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Sample records for crops uranium uptake

  1. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Benesova, Dagmar [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Environment Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dvorakova, Marcela [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vanek, Tomas, E-mail: vanek@ueb.cas.cz [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC{sub 50} value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC{sub 50} = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: > The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. > Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. > Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. > The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  2. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka; Benesova, Dagmar; Dvorakova, Marcela; Vanek, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC 50 value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC 50 = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: → The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. → Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. → Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. → The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  3. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soudek, Petr; Petrová, Šárka; Benešová, Dagmar; Dvořáková, Marcela; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 6 (2011), s. 598-604 ISSN 0265-931X R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09082; GA MŠk 2B06187; GA MŠk 2B08058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Uranium * Uptake * Sinapis alba Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 1.339, year: 2011

  4. Natural radioactivity, dose assessment and uranium uptake by agricultural crops at Khan Al-Zabeeb, Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kharouf, Samer J. [Royal Scientific Society, Amman 11941 (Jordan); Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F. [Prince Abdullah Bin Ghazi Faculty of Science and IT, Al-Balqa Applied University (BAU), Salt 19117 (Jordan)], E-mail: hamarnehibrahim@yahoo.com; Dababneh, Munir [Prince Abdullah Bin Ghazi Faculty of Science and IT, Al-Balqa Applied University (BAU), Salt 19117 (Jordan)

    2008-07-15

    Khan Al-Zabeeb, an irrigated cultivated area lies above a superficial uranium deposits, is regularly used to produce vegetables and fruits consumed by the public. Both soil and plant samples collected from the study area were investigated for their natural radioactivity to determine the uranium uptake by crops and hence to estimate the effective dose equivalent to human consumption. Concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K in nine soil profiles were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry whereas watermelon and zucchini crops were analyzed for their uranium content by means of alpha spectrometry after radiochemical separation. Correlations between measured radionuclides were made and their activity ratios were determined to evaluate their geochemical behavior in the soil profiles. Calculated soil-plant transfer factors indicate that the green parts (leaves, stems and roots) of the studied crops tend to accumulate uranium about two orders of magnitude higher than the fruits. The maximum dose from ingestion of 1 kg of watermelon pulp was estimated to be 3.1 and 4.7 nSv y{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and {sup 234}U, respectively. Estimations of the annual effective dose equivalent due to external exposure showed extremely low values. Radium equivalent activity and external hazard index were seen to exceed the permissible limits of 370 Bq kg{sup -1} and 1, respectively.

  5. Natural radioactivity, dose assessment and uranium uptake by agricultural crops at Khan Al-Zabeeb, Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kharouf, Samer J.; Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F.; Dababneh, Munir

    2008-01-01

    Khan Al-Zabeeb, an irrigated cultivated area lies above a superficial uranium deposits, is regularly used to produce vegetables and fruits consumed by the public. Both soil and plant samples collected from the study area were investigated for their natural radioactivity to determine the uranium uptake by crops and hence to estimate the effective dose equivalent to human consumption. Concentrations of 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra, 222 Rn, 137 Cs and 40 K in nine soil profiles were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry whereas watermelon and zucchini crops were analyzed for their uranium content by means of alpha spectrometry after radiochemical separation. Correlations between measured radionuclides were made and their activity ratios were determined to evaluate their geochemical behavior in the soil profiles. Calculated soil-plant transfer factors indicate that the green parts (leaves, stems and roots) of the studied crops tend to accumulate uranium about two orders of magnitude higher than the fruits. The maximum dose from ingestion of 1 kg of watermelon pulp was estimated to be 3.1 and 4.7 nSv y -1 for 238 U and 234 U, respectively. Estimations of the annual effective dose equivalent due to external exposure showed extremely low values. Radium equivalent activity and external hazard index were seen to exceed the permissible limits of 370 Bq kg -1 and 1, respectively

  6. Uranium uptake of Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu Viet Hung; Maslov, O.D.; Trinh Thi Thu My; Phung Khac Nam Ho; Dang Duc Nhan

    2010-01-01

    Uranium uptake of vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) from Eutric Fluvisols (AK), Albic Acrisols (BG), Dystric Fluvisols (HP) and Ferralic Acrisols (TC) in northern Vietnam is assessed. The soils were mixed with aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate to make soils contaminated with uranium at 0, 50, 100, 250 mg/kg before planting the grass. The efficiency of uranium uptake by the grass was assessed based on the soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF U , kg·kg -1 ). It was found that the TF U values are dependent upon the soils properties. CEC facilitates the uptake and the increased soil pH could reduce the uptake and translocation of uranium in the plant. Organic matter content, as well as iron and potassium, inhibits the uranium uptake of the grass. It was revealed that the lower fertile soil, the higher uranium uptake. The translocation of uranium in root for all the soil types studied is almost higher than that in its shoot. It seems that vetiver grass could potentially be used for the purpose of phytoremediation of soils contaminated with uranium

  7. Microbial uptake of uranium, cesium, and radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; McWhirter, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of diverse microbial species to concentrate uranium, cesium, and radium was examined. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium to 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight. Only a fraction of the cells in a given population had visible uranium deposits in electron micrographs. While metabolism was not required for uranium uptake, mechanistic differences in the metal uptake process were indicated. Uranium accumulated slowly (hours) on the surface of S. cerevisiae and was subject to environmental factors (i.e., temperature, pH, interfering cations and anions). In contrast, P. aeruginosa and the mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense, apparently random, intracellular deposits. This very rapid accumulation has prevented us from determining whether the uptake rate during the transient between the initial and equilibrium distribution of uranium is affected by environmental conditions. However, the final equilibrium distributions are not affected by those conditions which affect uptake by S. cerevisiae. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several microbial species tested. The potential utility of microorganisms for the removal and concentration of these metals from nuclear processing wastes and several bioreactor designs for contacting microorganisms with contaminated waste streams will be discussed.

  8. Uptake of uranium from sea water by microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Horikoshi, Takao; Nakajima, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The uptake of uranium from aqueous systems especially from sea water by various microalgae was investigated. The freshwater microalgae, Chlorella regularis, Scenedesmus bijuga, Scenedesmus chloreloides, Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlamydomonas angulosa, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, accumulated relatively large amounts of uranium from the solution containing uranium only. The concentration factors of the above mentioned algae were: Chlorella regularis 3930, Chlamydomonas 2330 - 3400, Scenedesmus 803 - 1920. The uptake of uranium from sea water by Chlorella regularis was inhibited markedly by the co-existence of carbonate ions. Chlorella cells could take up a great quantity of uranium from decarbonated sea water. The uptake of uranium was affected by the pH of sea water, and the amount of uranium absorbed was maximum at pH 5. The experiment was carried out to screen marine microalgae which have the ability to accumulate a large amount of uranium from sea water. The uptake of uranium from sea water by marine microalgae of different species turned out to be in the following decreasing order: Synechococcus > Chlamydomonas >> Chlorella > Dunaliella > Platymonas > Calothrix > Porphyridium. The amount of uranium absorbed differed markedly with different species of marine microalgae. (author)

  9. Plant-uptake of uranium: Hydroponic and soil system studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, A.; Carr, P.; Burkhardt, M.

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is available on screening and selection of terrestrial plants for uptake and translocation of uranium from soil. This article evaluates the removal of uranium from water and soil by selected plants, comparing plant performance in hydroponic systems with that in two soil systems (a sandy-loam soil and an organic-rich soil). Plants selected for this study were Sunflower (Helianthus giganteus), Spring Vetch (Vicia sativa), Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa), Juniper (Juniperus monosperma), Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea), and Bush Bean (Phaseolus nanus). Plant performance was evaluated both in terms of the percent uranium extracted from the three systems, as well as the biological absorption coefficient (BAC) that normalized uranium uptake to plant biomass. Study results indicate that uranium extraction efficiency decreased sharply across hydroponic, sandy and organic soil systems, indicating that soil organic matter sequestered uranium, rendering it largely unavailable for plant uptake. These results indicate that site-specific soils must be used to screen plants for uranium extraction capability; plant behavior in hydroponic systems does not correlate well with that in soil systems. One plant species, Juniper, exhibited consistent uranium extraction efficiencies and BACs in both sandy and organic soils, suggesting unique uranium extraction capabilities.

  10. Uptake of uranium from sea water by Synechococcus elongatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikoshi, Takao; Nakajima, Akira; Sakaguchi, Takashi

    1979-01-01

    Basic features of the uranium uptake by Synechococcus elongatus, and the factors affecting it were examined. Synechococcus elongatus was grown in Roux flasks containing 1 liter of culture solution in light (20,000 lux) and with aeration at 30 deg C. Synechococcus cells in the linear growth phase were collected by centrifugation at 6,000 x g for 5 minutes, washed with sea water, and used for the uranium-uptake experiments. The uptake of uranium from sea water containing 1 ppm of the element was strongly affected by the pH of sea water. The optimum uptake was at pH 5. Presence of carbonate ions markedly inhibited and decarbonation of sea water greatly enhanced the uptake. Absorption of uranium by Synechococcus cells was initially rapid, and reached a plateau within 24 hours. The uranium accumulation capacity of Synechococcus cells was increased by heat treatment, the capacity of scalded cells being about twice as much as that of living cells. Most of the uranium absorbed by Synechococcus was found in the inner space of the cells, and only a small amount was present in the cell walls. (Kaihara, S.)

  11. Pollution of agricultural crops with lanthanides, thorium and uranium studied

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Jan; Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk; Vávrová, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 271, č. 3 (2007), s. 581-587 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : thorium, uranium * agricultural crops * neutron activation analysis Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.499, year: 2007

  12. Uptake of iodine-131 in tropical crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asprer, G.A.; Lansangan, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Vegetable crops which include sweet potato tops (Ipomoea batatas), kangkong (Ipomoea repitans) and tomato plants were grown in dark-painted jars containing Hoagland-Arnon modified nutrient solution, utilizing the technique of hydroponics. The experiments for sweet potato tops and kangkong plants were duplicated for replicate studies and steady-state conditions were simulated throughout. Tomato plants were grown in the same manner but growth was observed to be hampered when starting from mature plants. Radioiodine was added to the nutrient medium containing 0.5% non-radioactive NaI solution. The solution in the jar was adjusted daily so as to maintain a constant concentration which would simulate routine releases that are essentially continuous. After incorporating the radioiodine to the solution, 10 ml aliquot was taken and counted for radioactivity by means of a 5'' x 5'' NaI(T1) detector connected to the multichannel gamma analyzer. Both plants and solution were counted for radioactivity at different time intervals using the same geometry. Results indicate that the activity in the plants were relatively higher than that of the solution. The activity tends to level off or decrease after a few days. The concentration factor which is the ratio of the activity in the plant (uCi/gm) over the activity in the medium (uCi/ml) varied for each time interval. 12 references, 2 figures, 3 tables

  13. Uptake of uranium from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.P.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The gastrointestinal absorption (G.I.) of uranium in man from drinking water was determined by measuring urinary and fecal excretion of 234 U and 238 U in eight subjects. In order to establish their normal backgrounds of uranium intake and excretion the subjects collected 24 hour total output of both urine and feces for seven days prior to drinking water. During the next day they drank, at their normal rate of drinking water intake, 900 ml of water containing approximately 90 pCi 238 U and 90 pCi 234 U (274 μg U) and continued to collect their urine and feces for seven additional days. Utilizing one technique for analyzing data, the G.I. absorption of 234 U ranged from -0.07% to 1.88% with an average of 0.51% and G.I. absorption of 238 U ranged from -0.07% to 1.79% with an average of 0.50%. Employing another technique for analyzing the data, the G.I. absorption ranged from -0.04 to 1.46% with a mean of 0.53% for 234 U and from 0.03% to 1.43% with a mean of 0.52 for 238 U. The dietary intake of U was also estimated from measurements of urinary and fecal excretion of U in eight subjects prior to drinking water containing U. The estimated average dietary intake of U for these subjects is 3.30 +/- 0.65 or 4.22 +/- 0.65 μg/day. These averages are two to four times higher than the values reported in the literature for dietary intake

  14. The uptake of 131I by some hydroponically grown crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asprer, G.A.; Lansangan, L.M.; de la Paz, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    Biologically labelled vegetables which include kangkong and sweet potato tops were grown hydroponically in a modified Hoagland-Arnon nutrient solution containing radioiodine with 0.5% non-radioactive Nal solution as the medium. The crops considered in this study are commonly eaten by Filipinos. The concentration of the solution as well as the uptake in the plant system were determined at various time intervals. The extent of radioiodine uptake through air-water-plant pathway is one of the parameters needed for calculating the dose that the general populace could be exposed to, due to radioactivity in the environment. (author)

  15. Modelling farmer uptake of perennial energy crops in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrington, Chris; Moran, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    The UK Biomass Strategy suggests that to reach the technical potential of perennial energy crops such as short rotation coppice (SRC) willow and miscanthus by 2020 requires 350,000 hectares of land. This represents a more than 20-fold increase on the current 15,546 hectares. Previous research has identified several barriers to adoption, including concerns over security of income from contracts. In addition, farmers perceive returns from these crops to be lower than for conventional crops. This paper uses a farm-level linear programming model to investigate theoretical uptake of energy crops at different gross margins under the assumption of a profit-maximising decision maker, and in the absence of known barriers to adoption. The findings suggest that while SRC willow, at current prices, remains less competitive, returns to miscanthus should have encouraged adoption on a wider scale than at present. This highlights the importance of the barriers to adoption. Recently announced contracts for miscanthus appear to offer a significant premium to farmers in order to encourage them to grow the crops. This raises the question of whether a more cost-effective approach would be for government to provide guarantees addressing farmers concerns including security of income from the contracts. Such an approach should encourage adoption at lower gross margins. (author)

  16. Uranium uptake by immobilized cells of Pseudomonas strain EPS 5028

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, M.P.; Fuste, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Polyacrylamide-gel-immobilized cells of Pseudomonas strain EPS 5028 were effective in the removal of uranium (U) from synthetic effluents. Metal accumulation was performed in an open system in columns filled with immobilized cells that were challenged with continuous flows containing U. Possible variable of the system were studied. Uranium uptake by the immobilized cells of this microorganism was affected by pH but not by temperature or flow rate. In addition, U binding could be interpreted in terms of the Freundlich adsorption isotherm indicating single-layer adsorption. The feasibility of reusing the immobilized cells was suggested after the recovery of U with a solution of 0.1 M sodium carbonate. (orig.)

  17. Uranium uptake and accumulation in plants from soil contaminated with uranium in different concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Luxue; Tang Yongjin; Luo Xuegang

    2014-01-01

    The plants of Medicago sativa L., Hibiscus esulentus L, Waterspinach, Amaranthus retroflexus and Abutilon theophrasti Medic were employed as the indicator to investigate the uranium uptake and accumulation from soils contaminated with uranium (UO_2 (CH_3COO)_2 · 2H_2O) of 25 mg · kg"-"l, 75 mg · kg"-"1, 125 mg · kg"-"l, 175 mg · kg"-"l respectively, in a pot experiment. The result shows that, U concentration in the aerial part and underground part of the whole plant increased with the rise of uranium concentration in the soils. In the contaminated soils with 25∼125 mg · kg"-"l concentrations of uranium, U content of Medicago sativa L is the highset (6.78 mg · kg"-"l, 61.53 mg · kg"-"l, 74.06 mg · kg"-"l separately). While in the 175 mg · kg"-"l concentration of uranium contaminated soils, U content of Hibiscus esulentus L is the highest (86.72 mg · kg"-"1), which is mainly because of U concentration in its roots have higher level of uranium (388.16 mg · kg"-"l). Comprehensive analysis shows that Medicago sativa L. is a good plant for phytoextraction and Hibiscus esulentus L is a good immobilizing plant for phytoremediation. The results can provide some theoretical basis and technical support for remedying U-contaminated soils in different areas of our country. (authors)

  18. Uptake and recovery of americium and uranium by Anacystis biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.H.; Jiunntzong Wu

    1993-01-01

    The optimum conditions for the uptake of americium and uranium from wastewater solutions by Anacystis nidulans cells, and the recovery of these radionuclides were studied. The optimum pH range for both actinides was in the acidic region between 3.0 and 5.0. In a pH 3.5 solution with an algal biomass of 70 μg/mL, up to 95% of the Am and U were taken up by the cells. However, the uptake levels were lowered considerably when ethylene dinitrilotetraacetic acid (EDTA) or iron or calcium ions were present in the solutions. Most of the radionuclides taken up by the cells could also be desorbed by washing with salt solutions. Of nine salt solutions tested, ammonium carbonate was the most effective. Our experiments using algal biomass to remove radionuclides from wastewater showed that about 92% of americium and 85% of uranium in wastewater could be taken up by algal biomass, from which about 46% of the Am and 82% of the U originally present in the wastewater could be recovered by elution with a salt solution. 17 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation and nitrate uptake by the pea crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1986-08-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation and nitrate uptake by pea plants (Pisum sativum L.) were studied in field and pot experiments using the 15 N isotope dilution technique and spring barley as a non-fixing reference crop. Barley, although not ideal, seemed to be a suitable reference for pea in the 15 N-technique. Maximum N 2 fixation activity of 10 kg N fixed per ha per day was reached around the flat pod growth stage, and the activity decreased rapidly during pod-filling. The pea crop fixed between 100 and 250 kg N ha -1 , corresponding to from 45 to 80 per cent of total crop N. The amount of symbiotically fixed N 2 depended on the climatic conditions in the experimental year, the level of soil mineral N and the pea cultivar. Field-grown pea took up 60 to 70 per cent of the N-fertilizer supplied. The supply of 50 kg NO 3 -N ha -1 inhibited the N 2 fixation approximately 15 per cent. Small amounts of fertilizer N, supplied at sowing (starter-N), slightly stimulated the vegetative growth of pea, but the yields of seed dry matter and protein were not significantly influenced. In the present field experiments the environmental conditions, especially the distribution of rainfall during the growth season, seemed to be more important in determining the protein and dry matter yield of the dry pea crop, than the ability of pea to fix nitrogen symbiotically. However, fertilizer N supplied to pot-grown pea plants at the flat pod growth stage or as split applications significantly increased the yield of seed dry matter and protein. (author)

  20. An investigation of radionuclide uptake into food crops grown in soils treated with bauxite mining residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Clarke, P.C.; Robertson, W.; McPharlin, I.R.; Jeffrey, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Sandy soils of the coastal plain area of Western Australia have poor phosphorous retention capacity which leads to pollution of surface water bodies in the region. Application of bauxite mining residues (termed 'red mud') to vegetable and crops has been proposed as a solution to increase the phosphorous and water retention and thereby reduce the leaching of nutrients. The thorium and radium-226 concentrations in the 'red mud' residues are in excess of 1 kBq/kg, and 300 Bq/kg respectively. Potentially, the use of these residues on agricultural land could result in increased levels of radionuclides in food grown in amended soils. The transfer of long-lived radionuclides of both the natural thorium and uranium series to a variety of vegetable crops grown under controlled conditions is investigated. The effects of varying the rates of application of 'red mud' and phosphate fertilizers on radionuclide uptake are studied. It has been shown previously that fallout caesium-137 is sandy soils of the region transfers readily to food and grazing crops. Some of the parameters which influence that transfer are also examined. (author). 14 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs

  1. The uptake of uranium from soil to vetiver grass (vetiver zizanioides (L.) nash)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu Viet Hung; Bui Duy Cam; Dang Duc Nhan

    2012-01-01

    Uranium uptake of vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) from Eutric Fluvisols (AK), Albic Acrisols (LP), Dystric Fluvisols (TT) and Ferralic Acrisols (TC) in northern Vietnam is assessed. The soils were mixed with aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate to make soils be contaminated with uranium at 0, 50, 100, 250 mg per kg before planting the grass. The efficiency of uranium uptake by the grass was assessed based on the soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF U , kg kg -1 ). It was found that the TF U values are dependent upon the soil properties. CEC facilitates the uptake and the increase soil pH could reduce the uptake and translocation of uranium in the plant. Organic matter content as well as ferrous and potassium inhibit the uranium uptake of the grass. It was revealed that the lower fertile soil the higher uranium uptake. The grass could tolerate to the high extent (up to 77%) of uranium in soils and could survive and grow well without fertilization. The translocation of uranium in root for all the soil types studies almost higher than that in its shoot. It seem that vetiver grass potentially be use for the purpose of phytoremediation of soils contaminated with uranium. (author)

  2. Nutrient Uptake by High-Yielding Cotton Crop in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Vilela Vieira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Determining nutrient uptake and accumulation rates by cotton crops is important to define management strategies, especially for transgenic varieties, which are cultivated using high-technology approaches that require substantial investment to maximize yield. Currently in Brazil, the states of Bahia and Mato Grosso are responsible for 84.4 % of the total cotton growing area. In the present study, two trials were conducted in 2013, one that involved planting FM 940 GLT, FM 980 GLT, and FM 913 GLT varieties in the state of Bahia and the other which involved FM 940 GLT and FM 980 GLT varieties in the state of Mato Grosso. The aim of the two trials was to represent the two regions that currently encompass the largest areas of cotton cultivation. Tissue samples, consisting of leaves, stems, and reproductive components, were collected eleven times during the crop cycle for determination of nutrient content and shoot dry matter. After weighing, plant tissue samples were dried and ground to determine nutrient contents. Because there were no overall differences in nutrient contents and biomass accumulation of the varieties during the crop cycle, we undertook joint analysis of the data from all varieties at each site. Favorable climatic conditions in Bahia promoted plant biomass production that was twice as much as plants grown in Mato Grosso, with cotton yields of 6.2 and 3.8 t ha−1 of lint and seed, respectively. The maximum nutrient accumulation occurred between 137-150 days after emergence (DAE for N; 143-148 for P; 172-185 for K; 100 for Ca; 144-149 for Mg; and 153-158 for S. Maximum uptake ranged from 218-362 kg ha−1 N; 26-53 kg ha−1 P; 233-506 kg ha−1 K; 91-202 kg ha−1 Ca; 28-44 kg ha−1 Mg; and 19-61 kg ha−1 S. On average, the sites revealed nutrient export of 14, 2, 23, 3, 2, and 2 kg t−1 of lint and seed for N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S, respectively, with little variation among sites. Extraction of nutrients per area by cotton

  3. A two-dimensional simulation model of phosphorus uptake including crop growth and P-response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollier, A.; Willigen, de P.; Heinen, M.; Morel, C.; Schneider, A.; Pellerin, S.

    2008-01-01

    Modelling nutrient uptake by crops implies considering and integrating the processes controlling the soil nutrient supply, the uptake by the root system and relationships between the crop growth response and the amount of nutrient absorbed. We developed a model that integrates both dynamics of maize

  4. Uptake of uranium by aquatic plants growing in fresh water ecosystem around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, V.N., E-mail: jhavn1971@gmail.com; Tripathi, R.M., E-mail: tripathirm@yahoo.com; Sethy, N.K., E-mail: sethybarc@rediffmail.com; Sahoo, S.K., E-mail: sksbarc@gmail.com

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of uranium was determined in aquatic plants and substrate (sediment or water) of fresh water ecosystem on and around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India. Aquatic plant/substrate concentration ratios (CRs) of uranium were estimated for different sites on and around the uranium mill tailings disposal area. These sites include upstream and downstream side of surface water sources carrying the treated tailings effluent, a small pond inside tailings disposal area and residual water of this area. Three types of plant groups were investigated namely algae (filamentous and non-filamentous), other free floating & water submerged and sediment rooted plants. Wide variability in concentration ratio was observed for different groups of plants studied. The filamentous algae uranium concentration was significantly correlated with that of water (r = 0.86, p < 0.003). For sediment rooted plants significant correlation was found between uranium concentration in plant and the substrate (r = 0.88, p < 0.001). Both for other free floating species and sediment rooted plants, uranium concentration was significantly correlated with Mn, Fe, and Ni concentration of plants (p < 0.01). Filamentous algae, Jussiaea and Pistia owing to their high bioproductivity, biomass, uranium accumulation and concentration ratio can be useful for prospecting phytoremediation of stream carrying treated or untreated uranium mill tailings effluent. - Highlights: • Uranium mill tailings pond. • Jaduguda, India. • Fresh water plants. • Uranium uptake. • Relationship of uranium with stable elements.

  5. Uranium and thorium uptake by live and dead cells of Pseudomonas Sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva Prasath, C.S.; Manikandan, N.; Prakash, S.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents uptake of uranium (U) and thorium (Th) by live and dead cells of Pseudomonas Sp. Increasing concentration of U and Tb showed decrease in absorption by Pseudomonas Sp. Dead cells of Pseudomonas Sp. exhibited same or more uptake of U and Th than living cells. Increasing temperature promotes uptake of U and Th by Pseudomonas Sp. (author)

  6. Improved fluorimetric measurement of uranium uptake and distribution in spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borcia, Catalin [' ' Alexandru Ioan Cuza' ' Univ., Iasi (Romania). Dept. of Physics; Popa, Karin; Cecal, Alexandru [' ' Alexandru Ioan Cuza' ' Univ., Iasi (Romania). Dept. of Chemistry; Murariu, Manuela [' ' Petru Poni' ' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi (Romania)

    2016-08-01

    Uranium uptake and (radio)toxicity was tested on spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a laboratory study using differently concentrated uranium nitrate solutions. Within these experiments, two analytical assays of uranium were comparatively tested: a fast and improved fluorimetric assay and the classical colorimetric (U(IV)-arsenazo(III) complexation) one. During the germination, the wheat seeds and plantlets supported well the uranium solutions of treatment within the entire concentration range (1 x 10{sup -4} -5 x 10{sup -3} M). Uranium proved to be non (radio)toxic to wheat as compared with other natural and anthropogenic radiocations, probably because its uptake by spring wheat during the germination is low. Indeed, only a small fraction of uranium administered was located within the roots, whereas the uranium content of the stems was negligible. A high correlation between the results obtained by two analytical methods was found. However, the fluorimetric assay proved to be more reliable and fast, and accurate.

  7. Uptake of cesium-137 by crops from contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, H.; Oezer, I.; Celenk, I.; Halitligil, M.B.; Oezmen, A. [Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Center (Turkey)

    1994-11-01

    The Turkish tea crop was contaminated following the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Finding ways to dispose of the contaminated tea (Camellia sinensis L.) without damaging the environment was the goal of this research conducted at the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA). In this study, an investigation was made of {sup 137}Cs activities of the plants and the ratios of transfer of {sup 137}Cs activity to plants when the contaminated tea was applied to the soil. Experiments were conducted in the field and in pots under greenhouse conditions. The activities of the tea applied in the field ranged from 12 500 to 72 800 Bq/m{sup 2}, whereas this activity was constant at 8000 Bq/pot in the greenhouse experiment. The transfer of {sup 137}Cs from soil to the plants was between 0.037 and 1.057% for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), corn (Zea mays indentata Sturt), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), and grass (Lolium perenne L.). The ratio of the transfer of {sup 137}Cs activity to plants increased as the activity {sup 137}Cs in tea applied to soil was increased. The activity in the plants increased due to increased uptake of {sup 137}Cs by plants. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Role of uranium speciation in the uptake and translocation of uranium by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbs, S. D.; Brady, D. J.; Kochian, L. V. [US Plant, Soil, and Nutrition Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Uranium (U) uptake and translocation by plants was characterized using a computer speciation model to develop a nutrient culture system that provided U as a single predominant species in solution. A hydroponic uptake study determined that at pH 5.0, the uranyl (UO2{sup 2+}) cation was more readily taken up and translocated by peas (Pisum sativum) than the hydroxyl and carbonate U complexes present in the solution at pH 6.0 and 8.0, respectively. A subsequent experiment tested the extent to which various monocot and dicot species take up and translocate the uranyl cation. Of the species screened, tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) and red beet (Beta vulgaris) were the species showing the greatest accumulation of U. In addition to providing fundamental information regarding U uptake by plants, the results obtained also have implications for the phytoremediation of U-contaminated soils. The initial characterization of U uptake by peas suggested that in the field, a soil pH of <5.5 would be required in order to provide U in the most plant-available form. A pot study using U-contaminated soil was therefore conducted to assess the extent to which two soil amendments, HEDTA and citric acid, were capable of acidifying the soil, increasing U solubility, and enhancing U uptake by red beet. Of these two amendments, only citric acid proved effective, decreasing the soil pH to 5.0 and increasing U accumulation by a factor of 14. The results of this pot study provide a basis for the development of an effective phytoremediation strategy for U-contaminated soils. (author)

  9. Role of uranium speciation in the uptake and translocation of uranium by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbs, S.D.; Brady, D.J.; Kochian, L.V.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium (U) uptake and translocation by plants was characterized using a computer speciation model to develop a nutrient culture system that provided U as a single predominant species in solution. A hydroponic uptake study determined that at pH 5.0, the uranyl (UO2 2+ ) cation was more readily taken up and translocated by peas (Pisum sativum) than the hydroxyl and carbonate U complexes present in the solution at pH 6.0 and 8.0, respectively. A subsequent experiment tested the extent to which various monocot and dicot species take up and translocate the uranyl cation. Of the species screened, tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) and red beet (Beta vulgaris) were the species showing the greatest accumulation of U. In addition to providing fundamental information regarding U uptake by plants, the results obtained also have implications for the phytoremediation of U-contaminated soils. The initial characterization of U uptake by peas suggested that in the field, a soil pH of <5.5 would be required in order to provide U in the most plant-available form. A pot study using U-contaminated soil was therefore conducted to assess the extent to which two soil amendments, HEDTA and citric acid, were capable of acidifying the soil, increasing U solubility, and enhancing U uptake by red beet. Of these two amendments, only citric acid proved effective, decreasing the soil pH to 5.0 and increasing U accumulation by a factor of 14. The results of this pot study provide a basis for the development of an effective phytoremediation strategy for U-contaminated soils. (author)

  10. Forage uptake of uranium series radionuclides in the vicinity of the anaconda uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayno, D.R.; Momeni, M.H.; Sabau, C.

    1980-01-01

    Radiochemical analysis was performed on samples of soil and eight species of common vegetation growing on the Anaconda uranium mill site, located in New Mexico. The concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, and Pb-210 in these forage plants were determined. The sampling procedures and analytical laboratory methods used are described. The highest radionuclide concentration found in a forage species was 130 pCi of Ra-226 per gram dry weight for grass growing on the main tailings pile at Anaconda, where the surface soil activity of Ra-226 was 236 pCi/g. A comparison of shoots activity with that of roots and soil was used to determine a distribution index and uptake coefficient for each species. The distribution index, the ratio of root activity to shoot activity, ranged from 0.30 (Th-230) in galleta grass (Hilaria jamesii) to 38.0 (Ra-226) in Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides). In nearly all instances, the roots contained higher radionuclide concentrations. The uptake coefficient, the ratio of vegetation activity to soil activity, ranged from 0.69 (U-238) in Indian ricegrass roots to 0.01 (U-238) in four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescans) shoots. The range of radionuclide concentrations in plants growing on the Anaconda mill site is compared to that in vegetation from a control site 20 km away

  11. Uranium uptake by the filamentous fungal biomass, Aspergillus fumigatus and mechanism of biosorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhainsa, Kuber C.; D'Souza, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    Uptake of uranium by Aspergillus fumigatus was investigated in a batch study. Previously, we had reported good uranium uptake capacity, i.e., 423 mg U/g by this fungal biomass. The objective of the present study was to investigate the uranium uptake and mechanism of biosorption by Aspergillus fumigatus. The metal uptake was rapid and 80% of metal ion could be removed within 4 minutes of contact time. Kinetic modeling indicated that the uptake of uranium followed Lagergren's pseudo-second order reaction indicating the process to be mediated through chemisorption mechanism. Further studies on isotherm modeling were carried out using D-R isotherm to confirm the same. The energy of biosorption obtained from D-R isotherm was found to be 14.4 kJ/mol. This energy corresponds to the energy of chemisorption (ion-exchange) which varies between 8-16 kJ/mol. All these results suggest that uranium uptake by Aspergillus fumigatus is mediated through chemisorptions mechanism. (author)

  12. Testing and evaluation of existing techniques for identifying uptakes and measuring retention of uranium in mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    Preliminary tests and evaluations of existing bio-analytical techniques for identifying uptakes and measuring retention of uranium in mill workers were made at two uranium mills. Urinalysis tests were found to be more reliable indicators of uranium uptakes than personal air sampling. Static air samples were not found to be good indicators of personal uptakes. In vivo measurements of uranium in lung were successfully carried out in the presence of high and fluctuating background radiation. Interference from external contamination was common during end of shift measurements. A full scale study to evaluate model parameters for the uptake, retention and elimination of uranium should include, in addition to the above techniques, particle size determination of airborne uranium, solubility in simulated lung fluid, uranium analysis in faeces and bone and minute volume measurements for each subject

  13. Uranium(VI) speciation: modelling, uncertainty and relevance to bioavailability models. Application to uranium uptake by the gills of a freshwater bivalve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denison, F.H.

    2004-07-01

    The effects of varying solution composition on the interactions between uranium(VI) and excised gills of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been investigated in well defined solution media. A significant reduction in the uptake of uranium was observed on increasing the concentrations of the uranium complexing ligands citrate and carbonate. Saturation kinetics as a function of uranium concentration at a pH value of 5.0 were observed, indicating that the uptake of uranium is a facilitated process, probably involving one or several trans-membrane transport systems. A relatively small change in the uptake of uranium was found as a function of pH (factor of ca. 2), despite the extremely large changes to the solution speciation of uranium within the range of pH investigated (5.0 - 7.5). A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to the solution composition domain employed for this study was performed. Estimates of the uncertainties for the formation constants of aqueous uranium(VI) species were integrated into a thermodynamic database. A computer program was written to predict the equilibrium distribution of uranium(VI) in simple aqueous systems, using thermodynamic parameter mean-values. The program was extended to perform Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses, incorporating the thermodynamic database uncertainty estimates, to quantitatively predict the uncertainties inherent in predicting the solution speciation of uranium. The use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of uranium(VI) was investigated. Observed uranium(VI) uptake behaviour was interpreted as a function of the predicted changes to the solution speciation of uranium. Different steady-state or pre-equilibrium approaches to modelling uranium uptake were tested. Alternative modelling approaches were also tested, considering the potential changes to membrane transport system activity or sorption characteristics on

  14. Summer cover crops and soil amendments to improve growth and nutrient uptake of okra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.R.; Li, Y.C.; Klassen, W. [University of Florida, Homestead, FL (United States). Center for Tropical Research & Education

    2006-04-15

    A pot experiment with summer cover crops and soil amendments was conducted in two consecutive years to elucidate the effects of these cover crops and soil amendments on 'Clemson Spineless 80' okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) yields and biomass production, and the uptake and distribution of soil nutrients and trace elements. The cover crops were sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana), and sorghum sudan-grass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanense) with fallow as the control. The organic soil amendments were biosolids (sediment from wastewater plants), N-Viro Soil (a mixture of biosolids and coal ash), coal ash (a combustion by-product from power plants), co-compost (a mixture of 3 biosolids: 7 yard waste), and yard waste compost (mainly from leaves and branches of trees and shrubs, and grass clippings) with a soil-incorporated cover crop as the control. As a subsequent vegetable crop, okra was grown after the cover crops, alone or together with the organic soil amendments, had been incorporated. All of the cover crops, except sorghum sudangrass in 2002-03, significantly improved okra fruit yields and the total biomass production. Both cover crops and soil amendments can substantially improve nutrient uptake and distribution. The results suggest that cover crops and appropriate amounts of soil amendments can be used to improve soil fertility and okra yield without adverse environmental effects or risk of contamination of the fruit. Further field studies will be required to confirm these findings.

  15. Uptake of uranium from underground drinking water by chlorella (Chlorella pyrendoidosa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhal, R.K.; Joshi, Shobha; Gurg, R.P.; Shenoy, N.S.; Ferandes, Neychelle; Gopale, Rajesh S.; Jhaveri, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Naturally occurring uranium has found at elevated levels i.e. 300-1200 ppb in underground water, especially in the areas located around uranium mines and granite rocks sites. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently adopted drinking water standards requiring a maximum uranium concentration of 20 μgl. This limit is based on nephro-toxicity, rather than on radiological hazards. The concentration of uranium is to be monitored along with other parameters in well and other sources of drinking water in these areas. During this work a low cost kit was developed for removing uranium from under-ground water used for drinking purposes. This unit is capable of reducing uranium from 1000 ppb to 15-20 ppb. Chlorella (Chlorella pyrendoidosa), a fresh water algae, was immobilised in sodium alginate in the form of beads by using 0.2 M calcium chloride. These beads were put in container and the water is stirred occasionally. 99-100 % uranium adsorbed was recovered from the beads by using 0.1 M HNO 3 . These results suggest that the uptake of uranium by Chlorella depended upon the physico-chemical adsorption on the cell surface, but not upon the biological activity and that uranium in the algal cells was coupled with the ligands, which can be easily substituted with NO 3 -1 . (author)

  16. Effects of pH on uranium uptake and oxidative stress responses induced in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Saenen, Eline; Horemans, Nele; Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Biermans, Geert; Van Hees, May; Wannijn, Jean; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (U) causes oxidative stress in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown at pH 5.5. However, U speciation and its toxicity strongly depend on environmental parameters, for example pH. It is unknown how different U species determine U uptake and translocation within plants and how they might affect the oxidative defense mechanisms of these plants. The present study analyzed U uptake and oxidative stress-related responses in A. thaliana (Columbia ecotype) under contrasted U chemical speciation ...

  17. Principles of root water uptake, soil salinity and crop yield for optimizing irrigation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirksen, C.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reviews the principles of water and salt transport, root water uptake, crop salt tolerance, water quality, and irrigation methods which should be considered in optimizing irrigation management for sustained, viable agriculture with protection of the quality of land and water resources. In particular, the advantages of high-frequency irrigation at small leaching fractions with closed systems are discussed, for which uptake-weighted mean salinity is expected to correlate best with crop yields. Optimization of irrigation management depends on the scale considered. Non-technical problems which are often much harder to solve than technical problems, may well be most favourable for new projects in developing countries. (author)

  18. The selective uptake of uranium and thorium from the environment by some vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, A.M.; Ghazali, Z.; Abdul-Rahman, S.; Sharif, J.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt was made to establish baseline information on environmental pollution in locally-grown vegetables by uranium and thorium. Lowland and highland species together with soil and fertilizer samples were collected and analyzed using fluorimetry, spectrophotometry and delayed neutron counting techniques. All leafy vegetables observed showed high uranium and thorium uptake especially those grown in the lowlands. Those grown in the highlands reflected no direct relationship in uranium and thorium contents. Several species common in both sampling areas exhibited direct relationship between these two elements making them as potential bio-indicators. Figures calculated for fruit-type and leafy vegetables were not only comparatively low but bore no direct correlation between the two elements. The use of phosphate-based fertilizers on some of the leafy species in the lowlands did not enhance the uptake of these elements in spite of the higher uranium and thorium contents in soil samples from the lowlands, between 20-85 μg/g for uranium and 43-226 μg/g thorium compared to about 13-20 μg/g and 35-55 μg/g respectively for soil samples in the highlands. Statistical analysis was done to substantiate these findings. Climatic conditions were also taken into account as one of the factors affecting selective uptake of these elements in the vegetables

  19. Nutrient uptake and biomass accumulation for eleven different field crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. HAKALA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil hemp (Cannabis sativa L., quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd., false flax (Camelina sativa (L. Crantz, caraway (Carum carvi L., dyer’s woad (Isatis tinctoria L., nettle (Urtica dioica L., reed canary grass (RCG (Phalaris arundinacea L., buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench, linseed (Linum usitatissimum L., timothy (Phleum pratense L. and barley (Hordeum vulgare L. were grown under uniform conditions in pots containing well fertilised loam soil. Dry matter (DM accumulation was measured repeatedly, and contents of minerals N, P, K, Ca and Mg at maturity. Annual crops accumulated above-ground biomass faster than perennials, while perennials had higher DM accumulation rates below ground. Seeds had high concentrations of N and P, while green biomass had high concentrations of K and Ca. Stems and roots had low concentrations of minerals. Concentrations of K and P were high in quinoa and caraway, and that of P in buckwheat. Hemp and nettle had high Ca concentrations, and quinoa had high Mg concentration. N and P were efficiently harvested with seed, Ca and K with the whole biomass. Perennials could prevent soil erosion and add carbon to the soil in the long term, while annuals compete better with weeds and prevent erosion during early growth. Nutrient balances in a field could be modified and nutrient leaching reduced by careful selection of the crop and management practices.;

  20. Factors affecting uptake and distribution of uranium in plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Krejčová, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Uranium is a radionuclide, which naturally occurs in Earth's soil in rather an insignificant amount. It is not very dangerous in such small concentration; however, this concentration is rising due to anthropogenic activity, therefore an estimation of its increase is at hand. It is necessary to research possibilities of not only effective, but also ecological extermination of this contamination. Phytoremediation could be an appropriate solution, but this method is still in its beginning stages...

  1. Engineering recombinant EF-hand peptides for selective uranium uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthomieu, C.; Pardoux, R.; Beccia, M.R.; Lemaire, D.; Sauge-Merle, S. [CEA, DSV, IBEB, UMR7265 CNRS CEA Aix-Marseille Univ. (France); Guilbaud, P. [CEA, DRCPC, SMCS, LILA (France); Delangle, P. [CEA, INAC, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique (France)

    2014-07-01

    In spite of an increasing number of publications in recent years, information regarding the mechanism of uranium interaction with proteins at the molecular level is limited and few quantitative studies have investigated the binding properties of uranyl with proteins or peptides. It is thus of great interest to better characterize these interactions, and to analyze structural factors governing uranyl binding and thermodynamic stabilization in proteins. Research in this direction will benefit our understanding of the molecular factors governing uranyl toxicity and speciation in cells and will also aid in developing new molecules for selectively binding uranium that could be used for uranium bioremediation purposes. Uranyl coordination properties have similarities with those of calcium, i.e electrostatic interactions preferentially with hard donor oxygen ligands and pentagonal bipyramidal structures. The EF-hand structural motif is the most prevalent Ca2{sup +-}binding site in proteins and is very appealing to analyse uranyl binding properties and develop affine and specific uranyl binding sites for biotechnology approaches. We selected the recombinant N-terminal domain of calmodulin from A. thaliana as a structured template that contains two EF-hand motifs (site I and site II) to analyze its uranyl binding properties and to engineer peptide variants with increased uranyl affinity and specificity. We showed that both site I and site II bind uranyl, with a dissociation constant in the nano-molar range for site I (K{sub d} ≅ 25 nM at pH 6). Using in vitro phosphorylation of a threonine located in the uranyl binding loop, we measured how adding a phosphoryl group affects the calcium and uranium binding affinities. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a very large affinity for uranyl at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the sub-nano-molar range K{sub d} = 0.25 ±0.06 nM, and FTIR analysis demonstrated that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl

  2. Modelling soil water dynamics and crop water uptake at the field level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabat, P.; Feddes, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Parametrization approaches to model soil water dynamics and crop water uptake at field level were analysed. Averaging and numerical difficulties in applying numerical soil water flow models to heterogeneous soils are highlighted. Simplified parametrization approaches to the soil water flow, such as

  3. Root uptake of uranium by a higher plant model (Phaseolus vulgaris) bioavailability from soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, L.; Henner, P.; Camilleri, V.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Uranium behaviour in soils is controlled by actions and interactions between physicochemical and biological processes that also determine its bioavailability. In soil solution, uranium(+VI) aqueous speciation undergoes tremendous changes mainly depending on pH, carbonates, phosphates and organic matter. In a first approach to identify bioavailable species of U to plants, cultures were performed using hydroponics, to allow an easy control of the composition of the exposure media. The latter, here an artificial soil solution, was designed to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS using a database compiled from the OECD/NEA thermochemical database project and verified was used to perform the solution speciation calculations. On this theoretical basis, three domains were defined for short-duration well-defined laboratory experiments in simplified conditions: pH 4.9, 5.8 and 7 where predicted dominant species are uranyl ions, hydroxyl complexes and carbonates respectively. For these domains, biokinetics and characterization of transmembrane transport according to a classical Michaelis Menten approach were investigated. The Free Ion Model (or its derived Biotic Ligand Model) was tested to determine if U uptake is governed by the free uranyl species or if other metal complexes can be assimilated. The effect of different variables on root assimilation efficiency and phyto-toxicity was explored: presence of ligands such as phosphates or carbonates and competitive ions such as Ca{sup 2+} at the 3 pH. According to previous experiments, uranium was principally located in roots whatever the pH and no difference in uranium uptake was evidenced between the main growth stages of the plant. Within the 3 studied chemical domains, results from short-term kinetics evidenced a linear correlation between total uranium concentration in bean roots and that in exposure media, suggesting that total uranium in soil solution could be a good predictor

  4. Root uptake of uranium by a higher plant model (Phaseolus vulgaris) bioavailability from soil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroche, L.; Henner, P.; Camilleri, V.; Garnier-Laplace, J.

