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Sample records for crops alleviate tribal

  1. Genetic engineering to enhance crop-based phytonutrients (nutraceuticals) to alleviate diet-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, Autar K; Shukla, Vijaya; Fatima, Tahira; Handa, Avtar K; Yachha, Surender K

    2010-01-01

    Nutrition studies have provided unambiguous evidence that a number of human health maladies including chronic coronary artery, hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, cancer and age- and lifestyle-related diseases are associated with the diet. Several favorable and a few deleterious natural dietary ingredients have been identified that predispose human populations to various genetic and epigenetic based disorders. Media dissemination of this information has greatly raised public awareness of the beneficial effects due to increased consumption of fruit, vegetables and whole grain cereals-foods rich in phytonutrients, protein and fiber. However, the presence of intrinsically low levels of the beneficial phytonutrients in the available genotypes of crop plants is not always at par with the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for different phytonutrients (nutraceuticals). Molecular engineering of crop plants has offered a number of tools to markedly enhance intracellular concentrations of some of the beneficial nutrients, levels that, in some cases, are closer to the RDA threshold. This review brings together literature on various strategies utilized for bioengineering both major and minor crops to increase the levels of desirable phytonutrients while also decreasing the concentrations of deleterious metabolites. Some of these include increases in: protein level in potato; lysine in corn and rice; methionine in alfalfa; carotenoids (beta-carotene, phytoene, lycopene, zeaxanthin and lutein) in rice, potato, canola, tomato; choline in tomato; folates in rice, corn, tomato and lettuce; vitamin C in corn and lettuce; polyphenolics such as flavonol, isoflavone, resveratrol, chlorogenic acid and other flavonoids in tomato; anthocyanin levels in tomato and potato; alpha-tocopherol in soybean, oil seed, lettuce and potato; iron and zinc in transgenic rice. Also, molecular engineering has succeeded in considerably reducing the levels of the offending protein glutelin in rice

  2. Poverty alleviation potential of speculation crops and remittance flows in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hes, Tomás

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural growth and poverty reduction are not necessarily interconnected. Productivity increase can be fueled by few powerful organizations leaving aside large number of ostracized smallholders who do not participate in global production-market channels (characterized by economies of scale, capital accumulation and globalized market diversification. The choice of agricultural products that provide the best combination of income level and long term stability is a key decision. This is especially important for marginalized population that lack of a geographically spread product portfolio that could offset potential price volatilities as well as production variation. The study analyzes the impact on poverty reduction of four strategic traditional agricultural products produced in Mexico (corn, beans, chili pepper and tomato. Thirty two Mexican states have been included in the study within the span of 10 years. The work takes into account influences of macroeconomic character and concludes that commercial crops with a speculation potential, for instance tomato, may have been a better choice for the small scale producers than subsistence crops, as they seem to have a statistically important impact on poverty reduction. As to the other variables studied, remittances show to be another crucial factor for poverty reduction. These are essential for Mexican rural smallholders due to family interconnections with U.S. labour markets.

  3. 77 FR 71833 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... traditional cultural values and beliefs of the people they are designed to serve, including youth and at-risk... workplace safety while working to alleviate the high unemployment found on tribal lands. The Department is...

  4. One crop breeding cycle from starvation? How engineering crop photosynthesis for rising CO2 and temperature could be one important route to alleviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromdijk, Johannes; Long, Stephen P

    2016-03-16

    Global climate change is likely to severely impact human food production. This comes at a time when predicted demand for primary foodstuffs by a growing human population and changing global diets is already outpacing a stagnating annual rate of increase in crop productivity. Additionally, the time required by crop breeding and bioengineering to release improved varieties to farmers is substantial, meaning that any crop improvements needed to mitigate food shortages in the 2040s would need to start now. In this perspective, the rationale for improvements in photosynthetic efficiency as a breeding objective for higher yields is outlined. Subsequently, using simple simulation models it is shown how predicted changes in temperature and atmospheric [CO2] affect leaf photosynthetic rates. The chloroplast accounts for the majority of leaf nitrogen in crops. Within the chloroplast about 25% of nitrogen is invested in the carboxylase, Rubisco, which catalyses the first step of CO2 assimilation. Most of the remaining nitrogen is invested in the apparatus to drive carbohydrate synthesis and regenerate ribulose-1:5-bisphosphate (RuBP), the CO2-acceptor molecule at Rubisco. At preindustrial [CO2], investment in these two aspects may have been balanced resulting in co-limitation. At today's [CO2], there appears to be over-investment in Rubisco, and despite the counter-active effects of rising temperature and [CO2], this imbalance is predicted to worsen with global climate change. By breeding or engineering restored optimality under future conditions increased productivity could be achieved in both tropical and temperate environments without additional nitrogen fertilizer. Given the magnitude of the potential shortfall, better storage conditions, improved crop management and better crop varieties will all be needed. With the short time-scale at which food demand is expected to outpace supplies, all available technologies to improve crop varieties, from classical crop breeding to

  5. Silicon improves seed germination and alleviates drought stress in lentil crops by regulating osmolytes, hydrolytic enzymes and antioxidant defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biju, Sajitha; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Gupta, Dorin

    2017-10-01

    Silicon (Si) has been widely reported to have beneficial effect on mitigating drought stress in plants. However, the effect of Si on seed germination under drought conditions is still poorly understood. This research was carried out to ascertain the role of Si to abate polyethylene glycol-6000 mediated drought stress on seed germination and seedling growth of lentil. Results showed that drought stress significantly decreased the seed germination traits and increased the concentration of osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine and soluble sugars), reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion) and lipid peroxides in lentil seedlings. The activities of hydrolytic enzymes and antioxidant enzymes increased significantly under osmotic stress. The application of Si significantly enhanced the plants ability to withstand drought stress conditions through increased Si content, improved antioxidants, hydrolytic enzymes activity, decreased concentration of osmolytes and reactive oxygen species. Multivariate data analysis showed statistically significant correlations among the drought-tolerance traits, whereas cluster analysis categorised the genotypes into distinct groups based on their drought-tolerance levels and improvements in expression of traits due to Si application. Thus, these results showed that Si supplementation of lentil was effective in alleviating the detrimental effects of drought stress on seed germination and increased seedling vigour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Clean Diesel Tribal Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DERA Tribal Program awards clean diesel grants specifically for tribal nations. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication Numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  7. Tribal Waste Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Tribal Waste Management Program encourages environmentally sound waste management practices that promote resource conservation through recycling, recovery, reduction, clean up, and elimination of waste.

  8. 3 CFR - Tribal Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Departments and Agencies The United States has a unique legal and political relationship with Indian tribal... the OMB is hereby authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register. This...

  9. ACF Tribal Consultation Policy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The purpose of the ACF Tribal Consultation Policy is to build meaningful relationships with federally recognized tribes by engaging in open, continuous, and...

  10. Work Participation in Cultural Operations of Rice Farming by Tribal and Non-Tribal Labourers in Wayanad district : A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Narayanan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice is a traditional staple food crop of India, having high cultural and ecological significance in the present global scenario. Tribal labourers in Wayanad district of Kerala had been the traditional labourers in rice farming. The consequent migration of non-tribals to Wayanad district of Kerala had been changed the demographic and cultural entity of the district. The present study was conducted in Wayanad district to compare the work participation between tribal and non- tribal labourers. Twenty tribal and non-tribal labourers were selected from each selected panchayats and a total of one hundred and twenty respondents were included in the study. A well-structured interview schedule was used for collecting the data from the respondents. The data were tabulated and inferences were drawn after appropriate statistical analysis. The results show that majority of the tribal labourers had high work participation than non-tribals. While comparing based on gender, female labourers had high work participation than male labourers both in the case of tribal and non-tribal labourers.

  11. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon

  12. 77 FR 16120 - Tribal Consultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Tribal Organizations to apply for grants for Veterans cemeteries on Trust Lands. Public Law 109-461, 120... the Veterans Cemetery Grant Program to Tribal Organizations in the same manner, and under the same... applying for these grants. Veterans Health Administration: The VA-IHS MOU was signed by Dr. Petzel and Dr...

  13. Efeito da descompactação profunda de solo na produção da cultura da batata Effect of deep soil compaction alleviation on the production of potato crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Francisco Ragassi

    2009-12-01

    .The soil tillage for potato in Brazil commonly relies on harrow utilization (shallow tillage, which causes a compacted zone below 20 cm. Apparently, deep soil loosening improves productivity and reduces tuber disease incidence and these effects can vary according to the species of grass cultivated before the potato crop. The objective of this work was to study deep loosening associated to the cultivation of Panicum maximum cv. Tanzânia, Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu and maize (Zea mays 'Dekalb 191' and the control (shallow tillage with the same maize genotype. The experiment was carried out in Piracicaba, São Paulo State, Brazil, from December 2006 to October 2008, in a complete randomized blocks design. The soil penetration resistance (SPR value, evaluated by impact penetrometer in the center of the seed bed, was lower than 1.5 MPa up to 40 cm depth for all treatments and, in the 40-60 cm layer, the SPR value in the shallow tillage (2.4 MPa was statistically higher than all other treatments, whose values ranged from 0.9 to 1.0 MPa. Tuber productivity in the shallow tillage was 28.3 t ha-1 and differed from the highest value among the deep soil loosening treatments (32.9 t ha-1. The proportion of tubers with less than 4 cm diameter in the shallow tillage (5.1% was higher than the deep soil alleviation treatments with maize (2.9% and B. brizantha (2.2%. The occurrence of tuber pests, diseases and lenticelose (Diabrotica speciosa, 31.0% to 49.7%; Streptomyces scabies, 3.3% to 6.3%; Helminthosporium solani, 60.3% to 69%; Rhizoctonia solani, 1.3% to 4.3%; lenticelose, 6.0% to 15.7%, was not influenced by the treatments. The deep soil loosening reduced soil penetration resistance and increased potato productivity, with lower rate of small tubers, but did not affect the occurrence of tuber pests, diseases and lenticelose.

  14. 75 FR 39730 - Tribal Economic Development Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... Tribal Economic Development Bonds AGENCY: Department of the Treasury, Departmental Offices. ACTION... from Indian Tribal Governments regarding the Tribal Economic Development Bond provision in Section 7871... ``Tribal Economic Development Bonds,'' under Section 7871(f) of the Internal Revenue Code (``Code'') to...

  15. 76 FR 48865 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... Program Manager Region XI, e-mail [email protected] or phone (202) 401- 5964. Additional...) Tribal Consultations ] for leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start and Early Head Start... Natives convention. We are convening the OHS Tribal Consultations in conjunction with other Tribal Leader...

  16. 78 FR 57858 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... 57701. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Bialas, Regional Program Manager, Region XI, Office of...) Tribal Consultations for leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start and Early Head Start programs... the issues and concerns raised in 2012 OHS Tribal Consultations. Tribal leaders and designated...

  17. 78 FR 24212 - Tribal Management Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    .... 450b(l). Tribal organizations must provide proof of non-profit status. Tribal organizations are... additional proof of applicant status documents required such as Tribal resolutions, proof of non-profit..., Program Analyst, Office of Tribal Self-Governance, Indian Health Service, Reyes Building, 801 Thompson...

  18. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  19. Renewable Energy on Tribal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains presentations from the Brown to Green: Make the Connection to Renewable Energy workshop held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during December 10-11, 2008 regarding Renewable Energy on Tribal Lands.

  20. EPA Region 1 Tribal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a dataset of Tribal/Native American lands in the New England region. EPA notes that there are some disputes over the exact boundaries of the territories of...

