the most dominant bridge system in the United States. In the early design : stages, preliminary design becomes a vital first step in designing an economical bridge. Within the state of Nebrask...

  19. Long-term behavior of integral abutment bridges : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Integral abutment bridges, a type of jointless bridge, are the construction option of choice when designing highway bridges in many parts of the country. Rather than providing an expansion joint to separate the substructure from the superstructure to...

  20. Methods and tools for diagnosing bridge structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С.Ф. Філоненко

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available  In the paper is reviewed the methods and means, which used at technical diagnostic of bridge designs. The general approaches to technical diagnostic, the main methods, primary converters and hardwares, which used on static and dynamic tests of bridge designs are reviewed.

  1. Kings Covered Bridge rehabilitation, Somerset County, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Collins; David C. Fischetti; Arnold M. Jr. Graton; Len Lichvar; Branden Diehl; James P. Wacker; Ed Cesa; Ed Stoltz; Emory L. Kemp; Samer H. Petro; Leon Buckwalter; John McNamara

    2005-01-01

    Kings Covered Bridge over Laurel Creek in Somerset County, Pennsylvania is approximately 114-foot clear span multiple Kingpost Truss with nail-laminated arches. This timber bridge is historically significant because it retains its original features of the 1860’s since the 1930s when it was spared from modernization by the construction of an adjacent steel highway...

  2. Neighborhood Bridges: 2010-2011 Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Debra

    2011-01-01

    In 2010-2011, students in twenty-five classrooms from eleven schools in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area participated in The Children's Theatre Company's Neighborhood Bridges (Bridges) program. The Children's Theatre Company contracted with the University of Minnesota's Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement (CAREI) to…

  3. Bridges Over Troubled Waters: Theoretical Linguistics And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper tries to construct a bridge between the concerns of theoretical linguistics and those of multilingualism and code-switching (CS) research. It argues that the primary special point of interaction between these fields lies in the question of potential equivalence between elements or categories, bridging across ...

  4. History of cable-stayed bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The principle of supporting a bridge deck by inclined tension members leading to towers on either side of the span has been known for centuries. However, the real development of cable-stayed bridges did not begin before the 1950s. Since then the free span has been increased from 183 m in the Strö...

  5. Re-Assessment of Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper two aspects of re-assessment of the reliability of concrete bridges are discussed namely modelling of the corrosion of reinforcement and updating of uncertain variables. The main reason for deterioration of concrete bridges is corrosion of the reinforcement. Therefore, modelling...

  6. Analysis of Biaxially Stressed Bridge Deck Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Bondum, Tommi Højer

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate state analysis of bridge deck plates at the intersection zone between main girders and transverse beams is complicated by biaxial membrane stresses, which may be in compression or tension in either direction depending on the bridge configuration and the specific location. This paper...

  7. Construction of CCC resistance ratio bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Z.; Jensen, D.H.; Holtoug, J.U. [Danish Institute of Fundamental Metrology, Lynbgy (Denmark)

    1994-12-31

    The paper introduces the cryogenic current comparator (CCC) resistance ratio bridge being built at DFM, which is designed to relate the value of quantized hall resistance R{sub H}(i) to room temperature resistance standards. The CCC is an overlapping tube type with copper wire. A double constant current source is used to supply for the CCC resistance ratio bridge.

  8. Shear assessment of reinforced concrete slab bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantsoght, E.O.L.; Van der Veen, C.; Walraven, J.C.; De Boer, A.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of reinforced concrete solid slab bridges in shear is assessed by comparing the design beam shear resistance to the design value of the applied shear force due to the permanent actions and live loads. Results from experiments on half-scale continuous slab bridges are used to develop a

  9. Lifetime Reliability Assessment of Concrete Slab Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    A procedure for lifetime assesment of the reliability of short concrete slab bridges is presented in the paper. Corrosion of the reinforcement is the deterioration mechanism used for estimating the reliability profiles for such bridges. The importance of using sensitivity measures is stressed...

  10. Disturbance indicator benchmark for urban bridge construction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.; Vogel, R.; Thodesen, C.