    2004-01-01

    Uranium behaviour in soils is controlled by actions and interactions between physicochemical and biological processes that also determine its bioavailability. In soil solution, uranium(+VI) aqueous speciation undergoes tremendous changes mainly depending on pH, carbonates, phosphates and organic matter. In a first approach to identify bioavailable species of U to plants, cultures were performed using hydroponics, to allow an easy control of the composition of the exposure media. The latter, here an artificial soil solution, was designed to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS using a database compiled from the OECD/NEA thermochemical database project and verified was used to perform the solution speciation calculations. On this theoretical basis, three domains were defined for short-duration well-defined laboratory experiments in simplified conditions: pH 4.9, 5.8 and 7 where predicted dominant species are uranyl ions, hydroxyl complexes and carbonates respectively. For these domains, biokinetics and characterization of transmembrane transport according to a classical Michaelis Menten approach were investigated. The Free Ion Model (or its derived Biotic Ligand Model) was tested to determine if U uptake is governed by the free uranyl species or if other metal complexes can be assimilated. The effect of different variables on root assimilation efficiency and phyto-toxicity was explored: presence of ligands such as phosphates or carbonates and competitive ions such as Ca 2+ at the 3 pH. According to previous experiments, uranium was principally located in roots whatever the pH and no difference in uranium uptake was evidenced between the main growth stages of the plant. Within the 3 studied chemical domains, results from short-term kinetics evidenced a linear correlation between total uranium concentration in bean roots and that in exposure media, suggesting that total uranium in soil solution could be a good predictor for

  5. Uranium, thorium and radium in soil and crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.; Eriksson, Aa.

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of the naturally occuring radionuclides uranium, thorium and radium in soil, plant material and drainage water was evaluated. The plant/soil concentration factors showed that very small fractions of the nuclides were available for the plants. The water/soil concentration factors were calculated; the nuclide content in drainage water generally indicated very low leaching rates. The distribution of the radionuclides was utilized with the aim to obtain reliable concentration factors which in turn could be used to calculate the transfer of nuclides within the agricultural ecosystem. Dose calculations were performed using plant/soil concentration factors based on geometric mean values. (authors)

  6. Uptake and translocation of Ti from nanoparticles in crops and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Donna L; Borchardt, Joshua D; Navaratnam, Leelaruban; Otte, Marinus L; Bezbaruah, Achintya N

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability of engineered metal nanoparticles affects uptake in plants, impacts on ecosystems, and phytoremediation. We studied uptake and translocation of Ti in plants when the main source of this metal was TiO2 nanoparticles. Two crops (Phaseolus vulgaris (bean) and Triticum aestivum (wheat)), a wetland species (Rumex crispus, curly dock), and the floating aquatic plant (Elodea canadensis, Canadian waterweed), were grown in nutrient solutions with TiO2 nanoparticles (0, 6, 18 mmol Ti L(-1) for P. vulgaris, T. aestivum, and R. crispus; and 0 and 12 mmol Ti L(-1) for E. canadensis). Also examined in E. canadensis was the influence of TiO2 nanoparticles upon the uptake of Fe, Mn, and Mg, and the influence of P on Ti uptake. For the rooted plants, exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles did not affect biomass production, but significantly increased root Ti sorption and uptake. R. crispus showed translocation of Ti into the shoots. E. canadensis also showed significant uptake of Ti, P in the nutrient solution significantly decreased Ti uptake, and the uptake patterns of Mn and Mg were altered. Ti from nano-Ti was bioavailable to plants, thus showing the potential for cycling in ecosystems and for phytoremediation, particularly where water is the main carrier.

  7. Uranium uptake history, open-system behaviour and uranium-series ages of fossil Tridacna gigas from Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, Bridget F.; Eggins, Stephen; McCulloch, Malcolm T.; Chappell, John; Grün, Rainer; Mortimer, Graham

    2017-09-01

    Molluscs incorporate negligible uranium into their skeleton while they are living, with any uranium uptake occurring post-mortem. As such, closed-system U-series dating of molluscs is unlikely to provide reliable age constraints for marine deposits. Even the application of open-system U-series modelling is challenging, because uranium uptake and loss histories can affect time-integrated uranium distributions and are difficult to constrain. We investigate the chemical and isotopic distribution of uranium in fossil Tridacna gigas (giant clams) from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e (128-116 ka) and MIS 11 (424-374 ka) reefs at Huon Peninsula in Papua New Guinea. The large size of the clams enables detailed chemical and isotopic mapping of uranium using LA-ICPMS and LA-MC-ICPMS techniques. Within each fossil Tridacna specimen, marked differences in uranium concentrations are observed across the three Tridacna growth zones (outer, inner, hinge), with the outer and hinge zones being relatively enriched. In MIS 5e and MIS 11 Tridacna, the outer and hinge zones contain approximately 1 ppm and 5 ppm uranium respectively. In addition to uptake of uranium, loss of uranium appears prevalent, especially in the MIS 11 specimens. The effect of uranium loss is to elevate measured [230Th/238U] values with little effect on [234U/238U] values. Closed-system age estimates are on average 50% too young for the MIS 5e Tridacna, and 25% too young for the MIS 11 Tridacna. A complex, multi-stage uptake and loss history is interpreted for the fossil Tridacna and we demonstrate that they cannot provide independent, reliable geochronological controls on the timing of past reef growth at Huon Peninsula.

  8. Modelling and Evaluation of Non-Linear Rootwater Uptake for Winter Cropping of Wheat and Berseem

    Science.gov (United States)

    GS, K.; Prasad, K. S. H.

    2017-12-01

    The plant water uptake is significant for study to monitor the irrigation supplied to the plant. The Richards equation has been the key governing equation to quantify the root water uptake in the vadose zone and it takes all the sources and sink terms into consideration. The β parameter or the non linearity parameter is used in this modeling to bring the non linearity in the plant root water uptake. The soil parameters are obtained by experimentation and are employed in the Van-Genuchten equation for soil moisture study. Field experiments were carried out at Civil Engineering Department IIT Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India, during the winter season of 2013 and 2014 for berseem and 2016 for wheat as per the local cropping practices. Drainage type lysimeters were installed to study the soil water balance. Soil moisture was monitored using profile probe. Precipitation and all meteorological data were obtained from the nearby gauges located at the National Institute of Hydrology, Roorkee.The moisture data and the deep percolation data were collected on a daily basis and the irrigation supply was controlled and monitored to satisfy the moisture requirements of the crops respectively.In order to study the effect of water scarcity on the crops, the plot was divided and deficited irrigation was applied for the second cropping season for Berseem.The yields for both the seasons was also measured. The solution of Richards equation as applied to the moisture movement in the root zone was modeled. For estimation of root water uptake, the governing equation is the one-dimensional mixed form of Richards' equation is employed (Ji et al., 2007; Shankar et al., 2012).The sink term in the model accounts for the root water uptake, which is utilized by the plant for transpiration. Smaxor the maximum root water uptake for the root zone on a given day must be equal to the maximum transpiration on the corresponding day The model computed moisture content and pressure head is calibrated with

  9. Uranium uptake by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) - development of a biological ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oost, T.; Schoening, K.U.

    1991-01-01

    The use of micro-organisms for decontamination of, and heavy metal recovery from industrial waste water is a modern, low-cost, and environmentally friendly alternative to the conventional chemical and physical methods. The uptake of uranium by baker's yeast is investigated under the aspect of application in biotechnology. A novel, regenerable biological ion exchanger was produced by immobilisation of the yeast in agar gel. (orig.) [de

  10. Effect of K-fertilization, liming and placement on crop uptake of cesium and strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haak, E.

    1985-01-01

    remedial measures to reduce crop uptake of cesium and strontium under Swedish field conditions have been investigated in micro plot experiments. For cesium the effect of K-fertilization was studied on three soils with oats, peas and mustard and, in combination with placement, on two other soils with wheat, barley and rape. For strontium the effect of liming was studied on three soils with oats, barley and peas and, in combination with placement, on two other soils with wheat, oats, barley and peas. In this paper results are summarized for the grain products. Deep placement of nuclides in combination with K-fertilization and liming reduced the crop uptake of cesium and strontium by a factor of 10 and 4, respectively. On the basis of the experimental results, the practical advantages of K-fertilization and liming, as well as deep ploughing of surface contaminated land are discussed

  11. N Uptake From Irradiated Sludge Combined With N Fertilizer By Edible Nightshade Crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrosuharjo, M.M.; Haryanto; S, Suwirma; Harsojo; Hilmy N

    2000-01-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment has been carried out to study the amount of N uptake from sludge by edible nightshade (solanum melongena) crop. Sludge used in this experiment was a municipal sludge that has been processed (to be a compost sludge so it was ready to be used) from pulo gebang, east jakarta, then sludge was irradiated in a dose rate between 3.6 to 4.4 kGy at P3TIR-BATAN, jakarta. The sludge was given in the amount equivalent to 60, 120, 180 and 240 kg N/ha. For control was used treatment without sludge, without sludge but with N fertilizer in a normal rate. Each of treatment was applied with 15N in the rate equivalent to 20 kg N/ha. For buffer of soil nutrient, fertilizer P and K were also applied in normal rate. As experimental crop hybrid edible nightshade of FORTUNA variety was used. Result of this experiment showed that application of sludge was able to increase yield, dry matter production, total N uptake and N uptake derived from sludge. The amount of N uptake derived from sludge was spread between 17.5 to 151.8 mg N/pot for application sludge in 1% N content at the rate equivalent 60 to 240 kg N/ha

  12. Texas Panhandle soil-crop-beef food chain for uranium: a dynamic model validated by experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, W.J.; Wallwork-Barber, K.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Gallegos, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Long-term simulations of uranium transport in the soil-crop-beef food chain were performed using the BIOTRAN model. Experimental data means from an extensive Pantex beef cattle study are presented. Experimental data were used to validate the computer model. Measurements of uranium in air, soil, water, range grasses, feed, and cattle tissues are compared to simulated uranium output values in these matrices when the BIOTRAN model was set at the measured soil and air values. The simulations agreed well with experimental data even though metabolic details for ruminants and uranium chemical form in the environment remain to be studied

  13. Occurrence and potential crop uptake of emerging contaminants and related compounds in an agricultural irrigation network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Preciado, Diana; Matamoros, Víctor; Bayona, Josep M

    2011-12-15

    Emerging contaminants have received much attention in recent years due to their presence in surface waters, but little attention has been paid to their occurrence in agricultural irrigation waters. This study investigated the occurrence of these compounds in an agricultural irrigation network in northeastern Spain and, for the first time, using two plant uptake models, estimated the concentration of selected micropollutants in crops. The concentration of micropollutants in agricultural irrigation waters ranged from 10 to 5130 ng L(-1) and exhibited some attenuation over the course of the irrigation network. Bromoform, chloroform, diclofenac, caffeine, ibuprofen, naproxen, methyl dihydrojasmonate, galaxolide, butylated hydroxytoluene, and butylated hydroxyanisole were the most abundant contaminants (>200 ng L(-1), on average). The estimated concentration of micropollutants in crops ranged from contaminants detected). Further studies are needed to determine the health implications that the presence of these compounds in fruit and vegetables may have for consumers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of iodine aerial deposition on crops, grass and soil and it's subsequent uptake and translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhaorong

    2006-03-01

    In order to further the knowledge of radioiodine mobility in the Asian biosphere system, a closed experimental system was established to study gaseous iodine deposition and uptake in a simulated agricultural system using 125 I. Pot experiments were carried out to study airborne 125 I deposition on crops and soil, the results show that (1) 125 I aerosol deposited on plants in a dry deposition mode; (2) 125 I aerial deposition on leaves can be transferred to other tissues through foliar absorption; (3) corn and navy bean have the largest observed translocation factor of the selected crops. The 125 I soil-to-crops uptake test shows that 125 I deposited in soil can be transfered to plants via root uptake, and that the transfer factors in millet and broomcorn are significantly higher than that in other crops. (authors)

  15. A Study of Iodine aerial deposition on crops, grass and soil and it's subsequent uptake and translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Zhaorong

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In order to further the knowledge of radioiodine mobility in the Asian biosphere system, a closed experimental system was established to study gaseous iodine deposition and uptake in a simulated agricultural system using 125 I. Pot experiments were carried out to study airborne 125 I deposition on crops and soil, the results show that: 1) 125 I aerosol deposited on plants in a dry deposition mode; 2) 125 I aerial deposition on leaves can be transferred to other tissues through foliar absorption; and 3) Corn and navy bean have the largest observed translocation factor of the selected crops. The 125 I soil-to-crops uptake test shows that 125 I deposited in soil can be transferred to plants via root uptake, and that the transfer factors in millet and broomcorn are significantly higher than other crops. (author)

  16. Concentration of radionuclides in uranium tailings and its uptake by plants at Jaduguda, Jharkhand, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Lal; Soni, Prafulla

    2010-01-01

    Mining and processing of uranium ore was started in several parts of eastern Singhbhum, viz. Jaduguda, Bhatin and Narwapahar (Jharkhand) in 1968. Radioactivity in the mine tailings has to be consolidated so that it does not emanate in the atmosphere or enter the food chain. Hence, the area has been covered with 30 cm thick soil cover followed by development of plant species that do not have any socioeconomic relevance in the area. Seven native plant species of forestry origin, viz. Colebrookea oppositifolia, Dodonaea viscosa, Furcraea foetida, Imperata cylindrica, Jatropha gossypifolia, Pogostemon benghalense and Saccharum spontaneum have been selected for experimental trials. Distribution and concentration of radionuclides have been evaluated in a tailing pond at different depths in soil and tailings. Radionuclide uptake in each of the selected plant species has been evaluated and discussed in this article. The highest concentration of radionuclides has been found in tailings > soil cover on tailings > roots of selected plant species > shoots of all the selected species. These results show that among the seven species tried, J. gossypifolia and F. foetida have the lowest uptake (below detectable limits), while S. spontaneum and P. benghalense have comparatively higher uptake. However, radionuclide concentration in all the tried species is significantly low compared to species of natural occurrence which have higher radionuclides uptake and accumulation. (author)

  17. Concentration of radionuclides in uranium tailings and its uptake by plants at Jaduguda, Jharkhand, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Lal; Soni, Prafulla [Ecology and Environment Div., Forest Research Institute, Dehradun (India)

    2010-01-10

    Mining and processing of uranium ore was started in several parts of eastern Singhbhum, viz. Jaduguda, Bhatin and Narwapahar (Jharkhand) in 1968. Radioactivity in the mine tailings has to be consolidated so that it does not emanate in the atmosphere or enter the food chain. Hence, the area has been covered with 30 cm thick soil cover followed by development of plant species that do not have any socioeconomic relevance in the area. Seven native plant species of forestry origin, viz. Colebrookea oppositifolia, Dodonaea viscosa, Furcraea foetida, Imperata cylindrica, Jatropha gossypifolia, Pogostemon benghalense and Saccharum spontaneum have been selected for experimental trials. Distribution and concentration of radionuclides have been evaluated in a tailing pond at different depths in soil and tailings. Radionuclide uptake in each of the selected plant species has been evaluated and discussed in this article. The highest concentration of radionuclides has been found in tailings > soil cover on tailings > roots of selected plant species > shoots of all the selected species. These results show that among the seven species tried, J. gossypifolia and F. foetida have the lowest uptake (below detectable limits), while S. spontaneum and P. benghalense have comparatively higher uptake. However, radionuclide concentration in all the tried species is significantly low compared to species of natural occurrence which have higher radionuclides uptake and accumulation. (author)

  18. Experimental studies on the uptake of technetium-99 to terrestrial crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joanne; Ewers, Leon [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Technetium-99 has been dispersed in the environment from many sources such as nuclear weapons testing, releases from medical or industrial processes, nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel processing facilities. The pertechnetate ion, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} is the form produced during the nuclear fuel cycle and the most likely to be released into the environment. A recent review published by Public Health England (formerly the Health Protection Agency) found that the availability for the root uptake of technetium into crops depends on whether the technetium is in a chemically non-reduced more plant available form, such as TcO{sub 4}{sup -} or a chemically reduced less plant available form, such as TcO{sub 2}. Based on the review, generic soil to crop transfer factor (TF) values for use in non-site specific UK based radiological assessments were proposed, with the TF value for the reduced form of technetium in crops around a factor of 10 lower than that for the non-reduced form. The implications of the use of different TF values on the activity concentrations in crops and animal products predicted by PHE's food chain model, FARMLAND, for both routine and accidental release situations were explored. Recommendations on the best choice of TF values for use in the model have been given for a range of contamination scenarios. A small scale experimental study has been carried out to provide further evidence that the generic assumption made on the difference between soil-crop TF values for non-reduced and reduced forms of technetium is valid. The study was also designed to establish likely time periods over which the chemical reduction of technetium takes place and to provide additional soil-crop TF values for use in UK based radiological assessments. Soil to crop TFs for crops harvested from loam and peat soils up to 4 months after contamination are about a factor of 10 higher than those seen in soil contaminated more than a year previously, indicating that the

  19. A kinetic study of cation release from a mixed mineral assemblage: implications for determination of uranium uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, B.R.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    The uptake of U(VI) as UO 2+ 2 on a natural complex mineral assemblage has been studied using batch selective chemical extraction techniques and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Sediments used in the study consisted of a quartz/mica schist collected from the locale of the Koongarra Uranium ore body, Alligator Rivers Uranium Province, Northern Territory, Australia. The bulk sediment was gravity separated into four size fractions, with attention focused on the nominally <25 μm and 250-1000 μm fractions of the bulk sample, in order to assess the effects of particle size on uranium uptake. Investigation of the kinetics of elemental release in the presence of selective extractants show that uranium is bound largely within the iron and aluminium oxyhydroxides of the assemblage, with a highly mobile fraction of this associated with aluminol sites. SIMS analysis of the natural substrate confirms that significant quantities of aluminium are present in surface layers. The effect of particle size on the uptake of uranium indicates very little change with respect to particle size. This finding may be attributed to the presence of highly porous surface coatings. (orig.)

  20. Depleted Uranium Toxicity, Accumulation, and Uptake in Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda) and Aristida purpurea (Purple Threeawn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Afrachanna D; Wynter, Michelle; Medina, Victor F; Bednar, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) in western Arizona is a testing range where Depleted uranium (DU) penetrators have been historically fired. A portion of the fired DU penetrators are being managed under controlled conditions by leaving them in place. The widespread use of DU in armor-penetrating weapons has raised environmental and human health concerns. The present study is focused on the onsite management approach and on the potential interactions with plants local to YPG. A 30 day study was conducted to assess the toxicity of DU corrosion products (e.g., schoepite and meta-schoepite) in two grass species that are native to YPG, Bermuda (Cynodon dactylon) and Purple Threeawn (Aristida purpurea). In addition, the ability for plants to uptake DU was studied. The results of this study show a much lower threshold for biomass toxicity and higher plant concentrations, particularly in the roots than shoots, compared to previous studies.

  1. Occurrence and potential crop uptake of emerging contaminants and related compounds in an agricultural irrigation network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderón-Preciado, Diana; Matamoros, Víctor; Bayona, Josep M.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging contaminants have received much attention in recent years due to their presence in surface waters, but little attention has been paid to their occurrence in agricultural irrigation waters. This study investigated the occurrence of these compounds in an agricultural irrigation network in northeastern Spain and, for the first time, using two plant uptake models, estimated the concentration of selected micropollutants in crops. The concentration of micropollutants in agricultural irrigation waters ranged from 10 to 5130 ng L −1 and exhibited some attenuation over the course of the irrigation network. Bromoform, chloroform, diclofenac, caffeine, ibuprofen, naproxen, methyl dihydrojasmonate, galaxolide, butylated hydroxytoluene, and butylated hydroxyanisole were the most abundant contaminants (> 200 ng L −1 , on average). The estimated concentration of micropollutants in crops ranged from −1 , with the neutral compounds being the most abundant. Moreover, the predicted data obtained by fate models generally agreed with experimental data. Finally, human exposure to micropollutants through fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated to be 9.8 μg per person and week (Σ 27 contaminants detected). Further studies are needed to determine the health implications that the presence of these compounds in fruit and vegetables may have for consumers.

  2. Occurrence and potential crop uptake of emerging contaminants and related compounds in an agricultural irrigation network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon-Preciado, Diana [IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona, 18, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Matamoros, Victor, E-mail: victor.matamoros@udg.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Bayona, Josep M. [IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona, 18, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    Emerging contaminants have received much attention in recent years due to their presence in surface waters, but little attention has been paid to their occurrence in agricultural irrigation waters. This study investigated the occurrence of these compounds in an agricultural irrigation network in northeastern Spain and, for the first time, using two plant uptake models, estimated the concentration of selected micropollutants in crops. The concentration of micropollutants in agricultural irrigation waters ranged from 10 to 5130 ng L{sup -1} and exhibited some attenuation over the course of the irrigation network. Bromoform, chloroform, diclofenac, caffeine, ibuprofen, naproxen, methyl dihydrojasmonate, galaxolide, butylated hydroxytoluene, and butylated hydroxyanisole were the most abundant contaminants (> 200 ng L{sup -1}, on average). The estimated concentration of micropollutants in crops ranged from < 1 to 7677 ng kg{sup -1}, with the neutral compounds being the most abundant. Moreover, the predicted data obtained by fate models generally agreed with experimental data. Finally, human exposure to micropollutants through fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated to be 9.8 {mu}g per person and week ({Sigma} 27 contaminants detected). Further studies are needed to determine the health implications that the presence of these compounds in fruit and vegetables may have for consumers.

  3. Uptake of uranium and thorium series radionuclides by the waterlily, Nymphaea violacea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, H.B.L.

    1993-01-01

    The waterlily Nymphaea violacea is a major aquatic macrophyte in the waters of the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory, Australia. It is also a traditional Aboriginal diet item, and is considered to be potentially one of the main contributors to the effective dose equivalent arising from consumption of so called bush food in the region. Because of the proximity of the Ranger Uranium Mine (RUM), the activity concentrations of the U and Th series radionuclides have been studied in water, sediment and waterlily during different seasons at five sites downstream of the mine site. The objectives of the study are: 1. To identify the major source of radionuclide uptake by the plant; i.e. water or sediment; 2. To assess the concentration factors/ratios needed for predicting the radiation exposure of the critical group resulting from any discharge of water to the aquatic environment from the Ranger uranium mine; 3. To estimate the natural radiation exposure of the public arising from consumption of waterlilies. (Author)

  4. Dried gamma-irradiated sewage solids use on calcareous soils: crop yeilds and heavy metals uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCaslin, B.D.; Sivinski, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments designed to examine gamma-radiation effects on extractable and plant-available sludge elements and to examine the response of crops to sludge applications on two typical, calcareous soils in New Mexico are summarized. Information has been given indicating that the radiation process of reducing pathogens in sewage products being developed by Sandia Laboratories, does not significantly increase the chemical extractability and plant uptake of a broad range of nutrients and heavy metals. However, radiation treatment greatly facilitates handling sewage for experimentation, because pathogen contamination precautions are eliminated and weed seeds killed. Studies on the effects of sludge irradiation on plant nutrient uptake revealed no concentration increases, agreeing with results presented herein. Sewage products may have special potential for use on calcareous soils, such as in New Mexico. For instance, in New Mexico the lack of potassium in sewage products is not a problem and the naturally high pH of New Mexico soil greatly reduces plant availability of many problem heavy metals. Dramatic increases in yield are typified by the greenhouse and field results presented herein, especially for the known micronutrient deficient soils of New Mexico. Results indicate that sewage sludge is an excellent Zn and Fe fertilizer. More research needs to be done before the economics of sludge application can be calculated and more field information is needed before irradiated sewage products are used indiscriminately

  5. Uptake of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by carrot and lettuce crops grown in compost-amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizkarguenaga, E; Iparraguirre, A; Oliva, E; Quintana, J B; Rodil, R; Fernández, L A; Zuloaga, O; Prieto, A

    2016-02-01

    The uptake of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) by carrot and lettuce was investigated. Degradation of PBDEs in soil in the absence of the plants was discarded. Different carrot (Nantesa and Chantenay) and lettuce (Batavia Golden Spring and Summer Queen) varieties were grown in fortified or contaminated compost-amended soil mixtures under greenhouse conditions. After plant harvesting, roots (core and peel) and leaves were analyzed separately for carrot, while for lettuce, leaves and hearts were analyzed together. The corresponding bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were calculated. In carrots, a concentration gradient of 2,2',3,4,4',5'-hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-138) became evident that decreased from the root peel via root core to the leaves. For decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) at the low concentration level (7 and 20 ng g(-1)), the leaves incorporated the highest concentration of the target substance. For lettuce, a decrease in the BCF value (from 0.24 to 0.02) was observed the higher the octanol-water partition coefficient, except in the case of BDE-183 (BCF = 0.51) and BDE-209 (BCF values from 0.41 to 0.74). Significant influence of the soils and crop varieties on the uptake could not be supported. Metabolic debromination, hydroxylation or methylation of the target PBDEs in the soil-plant system was not observed.

  6. Dried gamma-irradiated sewage solids use on calcareous soils: crop yeilds and heavy metals uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaslin, B.D.; Sivinski, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments designed to examine gamma-radiation effects on extractable and plant-available sludge elements and to examine the response of crops to sludge applications on two typical, calcareous soils in New Mexico are summarized. Information has been given indicating that the radiation process of reducing pathogens in sewage products being developed by Sandia Laboratories, does not significantly increase the chemical extractability and plant uptake of a broad range of nutrients and heavy metals. However, radiation treatment greatly facilitates handling sewage for experimentation, because pathogen contamination precautions are eliminated and weed seeds killed. Studies on the effects of sludge irradiation on plant nutrient uptake revealed no concentration increases, agreeing with results presented herein. Sewage products may have special potential for use on calcareous soils, such as in New Mexico. For instance, in New Mexico the lack of potassium in sewage products is not a problem and the naturally high pH of New Mexico soil greatly reduces plant availability of many problem heavy metals. Dramatic increases in yield are typified by the greenhouse and field results presented herein, especially for the known micronutrient deficient soils of New Mexico. Results indicate that sewage sludge is an excellent Zn and Fe fertilizer. More research needs to be done before the economics of sludge application can be calculated and more field information is needed before irradiated sewage products are used indiscriminately. (ERB)

  7. Uptake and distribution of bisphenol A and nonylphenol in vegetable crops irrigated with reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian; Wu, Jun; Stoffella, Peter J; Wilson, P Chris

    2015-01-01

    The potential uptake and distribution of bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) (from reclaimed irrigation water) in edible crops was investigated. BPA and NP were spiked into simulated reclaimed water at environmentally relevant concentrations. Two crops (lettuce, Lactuca sativa and tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum) were grown hydroponically in a greenhouse using the spiked irrigation water under two irrigation exposure scenarios (overhead foliar exposure and subsurface root exposure). BPA concentrations in tomato fruit were 26.6 ± 5.8 (root exposure) and 18.3 ± 3.5 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1), while concentrations in lettuce leaves were 80.6 ± 23.1 (root exposure) and 128.9 ± 17.4 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1). NP concentrations in tomato fruit were 46.1 ± 6.6 (root exposure) and 24.6 ± 6.4 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1), while concentrations in lettuce leaves were 144.1 ± 9.2 (root exposure) and 195.0 ± 16.9 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1). BPA was relatively mobile in lettuce plants regardless of exposure route. Limited mobility was observed for NP in both crops and BPA in tomatoes. The estimated daily intake of BPA and NP through consumption of vegetables irrigated with reclaimed water ranged from 8.9-62.9 to 11.9-95.1 μg, respectively, depending on the exposure route. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Uptake and effects of uranium nanoparticles on early life stage of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiven, M.; Teien, H.C.; Lind, O.C.; Vaa Johnsen, I.; Oughton, D.; Salbu, B. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    Nanotechnology has been, and still is, a major scientific and economic growth area. Over the last decade, the awareness of nano-material as a potential human and environmental hazard has increased dramatically. Being a naturally occurring radionuclide, as well as the major fuel material used in nuclear energy power plants, many sources of uranium (U) are found in the environment. Uranium nanoparticles (NPs) can occur naturally (i.e., colloidal species), as incidental anthropogenic sources (e.g., debris from depleted U weapons and fuel manufacture and reprocessing), or can be intentionally synthesized for use as catalysts. Studies on environmental aspects of U NPs are rather scarce in literature. Thus, the focus of the present work was to obtain information on uptake and potential effects of U NPs on early life stage of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Eggs of Atlantic salmon were exposed to two types of U NPs, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and UO{sub 2}, as well as to uranyl ions, in natural soft water (TOC 4.5 mg/L) at pH 7.2. Two U NP exposure experiments during fertilization were performed, both with exposure for 24 h. The exposure period was followed by a depuration period in uncontaminated water (7 and 69 days of depuration, respectively). Exposure solutions were subject to a suite of techniques to characterize the exposure during the experiment. Dissection of eggs was performed prior to the determination of U to distinguish between U associated to the shell and U in the egg fluid. Results showed that U was highest in eggs exposed to uranyl, especially during the stage of swelling, and the uptake into the eggs increased with exposure time. The uptake of U in eggs exposed to U NPs was only minor, and may be due to U ions in exposure solutions or released from U-NPs, rather than an actual U NP uptake. However, on the surface of eggs exposed to U NPs large amounts of U NPs were deposited during the experimental duration period, potentially posing a risk over time. There were no

  9. Uptake of soil cadmium by three field crops and its prediction by a pHdependent Freundlich sorption model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castilho, del P.; Chardon, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    Crop contamination with cadmium is a function of soil contamination. Here we study the applicability of the soil solution bioavailability hypothesis to Cd: that is, whether uptake of Cd was more directly related to its concentration or activity in the soil solution than in the soil solid phase.

  10. Modeling Root Growth, Crop Growth and N Uptake of Winter Wheat Based on SWMS_2D: Model and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejun Yang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Simulations for root growth, crop growth, and N uptake in agro-hydrological models are of significant concern to researchers. SWMS_2D is one of the most widely used physical hydrologically related models. This model solves equations that govern soil-water movement by the finite element method, and has a public access source code. Incorporating key agricultural components into the SWMS_2D model is of practical importance, especially for modeling some critical cereal crops such as winter wheat. We added root growth, crop growth, and N uptake modules into SWMS_2D. The root growth model had two sub-models, one for root penetration and the other for root length distribution. The crop growth model used was adapted from EU-ROTATE_N, linked to the N uptake model. Soil-water limitation, nitrogen limitation, and temperature effects were all considered in dry-weight modeling. Field experiments for winter wheat in Bouwing, the Netherlands, in 1983-1984 were selected for validation. Good agreements were achieved between simulations and measurements, including soil water content at different depths, normalized root length distribution, dry weight and nitrogen uptake. This indicated that the proposed new modules used in the SWMS_2D model are robust and reliable. In the future, more rigorous validation should be carried out, ideally under 2D situations, and attention should be paid to improve some modules, including the module simulating soil N mineralization.

  11. Soil and vegetation influence in plants natural radionuclides uptake at a uranium mining site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charro, E.; Moyano, A.

    2017-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the uptake of several radionuclides by the vegetation characteristic of a dehesa ecosystem in uranium mining-impacted soils in Central-West of Spain. The activity concentration for 238U, 226Ra, 210Pb, 232Th, and 224Ra was measured in soil and vegetation samples using a Canberra n-type HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. Transfer factors of natural radionuclides in different tissues (leaves, branches, twigs, and others) of native plants were evaluated. From these data, the influence of the mine, the physicochemical parameters of the soils and the type of vegetation were analyzed in order to explain the accumulation of radionuclides in the vegetation. A preferential uptake of 210Pb and 226Ra by plants, particularly by trees of the Quercus species (Quercus pyrenaica and Quercus ilex rotundifolia), has been observed, being the transfer factors for 226Ra and 210Pb in these tree species higher than those for other plants (like Pinus pinaster, Rubur ulmifolius and Populus sp.). The analysis of radionuclide contents and transfer factors in the vegetation showed no evidence of influence of the radionuclide concentration in soils, although it could be explained in terms of the type of plants and, in particular, of the tree's species, with special attention to the tree's rate of growth, being higher in slow growing species.

  12. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizae does not improve 137Cs uptake in crops grown in the Chernobyl region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinichuk, M.; Mårtensson, A.; Rosén, K.

    2013-01-01

    Methods for cleaning up radioactive contaminated soils are urgently needed. In this study we investigated whether the use of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can improve 137 Cs uptake by crops. Barley, cucumber, perennial ryegrass, and sunflower were inoculated with AM fungi and grown in low-level radionuclide contaminated soils in a field experiment 70 km southwest of Chernobyl, Ukraine, during two successive years (2009–2010). Roots of barley, cucumber and sunflower plants were slightly or moderately infected with AM fungus and root infection frequency was negatively or non-correlated with 137 Cs uptake by plants. Roots of ryegrass were moderately infected with AM fungus and infection frequency was moderately correlated with 137 Cs uptake by ryegrass. The application of AM fungi to soil in situ did not enhance radionuclide plant uptake or biomass. The responsiveness of host plants and AM fungus combination to 137 Cs uptake varied depending on the soil, although mycorrhization of soil in the field was conditional and did not facilitate the uptake of radiocesium. The total amount of 137 Cs uptake by plants growing on inoculated soil was equal to amounts in plant cultivated on non-inoculated soil. Thus, the use of AM fungi in situ for bioremediation of soil contaminated with a low concentration of 137 Cs could not be recommended. -- Highlights: • Effect of mycorrhization on 137 Cs uptake by crops was studied in a field experiment. • AM fungi did not enhance radionuclide plant uptake or biomass. • Plants growing on inoculated and non-inoculated soil accumulate 137 Cs equally

  13. Bio fertilization of Cereal and Legume Crops for Increasing Soil available P Uptake Using Nuclear Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.; El-Gandour, E. A.; El Gala, A. M.; Ishac, Y. Z.

    2004-01-01

    Application of N and P in uncommon sources such as N 2 -fixers and AM fungi considered as an important source to save money and reduce pollution. In this concern, two pot experiments were carried out in sandy soils, to study the role of these neutral organisms in increasing the fertility of sandy soil. Wheat and faba bean were used. Seeds of wheat or faba bean were inoculated with Azotobacter or Rhizobium and planted in soils inoculated with and without AM fungi. A 20 mg P/kg soil in the form of single super phosphate (15.5 % P 2 O 5 ) or rock-P (26.6% P 2 O 5 ) were applied in the first experiment while KH 2 PO 4 was added in the second one. Dry weight, spore number, root infection, total and specific P were also determined. Maximum shoot growth were gained when either, wheat or faba bean inoculated with mycorrhizae and N2-fixers relative to the control. it was reached to 54 and 73%, respectively. Phosphorus uptake for shoots of both wheat and faba bean had been significantly increased upon inoculating with AM and/or Azotobacter or Rhizobium. Addition of fertilizer P help to identify the P uptake from soil or fertilizer. Mycorrhizal plants induced significant increase in Pdff by about 39 and 27% over inoculated with Azotobacter for wheat and Rhizobium for faba bean and it reached to 95 and 79% when inoculated with combined inoculation. This may be due to AM fungi absorb more available P than do nonmycorrhizal roots. FUE was increased from about 5 to 10% for wheat; 6 to 19% for faba bean. It can be concluded that, bio fertilizers can increase crop production and soil fertility. Rock-P might be recommended as a source of P fertilizer to be applied with AM fungi. (Authors)

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  15. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizae does not improve 137Cs uptake in crops grown in the Chernobyl region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinichuk, M; Mårtensson, A; Rosén, K

    2013-12-01

    Methods for cleaning up radioactive contaminated soils are urgently needed. In this study we investigated whether the use of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can improve (137)Cs uptake by crops. Barley, cucumber, perennial ryegrass, and sunflower were inoculated with AM fungi and grown in low-level radionuclide contaminated soils in a field experiment 70 km southwest of Chernobyl, Ukraine, during two successive years (2009-2010). Roots of barley, cucumber and sunflower plants were slightly or moderately infected with AM fungus and root infection frequency was negatively or non-correlated with (137)Cs uptake by plants. Roots of ryegrass were moderately infected with AM fungus and infection frequency was moderately correlated with (137)Cs uptake by ryegrass. The application of AM fungi to soil in situ did not enhance radionuclide plant uptake or biomass. The responsiveness of host plants and AM fungus combination to (137)Cs uptake varied depending on the soil, although mycorrhization of soil in the field was conditional and did not facilitate the uptake of radiocesium. The total amount of (137)Cs uptake by plants growing on inoculated soil was equal to amounts in plant cultivated on non-inoculated soil. Thus, the use of AM fungi in situ for bioremediation of soil contaminated with a low concentration of (137)Cs could not be recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The uptake of uranium and radium from food and water in relation to calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Observed ratios for dietary radium and calcium suggest that at least a 20 to 70 fold discrimination exists against radium uptake in the skeleton relative to calcium. It has been widely shown in many countries around the world that the relative radium to calcium ratio in the human skeleton varies from country to country, but within geographic areas, it appears to be relatively invariant with age. The ratio of radium-226 to calcium in intake, relative to the radium-226 to calcium value in the skeleton, is called the observed ratio, and varies over the world from a value of 0.013 to 0.039, with a mean of 0.024. In 1975, I inferred a mean observed ratio for uranium of 0.057 for the US. These findings suggest that man is in equilibrium with radium-226 with respect to the calcium in food and water. Most of the calcium would be ingested in diet, as would a significant amount, but not necessarily all, of the radium. The role of calcium for intake in water has not been examined

  17. Assessing soil and plant parameters affecting uranium availability and plant uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, H.

    2009-01-01

    In the assessment of the potential impact of contaminants in soils and the requirement for the implementation of corrective actions, it is important to determine the contaminant's mobility and bioavailability and to identify the processes and parameters ruling it. Mobility and bioavailability of contaminants are among others affected by the physicochemical characteristics of the environment itself and plant properties. This is also the case for uranium (U), reported to be the most frequent radionuclide contaminant in ground and surface water and soils. The actual failure of the available transfer factor (TF) data and their broad relation to soil type to be an appropriate measure for food chain transfer in assessment models, calls for a more mechanistic understanding of the individual processes affecting bioavailability. The objectives of this study were (1) to test if Diffusive Gradient in Thin film (DGT) measured concentrations adequately assess U bioavailability and (2) to evaluate if differences in U uptake by plants can be explained by variation in root-mediated changes in selected soil properties and assess the role of organic acids in this process

  18. Uptake of uranium by aquatic plants growing in fresh water ecosystem around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V N; Tripathi, R M; Sethy, N K; Sahoo, S K

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of uranium was determined in aquatic plants and substrate (sediment or water) of fresh water ecosystem on and around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India. Aquatic plant/substrate concentration ratios (CRs) of uranium were estimated for different sites on and around the uranium mill tailings disposal area. These sites include upstream and downstream side of surface water sources carrying the treated tailings effluent, a small pond inside tailings disposal area and residual water of this area. Three types of plant groups were investigated namely algae (filamentous and non-filamentous), other free floating & water submerged and sediment rooted plants. Wide variability in concentration ratio was observed for different groups of plants studied. The filamentous algae uranium concentration was significantly correlated with that of water (r=0.86, puranium concentration in plant and the substrate (r=0.88, puranium concentration was significantly correlated with Mn, Fe, and Ni concentration of plants (puranium accumulation and concentration ratio can be useful for prospecting phytoremediation of stream carrying treated or untreated uranium mill tailings effluent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Seasonal temperatures have more influence than nitrogen fertilizer rates on cucumber yield and nitrogen uptake in a double cropping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ruiying; Li Xiaolin; Christie, Peter; Chen Qing; Zhang Fusuo

    2008-01-01

    Two-year greenhouse cucumber experiments were conducted to investigate seasonal effects on fruit yield, dry matter allocation, and N uptake in a double-cropping system with different fertilizer management. Seasonal effects were much greater than fertilizer effects, and winter-spring (WS) cucumber attained higher fruit yields and N uptake than autumn-winter (AW) cucumber due to lower cumulative air temperatures during fruit maturation in the AW season. Fertilizer N application and apparent N loss under recommended N management (Nmr) decreased by 40-78% and 33-48% without yield loss compared to conventional N management (Nmt) over four growing seasons. However, there were no seasonal differences in N recommendations, taking into consideration seasonal differences in crop N demand, critical nutrient supply in the root zone and N mineralization rate. - Nitrogen inputs can be reduced to minimize N losses to the environment while maintaining yields but N recommendations must reflect seasonal temperature effects

  20. Seasonal temperatures have more influence than nitrogen fertilizer rates on cucumber yield and nitrogen uptake in a double cropping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Ruiying; Li Xiaolin [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China); Christie, Peter [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China); Agricultural and Environmental Science Department, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Chen Qing [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China)], E-mail: qchen@cau.edu.cn; Zhang Fusuo [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2008-02-15

    Two-year greenhouse cucumber experiments were conducted to investigate seasonal effects on fruit yield, dry matter allocation, and N uptake in a double-cropping system with different fertilizer management. Seasonal effects were much greater than fertilizer effects, and winter-spring (WS) cucumber attained higher fruit yields and N uptake than autumn-winter (AW) cucumber due to lower cumulative air temperatures during fruit maturation in the AW season. Fertilizer N application and apparent N loss under recommended N management (Nmr) decreased by 40-78% and 33-48% without yield loss compared to conventional N management (Nmt) over four growing seasons. However, there were no seasonal differences in N recommendations, taking into consideration seasonal differences in crop N demand, critical nutrient supply in the root zone and N mineralization rate. - Nitrogen inputs can be reduced to minimize N losses to the environment while maintaining yields but N recommendations must reflect seasonal temperature effects.

  1. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, I.-Y.; Lee, S.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Beeson, P. C.; Hively, W. D.; McCarty, G. W.; Lang, M. W.

    2014-01-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW), which is located in the mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized, and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops to improve water quality a...

  2. A field study of the uptake of 35S and 14C into crops characteristic of the UK diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluczewski, S.M.; Bell, J.N.B.; Nair, S.

    1986-02-01

    The uptake of 35 S and 14 C into crops characteristic of the UK diet was studied. Four common types of green vegetable, six common types of root vegetable and perennial ryegrass were grown in a garden plot in the environs of Hinkley Point Nuclear Power Station and the 35 S and 14 C contents of the crops were measured. Also measured were the corresponding air concentrations over the plot averaged over a range of time periods between sowing and harvesting. The results were analysed in terms of air to crop transfer factors for 35 S and 14 C and the implications of these for dose calculations were assessed for both collective dose and for a hypothetical critical group consuming a range of foods produced in situ. (author)

  3. Influence of gypsum and farmyard manure on fertilizer zinc uptake by wheat and its residual effect on succeeding rice and wheat crops in a sodic soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, P.; Deb, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of gypsum and FYM on a sodic soil on fertilizer Zn uptake by wheat and residual effect on succeeding crops of rice and wheat. Application of FYM significantly increased the yield of first wheat crop as well as the yield of subsequent rice and wheat crops, but gypsum showed significant effect only on rice. FYM application also resulted in an increase in Zn content of all the three crops. Utilisation of the fertilizer Zn by the first crop of wheat ranged between 0.30 to 0.54 per cent while succeeding crop of rice utilised 1.00 to 1.25 per cent of the applied Zn. Application of gypsum to the first crop did not influence the fertilizer Zn uptake by wheat, rice and wheat, however, it significantly reduced the soil pH and increased the available Zn content in soil. (author). 15 refs., 6 tabs

  4. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  5. Mechanism of uranium(VI) uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under environmentally relevant conditions: Batch, HRTEM, and FTIR studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xia, E-mail: lux2009@lzu.edu.cn; Zhou, Xiao-jiao; Wang, Tie-shan, E-mail: tswang@lzu.edu.cn

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium reaches very rapid within 15 min. • pH shift towards neutral indicates release of hydroxyl ions. • High ionic strength inhabits biosorption capacity. • Uptake capacity of heat-killed cells is an order of magnitude higher than live one. • Electrostatic interaction, precipitation, and complexation are the main mechanisms. -- Abstract: Biosorption is of significance for the safety evaluation of high-level nuclear wastes repositories and remediation of radioactive contamination places. Quantitive study and structural characterization of uranium uptake by both live and heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae at environmentally relevant uranium concentration and with different ionic strengths were carried out. Kinetic investigation showed the equilibrium reached within 15 min. In equilibrium studies, pH shift towards neutral indicated release of hydroxyl ions. pH was the most important factor, which partly affected electrostatic interaction between uranyl ions and S. cerevisiae surface. The high ionic strength inhibited biosorption capacity, which can be explained by a competitive reaction between sodium ions and uranyl ions. Heat killing process significantly enhanced biosorption capacity, showing an order of magnitude higher than that of live cells. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) showed needle-like uranium-phosphate precipitation formed on the cell walls for both live and heat-killed cells. Besides, dark-field micrographs displayed considerable similar uranium-phosphate precipitation presented outside the heat-killed cells. The phosphate released during heat-killing process. FTIR illustrated function groups hydroxyl, carboxyl, phosphate, and amino groups played important role in complexation with uranium.