  1. The role of underutilized fruits in nutritional and economic security of tribals: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandal, Urvashi; Bhardwaj, Raju Lal

    2014-01-01

    The tribal people of Rajasthan are severely malnourished along with multiple nutrient-deficiency disorders due to ignorance about importance of fruits and vegetables in their diets. The tribal areas are full of biodiversity having natural vegetation which is not harnessed fully. Due to which a wide gap is formed between health and optimal use of natural sources of nutrients, i.e., underutilized crops. The crops, which are neither grown commercially on large scale nor traded widely, may be termed as underutilized horticultural crops. These crops are cultivated, traded, and consumed locally. These crops have many advantages like easier to grow and hardy in nature, producing a crop even under adverse soil and climatic conditions. So, exploitation of underutilized horticultural crops can become a solution to the social problem of health and nutrition insecurity, poverty, and unemployment. The consumption of underutilized fruit crops can provide nutrition to the poor and needy tribals by meeting the nutrient requirements of vulnerable groups. As underutilized fruits, nuts, and vegetables are a rich of source of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, energy, vitamins-A, B1, B2, B3, B6, B9, B12, C, folic acid, and minerals-Ca, P, Fe, and dietary fiber. Thus, they have the nutritional capacity to prevent and cure various diseases like kwashiorkor, marasmus, night blindness, anemia, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, and hidden hunger. It is also established fact that seasonal, locally available, and cheap fruits and vegetables can also keep the population healthy and nutritionally secure rather than costly off-season ones. Also, the underutilized crops have the potential to give economic security to tribals by giving employment and by fetching good returns from their sale in raw form as well as value-added products.

  2. 77 FR 3210 - Indian Tribal Government Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ...-08] RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Government Plans AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury... hearing on proposed regulations, (REG-133223-08) relating to Indian tribal government plans. DATES: The...

  3. Infrastructure Task Force Tribal Solid Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents describe 1) issues to consider when planning and designing community engagement approaches for tribal integrated waste management programs and 2) a proposed approach to improve tribal open dumps data and solid waste projects, and 3) an MOU.

  4. 50 CFR 223.204 - Tribal plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Threatened Marine and Anadromous Species § 223.204 Tribal plans. (a) Limits on the prohibitions. The... impact on the biological requirements of the species, and will assess the effect of the Tribal Plan on... or not implementation of a Tribal Plan will appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and...

  5. 78 FR 20658 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... CONTACT: Robert Bialas, Regional Program Manager, Region XI, Office of Head Start, email [email protected] leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start and Early Head Start programs. As much as possible, the... OHS Tribal Consultations. Tribal leaders and designated representatives interested in submitting...

  6. 78 FR 11891 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Bialas, Regional Program Manager, Region XI, Office of Head Start, email Robert... leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start and Early Head Start programs. As much as possible, the... OHS Tribal Consultations. Tribal leaders and designated representatives interested in submitting...

  7. 77 FR 19020 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Program Manager Region XI, email [email protected] or phone (202) 401- 5964. Additional information... Consultations with leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs for...) programs are located. We are convening the OHS Tribal Consultations in conjunction with other Tribal Leader...

  8. Minnesota Tribal Coalition - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Triplett

    2006-12-19

    The project helped tribal leaders, staff and community members on the Grand Portage, Leech Lake, and White Earth Reservations better understand their community's energy usage, assess local resources that might be utilized to reduce energy consumption and begin to formulate appropriate development strategies. The principal guiding interest was to assess energy usage and the potential for wind resource development on each of the three reservations. Key tribal staff became familiar with wind energy technology and assessment methodologies that will be of continued use as each tribe moves forward with development projects. The findings were that wind resources are available at each reservation with varying degrees of potential for development. At White Earth moderate to excellent resources are present at White Earth village and along the U.S. 59 corridor sufficient to be tapped to serve several scattered tribal complexes. At Grand Portage a former community television repeater tower site provides a viable elevated location for a wind turbine to serve the tribal community settlement. At Leech Lake, while most constrained by tree cover, a site adjacent to a casino holds promise for the newer taller wind turbines now coming to market at ever-increasing taller rotor heights. The project developed considerable data of importance regarding the potential for wind development on and near each reservation.

  9. TRIBALISM-VAGUE BUT VALID

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-09-02

    Sep 2, 1999 ... One doubts if this malaise stems from tribal life. If anything, in other parts of the world a revival has taken placein recent years; in Australia .... focus of allegiance and social identity. For many for whom the state fails to evoke the necessary sentiments, in the understandable and justifiable striving for national ...

  10. Ethics and Transgenic Crops: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    This article represents a review of some of the ethical dilemmas that have arisen as a result of the development and deployment of transgenic crop plants. The potential for transgenic crops to alleviate human hunger and the possible effects on human health are discussed. Risks and benefits to the environment resulting from genetic engineering of crops for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses are considered, in addition to effects on biodiversity. The socio-economic impacts and distributi...

  11. 76 FR 12967 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... Families, OHS leadership, and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early... the report without attribution, along with topics of concern and recommendations. Hotel and logistical...

  12. Tribal Geographic Area (RTOC) Polygons with Representative Information, US EPA Region 9, 2015, Regional Tribal Operations Committee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Tribal Operations Committee (RTOC) is a working committee of EPA and Tribal personnel co-chaired by an EPA representative and a Tribal representative....

  13. ODDJP's Tribal Youth Initiatives: Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Kay

    The violent crime rate among American Indians is twice that of the United States as a whole. Tribal communities are also beset by high rates of domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, alcohol abuse, and gang involvement. Given such factors, it is not surprising that tribal youth are exposed to multiple risk factors for delinquency. Indeed,…

  14. 77 FR 5442 - Indian Tribal Government Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Government Plans AGENCY: Internal...-08) relating to Indian tribal government plans. This notice supersedes the notice of public hearing...

  15. Healthy Tribal Colleges Create Healthy Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarest, Donna

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that tribal colleges play a pivotal role in both the cultural resilience and in addressing the health problems of a tribal community. Relates Oglala Lakota College (South Dakota) Department of Nursing's leadership role in the development of community resources and identification of private and federal sources of funding. (VWC)

  16. Types, outcome and risk factors of stroke in Tribal Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jittendra K; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumari, Archana; Dahale, Amol S; Jha, Rajendra; Das, Ranjan

    2013-12-01

    Studies suggest that ethnicity and racial factors has an important role in the variation in epidemiology of stroke. The present study was conducted to assess the subtypes, risk factors, and outcome of stroke in the tribal community of Jharkhand state and to compare it with that in the non-tribals from the same geographical location. We carried out a hospital-based prospective observational study at Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences-Ranchi. Patients of acute stroke, reporting to the medical outpatient department and emergency department from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010 were studied. Computed tomography scan was done immediately and again after 24 h to confirm the diagnosis of stroke. To compare the findings between tribal and non-tribal patients, we used chi-square test/Fisher exact test as appropriate. Of the total 1156 patients included in the study, 536 were tribals, while 620 were non-tribals. Significant differences were found in tribal stroke patients as compared with non-tribals: mean age of tribal subjects was 53·8 years (60·8 years in non-tribals); stroke in young individual was present in 25% of tribal subjects (17% in non-tribals, P = 0·01); primary intracerebral hemorrhage variety was present in 31% of tribals (18% in non-tribals, P-value tribal subjects (35% among non-tribals, P = 0·02). Hypertension and alcohol abuse was found to be associated with intracerebral hemorrhage in tribal subjects, although no such association was found in non-tribals. Tribals have early onset, poor outcomes and higher proportion of ICH compared to non-tribals. [Correction added after online publication 7 Aug 2012: The sentence "Tribals have early with non-tribals." in the Conclusion section of the abstract was deleted.]. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Nurse crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne D. Shepperd; John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    In forestry, a nurse crop generally is a crop of trees or shrubs that fosters the development of another tree species, usually by protecting the second species, during its youth, from frost, insolation, or wind (Ford-Robertson 1971). Aspen may be a nurse crop for shade-tolerant tree species that do not become established in full sunlight (e.g., Engelmann spruce)....

  18. Doctors for tribal areas: Issues and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Mavalankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health parameters of tribal population had always been a concern for India's march towards Millennium development Goals (MDG's. Tribal population contributes 8.6% of total population, in spite of efforts and commitment of Government of India towards MGD, India lagged far behind from achieving and optimal health of tribal population will be a concern for achieving Sustainable development Goals SDG's also. Some of the common health problems of the tribal population face are deficiency of essential components in diet like energy malnutrition, protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Goiter, Gastrointestinal disorders, particularly dysentery and parasitic infections are very common. High prevalence of genetic disorders like sickle cell anemia and others are endemic in few tribes of India. Tribal Health is further compounded issues by social issues like excessive consumption of alcohol, poor access to contraceptive, substance abuse and gender based violence. Besides other reasons, like poor budget allocation, difficult to reach, poor access to health care facility, severe shortage of qualified health workers and workforce led to poor governance of health sector in tribal areas. Present view point reflects on the issues of inadequacy of doctors in tribal area and suggests possible solutions.

  19. CULTURAL TOURISM: BANGLADESH TRIBAL AREAS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad SHAMSUDDOHA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the world's largest industry which is linked with thousands of associated business. Though Bangladesh is a small country in terms of its size it contains huge prospect in its tourism including culture. Bangladesh culture is very rich which initiated long ago with different dimensions. Chittagong hill tracts of Bangladesh are a place of tribal. Tribal are having their own rich culture which is very attractive and nice looking. This study focused on tribal culture and its tourists. This paper also seeks about problems of cultural tourism in Bangladesh.

  20. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  1. Emergency preparedness handbook for tribal governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Many Native American tribal governments are lacking in emergency preparedness, a part of the : emergency management cycle where planning for disasters happens. These governments need : assistance planning for future disasters. Federal, and state gove...

  2. 77 FR 48159 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ..., Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal... Session will be summarized in each report without attribution, along with topics of concern and...

  3. Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribal Green Building Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pinoleville Pomo Nation (PPN) worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Development Center for Appropriate Technology (DCAT) to create this framework for tribal building codes.

  4. 77 FR 23283 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... are designed to serve, including youth and at-risk populations facing employment barriers. DINAP works... high unemployment found on tribal lands. The Department is committed to building on these efforts to...

  5. Region 9 Tribal Environmental GAP Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Region 9 invites Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) grant proposals from federally recognized tribal governments and eligible intertribal consortia for FY2019 work plan program development activities.

  6. ETHNOMARKETING AND TRIBAL MARKETING – GENERAL ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Angelica-Nicoleta NECULAESEI (ONEA)

    2017-01-01

    Ethnomarketing and tribal marketing can be regarded as subdivisions of intercultural management. This is the perspective intended to be analyzed in the proposed study, by valuing cultural specificity features that can support the effort of adaptation to a group that can be described by common features. The aim is to provide a general theoretical framework and proposals to adapt the marketing mix to a certain ethnic or "tribal" profile, in order to increase the company's performance.

  7. ETHNOMARKETING AND TRIBAL MARKETING – GENERAL ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica-Nicoleta NECULAESEI (ONEA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethnomarketing and tribal marketing can be regarded as subdivisions of intercultural management. This is the perspective intended to be analyzed in the proposed study, by valuing cultural specificity features that can support the effort of adaptation to a group that can be described by common features. The aim is to provide a general theoretical framework and proposals to adapt the marketing mix to a certain ethnic or "tribal" profile, in order to increase the company's performance.

  8. Investigating an Ethical Approach to Genetically Modified Crops in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetically modified (GM) crops gained attention in southern Africa in the context of broader debates about the struggle for food security and poverty alleviation to achieve sustainable development. The prospects of GM crops as a technological innovation have provoked numerous debates and environmental concern ...

  9. Land Suitability Characterization for Crop and Fruit Production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus was on food crops and fruits those can be used to alleviate poverty and improve nutrition in farm households, with the highest priority assigned to crops and fruits already well established in the area. Remote sensing (ILWIS3.3) and GIS (ArcView3.2) softwares were used to establish the land unit maps of the area.