    2013-01-01

    European bridges are today in a state of particular concern with over 50% of European urban bridges being more than 40 years old and thus requiring considerable maintenance or possibly even replacement [1]. This means that interventions in the present infrastructure have to be made while ensuring

  11. The receptor RAGE: Bridging inflammation and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess Jochen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE is a single transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is mainly expressed on immune cells, neurons, activated endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, bone forming cells, and a variety of cancer cells. RAGE is a multifunctional receptor that binds a broad repertoire of ligands and mediates responses to cell damage and stress conditions. It activates programs responsible for acute and chronic inflammation, and is implicated in a number of pathological diseases, including diabetic complications, stroke, atheriosclerosis, arthritis, and neurodegenerative disorders. The availability of Rage knockout mice has not only advanced our knowledge on signalling pathways within these pathophysiological conditions, but also on the functional importance of the receptor in processes of cancer. Here, we will summarize molecular mechanisms through which RAGE signalling contributes to the establishment of a pro-tumourigenic microenvironment. Moreover, we will review recent findings that provide genetic evidence for an important role of RAGE in bridging inflammation and cancer.

  12. New regulations on railroad bridge safety: opportunities and challenges for railroad bridge monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreu, Fernando; LaFave, James M.; Spencer, Billie F.

    2012-04-01

    New federal regulations now mandate North American railroad bridge owners to closely assess the structural capacity of their bridges. Consequently, railroad companies are currently looking into developing and exploring monitoring systems for specific bridges, to help them improve and develop bridge safety in order to help comply with this new rule. The first part of this paper explains the significance of the new federal law. The new rule comes from the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of Transportation (DOT), and it falls under the 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Parts 213 and 2371. It requires railroad track owners to know the safe capacity of their bridges and to additionally conduct special inspections if either weather or other exceptional conditions make them necessary to ensure safe railroad bridge operations. The second part of this paper will cover past and current studies about the viability of bridge health monitoring, and actual structural monitoring experiences for railroad bridges. Finally, lessons learned from these monitoring examples, as well as recommendations for future applications, are suggested, including wireless monitoring strategies for railroad bridges such as: campaign sensing inspections (periodic monitoring); bridge replacement observations (short term monitoring); and permanent bridge instrumentation (long term monitoring).

  13. Seismic response of steel suspension bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, D.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Astaneh-Asl, A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-11-01

    Performing accurate, realistic numerical simulations of the seismic response of long-span bridges presents a significant challenge to the fields of earthquake engineering and seismology. Suspension bridges in particular represent some of the largest and most important man-made structures and ensuring the seismic integrity of these mega-structures is contingent on accurate estimations of earthquake ground motions and accurate computational simulations of the structure/foundation system response. A cooperative, multi-year research project between the Univ. of California and LLNL was recently initiated to study engineering and seismological issues essential for simulating the response of major structures. Part of this research project is focused on the response of the long-span bridges with the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge serving as a case study. This paper reports on the status of this multi-disciplinary research project with emphasis on the numerical simulation of the transient seismic response of the Bay Bridge.

  14. Optimum Maintenance Strategies for Highway Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frangopol, Dan M.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Das, Parag C.

    As bridges become older and maintenance costs become higher, transportation agencies are facing challenges related to implementation of optimal bridge management programs based on life cycle cost considerations. A reliability-based approach is necessary to find optimal solutions based on minimum...... expected life-cycle costs or maximum life-cycle benefits. This is because many maintenance activities can be associated with significant costs, but their effects on bridge safety can be minor. In this paper, the program of an investigation on optimum maintenance strategies for different bridge types...... is described. The end result of this investigation will be a general reliability-based framework to be used by the UK Highways Agency in order to plan optimal strategies for the maintenance of its bridge network so as to optimize whole-life costs....