  6. Uptake of uranium in Atlantic salmon gills following exposure experiments demonstrated by SR-XRF tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, O.C.; Cagno, S.; Brit Salbu, H.C.T. [Centre of Excellence in Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, Norwegian University of Life Sciences - UMB (Norway); Vanmeert, F.; Nuyts, G.; Janssens, K. [University of Antwerp (Belgium); Alfeld, M.; Falkenberg, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron - DESY (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide as well as a heavy metal that can be found in elevated concentrations (mg/L) in the aquatic environment and therefore may pose a risk to aquatic organisms including fish. The major challenges in monitoring the fate of U in complex media, such as soils, sediments and water are to identify mobile and bioavailable U species, interactions with environmental components, transfer to organisms via sorption to surfaces and across membranes, and the internal distribution of target organs. As part of a larger study, U accumulation in gills and internal organs (e.g. liver) as well as mortality of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) were studied as a function of U concentration as well as pH of the exposure water. As Atlantic salmon does not ingest freshwater, the major pathway for uptake of U in the liver is hypothesized to be by transfer across the gills. However, to our best knowledge, active uptake of U within gill filaments has never been proven. In the present work, we demonstrate that following 96 hours exposure of 6 mg U/l in freshwater at pH 7 and 1 mg U/l at pH 5, U was actively taken up in the Atlantic Salmon gill filaments. The internal distribution of U within exposed organisms was visualized using μXRF/μXRD two-dimensional scanning and XRF/XRD tomography at the microprobe end-station of the PETRA III P06 beamline. The recently developed and highly efficient Maia detector array was successfully employed to record extended high-resolution element-specific maps of the tissue samples. First, conventional 2D μXRF/μXRD mapping allowed to identify the axial planes in the samples actually containing U. On the same samples, higher resolution virtual cross-sections were obtained (18 keV, 0.6 μm beam size) by means of μXRF/μXRD tomography of the planes in which U was encountered. The results proved that U not only adheres to the external boundary of the fish gills, but it is also taken up via gills. The results of this work

  7. Uranium(VI) speciation: modelling, uncertainty and relevance to bioavailability models. Application to uranium uptake by the gills of a freshwater bivalve; Speciation de l'uranium(6), modelisation, incertitude et implication pour les modeles de biodisponibilite. Application a l'accumulation dans les branchies d'un bivalve d'eau douce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denison, F.H

    2004-07-01

    The effects of varying solution composition on the interactions between uranium(VI) and excised gills of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been investigated in well defined solution media. A significant reduction in the uptake of uranium was observed on increasing the concentrations of the uranium complexing ligands citrate and carbonate. Saturation kinetics as a function of uranium concentration at a pH value of 5.0 were observed, indicating that the uptake of uranium is a facilitated process, probably involving one or several trans-membrane transport systems. A relatively small change in the uptake of uranium was found as a function of pH (factor of ca. 2), despite the extremely large changes to the solution speciation of uranium within the range of pH investigated (5.0 - 7.5). A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to the solution composition domain employed for this study was performed. Estimates of the uncertainties for the formation constants of aqueous uranium(VI) species were integrated into a thermodynamic database. A computer program was written to predict the equilibrium distribution of uranium(VI) in simple aqueous systems, using thermodynamic parameter mean-values. The program was extended to perform Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses, incorporating the thermodynamic database uncertainty estimates, to quantitatively predict the uncertainties inherent in predicting the solution speciation of uranium. The use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of uranium(VI) was investigated. Observed uranium(VI) uptake behaviour was interpreted as a function of the predicted changes to the solution speciation of uranium. Different steady-state or pre-equilibrium approaches to modelling uranium uptake were tested. Alternative modelling approaches were also tested, considering the potential changes to membrane transport system activity or sorption characteristics on

  8. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, I.-Y.; Lee, S.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Beeson, P. C.; Hively, W. D.; McCarty, G. W.; Lang, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW), which is located in the mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized, and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops to improve water quality at the watershed scale (~ 50 km2) and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data to simulate hydrological processes and agricultural nutrient cycling over the period of 1990-2000. To accurately simulate winter cover crop biomass in relation to growing conditions, a new approach was developed to further calibrate plant growth parameters that control the leaf area development curve using multitemporal satellite-based measurements of species-specific winter cover crop performance. Multiple SWAT scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops and to investigate how nitrate loading could change under different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting dates, and implementation areas. The simulation results indicate that winter cover crops have a negligible impact on the water budget but significantly reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading from agricultural lands was approximately 14 kg ha-1, but decreased to 4.6-10.1 kg ha-1 with cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27-67% at the watershed scale. Rye was the most effective species, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of cover crops (~ 30

  9. Uptake and Effects of Six Rare Earth Elements (REEs on Selected Native and Crop Species Growing in Contaminated Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Carpenter

    Full Text Available Rare earth elements (REEs have become increasingly important metals used in modern technology. Processes including mining, oil refining, discarding of obsolete equipment containing REEs, and the use of REE-containing phosphate fertilizers may increase the likelihood of environmental contamination. However, there is a scarcity of information on the toxicity and accumulation of these metals to terrestrial primary producers in contaminated soils. The objective of this work was to assess the phytotoxicity and uptake from contaminated soil of six REEs (chloride forms of praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, terbium, dysprosium, and erbium on three native plants (Asclepias syriaca L., Desmodium canadense (L. DC., Panicum virgatum L. and two crop species (Raphanus sativus L., Solanum lycopersicum L. in separate dose-response experiments under growth chamber conditions. Limited effects of REEs were found on seed germination and speed of germination. Effects on aboveground and belowground biomass were more pronounced, especially for the three native species, which were always more sensitive than the crop species tested. Inhibition concentrations (IC25 and IC50 causing 25 or 50% reductions in plant biomass respectively, were measured. For the native species, the majority of aboveground biomass IC25s (11 out of 18 fell within 100 to 300 mg REE/kg dry soil. In comparison to the native species, IC25s for the crops were always greater than 400 mg REE/kg, with the majority of results (seven out of 12 falling above 700 mg REE/kg. IC50s were often not detected for the crops. Root biomass of native species was also affected at lower doses than in crops. REE uptake by plants was higher in the belowground parts than in the above-ground plant tissues. Results also revealed that chloride may have contributed to the sensitivity of the native species, Desmodium canadense, one of the most sensitive species studied. Nevertheless, these results demonstrated that

  10. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, In-Young; Lee, Sangchui; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Beeson, Peter C.; Hively, W. Dean; McCarty, Greg W.; Lang, Megan W.

    2013-01-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW), which is located in the Mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of winter cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops at the watershed scale and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically-based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data and satellite-based estimates of winter cover crop species performance to simulate hydrological processes and nutrient cycling over the period of 1991–2000. Multiple scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops planted and to investigate how nitrate loading could change with different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting times, and implementation areas. The results indicate that winter cover crops had a negligible impact on water budget, but significantly reduced nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading was approximately 14 kg ha−1, but it decreased to 4.6–10.1 kg ha−1 with winter cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27–67% at the watershed scale. Rye was most effective, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of winter cover crops (~30 days of additional growing days) was crucial, as it lowered nitrate export by an additional ~2 kg ha−1 when compared to late planting scenarios. The effectiveness of cover cropping increased with increasing extent of winter cover crop implementation. Agricultural fields with well-drained soils

  11. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  12. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  15. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  16. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  17. Radiation utilization efficiency, nitrogen uptake and modeling crop growth and yield of rainfed rice under different nitrogen rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouranga, Kar; Ashwani Kumar; Mohapatra, Sucharita

    2014-01-01

    Optimum utilization of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) along with proper nitrogen (N) management for sustainable rice production is still a promising management recommendation for sustainable rainfed rice cultivation in eastern India. The objective of this investigation was to study radiation utilization efficiency (RUE), N uptake and modeling growth and productivity of wet/rainy season rice (cv. Lalat and Gayatri) under 0, 50, 90, 120 and 150 kg ha -1 N application. Results showed that N rates significantly affected plant biomass, leaf area index (LAI), biological yield (straw and grain yield) and N uptake for both the varieties. The intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR) and spectral reflectance based vegetation indices (IR/R, NDVI) were also different between two varieties and among N rates. Higher rate of N increased the RUE significantly; averaged over years and varieties, mean values of RUE were 1.35, 1.70, 2.01, 2.15 and 2.17 g MJ -1 under 0, 50, 90, 120 and 150 kg N ha -1 , respectively. Though crop growth, yield, N uptake and RUE were higher at 150 kg N ha -1 but the results were at par with 120 kg N ha -1 . Agronomic N use efficiency (ANUE) was also low at 150 kg N ha -1 . The DSSAT v 4.5 model was applied to simulate crop growth, yield and phenology of the crop under different N rates. Model performance was found to be poor at low N rates (0, 50 kg N ha -1 ), but the model performed fairly well at higher N rates (90 kg ha -1 and above). (author)

  18. On the uptake and binding of uranium (VI) by the green alga Chlorella Vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Manja

    2011-01-01

    Uranium could be released into the environment from geogenic deposits and from former mining and milling areas by weathering and anthropogenic activities. The elucidation of uranium behavior in geo- and biosphere is necessary for a reliable risk assessment of radionuclide migration in the environment. Algae are widespread in nature and the most important group of organisms in the aquatic habitat. Because of their ubiquitous occurrence in nature the influence of algae on the migration process of uranium in the environment is of fundamental interest e.g. for the development of effective and economical remediation strategies for contaminated waters. Besides, algae are standing at the beginning of the food chain and play an economically relevant role as food and food additive. Therefore the transfer of algae-bound uranium along the food chain could arise to a serious threat to human health. Aim of this work was the quantitative and structural characterization of the interaction between U(VI) and the green alga Chlorella vulgaris in environmental relevant concentration and pH range with special emphasis on metabolic activity. Therefore a defined medium was created which assures the survival/growth of the algae as well as the possibility to predict the uranium speciation. The speciation of uranium in the mineral medium was calculated and experimentally verified by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results of the sorption experiments showed that both metabolic active and inactive algal cells bind uranium in significant amounts of around 14 mg U/g dry biomass and 28 mg U/g dry biomass, respectively. Another interesting observation was made during the growth of Chlorella cells in mineral medium at the environmental relevant uranium concentration of 5 μM. Under these conditions and during ongoing cultivation a mobilization of the algae-bound uranium occurred. At higher uranium concentrations this effect was not observed due to the die off of

  19. Herbicide-induced changes in 14CO2 uptake of leaves of some crop and weed species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santakumari, M.; Rama Das, V.S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of diuron or atrazine on the rate of photosynthetic 14 CO 2 uptake of two each crop (Pisum Sativum and Pennisetum typhoides) and weed species (Amaranthus viridis and Cyperus rotundus) was studied. The results indicated a marked inhibition of 14 CO 2 fixation of leaves within two hours after diuron or atrazine treatment. However the resistant plants were able to exhibit a recovery of the net photosynthetic rate subsequently while the susceptible plants failed to recover. The results suggested that even with fully open stomata and available NADPH, the normal CO 2 fixation was not restored by herbicide treated leaves. (author)

  20. Influence of Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) and Tubifex tubifex (Annelida, Oligochaeta) on oxygen uptake by sediments. Consequences of uranium contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagauzere, S. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI/SECRE/LRE, Cadarache 186, BP 3, F-13115 Cedex, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: lagauzere@gmail.com; Pischedda, L.; Cuny, P. [Laboratoire de Microbiologie, Geochimie et Ecologie Marines, UMR 6117 CNRS/COM/Universite de la Mediterranee, Campus de Luminy, Case 901, F-13288 Cedex 09, Marseille (France); Gilbert, F. [EcoLab, Laboratoire d' Ecologie Fonctionnelle, UMR 5245 CNRS/INP/Universite Paul Sabatier, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Cedex 4, Toulouse (France); Stora, G. [Laboratoire de Microbiologie, Geochimie et Ecologie Marines, UMR 6117 CNRS/COM/Universite de la Mediterranee, Campus de Luminy, Case 901, F-13288 Cedex 09, Marseille (France); Bonzom, J.-M. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI/SECRE/LRE, Cadarache 186, BP 3, F-13115 Cedex, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2009-04-15

    The diffusive oxygen uptake (DOU) of sediments inhabited by Chironomus riparius and Tubifex tubifex was investigated using a planar oxygen optode device, and complemented by measurements of bioturbation activity. Additional experiments were performed within contaminated sediments to assess the impact of uranium on these processes. After 72 h, the two invertebrate species significantly increased the DOU of sediments (13-14%), and no temporal variation occurred afterwards. Within contaminated sediments, it was already 24% higher before the introduction of the organisms, suggesting that uranium modified the sediment biogeochemistry. Although the two species firstly reacted by avoidance of contaminated sediment, they finally colonized it. Their bioturbation activity was reduced but, for T. tubifex, it remained sufficient to induce a release of uranium to the water column and an increase of the DOU (53%). These results highlight the necessity of further investigations to take into account the interactions between bioturbation, microbial metabolism and pollutants. - This study highlights the ecological importance of bioturbation in metal-contaminated sediments.

  1. Influence of Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) and Tubifex tubifex (Annelida, Oligochaeta) on oxygen uptake by sediments. Consequences of uranium contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagauzere, S.; Pischedda, L.; Cuny, P.; Gilbert, F.; Stora, G.; Bonzom, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    The diffusive oxygen uptake (DOU) of sediments inhabited by Chironomus riparius and Tubifex tubifex was investigated using a planar oxygen optode device, and complemented by measurements of bioturbation activity. Additional experiments were performed within contaminated sediments to assess the impact of uranium on these processes. After 72 h, the two invertebrate species significantly increased the DOU of sediments (13-14%), and no temporal variation occurred afterwards. Within contaminated sediments, it was already 24% higher before the introduction of the organisms, suggesting that uranium modified the sediment biogeochemistry. Although the two species firstly reacted by avoidance of contaminated sediment, they finally colonized it. Their bioturbation activity was reduced but, for T. tubifex, it remained sufficient to induce a release of uranium to the water column and an increase of the DOU (53%). These results highlight the necessity of further investigations to take into account the interactions between bioturbation, microbial metabolism and pollutants. - This study highlights the ecological importance of bioturbation in metal-contaminated sediments

  2. Impacts of Watershed Characteristics and Crop Rotations on Winter Cover Crop Nitrate-Nitrogen Uptake Capacity within Agricultural Watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Yeo, In-Young; Sadeghi, Ali M; McCarty, Gregory W; Hively, W Dean; Lang, Megan W

    2016-01-01

    The adoption rate of winter cover crops (WCCs) as an effective conservation management practice to help reduce agricultural nutrient loads in the Chesapeake Bay (CB) is increasing. However, the WCC potential for water quality improvement has not been fully realized at the watershed scale. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term impact of WCCs on hydrology and NO3-N loads in two adjacent watersheds and to identify key management factors that affect the effectiveness of WCCs using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and statistical methods. Simulation results indicated that WCCs are effective for reducing NO3-N loads and their performance varied based on planting date, species, soil characteristics, and crop rotations. Early-planted WCCs outperformed late-planted WCCs on the reduction of NO3-N loads and early-planted rye (RE) reduced NO3-N loads by ~49.3% compared to the baseline (no WCC). The WCCs were more effective in a watershed dominated by well-drained soils with increased reductions in NO3-N fluxes of ~2.5 kg N·ha-1 delivered to streams and ~10.1 kg N·ha-1 leached into groundwater compared to poorly-drained soils. Well-drained agricultural lands had higher transport of NO3-N in the soil profile and groundwater due to increased N leaching. Poorly-drained agricultural lands had lower NO3-N due to extensive drainage ditches and anaerobic soil conditions promoting denitrification. The performance of WCCs varied by crop rotations (i.e., continuous corn and corn-soybean), with increased N uptake following soybean crops due to the increased soil mineral N availability by mineralization of soybean residue compared to corn residue. The WCCs can reduce N leaching where baseline NO3-N loads are high in well-drained soils and/or when residual and mineralized N availability is high due to the cropping practices. The findings suggested that WCC implementation plans should be established in watersheds according to local edaphic and agronomic

  3. Impacts of Watershed Characteristics and Crop Rotations on Winter Cover Crop Nitrate-Nitrogen Uptake Capacity within Agricultural Watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchul Lee

    Full Text Available The adoption rate of winter cover crops (WCCs as an effective conservation management practice to help reduce agricultural nutrient loads in the Chesapeake Bay (CB is increasing. However, the WCC potential for water quality improvement has not been fully realized at the watershed scale. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term impact of WCCs on hydrology and NO3-N loads in two adjacent watersheds and to identify key management factors that affect the effectiveness of WCCs using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT and statistical methods. Simulation results indicated that WCCs are effective for reducing NO3-N loads and their performance varied based on planting date, species, soil characteristics, and crop rotations. Early-planted WCCs outperformed late-planted WCCs on the reduction of NO3-N loads and early-planted rye (RE reduced NO3-N loads by ~49.3% compared to the baseline (no WCC. The WCCs were more effective in a watershed dominated by well-drained soils with increased reductions in NO3-N fluxes of ~2.5 kg N·ha-1 delivered to streams and ~10.1 kg N·ha-1 leached into groundwater compared to poorly-drained soils. Well-drained agricultural lands had higher transport of NO3-N in the soil profile and groundwater due to increased N leaching. Poorly-drained agricultural lands had lower NO3-N due to extensive drainage ditches and anaerobic soil conditions promoting denitrification. The performance of WCCs varied by crop rotations (i.e., continuous corn and corn-soybean, with increased N uptake following soybean crops due to the increased soil mineral N availability by mineralization of soybean residue compared to corn residue. The WCCs can reduce N leaching where baseline NO3-N loads are high in well-drained soils and/or when residual and mineralized N availability is high due to the cropping practices. The findings suggested that WCC implementation plans should be established in watersheds according to local edaphic and agronomic

  4. Nutrient uptake by agricultural crops from biochar-amended soils: results from two field experiments in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karer, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Kloss, Stefanie; Wimmer, Bernhard; Soja, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    The use of biochar as soil amendment is considered as a promising agricultural soil management technique, combining carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvements. These expectations are largely founded on positive experiences with biochar applications to impoverished or degraded tropical soils. The validity of these results for soils in temperate climates needs confirmation from field experiments with typical soils representative for intensive agricultural production areas. Frequently biochar is mixed with other organic additives like compost. As these two materials interact with each other and each one may vary considerably in its basic characteristics, it is difficult to attribute the effects of the combined additive to one of its components and to a specific physico-chemical parameter. Therefore investigations of the amendment efficacy require the study of the pure components to characterize their specific behavior in soil. This is especially important for adsorption behavior of biochar for macro- and micronutrients because in soil there are multiple nutrient sinks that compete with plant roots for vital elements. Therefore this contribution presents results from a field amendment study with pure biochar that had the objective to characterize the macro- and microelement uptake of crops from different soils in two typical Austrian areas of agricultural production. At two locations in North and South-East Austria, two identical field experiments on different soils (Chernozem and Cambisol) were installed in 2011 with varying biochar additions (0, 30 and 90 t/ha) and two nitrogen levels. The biochar was a product from slow pyrolysis of wood (SC Romchar SRL). During the installation of the experiments, the biochar fraction of corn). An omission of biochar addition at the same nitrogen addition rate resulted in a yield decrease of 10 % for barley although the total N uptake was 11 % higher but P and K uptake decreased by 14 and 6 %. This indicates that the

  5. Investigation of Cd Uptake and Transfer in Different Parts of Wheat, Spinach, Cucumber and Carrot Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Yargholi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution due to the accumulation of heavy metals in soil and their subsequent transfer to crops is a global concern that arises from improper application of industrial wastewaters. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of soil Cd on its accumulation rate in the various organs of four common crops in Iran (namely, wheat, spinach, cucumber, and carrot. The experiment was performed in a factorial design with random blocks including 3 treatments with 0 (control, 50, and 100 mg/kg.soil in 4 replicates. Soil was collected from the farm belonging to the Research Institute for Plant and Seed Breeding (Karaj and filtered twice using 2-mm sieves before Cadmium Nitrate (Cd(NO32 was added and completely mixed. Crops were planted in plastic pots 40 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. The water demand was determined using the Jenman Mantite method. At the end of the growing season, samples were taken from various organs of the crops and their Cd concentrations were measured. The results revealed a direct relationship between Cd accumulation and Cd concentration in the root region. All the treatments other than the control exhibited Cd concentrations higher than the standard limits for human consumption. Cadmium accumulation in the different organs of the crops exhibited the following orders: Root: Cucumber

  6. Beneficial Use of Produced Water from Oil and Gas Operations for Agriculture: Effects on Crop Health and Crop Uptake of Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacko, E.; Blaine, A. C.; Haynes, K. M.; Higgins, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    The balance between water conservation and energy generation is difficult to maintain. Oil and gas (O&G) companies look to dispose of produced water in safe, economical ways, while farmers desperate for water seek plentiful sources to maintain their fields. The solution seems simple—purify the water from O&G operations and deliver it to the farmers for irrigation to ensure a reliable source of food. Unfortunately, little research has been conducted to date that could provide purification guidelines, risk warnings, or standard methods for how to implement this solution. In addition, multiple barriers to implementation including regulatory, economic, liability, and social license considerations, must be addressed. This presentation contains data regarding the uptake of compounds two crops, Triticum aestivum (spring wheat) and Helianthus annus (sunflower), grown in a controlled greenhouse environment and irrigated with different dilutions of raw and treated produced water from O&G operations. Differences in plant height, plant color, leaf area, and plant mass were examined, and additional laboratory analyses were conducted on the plants to detect uptake of inorganic and organic substances. Plant stress was also assessed both qualitatively and through plant hormone analysis. In addition, this project provided the opportunity for K-12 teachers to become involved in university research through a new National Science Foundation Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program at Colorado School of Mines. The subsequent impacts of this food-energy-water nexus research on local communities and local STEM curricula via the RET program will also be highlighted.

  7. Pressure Heads and Simulated Water Uptake Patterns for a Severely Stressed Bean Crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durigon, A.; Santos, dos M.A.; Lier, van Q.D.; Metselaar, K.

    2012-01-01

    In modeling, actual crop transpiration as a function of soil hydraulic conditions is usually estimated from a water content or pressure head dependent reduction function. We compared the performance of the empirical pressure head based reduction function of Feddes (FRF) and a more physically based

  8. Nitrogen and Winter Cover Crop Effects on Spring and Summer Nutrient Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertilization of bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] with swine-lagoon effluent in summer, April to September, does not match the period of productivity of the winter annual cover crops, annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.), cereal rye (Secale cereale), and berseem clover (Trifolium alexan...

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  10. Uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids into edible crops via land applied biosolids: Field and greenhouse studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in biosolids destined for use in agriculture has raised concerns about their potential to enter the terrestrial food chain via bioaccumulation in edible plants. Uptake of PFAAs by greenhouse lettuce ( Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Lycope...

  11. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  12. Uranium biosorption by a filamentous fungus Mucor miehei pH effect on mechanisms and performances of uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibal, E.; Roulph, C.; Le Cloirec, P.

    1992-01-01

    This study focuses on uranium sorption mechanisms by Mucor miehei, a fungal biomass, used in agro-industries (enzyme synthesis). The pH plays an important part in these phenomena, mainly by its influence on metal or cell wall chemistry. Hydroxylation of uranyl, dependent on the pH and total metal concentration, influences kinetics, via the nature of the limiting phases: diffusion of metal through layers bordering or consituting the biomass, or intramembranar precipitation of uranyl initially adsorbed, and sorption mechanisms. With a moderate pH, sorption of uranylhydroxides modifies extracellular sorbent structures, consequently inducing a multilayer sorption opposed to monolayer adsorption obtained with acid pH. Uptake capacity is characterized by high values obtained even with low metal concentration in solution. Biosorbent could be a technical answer to pollution treatment and valorization of low charge waste streams and leaching solutions obtained in recovery of infra-marginal ores. (author)

  13. Crop Nitrogen Uptake in A Legume-wheat Rotation Using1'5N Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badarneh, D.

    2005-01-01

    Afield experiment was conducted to assess the impact of residual N from legume crops, fertilizer applied N, and fallow on the subsequent wheat production. The experiment was carried out in a randomized complex block design for the years 1993 and 1994. In 1993, barley was planted as a reference crop in legume plots. Micro plots, in both years were treated with 15 N. In 1994, whole plots were planted with wheat. In 1993, the yield of lentil treatments was not significantly different. The wheat yield, responded significantly to N addition. Lentil and chickpea derived 2/3 and 3/4 of their N needs from the atmosphere, respectively. In contrast, wheat derived most of its N needs(90%) from the soil. Water consumption was similar expect for wheat fertilized at low rate of N (179.5 mm). In 1994, wheat yields, the harvesting index and water consumption were not significantly different. Traditional harvesting of lentil and fertilizing wheat at a low rate reduced significantly the N% of wheat bio-mass. The % of N derived from fertilizer (Ndff) by wheat was much higher in 1994 (4.18 to 9.24%), but it was 3.62% for the fallow treatments. The % of N derived from soil (%Ndfs) by wheat 93% in 1994 for wheat planted after legume. The results indicated that legumes depleted soil N under the croping system currently adopted in Jordan, and the benefit of fallow to the subsequent wheat crop is attributed to the increase of soil organic N mineralization. (Author) 35 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  14. Uptake of uranium by native aquatic plants: potential for bioindication and phytoremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favas P. J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here is a part the on going study on the uraniferous geochemical province of Central Portugal in which, the use of aquatic plants as indicators of uranium contamination is being probed using aquatic plants emphasizing their potential use in the emerging phytotechnologies. Even though we have observed very low concentration of U in the fresh waters of the studied sites we found a set of vegetable species with the ability to accumulate U in concentrations which are orders of magnitude higher than the surrounding environment. We have observed that Apium nodiflorum, Callitriche stagnalis, Lemna minor and Fontinalis antipyretica accumulated significant amounts of uranium, whereas Oenanthe crocata excluded U. These results indicate substantial scope for proper radiophytoremediation and phytosociological investigation exploiting the native flora. These species show great potential for phytoremediation because they are endemic and easy to grow in their native conditions. A. nodiflorum and C. stagnalis have high bioproductivity and yield good biomass.

  15. A Model of Uranium Uptake by Plant Roots Allowing for Root-Induced Changes in the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghi, Andrea; Roose, Tiina; Kirk, Guy J D

    2018-03-20

    We develop a model with which to study the poorly understood mechanisms of uranium (U) uptake by plants. The model is based on equations for transport and reaction of U and acids and bases in the rhizosphere around cylindrical plant roots. It allows for the speciation of U with hydroxyl, carbonate, and organic ligands in the soil solution; the nature and kinetics of sorption reactions with the soil solid; and the effects of root-induced changes in rhizosphere pH. A sensitivity analysis showed the importance of soil sorption and speciation parameters as influenced by pH and CO 2 pressure; and of root geometry and root-induced acid-base changes linked to the form of nitrogen taken up by the root. The root absorbing coefficient for U, relating influx to the concentration of U species in solution at the root surface, was also important. Simplified empirical models of U uptake by different plant species and soil types need to account for these effects.

  16. Dried gamma-irradiated sewage solids use on calcareous soils: crop yields and heavy metals uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCaslin, B.D.; Sivinski, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    The fertilizer values of gamma-irradiated digested sewage solids (RDSS) and gamma-irradiated undigested sewage solids (RUSS) have been examined on calcareous soils. Previously published data from Sandia Laboratories have shown that approximately 1 mega-rad of gamma-irradiation effectively destroys pathogenic bacteria, parasites and plant seeds in dried sewage solids. Greenhouse experiments directly comparing gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated undigested and digested dried sewage solids as fertilizers indicate little or no effect of 1 mega-rad gamma radiation treatment on plant yield or plant-nutrient uptake and demonstrated considerable benefit from using sewage solids on calcareous soils. Plant response to undigested sewage solids was considerably greater than to digested sewage solids when applied at levels that were isonitrogenous. The calcareous soils in New Mexico typically range in pH from 7.5 to 9.0, limiting the plant-availability of many elements, especially heavy metals. Soils irrigated with sewage-effluent for 40 years demonstrated beneficial use of supplied plant-nutrients with no apparent increase in plant-uptake of heavy metals. RDSS applied to a calcareous soil low in plant-available iron increased plant growth in the greenhouse considerably more than treatments with equal amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron applied as common fertilizer materials. Plant tissue concentrations of Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu showed that RDSS was a good source of these nutrients. Results also indicated that the total soluble salt concentration of the RDSS was the factor most limiting plant growth. Chromium, Cd, Ni and Pd plant-tissue concentrations were apparently not increased by RDSS treatments. (Auth.)

  17. Prediction of cesium-134 and strontium-85 crop uptake based on soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.C.; Vallejo, V.R.; Roig, M.; Tent, J.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G.

    1997-01-01

    Nowadays, there is still the need to improve the quantification of parameters that affect radionuclide mobility. With this aim, radiocesium and radiostrontium soil-to-plant transfer was measured in lysimeters in a Calcic Luvisol, loamy soil and in a Fluvisol, loam-sandy soil, using lettuce [Lactuca sativa L. cv. Kinemontepas] and pea plants [Pisum sativum L. cv. Kelvedon Wonder]. Weighted Concentration Ratios (WCR), expressed as kg soil/kg plant, were calculated for different growth stages. Weighted Concentration Ratios were in general higher for 85Sr than for 134Cs, and also higher in the loam-sandy than in the loamy soil. To predict plant uptake, we evaluated a set of soil properties to define a prediction factor for the relative transfer in the two soils using cation exchange capacity (CEC) and radionuclide available fraction (fav) for radiostrontium, and soil solution composition, solid-liquid distribution coefficient, and radionuclide available fraction for radiocesium. The ratios of WCR in the loam-sandy and loamy soil were compared with the prediction factor. There was good agreement in lettuce for 85Sr (ratio of WCR was 5.4 for seedling and 3.9 for commercial samples, whereas prediction factor was 3.1) and for 134Cs (ratio of WCR was 5.1 for seedling and 5.5 for commercial samples, the prediction factor being 5.1), although for pea only the relative root uptake of radiocesium in seedling pea was well predicted (the ratio of WCR was 8.8, the prediction factor being 9.1). These soil parameters improved former predictions based solely on the fav, although factors depending on plant physiology should be better evaluated

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  20. Comparative uptake of uranium, thorium, and plutonium by biota inhabiting a contaminated Tennessee floodplain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Bondietti, E.A.; Walker, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The uptake of 238 U, 232 Th, and 239 Pu from soil by fescue, grasshoppers, and small mammals was compared at the contaminated White Oak Creek floodplain in East Tennessee. Comparisons of actinide uptake were based on analyses of radionuclide ratios (U/Pu and Th/Pu) in soil and biota. U:Pu ratios in small mammal carcasses (shrews, mice, and rats) and bone samples from larger mammals (rabbit, woodchuck, opossum, and raccoon) were significantly greater (P less than or equal to 0.05) than U/Pu ratios in soil (based on 8M HNO 3 extractable). There was no significant difference between Th/Pu ratios in animals and soil. The order of actinide accumulation by biota from the site relative to contaminated soil was U > Th approx. = Pu

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  3. Effect of soil amendments and crop varieties on the amelioration of heavy metal uptake into crops grown on polluted soils of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamon, A.S.

    2000-11-01

    Bangladesh possesses many industrial sites, whereby wastes and effluents are directly discharged into the environment without any treatment. Agricultural areas are contaminated thereby and the food quality is impaired. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to develop simple and cost effective strategies to reduce soil-plant transfer of harmful substances. Three sites were selected in the vicinity of Dhaka city (Tongi pharmaceutical, Tejgaon industrial and Hazaribagh tannery area). Field and pot experiments were carried out with different varieties of field crops (rice, wheat and tomato) and different soil amendments (cowdung, city waste compost, oil cake, waterhyacinth, poultry litter, lime and red mud). At the site Tongi, pollutants mainly consists of organic compounds. The soil of Tejgaon is acidic (pH=5.7), contains high organic matter and elevated concentrations of Zn (685 mg/kg), Pb (136 mg/kg), and Cd (2.6 mg/kg). The Hazaribagh region is polluted by a highly elevated concentration of heavy metals, especially Cr (11000 mg/kg). The amendment by organic residues significantly improved harvested rice yield as well as the contents of heavy metals were partly reduced on Tongi soil. The different varieties of rice and wheat showed distinct differences in biomass yield and in heavy metal accumulation on three soils. The positive effect of lime application in reducing metal uptake by rice, wheat and tomato plants were observed on both Tejgaon and Hazaribagh soil, compared to the control. Red mud (ferric oxide) applied in small amounts, on Tejgaon and Hazaribagh soil, led to an increase in biomass production and improved yield for rice plants and to significant reductions of soil plant transfer for Zn, Ni, Cd and Cr. (author)

  4. Uptake of radiocaesium by lettuce crops: the effect of K in soil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waegeneers, N.; Camps I Vila, M.; Smolders, E.; Merckx, R.; Sauras, T.; Madoz-Escande, C.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of varying K supply on 137 Cs uptake by lettuce (Lactuca sativa, cv. Batavia, Gloire du Dauphine) was studied in solution culture, in a potted soil experiment and in a greenhouse lysimeter experiment under close-to-real conditions. Lettuce was grown for 13 days in nutrient solution spiked with 137 Cs. Treatments were four concentrations of potassium in solution (25, 50, 250, and 1000 μM). Yields were marginally affected by K supply. The 137 Cs concentration factor (CF, ml/g) decreased 66-fold in the shoot and 432-fold in the roots over the whole K concentration range. The decrease was most pronounced between 25 and 250 μM K. In a subsequent experiment, lettuce was grown for 20 days under the same climatic conditions in two sandy-foam soils (A, B) contaminated with 134 Cs. Both had similar characteristics but differed widely in K supply. Soil solution K concentrations were 100 μM (A) or 3000 μM (B). The radiocesium soil-to-plant Transfer Factor (TF, g plant dry weight / g soil) was 0.320 in soil A and 0.016 in soil B. The higher 137 Cs availability at the lower K supply (soil A) was contrasted by lower 137 Cs concentrations in soil solution of soil A than of soil B. Radiocesium transfer to lettuce grown to maturity was analysed on 5 different lysimeter soils under controlled climatic conditions. The soils were artificially contaminated with 137 Cs in 1994. The TF's varied between 0.032 and 0.191 and were not related to K concentrations in soil solution. The CF decreased about 100-fold with K concentrations increasing from 0.3 to 18 mM. Predictions of soil-to-plant transfer factors based on soil solution composition and nutrient solution results were qualitatively correct but underestimated the observed values

  5. Effect of repeated addition of irradiated and normal sewage sludges on the uptake of macro - and micronutrients by wheat and sunflower crops grown successively on an inceptisol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, V.; Patel, D.U.; Athalye, V.V.; D'Souza, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    Microplot field experiments were conducted to evaluate the uptake of macro - and micronutrients by wheat (Triticum sativum L. cv. Kalyan Sona) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Morden) as 5th and 6th crops. respectively, grown on an inceptisol amended with normal sewage sludge (NSS) and irradiated sewage sludge (ISS) at the application rates of 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 t ha -1 . Results indicated no significant differences in the dry matter yield (DMY) between the various treatments of either shoot or grain of both the crops. In general DMY of shoot was more than that of grain and also the DMY of wheat crop was more than that of sunflower. Data on the N, P, K contents of the two crops revealed no significant differences at the different treatments of both NSS and ISS; however, the different levels of NSS and ISS significantly enhanced the shoot N content of wheat, whereas grain P content of sunflower was significantly reduced. Nitrogen and P uptake in grain was higher than that of shoot of both the crops, but reverse was true for K. In general, N and P contents were higher in sunflower crop as compared to wheat crop and the opposite trend was obtained for K content. Results on the micronutrient contents of the two crops indicated an enhancement in the Cu and Zn contents of wheat crop by both NSS and ISS at different rates of application. Copper and Mn contents in wheat shoot were higher than that of wheat grain and the reverse was obtained for Zn. Copper, Zn and Mn contents of wheat shoot were lower than that of previous crops. Data on the micronutrient contents of sunflower crop indicated no significant differences between the different levels of NSS and ISS application. Manganese content of sunflower grain was higher than that of shoot and the opposite trend was noticed for Cu and Zn. Soil analysis after harvest of wheat crop indicated a significant enhancement in the soil characteristics such as pH, organic C and total N due to various levels of NSS and ISS

  6. Study of oxygen mass transfer coefficient and oxygen uptake rate in a stirred tank reactor for uranium ore bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zokaei-Kadijani, S.; Safdari, J.; Mousavian, M.A.; Rashidi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass transfer coefficient does not depend on biomass concentration. ► The pulp density has a negative effect on mass transfer coefficient. ► The pulp density is the unique factor that affects maximum OUR. ► In this work, Neale’s correlation is corrected for prediction of mass transfer coefficient. ► Biochemical reaction is a limiting factor in the uranium bioleaching process. - Abstract: In this work, the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient and the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) were studied for uranium ore bioleaching process by Acidthiobacillus ferrooxidans in a stirred tank reactor. The Box-Bohnken design method was used to study the effect of operating parameters on the oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The investigated factors were agitation speed (rpm), aeration rate (vvm) and pulp density (% weight/volume) of the stirred tank reactor. Analysis of experimental results showed that the oxygen mass transfer coefficient had low dependence on biomass concentration but had higher dependence on the agitation speed, aeration rate and pulp density. The obtained biological enhancement factors were equal to ones in experiments. On the other hand, the obtained values for Damkohler number (Da < 0.468) indicated that the process was limited by the biochemical reaction rate. Experimental results obtained for oxygen mass transfer coefficient were correlated with the empirical relations proposed by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez (2009) and Neale and Pinches (1994). Due to the high relative error in the correlation of Neale and Pinches, that correlation was corrected and the coefficient of determination was calculated to be 89%. The modified correlation has been obtained based on a wide range of operating conditions, which can be used to determine the mass transfer coefficient in a bioreactor

  7. Caesium-137 root uptake by agricultural and wild crops in post-Chernobyl landscape: the possibilities for phytoremediation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonova, Tatiana; Shamshurina, Eugenia; Komissarova, Olga; Belyaev, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    In spite of long term period after Chernobyl fallout (≈25 years after the accident) the level of Cs-137 in soils of contaminated landscapes remains several times more than radiation safety standard (= 37 kBq/m2). In particular, within the area of Plavsk radioactive hot spot (Tula region, Russia) current Cs-137 activities in soil are 460-500 Bq/kg (170-200 kBq/m2) on watershed, 580-680 Bq/kg (200-220 kBq/m2) in arable lower parts of slopes and 620-710 Bq/kg (210-280 kBq/m2) in untilled foots of slopes and river floodplains. To estimate the process of Cs-137 root uptake and incorporation of the radionuclide in plant tissues 6 agricultural crops of typical field rotation (spring barley, maize, summer rape, galega, potatoes, amaranth) as well as natural ecosystems of dry and wet meadows were selected for the detailed study. Total bioproductivity of agricultural crops varies between 1.7-3.9 kg/m2, natural grass ecosystems - 1.9-2.2 g/m2, and is obviously unaffected by radioactive land contamination. At the same time Cs-137 activity in total biomass slightly increases with Cs-137 activity in soil (correlation coefficient r=0.45) and with total biomass (correlation coefficient r=0.51) in the row: rape (5 Bq/kg) cereals that are true accumulators of Cs-137 seem to be useless for phytoremediation purposes, as 86-97% of the radionuclide inventory is associated with roots and remains in soil after cutting of aboveground parts. On the other hand, galega and amaranth could be considered as agricultural crops potentially being used for phytoremediation, since 87-93% of Cs-137 inventory is located in shoots. Potatoes having rather high aboveground biomass and easily removed from soil underground part could be also used for phytoremediation. However, it should be clearly understood that in total Cs-137 inventory in "soil-plant" system the annual amount of the radionuclide's consumption (that may be alienated when harvesting) is less than 0.01%, while the rate of Cs-137

  8. Radionuclide uptake by various plants growing on uranium tailings, Elliot Lake, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, N.K.; Lim, T.P.; Cloutier, N.R.

    1984-02-01

    Detectable levels of Ra-226 (0.2 to 27.6 pCi/g), Ra-223 (<= 0.1 to 4.3 pCi/g) and Pb-210 (0.6 to 6.9 pCi/g) were measured in various species of vegetation growing on various uranium tailings in Elliot Lake. On the other hand levels of Th-232 (<= 0.1 pCi/g), Th-230 (<= 0.1 pCi/g) were near detection limits in the same vegetation samples. In tailings substrates, all radionuclides investigated were detectable: Ra-226 (8.8 to 552 pCi/g), Ra-223 (3.1 to 213 pCi/g), Pb-210 (5.4 to 441 pCi/g), Th-232 (1.6 to 15.4 pCi/g), Th-230 (4.9 to 62 pCi/g) and Th-228 (1.3 to 38 pCi/g). Lower Th than Ra and Pb levels in tailings substrate were believed to be the cause for the relatively lower Th levels measured in vegetation when compared to Ra and Pb concentrations. No correlation was observed between the level of a given radionuclide in tailings and in the vegetation growing on that tailings

  9. The Effect of Preceding Crops on the Chemical Fractions of Copper (Cu in the Rhizosphere and the Bulk Soil and its Relationship with Copper Uptake by Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shahrzad kabirinejad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preceding crops as a source of organic matter are an important source of micronutrient and can play an important role in the soil fertility and the micronutrients cycle of soil. In addition to the role of the organic matter in increasing the concentration of micronutrients in soil solution, attention also should be paid to the role of the kind and the quantity of the root’s exudates that are released in response to the incorporation of different plant residues in the rhizosphere. Present research was conducted with the objective of studying the effect of the kind of preceding crops: Trifolium (Trifolium pretense L, Sofflower (Carthamus tinectirus L, Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L, Sunflower (Heliantus annus L and control (fallow on the chemical forms of copper in the wheat rhizosphere and the bulk soil and Cu uptake by wheat and also investigating the correlation between the fractions of Cu in soil and Cu uptake in wheat. Materials and Methods: The present research was conducted as split plot in a Randomized Complete Block design (RCBD with 3 replications and 5 treatments, in field conditions. In the beginning, the preceding crops were cultivated in the experimental plots and after ending growth, preceding crops were harvested. Then the wheat was cultivated in the experimental plots. Finally, after harvesting the wheat, soil samples were collected from the two parts of the root zone (the wheat rhizosphere and the bulk soil. The soil samples were air dried ground and passed through a 2-mm sieve and stored for chemical analysis. Soil pH (in the soil saturation extract and organic matter (Walkley–Black wet digestion were measured in standard methods (1. The Total Organic Carbon (TOC was measured by Analyzer (Primacs SLC TOC Analyzer (CS22, Netherlands. The available Cu in soil was extracted by DTPA and determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy (2. The fractionation of soil Cu was carried out using the MSEP method (3. Results and

  10. Effect of gypsum, pressmud, fulvic acid and zinc sources on yield and zinc uptake by rice crop in a saline-sodic soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chand, M.

    1980-01-01

    The application of fulvic acid to a saline-sodic soil augmented the solubility of zinc by thousands fold. Zinc fulvate when applied at levels equivalent to that of zinc sulphate was more effective in enhancing diffusion of zinc in the soil. Application of gypsum, zinc sulphate and fulvic acid significantly increased dry matter yield and uptake of zinc by rice crop in a saline-sodic soil. Application of gypsum with pressmud or with fulvic acid and zinc sulphate resulted in significantly higher yield and zinc uptake than in other treatments. (orig.)