  10. The tribal girl child in Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanti, R

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the status of the girl child among tribes in India. Tribes have son preference but do not discriminate against girls by female infanticide or sex determination tests. Girls do not inherit land, but they are not abused, hated, or subjected to rigid social norms. Girls are not veiled and are free to participate in dancing and other recreational programs. There is no dowry on marriage. The father of the bridegroom pays a brideprice to the father of the girl. Widowed or divorced women are free to marry again. Daughters care for young children, perform housework, and work in the field with their brothers. In the tribal village of Choti Underi girls were not discriminated against in health and nutrition, but there was a gender gap in education. Both girls and boys were equally exposed to infection and undernourishment. Tribals experience high rates of infant and child mortality due to poverty and its related malnutrition. Child labor among tribals is a way of life for meeting the basic needs of the total household. A recent report on tribals in Rajasthan reveals that 15-20% of child labor involved work in mines that were dangerous to children's health. Girl children had no security provisions or minimum wages. Tribal children were exploited by human service agencies. Child laborers were raped. Government programs in tribal areas should focus on improving living conditions for children in general. Special programs for girls are needed for providing security in the workplace and increasing female educational levels. More information is needed on the work burden of tribal girls that may include wage employment as well as housework.

  11. Elevatated CO2 alleviates heat stress tolerance in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Rosenqvist, Eva S. K.; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2014-01-01

    Wollenweber4 1Department of Bioenergy, Tamilnadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India. 2Department of Food Science, Aarhus University, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Årslev, Denmark 3Institute of Agricultural Sciences and Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Hojbakkegaard Allé 9, 2630 Taastrup, Denmark 4......Institute for Agroecology, Aarhus University, Forsøgsvej 1, 4200 Slagelse, Denmark *Presenting author This study analysed the alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on stress-induced decreases in photosynthesis and changes in carbohydrate metabolism in two wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) of different...... crop performance under various climatic stresses....

  12. EPA Tribal Areas (1 of 4): Lower 48 States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer represents locations of American Indian Tribal lands in the lower 48 states. The areas include all lands associated with Federally recognized tribal...

  13. Building Tribal Communities in the Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Stuart; Mattsson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    the nature and development of a variety of collaborative consumption businesses; in particular, we explore how start-up entrepreneurs see the problems of creating a tribal community among customers and users. Interviews were carried out with founders and co-founders of collaborative consumption ventures...... during 2014–15. The results suggest that these organisations face many common issues. We develop and apply a framework to understand some of these. We find that collaborative consumption entrepreneurs strive to build a tribal community by matching, in an innovative way, supply and demand....... This is typically done by co-creating shared commonality, developing scalable electronic platforms, and building trust into platforms using social media to develop proxy social capital. Consequently, by using existing ecosystems of social media, tribal communities can be formed and scaled much more quickly than via...

  14. Tribal Energy Program for California Indian Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-10

    A strategic plan is needed to catalyze clean energy in the more than 100 California Indian tribal communities with varying needs and energy resources. We propose to conduct a scoping study to identify tribal lands with clean energy potential, as well as communities with lack of grid-tied energy and communications access. The research focus would evaluate the energy mixture and alternatives available to these tribal communities, and evaluate greenhouse gas emissions associated with accessing fossil fuel used for heat and power. Understanding the baseline of energy consumption and emissions of communities is needed to evaluate improvements and advances from technology. Based on this study, we will develop a strategic plan that assesses solutions to address high energy fuel costs due to lack of electricity access and inform actions to improve economic opportunities for tribes. This could include technical support for tribes to access clean energy technologies and supporting collaboration for on-site demonstrations.

  15. 75 FR 48329 - Tribal Drinking Water Operator Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... AGENCY Tribal Drinking Water Operator Certification Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Drinking Water Infrastructure Grant Tribal Set-Aside (DWIG TSA) program. The Federal drinking water regulations require some system operators to be ``qualified.'' Participation in EPA's Tribal Drinking Water...

  16. Toward a Tribal Critical Race Theory in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones Brayboy, Bryan McKinley

    2005-01-01

    In this article, I outline the central tenets of an emerging theory that I call Tribal Critical Race Theory (TribalCrit) to more completely address the issues of Indigenous Peoples in the United States. TribalCrit has it roots in Critical Race Theory, Anthropology, Political/Legal Theory, Political Science, American Indian Literatures, Education,…

  17. Universal Primary Education among Tribals in Jharkhand: A Situational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anant

    2008-01-01

    The paper is an attempt to understand and analyse the status of universal primary education among tribals in Jharkhand and its challenges. Considering the low literacy among tribals and high drop out rates at elementary and higher levels, there is need of special focus on tribal's education, inclusive of context-specific traditional and innovative…

  18. Alleviating energy poverty: Indian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Garima

    2010-09-15

    Energy services play an important role in human welfare. India faces acute energy poverty indicating lack of access of clean energy fuels. Access to electricity is limited to 56% households in India and about 89% of rural households depend on polluting energy sources. Energy poverty impacts income poverty as poor find it difficult to acquire high priced cleaner fuels. It also adversely impacts the socio economic conditions of women. The paper highlights the linkage of energy poverty with income poverty and gender inequality. It analyses measures taken to alleviate energy poverty and recommends regulatory and policy measures as way forward.

  19. Is current irrigation sustainable in the United States? An integrated assessment of climate change impact on water resources and irrigated crop yields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanc, Elodie; Caron, Justin; Fant, Charles; Monier, Erwan

    2017-01-01

    Climate and socioeconomic changes will increase water shortages and strongly reduce irrigated crop yields in specific regions or crops GHG mitigation has the potential to alleviate the effect of water...

  20. Working with Indian Tribal Nations. A guide for DOE employees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) employees and contractors frequently work with Indian tribes or nations as part of their jobs. The purpose of this guide is to help DOE employees and contractors initiate contact with tribes and build effective relationships. DOE maintains a unique government-to government relationship with tribal nations. This guide presents an overview of the history of the relationship between the tribes and the Federal government, as well as the laws and Executive Orders that define that relationship. The guide discusses the Federal government’s trust responsibility to the tribes, tribal treaty rights, and the Department of Energy’s American Indian policy. The guide also discusses important cultural differences that could lead to communication problems if not understood and provides examples of potential cultural misunderstandings. In particular the guide discusses tribal environmental beliefs that shape tribal responses to DOE actions. The guide also provides pointers on tribal etiquette during meetings and cultural ceremonies and when visiting tribal reservations. Appendix 1 gives examples of the tribal nations with whom DOE currently has Memoranda of Understanding. While this guide provides an introduction and overview of tribal relations for DOE staff and contractors, DOE has also designated Tribal Issues Points of Contacts at each of its facilities. A list of these Points of Contact for all DOE facilities is provided in Appendix 2. DOE staff and contractors should consult with the appropriate tribal representatives at their site before initiating contact with a tribal nation, because many tribes have rules and procedures that must be complied with before DOE staff or contractors may go on tribal lands or conduct interviews with tribal members. Appendix 3 is the complete DOE American Indian Policy. Appendices 4-6 are Executive Orders that govern the relationship of all federal agencies with tribal nations. DOE employees and staff are

  1. 78 FR 44459 - Tribal Self-Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service 42 CFR Part 137 Tribal Self-Governance CFR Correction In Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 to 399, revised as of October 1, 2012, on page 932, in...

  2. Natural Resources Education Embraces Tribal Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    The Northwest Center for Sustainable Resources, at Chemeketa Community College (Salem, Oregon), develops college curricula in natural resources management encompassing Native American understandings of relations between humans and their environment; organizes hands-on conservation programs for tribal youth; and sponsors conferences and seminars…

  3. 76 FR 55678 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... President Obama's Executive Memorandum be moved to either the Background section or some sort of History... ACF. ACF will continue to utilize TFWGs that incorporate tribal leadership to inform ACF leadership... concepts of Executive Order 13175. ACF would like to refer the commenter to Section 7. Consultation Parties...

  4. Contemporary Tribal Codes and Gender Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bruce G.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the legal codes of eight Coast Salish tribes. Focuses on gender issues, including the legal statuses of males and females, inheritance, access to tribal jobs and job training, political enfranchisement, child welfare and parental responsibilities, parent rights, and public safety. The codes vary substantially in how they balance…

  5. Harnessing motivation to alleviate neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eRussell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of spatial neglect results from the combination of a number of deficits in attention, with patients demonstrating both spatially lateralised and non-lateralised impairments. Previous reports have hinted that there may be a motivational component to neglect and that modulating this might alleviate some of the debilitating symptoms. Additionally, recent work on the effects of reward on attention in healthy participants has revealed improvements across a number of paradigms. As the primary deficit in neglect has been associated with attention, this evidence for reward’s effects is potentially important. However, until very recently there have been few empirical studies addressing this potential therapeutic avenue. Here we review the growing body of evidence that attentional impairments in neglect can be reduced by motivation, for example in the form of preferred music or anticipated monetary reward, and discuss the implications of this for treatments for these patients. Crucially these effects of positive motivation are not observed in all patients with neglect, suggesting that the consequences of motivation may relate to individual lesion anatomy. Given the key role of dopaminergic systems in motivational processes, we suggest that motivational stimulation might act as a surrogate for dopaminergic stimulation. In addition, we consider the relationship between clinical post stroke apathy and lack of response to motivation.

  6. Tribal and stakeholder involvement in systems analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, L. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates, Boulder City, NV (United States); Cooley, C. [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Beginning in early 1995, U.S. Department of Energy began an experiment to link tribal and stakeholder representatives into technology assessment activities related to an Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. The INTS study moved outside the framework of after-the-fact public involvement by providing the opportunity for technical and non-technical stakeholders alike to work together in the early predecision stages of the criteria development and assessment of options for innovative mixed waste treatment. The stakeholders gained an appreciation of the intense level of effort required to complete such an analysis. The engineers and scientists conducting the systems analyses had the opportunity (some for the first time) to learn more about tribal and stakeholder issues and how they might apply to the technical tasks related to technology assessment and selection.

  7. 75 FR 41896 - Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... Employment and Training Administration Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer Colville Tribal Enterprise..., applicable to workers of Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood... Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division. The Department has determined that...

  8. Rates, indications, and outcomes of caesarean section deliveries: A comparison of tribal and non-tribal women in Gujarat, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Desai

    Full Text Available Even though the caesarean section is an essential component of comprehensive obstetric and newborn care for reducing maternal and neonatal mortality, there is a lack of data regarding caesarean section rates, its determinants and health outcomes among tribal communities in India.The aim of this study is to estimate and compare rates, determinants, indications and outcomes of caesarean section. The article provides an assessment on how the inequitable utilization can be addressed in a community-based hospital in tribal areas of Gujarat, India.Prospectively collected data of deliveries (N = 19923 from April 2010 to March 2016 in Kasturba Maternity Hospital was used. The odds ratio of caesarean section was estimated for tribal and non-tribal women. Decomposition analysis was done to decompose the differences in the caesarean section rates between tribal and non-tribal women.The caesarean section rate was significantly lower among tribal compared to the non-tribal women (9.4% vs 15.6%, p-value < 0.01 respectively. The 60% of the differences in the rates of caesarean section between tribal and non-tribal women were unexplained. Within the explained variation, the previous caesarean accounted for 96% (p-value < 0.01 of the variation. Age of the mother, parity, previous caesarean and distance from the hospital were some of the important determinants of caesarean section rates. The most common indications of caesarean section were foetal distress (31.2%, previous caesarean section (23.9%, breech (16% and prolonged labour (11.2%. There was no difference in case fatality rate (1.3% vs 1.4%, p-value = 0.90 and incidence of birth asphyxia (0.3% vs 0.6%, p-value = 0.26 comparing the tribal and non-tribal women.Similar to the prior evidences, we found higher caesarean rates among non-tribal compare to tribal women. However, the adverse outcomes were similar between tribal and non-tribal women for caesarean section deliveries.