  15. Adaptive bridge control strategy for opinion evolution on social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Cheng; Cao, Jinde; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present an efficient opinion control strategy for complex networks, in particular, for social networks. The proposed adaptive bridge control (ABC) strategy calls for controlling a special kind of nodes named bridge and requires no knowledge of the node degrees or any other global or local knowledge, which are necessary for some other immunization strategies including targeted immunization and acquaintance immunization. We study the efficiency of the proposed ABC strategy on random networks, small-world networks, scale-free networks, and the random networks adjusted by the edge exchanging method. Our results show that the proposed ABC strategy is efficient for all of these four kinds of networks. Through an adjusting clustering coefficient by the edge exchanging method, it is found out that the efficiency of our ABC strategy is closely related with the clustering coefficient. The main contributions of this paper can be listed as follows: (1) A new high-order social network is proposed to describe opinion dynamic. (2) An algorithm, which does not require the knowledge of the nodes' degree and other global∕local network structure information, is proposed to control the "bridges" more accurately and further control the opinion dynamics of the social networks. The efficiency of our ABC strategy is illustrated by numerical examples. (3) The numerical results indicate that our ABC strategy is more efficient for networks with higher clustering coefficient.

  16. Environment Impact Analysis of Shield Passing Alongside Bridge Pile Platform Using Three Dimensional Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yanliang; Shi, Wenjun; Han, Tongyin; Qin, Zhichao; Du, Shouji

    2017-10-01

    The shield method has many advantages in the construction of urban subway, and has become the preferred method for the construction of urban subway tunnel. Taking Shijiazhuang metro line 3 (administrative center station - garden park station interval) Passing alongside bridge as the engineering background, double shield crossing the bridge pile foundation model was set up. The deformation and internal force of the pile foundation during the construction of the shield were analyzed. Pile stress caused by shield construction increases, but the maximum stress is less than the design strength; the maximum surface settlement caused by the construction of 10.2 mm, the results meet the requirements of construction.

  17. 76 FR 42545 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chelsea Street Bridge Construction, Chelsea, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ...The United States Coast Guard is establishing a regulated navigation area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Chelsea River under and surrounding the Chelsea Street Bridge (CSB) that crosses the Chelsea River between East Boston and Chelsea, Massachusetts. This temporary interim rule allows the Coast Guard to suspend all vessel traffic within the RNA for construction operations, both planned and unforeseen, that could pose an imminent hazard to vessels operating in the area. This rule is necessary to provide for the safety of life on the navigable waters during the construction of the Chelsea Street Bridge.

  18. On the use of a passing vehicle for the estimation of bridge mode shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekjafarian, Abdollah; OBrien, Eugene J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for the estimation of bridge mode shapes using the response measured on a passing vehicle. A truck-trailer system is assumed, equipped with an external excitation at a frequency close to one of the bridge natural frequencies. The excitation makes the bridge response dominant at its natural frequency. The acceleration responses are measured on two following axles of the vehicle. It is shown that the amplitude of the signal includes the operational deflected shape data which can be used to estimate the bridge mode shapes. The energy of the responses measured on two following axles is obtained using the Hilbert Huang Transform. It is shown that the bridge mode shape can be estimated with high resolution and accuracy using a rescaling process. The presence of road roughness introduces additional contributions to the response measured on the vehicle, in addition to the bridge response. The concept of subtraction of the responses measured from two identical axles is used to remove the effect of road roughness.

  19. Building bridges … and accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Lyn Evans, the LHC project leader, was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) to celebrate his role not just in building accelerators, but also in building bridges between nations. He was one of four notables honoured at the event on Friday 5 June, coinciding with the University’s 450th Anniversary. Lyn Evans arriving at the ceremony with Archbishop Desmond Tutu. "It was a big surprise when I found out I’d been nominated," recounts Evans, "but it was an even bigger surprise to find out with whom I’d been nominated". At the ceremony Evans was awarded the honorary doctorate along with three others: Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who was acclaimed for his fight against apartheid in South Africa, Mary Robinson, first woman president of Ireland and former United Nations’ high commissioner of human rights, and Pascal Lamy, Director-General of the World Trade Organization. The award ceremony, known as the �...

  20. Noise Considerations in Resistance Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1963-01-01

    A signal-to-noise analysis is made of the Wheatstone bridge, where the unknown and standard resistors may be at different temperatures, a situation which occurs in resistance thermometry. The limiting condition is assumed to be dissipation in the unknown resistor. It is shown that the ratio arms......, namely, noise in the loss resistance of the step-up device, and grid current noise. There is therefore an optimum step-up ratio, which has been found. The step-up device is permitted to have a different temperature from the unknown and standard resistors, to evaluate the advantage of cooling it...... should be low in resistance compared with the unknown resistor, while the standard resistor should be high. This is true to an extreme degree when the unknown resistor is at liquid helium temperatures, and the standard resistor at room temperature. This factor is much less important in high temperature...