  11. Speciation, uptake and toxicity of uranium in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teien, Hans-Christian; Hertel-Aas, Turid; Lind, Ole Christian; Skipperud, Lindis; Oughton, Deborah H.; Salbu, Brit [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Center of Excellence in Environmental Radioactivity (CERAD). P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Aas (Norway); Thoerring, Haavard [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), P.O. Box 55, N-1332 Oesteraas (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    To obtain information about the bioavailability of uranium (U) and its chemical toxicity, a significant number of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) juveniles (in total about 800 fish) were exposure to commercial available depleted uranium (DU) in controlled experiments conducted in accordance with the OECD guidelines for acute toxicity tests. Speciation, gill accumulation and induced toxicity of U as a function of varying water concentrations of H{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Na{sup +} and K{sup +} as well as U were studied. In addition to recording mortality, blood samples were collected and analysed for general stress parameters (plasma Cl and glucose) prior to fish dissection and collection of different tissues. The observed dose-response demonstrated that varying concentrations of K{sup +}, Na{sup +} or Mg{sup 2+} had no apparent effect on the U induced toxicity in terms of 96 h LC50-values. U toxicity was, however, strongly dependent on pH. Reducing pH from about 6.7 to 6.0 or 5.5 reduced the LC50-value from 3.1 to 1.4 mg U/l. However, by increasing pH to 7.9, LC50-values increased to 25 mg/L. Fractionation of the exposure waters, demonstrated that U was present as dissolved species less than 10 kDa in size predominantly as anion, and that a fraction (30%) was present as U colloids ( 3-10 kDa). Furthermore, U accumulated in fish gills, and the accumulation of U in the fish gills increased with increasing U concentration in the water. U accumulation at >50 μg U/g dry weight gill was correlated with ion regulation problems and stress response in fish, reflected by reduced plasma Cl concentration and increased blood glucose, and mortality was observed at concentration levels >300 μg/g gill dry weight. Thus, toxic effects in fish were correlated to U concentration in gills, and the concentration of U in gills was highly dependent upon pH in water and the U speciation. As presented in detail on a poster at the present conference (Cagno et al.), U did not only

  12. Uptake and speciation of uranium in synthetic gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O): Applications to radioactive mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinru; Sun, Wei; Desmarais, Jacques; Chen, Ning; Feng, Renfei; Zhang, Patrick; Li, Dien; Lieu, Arthur; Tse, John S; Pan, Yuanming

    2018-01-01

    Phosphogypsum formed from the production of phosphoric acid represents by far the biggest accumulation of gypsum-rich wastes in the world and commonly contains elevated radionuclides, including uranium, as well as other heavy metals and metalloids. Therefore, billions-of-tons of phosphogypsum stockpiled worldwide not only possess serious environmental problems but also represent a potential uranium resource. Gypsum is also a major solid constituent in many other types of radioactive mine tailings, which stems from the common usage of sulfuric acid in extraction processes. Therefore, management and remediation of radioactive mine tailings as well as future beneficiation of uranium from phosphogysum all require detailed knowledge about the nature and behavior of uranium in gypsum. However, little is known about the uptake mechanism or speciation of uranium in gypsum. In this study, synthesis experiments suggest an apparent pH control on the uptake of uranium in gypsum at ambient conditions: increase in U from 16 μg/g at pH = 6.5 to 339 μg/g at pH = 9.5. Uranium L 3 -edge synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses of synthetic gypsum show that uranyl (UO 2 ) 2+ at the Ca site is the dominant species. The EXAFS fitting results also indicate that uranyl in synthetic gypsum occurs most likely as carbonate complexes and yields an average U-O distance ∼0.25 Å shorter than the average Ca-O distance, signifying a marked local structural distortion. Applications to phosphogypsum from the New Wales phosphoric acid plant (Florida, USA) and uranium mine tailings from the Key Lake mill (Saskatchewan, Canada) show that gypsum is an important carrier of uranium over a wide range of pH and controls the fate of this radionuclide in mine tailings. Also, development of new technologies for recovering U from phosphogypsum in the future must consider lattice-bound uranyl in gypsum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  14. Na, K, Ca, Mg, and U-series in fossil bone and the proposal of a radial diffusion–adsorption model of uranium uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cid, A.S.; Anjos, R.M.; Zamboni, C.B.; Cardoso, R.; Muniz, M.; Corona, A.; Valladares, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Fossil bones are often the only materials available for chronological reconstruction of important archeological sites. However, since bone is an open system for uranium, it cannot be dated directly and therefore it is necessary to develop models for the U uptake. Hence, a radial diffusion–adsorption (RDA) model is described. Unlike the classic diffusion–adsorption (D–A) model, RDA uses a cylindrical geometry to describe the U uptake in fossil bones. The model was applied across a transverse section of a tibia of an extinct megamammal Macrauchenia patachonica from the La Paz Local Fauna, Montevideo State, Uruguay. Measurements of spatial distribution of Na, K, Ca, and Mg were also performed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Gamma-ray spectrometric U-series dating was applied to determine the age of the bone sample. From U concentration profile, it was possible to observe the occurrence of a relatively slow and continuous uranium uptake under constant conditions that had not yet reached equilibrium, since the uranium distribution is a ∪-shaped closed-system. Predictions of the RDA model were obtained for a specific geochemical scenario, indicating that the effective diffusion coefficient D/R in this fossil bone is (2.4 ± 0.6)10 −12 cm 2 s −1 . Mean values of Na, K, Ca, and Mg contents along the radial line of the fossil tibia are consistent with the expected behavior for spatial distributions of these mineral elements across a modern bone section. This result indicates that the fossil tibia may have its mineral structure preserved. - Highlights: • The Radial diffusion–adsorption (RDA) model is described. • RDA uses a cylindrical geometry to describe the U uptake in fossil bones. • We show new data for an extinct Macrauchenia patachonica from Uruguay. • Spatial distributions of Na, K, Ca, Mg, and U across a fossil bone section. • Gamma-ray spectrometric U-series dating was applied to determine its age

  15. Dissolution of different zinc salts and zn uptake by Sedum alfredii and maize in mono- and co-cropping under hydroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cheng'ai; Wu, Qitang; Zeng, Shucai; Chen, Xian; Wei, Zebin; Long, Xinxian

    2013-09-01

    Previous soil pot and field experiments demonstrated that co-cropping the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii with maize increased Zn phytoextraction by S. alfredii and decreased Zn uptake by maize shoots. This hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate whether the facilitation of Zn phytoextraction by S. alfredii resulted from improved dissolution in this co-cropping system and its relation to root exudates. S. alfredii and maize were mono- and co-cropped (without a root barrier) in nutrient solution spiked with four Zn compounds, ZnS, ZnO, Zn3(PO4)2 and 5ZnO x 2CO3-4H2O (represented as ZnCO3) at 1000 mg/L Zn for 15 days without renewal of nutrient solution after pre-culture. The root exudates were collected under incomplete sterilization and analyzed. The results indicated that the difference in Zn salts had a greater influence on the Zn concentration in maize than for S. alfredii, varying from 210-2603 mg/kg for maize shoots and 6445-12476 mg/kg for S. alfredii in the same order: ZnCO3 > ZnO > Zn3(PO4)2 > ZnS. For the four kinds of Zn sources in this experiment, co-cropping with maize did not improve Zn phytoextraction by S. alfredii. In most cases, compared to co-cropped and mono-cropped maize, mono-cropped S. alfredii resulted in the highest Zn2+ concentration in the remaining nutrient solution, and also had a higher total concentration of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) and lower pH of root exudation. Root exudates did partly influence Zn hyperaccumulation in S. alfredii.

  16. Uptake of trace elements and radionuclides from uranium mill tailings by four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescens) and alkali sacaton (Sporobolus airoides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Marple, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was performed to determine the uptake of trace elements and radionuclides from uranium mill tailings by native plant species. Four-wing saltbush and alkali sacaton were grown in alkaline tailings covered with soil and in soil alone as controls. The tailings material was highly enriched in Ra-226, Mo, U, Se, V, and As compared with three local soils. The shrub grown in tailings had elevated concentrations of Mo, Se, Ra-226, U, As, and Na compared with the controls. Alkali sacaton contained high concentrations of Mo, Se, Ra-226, and Ni when grown on tailings. Molybdenum and selenium concentrations in plants grown in tailings are above levels reported to be toxic to grazing animals. These results indicate that the bioavailability of Mo and Se in alkaline environments makes these elements among the most hazardous contaminants present in uranium mill wastes

  17. Na, K, Ca, Mg, and U-series in fossil bone and the proposal of a radial diffusion-adsorption model of uranium uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, A S; Anjos, R M; Zamboni, C B; Cardoso, R; Muniz, M; Corona, A; Valladares, D L; Kovacs, L; Macario, K; Perea, D; Goso, C; Velasco, H

    2014-10-01

    Fossil bones are often the only materials available for chronological reconstruction of important archeological sites. However, since bone is an open system for uranium, it cannot be dated directly and therefore it is necessary to develop models for the U uptake. Hence, a radial diffusion-adsorption (RDA) model is described. Unlike the classic diffusion-adsorption (D-A) model, RDA uses a cylindrical geometry to describe the U uptake in fossil bones. The model was applied across a transverse section of a tibia of an extinct megamammal Macrauchenia patachonica from the La Paz Local Fauna, Montevideo State, Uruguay. Measurements of spatial distribution of Na, K, Ca, and Mg were also performed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Gamma-ray spectrometric U-series dating was applied to determine the age of the bone sample. From U concentration profile, it was possible to observe the occurrence of a relatively slow and continuous uranium uptake under constant conditions that had not yet reached equilibrium, since the uranium distribution is a ∪-shaped closed-system. Predictions of the RDA model were obtained for a specific geochemical scenario, indicating that the effective diffusion coefficient D/R in this fossil bone is (2.4 ± 0.6)10(-12) cm(2)s(-1). Mean values of Na, K, Ca, and Mg contents along the radial line of the fossil tibia are consistent with the expected behavior for spatial distributions of these mineral elements across a modern bone section. This result indicates that the fossil tibia may have its mineral structure preserved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Crop uptake and leaching losses of 15N labelled fertilizer nitrogen in relation to waterlogging of clay and sandy loam soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, C.P.; Belford, R.K.; Cannell, R.Q.

    1986-01-01

    Ammonium nitrate fertilizer, labelled with 15 N, was applied in spring to winter wheat growing in undisturbed monoliths of clay and sandy loam soil in lysimeters; the rates of application were respectively 95 and 102 kg N ha -1 in the spring of 1976 and 1975. Crops of winter wheat, oilseed rape, peas and barley grown in the following 5 or 6 years were treated with unlabelled nitrogen fertilizer at rates recommended for maximum yields. During each year of the experiments the lysimeters were divided into treatments which were either freely drained or subjected to periods of waterlogging. Another labelled nitrogen application was made in 1980 to a separate group of lysimeters with a clay soil and a winter wheat crop to study further the uptake of nitrogen fertilizer in relation to waterlogging. In the first growing season, shoots of the winter wheater at harvest contained 46 and 58% of the fertilizer nitrogen applied to the clay and sandy loam soils respectively. In the following year the crops contained a further 1-2% of the labelled fertilizer, and after 5 and 6 years the total recoveries of labelled fertilizer in the crops were 49 and 62% on the clay and sandy loam soils respectively. In the first winter after the labelled fertilizer was applied, less than 1% of the fertilizer was lost in the drainage water, and only about 2% of the total nitrogen (mainly nitrate) in the drainage water from both soils was derived from the fertilizer

  19. A review of plant-pharmaceutical interactions: from uptake and effects in crop plants to phytoremediation in constructed wetlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Pedro N; Basto, M Clara P; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2014-01-01

    the potential impact of veterinary and human pharmaceuticals on arable land. However, plant uptake as well as phytotoxicity data are scarcely studied. Simultaneously, phytoremediation as a tool for pharmaceutical removal from soils, sediments and water is starting to be researched, with promising results....... This review gives an in-depth overview of the phytotoxicity of pharmaceuticals, their uptake and their removal by plants. The aim of the current work was to map the present knowledge concerning pharmaceutical interactions with plants in terms of uptake and the use of plant-based systems for phytoremediation...

  20. Uptake of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes by plants growing in dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region (Kazakhstan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matveyeva, Ilona; Burkitbayev, Mukhambetkali [al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan). Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology; Jacimovic, Radojko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Planinsek, Petra; Smodis, Borut [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Jozef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-04-01

    The activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in dominant species of plants (Xantium strumarium, Phragmites communis, Artemisia nitrosa and Artemisia serotina) growing on the territories contaminated by uranium industry of Kazakhstan (close to dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region) are presented. The obtained data showed the significant variations of activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in above ground parts. The concentrations of most of the investigated radionuclides in the root system are higher than in the aboveground parts; it can be explained by root barrier. It was found that the highest root barrier has Xantium strumarium, especially for uranium isotopes. The concentration ratios of radionuclides were calculated, and as the result it was found that the highest accumulation ability in the investigated region has Artemisia serotina.

  1. Uptake of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes by plants growing in dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region (Kazakhstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveyeva, Ilona; Burkitbayev, Mukhambetkali

    2016-01-01

    The activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in dominant species of plants (Xantium strumarium, Phragmites communis, Artemisia nitrosa and Artemisia serotina) growing on the territories contaminated by uranium industry of Kazakhstan (close to dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region) are presented. The obtained data showed the significant variations of activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in above ground parts. The concentrations of most of the investigated radionuclides in the root system are higher than in the aboveground parts; it can be explained by root barrier. It was found that the highest root barrier has Xantium strumarium, especially for uranium isotopes. The concentration ratios of radionuclides were calculated, and as the result it was found that the highest accumulation ability in the investigated region has Artemisia serotina.

  2. [Effects of intercropping Sedum plumbizincicola in wheat growth season under wheat-rice rotation on the crops growth and their heavy metals uptake from different soil types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Shen, Li-bo; Cheng, Miao-miao; Wang, Song-feng; Wu, Long-hua; Zhou, Shou-biao; Luo, Yong-ming

    2011-10-01

    A pot experiment with heavy metals- contaminated black soil from Heilongjiang Province, alluvial soil from Henan Province, and paddy soil from Zhejiang Province was conducted to study the effects of intercropping Sedum plumbizincicola in wheat growth season under wheat (Triticum aestivum) - rice (Oryza sativa) rotation on the growth of the crops and their heavy metals uptake, aimed to explore the feasibility of simultaneous grain production and heavy metals-contaminated soil phytoremediation in main food crop production areas of this country. Comparing with monoculture T. aestivum, intercropping S. plumbizincicola increased the soil NaNO3 -extractable Zn and Cd significantly, with the increment of extractable Zn in test paddy soil, alluvial soil, and black soil being 55%, 32% and 110%, and that of extractable Cd in test paddy soil and black soil being 38% and 110%, respectively. The heavy metals concentration in T. aestivum shoots under intercropping S. plumbizincicola was 0.1-0.9 times higher than that under monoculture T. aestivum, but the intercropping had little effects on the rice growth and its heavy metals uptake. Though the Cd concentration in rice grain after S. plumbizincicola planting was still higher than 0.2 mg kg(-1) (the limit of Cd in food standard), it presented a decreasing trend, as compared with that after monoculture T. aestivum. Therefore, intercropping S. plumbizincicola in wheat growth season under wheat-rice rota- tion could benefit the phytoremediation of heavy metals-contaminated soil, and decrease the food-chain risk of rotated rice.

  3. Endophyte-assisted promotion of biomass production and metal-uptake of energy crop sweet sorghum by plant-growth-promoting endophyte Bacillus sp. SLS18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shenglian; Xu, Taoying; Chen, Liang [Hunan Univ., Changsha (China). College of Environmental Science and Engineering] [and others

    2012-02-15

    The effects of Bacillus sp. SLS18, a plant-growth-promoting endophyte, on the biomass production and Mn/Cd uptake of sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), Phytolacca acinosa Roxb., and Solanum nigrum L. were investigated. SLS18 displayed multiple heavy metals and antibiotics resistances. The strain also exhibited the capacity of producing indole-3-acetic acid, siderophores, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. In pot experiments, SLS18 could not only infect plants effectively but also significantly increase the biomass of the three tested plants in the presence of Mn/Cd. The promoting effect order of SLS18 on the biomass of the tested plants was sweet sorghum > P. acinosa > S. nigrum L. In the presence of Mn (2,000 mg kg{sup -1}) and Cd (50 mg kg{sup -1}) in vermiculite, the total Mn/Cd uptakes in the aerial parts of sweet sorghum, P. acinosa, and S. nigrum L. were increased by 65.2%/40.0%, 55.2%/31.1%, and 18.6%/25.6%, respectively, compared to the uninoculated controls. This demonstrates that the symbiont of SLS18 and sweet sorghum has the potential of improving sweet sorghum biomass production and its total metal uptake on heavy metal-polluted marginal land. It offers the potential that heavy metal-polluted marginal land could be utilized in planting sweet sorghum as biofuel feedstock for ethanol production, which not only gives a promising phytoremediation strategy but also eases the competition for limited fertile farmland between energy crops and food crops. (orig.)

  4. CO2 uptake and ecophysiological parameters of the grain crops of midcontinent North America: estimates from flux tower measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanov, Tagir; Wylie, Bruce; Tieszen, Larry; Meyers, Tilden P.; Baron, Vern S.; Bernacchi, Carl J.; Billesbach, David P.; Burba, George G.; Fischer, Marc L.; Glenn, Aaron J.; Hanan, Niall P.; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Heuer, Mark W.; Hollinger, Steven E.; Howard, Daniel M.; Matamala, Roser; Prueger, John H.; Tenuta, Mario; Young, David G.

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed net CO2 exchange data from 13 flux tower sites with 27 site-years of measurements over maize and wheat fields across midcontinent North America. A numerically robust “light-soil temperature-VPD”-based method was used to partition the data into photosynthetic assimilation and ecosystem respiration components. Year-round ecosystem-scale ecophysiological parameters of apparent quantum yield, photosynthetic capacity, convexity of the light response, respiration rate parameters, ecological light-use efficiency, and the curvature of the VPD-response of photosynthesis for maize and wheat crops were numerically identified and interpolated/extrapolated. This allowed us to gap-fill CO2 exchange components and calculate annual totals and budgets. VPD-limitation of photosynthesis was systematically observed in grain crops of the region (occurring from 20 to 120 days during the growing season, depending on site and year), determined by the VPD regime and the numerical value of the curvature parameter of the photosynthesis-VPD-response, σVPD. In 78% of the 27 site-years of observations, annual gross photosynthesis in these crops significantly exceeded ecosystem respiration, resulting in a net ecosystem production of up to 2100 g CO2 m−2 year−1. The measurement-based photosynthesis, respiration, and net ecosystem production data, as well as the estimates of the ecophysiological parameters, provide an empirical basis for parameterization and validation of mechanistic models of grain crop production in this economically and ecologically important region of North America.

  5. Pollution of agricultural crops with lanthanides, thorium and uranium studied by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.; Mizera, J.; Randa, Z.; Vavrova, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lanthanide elements, Th and U were measured in soils and agricultural crops collected in an area polluted by emissions from a phosphate fertilizer plant. Concentrations of the above elements in the soil and crop samples were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Selected crop samples were also analyzed using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) based on alkaline-oxidative fusion of the irradiated samples followed by precipitation of REE oxalates. Elevated levels of lanthanides, Th and U were found in some samples, especially in wheat chaff and parsley. (author)

  6. Influence of Rapeseed Cake on Heavy Metal Uptake by a Subsequent Rice Crop After Phytoextraction Using Sedum plumbizincicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liqiang; Wu, Longhua; Li, Zhu; Yang, Bingfan; Yin, Bin; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A glasshouse pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of phytoextraction by Sedum plumbizincicola and application of rapeseed cake (RSC) on heavy metal accumulation by a subsequent rice (Oryza sativa L.) crop in a contaminated paddy soil collected from east China. After phytoextraction by S. plumbizincicola the soil and brown rice Cd concentrations effectively declined. After phytoextraction, RSC application reduced brown rice Cd concentrations in the subsequent rice crop to 0.23-0.28 mg kg(-1), almost down to the standard limit (0.2 mg kg(-1)). After phytoextraction and then application of RSC, the soil solution pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations increased during early stages of rice growth resulting directly and indirectly in lowering the bioavailability of the heavy metals. Thus the grain yield of the subsequent rice crop increased and the heavy metals in the brown rice declined significantly. In this contaminated acid soil, growing the hyperaccumulator S. plumbizincicola and rice in rotation together with RSC application may therefore be regarded as a viable strategy for safe grain production and bioremediation.

  7. The uptake and transfer of caesium-137, strontium-90 and zinc-65 from soil to food crops in tropical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, P.; Sachdev, M.S.; Deb, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The soil to plant transfer factors (TF) of 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 65 Zn were determined for two crops, pearlmillet (Pennisetum typhoides) and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) under irrigated conditions in greenhouse and in natural conditions of rain in field. The accumulation of 137 Cs was almost doubled when the soil contamination level was doubled. Under the field conditions, 137 Cs concentration in both pearlmillet and sorghum grains as well as straw was nearly four times more at a higher level of soil contamination (148 kBq/kg soil) compared to that at a lower level of 74 kBq/kg soil. 90 Sr absorption by both the crops was nearly 50 to 100 times more compared to 137 Cs under identical conditions of crop growth and soil contamination. 65 Zn concentration was higher in pearlmillet grains than in straw portions, whereas in sorghum it was otherwise. The TF values for 137 Cs decreased nearly ten fold in the second year both under field and pot culture conditions, while those for 90 Sr reduced by half and for 65 Zn by about five times. Under irrigated conditions in field the transfer factors for 137 Cs were nearly four times larger both for pearlmillet and sorghum (1996 experiment) and for 90 Sr more than two times, compared to those under rain fed conditions obtained in 1994. (author)

  8. Root uptake of exogenous Ra226 by three edible vegetables grown in farm soils from the vicinity of the first Brasilian Uranium Mine and Mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, V.S.; Franca, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the uptake of exogenous 226 Ra by carrot, brow-bean and cabbage. Greenhouse experiments were carried out with farm soils collected near the first Brazilian Uranium Mine and Mill and contamin ted with 226 Ra solution. After the maturity, the plants were harvested, ashed and this nuclide was analysed by gamma spectrometry. Among the edible parts, 226 Ra content decreased in the following order: cabbage > brown-bean > carrot. Soil-to-plant transfer coeficients were of the order of 10 -2 , values of 10 to 100 times greater than those observed in the region. The results emphasize the importance of irrigation water as a contamination pathway of human groups in the area. (Author) [pt

  9. Direct and residual effect of rockphosphate with amendments on growth and uptake of P by mustard and moong crops grown in Typic Ustochrept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dravid, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    A considerable increase in drymatter accumulation and total phosphorus uptake by mustard was observed with the addition of partially acidulated rockphosphate (PARP) and rockphosphate (RP) pre-decomposed with biogas slurry treatments as compared to other combinations, while in case of moong RP amended with pyrite followed by PARP exhibited marked increase in yield and assimilation of P over the other treatments. The differences between control and rockphosphate or pyrite alone were significant in both the crops. The percent Pdff and its utilization from rockphosphate were highest under partially acidulated rockphosphate treatment. Among the different amendments, the performance of biogas slurry was superior to the pyrite and P solubiliser with respect to the Pdff and P utilization from rockphosphate. The available P in soil was depressed drastically after mustard, but it improved again after moong. (author)

  10. Uptake of radionuclide thorium by twelve native plants grown in uranium mill tailings soils from south part of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Screen dominant plants grown in uranium mill tailings soils. • Quantify the content of "2"3"2Th of soil samples from uranium mill tailings. • Quantify the transfer factor, bioconcentration factor and phytoremediation factor. • Screen out the plant species capable of remediating radionuclide contaminated soils. • Guide the reuse of study area in future. - Abstract: The concentrations of thorium ("2"3"2Th) in soil from a uranium mill tailings repository in South China were analyzed. The results showed that all the soil samples were acidic and the concentrations of "2"3"2Th in all the soil samples were more than the natural radionuclide content in soil of China. Through the field investigation, twelve kinds of dominant plants were discovered. The total quantity of "2"3"2Th in the whole plant is highest in rice flat sedge. We also found that Miscanthus floridulus has the greatest transfer factor (TF) for "2"3"2Th, rice flat sedge has the greatest bioconcentration factor (BF) for "2"3"2Th. At the mean time, M. floridulus has the greatest phytoremediation factor (PF) for "2"3"2Th. On the basis of the above conclusions and the definition for hyperaccumulator, rice flat sedge and M. floridulus could be the candidates of phytoremediation for radionuclide "2"3"2Th in the soil.

  11. Uptake of radionuclide thorium by twelve native plants grown in uranium mill tailings soils from south part of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xun, E-mail: m13836295186@163.com

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Screen dominant plants grown in uranium mill tailings soils. • Quantify the content of {sup 232}Th of soil samples from uranium mill tailings. • Quantify the transfer factor, bioconcentration factor and phytoremediation factor. • Screen out the plant species capable of remediating radionuclide contaminated soils. • Guide the reuse of study area in future. - Abstract: The concentrations of thorium ({sup 232}Th) in soil from a uranium mill tailings repository in South China were analyzed. The results showed that all the soil samples were acidic and the concentrations of {sup 232}Th in all the soil samples were more than the natural radionuclide content in soil of China. Through the field investigation, twelve kinds of dominant plants were discovered. The total quantity of {sup 232}Th in the whole plant is highest in rice flat sedge. We also found that Miscanthus floridulus has the greatest transfer factor (TF) for {sup 232}Th, rice flat sedge has the greatest bioconcentration factor (BF) for {sup 232}Th. At the mean time, M. floridulus has the greatest phytoremediation factor (PF) for {sup 232}Th. On the basis of the above conclusions and the definition for hyperaccumulator, rice flat sedge and M. floridulus could be the candidates of phytoremediation for radionuclide {sup 232}Th in the soil.

  12. Modeling Uptake of Selected Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products into Food Crops from Biosolids-Amended Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosser, Ryan S.; Trapp, Stefan; Sibley, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    and comparing them to an acceptable daily intake value. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) portion of BASL4 overpredicted the concentrations of triclosan, triclocarban, and miconazole in root and shoot tissue by two to three orders of magnitude, while the dynamic carrot root (DCR) portion overpredicted...... by a single order of magnitude. DPU predicted concentrations of triclosan, triclocarban, miconazole, carbamazepine, and diphenhydramine in plant tissues that were within an order of magnitude of concentrations reported in the literature. The study also found that more empirical data are needed on the uptake...

  13. Effects of past sewage sludge additions on heavy metal availability in light textured soils: implications for crop yields and metal uptakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhogal, A.; Nicholson, F.A.; Chambers, B.J.; Shepherd, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Topsoil extractable zinc and copper concentrations are a good indicator of metal bioavailability to crops. - The effect of heavy metal additions in past sewage sludge applications on soil metal availability and the growth and yield of crops was evaluated at two sites in the UK. At Gleadthorpe, sewage sludges enriched with salts of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) had been applied to a loamy sand in 1982 and additionally naturally contaminated Zn and Cu sludge cakes in 1986. At Rosemaund, sewage sludges naturally contaminated with Zn, Cu, Ni and chromium (Cr) had been applied in 1968-1971 to a sandy loam. From 1994 to 1997, the yields of both cereals and legumes at Gleadthorpe were up to 3 t/ha lower than the no-sludge control where total topsoil Zn and Cu concentrations exceeded 200 and 120 mg/kg, respectively, but only when topsoil ammonium nitrate extractable metal levels also exceeded 40 mg/kg Zn and 0.9 mg/kg Cu. At Rosemaund, yields were only decreased where total topsoil Cu concentrations exceeded 220 mg/kg or 0.7 mg/kg ammonium nitrate extractable Cu. These results demonstrate the importance of measuring extractable as well as total heavy metal concentrations in topsoils when assessing likely effects on plant yields and metal uptakes, and setting soil quality criteria

  14. Application of ground bone and sheep manure on soils from two contaminated sites and influence on oat growth, uranium and radium uptake and translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, M. M.; Pacheco, A.; Santos, E.; Magalhães, M. C. F.

    2012-04-01

    Past radium and uranium exploitation and processing in Urgeiriça mine and radium processing in Barracão (centre-north of Portugal) led to soils and waters contamination. Most of the soils, located in rural areas, are cultivated for vegetables, fruit trees, and/or pasturage, and the waters used for soils irrigation. The objective of this work was to evaluate the capacity of organic amendments and hydroxiapatite to reduce the soil available fraction of Utotal and 226Ra in soils of two areas after four months of incubation. Influence on oat growth, uranium and radium uptake and translocation was also studied. Pot experiments, under controlled conditions, were undertaken during four months of incubation at 70% of the soil water-holding capacity. Urgeiriça (Urg) and Barracão (Brc) soils containing large concentrations of Utotal (635 and 189 mg/kg, respectively), and 226Ra (2310 and 1770 Bq/kg, respectively) were used. The available fraction of these elements, extracted with ammonium acetate, corresponds to: 90 and 20% of total concentration of uranium and radium, respectively, for Urgeiriça soil, and 19 and 43% of total concentration of uranium and radium, respectively, for Barracão soil. Fine ground bone (FB), sheep manure (OM), and vermicompost (V) single or mixtures were used as amendments. Control (soil) and treatments were made in triplicate: (T1) soil+96 g FB/kg of soil; (T2) soil+168 g OM/kg of soil; (T3) soil+168 g OM/kg of soil+96 g FB/kg of soil; (T4) soil+168 g V/kg of soil. After incubation, soil subsamples were analysed for pH, electric conductivity (EC), and available fractions of Utotal and 226Ra. The remaining soils were used for oat (Avena sativa L.) cultivation. Soils had pH 5.15 (Urg) and 6.04 (Brc), and EC 57.3 µS/cm (Urg) and 36.3 µS/cm (Brc). After incubation soil pH increased to a maximum of 6.82 (Urg) and 7.10 (Brc) in amended samples, and EC showed a large increase (15-19 times) when compared to the control. A decrease of the available

  15. Early prediction of 90Sr and 137Cs content in edible parts of crops and selection of plants with high uptake ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenhu; Xu Shiming; Hou Lanxin; Shang Zhaorong

    1995-10-01

    The uptake characteristics to 90 Sr and 137 Cs of nine kinds of crops, including spring wheat, rice, soybean, vegetables etc., were studied from seedling to maturity. The change of 90 Sr content per unit of dry weight can be classified into two types--the 90 Sr content kept in the same level during the whole growing season and kept increasing with the growing period until it came to the maximum point at the time of maturity. 90 Sr and 137 Cs in the aerial part of plants were mainly distributed in leaves, but the amounts in seeds and fruits were less. The content of 90 Sr decreased but the content of 137 Cs increased from young to old leaves. So it could be concluded that early prediction of the radioactive content of edible parts according to the content of young leaves was possible. Selection of 169 species in 18 families of plants with high uptake ability of 90 Sr and 137 Cs, which grow in Qinshan region near a nuclear power plant and in Beijing region, is also reported. (8 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.)

  16. Temperature effect on the physico-chemical properties of silica based bio-hybrid composite for uranium uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Archana; Melo, Jose Savio

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, silica based bio-hybrid composite has been prepared using Streptococcus lactis cells and silica nanoparticles through one step single process of spray drying. Bio-hybrids have many desired characteristics, and are thus used in a wide range of applications for example environmental cleanup which is of increasing importance. Thermogravimetric and thermodynamic analysis have been employed to understand the binding of uranium to the synthesized bio-hybrid material. Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG 0 , ΔS 0 and ΔH 0 ) provides information regarding the inherent energy and feasibility of the sorption process. (author)

  17. The value and adaptation of plant uptake models in international trade of produce treated with crop protection products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennedy, C.; Anderson, J.; Snyder, N.

    2010-01-01

    Crop Protection Product (CPP) national registrations and/or international trade require magnitude and decline of residue data for treated produce. These data are used to assess human dietary risk and establish legal limits (Maximum Residue Limits, MRLs) for traded produce. The ability to predict...... residues based on limited data sets affords business value by enabling informed product development decisions about the likelihood for MRL compliance for varied product use scenarios. Predicted residues can additionally support the design and conduct of time-constrained interdependent studies required...... for product registrations. While advances in predicting residues for the case of foliar applications of CPPs have been achieved, predictions for the case of soil applications of CPPs provide additional challenge. The adaptation of a newly developed dynamic model to CPP product use scenarios will be explored...

  18. Forage grasses with lower uptake of caesium and strontium could provide ‘safer’ crops for radiologically contaminated areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, Nicholas A.; Crout, Neil M. J.; Lovatt, J. Alan; Thomson, Russell; Broadley, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    Substitution of a species or cultivar with higher uptake of an element by one with lower uptake has been proposed as a remediation strategy following accidental releases of radioactivity. However, despite the importance of pasture systems for radiological dose, species/cultivar substitution has not been thoroughly investigated for forage grasses. 397 cultivars from four forage grass species; hybrid ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. x Lolium multiflorum Lam.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Shreb.); were sampled from 19 field-based breeding experiments in Aberystwyth and Edinburgh (UK) in spring 2013 and analysed for caesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) concentrations. In order to calculate concentration ratios (CRs; the concentration of an element in a plant in relation to the concentration in the soil), soils from the experiments were also analysed to calculate extractable concentrations of Cs and Sr. To test if cultivars have consistently low Cs and Sr concentration ratios, 17 hybrid ryegrass cultivars were sampled from both sites again in summer 2013 and spring and summer 2014. Tall fescue cultivars had lower Cs and Sr CRs than the other species. Three of the selected 17 hybrid ryegrass cultivars had consistently low Cs CRs, two had consistently low Sr CRs and one had consistently low Cs and Sr CRs. Cultivar substitution could reduce Cs CRs by up to 14-fold and Sr CRs by 4-fold in hybrid ryegrass. The identification of species and cultivars with consistently low CRs suggests that species or cultivar substitution could be an effective remediation strategy for contaminated areas. PMID:28459808

  19. Forage grasses with lower uptake of caesium and strontium could provide 'safer' crops for radiologically contaminated areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Penrose

    Full Text Available Substitution of a species or cultivar with higher uptake of an element by one with lower uptake has been proposed as a remediation strategy following accidental releases of radioactivity. However, despite the importance of pasture systems for radiological dose, species/cultivar substitution has not been thoroughly investigated for forage grasses. 397 cultivars from four forage grass species; hybrid ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. x Lolium multiflorum Lam., perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L., Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Shreb.; were sampled from 19 field-based breeding experiments in Aberystwyth and Edinburgh (UK in spring 2013 and analysed for caesium (Cs and strontium (Sr concentrations. In order to calculate concentration ratios (CRs; the concentration of an element in a plant in relation to the concentration in the soil, soils from the experiments were also analysed to calculate extractable concentrations of Cs and Sr. To test if cultivars have consistently low Cs and Sr concentration ratios, 17 hybrid ryegrass cultivars were sampled from both sites again in summer 2013 and spring and summer 2014. Tall fescue cultivars had lower Cs and Sr CRs than the other species. Three of the selected 17 hybrid ryegrass cultivars had consistently low Cs CRs, two had consistently low Sr CRs and one had consistently low Cs and Sr CRs. Cultivar substitution could reduce Cs CRs by up to 14-fold and Sr CRs by 4-fold in hybrid ryegrass. The identification of species and cultivars with consistently low CRs suggests that species or cultivar substitution could be an effective remediation strategy for contaminated areas.

  20. Traits and selection strategies to improve root systems and water uptake in water-limited wheat crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, A P; Richards, R A; Chatrath, R; Misra, S C; Prasad, S V Sai; Rebetzke, G J; Kirkegaard, J A; Christopher, J; Watt, M

    2012-05-01

    Wheat yields globally will depend increasingly on good management to conserve rainfall and new varieties that use water efficiently for grain production. Here we propose an approach for developing new varieties to make better use of deep stored water. We focus on water-limited wheat production in the summer-dominant rainfall regions of India and Australia, but the approach is generally applicable to other environments and root-based constraints. Use of stored deep water is valuable because it is more predictable than variable in-season rainfall and can be measured prior to sowing. Further, this moisture is converted into grain with twice the efficiently of in-season rainfall since it is taken up later in crop growth during the grain-filling period when the roots reach deeper layers. We propose that wheat varieties with a deeper root system, a redistribution of branch root density from the surface to depth, and with greater radial hydraulic conductivity at depth would have higher yields in rainfed systems where crops rely on deep water for grain fill. Developing selection systems for mature root system traits is challenging as there are limited high-throughput phenotyping methods for roots in the field, and there is a risk that traits selected in the lab on young plants will not translate into mature root system traits in the field. We give an example of a breeding programme that combines laboratory and field phenotyping with proof of concept evaluation of the trait at the beginning of the selection programme. This would greatly enhance confidence in a high-throughput laboratory or field screen, and avoid investment in screens without yield value. This approach requires careful selection of field sites and years that allow expression of deep roots and increased yield. It also requires careful selection and crossing of germplasm to allow comparison of root expression among genotypes that are similar for other traits, especially flowering time and disease and toxicity

  1. Uranium-rich opal from the Nopal I uranium deposit, Peña Blanca, Mexico: Evidence for the uptake and retardation of radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Michael; Fayek, Mostafa; Hawthorne, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    The Nopal I uranium deposit of the Sierra Peña Blanca, Mexico, has been the focus of numerous studies because of its economic importance and its use as a natural analog for nuclear-waste disposal in volcanic tuff. Secondary uranyl minerals such as uranophane, Ca[(UO 2)(SiO 3OH)] 2(H 2O) 5, and weeksite, (K,Na) 2[(UO 2) 2(Si 5O 13)](H 2O) 3, occur in the vadose zone of the deposit and are overgrown by silica glaze. These glazes consist mainly of opal A, which contains small particles of uraninite, UO 2, and weeksite. Close to a fault between brecciated volcanic rocks and welded tuff, a greenish silica glaze coats the altered breccia. Yellow silica glazes from the center of the breccia pipe and from the high-grade pile coat uranyl-silicates, predominantly uranophane and weeksite. All silica glazes are strongly zoned with respect to U and Ca, and the distribution of these elements indicates curved features and spherical particles inside the coatings. The concentrations of U and Ca correlate in the different zones and both elements inversely correlate with the concentration of Si. Zones within the silica glazes contain U and Ca in a 1:1 ratio with maximum concentrations of 0.08 and 0.15 at.% for the greenish and yellow glazes, respectively, suggesting trapping of either Ca 1U 1-aqueous species or -particles in the colloidal silica. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), and oxygen-isotope ratios measured by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) indicate higher U 6+/U 4+ ratios, higher proportions of Si-OH groups and lower δ 18O values for the greenish silica glaze than for the yellow silica glaze. These differences in composition reflect increasing brecciation, porosity, and permeability from the center of the breccia pipe (yellow silica glaze) toward the fault (green silica glaze), where the seepage of meteoric water and Eh are higher.

  2. Uranium speciation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, A.; Bernhard, G.; Geipel, G.; Reich, T.; Rossberg, A.; Nitsche, H.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the nature of uranium complexes formed after the uptake by plants is an essential prerequisite to describe the migration behavior of uranium in the environment. This study focuses on the determination of uranium speciation after uptake of uranium by lupine plants. For the first time, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the chemical speciation of uranium in plants. Differences were detected between the uranium speciation in the initial solution (hydroponic solution and pore water of soil) and inside the lupine plants. The oxidation state of uranium did not change and remained hexavalent after it was taken up by the lupine plants. The chemical speciation of uranium was identical in the roots, shoot axis, and leaves and was independent of the uranium speciation in the uptake solution. The results indicate that the uranium is predominantly bound as uranyl(VI) phosphate to the phosphoryl groups. Dandelions and lamb's lettuce showed uranium speciation identical to lupine plants. (orig.)

  3. Fertilizer-N uptake by Chickpea and Wheat Crops under Intercropping System using 15N Tracer Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, I.M.; Moursy, A.A.A.; Kotb, E.A.; Ismail, M.

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out at the Plant Nutrition and Fertilization Unit, Soils and Water Research Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Inshas, Egypt on wheat and chickpea inter cropping. The Objective of this current work is to study Organic matter decomposition under clean agriculture system in sandy soil using nuclear technique. The lowest portion of nitrogen derived from fertilizer was resulted from application of compost and chickpea straw treatments. It is worthy to mention that full recommend dos of fertilizer (20 kg N fed-1) was efficiently used by shoots of chickpea plants. Portion of nitrogen derived from fertilizer by seeds of chickpea was lower than those recorded with shoots. Generally, there was no big significant difference between nitrogen gained by shoots and seeds from the organic materials. This holds true with all treatments. More declines in nitrogen derived from soil percentages were resulted from application of cow manure and compost treatments under different rate of mineral fertilizer, the application 100% MF treatment induced higher nitrogen derived from soil pool as compared to the other treatments. The best value of nitrogen derived from air was detected followed by compost, while the lowest value was recorded with wheat straw. In general, nitrogen derived from air by shoots lower than those up taken by seeds of chickpea plant. Application of wheat straw and compost treatments were enhanced the nitrogen derived from fertilizer by straw of wheat plant as compared to caw manure, maize stalk, chickpea straw, but Ndff% in grains of wheat , cow manure and maize stalk increased as compared to the other treatment. Application of organic materials, chickpea straw and cow manure achieved the highest value of Ndfo% by straw of wheat plant as compared to maize stalk, compost and wheat straw. But values of nitrogen derived from organic in grains of wheat plants, the application of chickpea straw and wheat straw

  4. The behavior of uranium in the soil/plant system with special consideration of the uranium input by mineral phosphorus fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setzer, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    The fate of uranium in the environment and, consequently, its hazard potential for human beings is still discussed controversially in the scientific literature. Mineral phosphorous fertilizer can contain uranium as impurity, so that their application can cause an additional input of uranium into agricultural environments. It is still unclear whether and to what extent fertilizer-derived uranium can enter the human food chain by the consumption of contaminated waters or vegetable crop products. The mobility and availability of uranium in the agricultural ecosystem is mainly determined by its behavior in the pedosphere. Due to interactions with organic and inorganic components, the pedosphere is an effective storage and filter system for pollutants and thus plays an important role for the fate of uranium in the environment. In order to improve the assessment of the hazard potential, the present study investigates the behavior of uranium in the soil/plant-system with a focus on the uranium input by mineral phosphorous fertilizer. The specific objectives were (A) to investigate the general distribution of uranium in soils, (B) to determine the effect of CaCO 3 on the sorption behavior of uranium and to quantify the effects of (C - D) varying substrate properties and (E) the application of phosphorus fertilizers on the uranium uptake by ryegrass. The results of these experiments imply that the use of mineral phosphorous fertilizers does not pose an acute risk within the meaning of consumer protection. The studied soils predominantly had a high to very high sorption capability for uranium. At the same time, a small soil-to-plant-transfer of uranium was determined, where the majority of uranium accumulated in/to the plant roots. The availability of uranium in soils and its uptake by plants can thus be classified as generally low. Furthermore, some soil parameters were identified which seem to favor a higher uranium-availability. This study found that very high and very

  5. Ambient and elevated carbon dioxide on growth, physiological and nutrient uptake parameters of perennial leguminous cover crops under low light intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaptability and optimum growth of cover crops in plantation crops is affected by the inherent nature of the cover crop species and the light intensity at canopy levels. Globally concentrations of atmospheric CO2 are increasing and this creates higher photosynthesis and nutrient demand by crops as l...

  6. Inclusion of Whole Flour from Latin-American Crops into Bread Formulations as Substitute of Wheat Delays Glucose Release and Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laparra, José Moisés; Haros, Monika

    2018-03-01

    Bakery formulations limiting glucose availability for uptake without compromising product quality are required. Herein, bread formulations containing whole flour from Amaranthus hypochondriacus (AB), Chenopodium quinoa (QB), Salvia hispanica L (ChB) or wheat (WWB) were compared to white bread (WB) for glycaemic index (GI) in fasted animals. The hepatic expression (mRNA) of PPAR-γ receptor as key regulator in substrate fractionation towards energy expenditure was monitored. GIs were associated to fluxes of glucose release (F Gluc ) and metabolic response (MTT assay) of HepG2 cells. ChB (19.7%) and AB (13.5%) decreased GI to a higher extent than QB (2.7%), but all increased expression of PPARγ in relation to WB. F Gluc (AB> > ChB, WWB, WB > QB) showed a reciprocal relationship with the area under curve (AUC) in vivo, and decreased MTT conversion values (WB > WWB, ChB, AB, QB) by HepG2 cells. Thus, inclusion of latin-american crops (LAcs) reducing GI, without compromising bread quality, could help preventing metabolic diseases.