  9. Rates, indications, and outcomes of caesarean section deliveries: A comparison of tribal and non-tribal women in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Gayatri; Anand, Ankit; Modi, Dhiren; Shah, Shobha; Shah, Kalpana; Shah, Ajay; Desai, Shrey; Shah, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    Even though the caesarean section is an essential component of comprehensive obstetric and newborn care for reducing maternal and neonatal mortality, there is a lack of data regarding caesarean section rates, its determinants and health outcomes among tribal communities in India. The aim of this study is to estimate and compare rates, determinants, indications and outcomes of caesarean section. The article provides an assessment on how the inequitable utilization can be addressed in a community-based hospital in tribal areas of Gujarat, India. Prospectively collected data of deliveries (N = 19923) from April 2010 to March 2016 in Kasturba Maternity Hospital was used. The odds ratio of caesarean section was estimated for tribal and non-tribal women. Decomposition analysis was done to decompose the differences in the caesarean section rates between tribal and non-tribal women. The caesarean section rate was significantly lower among tribal compared to the non-tribal women (9.4% vs 15.6%, p-value < 0.01) respectively. The 60% of the differences in the rates of caesarean section between tribal and non-tribal women were unexplained. Within the explained variation, the previous caesarean accounted for 96% (p-value < 0.01) of the variation. Age of the mother, parity, previous caesarean and distance from the hospital were some of the important determinants of caesarean section rates. The most common indications of caesarean section were foetal distress (31.2%), previous caesarean section (23.9%), breech (16%) and prolonged labour (11.2%). There was no difference in case fatality rate (1.3% vs 1.4%, p-value = 0.90) and incidence of birth asphyxia (0.3% vs 0.6%, p-value = 0.26) comparing the tribal and non-tribal women. Similar to the prior evidences, we found higher caesarean rates among non-tribal compare to tribal women. However, the adverse outcomes were similar between tribal and non-tribal women for caesarean section deliveries.

  10. Tribal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  11. Agricultural activities of the malayali tribal for subsistence and economic needs in the mid elevation forest of pachamalai hills, eastern ghats, Tamil nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Anburaja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed to study the Agricultural activities of the Malayali Tribal for Subsistence and Economic needs in the mid elevation forest of Pachamalai Hills, Eastern Ghats, Tamil nadu. About 8 percent of the Indian population belongs to a category listed as “Scheduled Tribes” enumerated in the Schedule to Article 342 of the Constitution of India. Tribal people has been seen to be strongly associated with the forests, hills and remote areas, practicing a unique life style, having a unique set of cultural and religious beliefs. For millennia, tribal communities have lived in forests and survived on hunting and gathering. However, with growing population and resource pressure, it is now witnessing that a rise in livelihoods based on settled farming. In the study area, cereals are the major crop cultivated for their edible grains. The tribal people living in the hills tops of the study area were cultivated 11 major agricultural crops. They are, Eleusine coracana, Panicum miliare, Oryza sativa (verity I (Mara Nellu, Oryza sativa (verity II, Manihot esculenta, Macrotyloma uniflorum, Vigna mungo, Sesamum orientale, Paspalum sp, Pennisetum americanum and Setaria italica. Among them, Paspalum sp gives the maximum yield with 655 kg acre-1.

  12. 78 FR 60861 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... the tribe and the address for correspondence; (2) a copy of the tribal resolution adopting the... official insignia adopted by the tribal resolution. Requests from state-recognized tribes must also be in... Respondent Cost Burden: $228. The USPTO expects that the information in this collection will be prepared by...

  13. 44 CFR 201.7 - Tribal Mitigation Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE MITIGATION PLANNING § 201.7 Tribal Mitigation Plans. The... events. (ii) A description of the Indian tribal government's vulnerability to the hazards described in... its impact on the tribe. The plan should describe vulnerability in terms of: (A) The types and numbers...

  14. Geographic science for public and Tribal lands management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Alicia; Hendley, James W. II

    2011-01-01

    There are more than 650 million acres of U.S. public and Tribal lands, most found west of the Mississippi River. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey's Western Geographic Science Center are working to increase the scientific information available for natural resource decision making, while continuing productive collaborations with Federal land managers, Tribal leaders, and local communities.

  15. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  16. 42 CFR 137.3 - Effect on existing Tribal rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect on existing Tribal rights. 137.3 Section 137.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE General Provisions § 137.3 Effect on existing...

  17. Tribal experiences and lessons learned in riparian ecosystem restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald K. Miller; James E. Enote; Cameron L. Martinez

    1996-01-01

    Riparian ecosystems have been part of the culture of land use of native peoples in the Southwest United States for thousands of years. The experiences of tribal riparian initiatives to incorporate modern elements of environment and development with cultural needs are relatively few. This paper describes tribal case examples and approaches in riparian management which...

  18. Tribal lands provide forest management laboratory for mainstream university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra J. Hoagland; Ronald Miller; Kristen M. Waring; Orlando Carroll

    2017-01-01

    Northern Arizona University (NAU) faculty and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) foresters initiated a partnership to expose NAU School of Forestry (SoF) graduate students to tribal forest management practices by incorporating field trips to the 1.68-million acre Fort Apache Indian Reservation as part of their silviculture curriculum. Tribal field trips were contrasted and...

  19. Collaborations for Building Tribal Resiliency to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamzai, A.; Taylor, A.; Winton, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sixty-eight tribes are located in the U.S. Department of the Interior's South Central Climate Science Center (SCCSC) region. The SCCSC made it a priority to include the tribes as partners from its inception and both the Chickasaw Nation and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma participate in the center's activities as consortium members. Under this arrangement, the SCCSC employs a full-time tribal liaison to facilitate relations with the tribes, develop partnerships for climate-relevant projects, build tribal stakeholder capacity, and organize tribal youth programs. In 2014, the SCCSC published its Tribal Engagement Strategy (USGS Circular 1396) to outline its approach for developing tribal relationships. The conceptual plan covers each step in the multi-year process from initial introductory meetings and outreach to demonstrate commitment and interest in working with tribal staff, building tribal capacity in climate related areas while also building researcher capacity in ethical research, and facilitating the co-production of climate-relevant research projects. As the tribes begin to develop their internal capacity and find novel ways to integrate their interests, the plan ultimately leads to tribes developing their own independent research projects and integrating climate science into their various vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans. This presentation will outline the multiple steps in the SCCSC's Tribal Engagement Strategy and provide examples of our ongoing work in support of each step.

  20. 75 FR 65611 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION: Proposed collection; comment... recommendations made in the report was that the USPTO create and maintain an accurate and comprehensive database... database. The USPTO database of official tribal insignias assists trademark attorneys in their examination...

  1. Streptomyces sp. strain PGPA39 alleviates salt stress and promotes growth of 'Micro Tom' tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyandi, S A; Damodharan, K; Yang, S H; Suh, J W

    2014-09-01

    To identify an actinobacterial strain that can promote growth and alleviate salinity stress in tomato plants. Actinobacteria were isolated from agricultural soil and screened for ACC deaminase activity, production of indole acetic acid (IAA), solubilization of tricalcium phosphate and sodium chloride (NaCl) salinity tolerance. Among the several strains tested, one strain designated PGPA39 exhibited higher IAA production, and phosphate solubilization in addition to ACC deaminase activity, and tolerance to 1 mol l(-1) NaCl. Strain PGPA39 was identified as a Streptomyces strain based on 16S rDNA sequence and designated Streptomyces sp. strain PGPA39. It promoted the growth of Arabidopsis seedlings in vitro as evidenced by a significant increase in plant biomass and number of lateral roots. Salinity stress-alleviating activity of PGPA39 was evaluated using 'Micro Tom' tomato plants with 180 mmol l(-1) NaCl stress under gnotobiotic condition. A significant increase in plant biomass and chlorophyll content and a reduction in leaf proline content were observed in PGPA39-inoculated tomato plants under salt stress compared with control and salt-stressed noninoculated plants. Streptomyces sp. strain PGPA39 alleviated salt stress and promoted the growth of tomato plants. This study shows the potential of Streptomyces sp. strain PGPA39 in alleviating salinity stress in tomato plants and could be utilized for stress alleviation in crop plants under field conditions. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Reasons for Substance Use: A Comparative Study of Alcohol Use in Tribals and Non-tribals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeraj, V S; Prasad, Surjit; Khess, Christoday Raja Jayant; Uvais, N A

    2012-07-01

    Consumption of alcohol has been attributed to different reasons by consumers. Attitude and knowledge about the substance and addiction can be influenced by the cultural background of the individual. The tribal population, where alcohol intake is culturally accepted, can have different beliefs and attributes causing one to take alcohol. This study attempts to examine the reasons for alcohol intake and the belief about addiction and their effect on the severity of addiction in people with a different ethnic background. The study was conducted at a Psychiatric institute with a cross-sectional design. The study population included patients hailing from the Jharkhand state, twenty each, belonging to tribal and non-tribal communities. Patients fulfilling the ICD 10 diagnostic criteria of mental and behavioral disorders due to the alcohol dependence syndrome, with active dependence, were taken, excluding those having any comorbidity or complications. The subjects were assessed with specially designed Sociodemographic-Clinical Performa, modified version of Reasons for Substance Use scale, Addiction Belief scale, and the Alcohol Dependence scale. A significantly high number of tribals cited reasons associated with social enhancement and coping with distressing emotions rather than individual enhancement, as a reason for consuming alcohol. Addiction was severe in those consuming alcohol to cope with distressing emotions. Belief in the free-will model was noted to be stronger across the cultures, without any correlation with the reason for intake. This cross-sectional study design, which was based on patients, cannot be easily generalized to the community. [corrected] Societal acceptance and pressure as well as high emotional problems appears to be the major etiology leading to higher prevalce of substance depedence in tribals. Primary prevention should be planned to fit the needs of the ethnics.

  3. Impact of cash cropping and perennial crops on food crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    synergies or trade-offs between the two crops are scant to address the concerns that cash cropping can ..... production and productivity, we develop indices of intensity of PCC and enset cultivation. We define household i's ... study the impact of these indices on food crop production and productivity, we specify models for i.

  4. Crop-insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van der S.

    1945-01-01

    Crop insurance was fairly new in the Netherlands but there was no legal objection or limitation to particular crops. If a crop were insured, it was important that the whole area of the crop were insured. Speculative insurance seemed preferable to mutual insurance.

    Crop insurance covered all risks

  5. Water Resources Impacts on Tribal Irrigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihane, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Branch of Irrigation and Power provides oversight and technical support to select irrigation projects and systems on tribal lands. The BIA provides operations and maintenance support for 16 irrigation systems. To make the best use of limited resources, the BIA must incorporate climate change impacts on hydrology and water management for these irrigation systems in the coming decades. The 16 irrigation projects discussed here are divided into three climatological regions: the Pacific Northwest Region, the Greater Rocky Mountain Region, and the Western, Southwest, & Navajo Region. Significant climate projections that impact irrigation systems in one or more of these regions include increased temperatures and evaporative demand, earlier snowmelt and runoff, an increase in floods, an increase in heavy precipitation events, an increase in the frequency and intensity of droughts, and declining water supplies. Some irrigation projects are particularly vulnerable to these climate impacts because they are in already water-stressed areas or areas in which water resources are over-allocated. Other irrigation projects will have to adjust their storage and water management strategies to accommodate changes in the timing of streamflow. Overall, though, the BIA will be better able to assist tribal nations by incorporating expected climate impacts into their water resources management practices.

  6. [Mechanism on biodiversity managing crop diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Shi, Zhu-Feng; Gao, Dong; Liu, Lin; Zhu, You-Yong; Li, Cheng-Yun

    2012-11-01

    Reasonable utilization of natural resource and protection of ecological environment is the foundation for implementing agricultural sustainable development. Biodiversity research and protection are becoming an important issue concerned commonly in the world. Crop disease is one of the important natural disasters for food production and safety, and is also one of the main reasons that confine sustainable development of agricultural production. Large-scale deployment of single highly resistant variety results in reduction of agro-biodiversity level. In this case, excessive loss of agro-biodiversity has become the main challenge in sustainable agriculture. Biodiversity can not only effectively alleviate disease incidence and loss of crop production, but also reduce pollution of agricultural ecological environment caused by excessive application of pesticides and fertilizers to the agricultural ecological environment. Discovery of the mechanism of biodiversity to control crop diseases can reasonably guide the rational deployment and rotation of different crops and establish optimization combinations of different crops. This review summarizes recent advances of research on molecular, physiological, and ecological mechanisms of biodiversity managing crop diseases, and proposes some research that needs to be strengthened in the future.

  7. 76 FR 367 - Office of State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... identified by TCAC members and other tribal leaders as priority public health issues. The Biannual Tribal... Consultation meeting is by special invitation to the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Tribal Leaders from... complementary venue wherein tribal representatives and CDC staff have the opportunity to exchange information...