  1. Monitoring steel bridge renovation using lead isotopic tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salome, Fred; Gulson, Brian; Chiaradia, Massimo; Davis, Jeffrey; Morris, Howard

    2017-05-01

    Monitoring removal of lead (Pb) paint from steel structures usually involves analysis of environmental samples for total lead and determination of blood Pb levels of employees involved in the Pb paint removal. We used high precision Pb isotopic tracing for a bridge undergoing Pb paint removal to determine if Pb in the environmental and blood samples originated from the bridge paint. The paint system on the bridge consisted of an anti-corrosive red Pb primer top-coated with a Micaceous Iron Oxide (MIO) alkyd. Analysis of the red Pb primer gave uniform isotopic ratios indicative of Pb from the geologically-ancient Broken Hill mines in western New South Wales, Australia. Likewise waste abrasive material, as anticipated, had the same isotopic composition as the paint. The isotopic ratios for other samples lay on 2 separate linear arrays on a(207)Pb/(204)Pb versus (206)Pb/(204)Pb diagram, one largely defined by gasoline and the majority of the ambient air data, and the other by data for one sample each of gasoline and ambient air and underwater sediments. Isotopic ratios in background ambient air samples for the project were characteristic of leaded gasoline. Air sampling during paint removal showed a contribution of paint Pb ranging from about 20 to 40%. Isotopic ratios in the blood of 8 employees prior to the commencement of work showed that 6 of these had been previously exposed to the Broken Hill Pb possibly from earlier bridge paint removal projects. One subject appeared to have increased exposure to Pb probably from the paint renovations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An evaluation of the Human Capital BRidgeTM framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho D. Magau

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The methodologies employed for achieving two important goals of human resource (HR measurement, namely to enhance decisions about human capital and to connect HR and business strategy, are rarely empirically investigated.Research purpose: The aim of the present study was therefore to use the Human Capital (HC BRidgeTM framework to compare the views of HR practitioners with those of line management on HC solutions towards achieving strategic business objectives.Motivation for the study: The motivation for this study was to determine whether the HC BRidgeTM framework can create a useful platform for leveraging human capital solutions and for demonstrating HR value-add.Research design: A census-based survey was conducted on a target population of 787 supervisors and managers in specific categories in a mining company, which yielded 202 responses. The measuring instrument used was based on the HC BRidgeTM framework and on the company’s strategic objectives. Item intercorrelations on the subscales were followed by factor analyses and iterative item analyses.Main findings/results: The self-developed measuring instrument yielded an overall Cronbach alpha coefficient of 0.97. Statistically significant differences were found between line management’s and HR practitioners’ views in respect of the three strategic business objectives.Practical/managerial implications: The results suggested that HR management was not yet fully aligned in respect of strategic business objectives and of becoming a strategic business partner.Contribution/value-add: The study therefore suggested that the HC BRidgeTM framework can be used as a method to connect human capital processes with business strategy to leverage business results and to demonstrate value-add.

  3. Superconducting micronets: The Wheatstone bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammann, C.; Erdoes, P. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Haley, S.B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Using the Ginzburg-Landau theory, a particular superconducting (sc) micronet, called the Wheatstone bridge, is studied. This planar micronet is made of two nodes connected by three thin sc wires. A magnetic field is applied perpendicularly to its plane. The sc-normal second-order phase transition is characterized by only two configurations of the order parameter: {ital cphi}{sub {ital A}}={ital cphi}{sub {ital B}} and {ital cphi}{sub {ital A}}={minus}{ital cphi}{sub {ital B}}, where {ital cphi}{sub {ital A}} and {ital cphi}{sub {ital B}} are the order parameters at the nodes. For temperatures near {ital T}{sub {ital c}}, we show that only the {ital cphi}{sub {ital A}}={ital cphi}{sub {ital B}} configuration is admissible for fluxes near {Phi}={ital n}{Phi}{sub 0}, where {ital n} is an integer and {Phi}{sub 0} is the flux quantum. Finally, the exact solution of the nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau equations for one-dimensional systems is numerically fitted to the boundary conditions of the Wheatstone bridge for the two configurations {ital cphi}{sub {ital A}}={ital cphi}{sub {ital B}} and {ital cphi}{sub {ital A}}={minus}{phi}{sub {ital B}}. Graphs of the Gibbs energy and of the spontaneous supercurrent, which for these two configurations is always a screening supercurrent, are given as functions of the total flux. A discontinuous transition between configurations occurs as a function of the flux.