  7. On the uptake and binding of uranium (VI) by the green alga Chlorella Vulgaris; Zur Aufnahme und Bindung von Uran(VI) durch die Gruenalge Chlorella Vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Manja

    2011-07-01

    Uranium could be released into the environment from geogenic deposits and from former mining and milling areas by weathering and anthropogenic activities. The elucidation of uranium behavior in geo- and biosphere is necessary for a reliable risk assessment of radionuclide migration in the environment. Algae are widespread in nature and the most important group of organisms in the aquatic habitat. Because of their ubiquitous occurrence in nature the influence of algae on the migration process of uranium in the environment is of fundamental interest e.g. for the development of effective and economical remediation strategies for contaminated waters. Besides, algae are standing at the beginning of the food chain and play an economically relevant role as food and food additive. Therefore the transfer of algae-bound uranium along the food chain could arise to a serious threat to human health. Aim of this work was the quantitative and structural characterization of the interaction between U(VI) and the green alga Chlorella vulgaris in environmental relevant concentration and pH range with special emphasis on metabolic activity. Therefore a defined medium was created which assures the survival/growth of the algae as well as the possibility to predict the uranium speciation. The speciation of uranium in the mineral medium was calculated and experimentally verified by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results of the sorption experiments showed that both metabolic active and inactive algal cells bind uranium in significant amounts of around 14 mg U/g dry biomass and 28 mg U/g dry biomass, respectively. Another interesting observation was made during the growth of Chlorella cells in mineral medium at the environmental relevant uranium concentration of 5 {mu}M. Under these conditions and during ongoing cultivation a mobilization of the algae-bound uranium occurred. At higher uranium concentrations this effect was not observed due to the die off

  8. Gradual Accumulation of Heavy Metals in an Industrial Wheat Crop from Uranium Mine Soil and the Potential Use of the Herbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Gramss

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Testing the quality of heavy-metal (HM excluder plants from non-remediable metalliferous soils could help to meet the growing demands for food, forage, and industrial crops. Field cultures of the winter wheat cv. JB Asano were therefore established on re-cultivated uranium mine soil (A and the adjacent non-contaminated soil (C. Twenty elements were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS from soils and plant sections of post-winter seedlings, anthesis-state, and mature plants to record within-plant levels of essential and toxic minerals during ripening and to estimate the (reuse of the soil-A herbage in husbandry and in HM-sensitive fermentations. Non-permissible HM loads (mg∙kg−1∙DW of soil A in Cd, Cu, and Zn of 40.4, 261, and 2890, respectively, initiated the corresponding phytotoxic concentrations in roots and of Zn in shoots from the seedling state to maturity as well as of Cd in the foliage of seedlings. At anthesis, shoot concentrations in Ca, Cd, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn and in As, Cr, Pb, and U had fallen to a mean of 20% to increase to 46% during maturation. The respective shoot concentrations in C-grown plants diminished from anthesis (50% to maturity (27%. They were drastically up/down-regulated at the rachis-grain interface to compose the genetically determined metallome of the grain during mineral relocations from adjacent sink tissues. Soil A caused yield losses of straw and grain down to 47.7% and 39.5%, respectively. Nevertheless, pronounced HM excluder properties made Cd concentrations of 1.6–3.08 in straw and 1.2 in grains the only factors that violated hygiene guidelines of forage (1. It is estimated that grains and the less-contaminated green herbage from soil A may serve as forage supplement. Applying soil A grains up to 3 and 12 in Cd and Cu, respectively, and the mature straw as bioenergy feedstock could impair the efficacy of ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  9. Root uptake of uranium (6) in solution by a higher plant: speciation in hydroponic solution, bioavailability, micro-localisation and biological effects induced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroche, L.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium exists naturally in the environment, usually present in trace quantities. In soil solution and oxic conditions, uranium is present in the +VI oxidation state and forms a large number of inorganic and organic complexes. The exposure medium, an artificial soil solution, was designed in such a way as to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS was used to calculate the uranium aqueous species concentration and to define the domains of interest, each of them characterized by a limited number of dominant U species. These domains were defined as follows: pH 4.9 with uranyl ions as dominant species, pH 5.8 with hydroxyl complexes and pH 7 where carbonates play a major role. For each pH, short-duration (5 hours of exposure) well-defined laboratory experiments were carried out with Phaseolus vulgaris as plant model. The effect of competitive ions such as Ca 2+ or the presence of ligands such as phosphate or citrate on root assimilation efficiency was explored. Results have shown that uranium transfer was not affected by the presence of calcium, phosphate or citrate (but was decreased of 60% with citrate (10 μM) at pH 5.8) in our experimental conditions. Moreover, observation in Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM), equipped with an EDAX probe, have shown that uranium was associated with granules rich in phosphorus and that there were some chloroplast anomalies. Finally, the presence of uranium affects root CEC by reducing it and stimulates root elongation at low uranium concentrations (100 nM, 400 nM and 2 μM at pHs 4.9, 5.8 and 7 respectively) and inhibits it at high uranium concentrations. (author)

  10. Uranium accumulation by aquatic macrophyte, Pistia stratiotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhainsa, K.C.; D'Souza, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium accumulation by aquatic macrophyte, Pistia stratiotes from aqueous solution was investigated in laboratory condition. The objective was to evaluate the uranium accumulation potential and adopt the plant in uranium containing medium to improve its uptake capacity. The plant was found to tolerate and grow in the pH range of 3-7. Accumulation of uranium improved with increasing pH and the plant could remove 70% uranium from the medium (20 mg/L) within 24 hours of incubation at pH 5-6. Uptake of uranium on either side of this pH range decreased

  11. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; North, S.E.

    1981-05-01

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested

  12. Uptake of radionuclides by a common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud.) grown in the vicinity of the former uranium mine at Zirovski vrh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerne, Marko, E-mail: marko.cerne@ijs.s [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Smodis, Borut, E-mail: borut.smodis@ijs.s [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Strok, Marko, E-mail: marko.strok@ijs.s [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-04-15

    From uranium mining areas, in particular, the radionuclides are usually discharged to the environment during the mining and milling process. At the former uranium mine Zirovski vrh, Slovenia, mine waste and mill tailings were deposited at the Jazbec site and the Borst site, respectively. Plants grown in soils contaminated with the seepage waters from tailings may represent radiological concern if radionuclides from the uranium decay chain are transferred into the food chain. Uranium is usually accumulated in the roots and translocated to the shoots in limited amounts. Uranium plant accumulators are usually plants from Brassicaceae and Poaceae families. A common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud.), a tall perennial grass, growing in a wetland habitats, accumulates metals in the above-ground parts. It may be used for phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated soils, because of high biomass production and high metal-accumulation potential. Preliminary results of radionuclide contents measured in such plants, growing on the deposit tailings are presented. A common reed, that was grown on the Borst tailings pile accumulated 8.6 {+-} 8 mBq/g dry weight (d.w.) and 2.4 {+-} 2 mBq/g dry weight (d.w.) of {sup 238}U in leaves and stems, respectively. In the paper, activity concentrations of other nuclides, i.e. {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K are also shown and discussed.

  13. Diffusive gradient in thin FILMS (DGT) compared with soil solution and labile uranium fraction for predicting uranium bioavailability to ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquène, L; Vandenhove, H; Tack, F; Van Hees, M; Wannijn, J

    2010-02-01

    The usefulness of uranium concentration in soil solution or recovered by selective extraction as unequivocal bioavailability indices for uranium uptake by plants is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to test if the uranium concentration measured by the diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique is a relevant substitute for plant uranium availability in comparison to uranium concentration in the soil solution or uranium recovered by ammonium acetate. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. var. Melvina) is grown in greenhouse on a range of uranium spiked soils. The DGT-recovered uranium concentration (C(DGT)) was correlated with uranium concentration in the soil solution or with uranium recovered by ammonium acetate extraction. Plant uptake was better predicted by the summed soil solution concentrations of UO(2)(2+), uranyl carbonate complexes and UO(2)PO(4)(-). The DGT technique did not provide significant advantages over conventional methods to predict uranium uptake by plants. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diffusive gradient in thin FILMS (DGT) compared with soil solution and labile uranium fraction for predicting uranium bioavailability to ryegrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duquene, L. [SCK-CEN, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vandenhove, H., E-mail: hvandenh@sckcen.b [SCK-CEN, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Tack, F. [Ghent University, Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Van Hees, M.; Wannijn, J. [SCK-CEN, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-02-15

    The usefulness of uranium concentration in soil solution or recovered by selective extraction as unequivocal bioavailability indices for uranium uptake by plants is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to test if the uranium concentration measured by the diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique is a relevant substitute for plant uranium availability in comparison to uranium concentration in the soil solution or uranium recovered by ammonium acetate. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. var. Melvina) is grown in greenhouse on a range of uranium spiked soils. The DGT-recovered uranium concentration (C{sub DGT}) was correlated with uranium concentration in the soil solution or with uranium recovered by ammonium acetate extraction. Plant uptake was better predicted by the summed soil solution concentrations of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, uranyl carbonate complexes and UO{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}. The DGT technique did not provide significant advantages over conventional methods to predict uranium uptake by plants.

  15. Diffusive gradient in thin FILMS (DGT) compared with soil solution and labile uranium fraction for predicting uranium bioavailability to ryegrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duquene, L.; Vandenhove, H.; Tack, F.; Van Hees, M.; Wannijn, J.

    2010-01-01

    The usefulness of uranium concentration in soil solution or recovered by selective extraction as unequivocal bioavailability indices for uranium uptake by plants is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to test if the uranium concentration measured by the diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique is a relevant substitute for plant uranium availability in comparison to uranium concentration in the soil solution or uranium recovered by ammonium acetate. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. var. Melvina) is grown in greenhouse on a range of uranium spiked soils. The DGT-recovered uranium concentration (C DGT ) was correlated with uranium concentration in the soil solution or with uranium recovered by ammonium acetate extraction. Plant uptake was better predicted by the summed soil solution concentrations of UO 2 2+ , uranyl carbonate complexes and UO 2 PO 4 - . The DGT technique did not provide significant advantages over conventional methods to predict uranium uptake by plants.

  16. Assessing climate change impacts on winter cover crop nitrate uptake efficiency on the coastal plain of the Chesapeake Bay watershed using the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change is expected to exacerbate water quality degradation in the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW). Winter cover crops (WCCs) have been widely implemented in this region owing to their high effectiveness at reducing nitrate loads. However, little is known about climate change impacts on the ef...

  17. The behavior of uranium in the soil/plant system with special consideration of the uranium input by mineral phosphorus fertilizer; Untersuchungen zum Verhalten von Uran im System Boden/Pflanze unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung des Uran-Eintrags durch mineralische Phosphorduenger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setzer, Sascha

    2014-03-28

    The fate of uranium in the environment and, consequently, its hazard potential for human beings is still discussed controversially in the scientific literature. Mineral phosphorous fertilizer can contain uranium as impurity, so that their application can cause an additional input of uranium into agricultural environments. It is still unclear whether and to what extent fertilizer-derived uranium can enter the human food chain by the consumption of contaminated waters or vegetable crop products. The mobility and availability of uranium in the agricultural ecosystem is mainly determined by its behavior in the pedosphere. Due to interactions with organic and inorganic components, the pedosphere is an effective storage and filter system for pollutants and thus plays an important role for the fate of uranium in the environment. In order to improve the assessment of the hazard potential, the present study investigates the behavior of uranium in the soil/plant-system with a focus on the uranium input by mineral phosphorous fertilizer. The specific objectives were (A) to investigate the general distribution of uranium in soils, (B) to determine the effect of CaCO{sub 3} on the sorption behavior of uranium and to quantify the effects of (C - D) varying substrate properties and (E) the application of phosphorus fertilizers on the uranium uptake by ryegrass. The results of these experiments imply that the use of mineral phosphorous fertilizers does not pose an acute risk within the meaning of consumer protection. The studied soils predominantly had a high to very high sorption capability for uranium. At the same time, a small soil-to-plant-transfer of uranium was determined, where the majority of uranium accumulated in/to the plant roots. The availability of uranium in soils and its uptake by plants can thus be classified as generally low. Furthermore, some soil parameters were identified which seem to favor a higher uranium-availability. This study found that very high and

  18. A study of contaminated soils near Crucea-Botus, ana uranium mine (East Carpathians, Romania): metal distribution and partitioning of natural actinides with implications for vegetation uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, L.; Bilal, E.

    2012-04-01

    Between 1962 and 2009, National Company of Uranium - CNU, the former Romanian Rare Metals Mining Company, mined over 1,200,000 tones of pitchblende ore in the East Carpathians (Crucea-Botušana area, Bistrita Mountains). The exploration and mining facilities include 32 adits, situated between 780 and 1040 m above sea level. Radioactive waste resulted from mining are disposed next to the mining facilities. Mine dumps (32) cover an area of 364,000 square meters and consist of waste rock (rocks with sub-economic mineralization) and gangue minerals. Older dumps (18) have been already naturally reclaimed by forest vegetation, which played an important role in stabilizing the waste dump cover and in slowing down the uranium migration processes. The soils samples have been collected from different mine dumps in the Crucea-Botušana uranium deposit, mainly from 1, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 1/30 and 950 mine waste galleries. Soil samples were collected from the upper part and slope at each mine dump, from the vegetation root zones. Total uranium concentration in soils collected from Crucea-Botušana site ranged from 6.10 to 680.70 ppm, with a mean of 52.48 ppm (dry wt.). Total thorium varies between 7.70 and 115.30 ppm (dry wt.). This indicates that the adsorption of the radioactive elements by the soils is high and variable, influenced by the ore dump - sample relationship. The sequential extraction has emphasized the fact that the uranium is associated with all the mineral fractions present in the soil samples. A great percentage of U can be found in the carbonate (21.77%), organic (15.04%) and oxides fractions (15.88%) - in accordance with the high absorbed/adsorbed properties of this element. The percentage of uranium detected in the exchangeable fraction is rather small - 2.16%. It is also to be expected that the uranium should be irreversible adsorbed by the organic matter and by the clay minerals due to its ionic radius and to its positive charge. The fact that 21.77% of the

  19. Applications of 15N-isotopic dilution techniques to study the recovery of nitrogen fertilizer in the soil and plant uptake in wheat cropping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouanet, Juan Luis; Godoy, Alejandra; Montenegro, Adolfo; Mera, Mario; Uribe, Hamil; Pino, Ines; Parada, Ana Maria; Nario, Adriana

    1999-01-01

    Soil erosion is a major concern of the Chilean Ministry of Agriculture, which supports actions to develop new approaches in order to decrease the loss of this fragile natural resource and to promote sustainable production systems. This study, based on the management of biological, chemical and physical characteristics of the soil, was aimed to save nitrogen fertilizer. Nitrogen fertilization is the most costly production factor in wheat cropping systems on Ultisols, one of the most eroded soil types in southern Chile. A field experiment was undertaken on a Ultisol (''Buenos Aires'' Farm) at Imperial, IX Region, during 1997 and 1998, in order to assess the nitrogen and water use efficiency by a wheat crop (cv. Dalcahue-INIA) under alternative soil tillage systems. 15 N-isotopic dilution techniques allowed determining aspects of plant nutrition, nitrogen and water movement in the soil, processes not evaluated so far under these conditions. A strip-plot field layout with four replications was used , with soil tillage systems (traditional, burning/no-till, and no burning/no-till) as the main plots and crop successions (wheat-lupin-wheat and lupin-wheat-oat) as the subplots (30 m-2). In each subplot, a microplot (1m-2 ) was delimited. N fertilizer in the form of urea was added on subplots, except the microplot, at the rate of 150 kg N ha-1. 15N-labelled urea at c. 10 atom % excess, at the rate of 150 kg N ha-1, was added to the microplots. The fertilizer was split three times, 10% at planting, 45% at tillering and 45% jointing stage. No significant differences were found for wheat grain yield among tillage treatments. N fertilizer recovery by the wheat crop was 43%, and 56% on the nitrogen found in plants was derived from soil. No significant differences for these proportions were found among treatments. Although the wheat crop did not respond to tillage treatments in terms of 15N recovery, the physiological nitrogen use efficiency, or grain production per unit of

  20. Investigations on the radioactive contamination of crop plants as a result of hydrogen-bomb detonation. Part II. Root and foliage uptake of Bikini ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, S; Aso, S; Tensho, K; Kumazawa, K

    1955-01-01

    Bikini ash (I) was prepared by igniting the heavily contaminated substances on board No. 5 Fukuryu Maru at 650/sup 0/. The I was extracted with H/sub 2/O, concentrated HCl, and 2% citric acid. The acid extracts were neutralized to pH 5.0 to 5.5 with NaOH. Squash-plant leaves were painted with these extracts, after 6 days the plant parts were assayed for radioactivity. Uptake and translocation of radioactive fission products to all plant parts was found, but with the major portion in above ground parts. Wheat seeds grown in natural and synthetic soil mixtures showed a much depressed uptake of fission materials. Most of the radioactivity was found in the roots. About 10% was translocated to aerial portions of plants.

  1. Uranium phytoextraction induced by citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalik, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed at enhancing uranium availability in soil and its uptake by sunflowers and willows. The soil was modified with citric acid. Low citric acid doses (5 mmol/kg soil) were applied to avoid a deep impact on plant physiology. Uranium concentrations increased substantially in the two plants, the increase being most marked in the plant leaves. Uranium uptake by the plants was also simulated by the DGT (diffusion gradients in thin films) method. (orig.)

  2. Contribution to interpretation of metal uptake dependence upon the growth phase of microorganisms. The case of uranium (VI) uptake by common yeasts, cultivated at different temperatures, with or without aeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostopoulos, V.A.; Symeopoulos, B.D.; Argyro Bekatorou

    2011-01-01

    The dependence of U(VI) uptake on the temperature of cell culture, the air flow during the cultivation process and the age of cells were studied. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaromyces hansenii were chosen as typical yeasts, which are widely used, in food industries. Our results revealed that the highest metal uptake was obtained from exponential phase cells, which had been cultivated at the optimum temperature of growth, while the air flow during the cultivation process, exhibited no significant effect on the metal uptake. A qualitative interpretation of bibliographic data, concerning the metal uptake on the age of cells is proposed, assuming that qualitative changes in the cell wall structure take place, as the cells pass from exponential to stationary phase, in addition to quantitative modifications, which have been reported in the literature. According to our interpretation, the relative abundances among quantitative and qualitative alterations of cell wall, determine which cells (exponential or stationary) exhibit the higher metal capacity. One type of the suggested qualitative modifications of surface constituent of cell wall, may have been caused by a shortening of a carboxylic acid carbon chain. This type of modification implies, as prerequisite, the decrease of pK a values of cell wall carboxyl groups, with the age of cells. An evidence, supporting our approach, may be the fact that the decrease of pK a values mentioned above, has been observed by other authors. (author)

  3. Ivestigation of uranium adsorption by using coconut shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslani, M.A.A.; Akyil, S.; Aytas, S.; Eral, M.

    2001-01-01

    At the present study, we investigated the basic features of uranium uptake from dilute aqueous solution by using coconut shell and the effect of uranium on this adsorption phenomena. It has also been shown that the adsorption of uranium was affected with some factors such as pH, uranium concentration, and contact time

  4. Aquaporins and root water uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water is one of the most critical resources limiting plant growth and crop productivity, and root water uptake is an important aspect of plant physiology governing plant water use and stress tolerance. Pathways of root water uptake are complex and are affected by root structure and physiological res...

  5. Characterizing nutrient uptake kinetics for efficient crop production during Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme Alef. growth in a closed indoor hydroponic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Rahman, Arifur; Azam, Hossain; Kim, Hyung Seok; Kwon, Man Jae

    2017-01-01

    A balanced nutrient supply is essential for the healthy growth of plants in hydroponic systems. However, the commonly used electrical conductivity (EC)-based nutrient control for plant cultivation can provide amounts of nutrients that are excessive or inadequate for proper plant growth. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of major and minor nutrient uptake in a nutrient solution during the growth of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme Alef.) in a closed hydroponic system. The concentrations of major and minor ions in the nutrient solution were determined by various analytical methods including inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), ion chromatography (IC), ion specific electrodes, and/or colorimetric methods. The concentrations of the individual nutrient ions were compared with changes in the EC. The EC of the nutrient solution varied according to the different growth stages of tomato plants. Variation in the concentrations of NO3-, SO42-, Mg2+, Ca2+, and K+ was similar to the EC variation. However, in the cases of PO43-, Na+, Cl-, dissolved Fe and Mn, Cu2+, and Zn2+, variation did not correspond with that of EC. These ions were generally depleted (to 0 mg L-1) during tomato growth, suggesting that these specific ions should be monitored individually and their supply increased. Nutrient uptake rates of major ions increased gradually at different growth stages until harvest (from 15 mg L-1 d-1). Saturation indices determined by MINEQL+ simulation and a mineral precipitation experiment demonstrated the potential for amorphous calcium phosphate precipitation, which may facilitate the abiotic adsorptive removal of dissolved Fe, dissolved Mn, Cu2+, and Zn2+.

  6. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  7. Uptake and Accumulation of Nephrotoxic and Carcinogenic Aristolochic Acids in Food Crops Grown in Aristolochia clematitis-Contaminated Soil and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Hu, Qin; Chan, Wan

    2016-01-13

    Emerging evidence has suggested aristolochic acids (AAs) are linked to the development of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN), a chronic renal disease affecting numerous farmers living in the Balkan peninsula. However, the pathway by which AAs enter the human food chain and cause kidney disease remains poorly understood. Using our previously developed analytical method with high sensitivity and selectivity (Chan, W.; Lee, K. C.; Liu, N.; Cai, Z. J. Chromatogr. A 2007, 1164, 113-119), we quantified AAs in lettuce, tomato, and spring onion grown in AA-contaminated soil and culture medium. Our study revealed that AAs were being taken up from the soil and bioaccumulated in food crops in a time- and dose-dependent manner. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to identify one of the possible pathways by which AAs enter our food chain to cause chronic food poisoning. Results also demonstrated that AAs were resistant to the microbial activity of the soil/water.

  8. Cover crops support ecological intensification of arable cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Raphaël A.; Dorn, Brigitte; Jossi, Werner; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.

    2017-02-01

    A major challenge for agriculture is to enhance productivity with minimum impact on the environment. Several studies indicate that cover crops could replace anthropogenic inputs and enhance crop productivity. However, so far, it is unclear if cover crop effects vary between different cropping systems, and direct comparisons among major arable production systems are rare. Here we compared the short-term effects of various cover crops on crop yield, nitrogen uptake, and weed infestation in four arable production systems (conventional cropping with intensive tillage and no-tillage; organic cropping with intensive tillage and reduced tillage). We hypothesized that cover cropping effects increase with decreasing management intensity. Our study demonstrated that cover crop effects on crop yield were highest in the organic system with reduced tillage (+24%), intermediate in the organic system with tillage (+13%) and in the conventional system with no tillage (+8%) and lowest in the conventional system with tillage (+2%). Our results indicate that cover crops are essential to maintaining a certain yield level when soil tillage intensity is reduced (e.g. under conservation agriculture), or when production is converted to organic agriculture. Thus, the inclusion of cover crops provides additional opportunities to increase the yield of lower intensity production systems and contribute to ecological intensification.

  9. Characterization of plant growth-promoting traits of free-living diazotrophic bacteria and their inoculation effects on growth and nitrogen uptake of crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Rashedul; Madhaiyan, M; Deka Boruah, Hari P; Yim, Woojong; Lee, Gillseung; Saravanan, V S; Fu, Qingling; Hu, Hongqing; Sa, Tongmin

    2009-10-01

    The search for diverse plant growth-promoting (PGP) diazotrophic bacteria is gaining momentum as efforts are made to exploit them as biofertilizers for various economically important crops. In the present study, 17 diazotrophic strains belonging to eight different genera isolated from rice paddy fields were screened for multiple PGP traits and evaluated for their inoculation effects on canola and rice plants. All of the strains tested positive for 1- aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity and production of indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) and ammonia (NH3). Additionally, four of the strains were able to solubilize phosphorus (P), five tested positive for zinc (Zn) solubilization and sulfur (S) oxidation, and eight strains produced siderophores. Based on the presence of multiple PGP traits, 10 strains were selected for inoculation studies. Treatment with Herbaspirillum sp. RFNB26 resulted in maximum root length (54.3%), seedling vigor, and dry biomass in canola, whereas Paenibacillus sp. RFNB4 exhibited the lowest activity under gnotobiotic conditions. However, under pot culture conditions, Paenibacillus sp. RFNB4 significantly increased plant height and dry biomass production by 42.3% and 29.5%, respectively. Canola plants and rhizosphere soils inoculated with Bacillus sp. RFNB6 exhibited significantly higher nitrogenase activity. In greenhouse experiments, Serratia sp. RFNB18 increased rice plant height by 35.1%, Xanthomonas sp. RFNB24 enhanced biomass production by 84.6%, and rice rhizosphere soils inoculated with Herbaspirillum sp. RFNB26 exhibited the highest nitrogenase activity. Our findings indicate that most of the selected strains possess multiple PGP properties that significantly improve the growth parameters of the two plants when tested under controlled conditions.

  10. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  11. Radioactivity in food crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for 137 Cs, 40 K, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for 241 Am, 7 Be, 60 Co, 55 Fe, 3 H, 131 I, 54 Mn, 95 Nb, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 228 Th, 232 Th, and 95 Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g -1 (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins

  12. Radioactivity in food crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  13. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  14. Effects of the mycorrhizal fungus ¤Glomus intraradices¤ on uranium uptake and accumulation by ¤Medicago truncatula¤ L. from uranium-contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, B.D.; Jakobsen, I.; Roos, P.

    2005-01-01

    cultivation system facilitating the specific measurement of U uptake by roots, AM roots and extraradical hyphae of AM fungi and the measurement of U partitioning between root and shoot. A soil-filled plastic pot constituted the main root compartment (C-A) which contained a plastic vial filled with U......-contaminated soil amended with 0, 50 or 200 mg KH2PO4-P kg(-1) soil (C-B). The vial was sealed by coarse or fine nylon mesh, permitting the penetration of both roots and hyphae or of just hyphae. Medicago truncatula plants grown in C-A were inoculated with G. intraradices or remained uninoculated. Dry weight...... in C-A, but decreased shoot U concentrations. Root U concentrations and contents were significantly higher when only hyphae could access U inside C-B than when roots could also directly access this U pool. The proportion of plant U content partitioned to shoots was decreased by root exclusion from C...

  15. Uranium geochemistry of Orca Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, F.F. Jr.; Sackett, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Orca Basin, an anoxic, brine-filled depression at a depth of 2200 m in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope, has been studied with respect to its uranium geochemistry. Uranium concentration profiles for four cores from within the basin were determined by delayed-neutron counting. Uranium concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 4.1 ppm on a salt-free and carbonate-corrected basis. The highest uranium concentrations were associated with the lowest percentage and delta 13 C organic carbon values. For comparison, cores from the brine-filled Suakin and Atlantis II Deeps, both in the Red Sea, were also analyzed. Uranium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.6 ppm in the Suakin Deep and from 8.0 to 11.0 ppm in the Atlantis II Deep. No significant correlation was found between uranium concentrations and organic carbon concentrations and delta 13 C values for these cores. Although anoxic conditions are necessary for significant uranium uptake by non-carbonate marine sediments, other factors such as dilution by rapidly depositing materials and uranium supply via mixing and diffusion across density gradients may be as important in determining uranium concentrations in hypersaline basin sediments. (author)

  16. Investigation of adsorbers for the extracting of uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, E.G.; Astheimer, L.; Schenk, H.J.; Schwochau, K.

    1979-01-01

    Organic ion exchangers have been tested with respect to their efficiency uranium from seawater. A complexing polymer resin which combines fast uptake of uranium with high selectivity is found to be able to accumulate uranium from natural seawater by a factor of 2.6 x 10 5 . (orig.) 891 HK/orig. 892 MKO [de

  17. Investigation of Artemisia tridentata as a biogeochemical uranium indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, F E; McGrath, S [Montana Coll. of Mineral Science and Technology, Butte (USA)

    1985-01-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted with seedlings of Artemisia tridentata subsp. tridentata (big sagebrush) to test the effect of the phosphate speciation of uranium in solution on its uptake by big sagebrush. No single complex could be identified as being preferentially taken up by the plant, but the varying aqueous phosphate concentrations did affect uranium uptake by the plants at the higher uranium concentrations in solution. The data also substantiate the tendency for uranium to behave as an essential element in this plant species. The implications for the use of Artemisia tridentata as a biogeochemical uranium indicator are discussed.

  18. Uranium speciation and stability after reductive immobilization in sediments.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp J.O

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been assumed that the bioreduction of hexavalent uranium in groundwater systems will result in the precipitation of immobile uraninite (UO2). In order to explore the form and stability of uranium immobilized under these conditions we introduced lactate (15 mM for 3 months) into flow through columns containing sediments derived from a former uranium processing site at Old Rifle CO. This resulted in metal reducing conditions as evidenced by concurrent uranium uptake and iron re...

  19. Uranium speciation and stability after reductive immobilization in sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Jonathan O.; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Webb, Sam; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Blue, Lisa; Chinni, Satyavani; Veeramani, Harish; Junier, Pilar; Margot-Roquier, Camille; Suvorova Buffat, Elena; Tebo, Bradley M.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been assumed that the bioreduction of hexavalent uranium in groundwater systems will result in the precipitation of immobile uraninite (UO2). In order to explore the form and stability of uranium immobilized under these conditions, we introduced lactate (15 mM for 3 months) into flow-through columns containing sediments derived from a former uranium-processing site at Old Rifle, CO. This resulted in metal-reducing conditions as evidenced by concurrent uranium uptake and iron ...

  20. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluskal, O.

    1992-01-01

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  1. Alternative crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreasen, L.M.; Boon, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    Surplus cereal production in the EEC and decreasing product prices, mainly for cereals, has prompted considerable interest for new earnings in arable farming. The objective was to examine whether suggested new crops (fibre, oil, medicinal and alternative grains crops) could be considered as real alternatives. Whether a specific crop can compete economically with cereals and whether there is a market demand for the crop is analyzed. The described possibilities will result in ca. 50,000 hectares of new crops. It is expected that they would not immediately provide increased earnings, but in the long run expected price developments are more positive than for cereals. The area for new crops will not solve the current surplus cereal problem as the area used for new crops is only 3% of that used for cereals. Preconditions for many new crops is further research activities and development work as well as the establishment of processing units and organizational initiatives. Presumably, it is stated, there will then be a basis for a profitable production of new crops for some farmers. (AB) (47 refs.)

  2. A review of the environmental behavior of uranium derived from depleted uranium alloy penetrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erikson, R.L.; Hostetler, C.J.; Divine, J.R.; Price, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    The use of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators as armor-piercing projectiles in the field results in the release of uranium into the environment. Elevated levels of uranium in the environment are of concern because of radioactivity and chemical toxicity. In addition to the direct contamination of the soil with uranium, the penetrators will also chemically react with rainwater and surface water. Uranium may be oxidized and leached into surface water or groundwater and may subsequently be transported. In this report, we review some of the factors affecting the oxidation of the DU metal and the factors influencing the leaching and mobility of uranium through surface water and groundwater pathways, and the uptake of uranium by plants growing in contaminated soils. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  4. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.; Asem, M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The historical development of the uranium market is present in two periods: The initial period 1947-1970 and from 1970 onwards, with the establishment of a commercial market. The world uranium requirements are derived from the corresponding forecast of nuclear generating capacity, with, particular emphasis to the brazilian requirements. The forecast of uranium production until the year 2000 is presented considering existing inventories and the already committed demand. The balance between production and requirements is analysed. Finally the types of contracts currently being used and the development of uranium prices in the world market are considered. (author)

  5. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report looks at the following issues: How much Soviet uranium ore and enriched uranium are imported into the United States and what is the extent to which utilities flag swap to disguise these purchases? What are the U.S.S.R.'s enriched uranium trading practices? To what extent are utilities required to return used fuel to the Soviet Union as part of the enriched uranium sales agreement? Why have U.S. utilities ended their contracts to buy enrichment services from DOE?

  6. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  7. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  8. Uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  9. Uranium supply and demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, M J

    1976-01-01

    Papers were presented on the pattern of uranium production in South Africa; Australian uranium--will it ever become available; North American uranium resources, policies, prospects, and pricing; economic and political environment of the uranium mining industry; alternative sources of uranium supply; whither North American demand for uranium; and uranium demand and security of supply--a consumer's point of view. (LK)

  10. Effect of uranium concentrations on plant growth - a control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P.C.; Hegde, A.G.; Arey, N.C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the details of pot culture experiments carried out to study the migration of uranium in soil to plant system. The effect of varying concentration and chemical forms of uranium on shoot and root length, shoot and root weight, leaf area, water potential, chlorophyll contents, soluble protein, total phenol etc. of two test crops were studied. In case of barley crop, the effect of uranium on seed yield and modulation were also studied. 100% germination could be achieved respectively after a period of 36 hours and 28 hours in uranyl acetate and uranyl nitrate in case of cowpea, whereas it is and 48 hours and 24 hours respectively for barley crop. Higher doses of uranium retarded both the speed as well as germination of seeds for tested crops

  11. Adsorption behaviour of uranium on immobilized tannin resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, Susana; Preval, Ivon; Santana, Jorge L.; Martinez, Francisco; Vargas, Luis M.

    1995-01-01

    The sorption of uranium by Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. tannin resin was investigated. This resin resulted a suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. The presence of appreciable quantities of sodium chloride does not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these found in seawater and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. TANNsorb resin can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. A spectroscopic study of uranium(VI) interaction with magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Aamrani, S.; Gimenez, J.; Rovira, M.; Seco, F.; Grive, M.; Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; Pablo, J. de

    2007-01-01

    The uranium sorbed onto commercial magnetite has been characterized by using two different spectroscopic techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Magnetite samples have been put in contact with uranium(VI) solutions in conditions in which a high uranium uptake is expected. After several days, the magnetite surface has been analysed by XPS and EXAFS. The XPS results obtained are not conclusive regarding the uranium oxidation state in the magnetite surface. On the other hand, the results obtained with the EXAFS technique show that the uranium-magnetite sample spectrum has characteristics from both the UO 2 and schoepite spectra, e.g. a relatively high coordination number of equatorial oxygens and two axial oxygens, respectively. These results would indicate that the uranium sorbed onto magnetite would be a mixture of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI)

  13. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects; Uranium, uranium appauvri, effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  14. Uranium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreyra, Mariana D.; Suarez Mendez, Sebastian

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are presented the methods and procedures optimized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) for the determination of: natural uranium mass, activity of enriched uranium in samples of: urine, mucus, filters, filter heads, rinsing waters and Pu in urine, adopted and in some cases adapted, by the Environmental Monitoring and Internal Dosimetry Laboratory. The analyzed material corresponded to biological and environmental samples belonging to the staff professionally exposed that work in plants of the nuclear fuel cycle. For a better comprehension of the activities of this laboratory, it is included a brief description of the uranium radiochemical toxicity and the limits internationally fixed to preserve the workers health

  15. Root uptake of uranium (6) in solution by a higher plant: speciation in hydroponic solution, bioavailability, micro-localisation and biological effects induced; Transfert racinaire de l'uranium (6) en solution chez une plante superieure: speciation en solution hydroponique, prise en charge par la plante, microlocalisation et effets biologiques induits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, L

    2005-01-15

    Uranium exists naturally in the environment, usually present in trace quantities. In soil solution and oxic conditions, uranium is present in the +VI oxidation state and forms a large number of inorganic and organic complexes. The exposure medium, an artificial soil solution, was designed in such a way as to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS was used to calculate the uranium aqueous species concentration and to define the domains of interest, each of them characterized by a limited number of dominant U species. These domains were defined as follows: pH 4.9 with uranyl ions as dominant species, pH 5.8 with hydroxyl complexes and pH 7 where carbonates play a major role. For each pH, short-duration (5 hours of exposure) well-defined laboratory experiments were carried out with Phaseolus vulgaris as plant model. The effect of competitive ions such as Ca{sup 2+} or the presence of ligands such as phosphate or citrate on root assimilation efficiency was explored. Results have shown that uranium transfer was not affected by the presence of calcium, phosphate or citrate (but was decreased of 60% with citrate (10 {mu}M) at pH 5.8) in our experimental conditions. Moreover, observation in Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM), equipped with an EDAX probe, have shown that uranium was associated with granules rich in phosphorus and that there were some chloroplast anomalies. Finally, the presence of uranium affects root CEC by reducing it and stimulates root elongation at low uranium concentrations (100 nM, 400 nM and 2 {mu}M at pHs 4.9, 5.8 and 7 respectively) and inhibits it at high uranium concentrations. (author)

  16. Cadmium uptake by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghiri, F.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption of /sup 115m/Cd by soybean (Gylcine max l.) plants via foliar and root systems and translocation into the seed was determined. The uptake of /sup 115m/Cd by soybeans via the root system was more efficient than that of the foliar placement. Growth and Cd concentrations of soybean and wheat (Triticum aestivum l.) tops were influenced by soil-applied Cd. In both crops, the Cd concentration of plant tops increased while yield decreased with increasing levels of applied Cd. Cadmium toxicitiy began to occur in both crops at the lowest level of soil applied Cd (2.5 ppM). With soybean plants, Cd toxicity symptoms resembled fe chlorosis. For wheat plants there were no visual symptoms other than the studied growth. The relative concentration of Cd found in several vegetable crops varied depending on the plant species. The relative Cd concentration in descending order for various vegetables was lettuce (Lactuca sativa l.) > radish top (Raphanus sativus l.) > celery stalk (Apium graveolens l.) > celery leaves greater than or equal to green pepper (Capsicum frutescens l.) > radish roots.

  17. Canaryseed Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Cogliatti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Canaryseed (Phalaris canariensis L. is a graminaceous crop species with production practices and cycle similar to those of other winter cereal crops such as spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and oat (Avena sativa L.. Currently its grains are used almost exclusively as feed for birds, alone or mixed with other grains like millet, sunflower seed, and flaxseed. Canaryseed is a genuine cereal with a unique composition that suggests its potential for food use. P. canariensis is cultivated in many areas of temperate climates. Currently, its production is concentrated in the southwestern provinces of Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba and on a smaller scale in Argentina, Thailand and Australia. Globally it is considered to be a minor crop with regional relevance, with a production about of 250000 tonnes per year, which restricts private investment and public research on its genetic and technological improvement. For this reason, the type of crop management that is applied to this species largely depends on innovations made in other similar crops. This work provides an updated summary of the available information on the species: its requirements, distribution, genetic resources, cultivation practices, potential uses, marketing and other topics of interest to researchers and producers.

  18. Rossing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In this article the geology of the deposits of the Rossing uranium mine in Namibia is discussed. The planning of the open-pit mining, the blasting, drilling, handling and the equipment used for these processes are described

  19. Translocation of uranium from water to foodstuff while cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnapriya, K.C.; Baksi, Ananya; Chaudhari, Swathi; Gupta, Soujit Sen; Pradeep, T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Rice can efficiently uptake uranium from water contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2.6 H 2 O), while cooking. • Unusual uranium uptake to the extent of about 1000 ppm is observed when rice is cooked in highly concentrated uranium contaminated water (1240 ppm). • Nature of interaction of uranium with carbohydrates is probed using small monosaccharides like glucose and mannose. • Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed UO 2 2+ to be the most stable species in water in such solutions which can form complexes with sugars. • The species (UO 2 2+ ) is also observed in the case of water exposed to the common mineral, uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and similar type of complexation is observed with sugars. - Abstract: The present work report the unusual uranium uptake by foodstuff, especially those rich in carbohydrates like rice when they are cooked in water, contaminated with uranium. The major staple diet in South Asia, rice, was chosen to study its interaction with UO 2 2+ , the active uranium species in water, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Highest uptake limit was checked by cooking rice at very high uranium concentration and it was found to be good scavenger of uranium. To gain insight into the mechanism of uptake, direct interaction of UO 2 2+ with monosaccharides was also studied, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry taking mannose as a model. The studies have been done with dissolved uranium salt, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O), as well as the leachate of a stable oxide of uranium, UO 2 (s), both of which exist as UO 2 2+ in water. Among the eight different rice varieties investigated, Karnataka Ponni showed the maximum uranium uptake whereas unpolished Basmati rice showed the minimum. Interaction with other foodstuffs (potato, carrot, peas, kidney beans and lentils) with and without NaCl affected the extent of chemical interaction but was not consistent with the

  20. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  1. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  2. Study on biosorption of uranium by alginate immobilized saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baoe; Xu Weichang; Xie Shuibo; Guo Yangbin

    2005-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has great capability of biosorption of uranium. The maxium uptake is 172.4 mg/g according to this study. To adapt to the application of the biomass in the field, the biosorption of uranium by cross-linked and alginate calcium immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae is studied. Results indicate the maxium uptake is 185.2 mg/g by formaldehyde cross-linked biomass, and it is 769.2 mg/g by alginate calcium immobilized biomass. (authors)

  3. Interaction of uranium with Pleurotus sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozaki, Naofumi; Ozaki, Takuro; Samadfam, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    Uptake of uranium by higher fungi, such as mushroom is little elucidated. We have studied the interaction of uranium with Pleurotus sp. (a mushroom) in pure culture over a wide range of U concentration (50-3000 mg/L). The Pleurotus sp. was cultured in two different media. One was rice bran medium, and the other was agar (yeast extract, peptone and dextrose) medium. The uptake of uranium in Pleurotus sp. was examined by alpha ray autoradiography (A,A), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning microcopy (SEM) equipped with EDS. In the agar medium, the higher uranium concentration gave lower growth of mycelia, and no fruiting body was observed. In the rice bran medium, the fruiting body was grown at U concentrations up to 1000 mg/L. The AA and XRF analysis showed that uranium taken up in the fruiting body was below the detection limit. The SEM-EDS analysis indicated that U was distributed in the limited region and was not transported to the mycelia far from U containing medium. It is concluded that uranium affects the growth of Pleurotus sp., and little uranium is taken up by Pleurotus sp. during the growth of both mycelia and fruiting body. (author)

  4. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  5. Uptake, distribution and metabolic fate of 59Fe, 58Co, 54Mn and 65Zn in plants and their mobility and availability to crops in typical black and laterite soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, T.J.; Mistry, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    Studies were undertaken on typical soils of India. Nutrient culture experiments indicated that with identical plant growth periods the accumulation in aerial tissues of 65 Zn and 54 Mn was greater than that of 58 Co and 59 Fe. The distribution of 59 Fe, 58 Co and 65 Zn in the various aerial organs of bean plants was generally uniform whereas the distribution of 54 Mn followed an acropetal gradient. The chemical association of 59 Fe, 58 Co and 65 Zn in the edible bean pods was predominantly with lipids and ionic forms whereas 54 Mn association was mainly with ionic forms. The plant uptake of these radionuclides from typical black and laterite soils showed maximum accumulation of 54 Mn followed by 65 Zn, 59 Fe and 58 Co in both soil types and the uptake was greater from the laterite soil than from the black soil. Flooding treatment of rice, while showing a reduction of 59 Fe uptake, showed an increase in plant uptake of 58 Co, 54 Mn and 65 Zn in both soil types. Organic matter addition resulted in a significant reduction of 59 Fe and 58 Co in the laterite soil and of 65 Zn in the black soil. All the four nuclides were completely immobile in the two soil types when leached with rain water or irrigation waters or when treated with organic matter. However, leaching with 10 -2 M EDTA solution induced a rapid breakthrough of all the four radionuclides. (author)

  6. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  7. Converging strategies by farmers and scientists to improve soil fertility and enhance crop production in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saidou, A.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: Farmer perception, indigenous knowledge, extensive cassava, earthworm casts, arbuscular mycorrhiza, crop rotation, nutrient uptake, soil fertility, co-research, land tenure.Farmers in the transitional zone of Benin claim that extensive cassava cropping and prior cotton fertiliser enhance

  8. Simulating Root Density Dynamics and Nitrogen Uptake – Can a Simple Approach be Sufficient?

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Anders; Zhang, Kefeng; Jensen, Lars Stoumann; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    The modeling of root growth in many plant–soil models is simple and with few possibilities to adapt simulated root proliferation and depth distribution to that actually found with different crop species. Here we propose a root model, developed to describe root growth, root density and nitrogen uptake. The model focuses on annual crops, and attempts to model root growth of different crop species and row crops and its significance for nitrogen uptake from different parts of the soil volume.

  9. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  10. Translocation of uranium from water to foodstuff while cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnapriya, K C; Baksi, Ananya; Chaudhari, Swathi; Gupta, Soujit Sen; Pradeep, T

    2015-10-30

    The present work report the unusual uranium uptake by foodstuff, especially those rich in carbohydrates like rice when they are cooked in water, contaminated with uranium. The major staple diet in South Asia, rice, was chosen to study its interaction with UO2(2+), the active uranium species in water, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Highest uptake limit was checked by cooking rice at very high uranium concentration and it was found to be good scavenger of uranium. To gain insight into the mechanism of uptake, direct interaction of UO2(2+) with monosaccharides was also studied, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry taking mannose as a model. The studies have been done with dissolved uranium salt, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO2(NO3)2·6H2O), as well as the leachate of a stable oxide of uranium, UO2(s), both of which exist as UO2(2+) in water. Among the eight different rice varieties investigated, Karnataka Ponni showed the maximum uranium uptake whereas unpolished Basmati rice showed the minimum. Interaction with other foodstuffs (potato, carrot, peas, kidney beans and lentils) with and without NaCl affected the extent of chemical interaction but was not consistent with the carbohydrate content. Uranium interaction with D-mannose monitored through ESI-MS, under optimized instrumental parameters, identified the peaks corresponding to uranyl adduct with mannose monomer, dimer and trimer and the species were confirmed by MS/MS studies. The product ion mass spectra showed peaks illustrating water loss from the parent ion as the collision energy was increased, an evidence for the strong interaction of uranium with mannose. This study would constitute the essential background for understanding interaction of uranium with various foods. Extension of this work would involve identification of foodstuff as green heavy metal scavengers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Uranium update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is about the current uranium mining situation, especially that in Saskatchewan. Canada has a unique advantage with the Saskatchewan uranium deposits. Making the most of this opportunity is important to Canada. The following is reviewed: project development and the time and capital it takes to bring a new project into production; the supply and demand situation to show where the future production fits into the world market; and our foreign competition and how we have to be careful not to lose our opportunity. (author)

  12. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  13. Modeling the Uptake and Transpiration of TCE Using Phreatophytic Trees

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wise, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research is to develop quantitative concepts for understanding the dynamics of TCE uptake and transpiration by phreatophytic trees over a short rotation woody crop time frame...