  8. Reasons for Substance Use: A Comparative Study of Alcohol Use in Tribals and Non-tribals

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeraj, V. S.; Prasad, Surjit; Khess, Christoday Raja Jayant; Uvais, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Consumption of alcohol has been attributed to different reasons by consumers. Attitude and knowledge about the substance and addiction can be influenced by the cultural background of the individual. The tribal population, where alcohol intake is culturally accepted, can have different beliefs and attributes causing one to take alcohol. This study attempts to examine the reasons for alcohol intake and the belief about addiction and their effect on the severity of addiction in peopl...

  9. Effect of specific soccer training on general soccer ability of high fit tribal soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.Gopal Chandra Saha; Dr. Hiralal Adhikari

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of specific soccer training on General Soccer ability (volleying Skill) by using Mcdonald Soccer Test of high fit tribal soccer players. ninety, high fit tribal Soccer players out of two hundred and seventy, 9th and 10th grade school level tribal Soccer players from Ergoda School parihati of paschim Medinipur, District of West Bengal were randomly selected as the tribal subjects for this study. To ascertain the high fit tribal Soccer play...

  10. AHP 25: Jahzong: Tibetan Tribal Leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzorge Guru མཛོད་དགེ་གུ་རུ།

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available "An electrifying, revelatory experience. In it, we learn much about the lives of Tibetan tribal groups that cannot be found in any academic treatise." Victor H. Mair, Professor, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia "A rare insight into an intriguing world of violence and compassion that has all but disappeared." Fernanda Pirie, Oxford University "A treasure. A window to the past and present of a dynamic Tibetan culture. A story full of life flowing with harsh reality and vivid imagination." Douglas Duckworth, Florida State University "Ethnographic and immediate, Guru's novel brings readers into a world of Eastern Tibetans generations ago. The spell-binding chain of events echoes the dynamics of traditional heroic epic and folktale." Mark Bender, The Ohio State University

  11. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory: Building partnerships and developing tools to support local Tribal community response to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. D.; Wee, B.; Kuslikis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Response of Tribal nations and Tribal communities to current and emerging climate change challenges requires active participation of stakeholders who have effective access to relevant data, information and analytical tools. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory (TLC), currently under development, is a joint effort between the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), the Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri), and the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The vision of the TLC is to create an integrative platform that enables coordination between multiple stakeholders (e.g. Tribal resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, farmers, ranchers, and other local community members) to collaborate on locally relevant climate change issues. The TLC is intended to facilitate the transformation of data into actionable information that can inform local climate response planning. The TLC will provide the technical mechanisms to access, collect and analyze data from both internal and external sources (e.g. NASA's Giovanni climate data portal, Ameriflux or USA National Phenology Network) while also providing the social scaffolds to enable collaboration across Tribal communities and with members of the national climate change research community. The prototype project focuses on phenology, a branch of science focused on relationships between climate and the seasonal timing of biological phenomena. Monitoring changes in the timing and duration of phenological stages in plant and animal co­­­­mmunities on Tribal lands can provide insight to the direct impacts of climate change on culturally and economically significant Tribal resources . The project will leverage existing phenological observation protocols created by the USA-National Phenology Network and NEON to direct data collection efforts and will be tailored to the specific needs and concerns of the community. Phenology observations will be captured and managed within the Collaboratory

  12. Accounting for soil biotic effects on soil health and crop productivity in the design of crop rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Teresa; Dukes, Angela; Antunes, Pedro M

    2015-02-01

    There is an urgent need for novel agronomic improvements capable of boosting crop yields while alleviating environmental impacts. One such approach is the use of optimized crop rotations. However, a set of measurements that can serve as guiding principles for the design of crop rotations is lacking. Crop rotations take advantage of niche complementarity, enabling the optimization of nutrient use and the reduction of pests and specialist pathogen loads. However, despite the recognized importance of plant-soil microbial interactions and feedbacks for crop yield and soil health, this is ignored in the selection and management of crops for rotation systems. We review the literature and propose criteria for the design of crop rotations focusing on the roles of soil biota and feedback on crop productivity and soil health. We consider that identifying specific key organisms or consortia capable of influencing plant productivity is more important as a predictor of soil health and crop productivity than assessing the overall soil microbial diversity per se. As such, we propose that setting up soil feedback studies and applying genetic sequencing tools towards the development of soil biotic community databases has a strong potential to enable the establishment of improved soil health indicators for optimized crop rotations. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Towards Sustainable Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria | Ogunleye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poverty, a global issue that is complex and multi-dimensional is one of the most dangerous diseases ravaging mankind. The quality of life one lives is greatly tied to whether he is poor or not, as such, government at all levels in Nigeria have on various occasions attempted to roll out programmes that can alleviate poverty.

  14. GLP-1 nanomedicine alleviates gut inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Thaqi, Mentor; Priyamvada, Shubha; Jayawardena, Dulari; Kumar, Anoop; Gujral, Tarunmeet; Chatterjee, Ishita; Mugarza, Edurne; Saksena, Seema; Onyuksel, Hayat; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2017-02-01

    The gut hormone, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts anti-inflammatory effects. However, its clinical use is limited by its short half-life. Previously, we have shown that GLP-1 as a nanomedicine (GLP-1 in sterically stabilized phospholipid micelles, GLP-1-SSM) has increased in vivo stability. The current study was aimed at testing the efficacy of this GLP-1 nanomedicine in alleviating colonic inflammation and associated diarrhea in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced mouse colitis model. Our results show that GLP-1-SSM treatment markedly alleviated the colitis phenotype by reducing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, increasing goblet cells and preserving intestinal epithelial architecture in colitis model. Further, GLP-1-SSM alleviated diarrhea (as assessed by luminal fluid) by increasing protein expression of intestinal chloride transporter DRA (down regulated in adenoma). Our results indicate that GLP-1 nanomedicine may act as a novel therapeutic tool in alleviating gut inflammation and associated diarrhea in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Towards Sustainable Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Poverty, a global issue that is complex and multi-dimensional is one of the most dangerous diseases ravaging .... government efforts at alleviating poverty in Nigeria, causes of poverty and. Towards Sustainable poverty .... Quite a number of employable youths are either unemployed or under employed. 3. Gender: This is ...

  16. Chinese herbal medicine alleviating hyperandrogenism of PCOS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women hence Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been chosen by many clinicians and patients as alternative treatment for PCOS. The present study was to explore the effects of CHM in alleviating hyperandrogenism of PCOS ...

  17. ACHIEVING POVERTY ALLEVIATION IN NIGERIA THROUGH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... could be strengthened to act as an instrument for poverty alleviation and economic empowerment. It recommends the introduction of pro-poor mortgage facilities in the mortgage industry in Nigeria as such initiatives will economically empower the low and middle income groups in the country to invest in real estate through ...

  18. Financial Institutions And Poverty Alleviation In Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the onset of economic reforms in 1984, the economy's direction began to move away from the tenets of a centrally planned economy towards free-market orientation. In 1991 financial sector reforms became a reality. In their current set up financial institutions are divorced from the strive for poverty alleviation. They are ...

  19. Poverty Alleviation Programmes and Economic Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study also acknowledged the existence of either one poverty alleviation program at one time or the other, but often the policy targets are at variance with the outcome. The study thus that suggests a kind of performance evaluation towards reappraising and adjusting the instruments employed by the programmes, refocus ...

  20. Alleviating Poverty Through Vocational Education: The Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper concludes that well-articulated vocational education policy and programmes will assist in employment generations and poverty reduction in Nigeria. Keywords: Alleviating Poverty, Vocational Education, Nigerian Experience Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria Vol. 10 (2) 2005: pp. 10-14 ...

  1. Lightweight, Economical Device Alleviates Drop Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deis, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    Corrective apparatus alleviates difficulties in walking for victims of drop foot. Elastic line attached to legband provides flexible support to toe of shoe. Device used with flat (heelless) shoes, sneakers, crepe-soled shoes, canvas shoes, and many other types of shoes not usable with short leg brace.

  2. Poverty Alleviation Programmes in Nigeria: Reflections on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In it, we have argued that past poverty alleviation policies and programmes have been elitist and non-participatory, especially by the target population. ... a paradigm shift in the process of policy making and implementation to involve the local people (those at the grassroot), based on participatory development approach.

  3. African Crop Science Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Crop Science Journal, a quarterly publication, publishes original research papers dealing with all aspects of crop agronomy, production, genetics and breeding, germplasm, crop protection, post harvest systems and utilisation, agro-forestry, crop-animal interactions, information science, environmental science ...

  4. Nutritional status of tribal children in Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangam Sukhdas, Sairam Challa, Prakash Bhatia, A.R. Rao, Koteswara Rao.P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tribes constitute separate socio-cultural groups, having distinct customs, traditions, marriage, kinship, and property inheritance systems. They live largely in agricultural and pre-agricultural level of technology. Their dependency on nature and impoverished economy bear effect on the nutritional status different compared to the general population. Aims: To study the prevalence of malnutrition in the under-five years age group tribal children in the three regions of Andhra Pradesh and compare the same with national statistics. Methods and Material: A cross sectional survey was carried out to assess the nutritional status of under-five age group children in three Integrated Tribal Development Agency (ITDA blocks of Andhra Pradesh. Results & Conclusions: Based on the WHO Child Growth Standards, the prevalence of malnutrition was lower in the AP tribal blocks than the national averages among tribal populations, but higher than the overall national and state averages.

  5. Region 9 Tribal Clean Water Act Programs and Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Tribal Water Office in Region 9 manages all grants related to the Clean Water Act for over 100 federally recognized tribes and provides programmatic and technical assistance for water quality standards and CWA grant programs.

  6. Comparing Tribal Research and Specimens Policies: Models, Practices, and Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Bardill

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews a range of tribal policies regarding the proper solicitation, collection, disposition, and return or disposal of biological samples, or biospecimens, which include not only the sample itself but also data, such as genetic information, derived from the sample. These policies are not always found within tribal regulation, and many that exist emerge from a discrete set of models, such as from the American Indian Law Center (AILC, the Canadian Institutes of Health (CIHR, and the Indigenous Peoples Council on Biocolonialism (IPCB. Some policies merge language from these national models and conceptual papers with tribally specific foci, including incorporating tribal language for specific principles to guide research with that community and their biospecimens. The article concludes with recommendations for principles that emerge as paramount in the review for directing research involving biospecimens.

  7. Impact of cash cropping and perennial crops on food crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increased crop production and sale of part of production during the main harvest season led households to ... Ethiopia, crop income accounts for the largest share of total income, 71%, followed by share of off-farm ... and Olinto (2001), in Colombia, off-farm employment contributes a significant share. (45%) to household ...

  8. Education for tribal children: An engine for human development

    OpenAIRE

    Malyadri, Pacha

    2012-01-01

    The Indian Constitution assigns special status to the Scheduled Tribes (STs). Traditionally referred to as adivasis, vanbasis, tribes, or tribals; STs constitute about 8% of the Indian population. There are around 573 Scheduled Tribes living in different parts of the country, having their own languages different from the one mostly spoken in the State where they live. There are more than 270 such languages in India. Accordingly to the 2001 census, the tribal population in India is about 67.8 ...

  9. Feasibility Analysis For Heating Tribal Buildings with Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Clairmont; Micky Bourdon; Tom Roche; Colene Frye

    2009-03-03

    This report provides a feasibility study for the heating of Tribal buildings using woody biomass. The study was conducted for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation in western Montana. S&K Holding Company and TP Roche Company completed the study and worked together to provide the final report. This project was funded by the DOE's Tribal Energy Program.

  10. DOE's Tribal Energy Program Offers Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas C. MacCourt, Chair, Indian Law Practice, Ater Wynne LLP

    2010-06-01

    This handbook is an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or who seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. Building upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in tribal energy workshops conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, it is designed to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process. It includes information on how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; a general overview of key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and a detailed discussion of ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects. The guide also includes a glossary of some of the most commonly used technical terms.