  4. The Impact of Traffic-Induced Bridge Vibration on Rapid Repairing High-Performance Concrete for Bridge Deck Pavement Repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on forced vibration tests for high-performance concrete (HPC, the influence of bridge vibration induced by traveling vehicle on compressive strength and durability of HPC has been studied. It is concluded that 1 d and 2 d compressive strength of HPC decreased significantly, and the maximum reduction rate is 9.1%, while 28 d compressive strength of HPC had a slight lower with a 3% maximal drop under the action of two simple harmonic vibrations with 2 Hz, 3 mm amplitude, and 4 Hz, 3 mm amplitude. Moreover, the vibration had a slight effect on the compressive strength of HPC when the simple harmonic vibration had 4 Hz and 1 mm amplitude; it is indicated that the amplitude exerts a more prominent influence on the earlier compressive strength with the comparison of the frequency. In addition, the impact of simple harmonic vibration on durability of HPC can be ignored; this shows the self-healing function of concrete resulting from later hydration reaction. Thus, the research achievements mentioned above can contribute to learning the laws by which bridge vibration affects the properties of concrete and provide technical support for the design and construction of the bridge deck pavement maintenance.

  5. Implementation of Bridge Management System on Interurban Bridge in Maluku Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Marasabessy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bridges as transport infrastructures play a vital role in smoothing traffic flows. The success of a bridge in playing its role and serving its function depends on its management. The Directorate General of Highways of the Ministry of Public Work has used a system to manage bridges known as the Bridge Management System (BMS. The system allows a systematic plan and provides a uniform procedure for all bridge operation activities on the national and provincial level. Data from Implementation Agency of National Inter-Urban Roads of Area IX, Northern Maluku in 2011 indicates that the total length of national roads in Maluku Province is 15,238.01 M, with a total of 562 bridges. In Ambon Island, especially, there are 52 bridges totaling 1,176.25 m in length. The study was conducted at several inter-urban bridges in Maluku Province of Ambon Island: Wai Batu Merah, Wai Ruhu, Wai Lawa, Wai Yari and Wai Tua bridges. Assessment of bridge structure conditions was conducted visually to determine the conditions of the existing bridges comprehensively by referring to the Bridge Management System (BMS complemented with a computer-based Bridge Management Information System (BMIS. Condition scores for the five bridges—Wai Batu Merah, Wai Ruhu, Wai Lawa, Wai Yari, and Wai Tua, according to Bridge Management System, are 2, 1, 2, 1, and 2 respectively. The scores of the five bridges indicate that their physical condition can be categorized as good or with minor defects. Based on technical screening, the proposed treatment for Wai Batu Merah, Wai Ruhu, Wai Lawa, dan Wai Tua bridges is the rehabilitation of their sub-elements. As for the Wai Yari Bridge, the treatment will be maintained regularly. The defect repair costs are IDR 149,138,238.00, IDR 81,048,000.00, IDR 174,579,106.10, IDR 79,233,324.01 and IDR 238,323,258.60 for Wai Batu, Wai Ruhu, Wai Lawa, Wai Yari, and Wai Tua Bridges, respectively.