  14. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheeseman, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The international uranium market appears to be currently over-supplied with a resultant softening in prices. Buyers on the international market are unhappy about some of the restrictions placed on sales by the government, and Canadian sales may suffer as a result. About 64 percent of Canada's shipments come from five operating Ontario mines, with the balance from Saskatchewan. Several other properties will be producing within the next few years. In spite of the adverse effects of the Three Mile Island incident and the default by the T.V.A. of their contract, some 3 600 tonnes of new uranium sales were completed during the year. The price for uranium had stabilized at US $42 - $44 by mid 1979, but by early 1980 had softened somewhat. The year 1979 saw the completion of major environmental hearings in Ontario and Newfoundland and the start of the B.C. inquiry. Two more hearings are scheduled for Saskatchewan in 1980. The Elliot Lake uranium mining expansion hearings are reviewed, as are other recent hearings. In the production of uranium for nuclear fuel cycle, environmental matters are of major concern to the industry, the public and to governments. Research is being conducted to determine the most effective method for removing radium from tailings area effluents. Very stringent criteria are being drawn up by the regulatory agencies that must be met by the industry in order to obtain an operating licence from the AECB. These criteria cover seepages from the tailings basin and through the tailings retention dam, seismic stability, and both short and long term management of the tailings waste management area. (auth)

  15. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  16. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  17. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  18. Root uptake of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The uptake of elements by plant roots is one of the important pathways of entry of many elements into the food chain of man. Data are cited showing plutonium concentration ratios, plant/soil, ranging from 10 -10 to 10 -3 . Concentration ratios for americium range from 10 -7 to 10 +1 . Limited experiments with curium and neptunium indicate that root uptake of curium is similar to that of americium and that plant uptake of neptunium is substantially larger than that of curium and americium. The extreme ranges of concentration ratios cited for plutonium and americium are due to a number of causes. Experimental conditions such as very intensive cropping will lead to abnormally high concentration ratios. In some experiments, addition of chelating agents markedly increased plant root uptake of transuranic elements. Particle size and composition of the source material influenced uptake of the transuranics by plants. Translocation within the plant, and soil factors such as pH and organic matter content, all affect concentration ratios

  19. Improvement of removal characteristics for uranium by immobilization of diphosil powder into alginate bead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. J.; Kang, I. S.; Lee, Y. H.; Son, J. S.; Hong, K. P.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical wastes containing small amounts of uranium can not be disposed of them as industrial wastes. Especially for the removal of uranium, In this study, the method of immobilizing Diphosil powder within alginate beads is adopted to make a bead from powdered resin. Sodium alginate bead itself showed a capability to uptake uranium to above 60%, but the value was decreased to below 30% after equilibrium. The rate of uranium adsorption increased with increasing content of Diphosil in sodium alginate bead. Diphosil resin itself showed very fast uptake of uranium from early stages, and then the rates were leveled off. Diphosil bead showed a improved capability to uptake uranium considering Diphosil content in the bead, and a considerable potential for further applications of a continuous process by using a bead form of Diphosil

  20. The effect of catch crop species on selenium availability for succeeding crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stavridou, Eleftheria; Young, Scott D.; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    2007–10 investigated the ability of catch crops (Italian ryegrass, fodder radish and hairy vetch) under different fertiliser regimes to reduce soil Se content in the autumn and to increase its availability in spring to the succeeding crop. Results and Conclusions The catch crops (Italian ryegrass...... and fodder radish) increased water-extractable Se content in the 0.25–0.75msoil layer in only one of the experiments. Selenium uptake by the catch crops varied between 65 and 3263 mg ha−1, depending on species, year and fertilisation treatment; this corresponded to 0.1–3.0% of the water-extractable soil Se......Background and Aims Selenium (Se) is an essential nutrient for humans and animals. In order to ensure an optimal concentration of Se in crops, Se fertilisers are applied. Catch crops may be an alternative way to increase Se concentrations in vegetables. Methods Three experiments in Denmark between...

  1. Uranium - what role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, T.; Gaul, J.; Crooks, P.; Robotham, R.

    1980-01-01

    Opposing viewpoints on the future role of uranium are presented. Topics covered include the Australian Government's uranium policy, the status of nuclear power around the world, Australia's role as a uranium exporter and problems facing the nuclear industry

  2. Brazilian uranium exploration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.P.M.

    1981-01-01

    General information on Brazilian Uranium Exploration Program, are presented. The mineralization processes of uranium depoits are described and the economic power of Brazil uranium reserves is evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  3. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper analyzes under four different scenarios the adequacy of a $500 million annual deposit into a fund to pay for the cost of cleaning up the Department of Energy's (DOE) three aging uranium enrichment plants. These plants are located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. In summary the following was found: A fixed annual $500 million deposit made into a cleanup fund would not be adequate to cover total expected cleanup costs, nor would it be adequate to cover expected decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) costs. A $500 million annual deposit indexed to an inflation rate would likely be adequate to pay for all expected cleanup costs, including D and D costs, remedial action, and depleted uranium costs

  4. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The balance between uranium supply and demand is examined. Should new resources become necessary, some unconventional sources which could be considered include low-grade extensions to conventional deposits, certain types of intrusive rock, tuffs, and lake and sea-bed sediments. In addition there are large but very low grade deposits in carbonaceous shales, granites, and seawater. The possibility of recovery is discussed. Programmes of research into the feasibility of extraction of uranium from seawater, as a by-product from phosphoric acid production, and from copper leach solutions, are briefly discussed. Other possible sources are coal, old mine dumps and tailings, the latter being successfully exploited commercially in South Africa. The greatest constraints on increased development of U from lower grade sources are economics and environmental impact. It is concluded that apart from U as a by-product from phosphate, other sources are unlikely to contribute much to world requirements in the foreseeable future. (U.K.)

  5. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  6. Derived enriched uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-01-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market

  7. Use of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi for improved crop production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF), endophytic fungi reputed for their ability to enhance P uptake can be used to alleviate P deficiencies and improve crop productivity. Although the technology has been used in developed countries, it has not been applied in crop production systems in Africa to any significant level. This is ...

  8. Perception of Innovative Crop Insurance in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Molnar, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, extreme climate risks cause stakeholders in food supply chains to search for new risk management tools. In Australia, recently so-called crop yield simulation insurance has been introduced based on an integrated agrometeorological simulation model. Current uptake is relatively low,

  9. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  10. Uranium Industry. Annual 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, M.S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a statistical description of activities of the US uranium industry during 1984 and includes a statistical profile of the status of the industry at the end of 1984. It is based on the results of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey entitled ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (Form EIA-858). The principal findings of the survey are summarized under two headings - Uranium Raw Materials Activities and Uranium Marketing Activities. The first heading covers exploration and development, uranium resources, mine and mill production, and employment. The second heading covers uranium deliveries and delivery commitments, uranium prices, foreign trade in uranium, inventories, and other marketing activities. 32 figs., 48 tabs

  11. Development of sorbers for the recovery of uranium from seawater. Part 2. The accumulation of uranium from seawater by resins containing amidoxime and imidoxime functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astheimer, L.; Schenk, H.J.; Witte, E.G.; Schwochau, K.

    1983-01-01

    Hydroxylamine derivatives of cross-linked poly(acrylonitriles), so-called poly(acrylamidoxime) resins, are suitable for the accumulation of uranium from natural seawater of pH = 8.1 to 8.3. Depending on the method of manufacture, these sorbers yield excellent uranium loadings up to some thousand ppM which roughly equals the average uranium content of actually explored uranium ores. The rate of uranium uptake, which is 5 to 30 ppM/d at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature of seawater. Uranium can be eluted by 1 M HCl with an elution efficiency of more than 90%. Owing to a certain instability of the uranium binding groups in acid eluants, the uranium uptake decreases with increasing number of sorption-elution cycles. Hydroxylamine derivatives of poly(acrylonitrile) are shown to contain simultaneously at least two kinds of functional groups: open-chain amidoxime groups which are stable and cyclic imidoxime groups which are unstable in 1 M HCl. Experimental evidence is presented that the uptake of uranium from natural seawater is closely related to the presence of cyclic imidoxime configurations in the polyacrylic lattice. Polystyrene and poly(glycidylmethacrylate)-based amidoxime and imide dioxime resins are less effective in extracting uranium from natural seawater. 10 figures, 4 tables

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Per; Jakobsen, Iver

    2008-01-01

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal......-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  13. Uranium price reporting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the systems for uranium price reporting currently available to the uranium industry. The report restricts itself to prices for U 3 O 8 natural uranium concentrates. Most purchases of natural uranium by utilities, and sales by producers, are conducted in this form. The bulk of uranium in electricity generation is enriched before use, and is converted to uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , prior to enrichment. Some uranium is traded as UF 6 or as enriched uranium, particularly in the 'secondary' market. Prices for UF 6 and enriched uranium are not considered directly in this report. However, where transactions in UF 6 influence the reported price of U 3 O 8 this influence is taken into account. Unless otherwise indicated, the terms uranium and natural uranium used here refer exclusively to U 3 O 8 . (author)

  14. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  15. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  16. Provision by the uranium and uranium products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    International uranium market is converted from the buyer market into the seller market. The prices of uranium are high and the market attempts to adapt to changing circumstances. The industry of uranium enrichment satisfies the increasing demands but should to increase ots capacities. On the whole the situation is not stable and every year may change the existing position [ru

  17. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  18. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohrhauer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of uranium isotopes in order to enrich the fuel for light water reactors with the light isotope U-235 is an important part of the nuclear fuel cycle. After the basic principals of isotope separation the gaseous diffusion and the centrifuge process are explained. Both these techniques are employed on an industrial scale. In addition a short review is given on other enrichment techniques which have been demonstrated at least on a laboratory scale. After some remarks on the present situation on the enrichment market the progress in the development and the industrial exploitation of the gas centrifuge process by the trinational Urenco-Centec organisation is presented. (orig.)

  19. Putting mechanisms into crop production models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boote, Kenneth J; Jones, James W; White, Jeffrey W; Asseng, Senthold; Lizaso, Jon I

    2013-09-01

    Crop growth models dynamically simulate processes of C, N and water balance on daily or hourly time-steps to predict crop growth and development and at season-end, final yield. Their ability to integrate effects of genetics, environment and crop management have led to applications ranging from understanding gene function to predicting potential impacts of climate change. The history of crop models is reviewed briefly, and their level of mechanistic detail for assimilation and respiration, ranging from hourly leaf-to-canopy assimilation to daily radiation-use efficiency is discussed. Crop models have improved steadily over the past 30-40 years, but much work remains. Improvements are needed for the prediction of transpiration response to elevated CO₂ and high temperature effects on phenology and reproductive fertility, and simulation of root growth and nutrient uptake under stressful edaphic conditions. Mechanistic improvements are needed to better connect crop growth to genetics and to soil fertility, soil waterlogging and pest damage. Because crop models integrate multiple processes and consider impacts of environment and management, they have excellent potential for linking research from genomics and allied disciplines to crop responses at the field scale, thus providing a valuable tool for deciphering genotype by environment by management effects. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The collection of uranium from sea water with hydrous metal oxide, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hisao; Nakajima, Fumito; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Murata, Toshifumi.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of diverse ions present in sea water on the uranium adsorption is elucidated in the present paper. The uranium-adsorption experiments were conducted using sea water and a solution containing 0.72 mol dm -3 NaCl and 2.3 x 10 -3 mol dm -3 NaHCO 3 . The uranium uptake was about ten times larger from the NaCl-NaHCO 3 solution than from sea water. The ions which depressed the uranium uptake were the calcium, magnesium, and fluoride present in sea water. Among these ions, calcium had the largest effect on the uranium uptake. The analysis of calcium and carbonate in the adsorbent after the adsorption experiment has revealed that the molar ratio between calcium and carbonate was about one. It was considered that calcium carbonate was deposited on the adsorbent during the uranium adsorption. The specific surface area and the pore volume decreased after the deposition of calcium carbonate. It was supposed that the decrease in the uranium uptake was caused by the coverage of the surface of hydrous titanium(IV) oxide with calcium carbonate. Magnesium ions depressed the uranium uptake in the same manner as calcium ions. The effect of the magnesium ions, however, was relatively small compared with that of the calcium ions. (author)

  1. Interactions of uranium (VI) with biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, Sina; Arnold, Thuro; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-01-01

    In this study a detailed investigation was made of natural biofilms from two uranium-contaminated sites, namely the former uranium mine in Koenigstein (Saxony) and the ground surface of the former Grassenhalde tailing heap in Thuringia. A predominance of uranyl sulphate (UO 2 SO 4 ), a highly mobile, solute uranium species, was found in the mine waters of both sites. In this study an investigation was made of the capacity of Euglena mutabilis cells for bioaccumulation of uranium in a pH range of 3 to 6 using living cells and sodium perchlorate (9 g/l) or sodium sulphate (3.48 g/l) as background media. At acidic pH values in the range from 3 to 4 it was possible to remove more than 90% of the original uranium content from the test solution regardless of the medium being used. The speciation of the uranium accumulated in the Euglena cells was investigated by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). It was found that a new uranium species of low variability forms on the cells independent of the background medium, state of life of the cells and pH value. By comparing the data from the LIFS measurements with reference values it was possible to narrow down the identity of the uranium species to one bonded to (organo) phosphate and/or carboxylic functional groups. Using time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy it was possible to demonstrate carboxylic bonding of uranium to dead cells. However it was not possible to exclude (organo) complexation with this method. An investigation of the specific location of the uranium on or in the cells using combined CLSM/LIFS technology yielded first indications of intracellular accumulation of uranium in the living cells. Supplementary TEM/EDX measurements confirmed the intracellular uptake, showing it to occur in round to oval cell organelles which are thought to be vacuoles or vacuole-like vesicles. It was not possible to detect uranium on dead cells using these methods. This points to passive, homogeneously distributed biosorption of

  2. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  3. Issues in uranium availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanz, J.J. Jr.; Adams, S.S.; Gordon, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  4. Australian uranium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, R K

    1976-04-01

    Various aspects of the Australian uranium industry are discussed including the prospecting, exploration and mining of uranium ores, world supply and demand, the price of uranium and the nuclear fuel cycle. The market for uranium and the future development of the industry are described.

  5. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  6. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  7. Recovering uranium from phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeret, M [Compagnie de Produits Chimiques et Electrometallurgiques Pechiney-Ugine Kuhlmann, 75 - Paris (France)

    1981-06-01

    Processes for the recovery of the uranium contained in phosphates have today become competitive with traditional methods of working uranium sources. These new possibilities will make it possible to meet more rapidly any increases in the demand for uranium: it takes ten years to start working a new uranium deposit, but only two years to build a recovery plant.

  8. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.W.; Thomas, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The status of existing uranium enrichment contracts in the US is reviewed and expected natural uranium requirements for existing domestic uranium enrichment contracts are evaluated. Uncertainty in natural uranium requirements associated with requirements-type and fixed-commitment type contracts is discussed along with implementation of variable tails assay

  9. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.C.; Gagne, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are covered: the status of the Government's existing uranium enrichment services contracts, natural uranium requirements based on the latest contract information, uncertainty in predicting natural uranium requirements based on uranium enrichment contracts, and domestic and foreign demand assumed in enrichment planning

  10. Uranium industry annual 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and related topics. A glossary and appendices are included to assist the reader in interpreting the substantial array of statistical data in this report and to provide background information about the survey

  11. Uranium industry framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, K.

    2008-01-01

    The global uranium market is undergoing a major expansion due to an increase in global demand for uranium, the highest uranium prices in the last 20 years and recognition of the potential greenhouse benefits of nuclear power. Australia holds approximately 27% of the world's uranium resources (recoverable at under US$80/kg U), so is well placed to benefit from the expansion in the global uranium market. Increasing exploration activity due to these factors is resulting in the discovery and delineation of further high grade uranium deposits and extending Australia's strategic position as a reliable and safe supplier of low cost uranium.

  12. Africa needs streamlined regulation to support the deployment of GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Howard J; Roderick, Hugh; Tripathi, Leena

    2015-08-01

    Future food security in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) requires enhancement of its crop production. Transgenic crops with a poverty focus can enhance harvests and are available for staples such as cooking bananas and plantains. One constraint is optimisation of national biosafety processes to support rapid and safe uptake of such beneficial crops. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, I.S.; Do, J.B.; Choi, Y.D.; Park, M.H.; Yun, H.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, Y.W.

    1982-01-01

    The single step continuous reduction of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) has been investigated. Heat required to initiate and maintain the reaction in the reactor is supplied by the highly exothermic reaction of hydrogen with a small amount of elemental fluorine which is added to the uranium hexafluoride stream. When gases uranium hexafluoride and hydrogen react in a vertical monel pipe reactor, the green product, UF 4 has 2.5g/cc in bulk density and is partly contaminated by incomplete reduction products (UF 5 ,U 2 F 9 ) and the corrosion product, presumably, of monel pipe of the reactor itself, but its assay (93% of UF 4 ) is acceptable for the preparation of uranium metal with magnesium metal. Remaining problems are the handling of uranium hexafluoride, which is easily clogging the flowmeter and gas feeding lines because of extreme sensitivity toward moisture, and a development of gas nozzel for free flow of uranium hexafluoride gas. (Author)

  14. Uranium - the world picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, J.M.; Wright, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The world resources of uranium and the future demand for uranium are discussed. The amount of uranium available depends on the price which users are prepared to pay for its recovery. As the price is increased, there is an incentive to recover uranium from lower grade or more difficult deposits. In view of this, attention is drawn to the development of the uranium industry in Australias

  15. Diurnal urinary volume and uranium output in uranium workers and unexposed controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, D.W.; Kathren, R.L.; Miller, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    Volume and uranium content were determined in individual urine voids over a 76-h (3.25-d) period from six unexposed normal male subjects and three male uranium workers. Uranium analyses were accomplished by a newly developed high-precision kinetic phosphorescence analysis technique with a lower level of detection of 0.007 ng mL -1 . Urinary uranium concentrations in individual voids varied by a factor of 2 or less for any one unexposed subject, although there was an order of magnitude variation among the group of unexposed men. The fractional urinary volume excreted in the open-quotes standardclose quotes so-called simulated 24-h sample was the same for both the unexposed and exposed groups and averaged 0.42 ± 0.13 of the total daily urine volume. The fraction of uranium in the simulated 24-h samples was 0.43 ± 0.15 in the unexposed group but only 0.31 ± 0.13 in the uranium worker group, suggesting that the use of the simulated 24-h urine sample would underestimate the total daily urinary uranium output by approximately a factor of 2 in the uranium workers. Daily urinary excretion relative to intake from drinking water (essentially equal to the gastrointestinal uptake fraction) among the unexposed group ranged from 0.002-0.028, averaging 0.011 ± 0.008, with an indication that the gastrointestinal uptake factor was inversely proportional to total intake via drinking water. 11 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  16. Natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-08-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  17. Exploration of Uranium. Report to the Government of the Eastern Republic of Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muset, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Government of Uruguay with IAEA assistance carried out the Uranium prospection project and the evolution of uraniferous minerals resources on this country soil. Several arrangement were did such as the recollection and analysis of the geologic material. The Uranium project began with radiometric anomalies and out crops

  18. Inhalation of Uranium Oxide Aerosols: CNS Deposition, Neurotoxicity, and Role in Gulf War Illness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Johnnye

    2003-01-01

    .... Because several conditions during the war could have produced nasal inflammation, inflammation will be examined as a modifying factor that could result in increased sensitivity to uranium uptake via...

  19. Biosorption of uranium and lead by Streptomyces longwoodensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friis, N.; Myers-Keith, P.

    1986-01-01

    Biosorption of uranium and lead by lyophilized cells of Streptomyces longwoodensis was examined as a function of metal concentration, pH, cell concentration, and culture age. Cells harvested from the stationary growth phase exhibited an exceptionally high capacity for uranium (0.44 g U/g dry weight) at pH 5. Calculated values of the distribution coefficient and separation factor indicated a strong preference of the cell mass for uranyl ions over lead ions. The specific uranium uptake was similar for the cell wall and the cytoplasmic fraction. Uranium uptake was associated with an increase in hydrogen ion concentration, and phosphorus analysis of whole cells indicated a simple stoichiometric ratio between uranium uptake and phosphorus content. It is proposed that metal ions are bound to phosphodiester residues present both in the cell wall and cytoplasmic fractions. Based on this model, it was shown that uranium accumulation exhibits a maximum at pH 4.6 that is supported by experimental data from previous investigations

  20. Microbial cells as biosorbents for heavy metals: accumulation of Uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium accumulated extracellularly on the surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The rate and extent of accumulation were subject to environmental parameters, such as pH, temperature, and interference by certain anions and cations. Uranium accumulation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred intracellularly and was extremely rapid (<10 s), and no response to environmental parameters could be detected. Metabolism was not required for metal uptake by either organism. Cell-bound uranium reached a concentration of 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight, but only 32% of the S. cerevisiae cells and 44% of the P. aeruginosa cells within a given population possessed visible uranium deposits when examined by electron microscopy. Rates of uranium uptake by S. cerevisiae were increased by chemical pretreatment of the cells. Uranium could be removed chemically from S. cerevisiae cells, and the cells could then be reused as a biosorbent

  1. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  2. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  3. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  4. 小麦/玉米/大豆和小麦/玉米/甘薯套作对根际土壤细菌群落多样性及植株氮素吸收的影响%Effect of Wheat/Maize/Soybean and Wheat/Maize/Sweet Potato Relay Strip Intercropping on Bacterial Community Diversity of Rhizosphere Soil and Nitrogen Uptake of Crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雍太文; 杨文钰; 向达兵; 朱贞颖

    2012-01-01

    为探讨小麦/玉米/大豆和小麦/玉米/甘薯套作体系中根际细菌群落多样性与作物氮素高效吸收的差异特性及二者间的关系,应用变性梯度凝胶电泳(DGGE)技术研究了小麦-大豆(A1)、小麦-甘薯(A2)、玉米(A3)、小麦/玉米/大豆(A4)和小麦/玉米/甘薯(A5)5种种植模式的根际细菌群落多样性.结果表明,与A1、A2、A3及A5相比,A4套作提高了各作物在开花期(或吐丝期)与成熟期的籽粒吸氮量、地上部总吸氮量和Shannon-Weiner index多样性指数(H′).处理间的吸氮量与H′的变化规律为套作>单作、大豆茬口>甘薯茬口,以A4处理最高.不同种植模式下DGGE图谱条带的数量及亮度有较大区别,且有几条特征性条带发生了明显变化.不同种植模式间的细菌群落结构相似性较低,群落相似度系数(Cs)表现为套作与套作间>套作与单作间;A4与A5间的Cs相对较小,二者间的细菌群落结构差异较大.A4模式有利于提高根际细菌群落多样性,增强植株对氮素的吸收能力.%The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between diversity of rhizosphere bacterial community and nitrogen uptake of crops in two relay strip intercropping systems: wheat/maize/soybean and wheat/maize/sweet potato. We analyzed the diversities of rhizosphere bacterial community in five cropping systems using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) based on 16S rDNA. The cropping systems included wheat-soybean (Al), wheat-sweet potato (A2), maize single cropping (A3), wheat/maize/soybean (A4), and wheat/maize/sweet potato (A5). Compared to the sole cropping systems (Al, A2, and A3 treatments), the A4 treatment showed increases in grain nitrogen uptake and total nitrogen uptake amounts of aboveground of crops at both flowering (or silking) and maturity stages, and the Shannon-Weiner indices for rhizosphere bacterial community diversity was also increased significantly. The values of nitrogen

  5. Gastrointestinal absorption of soluble uranium from drinking water by man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Ruth, H.; Rallison, M.L.; Burleigh, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The gastrointestinal absorption of uranium has been measured in ten normal healthy adult volunteers of both sexes by feeding them one litre of water containing 200 to 300 μg of uranium per litre. The water was consumed during normal daytime activities while food was also ingested at its normal rate. Complete collections of urine and faeces were made and compounded on a daily basis over a period of two weeks, one week being prior to the consumption of the uranium-containing water. Uranium was measured by radiochemical separation followed by alpha spectrometry. Both 234 U and 238 U were determined. The results on these people showed that the uptake of uranium under these conditions averaged 0.6%, well below the f 1 of 5% assumed by the ICRP. (author)

  6. Metal accumulation and crop yield for a variety of edible crops grown in diverse soil media amended with sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, J; Blessin, C W; Inglett, G E; Kwolek, W F

    1981-07-01

    This study was designed to determine the best uses for sewage sludge, by amending soil materials ranging in scope from distributed materials such as coal mine gob and sanitary landfill to fully productive agricultural soils. The following aspects were studied: physical characteristics of the soils as a result of their amendment with sludge; yields for a broad variety of crop species; nutritional quality of selected crops; metal uptake and accumulation in crop tissues; and translocation of metals from soil medium to tissues. Harvested crops with the highest metal contents were derived from landfill and coal mine gob treatments, and the lowest were associated with loam, clay, and agriculturally productive topsoils.

  7. Nitrogen acquisition by pea and barley and the effect of their crop residues on available nitrogen for subsequent crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrogen acquisition by field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) grown on a sandy loam soil and availability of N in three subsequent sequences of a cropping system were studied in an outdoor pot experiment. The effect of crop residues on the N availability was evaluated....... The dry matter production and total N uptake of a spring barley crop following pea or barley, with a period of unplanted soil in the autumn/winter, were significantly higher after pea than after barley. The barley crop following pea and barley recovered 11% of the pea and 8% of the barley residue N...

  8. Uranium: a basic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crull, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    All energy sources and technologies, including uranium and the nuclear industry, are needed to provide power. Public misunderstanding of the nature of uranium and how it works as a fuel may jeopardize nuclear energy as a major option. Basic chemical facts about uranium ore and uranium fuel technology are presented. Some of the major policy decisions that must be made include the enrichment, stockpiling, and pricing of uranium. Investigations and lawsuits pertaining to uranium markets are reviewed, and the point is made that oil companies will probably have to divest their non-oil energy activities. Recommendations for nuclear policies that have been made by the General Accounting Office are discussed briefly

  9. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  10. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  11. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Bellary, M.P.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author)

  12. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Bellary, M P; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. The uranium in Kvanefjeld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, J.S.

    1983-08-01

    The report is a final thesis at the study of biology at the University of Copenhagen. It examines on a theoretical basis a number of possible environmental effects from a uranium mining and milling project under consideration at the Kvanefjeld site near Narssaq in South Greenland. An introductory description and discussion of the advantages and limitations of ecological baseline studies and dose committment assessments as a tool for planning and decision making is given. The leaching and atmospheric dispersion of particles, heavy metals, radionuclides and other elements from future waste rock and ore piles as well as from mill tailings at the Kvanefjeld site are analysed and discussed. Also, the mobility, transport and accumulation of potentially toxic elements in local terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and food chains are examined. The resulting human burden are discussed with special attention given to the impact on the local population from eating lamb and seafood. A special quantitative analysis of the dispersion and biological uptake of fluoride, which is found in high concentrations in the ore, is given, focusing on the possible human intake of fluoride-polluted arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) caught in Narrssaq River. The report at the end gives consideration to the long term problems of controlling mill tailings, discussing among other things the long term human exposure to radon and thoron daughters. (author)

  14. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.Q.

    1981-01-01

    The domestic uranium industry is in a state of stagflation. Costs continue to rise while the market for the product remains stagnant. During the last 12 months, curtailments and closures of mines and mills have eliminated over 5000 jobs in the industry, plus many more in those industries that furnish supplies and services. By January 1982, operations at four mills and the mines that furnish them ore will have been terminated. Other closures may follow, depending on cost trends, duration of current contracts, the degree to which mills have been amortized, the feasibility of placing mines on standby, the grade of the ore, and many other factors. Open-pit mines can be placed on standby without much difficulty, other than the possible cost of restoration before all the ore has been removed. There are a few small, dry, underground mines that could be mothballed; however, the major underground producers are wet sandstone mines that in most cases could not be reopened after a prolonged shutdown; mills can be mothballed for several years. Figure 8 shows the location of all the production centers in operation, as well as those that have operated or are on standby. Table 1 lists the same production centers plus those that have been deferred, showing nominal capacity of conventional mills in tons of ore per calendar day, and the industry production rate for those mills as of October 1, 1981

  15. Translocation of uranium from water to foodstuff while cooking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnapriya, K.C.; Baksi, Ananya; Chaudhari, Swathi; Gupta, Soujit Sen; Pradeep, T.

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Rice can efficiently uptake uranium from water contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}) 2.6 H{sub 2}O), while cooking. • Unusual uranium uptake to the extent of about 1000 ppm is observed when rice is cooked in highly concentrated uranium contaminated water (1240 ppm). • Nature of interaction of uranium with carbohydrates is probed using small monosaccharides like glucose and mannose. • Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to be the most stable species in water in such solutions which can form complexes with sugars. • The species (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) is also observed in the case of water exposed to the common mineral, uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) and similar type of complexation is observed with sugars. - Abstract: The present work report the unusual uranium uptake by foodstuff, especially those rich in carbohydrates like rice when they are cooked in water, contaminated with uranium. The major staple diet in South Asia, rice, was chosen to study its interaction with UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, the active uranium species in water, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Highest uptake limit was checked by cooking rice at very high uranium concentration and it was found to be good scavenger of uranium. To gain insight into the mechanism of uptake, direct interaction of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} with monosaccharides was also studied, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry taking mannose as a model. The studies have been done with dissolved uranium salt, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O), as well as the leachate of a stable oxide of uranium, UO{sub 2}(s), both of which exist as UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in water. Among the eight different rice varieties investigated, Karnataka Ponni showed the maximum uranium uptake whereas unpolished Basmati rice showed the minimum. Interaction with other foodstuffs (potato, carrot, peas, kidney beans and lentils) with and

  16. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Known uranium deposits and the companies involved in uranium mining and exploration in Australia are listed. The status of the development of the deposits is outlined and reasons for delays to mining are given

  17. Uranium Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — An integral part of Y‑12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium...

  18. Uranium in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelmann, E.

    1978-03-01

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities [fr

  19. Price of military uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical results about optimum strategy of use of military uranium confirmed by systems approach accounts are received. The numerical value of the system approach price of the highly enriched military uranium also is given

  20. Uranium market and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capus, G.; Arnold, Th.

    2004-01-01

    The controversy about the extend of the uranium resources worldwide is still important, this article sheds some light on this topic. Every 2 years IAEA and NEA (nuclear energy agency) edit an inventory of uranium resources as reported by contributing countries. It appears that about 4.6 millions tons of uranium are available at a recovery cost less than 130 dollars per kg of uranium and a total of 14 millions tons of uranium can be assessed when including all existing or supposed resources. In fact there is enough uranium to sustain a moderate growth of the park of nuclear reactors during next decades and it is highly likely that the volume of uranium resources can allow a more aggressive development of nuclear energy. It is recalled that a broad use of the validated breeder technology can stretch the durability of uranium resources by a factor 50. (A.C.)

  1. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  2. Industrial realities: Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiron, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this special issue are examined ores and metals in France and in the world for 1988. The chapter on uranium gives statistical data on the uranium market: Demand, production, prices and reserves [fr

  3. Brazilian uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.C.S. dos.

    1985-01-01

    Estimatives of uranium reserves carried out in Figueira, Itataia, Lagoa Real and Espinharas, in Brazil are presented. The samples testing allowed to know geological structures, and the characteristics of uranium mineralization. (M.C.F.) [pt

  4. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  5. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Western world requirements for uranium based on increasing energy consumption and a changing energy mix, will warrant the development of Australia's resources. By 1985 Australian mines could be producing 9500 tonnes of uranium oxide yearly and by 1995 the export value from uranium could reach that from wool. In terms of benefit to the community the economic rewards are considerable but, in terms of providing energy to the world, Australias uranium is vital

  6. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  7. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, C.

    1998-01-01

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented

  8. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, C.

    1998-12-31

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented.

  9. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  10. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for converting uranium oxide to uranium metal is described comprising the steps of heating uranium oxide in the presence of a reducing agent to a temperature sufficient to reduce the uranium oxide to uranium metal and form a heterogeneous mixture of a uranium metal product and oxide by-products, heating the mixture in a hydrogen atmosphere at a temperature sufficient to convert uranium metal in the mixture to uranium hydride, cooling the resulting uranium hydride-containing mixture to a temperature sufficient to produce a ferromagnetic transition in the uranium hydride, magnetically separating the cooled uranium hydride from the mixture, and thereafter heating the separated uranium hydride in an inert atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the uranium hydride to uranium metal

  11. Microbial accumulation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Dong Faqin; Dai Qunwei

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of microbial accumulation of uranium and the effects of some factors (including pH, initial uranium concentration, pretreatment of bacteria, and so on) on microbial accumulation of uranium are discussed briefly. The research direction and application prospect are presented. (authors)

  12. Uranium energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkes, P.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium supply and demand as projected by the Uranium Institute is discussed. It is concluded that for the industrialized countries, maximum energy independence is a necessity. Hence it is necessary to achieve assurance of supply for uranium used in thermal power reactors in current programs and eventually to move towards breeders

  13. Australian uranium today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, B.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: Australia's resources; Northern Territory uranium in perspective; the government's decision [on August 25, 1977, that there should be further development of uranium under strictly controlled conditions]; Government legislation; outlook [for the Australian uranium mining industry]. (U.K.)

  14. Uranium resources, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The specific character of uranium as energy resources, the history of development of uranium resources, the production and reserve of uranium in the world, the prospect regarding the demand and supply of uranium, Japanese activity of exploring uranium resources in foreign countries and the state of development of uranium resources in various countries are reported. The formation of uranium deposits, the classification of uranium deposits and the reserve quantity of each type are described. As the geological environment of uranium deposits, there are six types, that is, quartz medium gravel conglomerate deposit, the deposit related to the unconformity in Proterozoic era, the dissemination type magma deposit, pegmatite deposit and contact deposit in igneaus rocks and metamorphic rocks, vein deposit, sandstone type deposit and the other types of deposit. The main features of respective types are explained. The most important uranium resources in Japan are those in the Tertiary formations, and most of the found reserve belongs to this type. The geological features, the state of yield and the scale of the deposits in Ningyotoge, Tono and Kanmon Mesozoic formation are reported. Uranium minerals, the promising districts in the world, and the matters related to the exploration and mining of uranium are described. (Kako, I.)

  15. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  16. Biogeochemical prospecting for uranium with conifers: results from the Midnite mine area, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.T.; Ward, F.N.

    1977-01-01

    The ash of needles, cones, and duff from Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws) growing near uranium deposits of the Midnite mine, Stevens County, Wash., contain as much as 200 ppM uranium. Needle samples containing more than 10 ppM uranium define zones that correlate well with known uranium deposits or dumps. Dispersion is as much as 300 m but generally is less. Background is about 1 ppM. Tree roots are judged to be sampling ore, low-grade uranium halo, or ground water to a depth of about 15 m. Uptake of uranium by Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) needles appears to be about the same as by Ponderosa pine needles. Cones and duff are generally enriched in uranium relative to needles. Needles, cones, and duff are recommended as easily collected, uncomplicated sample media for geochemical surveys. Samples can be analyzed by standard methods and total cost per sample kept to about $6

  17. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M.B.; Andersen, R.L.

    1982-08-01

    The uranium favorability of the Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was determined by using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria; by subsurface studies of structure, facies distribution, and gamma-ray anomalies in well logs to a depth of 1500 m; and by surface studies involving extensive field sampling and radiometric surveying. These were supplemented by both aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. Favorable environments were identified in fluviodeltaic to fan-delta sandstones in the upper Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups (Pennsylvania to Lower Permian), which occur exclusively in the subsurface. Evaluation was based on the presence of a good uranium source, abundant feldspar, good hydrogeologic characteristics, association with carbonaceous shales, presence of coal and oil fields, and anomalies in gamma logs. Additional favorable environments include deltaic to alluvial sandstones in the Wichita-Albany Group (Lower Permian), which crops out widely and occurs in the shallow subsurface. Evaluation was based on high uranium values in stream-sediment samples, a small uranium occurrence located during the field survey, anomalous gamma logs, good uranium source, and hydrogeologic characteristics. Unfavorable environments include Cambrian to Permian limestones and shales. Pennsylvanian to Permian fluviodeltaic systems that have poor uranium sources, and Permian, Cretaceous, and Pleistocene formations that lack features characteristic of known uranium occurrences

  18. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a thyroid scan is 30 minutes or less. Thyroid Uptake You will be given radioactive iodine ( ... for each thyroid uptake is five minutes or less. top of page What will I experience during ...

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uptake measurements are obtained at different times. For example, you may have uptake measurements at four to ... medicine procedures can be time consuming. It can take several hours to days for the radiotracer to ...

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special ... is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine ...

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of ... potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic ...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... known as a thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. ... eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. Jewelry and other metallic accessories should be left ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) ... of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that ...

  4. Investigation of Great Basin big sagebrush and black greasewood as biogeochemical indicators of uranium mineralization. Final report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebold, F.E.; McGrath, S.

    1982-11-01

    The effects of varying phosphate concentrations in natural aqueous systems upon the uptake of uranium by big sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata subsp. tridentata) and black greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus (Hook) Torr.) were investigated. Two separate growth experiments with five drip-flow hyroponic units were used and plant seedlings were grown for 60 days in solutions of varying phosphate and uranium concentrations. Successful growth experiments were obtained only for big sagebrush; black greasewood did not sustain sufficient growth. The phosphate concentration of the water did affect the uptake of uranium by the big sagebrush, and this effect is most pronounced in the region of higher concentrations of uranium in the water. The ratio of the concentration of uranium in the plant to that in the water was observed to decrease with increasing uranium concentration in solution. This is indicative of an absorption barrier in the plants. The field data shows that big sagebrush responds to uranium concentrations in the soil water and not the groundwater. The manifestation of these results is that the use of big sagebrush as a biogeochemical indicator of uranium is not recommended. Since the concentration of phosphate must also be knwon in the water supplying the uranium to the plant, one should analyze this natural aqueous phase as a hydrochemical indicator rather than the big sagebrush

  5. Rainfed intensive crop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed.......This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed....

  6. Occurrences of uranium at Clinton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, F.A.; Klemic, H.; Choquette, P.W.

    1954-01-01

    An occurrence of uranium at Clinton, Hunterdon County, N. J. was first brought to the attention of the U.S. Geological Survey when Mr. Thomas L. Eak of Avenel, N. J. submitted to the Survey a sample containing 0.068 percent uranium. Subsequent examinations of the area around Clinton indicated that detailed mapping and study were warranted. The uranium occurrences at Clinton are in or associated with fault zones in the Kittatinny limestone of Cambro-Ordovician age. The limestone generally light gray, thick bedded, and dolomitic; chert is common but not abundant. Regionally and locally, faults are the most significant structural features. The local faults at Clinton are the loci for most of the uranium. The largest fault can be traced for about 700 feet and is radioactive everywhere it crops out. Samples from this fault contain as much as 0.038 percent uranium; the average content is about 0.010 percent uranium. Uranium also occurs disseminated in two 4-inch layers of black feldspathic dolomite and in several zones of residual soil derived from the Kittatinny limestone. The black layers contain as much as 0.046 percent uranium and can be traced only about 20 feet along strike. They are cut by a small fault that is also radioactive. The radioactive soil zones are roughly elongated parallel to bedding. Soil from them contains up to 0.008 percent uranium. The uranium occurrences are best explained by a supergene origin. The sampling, mapping, and radioactivity testing of uranium occurrences at Clinton indicate they are too low grade to be of current economic interest.

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a thyroid scan is 30 minutes or less. Thyroid Uptake You will be given radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) in liquid or capsule form to swallow. The thyroid uptake will begin several hours to 24 hours later. Often, two separate uptake ...

  8. High loading uranium plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pari of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat hiving a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process

  9. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  10. Biosorption of uranium, radium, and cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    Some fundamental aspects of the biosorption of metals by microbial cells were investigated. These studies were carried out in conjunction with efforts to develop a process to utilize microbial cells as biosorbents for the removal of radionuclides from waste streams generated by the nuclear fuel cycle. It was felt that an understanding of the mechanism(s) of metal uptake would potentially enable the enhancement of the metal uptake phenomenon through environmental or genetic manipulation of the microorganisms. Also presented are the results of a preliminary investigation of the applicability of microorganisms for the removal of 137 cesium and 226 radium from existing waste solutions. The studies were directed primarily at a characterization of uranium uptake by the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  11. Uranium speciation and stability after reductive immobilization in aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jonathan O.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Junier, Pilar; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Chinni, Satya; Veeramani, Harish; Margot-Roquier, Camille; Webb, Samuel M.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2011-11-01

    It has generally been assumed that the bioreduction of hexavalent uranium in groundwater systems will result in the precipitation of immobile uraninite (UO 2). In order to explore the form and stability of uranium immobilized under these conditions, we introduced lactate (15 mM for 3 months) into flow-through columns containing sediments derived from a former uranium-processing site at Old Rifle, CO. This resulted in metal-reducing conditions as evidenced by concurrent uranium uptake and iron release. Despite initial augmentation with Shewanella oneidensis, bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes dominated the biostimulated columns. The immobilization of uranium (˜1 mmol U per kg sediment) enabled analysis by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Tetravalent uranium associated with these sediments did not have spectroscopic signatures representative of U-U shells or crystalline UO 2. Analysis by microfocused XAS revealed concentrated micrometer regions of solid U(IV) that had spectroscopic signatures consistent with bulk analyses and a poor proximal correlation (μm scale resolution) between U and Fe. A plausible explanation, supported by biogeochemical conditions and spectral interpretations, is uranium association with phosphoryl moieties found in biomass; hence implicating direct enzymatic uranium reduction. After the immobilization phase, two months of in situ exposure to oxic influent did not result in substantial uranium remobilization. Ex situ flow-through experiments demonstrated more rapid uranium mobilization than observed in column oxidation studies and indicated that sediment-associated U(IV) is more mobile than biogenic UO 2. This work suggests that in situ uranium bioimmobilization studies and subsurface modeling parameters should be expanded to account for non-uraninite U(IV) species associated with biomass.

  12. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Walter K.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  13. Human enteric pathogen internalization by root uptake into food crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    With an increasing number of outbreaks and illnesses associated with pre-harvest contaminated produce, understanding the potential and mechanisms of produce contamination by enteric pathogens can aid in the development of preventative measures and post-harvest processing to reduce microbial populati...

  14. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The...

  15. Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-12-31

    The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

  16. Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

  17. Cycling of fertilizer and cotton crop residue nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, I.J.; Constable, G.A.; MacLeod, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Mineral nitrogen (N), nitrate and ammonium contents were monitored in N-fertilized soils supporting cotton crops to provide information on the nitrification, mineralization and immobilization processes operating in the soil. The relative contributions of fertilizer N, previous cotton crop residue N and indigenous soil N to the mineral N pools and to the current crop's N uptake were calculated. After N fertilizer (urea) application, the soil's mineral N content rose rapidly and subsequently declined at a slower rate. The recovery of 15 N-labelled urea as mineral N declined exponentially with time. Biological immobilization (and possibly denitrification to some extent) were believed to be the major processes reducing post-application soil mineral N content. Progressively less N was mineralized upon incubation of soil sampled through the growing season. Little soil N (either from urea or crop residue) was mineralized at crop maturity. Cycling of N was evident between the soil mineral and organic N pools throughout the cotton growing season. Considerable quantities of fertilizer N were immobilized by the soil micro biomass; immobilized N was remineralized and subsequently taken up by the cotton crop. A large proportion of the crop N was taken up in the latter part of the season when the soil mineral N content was low. It is suggested that much of the N taken up by cotton was derived from microbial sources, rather than crop residues. The application of cotton crop residue (stubble) slightly reduced the mineral N content in the soil by encouraging biological immobilization. 15 N was mineralized very slowly from the labelled crop residue and did not contribute significantly to the supply of N to the current crop. Recovery of labelled fertilizer N and labelled crop residue N by the cotton crop was 28% and 1%, respectively. In comparison, the apparent recovery of fertilizer N was 48%. Indigenous soil N contributed 68% of the N taken up by the cotton crop. 33 refs., 1 tab

  18. Can we predict uranium bioavailability based on soil parameters? Part 2: soil solution uranium concentration is not a good bioavailability index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhove, H; Van Hees, M; Wannijn, J; Wouters, K; Wang, L

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed to quantify the influence of soil parameters on uranium uptake by ryegrass. Ryegrass was established on eighteen distinct soils, spiked with (238)U. Uranium soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) ranged from 0.0003 to 0.0340kgkg(-1). There was no significant relation between the U soil-to-plant transfer (or total U uptake or flux) and the uranium concentration in the soil solution or any other soil factor measured, nor with the U recovered following selective soil extractions. Multiple linear regression analysis resulted in a significant though complex model explaining up to 99% of variation in TF. The influence of uranium speciation on uranium uptake observed was featured: UO(2)(+2), uranyl carbonate complexes and UO(2)PO(4)(-) seem the U species being preferentially taken up by the roots and transferred to the shoots. Improved correlations were obtained when relating the uranium TF with the summed soil solution concentrations of mentioned uranium species.