  11. California Tribal Nations Technical Water Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben, C; Coty, J

    2005-08-15

    , it was necessary to confine the analysis to a smaller geographic area, yet still represent the diversity of tribes and context within which tribal water issues arise. The state of California provides this opportunity. California has 106 federally recognized tribes. California is diverse in its geography, environment, demographics, and economic bases; California tribes demonstrate similar diversity. Additionally, no central repository of national or state tribal water issues exists and information must be aggregated, in general, tribe by tribe. This presents research challenges and, for this report, these were overcome by developing a method to essentially ''sub-sample'' the 106 federally recognized tribes in the state, while making every effort to maintain a sub-sample that broadly represents all of the 106 tribes. n an effort to develop an equitable and appropriate method with which to identify this set of representative tribes, multiple entities were contacted for guidance. Consultation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Indian Health Services (IHS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and Tribal Environmental Directors, provided key information and recommendations to guide the research process. It is hoped that an appropriate representation of the diversity of tribes across the state has been achieved; this includes an adequate representation of similarities and differences between Californian tribes on key water research issues (and the same between regions). This research occurred over a limited time period (i.e., three months) and given a general concern that this may not be sufficient, any information and conclusions in this report should be viewed with this in mind. Finally, it is hoped that this research allows for an (enhanced) informed capacity to better propose further dialog between tribes and LLNL to continue to exchange water research perspectives and define

  12. Gust alleviation using direct turbulence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynaski, E. G.; Andrisani, D., II; Eulrich, B. J.

    1979-01-01

    The research reported upon in this paper describes an effective method of gust alleviation using direct measurements of atmospheric turbulence to drive the aircraft control surfaces in a way that attempts to directly counter or cancel those forces and moments produced on the aircraft by gusts. The method yields a feedforward or open loop control law, simple to mechanize and relatively insensitive to changes in flight condition. When applied directly, the resulting control law effectively gust-alleviates in the low frequency phugoid and short period range but has a tendency to amplify structural mode vehicle motions due to the phase lag of the actuators. A method of design based upon the use of a diagonal or Jordan form of the equations of motion enables the designer to avoid this problem of structural mode excitation.

  13. Fluvoxamine alleviates paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Tanimukai, Hitoshi; Kudo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Px) is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various cancers. However, it is often associated with neurological side effects, including chemotherapy-associated cognitive impairment (CACI), such as “chemobrain”. Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in Px-induced neurotoxicity, and immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) inducer X (BIX) alleviates Px-induced neurotoxicity. However, BIX has not been used in clinical pr...

  14. poverty and poverty alleviation in globalised cities

    OpenAIRE

    Verena Ast

    2014-01-01

    In the light of increasing "division of the cities" and its underlying process of socio-spatial segregation researches focus more and more on the consequences of this process: the development of advantaged and disadvantaged districts within contemporary cities. Thereby especially poverty alleviation respectively poverty eradication in disadvantaged districts becomes an emerging and central field of intervention in social policies. This is due to the broad impact of poverty like higher risk of...

  15. Alleviating Media Bias Through Intelligent Agent Blogging

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Aviles, Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    Consumers of mass media must have a comprehensive, balanced and plural selection of news to get an unbiased perspective; but achieving this goal can be very challenging, laborious and time consuming. News stories development over time, its (in)consistency, and different level of coverage across the media outlets are challenges that a conscientious reader has to overcome in order to alleviate bias. In this paper we present an intelligent agent framework currently facilitating analysis of the m...

  16. Poverty alleviation in Uganda: the case for a viable optimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poverty alleviation is a long and painstaking process. It involves knowing what poverty is, its causes and means of alleviating it. Poverty is one of the scourges including disease and ignorance a combination of which deprives humanity of the basic needs for living. Among the strategies to alleviate poverty is effective ...

  17. Rural tourism development: a viable formula for poverty alleviation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case of rural tourism and community development has been made in general terms with less focus on poverty alleviation and more emphasis on economic modernisation. Recently, a link between rural tourism and poverty alleviation has been emphasised in the contemporary tourism and poverty alleviation literature.

  18. Assessment of Public Perception, Awareness and Knowledge on Genetically Engineered Food Crops and their Products in Trans-Nzoia County, Kenya

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinuthia Kagai, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    .... Adoption of genetically modified (GM) crops could contribute toward alleviating food insecurity in Kenya, but the attitudes and perceptions of stakeholders are crucial to the acceptance of GM products...

  19. Prioritizing refuge sites for migratory geese to alleviate conflicts with agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Anker; Wisz, Mary S.; Madsen, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    Expanding populations of geese feeding on farmland during winter and spring conflict with agricultural interests along their migratory flyway in north-western Europe. In Mid-Norway, farmers scare spring-staging pink-footed geese Anser brachyrhynchus off their land to protect crops, and this has had...... clear effects on goose distribution. To protect the geese, Norwegian authorities have implemented economic compensation to farmers to discourage scaring, but this has not been prioritised to accommodate the biological requirements and dispersal patterns of the geese, though such an approach is clearly...... prioritisation. Our approach has direct implications for alleviating similar goose-agriculture conflicts throughout Europe....

  20. Balancing Tribal Sovereignty and the Role of Interjurisdictional Partnerships in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Meenoo; Lupi, Monica Valdes; Carter, Sara Sally; Meeks, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Oklahoma has a history of strong partnerships with their tribal health leaders and tribal communities. In 2012, the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) established the Office of the Tribal Liaison, as Oklahoma has 39 tribal nations in the state, of which 38 are federally recognized. The Office of the Tribal Liaison is responsible for promoting relationships with Oklahoma Tribal Nations and implementing the OSDH Tribal Consultation policy. The strength of the partnership between the OSDH and the Tribal Nations enabled a new collaboration during an event hosted by a tribal casino event center that brought tattoo artists to provide tattoos to patrons over 3 days. Licensure issues that crossed the jurisdiction boundaries of the OSDH emerged before the event, which required the OSDH, Indian Health Service, and the Tribal Nation to work together to protect the public's health. The 3 jurisdictions drew upon their previously established partnership, OSDH's tribal consultation policy, and their open and trusting relationship to come together quickly to protect the public's health. This event and interjurisdictional partnership highlighted the importance of adopting the "Spectrum of Processes for Collaboration and Consensus-Building" model as outlined by Orenstein et al to help guide and support state, tribal, and federal collaborations. This case example highlights the opportunities for collaboration between different regulatory public health and tribal bodies to improve the communities' health.

  1. Rainfed intensive crop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed....

  2. A review of tribal best practices in substance abuse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Allyson; Witzel, Morgan; Fatupaito, Bethany

    2017-11-16

    American Indian youth experience higher rates of substance use than non-American Indian youth. Researchers, clinicians, and treatment programs embrace evidence-based practices (EBPs) and practice based evidence (PBE) as a primary method for addressing substance abuse and advancing behavioral health. However, less is known about the use of tribal best practices (TBPs) and how they are implemented in American Indian substance use prevention contexts. The main objective of this systematic review was to determine how TBPs are implemented and shared in the context of tribal substance use prevention. The second objective was to document TBP examples from three tribal communities involved in a 5-year substance use prevention initiative. A systematic review of published and grey literature was conducted using funding agencies websites, EBSCO Host and national registries. Three tribal communities involved in the initiative documented current TBPs to highlight characteristics of TBPs, costs, and approval processes. TBPs are very limited in the literature. Despite tribal use for thousands of years, TBPs are underrepresented and misunderstood. This review found that the terminology used to describe TBPs is not consistent across agencies, publications, websites, or reports. There is also variation in how TBPs originate in substance use prevention contexts and there is not a primary resource or protocol for sharing TBPs. Continued efforts are needed to support the use and dissemination of TBPs in substance use prevention.

  3. Microbial amelioration of crop salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian C; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    The use of soil and irrigation water with a high content of soluble salts is a major limiting factor for crop productivity in the semi-arid areas of the world. While important physiological insights about the mechanisms of salt tolerance in plants have been gained, the transfer of such knowledge into crop improvement has been limited. The identification and exploitation of soil microorganisms (especially rhizosphere bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi) that interact with plants by alleviating stress opens new alternatives for a pyramiding strategy against salinity, as well as new approaches to discover new mechanisms involved in stress tolerance. Although these mechanisms are not always well understood, beneficial physiological effects include improved nutrient and water uptake, growth promotion, and alteration of plant hormonal status and metabolism. This review aims to evaluate the beneficial effects of soil biota on the plant response to saline stress, with special reference to phytohormonal signalling mechanisms that interact with key physiological processes to improve plant tolerance to the osmotic and toxic components of salinity. Improved plant nutrition is a quite general beneficial effect and may contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis of toxic ions under saline stress. Furthermore, alteration of crop hormonal status to decrease evolution of the growth-retarding and senescence-inducing hormone ethylene (or its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid), or to maintain source-sink relations, photosynthesis, and biomass production and allocation (by altering indole-3-acetic acid and cytokinin biosynthesis) seem to be promising target processes for soil biota-improved crop salt tolerance.

  4. Fate and Effects of Leachate Contamination on Alaska's Tribal Drinking Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and Alaskan tribal communities identified and selected five representative Alaskan tribal landfills/dump sites and performed water quality sampling and analysis to identify chemical and microbial contaminants of concern (COCs) that could potentially impact the local drinking ...

  5. Report: Alleged Misuse of Tribal Clean Water Act Section 106 Funds in EPA Region 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-P-0453, May 4, 2012. On the first allegation, we found that Region 8 funded tribal Section 106 programs based on the region’s review of tribal work plans and did not inappropriately withhold funds.

  6. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District 1 [research brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This guide was created to help the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1 personnel and members of the North Coast Tribal Transportation Commission to develop interpretive tribal transportation corridors along stretches o...

  7. Tribal Science 2017 Webinar Series: Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs): Research, Collaborations, and Other Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tribal Science Webinar Series provides a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities, and features a wide variety of expert guest speakers from government,.....

  8. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting harvestable fisheries for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). The Spokane Tribe, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Colville Confederated Tribes and Lake Roosevelt Development Association/Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pen Project are cooperating in a comprehensive artificial production program to produce kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for annual releases into the project area. The program consists of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. The Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake Fisheries Evaluation Program monitor and evaluates release strategies and production methods for the aforementioned projects. Between 1985 and 2005 the projects have collectively produced up to 800,000 rainbow trout and 4 million kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry for Banks Lake annually. In 2005, the annual release goal included 3.3 million kokanee fry, 475,000 kokanee yearlings and 500,000 rainbow trout yearlings. Fish produced by this project in 2005 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 3,446,438 kokanee fingerlings, 347,730 rainbow trout fingerlings and 525,721 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Meadow Creek and Lake Whatcom kokanee, diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and

  9. Impact of GM crops on biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Janet E

    2011-01-01

    The potential impact of GM crops on biodiversity has been a topic of interest both in general as well as specifically in the context of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Agricultural biodiversity has been defined at levels from genes to ecosystems that are involved or impacted by agricultural production (www.cbd.int/agro/whatis.shtml). After fifteen years of commercial cultivation, a substantial body of literature now exists addressing the potential impacts of GM crops on the environment. This review takes a biodiversity lens to this literature, considering the impacts at three levels: the crop, farm and landscape scales. Within that framework, this review covers potential impacts of the introduction of genetically engineered crops on: crop diversity, biodiversity of wild relatives, non-target soil organisms, weeds, land use, non-target above-ground organisms, and area-wide pest suppression. The emphasis of the review is peer-reviewed literature that presents direct measures of impacts on biodiversity. In addition, possible impacts of changes in management practises such as tillage and pesticide use are also discussed to complement the literature on direct measures. The focus of the review is on technologies that have been commercialized somewhere in the world, while results may emanate from non-adopting countries and regions. Overall, the review finds that currently commercialized GM crops have reduced the impacts of agriculture on biodiversity, through enhanced adoption of conservation tillage practices, reduction of insecticide use and use of more environmentally benign herbicides and increasing yields to alleviate pressure to convert additional land into agricultural use.