  6. Track-Bridge Longitudinal Interaction of Continuous Welded Rails on Arch Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking arch bridges, including deck, half-through, and through arch bridges (short for DAB, HTAB, and TAB as examples, mechanics analysis models of longitudinal interaction between continuously welded rails (short for CWRs and arch bridges are established. Based on the finite element method (FEM, the longitudinal interaction calculation software of CWR on arch bridges has been developed. Focusing on an HTAB, the tension, compression, and deflection conditions are calculated and analyzed. The results show that the mechanics analysis models of three types of arch bridges can truly reflect the real state of the structure; the calculation software can be used for systematic research of the CWR on arch bridge; as for HTAB, temperature difference of arch rib has a small effect on rail tension/compression, and arch bridge can be simplified as a continuous beam for rail tension/compression additional force calculation; in calculation of deflection conditions of HTAB, it is suggested that train loads are arranged on half span and full span and take the direction of load entering bridge into account. Additionally, the deflection additional force variation of CFST basket handle arch bridge is different from that of ordinary bridge.

  7. Signal and noise in bridging PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaler David S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a variant of the standard PCR reaction termed bridging, or jumping, PCR the primer-bound sequences are originally on separate template molecules. Bridging can occur if, and only if, the templates contain a region of sequence similarity. A 3' end of synthesis in one round of synthesis that terminates in this region of similarity can prime on the other. In principle, Bridging PCR (BPCR can detect a subpopulation of one template that terminates synthesis in the region of sequence shared by the other template. This study considers the sensitivity and noise of BPCR as a quantitative assay for backbone interruptions. Bridging synthesis is also important to some methods for computing with DNA. Results In this study, BPCR was tested over a 328 base pair segment of the E. coli lac operon and a signal to noise ratio (S/N of approximately 10 was obtained under normal PCR conditions with Taq polymerase. With special precautions in the case of Taq or by using the Stoffel fragment the S/N was improved to 100, i.e. 1 part of cut input DNA yielded the same output as 100 parts of intact input DNA. Conclusions In the E. coli lac operator region studied here, depending on details of protocol, between 3 and 30% per kilobase of final PCR product resulted from bridging. Other systems are expected to differ in the proportion of product that is bridged consequent to PCR protocol and the sequence analyzed. In many cases physical bridging during PCR will have no informational consequence because the bridged templates are of identical sequence, but in a number of special cases bridging creates, or, destroys, information.

  8. The BRIDG project: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridsma, Douglas B; Evans, Julie; Hastak, Smita; Mead, Charles N

    2008-01-01

    The Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group (BRIDG) project is a collaborative initiative between the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC), the Regulated Clinical Research Information Management Technical Committee (RCRIM TC) of Health Level 7 (HL7), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to develop a model of the shared understanding of the semantics of clinical research. The BRIDG project is based on open-source collaborative principles and an implementation-independent, use-case driven approach to model development. In the BRIDG model, declarative and procedural knowledge are represented using the Unified Modeling Language (UML) class, activity and state diagrams. The BRIDG model currently contains harmonized semantics from four project use cases: the caXchange project and the patient study calendar project from caBIG; the standard data tabular model (SDTM) from CDISC; and the regulated products submission model (RPS) from HL7. Scalable harmonization processes have been developed to expand the model with content from additional use cases. The first official release of the BRIDG model was published in June 2007. Use of the BRIDG model by the NCI has supported the rapid development of semantic interoperability across applications within the caBIG program. The BRIDG project has brought together different standards communities to clarify the semantics of clinical research across pharmaceutical, regulatory, and research organizations. Currently, the NCI uses the BRIDG model to support interoperable application development in the caBIG, and CDISC and HL7 are using the BRIDG model to support standards development.

  9. Connecting Social Networks with Ecosystem Services for Watershed Governance: a Social-Ecological Network Perspective Highlights the Critical Role of Bridging Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlyn J. Rathwell

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In many densely settled agricultural watersheds, water quality is a point of conflict between amenity and agricultural activities because of the varied demands and impacts on shared water resources. Successful governance of these watersheds requires coordination among different activities. Recent research has highlighted the role that social networks between management entities can play to facilitate cross-scale interaction in watershed governance. For example, bridging organizations can be positioned in social networks to bridge local initiatives done by single municipalities across whole watersheds. To better understand the role of social networks in social-ecological system dynamics, we combine a social network analysis of the water quality management networks held by local governments with a social-ecological analysis of variation in water management and ecosystem services across the Montérégie, an agricultural landscape near Montréal, Québec, Canada. We analyze municipal water management networks by using one-mode networks to represent direct collaboration between municipalities, and two-mode networks to capture how bridging organizations indirectly connect municipalities. We find that municipalities do not collaborate directly with one another but instead are connected via bridging organizations that span the water quality management network. We also discovered that more connected municipalities engaged in more water management activities. However, bridging organizations preferentially connected with municipalities that used more tourism related ecosystem services rather than those that used more agricultural ecosystem services. Many agricultural municipalities were relatively isolated, despite being the main producers of water quality problems. In combination, these findings suggest that further strengthening the water management network in the Montérégie will contribute to improving water quality in the region. However, such