  19. Uranium of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsalyuk, Yu.; Gurevich, D.

    2000-01-01

    Over 25 % of the world's uranium reserves are concentrated in Kazakhstan. So, the world's largest Shu-Sarysu uranium province is situated on southern Kazakhstan, with resources exceeding 1 billion tonnes of uranium. No less, than 3 unique deposits with resources exceeding 100,000 tonnes are situated here. From the economic point of view the most important thing is that these deposits are suitable for in-situ leaching, which is the cheapest, environmentally friendly and most efficient method available for uranium extracting. In 1997 the Kazatomprom National Joint-Stock Company united all Kazakhstan's uranium enterprises (3 mine and concentrating plants, Volkovgeologiya Joint-Stock Company and the Ulbinskij Metallurgical plant). In 1998 uranium production came to 1,500 tonnes (860 kg in 1997). In 1999 investment to the industry were about $ 30 million. Plans for development of Kazakhstan's uranium industry provide a significant role for foreign partners. At present, 2 large companies (Comeco (Canada), Cogema (France) working in Kazakhstan. Kazakatomprom continues to attract foreign investors. The company's administration announced that in that in next year they have plan to make a radical step: to sell 67 % of stocks to strategic investors (at present 100 % of stocks belongs to state). Authors of the article regard, that the Kazakhstan's uranium industry still has significant reserves to develop. Even if the scenario for the uranium industry could be unfavorable, uranium production in Kazakhstan may triple within the next three to four years. The processing of uranium by the Ulbinskij Metallurgical Plant and the production of some by-products, such as rhenium, vanadium and rare-earth elements, may provide more profits. Obviously, the sale of uranium (as well as of any other reserves) cannot make Kazakhstan a prosperous country. However, country's uranium industry has a god chance to become one of the most important and advanced sectors of national economy

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Per; Jakobsen, Iver

    2008-01-01

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants and root-to-shoot ratio of most metals was increased by mycorrhizas. This protective role of mycorrhizas was observed even at very high supplies of phosphate rock. In contrast, phosphorus uptake was similar at all levels of phosphate rock, suggesting that the P was unavailable to the plant-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Per [Radiation Research Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Jakobsen, Iver [Biosystems Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)], E-mail: iver.jakobsen@risoe.dk

    2008-05-15

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants and root-to-shoot ratio of most metals was increased by mycorrhizas. This protective role of mycorrhizas was observed even at very high supplies of phosphate rock. In contrast, phosphorus uptake was similar at all levels of phosphate rock, suggesting that the P was unavailable to the plant-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock.

  2. Models for estimating the radiation hazards of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.N.

    1982-01-01

    Hazards to the health of workers in uranium mines derive from the decay products of radon and from uranium and its descendants. Radon daughters in mine atmospheres are either attached to aerosols or exist as free atoms and their physical state determines in which part of the lung the daughters deposit. The factors which influence the proportions of radon daughters attached to aerosols, their deposition in the lung and the dose received by the cells in lung tissue are discussed. The estimation of dose to tissue from inhalation or ingestion of uranium and daughters is based on a different set of models which have been applied in recent ICRP reports. The models used to describe the deposition of particulates, their movement in the gut and their uptake by organs, which form the basis for future limits on the concentration of uranium and daughters in air or on their intake with food, are outlined

  3. Models for estimating the radiation hazards of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.N.

    1990-01-01

    Hazards to the health of workers in uranium mines derive from the decay products of radon and from uranium and its descendants. Radon daughters in mine atmospheres are either attached to aerosols or exist as free atoms and their physical state determines in which part of the lung the daughters deposit. The factors which influence the proportions of radon daughters attached to aerosols, their deposition in the lung and the dose received by the cells in lung tissue are discussed. The estimation of dose to tissue from inhalation of ingestion or uranium and daughters is based on a different set of models which have been applied in recent ICRP reports. The models used to describe the deposition of particulates, their movement in the gut and their uptake by organs, which form the basis for future limits on the concentration of uranium and daughters in air or on their intake with food, are outlined. 34 refs., 12 tabs., 9 figs

  4. Thyroid uptake test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The uptake of radioiodine by the thyroid gland is altered by the iodine content of diet or drugs. American diet has a high iodine content because each slice of the white bread contains nearly 150μg of iodine due to the bleaching process employed in the production of the bread. This carrier content of iodine reduces the uptake so much, that the normal American uptakes are usually three to four times lower than the uptakes in the developing countries. The other drawback of the thyroid uptake test is that it is affected by the iodine containing drugs. Anti-diarrhoea medications are quire common in the developing countries and many of them contain iodine moiety. Without a reliable drug history, a low thyroid uptake value may lead to a misleading conclusion

  5. Impact of cash cropping and perennial crops on food crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    significant effects on food crop production and productivity. ... 2 Department of Economics and Resource management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway ... food markets work well, the problem of imperfect markets does not allow ..... prices at the time of purchase with the remaining balance due at the end of the.

  6. Titrimetric determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florence, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Titrimetric methods are almost invariably used for the high precision assay of uranium compounds, because gravimetric methods are nonselective, and not as reliable. Although precipitation titrations have been used, for example with cupferron and ferrocyanide, and chelate titrations with EDTA and oxine give reasonable results, in practice only redox titrations find routine use. With all redox titration methods for uranium a precision of 01 to 02 percent can be achieved, and precisions as high as 0.003 percent have been claimed for the more refined techniques. There are two types of redox titrations for uranium in common use. The first involves the direct titration of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) with a standard solution of a strong reductant, such as chromous chloride or titanous chloride, and the second requires a preliminary reduction of uranium to the (IV) or (III) state, followed by titration back to the (VI) state with a standard oxidant. Both types of redox titrations are discussed. 4 figs

  7. Politics of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is the most political of all the elements, the material for the production of both the large amounts of electricity and the most destructive weapons in the world. The problems that its dual potential creates are only now beginning to become evident. Author Norman Moss looks at this situation and sheds light on many of the questions that emerge. The nuclear issue always comes back to how much uranium there is, what can be done with it, and which countries have it. Starting with a concise history of uranium and explaining its technology in terms the nonspecialist can understand, The Politics of Uranium considers the political issues that technical arguments obscure. It tells the little-known story of the international uranium cartel, explains the entanglements of governments with the uranium trade, and describes the consequences of wrong decisions and blunders-especially the problems of nuclear waste. It also examines the intellectual and emotional roots of the anti-nuclear movement

  8. Uranium resources and supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, J.

    1973-01-01

    The future supply of uranium has to be considered against a background of forecasts of uranium demand over the next decades which show increases of a spectacular nature. It is not necessary to detail these forecasts, they are well known. A world survey by the Joint NEA/IAEA Working Party on 'Uranium Resources, Production and Demand', completed this summer, indicates that from a present production level of just over 19,000 tonnes uranium per year, the demand will rise to the equivalent of an annual production requirement of 50,000 tonnes uranium by 1980, 100,000 by 1985 and 180,000 by 1990. Few, if any, mineral production industries have been called upon to plan for a near tenfold increase in production in a space of about 15 years as these forecasts imply. This might possibly mean that, perhaps, ten times the present number of uranium mines will have to be planned and engineered by 1990

  9. How much uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenward, M.

    1976-01-01

    Comment is made on the latest of a series of reports on world uranium resources from the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency and the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (Uranium resources, production and demand (including other nuclear fuel cycle data), published by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris). The report categories uranium reserves by their recovery cost and looks at power demand and the whole of the nuclear fuel cycle, including uranium enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing. The effect that fluctuations in uranium prices have had on exploration for new uranium resources is considered. It is stated that increased exploration is essential considering the long lead times involved but that thanks to today's higher prices there are distinct signs that prospecting activities are increasing again. (U.K.)

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at the Fifth Symposium on Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Advances made with regard to uranium mill tailings management, environmental effects, regulations, and reclamation are reviewed. Topics considered include tailings management and design (e.g., the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, environmental standards for uranium mill tailings disposal), surface stabilization (e.g., the long-term stability of tailings, long-term rock durability), radiological aspects (e.g. the radioactive composition of airborne particulates), contaminant migration (e.g., chemical transport beneath a uranium mill tailings pile, the interaction of acidic leachate with soils), radon control and covers (e.g., radon emanation characteristics, designing surface covers for inactive uranium mill tailings), and seepage and liners (e.g., hydrologic observations, liner requirements)

  11. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  12. Classification of Uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlkamp, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A listing of the recognized types of uranium mineralization shows nineteen determinable types out of which only six can be classified as of economic significance at present: Oligomiitic quartz pebble conglomerates, sandstone types, calcretes, intra-intrusive types, hydrothermal veins, veinlike types. The different types can be genetically related to prevalent geological environments, i.e. 1. the primary uranium occurrences formed by endogenic processes, 2. the secondary derived from the primary by subsequent exogenic processes, 3. the tertiary occurrences are assumed to be formed by endogenic metamorphic processes, although little is known about the behaviour of the uranium during the metamorphosis and therefore the metallogenesis of this tertiary uranium generation is still vague. A metallotectonic-geochronologic correlation of the uranium deposits shows a distinct affinity of the uranium to certain geological epochs: The Upper Archean, Lower Proterozoic, the Hercynian and, in a less established stage, the Upper Proterozoic. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  13. Uranium Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The new Uranium Newsletter is presented as an IAEA annual newsletter. The organization of the IAEA and its involvement with uranium since its founding in 1957 is described. The ''Red Book'' (Uranium Resources, Production and Demand) is mentioned. The Technical Assistance Programme of the IAEA in this field is also briefly mentioned. The contents also include information on the following meetings: The Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium Deposits in Magmatic and Metamorphic Rocks, Advisory Group Meeting on the Use of Airborne Radiometric Data, and the Technical Committee Meeting on Metallogenesis. Recent publications are listed. Current research contracts in uranium exploration are mentioned. IAEA publications on uranium (in press) are listed also. Country reports from the following countries are included: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China (People's Republic of), Denmark, Finland, Germany (Federal Republic of), Malaysia, Philippines, Portugal, South Africa (Republic of), Spain, Syrian Arab Republic, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, and Greece. There is also a report from the Commission of European Communities

  14. Uranium purchases report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B ''Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data

  15. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  16. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  17. New french uranium mineral species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C.

    1952-01-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; β uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the α uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [fr

  18. Uranium demand. An exploration challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, A J.A.

    1976-10-01

    The estimated world resources of uranium as well as the estimated consumption of uranium over the next 25 years are briefly discussed. Attention is also given to the prospecting for uranium in South Africa and elsewhere in the world.

  19. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  20. Gold and uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, G.S.; Davidson, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process for extracting gold and uranium from an ore containing them both comprising the steps of pulping the finely comminuted ore with a suitable cyanide solution at an alkaline pH, acidifying the pulp for uranium dissolution, adding carbon activated for gold recovery to the pulp at a suitable stage, separating the loaded activated carbon from the pulp, and recovering gold from the activated carbon and uranium from solution

  1. Uranium mine ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katam, K.; Sudarsono

    1982-01-01

    Uranium mine ventilation system aimed basically to control and decreasing the air radioactivity in mine caused by the radon emanating from uranium ore. The control and decreasing the air ''age'' in mine, with adding the air consumption volume, increasing the air rate consumption, closing the mine-out area; using closed drainage system. Air consumption should be 60m 3 /minute for each 9m 2 uranium ore surfaces with ventilation rate of 15m/minute. (author)

  2. Pine Creek uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, M.B.; Needham, R.S.; Page, R.W.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.; Wyborn, L.A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project is to help establish a sound geological framework of the Pine Creek region through regional geological, geochemical and geophysical studies. Uranium ore at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is confined to a wedge of conglomerate in faulted contact with altered volcanics. The uranium, which is classified as epigenetic sandstone type, is derived from a uranium-enriched felsic volcanic source

  3. Chemical thermodynamics of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenthe, I.; Fuger, J.; Lemire, R.J.; Muller, A.B.; Nguyen-Trung Cregu, C.; Wanner, H.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive overview on the chemical thermodynamics of those elements that are of particular importance in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems is provided. This is the first volume in a series of critical reviews to be published on this subject. The book provides an extensive compilation of chemical thermodynamic data for uranium. A description of procedures for activity corrections and uncertainty estimates is given. A critical discussion of data needed for nuclear waste management assessments, including areas where significant gaps of knowledge exist is presented. A detailed inventory of chemical thermodynamic data for inorganic compounds and complexes of uranium is listed. Data and their uncertainty limits are recommended for 74 aqueous complexes and 199 solid and 31 gaseous compounds containing uranium, and on 52 aqueous and 17 solid auxiliary species containing no uranium. The data are internally consistent and compatible with the CODATA Key Values. The book contains a detailed discussion of procedures used for activity factor corrections in aqueous solution, as well as including methods for making uncertainty estimates. The recommended data have been prepared for use in environmental geochemistry. Containing contributions written by experts the chapters cover various subject areas such a s: oxide and hydroxide compounds and complexes, the uranium nitrides, the solid uranium nitrates and the arsenic-containing uranium compounds, uranates, procedures for consistent estimation of entropies, gaseous and solid uranium halides, gaseous uranium oxides, solid phosphorous-containing uranium compounds, alkali metal uranates, uncertainties, standards and conventions, aqueous complexes, uranium minerals dealing with solubility products and ionic strength corrections. The book is intended for nuclear research establishments and consulting firms dealing with uranium mining and nuclear waste disposal, as well as academic and research institutes

  4. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  5. Gender in crop agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Food and Agriculture Organization; The World Bank; IFAD

    2008-01-01

    Metadata only record This is a module in the "Gender in Agriculture Sourcebook" published by the World Bank, UN Food and Agriculture Organization, and International Fund for Agricultural Development. This module examines the role of gender in crop agriculture as an essential component of development and poverty reduction. Gender is an integral aspect of crop agriculture because women's roles in crop production and household subsistence, as well as their knowledge of complex production syst...

  6. Characterisation of a uranium fire aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuscher, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium swarf, which can burn spontaneously in air, creates an aerosol which is chemically toxic and radiotoxic. The uptake of uranium oxide in the respiratory system is determined to a large extent by the characteristics of the aerosol. A study has been made of the methods by which aerosols can be characterised. The different measured and defined characteristics of particles are given. The normal and lognormal particle size distributions are discussed. Shape factors interrelating characteristics are explained. Experimental techniques for the characterisation of an aerosol are discussed, as well as the instruments that have been used in this study; namely the Andersen impactor, point-to-plane electrostatic precipitator and the Pollak counter. Uranium swarf was made to burn with a heated filament, and the resulting aerosol was measured. Optical and electron microscopy have been used for the determination of the projected area diameters, and the aerodynamic diameters have been determined with the impactor. The uranium fire aerosol can be represented by a bimodal, or monomodal, lognormal particle size distribution depending on the way in which the swarf burns. The determined activity median aerodynamic diameter of the two peaks were 0,49μm and 6,0μm respectively [af

  7. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  8. Uranium production from phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzinel, Z.; Folkman, Y.

    1979-05-01

    According to estimates of the world's uranium consumption, exploitation of most rich sources is expected by the 1980's. Forecasts show that the rate of uranium consumption will increase towards the end of the century. It is therefore desirable to exploit poor sources not yet in use. In the near future, the most reasonable source for developing uranium is phosphate rock. Uranium reserves in phosphates are estimated at a few million tons. Production of uranium from phosphates is as a by-product of phosphate rock processing and phosphoric acid production; it will then be possible to save the costs incurred in crushing and dissolving the rock when calculating uranium production costs. Estimates show that the U.S. wastes about 3,000 tons of uranium per annum in phosphoric acid based fertilisers. Studies have also been carried out in France, Yugoslavia and India. In Israel, during the 1950's, a small plant was operated in Haifa by 'Chemical and Phosphates'. Uranium processes have also been developed by linking with the extraction processes at Arad. Currently there is almost no activity on this subject because there are no large phosphoric acid plants which would enable production to take place on a reasonable scale. Discussions are taking place about the installation of a plant for phosphoric acid production utilising the 'wet process', producing 200 to 250,000 tons P 2 O 5 per annum. It is necessary to combine these facilities with uranium production plant. (author)

  9. Phospholyl-uranium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradoz, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    After having reported a bibliographical study on penta-methylcyclopentadienyl uranium complexes, and a description of the synthesis and radioactivity of uranium (III) and (IV) boron hydrides compounds, this research thesis reports the study of mono and bis-tetramethyl-phospholyl uranium complexes comprising chloride, boron hydride, alkyl and alkoxide ligands. The third part reports the comparison of structures, stabilities and reactions of homologue complexes in penta-methylcyclopentadienyl and tetramethyl-phospholyl series. The last part addresses the synthesis of tris-phospholyl uranium (III) and (IV) complexes. [fr

  10. International trade in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two reports are presented; one has been prepared by the Uranium Institute and is submitted by the United Kingdom delegation, the other by the United States delegation. The report of the Uranium Institute deals with the influence of the government on international trade in uranium. This influence becomes apparent predominantly by export and import restrictions, as well as by price controls. The contribution submitted by the United States is a uranium market trend analysis, with pricing methods and contracting modes as well as the effect of government policies being investigated in the light of recent developments

  11. Uranium concentration in fossils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, J.; Uyeda, C.

    1988-01-01

    Recently it is known that fossil bones tend to accumulate uranium. The uranium concentration, C u in fossils has been measured so far by γ ray spectroscopy or by fission track method. The authors applied secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, to detect the uranium in fossil samples. The purpose of this work is to investigate the possibility of semi-quantitative analyses of uranium in fossils, and to study the correlation between C u and the age of fossil bones. The further purpose of this work is to apply SIMS to measure the distribution of C u in fossil teeth

  12. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  13. Compost amendment, enhanced nutrient uptake and dry matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trial was conducted to assess the influence of Compost and inorganic fertilizer as well as plant growth stage on growth, nutrient uptake, dry matter accumulation and partitioning in maize crop grown on the battery waste contaminated site. Two types of compost (Mexican Sunflower (MSC) and Cassava peels (CPC) ...

  14. Uranium uptake in Nicotiana sp under hydroponic conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soudek, Petr; Petrová, Šárka; Buzek, Martin; Lhotský, Ondřej; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 142, SI (2014), s. 130-137 ISSN 0375-6742 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13029 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Radionuclides * Accumulation * Plants Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.747, year: 2014

  15. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  16. Integrated crop management practices for maximizing grain yield of double-season rice crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Depeng; Huang, Jianliang; Nie, Lixiao; Wang, Fei; Ling, Xiaoxia; Cui, Kehui; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing

    2017-01-01

    Information on maximum grain yield and its attributes are limited for double-season rice crop grown under the subtropical environment. This study was conducted to examine key characteristics associated with high yielding double-season rice crop through a comparison between an integrated crop management (ICM) and farmers’ practice (FP). Field experiments were conducted in the early and late seasons in the subtropical environment of Wuxue County, Hubei Province, China in 2013 and 2014. On average, grain yield in ICM was 13.5% higher than that in FP. A maximum grain yield of 9.40 and 10.53 t ha-1 was achieved under ICM in the early- and late-season rice, respectively. Yield improvement of double-season rice with ICM was achieved with the combined effects of increased plant density and optimized nutrient management. Yield gain of ICM resulted from a combination of increases in sink size due to more panicle number per unit area and biomass production, further supported by the increased leaf area index, leaf area duration, radiation use efficiency, crop growth rate, and total nitrogen uptake compared with FP. Further enhancement in the yield potential of double-season rice should focus on increasing crop growth rate and biomass production through improved and integrated crop management practices.

  17. A rapid and efficient method to study the function of crop plant transporters in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for humans. Fe deficiency disease is wide-spread and has lead to extensive studies on the mechanisms of Fe uptake and storage, especially in staple food crops such as rice. However, studies of functionally related genes in rice and other crops are often time a...

  18. Coupling Cover Crops with Alternative Swine Manure Application Strategies: Manure-15N Tracer Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integration of rye cover crops with alternative liquid swine (Sus scrofa L.) manure application strategies may enhance retention of manure N in corn (Zea mays L.) - soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] cropping systems. The objective of this study was to quantify uptake of manure derived-N by a rye (Seca...

  19. Weed management practice and cropping sequence impact on soil residual nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inefficient N uptake by crops from N fertilization and/or N mineralized from crop residue and soil organic matter results in the accumulation of soil residual N (NH4-N and NO3-N) which increases the potential for N leaching. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of weed management ...

  20. Enhancing the biological nitrogen fixation of leguminous crops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Legumes have the ability to establish a symbiotic interaction with soil bacteria, collectively termed as rhizobia. These bacteria can enhance growth and development of associated crops by transferring atmospheric nitrogen into a form that is available for plant growth or by improving nutrient uptake through modulation of ...

  1. Trends in uranium supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Nuclear Power and Reactors, Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Section, Vienna (Austria)

    1976-07-01

    Prior to the development of nuclear power, uranium ores were used to a very limited extent as a ceramic colouring agent, as a source of radium and in some places as a source of vanadium. Perhaps before that, because of the bright orange and yellow colours of its secondary ores, it was probably used as ceremonial paint by primitive man. After the discovery of nuclear fission a whole new industry emerged, complete with its problems of demand, resources and supply. Spurred by special incentives in the early years of this new nuclear industry, prospectors discovered over 20 000 occurrences of uranium in North America alone, and by 1959 total world production reached a peak of 34 000 tonnes uranium from mines in South Africa, Canada and United States. This rapid growth also led to new problems. As purchases for military purposes ended, government procurement contracts were not renewed, and the large reserves developed as a result of government purchase incentives, in combination with lack of substantial commercial market, resulted in an over-supply of uranium. Typically, an over-supply of uranium together with national stockpiling at low prices resulted in depression of prices to less than $5 per pound by 1971. Although forecasts made in the early 1970's increased confidence in the future of nuclear power, and consequently the demand for uranium, prices remained low until the end of 1973 when OPEC announced a very large increase in oil prices and quite naturally, prices for coal also rose substantially. The economics of nuclear fuel immediately improved and prices for uranium began to climb in 1974. But the world-wide impact of the OPEC decision also produced negative effects on the uranium industry. Uranium production costs rose dramatically, as did capital costs, and money for investment in new uranium ventures became more scarce and more expensive. However, the uranium supply picture today offers hope of satisfactory development in spite of the many problems to be

  2. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  3. Trends in uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, M.

    1976-01-01

    Prior to the development of nuclear power, uranium ores were used to a very limited extent as a ceramic colouring agent, as a source of radium and in some places as a source of vanadium. Perhaps before that, because of the bright orange and yellow colours of its secondary ores, it was probably used as ceremonial paint by primitive man. After the discovery of nuclear fission a whole new industry emerged, complete with its problems of demand, resources and supply. Spurred by special incentives in the early years of this new nuclear industry, prospectors discovered over 20 000 occurrences of uranium in North America alone, and by 1959 total world production reached a peak of 34 000 tonnes uranium from mines in South Africa, Canada and United States. This rapid growth also led to new problems. As purchases for military purposes ended, government procurement contracts were not renewed, and the large reserves developed as a result of government purchase incentives, in combination with lack of substantial commercial market, resulted in an over-supply of uranium. Typically, an over-supply of uranium together with national stockpiling at low prices resulted in depression of prices to less than $5 per pound by 1971. Although forecasts made in the early 1970's increased confidence in the future of nuclear power, and consequently the demand for uranium, prices remained low until the end of 1973 when OPEC announced a very large increase in oil prices and quite naturally, prices for coal also rose substantially. The economics of nuclear fuel immediately improved and prices for uranium began to climb in 1974. But the world-wide impact of the OPEC decision also produced negative effects on the uranium industry. Uranium production costs rose dramatically, as did capital costs, and money for investment in new uranium ventures became more scarce and more expensive. However, the uranium supply picture today offers hope of satisfactory development in spite of the many problems to be

  4. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  5. Successful Coupling of a Bis-Amidoxime Uranophile with a Hydrophilic Backbone for Selective Uranium Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piechowicz, Marek [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Abney, Carter W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6201, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6181, United States; Thacker, Nathan C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Gilhula, James C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Wang, Youfu [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric; Veroneau, Samuel S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Hu, Aiguo [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric; Lin, Wenbin [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States

    2017-08-10

    The amidoxime group (-RNH2NOH) has long been used to extract uranium from seawater on account of its high affinity toward uranium. The development of tunable sorbent materials for uranium sequestration remains a research priority as well as a significant challenge. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, and uranium sorption properties of bis-amidoxime-functionalized polymeric materials (BAP 1–3). Bifunctional amidoxime monomers were copolymerized with an acrylamide cross-linker to obtain bis-amidoxime incorporation as high as 2 mmol g–1 after five synthetic steps. The resulting sorbents were able to uptake nearly 600 mg of uranium per gram of polymer after 37 days of contact with a seawater simulant containing 8 ppm uranium. Moreover, the polymeric materials exhibited low vanadium uptake with a maximum capacity of 128 mg of vanadium per gram of polymer. This computationally predicted and experimentally realized selectivity of uranium over vanadium, nearly 5 to 1 w/w, is one of the highest reported to date and represents an advancement in the rational design of sorbent materials with high uptake capacity and selectivity.

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ...

  8. Treatment of uranium mining and milling wastewater using biological adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsezos, M.

    1983-01-01

    Selected samples of waste microbial biomass originating from various industrial fermentation processes and biological treatment plants have been screened for biosorbent properties in conjunction with uranium, thorium and radium in aqueous solutions. Biosorption isotherms were used for the evaluation of biosorptive uptake capacity of the biomass. The biomass was also compared to synthetic adsorbents such as activated carbon. Determined uranium, thorium and radium biosorption isotherms were independent of the initial solution concentrations. Solution pH affected uptake. Rhizopus arrhizus at pH 4 exhibited the highest uranium and thorium biosorptive uptake capacity in excess of 180 Mg/g. It removed about 2.5 and 3.3 times more uranium than the ion exchange resin and activated carbon tested. Penicillium chrysogenum adsorbed 50000 pCi/g radium at pH 7 and at an equilibrium radium concentration of 1000 pCi/L. The most effective biomass types studied exhibited removals in excess of 99% of the radium in solution

  9. Application of phytoextraction for uranium contaminated soil in korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Y.; Han, Y.; Lee, M.

    2013-12-01

    The soils having high concentration of uranium, sampled from Goesan Deokpyungri area in Korea, were identified with the uranium removal efficiency of phytoextraction by using several plants. According to the results of physicochemical properties, uranium concentration from soil was 28.85mg/kg, pH 5.43 and soil texture was "Sand". Results of SEP(Sequential Extraction Procedure) test, uranium concentrations ratio of soil in the status of exchangeable/carbonate was 13.4%. Five plants such as Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L.), Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam), Radish (Raphanus sativus), Sesame (Perilla frutescens var. japonica) were cultivated during 56 days in phytotron. All the cultivation processes were conducted in a growth chamber at 25 degrees celsius, 70% relative humidity, 4000 Lux illumination (16 hours/day) and CO2 concentration of 600 ppm. Four times at intervals of 2 weeks leaves and roots collected were analyzed for uranium concentration. Ranges of uranium concentration of the roots and leaves from the five plants were measured to 206.81-721.22μg/kg and 3.45-10.21μg/kg respectively. The majority of uranium was found to accumulate in the roots. Uranium concentration in the leaves, regardless of the type of plants were presented below standard of drinking water(30μg/l) by U.S EPA. Phytoextraction pot experiments with citric acid were conducted. Citric acid as chelating agent was applied to soil to enhance uranium accumulation in five crop plants. 6 days before harvest crops, Each citric acid 25mM and 50mM was injected into the soil by 300ml. After injecting citric acid 25mM , pH of the soil was reduced to 4.95. Uranium concentration of leaves and roots collected from five plants was increased to 2-4times and 7-30times compared to control soil. Injected with citric acid 50mM , pH of the soil was reduced to 4.79. Uranium concentration of leaves and roots collected from five plants was increased to 3-10times and 10

  10. Perfluoroalkyl acid distribution in various plant compartments of edible crops grown in biosolids-amended soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from biosolids-amended soil has been identified as a potential pathway for PFAA entry into the terrestrial food chain. This study compared the uptake of PFAAs in greenhouse-grown radish (Raphanus sativus), celery (Apium graveolens var.d...

  11. Winter cover crops as a best management practice for reducing nitrogen leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, W. F.; Scarborough, R. W.; Chirnside, A. E. M.

    1998-10-01

    The role of rye as a winter cover crop to reduce nitrate leaching was investigated over a three-year period on a loamy sand soil. A cover crop was planted after corn in the early fall and killed in late March or early April the following spring. No-tillage and conventional tillage systems were compared on large plots with irrigated corn. A replicated randomized block design experiment was conducted on small plots to evaluate a rye cover crop under no-tillage and conventional tillage and with commercial fertilizer, poultry manure and composted poultry manure as nitrogen fertilizer sources. Nitrogen uptake by the cover crop along with nitrate concentrations in groundwater and the soil profile (0-150 cm) were measured on the large plots. Soil nitrate concentrations and nitrogen uptake by the cover crop were measured on the small plots. There was no significant difference in nitrate concentrations in the groundwater or soil profile with and without a cover crop in either no-tillage or conventional tillage. Annual amounts of nitrate-N leached to the water-table varied from 136.0 to 190.1 kg/ha in 1989 and from 82.4 to 116.2 kg/ha in 1991. Nitrate leaching rates were somewhat lower with a cover crop in 1989, but not in 1990. There was no statistically significant difference in corn grain yields between the cover crop and non-cover crop treatments. The planting date and adequate rainfall are very important in maximizing nitrogen uptake in the fall with a rye cover crop. On the Delmarva Peninsula, the cover crop should probably be planted by October 1 to maximize nitrogen uptake rates in the fall. On loamy sand soils, rye winter cover crops cannot be counted on as a best management practice for reducing nitrate leaching in the Mid-Atlantic states.

  12. Numerical simulation of cropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Hutchinson, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cropping is a cutting process whereby opposing aligned blades create a shearing failure by exerting opposing forces normal to the surfaces of a metal sheet or plate. Building on recent efforts to quantify cropping, this paper formulates a plane strain elastic-plastic model of a plate subject to s...

  13. Applied Crop Protection 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Nielsen, Bent Jørgen; Mathiassen, Solvejg Kopp

    Linket til højre henviser til rapporten i trykt format til download. This publication contains results from crop protection trials which were carried out at the Department of Agroecology within the area of gricultural crops. Most of the results come from field trials, but results from greenhouse...

  14. Applied Crop Protection 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Nielsen, Bent Jørgen; Mathiassen, Solvejg Kopp

    Linket til højre henviser til rapporten i trykt format til download. This publication contains results from crop protection trials which were carried out at the Department of Agroecology within the area of gricultural crops. Most of the results come from field trials, but results from greenhouse ...

  15. Applied crop protection 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Nielsen, Bent Jørgen; Jensen, Peter Kryger

    This publication contains results from crop protection trials which were carried out at the Department of Agroecology within the area of agricultural crops. Most of the results come from field trials, but results from greenhouse and semi-field trials are also included. The report contains results...

  16. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  17. Uranium enrichment techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    This article includes an introduction about the isotopes of natural uranium, their existence and the difficulty of the separation between them. Then it goes to the details of a number of methods used to enrich uranium: Gaseous Diffusion method, Electromagnetic method, Jet method, Centrifugal method, Chemical method, Laser method and Plasma method.

  18. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Sintered uranium dioxide pellets composed of particles of size > 50 microns suitable for power reactor use are made by incorporating a small amount of sulphur into the uranium dioxide before sintering. The increase in grain size achieved results in an improvement in overall efficiency when such pellets are used in a power reactor. (author)

  19. Uranium's scientific history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    The bicentenary of the discovery of uranium coincides with the fiftieth anniversary of the discovery of fission, an event of worldwide significance and the last episode in the uranium -radium saga which is the main theme of this paper. Uranium was first identified by the German chemist Martin Klaproth in 1789. He extracted uranium oxide from the ore pitchblende which was a by-product of the silver mines at Joachimsthal in Bohemia. For over a century after its discovery, the main application for uranium derived from the vivid colours of its oxides and salts which are used in glazes for ceramics, and porcelain. In 1896, however, Becquerel discovered that uranium emitted ionizing radiation. The extraction by Pierre and Marie Curie of the more radioactive radium from uranium in the early years of the twentieth century and its application to the treatment of cancer shifted the chief interest to radium production. In the 1930s the discovery of the neutron and of artificial radioactivity stimulated research in a number of European laboratories which culminated in the demonstration of fission by Otto Frisch in January 1939. The new found use of uranium for the production of recoverable energy, and the creation of artificial radioelements in nuclear reactors, eliminated the radium industry. (author)

  20. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  1. Rheinbraun's Australian uranium business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschbaum, S.

    1989-01-01

    The leaflet argues against the mining activities of the Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG in Germany and especially against uranium mining in Australia. The ethno-ecological impact on flora and fauna, aborigines and miners are pointed out. Uranium mining and lignite mining are compared. (HSCH) [de

  2. Australia and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A brief justification of the Australian Government's decision to mine and export Australian Uranium is presented along with a description of the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory where the major mines are to be located. Aboriginal interests and welfare in the region, the proposed Kakadu National Park and the economic benefits resulting from uranium development are also briefly covered. (J.R.)

  3. Nuclear and uranium policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacNabb, G.M.; Uranium Canada Ltd., Ottawa, Ontario)

    The background of the uranium industry in Canada is described. Government policies with respect to ownership of the uranium mining industry, price stabilization, and especially reservation of sufficient supplies of nuclear fuels for domestic utilities, are explained. Canadian policy re nuclear exports and safeguards is outlined. (E.C.B.)

  4. Uranium and transuranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnaud, F.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical chemistry of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium is reviewed. Uranium and neptunium are mainly treated and curium is only briefly evoked. Analysis methods include coulometry, titration, mass spectrometry, absorption spectrometry, spectrofluorometry, X-ray spectrometry, nuclear methods and radiation spectrometry [fr

  5. Preparation of uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirths, G.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is converted to uranium tetrafluoride under stoichiometric excess of hydrogen fluoride. The water formed in the process and the unreacted hydrogen fluoride are cooled and the condensate fractionally distilled into water and approx. 40% hydrofluoric acid. The hydrofluoric acid and water-free hydrogen fluoride are fed back into the process. (WI) [de

  6. Rossing uranium 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes the activities and organization of the Rossing uranium mine in South West Africa. The development of the mine during the last six years is described as well as the geology of the uranium deposits and aspects of the mining operations. The manpower structure and training possibilities for personnel are described

  7. National uranium resource evaluation program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Oklahoma City NTMS Quadrangle, Oklahoma. Uranium resource evaluation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Field and laboratory data are presented for 812 groundwater samples and 847 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and other possibly uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on the results from groundwater sampling, the most promising formations for potential uranium mineralization in the quadrangle are the Permian Bison, Purcell-Salt Plains-Kingman, Fairmont, Dog Creek, Chickasha, Duncan, and Cedar Hills Formations. These units are characterized by relatively high average concentrations of uranium, conductivity, arsenic, calcium, lithium, molybdenum, and sulfate. In addition, groundwaters from the Pennsylvanian Oscar Formation are characterized by values above the 85th percentile for uranium, conductivity, the uranium/sulfate ratio, arsenic, and vanadium. Results of stream sediment sampling indicate that the most promising formations for potential uranium mineralization include the same Permian Formation as indicated by groundwater sampling (Bison, Purcell-Salt Plains-Kingman, Fairmont, Dog-Creek, Chickasha, Duncan, and Cedar Hill Formations) in an area where these formations crop out north of the North Canadian River. Stream sediment samples from this area are characterized by concentrations above the 85th percentile for uranium, thorium, arsenic, lithium, manganese, and vanadium

  8. Management of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Large stocks of depleted uranium have arisen as a result of enrichment operations, especially in the United States and the Russian Federation. Countries with depleted uranium stocks are interested in assessing strategies for the use and management of depleted uranium. The choice of strategy depends on several factors, including government and business policy, alternative uses available, the economic value of the material, regulatory aspects and disposal options, and international market developments in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of a depleted uranium study conducted by an expert group organised jointly by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It contains information on current inventories of depleted uranium, potential future arisings, long term management alternatives, peaceful use options and country programmes. In addition, it explores ideas for international collaboration and identifies key issues for governments and policy makers to consider. (authors)

  9. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  10. Uranium deposit research, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzicka, V.; LeCheminant, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Research on uranium deposits in Canada, conducted as a prerequisite for assessment of the Estimated Additional Resources of uranium, revealed that (a) the uranium-gold association in rudites of the Huronian Supergroup preferably occurs in the carbon layers; (b) chloritized ore at the Panel mine, Elliot Lake, Ontario, occurs locally in tectonically disturbed areas in the vicinity of diabase dykes; (c) mineralization in the Black Sturgeon Lake area, Ontario, formed from solutions in structural and lithological traps; (d) the Cigar Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, has two phases of mineralization: monomineralic and polymetallic; (e) mineralization of the JEB (Canoxy Ltd.) deposit is similar to that at McClean Lake; (f) the uranium-carbon assemblage was identified in the Claude deposit, Carswell Structure; and (g) the Otish Mountains area, Quebec, should be considered as a significant uranium-polymetallic metallogenic province

  11. Uranium oxide recovering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kazuaki; Takazawa, Hiroshi; Teramae, Naoki; Onoue, Takeshi.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrates containing uranium nitrate are charged in a molten salt electrolytic vessel, and a heat treatment is applied to prepare molten salts. An anode and a cathode each made of a graphite rod are disposed in the molten salts. AC voltage is applied between the anode and the cathode to conduct electrolysis of the molten salts. Uranium oxides are deposited as a recovered product of uranium, on the surface of the anode. The nitrates containing uranium nitrate are preferably a mixture of one or more nitrates selected from sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and magnesium nitrate with uranium nitrate. The nitrates may be liquid wastes of nitrates. The temperature for the electrolysis of the molten salts is preferably from 150 to 300degC. The voltage for the electrolysis of the molten salts is preferably an AC voltage of from 2 to 6V, more preferably from 4 to 6V. (I.N.)

  12. Uranium mines of Tajikistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razykov, Z.A; Gusakov, E.G.; Marushenko, A.A.; Botov, A.Yu.; Yunusov, M.M.

    2002-12-01

    The book describes location laws, the main properties of geological structure and industrial perspectives for known uranium mines of the Republic of Tajikistan. Used methods of industrial processing of uranium mines are described. The results of investigations of technological properties of main types of uranium ores and methods of industrial processing of some of them are shown. Main properties of uranium are shortly described as well as problems, connected with it, which arise during exploitation, mining and processing of uranium ores. The main methods of solution of these problems are shown. The book has interest for specialists of mining, geological, chemical, and technological fields as well as for students of appropriate universities. This book will be interested for usual reader, too, if they are interested in mineral resources of their country [ru

  13. Uranium chemistry research unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The initial field of research of this Unit, established in 1973, was the basic co-ordination chemistry of uranium, thorium, copper, cobalt and nickel. Subsequently the interest of the Unit extended to extractive metallurgy relating to these metals. Under the term 'co-ordination chemistry' is understood the interaction of the central transition metal ion with surrounding atoms in its immediate vicinity (within bonding distance) and the influence they have on each other - for example, structural studies for determining the number and arrangement of co-ordinated atoms and spectrophotometric studies to establish how the f electron energy levels of uranium are influenced by the environment. New types of uranium compounds have been synthesized and studied, and the behaviour of uranium ions in non-aqueous systems has also received attention. This work can be applied to the development and study of extractants and new extractive processes for uranium

  14. Jabiluka uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The Jabiluka uranium and gold deposit located in the Northern Territory of Australia is the world's largest known primary uranium deposits and as such has the potential to become one of the most important uranium projects in the world. Despite the financial and structural challenges facing the major owner Pancontinental Mining Limited and the changing political policies in Australia, Jabiluka is well situated for development during the 1990's. With the availability of numerous financial and development alternatives, Jabiluka could, by the turn of the century, take its rightful place among the first rank of world uranium producers. The paper discusses ownership, location, property rights, licensing, environmental concerns, marketing and development, capital costs, royalties, uranium policy considerations, geologic exploration history, regional and site geology, and mining and milling operations

  15. EPR of uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.; Lupei, V.

    1984-02-01

    A review of the electron paramagnetic resonance data on the uranium ions is given. After a general account of the electronic structure of the uranium free atoms and ions, the influence of the external fields (magnetic field, crystal fields) is discussed. The main information obtained from EPR studies on the uranium ions in crystals are emphasized: identification of the valence and of the ground electronic state, determination of the structure of the centers, crystal field effects, role of the intermediate coupling and of the J-mixing, role of the covalency, determination of the nuclear spin, maqnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment of the odd isotopes of uranium. These data emphasize the fact that the actinide group has its own identity and this is accutely manifested at the beginning of the 5fsup(n) series encompassed by the uranium ions. (authors)

  16. Uranium-induced sensory alterations in the zebrafish Danio rerio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faucher, K., E-mail: kfaucher@hotmail.fr [Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie des radionucleides (LECO), Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire, Centre de Cadarache, Batiment 186, BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Floriani, M.; Gilbin, R.; Adam-Guillermin, C. [Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie des radionucleides (LECO), Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire, Centre de Cadarache, Batiment 186, BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2012-11-15

    The effect of chronic exposure to uranium ions (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) on sensory tissues including the olfactory and lateral line systems was investigated in zebrafish (Danio rerio) using scanning electron microscopy. The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to uranium damaged sensory tissues in fish. The fish were exposed to uranium at the concentration of 250 {mu}g l{sup -1} for 10 days followed by a depuration period of 23 days. Measurements of uranium uptake in different fish organs: olfactory rosettes and bulbs, brain, skin, and muscles, were also determined by ICP-AES and ICP-MS during the entire experimental period. The results showed that uranium displayed a strong affinity for sensory structures in direct contact with the surrounding medium, such as the olfactory and lateral line systems distributed on the skin. A decreasing gradient of uranium concentration was found: olfactory rosettes > olfactory bulbs > skin > muscles > brain. At the end of the experiment, uranium was present in non-negligible quantities in sensory tissues. In parallel, fish exposed to uranium showed severe sensory tissue alterations at the level of the olfactory and lateral line systems. In both sensory systems, the gross morphology was altered and the sensory hair cells were significantly damaged very early after the initiation of exposure (from the 3rd day). At the end of the experiment, after 23 days of depuration, the lateral line system still displayed slight tissue alterations, but approximately 80% of the neuromasts in this system had regenerated. In contrast, the olfactory system took more time to recover, as more than half of the olfactory rosettes observed remained destroyed at the end of the experiment. This study showed, for the first time, that uranium is able to damage fish sensory tissues to such an extent that tissue regeneration is delayed.

  17. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    Canadian uranium exploration and development efforts in 1985 and 1986 resulted in a significant increase in estimates of measured uranium resources. New discoveries have more than made up for production during 1985 and 1986, and for the elimination of some resources from the overall estimates, due to the sustained upward pressure on production costs and the stagnation of uranium prices in real terms. Canada possesses a large portion of the world's uranium resources that are of current economic interest and remains the major focus of inter-national uranium exploration activity. Expenditures for uranium exploration in Canada in 1985 and 1986 were $32 million and $33 million, respectively. Although much lower than the $130 million total reported for 1979, expenditures for 1987 are forecast to increase. Exploration and surface development drilling in 1985 and 1986 were reported to be 183 000 m and 165σ2 000 m, respectively, 85 per cent of which was in Saskatchewan. Canada has maintained its position as the world's leading producer and exporter of uranium. By the year 2000, Canada's annual uranium requirements will be about 2 100 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are either in operation now or expected to be in service by the late 1990s. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Annual sales currently approach $1 billion, of which exports account for 85 per cent. Forward domestic and export contract commitments totalled 73 000 tU and 62 000 tU, respectively, as of early 1987

  18. Itaconic acid based potential sorbent for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyan, Y.; Naidu, G.R.K.; Das, Sadananda; Pandey, A.K.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-linked hydrogels and adsorptive membranes containing Itaconic acid, Acrylamide, Penta erythritol tetra acrylate and α, α-dimethyl- α-phenyl aceto phenone were prepared by UV-initiated bulk polymerization. These hydrogels and adsorptive membranes were characterized for pH uptake, sorption and desorption kinetics and selectivity towards uranium. The sorption ability of the sorbents towards uranyl ion was thoroughly examined. The developed itaconic acid based sorbents were evaluated for the recovery of uranium from lean sources like sea water. (author)

  19. Uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in south China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyue, Feng; Debao, He [CNNC Key Laboratory of Uranium Resource Exploration and Evaluation Technology, Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology (China)

    2012-07-15

    The paper briefly introduces the differences between uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in the 5 provinces of South China, and discusses their main characteristics in 4 aspects, the uranium productive granite is highly developed in fracture, very strong in alteration, often occurred as two-mica granite and regularly developed with intermediate-basic and acid dikes. The above characteristics distinguish the uranium productive granite from the uranium rich granite. (authors)

  20. Uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in south China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Mingyue; He Debao

    2012-01-01

    The paper briefly introduces the differences between uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in the 5 provinces of South China, and discusses their main characteristics in 4 aspects, the uranium productive granite is highly developed in fracture, very strong in alteration, often occurred as two-mica granite and regularly developed with intermediate-basic and acid dikes. The above characteristics distinguish the uranium productive granite from the uranium rich granite. (authors)

  1. Pengaruh Kandungan Uranium Dalam Umpan Terhadap Efisiensi Pengendapan Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Torowati

    2010-01-01

    PENGARUH KANDUNGAN URANIUM DALAM UMPAN TERHADAP EFISIENSI PENGENDAPAN URANIUM. Setiap aktivitas analisis di Laboratorium Kendali Kualitas, Bidang Bahan Bakar Nuklir selalu dihasilkan limbah radioaktif cair. Limbah radioaktif cair di laboratorium masih mengandung uranium yang cukup besar ± 0,600 g U/l dengan keasamaan yang cukup besar pula. Karena uranium mempunyai nilai ekonomis yang cukup tinggi maka perlu USAha untuk mengambil kembali uranium tersebut. Pada kegiatan ini telah dilak...