  10. Serum Zinc Levels Amongst Tribal Population in a District of Jharkhand State, India: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    KAPİL, UMESH; SİNGH, PREETİ; PATHAK, PRİYALİ

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Nutritional deficiency of zinc is widespreadin developing countries. India has the second largestconcentration of tribal population after that of Africancontinent. Limited data is available on the serum zinclevels amongst tribal population in India.The objective of this study is to assess the status ofserum zinc amongst tribal population in a district ofJharkhand State, India.Method: The study was conducted amongst tribals inthe age group of 18-75 years residing in districtSahibgan...

  11. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  12. Access to Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) for Employees of Certain Indian Tribal Employers. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    This final rule makes Federal employee health insurance accessible to employees of certain Indian tribal entities. Section 409 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (codified at 25 U.S.C. 1647b) authorizes Indian tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations that carry out certain programs to purchase coverage, rights, and benefits under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for their employees. Tribal employers and tribal employees will be responsible for the full cost of benefits, plus an administrative fee.

  13. Final Report for the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Planning Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Kim [EPA Specialist

    2013-09-17

    In 2011 the Tribe was awarded funds from the Department of Energy to formulate the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan. This will be a guiding document used throughout the planning of projects focused on energy reduction on the Reservation. The Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan's goal is to create a Five Year Energy Plan for the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians in San Jacinto, California. This plan will guide the decision making process towards consistent progress leading to the Tribal goal of a 25% reduction in energy consumption in the next five years. It will additionally outline energy usage/patterns and will edentify areas the Tribe can decrease energy use and increase efficiency. The report documents activities undertaken under the grant, as well as incldues the Tribe's strategif energy plan.

  14. Historical review: Does falciparum malaria destroy isolated tribal populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, G Dennis

    Many isolated populations of tribal peoples were nearly destroyed when they first contacted infectious diseases particularly respiratory pathogens such as measles and smallpox. Surviving groups have often been found to have declining populations in the face of multiple social and infectious threats. Malaria, especially Plasmodium falciparum, was thought to be a major cause of depopulation in some tribal peoples isolated in tropical jungles. The dynamics of such host parasite interactions is unclear especially since most such populations would have had long histories of exposure to malaria. Three groups are individually reviewed: Meruts of Borneo, Yanomami of Amazonia, Jarawas of the Andaman Islands. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of falciparum malaria in the depopulation of some isolated tribal groups in order to understand what measures, if any, would be likely to prevent such losses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Negotiating Three Worlds: Academia, Nursing Science, and Tribal Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkup, Patricia A.; Rodehorst, T. Kim; Wilhelm, Susan L.; Kuntz, Sandra W.; Weinert, Clarann; Stepans, Mary Beth Flanders; Salois, Emily Matt; Bull, Jacqueline Left Hand; Hill, Wade G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to use a cross-cultural model to guide the exploration of common issues and the dynamic interrelationships surrounding entrée to tribal communities as experienced by four nursing research teams. Method Members of four research teams discuss the primary lessons learned about successful strategies and challenges encountered during their projects' early stages. Results Understanding the cultural values of relationship and reciprocity is critical to the success of research projects conducted in Native American communities. Discussion Conducting cross-cultural research involves complex negotiations among members of three entities: academia, nursing science, and tribal communities. The lessons learned in these four research projects may be instructive to investigators who have the opportunity to conduct research with tribal communities. PMID:18948449

  16. School Adjustment And Academic Achievement Among Tribal Dolescents In Manipur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ch. Beda Devi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study is an attempt to examine school adjustment and academic achievement among tribal adolescent students in two districts of Manipur. The study also attempts to examine the high and low academic achievers of tribal students of the two areas. The sample comprised of 629 XI standard tribal adolescent students. Out of which 136 were from Imphal West and 493 were from Ukhrul district. A standardized school adjustment inventory for adolescent students developed by the investigator was used. For academic achievement the last public examination i.e. H.S.L.C. marks were used as the index of academic achievement. The findings revealed that a low positive correlation between school adjustment and academic achievement in both the districts. It was also reveals that high academic achievers had better adaptability in school than that of low academic achievers

  17. Microbial Fuel Cell Possibilities on American Indian Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, Kimberlynn [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief background of tribal reservations, the process of how Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) work, and the potential benefits of using MFCs on tribal reservations to convert waste water to energy as a means to sustainably generate electricity. There have been no known studies conducted on tribal lands that would be able to add to the estimated percentage of all renewable energy resources identified. Not only does MFC technology provide a compelling, innovative solution, it could also address better management of wastewater, using it as a form of energy generation. Using wastewater for clean energy generation could provide a viable addition to community infrastructure systems improvements.

  18. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan and Appendices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Mobrand, Lars Erik

    1992-03-01

    This report describes the findings that have resulted from the effort to create a proposed Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in northern Idaho. This effort has been undertaken because of low population densities of salmon in the Clearwater and Salmon River Basins. The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) has approved the NPTH concept. For the NPTH to proceed, the Council must approve a master plan and amend the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (CBFWP). Requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) also must be met. The goals of NPTH are to: (1) develop, increase, and reintroduce natural populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook in the Clearwater and Salmon River Basins; (2) sustain long-term preservation and genetic integrity of target fish populations; (3) keep the ecological and genetic impacts of nontarget fish populations within acceptable limits; and, (4) provide harvest opportunities for both tribal and non-tribal anglers.

  19. 78 FR 37821 - Tribal Self-Governance Program, Negotiation Cooperative Agreement, Announcement Type: New-Limited...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Tribal Self-Governance Program, Negotiation Cooperative Agreement... (IHS) Office of Tribal Self-Governance (OTSG) is accepting limited competition Negotiation Cooperative Agreement applications for the Tribal Self-Governance Program (TSGP). This program is authorized under Title...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.14 - Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.14 Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance? Two types of entities are...

  1. 42 CFR 137.15 - Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance? 137... HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance § 137.15 Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance? Those...

  2. 25 CFR 1200.10 - Who is eligible to withdraw their tribal funds from trust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is eligible to withdraw their tribal funds from trust... INTERIOR AMERICAN INDIAN TRUST FUND MANAGEMENT REFORM ACT Withdrawing Tribal Funds From Trust § 1200.10 Who is eligible to withdraw their tribal funds from trust? Any tribe for whom we manage funds in trust. ...

  3. 25 CFR 115.807 - Will OTFM consult with tribes about investments of tribal trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... trust funds? 115.807 Section 115.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.807 Will OTFM consult with tribes about investments of tribal trust funds? Upon...

  4. In the Service of Others: How Volunteering Is Integral to the Tribal College Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talahongva, Patty

    2016-01-01

    Today, the spirit of volunteering is very much alive at every tribal college and university (TCU). From fundraisers for food pantries to educational activities that help fellow students, TCUs help forge reciprocity among students and staff. Volunteerism is integral to the tribal college experience. Volunteerism at three tribal colleges--Cankdeska…

  5. 26 CFR 305.7871-1 - Indian tribal governments treated as States for certain purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER THE INDIAN TRIBAL GOVERNMENTAL TAX STATUS ACT OF 1982 § 305.7871-1 Indian tribal governments... foundations). (b) Special rule for excise tax provisions. An Indian tribal government shall be treated as a... tax imposed on a transaction under— (1) Chapter 31 of the Code (relating to tax on special fuels); (2...

  6. 78 FR 37541 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS); Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... leaders on activities and areas identified by TAC members and other tribal leaders as priority public... responsibility. It is an open and free exchange of information and opinion among parties that leads to mutual... be provided during the Consultation Session for tribal testimony. Tribal Leaders are encouraged to...

  7. 76 FR 41297 - Grant Program To Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Grant Program To Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity AGENCY: Bureau of... proposals from Federally-recognized Indian tribes for projects to build tribal capacity for energy resource... Indian tribes that wish to build capacity to develop conventional or renewable energy resources on tribal...

  8. Educating Students, Transforming Communities: Tribal Colleges Bridge Gap from Poverty to Prosperity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Sherrole

    2012-01-01

    Tribal colleges are often performing little miracles in their communities. Most tribal colleges operate without benefit of local and state taxes. Yet, they bring in new money from other sources that stimulate the local economy. Students gain knowledge and skills that can transform their communities and local economies. Tribal colleges not only…

  9. 75 FR 8508 - Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation AGENCY: Office of Child Support Enforcement...) that we had begun consideration with stakeholders of appropriate minimum Tribal systems automation... Federal/Tribal workgroup was convened and considered such automation issues as compatibility, scale...

  10. 76 FR 35474 - Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Employment and Training Administration Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise... Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division, Omak, Washington. The Department's... employed on-site at the Omak, Washington location of Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal...

  11. 77 FR 39244 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS); Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments, CDC and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry... leadership and staff to conduct government-to-government consultation with elected tribal officials or their... wherein tribal representatives and CDC/ATSDR leadership and staff exchange information about public health...

  12. Goals, Family, and Community: What Drives Tribal College Transfer Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makomenaw, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This article examines success factors for American Indian tribal college students who transfer to 4-year predominantly White institutions. The study examined the experiences of 8 tribal college transfer students to Midwest universities. Using an indigenous methodology, 3 themes were found to help American Indian tribal college transfer students…

  13. Native Geosciences: Strengthening the Future Through Tribal Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J. R.; Quigley, I.; Douville, V.; Hollow Horn Bear, D.

    2008-12-01

    Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways in our natural sacred homelands and environments. Tribal cultures are the expression of deep understandings of geosciences shared through oral histories, language and ceremonies. Today, Native people as all people are living in a definite time of change. The developing awareness of "change" brings forth an immense opportunity to expand and elevate Native geosciences knowledge, specifically in the areas of earth, wind, fire and water. At the center of "change" is the need to balance the needs of the people with the needs of the environment. Native tradition and our inherent understanding of what is "sacred above is sacred below" is the foundation for an emerging multi-faceted approach to increasing the representation of Natives in geosciences. The approach is also a pathway to assist in Tribal language revitalization, connection of oral histories and ceremonies as well as building an intergenerational teaching/learning community. Humboldt State University, Sinte Gleska University and South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in partnership with Northern California (Hoopa, Yurok, & Karuk) and Great Plains (Lakota) Tribes have nurtured Native geosciences learning communities connected to Tribal Sacred Sites and natural resources. These sites include the Black Hills (Mato Paha, Mato Tiplia, Hinhan Kaga Paha, Mako Sica etc.), Klamath River (Ishkêesh), and Hoopa Valley (Natinixwe). Native geosciences learning is centered on the themes of earth, wind, fire and water and Native application of remote sensing technologies. Tribal Elders and Native geoscientists work collaboratively providing Native families in-field experiential intergenerational learning opportunities which invite participants to immerse themselves spiritually, intellectually, physically and emotionally in the experiences. Through this immersion and experience Native students and families strengthen the circle of our future Tribal

  14. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lamds of Viejas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrence Meyer (Black & Veatch); Mike Elenbaas (Black & Veatch)

    2005-09-30

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of Renewable Energy Development on the lands of the Viejas Band of the Kumeyaay Indian Nation. In addition, the study will investigate the feasibility of forming a renewable energy based tribal utility. Viejas contracted with Black & Veatch and Fredericks, Pelcyger & Hester, LLC to assist in the development of a feasibility study to ascertain the economics and operational factors of forming an electric and water utility. This report is the result of the investigation conducted by Black & Veatch, with input from Viejas Tribal Government.

  15. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meda Anderson R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.

  16. Neural predictive control for active buffet alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pado, Lawrence E.; Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Liguore, Salvatore L.; Drouin, Donald

    1998-06-01

    The adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response (ANCAR) and the affordable loads and dynamics independent research and development (IRAD) programs at the Boeing Company jointly examined using neural network based active control technology for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response in a scale model aircraft vertical tail. The potential benefits of adaptive control includes reducing aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, increasing flutter margins, and reducing response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and thus loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Wind tunnel tests were undertaken on a rigid 15% scale aircraft in Boeing's mini-speed wind tunnel, which is used for testing at very low air speeds up to 80 mph. The model included a dynamically scaled flexible fail consisting of an aluminum spar with balsa wood cross sections with a hydraulically powered rudder. Neural predictive control was used to actuate the vertical tail rudder in response to strain gauge feedback to alleviate buffeting effects. First mode RMS strain reduction of 50% was achieved. The neural predictive control system was developed and implemented by the Boeing Company to provide an intelligent, adaptive control architecture for smart structures applications with automated synthesis, self-optimization, real-time adaptation, nonlinear control, and fault tolerance capabilities. It is designed to solve complex control problems though a process of automated synthesis, eliminating costly control design and surpassing it in many instances by accounting for real world non-linearities.