  10. Feasibility and Costs of Natural Gas as a Bridge to Deep Decarbonization in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. D.; McJeon, H. C.; Muratori, M.; Shi, W.

    2015-12-01

    Achieving emissions reductions consistent with a 2 degree Celsius global warming target requires nearly complete replacement of traditional fossil fuel combustion with near-zero carbon energy technologies in the United States by 2050. There are multiple technological change pathways consistent with this deep decarbonization, including strategies that rely on renewable energy, nuclear, and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. The replacement of coal-fired power plants with natural gas-fired power plants has also been suggested as a bridge strategy to achieve near-term emissions reduction targets. These gas plants, however, would need to be replaced by near-zero energy technologies or retrofitted with CCS by 2050 in order to achieve longer-term targets. Here we examine the costs and feasibility of a natural gas bridge strategy. Using the Global Change Assessment (GCAM) model, we develop multiple scenarios that each meet the recent US Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) to reduce GHG emissions by 26%-28% below its 2005 levels in 2025, as well as a deep decarbonization target of 80% emissions reductions below 1990 levels by 2050. We find that the gas bridge strategy requires that gas plants be retired on average 20 years earlier than their designed lifetime of 45 years, a potentially challenging outcome to achieve from a policy perspective. Using a more idealized model, we examine the net energy system costs of this gas bridge strategy compared to one in which near-zero energy technologies are deployed in the near tem. We explore the sensitivity of these cost results to four factors: the discount rate applied to future costs, the length (or start year) of the gas bridge, the relative capital cost of natural gas vs. near-zero energy technology, and the fuel price of natural gas. The discount rate and cost factors are found to be more important than the length of the bridge. However, we find an important interaction as well. At low discount rates

  11. Realistic modelling of the effects of asynchronous motion at the base of bridge piers

    CERN Document Server

    Romanelli, F; Vaccari, F

    2002-01-01

    Frequently long-span bridges provide deep valley crossings, which require special consideration due to the possibility of local amplification of the ground motion as a consequence of topographical irregularities and local soil conditions. This does in fact cause locally enhanced seismic input with the possibility for the bridge piers to respond asynchronously. This introduces special design requirements so that possible out-of-phase ground displacements and the associated large relative displacements of adjacent piers can be accommodated without excessive damage. Assessment of the local variability of the ground motion due to local lateral heterogeneities and to attenuation properties is thus crucial toward the realistic definition of the asynchronous motion at the base of the bridge piers. We illustrate the work done in the framework of a large international cooperation to assess the importance of non-synchronous seismic excitation of long structures. To accomplish this task we compute complete synthetic acc...

  12. Concept project of joining segment, connecting two folding bridge structures MS-54 and widened DMS-65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Marszałek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article includes the concept project of truss segment enabling the constructions of MS-54 and DMS-65 bridges to joint. At the beginning, the basic technical and exploitative characteristics of joined constructions are introduced. On the basis of this data, geometrical analysis of the component is carried out. As a result, the concept project of fitting, enabling the crossing from two types of foldable constructions to be built, is developed. Sequentially, the computer calculations of the bridge including the part of the designed fitting are carried out.The article contains the fragments of M.A. dissertation awarded by the rector of Military University of Technology as the best from the Faculty of Civil Engineering in 2014. The article is summarized with the conclusions.[b]Keywords[/b]: construction, folding bridges, truss segment

  13. Hygroscopic study of hydroxypropylcellulose : Structure and strain-induced birefringence of capillary bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, M H; Pieranski, P; Sotta, P

    2016-09-01

    The hygroscopic method developed previously for studies of lyotropic liquid crystals is used for the first time in experiments with millimetric capillary bridges made of a hydroxypropylcellulose/water mixture. Composition of such very small samples is controlled via humidity of the surrounding air. By a slow and well-controlled drying of initially isotropic samples, the isotropic/anisotropic phase transition is crossed and polydomain pseudo-isotropic capillary bridges are prepared. Kept in an atmosphere of constant humidity, these bridges are stretched and the strain-induced birefringence [Formula: see text] n is measured as a function of the draw ratio [Formula: see text] . The variation of [Formula: see text] n with [Formula: see text] is interpreted in terms of an affine uniaxial deformation of the initial pseudo-isotropic texture.