  2. Uranium and the fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, T.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of uranium availability upon the future of the fast reactor is reviewed. The important issues considered are uranium reserves and resources, uranium market prices, fast reactor economics and the political availability of uranium to customers in other countries. (U.K.)

  3. Uranium retention in aqueous hydroxyapatite suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, Ana G.; Marrero, Julieta G.; Perez Arisnabarreta, Sebastian A.; Di Nanno, Maria P.; Smichowski, Patricia N.

    2000-01-01

    Batch equilibration were performed to study the ability of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP)[Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ] to immobilize uranium. Different parameters affecting U uptake were evaluated. These studies showed that U was quantitatively retained in a wide range of pHs in the first 15 minutes. These experiments were performed at different U concentrations, between 1 to 100 μg/g and in all cases U uptake did not depend on U concentration. The high retention of U in HAP could be explained by the high specific surface area of the synthesized starting material. The solid phase was characterised by energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis before and after U retention. Effluents were treated using the proposed method and recovery studies were in all cases better than 90%. (author)

  4. Geology and uranium favorability of the Sonora Pass region, Alpine and Tuolumne Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, J.S.; Short, W.O.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium mineralization at the Juniper Mine is restricted to host rocks of the Relief Peak Formation and is most common in coarse-grained lithic sandstone, conglomerate, and lithic wacke. The richest beds contain as much as 0.5% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. Uranium is present as coffinite, uraninite, and unidentified minerals. Thorium/uranium ratios are generally low and erratic. Equivalent uranium determinations are low in comparison with chemical uranium values, indicating that uranium mineralization of the Juniper Mine is geologically young. Core drilling at 16 localities shows that widely separated exposures of the Relief Peak Formation have very similar lithology, geochemistry, and stratigraphy. Some sections are similar to the Juniper Mine section. Core from the bottom of drill hole SP-1 contains 83 ppM uranium, the greatest known concentration outside the mine area. Significant uranium deposits may be concealed beneath the thick Tertiary volcanic cover of the region. The quartz latitic Eureka Valley Tuff is fairly widespread in east-central California and western Nevada. It contains 12 to 14 ppM uranium and stratigraphically overlies the Relief Peak Formation. It is permeable and contains abundant alkali metals and volcanic glass. Because of its petrology, geochemistry, and position, this formation is the most likely source for uranium mineralization of the Sonora Pass region. It should be examined as a potential source rock in other areas with special regard to its relationship to carbonaceous sedimentary formations. The uraniferous granite pegmatitite dike that crops out in the Niagara Creek area appears too small to be a significant source rock. The most favorable rocks in the Sonora Pass region occur near the Juniper Mine and west of it, in the Dardanelles, the Whittakers Dardanelles, and the area of the Big Meadow Quadrangle. Potential uranium host rocks crop out in areas along the crest of the Sierra Nevada from Lake Tahoe to Yosemite.

  5. Geology and uranium favorability of the Sonora Pass region, Alpine and Tuolumne Counties, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, J.S.; Short, W.O.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium mineralization at the Juniper Mine is restricted to host rocks of the Relief Peak Formation and is most common in coarse-grained lithic sandstone, conglomerate, and lithic wacke. The richest beds contain as much as 0.5% U 3 O 8 . Uranium is present as coffinite, uraninite, and unidentified minerals. Thorium/uranium ratios are generally low and erratic. Equivalent uranium determinations are low in comparison with chemical uranium values, indicating that uranium mineralization of the Juniper Mine is geologically young. Core drilling at 16 localities shows that widely separated exposures of the Relief Peak Formation have very similar lithology, geochemistry, and stratigraphy. Some sections are similar to the Juniper Mine section. Core from the bottom of drill hole SP-1 contains 83 ppM uranium, the greatest known concentration outside the mine area. Significant uranium deposits may be concealed beneath the thick Tertiary volcanic cover of the region. The quartz latitic Eureka Valley Tuff is fairly widespread in east-central California and western Nevada. It contains 12 to 14 ppM uranium and stratigraphically overlies the Relief Peak Formation. It is permeable and contains abundant alkali metals and volcanic glass. Because of its petrology, geochemistry, and position, this formation is the most likely source for uranium mineralization of the Sonora Pass region. It should be examined as a potential source rock in other areas with special regard to its relationship to carbonaceous sedimentary formations. The uraniferous granite pegmatitite dike that crops out in the Niagara Creek area appears too small to be a significant source rock. The most favorable rocks in the Sonora Pass region occur near the Juniper Mine and west of it, in the Dardanelles, the Whittakers Dardanelles, and the area of the Big Meadow Quadrangle. Potential uranium host rocks crop out in areas along the crest of the Sierra Nevada from Lake Tahoe to Yosemite

  6. Radiological impacts of uranium recovery in the phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    This article characterizes the occupational and public radiological health impacts associated with phosphate mining and milling. These impacts are related to the phosphate industry's uranium production potential and are compared with those associated with conventional uranium mining and milling. The radiological impacts resulting from occupational and nonoccupational exposures are assessed. Occupational exposures in phosphate facilities are compared to background exposures and radiological population dose assessments, which characterize important radionuclides and exposure pathways. The following conclusions were reached: (1) public consequences of phosphate mining will occur whether or not uranium is recovered as a by-product, (2) radiological consequences of phosphate mining may be comparable to those associated with uranium mining and milling per unit uranium production, (3) radiological impacts via surface waterways and crops fertilized with uranium-bearing phosphates are of minor consequence, and (4) major radiological public health problems associated with phosphate mining are related to radon and radon progeny exposures in structures built on reclaimed lands or with phosphate mining residues, although the magnitudes of these impacts are difficult to evaluate with current data

  7. Uranium producers foresee new boom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, H.

    1979-01-01

    The status of uranium production in Canada is reviewed. Uranium resources in Saskatchewan and Ontario are described and the role of the Cluff Lake inquiry in securing a government decision in favour of further uranium development is mentioned. There have been other uranium strikes near Kelowna, British Columbia and in the Northwest Territories. Increasing uranium demand and favourable prices are making the development of northern resources economically attractive. In fact, all uranium currently produced has been committed to domestic and export contracts so that there is considerable room for expanding the production of uranium in Canada. (T.I.)

  8. Uranium tipped ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, P.

    1993-01-01

    During the uranium enrichment process required to make nuclear weapons or fuel, the concentration of the 'fissile' U-235 isotope has to be increased. What is left, depleted uranium, is about half as radioactive as natural uranium, but very dense and extremely hard. It is used in armour piercing shells. External radiation levels from depleted uranium (DU) are low. However DU is about as toxic as lead and could be harmful to the kidneys if eaten or inhaled. It is estimated that between 40 and 300 tonnes of depleted uranium were left behind by the Allied armies after the Gulf war. The biggest hazard would be from depleted uranium shells which have hit Iraqui armoured vehicles and the resulting dust inhaled. There is a possible link between depleted uranium shells and an illness known as 'Desert Storm Syndrome' occurring in some Gulf war veterans. As these shells are a toxic and radioactive hazard to health and the environment their use and testing should be stopped because of the risks to troops and those living near test firing ranges. (UK)

  9. US uranium market developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusiewski, S.V.; Patterson, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Domestic uranium delivery commitments have risen significantly since January 1979, with the bulk of deliveries scheduled after 1990. Much of the long-term procurement will be obtained from captive production. However, buyers have adjusted their delivery schedules in the near term, deferring some procurement to later years, including a portion of planned captive production. Under current commitments, US imports of foreign uranium in the 1981 to 1985 period will be greater than our exports of domestic uranium. The anticipated supply of domestic uranium through 1985 is clearly more than adequate to fill the probable US demand in the meantime, uranium producers are continuing their efforts to increase future domestic supply by their considerable investments in new or expanded mine and mill facilities. Since January 1980, average contract prices including market-price settlements, for 1980 uranium deliveries have increased slightly, but average market-price settlements made this year have decreased by several dollars. While the general trend of US uranium prices has been upward since we began reporting price data in 1973, some reductions in average prices for future deliveries appeared in 1980. The softening of prices for new procurement can be expected to be increasingly apparent in future surveys

  10. Uranium deposits in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilpolt, R.H.; Simov, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Africa is not only known for its spectacular diamond, gold, copper, chromium, platinum and phosphorus deposits but also for its uranium deposits. At least two uranium provinces can be distinguished - the southern, with the equatorial sub-province; and the south Saharan province. Uranium deposits are distributed either in cratons or in mobile belts, the first of sandstone and quartz-pebble conglomerate type, while those located in mobile belts are predominantly of vein and similar (disseminated) type. Uranium deposits occur within Precambrian rocks or in younger platform sediments, but close to the exposed Precambrian basement. The Proterozoic host rocks consist of sediments, metamorphics or granitoids. In contrast to Phanerozoic continental uranium-bearing sediments, those in the Precambrian are in marginal marine facies but they do contain organic material. The geology of Africa is briefly reviewed with the emphasis on those features which might control the distribution of uranium. The evolution of the African Platform is considered as a progressive reduction of its craton area which has been affected by three major Precambrian tectonic events. A short survey on the geology of known uranium deposits is made. However, some deposits and occurrences for which little published material is available are treated in more detail. (author)

  11. Uranium chemistry: significant advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzanti, M.

    2011-01-01

    The author reviews recent progress in uranium chemistry achieved in CEA laboratories. Like its neighbors in the Mendeleev chart uranium undergoes hydrolysis, oxidation and disproportionation reactions which make the chemistry of these species in water highly complex. The study of the chemistry of uranium in an anhydrous medium has led to correlate the structural and electronic differences observed in the interaction of uranium(III) and the lanthanides(III) with nitrogen or sulfur molecules and the effectiveness of these molecules in An(III)/Ln(III) separation via liquid-liquid extraction. Recent work on the redox reactivity of trivalent uranium U(III) in an organic medium with molecules such as water or an azide ion (N 3 - ) in stoichiometric quantities, led to extremely interesting uranium aggregates particular those involved in actinide migration in the environment or in aggregation problems in the fuel processing cycle. Another significant advance was the discovery of a compound containing the uranyl ion with a degree of oxidation (V) UO 2 + , obtained by oxidation of uranium(III). Recently chemists have succeeded in blocking the disproportionation reaction of uranyl(V) and in stabilizing polymetallic complexes of uranyl(V), opening the way to to a systematic study of the reactivity and the electronic and magnetic properties of uranyl(V) compounds. (A.C.)

  12. Production of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.E.; Shuck, D.L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous, four stage fluidized bed process for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder suitable for use in the manufacture of fuel pellets for nuclear reactors is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of first reacting UF 6 with steam in a first fluidized bed, preferably at about 550 0 C, to form solid intermediate reaction products UO 2 F 2 , U 3 O 8 and an off-gas including hydrogen fluoride (HF). The solid intermediate reaction products are conveyed to a second fluidized bed reactor at which the mol fraction of HF is controlled at low levels in order to prevent the formation of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ). The first intermediate reaction products are reacted in the second fluidized bed with steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 630 0 C. The second intermediate reaction product including uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is conveyed to a third fluidized bed reactor and reacted with additional steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 650 0 C producing a reaction product consisting essentially of uranium dioxide having an oxygen-uranium ratio of about 2 and a low residual fluoride content. This product is then conveyed to a fourth fluidized bed wherein a mixture of air and preheated nitrogen is introduced in order to further reduce the fluoride content of the UO 2 and increase the oxygen-uranium ratio to about 2.25

  13. Purification of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shikama, Tatsuo; Ochiai, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    We developed the system for purifying uranium metal and its metallic compounds and for growing highly pure uranium compounds to study their intrinsic physical properties. Uranium metal was zone refined under low contamination conditions as far as possible. The degree of the purity of uranium metal was examined by the conventional electrical resistivity measurement and by the chemical analysis using the inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP). The results show that some metallic impurities evaporated by the r.f. heating and other usual metallic impurities moved to the end of a rod with a molten zone. Therefore, we conclude that the zone refining technique is much effective to the removal of metallic impurities and we obtained high purified uranium metal of 99.99% up with regarding to metallic impurities. The maximum residual resistivity ratio, the r.r.r., so far obtained was about 17-20. Using the purified uranium, we are attempting to grow a highly pure uranium-titanium single crystals. (author)

  14. Strong demand for natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinowski, P.

    1975-01-01

    The Deutsches Atomforum and the task group 'fuel elements' of the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft had organized an international two-day symposium in Mainz on natural uranium supply which was attended by 250 experts from 20 countries. The four main themes were: Demand for natural uranium, uranium deposits and uranium production, attitude of the uranium producing countries, and energy policy of the industrial nations. (orig./AK) [de

  15. The uranium equation in 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonny, J.; Fulton, M.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: comparison of world nuclear generating capacity forecasts; world uranium requirements; comparison of uranium production capability forecasts; supply and demand situation in 1990 and 1995; a perspective on the uranium equation (economic factors; development lead times as a factor affecting market stability; the influence of uncertainty; the uranium market in perspective; the uranium market in 1995). (U.K.)

  16. Uranium and thorium recovery in thorianite ore-preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotte, Joao V.M. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Villegas, Raul A.S.; Fukuma, Henrique T., E-mail: rvillegas@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of the studies aiming to develop a hydrometallurgical process to produce uranium and thorium concentrates from thorianite ore from Amapa State, Brazil. This process comprises two major parts: acid leaching and Th/U recovery using solvent extraction strategies. Thorianite ore has a typical composition of 60 - 70% of thorium, 8 - 10% lead and 7 - 10% uranium. Sulfuric acid leaching operational conditions were defined as follows: acid/ore ratio 7.5 t/t, ore size below 65 mesh (Tyler), 2 hours leaching time and temperature of 100 deg C. Leaching tests results showed that uranium and thorium recovery exceeded 95%, whereas 97% of lead ore content remained in the solid form. Uranium and thorium simultaneous solvent extraction is necessary due to high sulfate concentration in the liquor obtained from leaching, so the Primene JM-T primary anime was used for this extraction step. Aqueous raffinate from extraction containing sulfuric acid was recycled to the leaching step, reducing acid uptake around 60%, to achieve a net sulfuric acid consumption of 3 t/t of ore. Uranium and thorium simultaneous stripping was performed using sodium carbonate solution. In the aqueous stripped it was added sulfuric acid at pH 1.5, followed by a second solvent extraction step using the tertiary amine Alamine 336. The following stripping step was done with a solution of sodium chloride, resulting in a final solution of 23 g L-1 uranium. (author)

  17. Uranium biosorption by Trichoderma harzianum entrapped in polyester foam beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, A.M.; Shemsi, A.M.; Akhtar, K.; Anwar, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanism of uranium biosorption by resting cells of Trichoderma harzianum was studied at pH 4.5. Time-dependent uptake of uranium by Trichoderma harzianum was also determined. Various cations (Na, K, Ca and Fe, etc.) were found to affect the adsorption capability of these cells. Different theoretical thermodynamic models governing the adsorption behavior of uranium were also tested and it was found to follow the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The constants of Freundlich adsorption isotherm A and 1/n were found to be 1.5 x 10 -6 mole/g and 0.31 respectively. Dubinin Radushkevich equation was tested and the maximum adsorption capacity (X m ) of Trichoderma harzianum and sorption energy (E s ) for the ion exchange process computed. Data of uranium sorption were also examined using Weber Morris's equation. The upscaling of uranium biosorption by Trichoderma harzianum entrapped in commercial foam (polyesters) was carried out in glass columns. It was found to recover more than 85% of the total uranium present in bacterial leachate

  18. Uranium resource assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to examine what is generally known about uranium resources, what is subject to conjecture, how well do the explorers themselves understand the occurrence of uranium, and who are the various participants in the exploration process. From this we hope to reach a better understanding of the quality of uranium resource estimates as well as the nature of the exploration process. The underlying questions will remain unanswered. But given an inability to estimate precisely our uranium resources, how much do we really need to know. To answer this latter question, the various Department of Energy needs for uranium resource estimates are examined. This allows consideration of whether or not given the absence of more complete long-term supply data and the associated problems of uranium deliverability for the electric utility industry, we are now threatened with nuclear power plants eventually standing idle due to an unanticipated lack of fuel for their reactors. Obviously this is of some consequence to the government and energy consuming public. The report is organized into four parts. Section I evaluates the uranium resource data base and the various methodologies of resource assessment. Part II describes the manner in which a private company goes about exploring for uranium and the nature of its internal need for resource information. Part III examines the structure of the industry for the purpose of determining the character of the industry with respect to resource development. Part IV arrives at conclusions about the emerging pattern of industrial behavior with respect to uranium supply and the implications this has for coping with national energy issues

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about your thyroid’s size, shape, position and function that is often unattainable using other imaging procedures. ... thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is ...

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are encased in metal and plastic and most often shaped like a box, attached to a ... will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake procedures are painless. ...

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information ...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential ... or imaging device that produces pictures and provides molecular information. The thyroid scan and thyroid uptake provide ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Actual scanning time for each thyroid uptake is five minutes or less. top of page What will ... diagnostic procedures have been used for more than five decades, and there are no known long-term ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top ... Scan and Uptake Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When radiotracer is taken by mouth, in either liquid or capsule form, it is typically swallowed up ... radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) in liquid or capsule form to swallow. The thyroid uptake ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does ... they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. Jewelry ... small hand-held device resembling a microphone that can detect and measure the amount of the radiotracer ...

  9. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake ... you otherwise, you may resume your normal activities after your nuclear medicine scan. If any special instructions ...

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan and thyroid uptake provide information about the structure and function of the thyroid. The thyroid is ... computer, create pictures offering details on both the structure and function of organs and tissues in your ...

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. ... its radioactivity over time. It may also pass out of your body through your urine or stool ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... procedures within the last two months that used iodine-based contrast material. Your doctor will instruct you ... a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a ...

  13. Vacuum fusion of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.A.

    1957-01-01

    After having outlined that vacuum fusion and moulding of uranium and of its alloys have some technical and economic benefits (vacuum operations avoid uranium oxidation and result in some purification; precision moulding avoids machining, chip production and chemical reprocessing of these chips; direct production of the desired shape is possible by precision moulding), this report presents the uranium fusion unit (its low pressure enclosure and pumping device, the crucible-mould assembly, and the MF supply device). The author describes the different steps of cast production, and briefly comments the obtained results

  14. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  15. Uranium absorption study pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raievski, V.; Sautiez, B.

    1959-01-01

    The report describes a pile designed to measure the absorption of fuel slugs. The pile is of graphite and comprises a central section composed of uranium rods in a regular lattice. RaBe sources and BF 3 counters are situated on either side of the center. A given uranium charge is compared with a specimen charge of about 560 kg, and the difference in absorption between the two noted. The sensitivity of the equipment will detect absorption variations of about a few ppm boron (10 -6 boron per gr. of uranium) or better. (author) [fr

  16. The politics of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, N.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: what God hath joined (historical and technical summary of the atomic bomb project and the post-war attempt at international control of atomic energy); finding uranium and using it; atoms for peace; nuclear optimists (development of nuclear power); the Treaty brake (Non-Proliferation Treaty); bending the rules; plowshares and swords; the club and the gambler (uranium production industry); turnabout (government policies); the uranium cycle; nuclear conflict; tiger in the nursery (radiation hazards; nuclear controversy); breaking the rules (proliferation); new answers, old questions. (U.K.)

  17. Uranium thiolate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverd, Pascal C.

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis proposes a new approach to the chemistry of uranium thiolate complexes as these compounds are very promising for various uses (in bio-inorganic chemistry, in some industrial processes like oil desulphurization). It more particularly addresses the U-S bond or more generally bonds between polarizable materials and hard metals. The author thus reports the study of uranium organometallic thiolates (tricyclo-penta-dienic and mono-cyclo-octa-tetraenylic complexes), and of uranium homoleptic thiolates (tetra-thiolate complexes, hexa-thiolate complexes, reactivity of homoleptic thiolate complexes) [fr

  18. Uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floeter, W.

    1976-01-01

    In this report uranium mining and milling are reviewed. The fuel cycle, different types of uranium geological deposits, blending of ores, open cast and underground mining, the mining cost and radiation protection in mines are treated in the first part of this report. In the second part, the milling of uranium ores is treated, including process technology, acid and alkaline leaching, process design for physical and chemical treatment of the ores, and the cost. Each chapter is clarified by added figures, diagrams, tables, and flowsheets. (HK) [de

  19. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process

  20. African Crop Science Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... The African Crop Science Journal, a quarterly publication, publishes original ... interactions, information science, environmental science and soil science.

  1. African Crop Science Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Crop Science Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 2 (1993) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. African Crop Science Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Crop Science Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Possible uranium sources of Streltsovsky uranium ore field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lisheng

    2005-01-01

    The uranium deposit of the Late Jurassic Streltsovaky caldera in Transbaikalia of Russia is the largest uranium field associated with volcanics in the world, its uranium reserves are 280 000 t U, and it is the largest uranium resources in Russia. About one third of the caldera stratigraphic pile consists of strongly-altered rhyolites. Uranium resources of the Streltsovsky caldera are much larger than any other volcanic-related uranium districts in the world. Besides, the efficiency of hydrothermal alteration, uranium resources appear to result from the juxtaposition of two major uranium sources; highly fractionated peralkaline rhyolites of Jurassic age in the caldera, and U-rich subalkaline granites of Variscan age in the basement in which the major uranium-bearing accessory minerals were metamict at the time of the hydrothermal ore formation. (authors)

  4. Transfer of radionuclides to crop plants through roots. Radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Sumiya, Misako; Ohmomo, Yoichiro

    1987-07-01

    In an atmospheric discharge of radioiodines, direct deposition of the nuclides onto leaf surface must be the most significant pathway. However, root uptake is also of importance specifically for /sup 129/I because of its long half life of 1.57 x 10/sup 7/ years. In order to estimate the amount of the nuclide transferred to the crop plants from contaminated field, the experiments were carried out using solution culture. Rice plant, Oryza sativa cv. koshihikari, spinach, Spinacea oleracea L., radish, Raphanus sativus L., and the other four kinds of crop plants were exposed to culture solution in which Na/sup 131/I were contained. The transfer rates, defined as the ratio of activity of plant sample per day to the mean activity of culture solution, were calculated. And the differences by the organs of each crop plant and by plant species were discussed in this paper. Temporal critical crop plants for /sup 129/I were selected.

  5. Modelling 137Cs uptake in plants from undisturbed soil monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waegeneers, Nadia; Smolders, Erik; Merckx, Roel

    2005-01-01

    A model predicting 137 Cs uptake in plants was applied on data from artificially contaminated lysimeters. The lysimeter data involve three different crops (beans, ryegrass and lettuce) grown on five different soils between 3 and 5 years after contamination and where soil solution composition was monitored. The mechanistic model predicts plant uptake of 137 Cs from soil solution composition. Predicted K concentrations in the rhizosphere were up to 50-fold below that in the bulk soil solution whereas corresponding 137 Cs concentration gradients were always less pronounced. Predictions of crop 137 Cs content based on rhizosphere soil solution compositions were generally closer to observations than those based on bulk soil solution composition. The model explained 17% (beans) to 91% (lettuce) of the variation in 137 Cs activity concentrations in the plants. The model failed to predict the 137 Cs activity concentration in ryegrass where uptake of the 5-year-old 137 Cs from 3 soils was about 40-fold larger than predicted. The model generally underpredicted crop 137 Cs concentrations at soil solution K concentration below about 1.0 mM. It is concluded that 137 Cs uptake can be predicted from the soil solution composition at adequate K nutrition but that significant uncertainties remain when soil solution K is below 1 mM

  6. Exploration of Uranium. Report to the Government of the Eastern Republic of Uruguay; Prospeccion de uranio. Informe al gobierno de la Republica Oriental del Uruguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muset, J A [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1979-07-01

    The Government of Uruguay with IAEA assistance carried out the Uranium prospection project and the evolution of uraniferous minerals resources on this country soil. Several arrangement were did such as the recollection and analysis of the geologic material. The Uranium project began with radiometric anomalies and out crops.

  7. Irrigation water consumption modelling of a soilless cucumber crop under specific greenhouse conditions in a humid tropical climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galo Alberto Salcedo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The irrigation water consumption of a soilless cucumber crop under greenhouse conditions in a humid tropical climate has been evaluated in this paper in order to improve the irrigation water and fertilizers management in these specific conditions. For this purpose, a field experiment was conducted. Two trials were carried out during the years 2011 and 2014 in an experimental farm located in Vinces (Ecuador. In each trial, the complete growing cycle of a cucumber crop grown under a greenhouse was evaluated. Crop development was monitored and a good fit to a sigmoidal Gompertz type growth function was reported. The daily water uptake of the crop was measured and related to the most relevant indoor climate variables. Two different combination methods, namely the Penman-Monteith equation and the Baille equation, were applied. However, the results obtained with these combination methods were not satisfactory due to the poor correlation between the climatic variables, especially the incoming radiation, and the crop's water uptake (WU. On contrary, a good correlation was reported between the crop's water uptake and the leaf area index (LAI, especially in the initial crop stages. However, when the crop is fully developed, the WU stabilizes and becomes independent from the LAI. A preliminary model to simulate the water uptake of the crop was adjusted using the data obtained in the first experiment and then validated with the data of the second experiment.

  8. Addressing crop interactions within cropping systems in LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goglio, Pietro; Brankatschk, Gerhard; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman

    2018-01-01

    objectives of this discussion article are as follows: (i) to discuss the characteristics of cropping systems which might affect the LCA methodology, (ii) to discuss the advantages and the disadvantages of the current available methods for the life-cycle assessment of cropping systems, and (iii) to offer...... management and emissions, and (3) functional unit issues. The LCA approaches presented are as follows: cropping system, allocation approaches, crop-by-crop approach, and combined approaches. The various approaches are described together with their advantages and disadvantages, applicability...... considers cropping system issues if they are related to multiproduct and nutrient cycling, while the crop-by-crop approach is highly affected by assumptions and considers cropping system issues only if they are related to the analyzed crop. Conclusions Each LCA approach presents advantages and disadvantages...

  9. Uranium and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Basic principles and definitions of reactor technology, biological radiation effects in man, and radioactive wastes are outlined. An argument is presented against Australia exploiting its uranium resources. (R.L.)

  10. Uranium hexafluoride purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Eneas F. de

    1986-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride might contain a large amount of impurities after manufacturing or handling. Three usual methods of purification of uranium hexafluoride were presented: selective sorption, sublimation, and distillation. Since uranium hexafluoride usually is contaminated with hydrogen fluoride, a theoretical study of the phase equilibrium properties was performed for the binary system UF 6 -HF. A large deviation from the ideal solution behaviour was observed. A purification unity based on a constant reflux batch distillation process was developed. A procedure was established in order to design the re boiler, condenser and packed columns for the UF 6 -HF mixture separation. A bench scale facility for fractional distillation of uranium hexafluoride was described. Basic operations for that facility and results extracted from several batches were discussed. (author)

  11. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a sintered, high density, large crystal grain size uranium dioxide pellet is described which involves: (i) reacting a uranyl nitrate of formula UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O with a sulphur source, at a temperature of from about 300 deg. C to provide a sulphur-containing uranium trioxide; (ii) reacting the thus-obtained modified uranium trioxide with ammonium nitrate to form an insoluble sulphur-containing ammonium uranate; (iii) neutralizing the thus-formed slurry with ammonium hydroxide to precipitate out as an insoluble ammonium uranate the remaining dissolved uranium; (iv) recovering the thus-formed precipitates in a dry state; (v) reducing the dry precipitate to UO 2 , and forming it into 'green' pellets; and (vi) sintering the pellets in a hydrogen atmosphere at an elevated temperature

  12. Uranium market activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are summarized from the 1974 ERDA annual survey of buyers and sellers and from a survey of uranium price data which provided information on additional domestic buying activity during the first half of 1975 through 1982

  13. Heap leaching for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Denison Mines Ltd. is using two bacterial leaching processes to combat the high cost of extracting uranium from low grade ore in thin reefs. Both processes use thiobacillus ferro-oxidans, a bacterium that employs the oxidation of ferrous iron and sulphur as its source of energy for growth. The first method is flood leaching, in which ore is subjected to successive flood, drain and rest cycles. The second, trickle leaching, uses sprinklers to douse the broken muck continuously with leaching solution. In areas where grades are too low to justify the expense of hauling the ore to the surface, the company is using this biological process underground to recover uranium. In 1987 Denison recovered 840 000 lb of uranium through bacterial heap leaching. It plans to have biological in-place leaching contribute 25% of the total uranium production by 1990. (fig.)

  14. Uranium purchases report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B,'' Uranium Marketing Activities,'' are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year's report. The report contains a glossary of terms

  15. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  16. Uranium in granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice, Y.T.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research activities of the Canadian Uranium in Granites Study are presented in 18 papers and 3 abstracts. 'Granites' is used as a generic term for granitoids, granitic rocks, and plutonic rocks

  17. Uranium Research in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanouté, Mamadou

    2015-01-01

    The work of mining companies have so far not proved economic uranium resources, but they have nevertheless contributed greatly to a better understanding of the geology, particularly in Eastern Senegal, on the upper Precambrian basin including which equivalents exist throughout West Africa (the uranium belt of Zaire) prospected by CEA-COGEMA teams. The researches carried out in Senegal, but also in Guinea and Mali helped establish a detailed map and understand the course of geological history. With new exploration techniques and data of airborne geophysical (radiometric) provided by the Mining Sector Support Programme (PASMI 9th EDF 9 ACP SE 09), AREVA, at the end of the first period validity of the exploration permit increased significantly, the resources. Prospects are favorable to a doubling of resources; objective of a uranium mine in Senegal. Synergies are possible and desirable with joint exploitation of uranium deposits located in Mali, near the border with Senegal.

  18. Uranium industry seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The tenth annual Uranium Industry Seminar, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Grand Junction Office, was held in Grand Junction, Colorado, on October 22 and 23, 1980. There were 700 registered attendees as compared to 833 attending the previous year. The attendees were drawn largely from uranium and other energy resource companies, electric utility firms, energy consultants and service companies, and governmental agencies. In addition, there were representatives present from Indian tribes, universities, the media, DOE laboratories, and foreign countries and organizations. There were 14 papers presented at the seminar by speakers from the Department of Energy, US Geological Survey, and Bendix Field Engineering Corporation which is the on-site prime contractor for DOE's Grand Junction Office. The topics the papers dealt with were uranium policies, exploration, respources, supply, enrichment, and market conditions. There also were papers describing the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program and international activities. All 14 papers in this Proceedings have been abstracted and indexed

  19. Uranium in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The history, sources, mineralogy, extraction metallurgy, conversion, and enrichment of uranium in South Africa is reviewed. Over the past 40 years extraction plants were built at 27 sites, and over 140 kt of uranium have been produced. Older plants have had to adapt to changing market conditions, no single technology has had the opportunity to become entrenched, and the costs have been reduced to a third of those of the original flowsheet. The research efforts aimed at developing the country's nuclear raw materials have been particularly rewarding, as they have enabled South Africa to become a world leader in the extraction of uranium from low-grade ores and to develop methods for uranium enrichment and the production of nuclear fuels. 43 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Ontario's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1981-01-01

    This report traces the Ontario uranium mining industry from the first discovery of uranium north of Sault Ste. Marie through the uranium boom of the 1950's when Elliot Lake and Bancroft were developed, the cutbacks of the 1960s, the renewed enthusiasm in exploration and development of the 1970s to the current position when continued production for the domestic market is assured. Ontario, with developed mines and operational expertise, will be in a position to compete for export markets as they reopen. The low level of expenditures for uranium exploration and the lack of new discoveries are noted. The report also reviews and places in perspective the development of policies and regulations governing the industry and the jurisdictional relationships of the Federal and Provincial governments

  1. Uranium dioxide. Sintering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Description of a sintering method and of the equipment devoted to uranium dioxide powder caracterization and comparison between different samples. Determination of the curve giving specific volume versus pressure and micrographic examination of a pellet at medium pressure [fr

  2. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  3. The uranium market prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.

    1981-01-01

    A historical analysis of the uranium market points out the cyclical nature of the market and suggests that the spot price, exploration levels, and mill capacity utilization rate are dependent on economic factors. An examination of the current uranium market suggests that the effects of the forecasted surplus supply, the diminishing returns in exploration and the long lead times and high costs of development may mean that future production levels are uncertain. The general prospects for the uranium industry are also uncertain because of barriers to trade, environmental regulations and public opinion. The paper concludes that by the use of long term contracts, appropriate inventory policy and greater discussion between producers and consumers the prospects for the uranium market can be made more certain and further imbalances in demand and supply can be avoided. (author)

  4. Uranium industry seminar: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The eleventh annual Uranium Industry Seminar, sponsored by the Grand Junction Area Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE), was held in Grand Junction, Colorado, on October 21 and 22, 1981. There were 491 registered attendees as compared to 700 attending the previous year. The attendees were largely from uranium and other energy resource companies, electric utility firms, energy consultants and service companies, and governmental agencies. In addition, there were representatives present from Indian tribes, universities, the media, DOE laboratories, and foreign countries and organizations. Papers presented at the seminar dealt with uranium policies, exploration, resources, supply, enrichment, and market conditions. There also were papers on the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program and international activities. Thirteen papers included in this report have been abstracted and indexed

  5. Internal friction in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of studies conducted to relate internal friction measurements in U to allotropic transformations. It was found that several internal friction peaks occur in α-uranium whose magnitude changed drastically after annealing in the β phase. All of the allotropic transformations in uranium are diffusional in nature under slow heating and cooling conditions. Creep at regions of high stress concentration appears to be responsible for high temperature internal friction in α-uranium. The activation energy for grain boundary relaxation in α-uranium was found to be 65.1 +- 4 kcal/mole. Impurity atoms interfere with the basic mechanism for grain boundary relaxation resulting in a distribution in activation energies. A considerable distribution in ln tau 0 was also found which is a measure of the distribution in local order and in the Debye frequency around a grain boundary

  6. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  7. Uranium - the plain facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical, political, environmental and sociological aspects are discussed under the headings: mining; milling; dangers (particularly, radiation hazards); human sacrifice; Namibia; future of uranium; what you can do. (U.K.)

  8. MICRONUTRIENTS USE EFFICIENCY IN TROPICAL COVER CROPS AS INFLUENCED BY PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAND KUMAR FAGERIA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of micronutrients is increasing in the recent years in cropping systems in many parts of the world and cover crops are important components of cropping systems. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate copper (Cu, iron (Fe, manganese (Mn and zinc (Zn use efficiency in 14 tropical leg-ume cover crops grown on an Oxisol. The P levels used were low (0 mg kg-1, medium (100 mg kg-1 and high (200 mg kg-1. The P X cover crops interactions were significant for Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn use efficiency (tops dry weight/unit nutrient uptake. Hence, cover crop species varied in nutrient use efficiency with change in P levels. The micronutrient use efficiency was in the order of Cu > Zn > Mn > Fe. Higher Cu use efficiency was associated with lower uptake of this element, in the cover crop tops compared to other micronutrients. Similar-ly, lower efficiency of Fe and Mn was associated with their higher uptake in the tops of cover crops. Overall, Cu and Mn use efficiency was decreased when P level was raised from low to medium level and then it was constant. Iron use efficiency was increased with increasing P level but Zn use efficiency was constant with the addition of P fertilizer

  9. Biogeochemical controls of uranium bioavailability from the dissolved phase in natural freshwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Marie-Noele; Fuller, Christopher C.; Cain, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kate M.; Aiken, George R.

    2016-01-01

    To gain insights into the risks associated with uranium (U) mining and processing, we investigated the biogeochemical controls of U bioavailability in the model freshwater speciesLymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda). Bioavailability of dissolved U(VI) was characterized in controlled laboratory experiments over a range of water hardness, pH, and in the presence of complexing ligands in the form of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM). Results show that dissolved U is bioavailable under all the geochemical conditions tested. Uranium uptake rates follow first order kinetics over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations. Uranium uptake rates in L. stagnalis ultimately demonstrate saturation uptake kinetics when exposure concentrations exceed 100 nM, suggesting uptake via a finite number of carriers or ion channels. The lack of a relationship between U uptake rate constants and Ca uptake rates suggest that U does not exclusively use Ca membrane transporters. In general, U bioavailability decreases with increasing pH, increasing Ca and Mg concentrations, and when DOM is present. Competing ions did not affect U uptake rates. Speciation modeling that includes formation constants for U ternary complexes reveals that the aqueous concentration of dicarbonato U species (UO2(CO3)2–2) best predicts U bioavailability to L. stagnalis, challenging the free-ion activity model postulate.

  10. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In 1988 Canada's five uranium producers reported output of concentrate containing a record 12,470 metric tons of uranium (tU), or about one third of total Western world production. Shipments exceeded 13,200 tU, valued at $Cdn 1.1 billion. Most of Canada's uranium output is available for export for peaceful purposes, as domestic requirements represent about 15 percent of production. The six uranium marketers signed new sales contracts for over 11,000 tU, mostly destined for the United States. Annual exports peaked in 1987 at 12,790 tU, falling back to 10,430 tU in 1988. Forward domestic and export contract commitments were more than 70,000 tU and 60,000 tU, respectively, as of early 1989. The uranium industry in Canada was restructured and consolidated by merger and acquisition, including the formation of Cameco. Three uranium projects were also advanced. The Athabasca Basin is the primary target for the discovery of high-grade low-cost uranium deposits. Discovery of new reserves in 1987 and 1988 did not fully replace the record output over the two-year period. The estimate of overall resources as of January 1989 was down by 4 percent from January 1987 to a total (measured, indicated and inferred) of 544,000 tU. Exploration expenditures reached $Cdn 37 million in 1987 and $59 million in 1988, due largely to the test mining programs at the Cigar Lake and Midwest projects in Saskatchewan. Spot market prices fell to all-time lows from 1987 to mid-1989, and there is little sign of relief. Canadian uranium production capability could fall below 12,000 tU before the late 1990s; however, should market conditions warrant output could be increased beyond 15,000 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are now or are expected to be in service by the late 1990s. There is significant potential for discovering additional uranium resources. Canada's uranium production is equivalent, in

  11. Mechanisms of uranium interactions with hydroxyapatite: Implications for groundwater remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C.C.; Bargar, J.R.; Davis, J.A.; Piana, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The speciation of U(VI) sorbed to synthetic hydroxyapatite was investigated using a combination of U LIII-edge XAS, synchrotron XRD, batch uptake measurements, and SEM-EDS. The mechanisms of U(VI) removal by apatite were determined in order to evaluate the feasibility of apatitebased in-situ permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). In batch U(VI) uptake experiments with synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA), near complete removal of dissolved uranium (>99.5%) to use in development of PRBs for groundwater U(VI) remediation.

  12. Traits affecting early season nitrogen uptake in nine legume species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elana Dayoub

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Legume crops are known to have low soil N uptake early in their life cycle, which can weaken their ability to compete with other species, such as weeds or other crops in intercropping systems. However, there is limited knowledge on the main traits involved in soil N uptake during early growth and for a range of species. The objective of this research was to identify the main traits explaining the variability among legume species in soil N uptake and to study the effect of the soil mineral N supply on the legume strategy for the use of available N sources during early growth. Nine legume species were grown in rhizotrons with or without N supply. Root expansion, shoot and root biomass, nodule establishment, N2 fixation and mineral soil N uptake were measured. A large interspecific variability was observed for all traits affecting soil N uptake. Root lateral expansion and early biomass in relation to seed mass were the major traits influencing soil N uptake regardless of the level of soil N availability. Fenugreek, lentil, alfalfa, and common vetch could be considered weak competitors for soil N due to their low plant biomass and low lateral root expansion. Conversely, peanut, pea, chickpea and soybean had a greater soil N uptake. Faba bean was separated from other species having a higher nodule biomass, a higher N2 fixation and a lower seed reserve depletion. Faba bean was able to simultaneously fix N2 and take up soil N. This work has identified traits of seed mass, shoot and root biomass, root lateral expansion, N2 fixation and seed reserve depletion that allowing classification of legume species regarding their soil N uptake ability during early growth.

  13. U for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Beisa Mine is unique in South Africa - it is the only underground mine with uranium as its main product and gold as a by-product. At the rate of 1,2 Mt/a, the life of Beisa is estimated on 26 years. Beisa's metallurgical plant is designed to handle initially a monthly throughput of 100 000t of ore, from which uranium, gold and silver will be extracted

  14. Uranium leads political stakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, D.

    2009-01-01

    Until the announcement by the federal Environment Minister Peter Garrett that the government would permit uranium mining at Beverly Four Mile, South Australia, there had been little news flow from the sector over the past year. Uranium was the first to turn down, even before the United States sub-prime mortgage crisis began to cause shock waves through the global economy, a report by BGF Equities analyst Warwick Grigor shows.

  15. Uranium purchases report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs

  16. Gases in uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.J.; Pacer, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Interest continues to grow in the use of helium and radon detection as a uranium exploration tool because, in many instances, these radiogenic gases are the only indicators of deeply buried mineralization. The origin of these gases, their migration in the ground, the type of samples and measurement techniques are discussed. Case histories of comparative tests conducted on known uranium deposits at three geologically diverse sites in the United States of America are also presented. (author)

  17. Argentinian uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    A profit-making process for the exploitation of low grade uranium is presented. The process of lixiviation will be used, which will make it possible to obtain a final product whose humidity level will not exceed 10% and whose uranium oxide content will be no less than 68%. The operations of the plant are described. The plant can produce between 100 and 150 t of U 3 O 8 /yr in the form of yellow cake

  18. World uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffeyes, K.S.; MacGregor, I.D.

    1980-01-01

    To estimate the total resource availability of uranium, the authors' approach has been to ask whether the distribution of uranium in the earth's crust can be reasonably approximated by a bell-shaped log-normal curve. In addition they have asked whether the uranium deposits actually mined appear to be a portion of the high-grade tail, or ascending slope, of the distribution. This approach preserves what they feel are the two most important guiding principles of Hubbert's work, for petroleum, namely recognizing the geological framework that contains the deposits of interest and examining the industry's historical record of discovering those deposits. Their findings, published recently in the form of a book-length report prepared for the US Department of Energy, suggest that for uranium the crustal-distribution model and the mining-history model can be brought together in a consistent picture. In brief, they conclude that both sets of data can be described by a single log-normal curve, the smoothly ascending slope of which indicates approximately a 300-fold increase in the amount of uranium recoverable for each tenfold decrease in ore grade. This conclusion has important implications for the future availability of uranium. They hasten to add, however, that this is only an approximative argument; no rigorous statistical basis exists for expecting a log-normal distribution. They continue, pointing out the enormously complex range of geochemical behavior of uranium - and its wide variety of different binds of economic deposit. Their case study, supported by US mining records, indicates that the supply of uranium will not be a limiting factor in the development of nuclear power

  19. Recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowden, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    A process is provided for the recovery of uranium from an organic extractant phase containing an amine. The extractant phase is contacted in a number of mixing stages with an acidic aqueous stripping phase containing sulphate ions, and the phases are passed together through a series of mixing stages while maintaining a dispersion of droplets of one phase in the other. Uranium is precipitated from the final stage by raising the pH. An apparatus having several mixing chambers is described

  20. Uranium - the nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.E.N.

    1976-01-01

    A brief history is presented of Canadian uranium exploration, production, and sales. Statistics show that Canada is a good customer for its own uranium due to a rapidly expanding nuclear power program. Due to an average 10 year lag between commencement of exploration and production, and with current producers sold out through 1985, it is imperative that exploration efforts be increased. (E.C.B.)