  14. INFLUENCE OF MOVING LOADS ON CURVED BRIDGES

    OpenAIRE

    Thamer A. Z*, Jabbbar S. A

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of a curved slab bridge decks with uniform thickness under moving load is investigated in this study. Three radii of curvature "R" are used (25, 50 and 75m) along with the straight bridge, R = ∞. The decks are simply supported or clamped along the radial edges and free at the circular edges. The AASHTO[1] standard axle load of the truck H20-44 is used and assumed to move in three track positions on the bridge. The finite element method is employed for the analysis and the ANSYS 5...

  15. Calculations in bridge aeroelasticity via CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brar, P.S.; Raul, R.; Scanlan, R.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The central focus of the present study is the numerical calculation of flutter derivatives. These aeroelastic coefficients play an important role in determining the stability or instability of long, flexible structures under ambient wind loading. A class of Civil Engineering structures most susceptible to such an instability are long-span bridges of the cable-stayed or suspended-span variety. The disastrous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows suspension bridge in the recent past, due to a flutter instability, has been a big impetus in motivating studies in flutter of bridge decks.

  16. Transformation of the bridge during drop separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    The geometry of flows during separation of pendant drops of liquids with significantly different physical properties (alcohol, water, glycerin, oil) has been studied by high-speed video recording. The dynamics of the processes involving the formation of bridges of two characteristic shapes—slightly nonuniform in thickness and with thinning of the upper and lower ends—has been investigated. It has been shown that the shape change of the separated bridge has a number of stages determined by the properties of the liquid. As a result, the bridge is transformed into a small drop—a satellite drop.

  17. Active Control of Long Bridges Using Flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H. I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    The main problem in designing ultra-long span suspension bridges is flutter. A solution to this problem might be to introduce an active flap control system to increase the flutter wind velocity. The investigated flap control system consists of flaps integrated in the bridge girder so each flap...... is the streamlined part of the edge of the girder. Additional aerodynamic derivatives are shown for the flaps and it is shown how methods already developed can be used to estimate the flutter wind velocity for a bridge section with flaps. As an example, the flutter wind velocity is calculated for different flap...

  18. Robustness and health monitoring of existing bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Casas Rius, Joan Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The paper shows how the robustness concept, mainly developed and thought for the design of new structures, and the monitoring by suitable sensors based on fiber optics can also play a relevant role in the safety and management of existing bridges. A new approach of robustness more related to the long-term and service life of bridges is presented and its advantages in the decision-making process during the management of existing bridges are highlighted and afterwards applied on a real brid...

  19. Human Errors and Bridge Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Nowak, A. S.

    Human errors are divided in two groups. The first group contains human errors, which effect the reliability directly. The second group contains human errors, which will not directly effect the reliability of the structure. The methodology used to estimate so-called reliability distributions...... on basis of reliability profiles for bridges without human errors are extended to include bridges with human errors. The first rehabilitation distributions for bridges without and with human errors are combined into a joint first rehabilitation distribution. The methodology presented is illustrated...

  20. Gust loading on streamlined bridge decks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larose, Guy; Mann, Jakob

    1998-01-01

    The current analytical description of the buffeting action of wind on long-span bridges is based on the strip assumption. However, recent experiments on closed-box girder bridge decks have shown that this assumption is not valid and is the source of an important part of the error margin...... of the analytical prediction methods. In this paper, an analytical model that departs from the strip assumption is used to describe the gust loading on a thin airfoil. A parallel is drawn between the analytical model and direct measurements of gust loading on motionless closed-box girder bridge decks. Empirical...