  17. Delitto d’onore, ordine tribale e Stato - Honour crimes, tribal order and the State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Baghaï

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization does not only mean that the Western world is pervading the non-Western world but also that the non-Western world, through migration processes, moves and settles in the Western world. The impressive number of honor crimes committed every year in the Western world suggests that a different social political order is acting on the Western stage. Honor crimes are committed in Muslim communities that have their roots in those parts of the Muslim world which have tribal societies on their territories, i.e. tribal institutions and laws which interact with or ignore State law. This is a political order which is stateless and based on blood ties – the author calls it an “ematocracy” – and it is perfectly able to survive within the different shapes taken by the State – when there is the State – but also without the State when it is considered as unreliable or when, for some reasons, it collapses. The author argues that political order based on blood ties is considered as reliable by the social actors since it is permanent and in expansion: blood ties reproduce themselves as long as there is life. And women – as protagonists of reproduction processes – are unfortunately at the heart of the conflict between State laws and customary law both in their home countries and in their new homes. Through an analysis of the intertwinement between State law and customary law, in some of the home countries of the migrants, and between shariya and customary law in the classical doctrine, the author shows how this process of ordering the world carries on its political projects in the post-global context.

  18. Aluminium-phosphorus interactions in plants growing on acid soils: does phosphorus always alleviate aluminium toxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong Fu; Zhang, Fu Lin; Zhang, Qi Ming; Sun, Qing Bin; Dong, Xiao Ying; Shen, Ren Fang

    2012-03-30

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity and phosphorus (P) deficiency are considered to be the main constraints for crop production in acid soils, which are widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Conventionally, P addition is regarded as capable of alleviating Al toxicity in plants. However, this field is still rife with unsubstantiated theories, especially for different plant species growing on acid soils. In this review, the responses of plants to different methods of Al-P treatments are briefly summarized, and possible reasons are proposed by considering recent results from our laboratory. It is shown that: (1) long-term Al-P alternate treatment is advantageous for studying Al-P interactions in plants; (2) under the long-term Al-P alternate treatment, the roles of P in Al phytotoxicity might be associated with the Al resistance capability and P use efficiency of the plant, and a P/Al molar ratio exceeding 5 in roots may be the threshold of P alleviating Al toxicity based on the calculation of the tested plants; (3) in acid soils, P application may be effective only after Al stress is overcome for Al-sensitive species. Thus it is concluded that P application does not always alleviate Al toxicity under long-term Al-P alternate treatment. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Poverty alleviation potential of speculation crops and remittance flows in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Hes, Tomás; Ramírez Manzano, Mariana; Martínez Damián, Miguel Ángel; Martínez Saldaña, Tomás; Rechy Montiel, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural growth and poverty reduction are not necessarily interconnected. Productivity increase can be fueled by few powerful organizations leaving aside large number of ostracized smallholders who do not participate in global production-market channels (characterized by economies of scale, capital accumulation and globalized market diversification). The choice of agricultural products that provide the best combination of income level and long term stability is a key decision. This is esp...

  20. 25 CFR 115.815 - How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust... ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Withdrawing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.815 How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust account? To request trust funds from a...

  1. 25 CFR 900.51 - What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Property Management System Standards § 900.51 What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do? An Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management...

  2. 25 CFR 900.41 - How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep management system records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems General § 900.41 How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep management system records? The... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep...

  3. From the other end: Tribals and democratic decentralisation in Kerala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, A.; Krishnan, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the contradictions of India s development trajectory by taking the case of the tribal population in the state of Kerala. The wide appreciation for the Kerala Model of development (characterised by significant achievements in social development, without corresponding economic

  4. 78 FR 21826 - Tribal Background Investigations and Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 558 RIN 3141-AA15 Tribal Background Investigations and Licensing AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission, Interior. ACTION: Technical amendment. SUMMARY: The...

  5. Chaparral Commerce Center Proposed Tribal Minor NSR Permit Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal Minor New Source Review (NSR) Permit application for the two emergency diesel-fired generators (1,500 kW each) to be installed at the Chaparral Commerce Center in the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC) in Scottsdale, Arizona.

  6. Valuing Native American Tribal Elders and Stories for Sustainability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritter, Kristine; Scheurerman, Richard; Strong, Cindy; Schuster, Carrie Jim; Williams, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines a framework the authors have used to infuse sustainability study into humanities teaching at the middle school level. Native American tribal elders can act as co-teachers in such classrooms, and the place-based stories that shaped their views of the environment can serve as important classroom texts to investigate sustainable…

  7. Modeling tribal exposures to methyl mercury from fish consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish consumption are different than for the general U.S. population because of higher fish intake from subsistence fishing and/or from unique cultural practices. This research summarizes analyses of available data ...

  8. Tribalism as a Foiled Factor of Africa Nation-Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okogu, J. O.; Umudjere, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper tends to examine tribalism as a foiled factor on Africa nation-building and proffers useful tips to salvaging the Africa land from this deadly social problem. Africans in times past had suffered enormous attacks, injuries, losses, deaths, destruction of properties and human skills and ideas due to the presence of tribalistic views in…

  9. Tribal Watershed Management: Culture, Science, Capacity, and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Amanda; Ostergren, David M.

    2007-01-01

    This research focuses on two elements of contemporary American Indian natural resource management. First, the authors explore the capacity of tribes to manage natural resources, including the merging of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with Western science. Second, they analyze tribal management in the context of local and regional…

  10. Tribally Controlled Community College Libraries: A Paradigm for Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Lotsee; Taylor, Rhonda Harris

    1996-01-01

    This study reports on the results of a mail survey administered to tribally controlled college libraries during 1993, just before the colleges were granted federal land-grant college status. Highlights include the historical development of the institutions operated by Native American Indian tribes; budgets; staff; services; computer utilization;…

  11. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Maria Perez, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Historically, American Indian Tribes have lacked sufficient numbers of trained, technical personnel from their communities to serve their communities; tribal expertise in the fields of science, business and engineering being extremely rare and programs to encourage these disciplines almost non-existent. Subsequently, Tribes have made crucial decisions about their land and other facets of Tribal existence based upon outside technical expertise, such as that provided by the United States government and/or private industries. These outside expert opinions rarely took into account the traditional and cultural values of the Tribes being advised. The purpose of this internship was twofold: Create and maintain a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU) to plan for the Summit on Tribal human resource development; and Evaluate and engage in current efforts to strengthen the Tribal Resource Institute in Business, Engineering and Science (TRIBES) program. The intern lists the following as the project results: Positive interactions and productive meetings between CERT and CSU; Gathered information from Tribes; CERT database structure modification; Experience as facilitator in participating methods; Preliminary job descriptions for staff of future TRIBES programs; and Additions for the intern`s personal database of professional contacts and resources.

  12. 25 CFR 23.22 - Purpose of tribal government grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT.... Such child and family service programs may include, but need not be limited to: (1) A system for... tribal court in the disposition of domestic relations and child welfare matters, but not to establish...

  13. The impacts of climate change on tribal traditional foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathy Lynn; John Daigle; Jennie Hoffman; Frank Lake; Natalie Michelle; Darren Ranco; Carson Viles; Garrit Voggesser; Paul. Williams

    2013-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native tribes are uniquely affected by climate change. Indigenous peoples have depended on a wide variety of native fungi, plant and animal species for food, medicine, ceremonies, community and economic health for countless generations. Climate change stands to impact the species and ecosystems that constitute tribal traditional foods that...

  14. Mathematical Precision of Pitch Gaps in Tribal Tonal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    expressions in his mother tongue were quite without aesthetic parallel in any other language of mortals”.1. When I was a toddler one British Colonial Medical. Officer, Cicely Williams, described a children's dis- ease in Ghana and, using our tribal name Kwashiorkor, placed the condition in its socio-pathological context.2 3.

  15. Alleviate Cellular Congestion Through Opportunistic Trough Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichuan Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The demand for cellular data service has been skyrocketing since the debut of data-intensive smart phones and touchpads. However, not all data are created equal. Many popular applications on mobile devices, such as email synchronization and social network updates, are delay tolerant. In addition, cellular load varies significantly in both large and small time scales. To alleviate network congestion and improve network performance, we present a set of opportunistic trough filling schemes that leverage the time-variation of network congestion and delay-tolerance of certain traffic in this paper. We consider average delay, deadline, and clearance time as the performance metrics. Simulation results show promising performance improvement over the standard schemes. The work shed lights on addressing the pressing issue of cellular overload.

  16. A global overview of biotech (GM) crops: adoption, impact and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Clive

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1990s, some were skeptical that genetically modified (GM) crops, now referred to as biotech crops, could deliver improved products and make an impact at the farm level. There was even more skepticism that developing countries would adopt biotech crops. The adoption of and commercialization of biotech crops in 2008 is reviewed. The impact of biotech crops are summarized including their contribution to: global food, feed and fiber security; a safer environment; a more sustainable agriculture; and the alleviation of poverty, and hunger in the developing countries of the world. Future prospects are discussed. Notably, Egypt planted Bt maize for the first time in 2008 thereby becoming the first country in the Arab world to commercialize biotech crops.

  17. Crop detection and density estimation combing LiDAR points cloud with remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Lin, Ying

    2009-10-01

    To further improve the accuracy of crop detection and acquire more information for land use investigation and agriculture management, this paper proposes a variational level set model for crop detection by combining airborne LiDAR(Light Detection and Range) points cloud and aerial image simultaneously acquired by LiDAR device. Specifically, normalized digital surface model (nDSM) derived from raw LiDAR points cloud are combined with aerial image so as to alleviate the misclassification caused by insufficient information only based on remote sensing image data. This fusion combines spectral and height information of objects from both sensors. By classifying the combined image using our proposed level set model, crop can be discriminated. Then, the paper suggests a novel method based on classification to predict crop density in a given scene. Experiments have verified that the proposed scheme really improve the accuracy of crop detection and the effectiveness of the proposed scheme of crop density estimation.

  18. Haptoglobin polymorphism among the tribal groups of southern Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Priyanka; Aggarwal, Aastha; Huidrom, Suraj Singh; Kshatriya, Gautam K

    2011-09-01

    Gujarat is located at the western most point of the Indian subcontinent. Valsad and Surat districts are part of the 'tribal belt'of Gujarat and constitute 29.1% of total tribal population of Gujarat. These tribal populations are a rich source of gaining insights in the patterns of genetic diversity and genetico-environmental disorders against the back drop of their ecological, historical and ethnographic aspects. The objectives were to find out a) the genetic diversity among the tribes of Gujarat with reference to haptoglobin (Hp) locus b) the relationship between Hp polymorphism and sickle cell anemia/trait. 431 individuals belonging to eight tribal groups were studied for Hp polymorphism using polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Hb*S was screened by dithionate tube turbididy (DTT) test and confirmed using cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis (CAME). Allele frequency was calculated by direct gene counting method. Average heterozygosity and gene diversity were computed using software DISPAN. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) was estimated using software ARLEQUIN version 3.1. Pattern of allele frequency distribution showed preponderance of Hp(2) allele in all the eight tribal groups, which is in accordance with its frequency in different populations of Indian subcontinent. Total average heterozygosity (H(T)) was found to be low (0.160) but the level of genetic differentiation (G(ST)) was found to be moderately high (5.6%). AMOVA analysis indicated least among group variance between west and south Indian populations (-0.04%) indicating the affinities of the tribes of Gujarat with that of Dravidian speaking groups. Analysis of Hp phenotypes among sickle cell anemia/ trait individuals revealed a high frequency of Hp 0-0 phenotype (92.7%) among SS individuals as opposed to only 9.7% among AS individuals, reaffirming the selective advantage of HbAS state in relation to hemolytic disorders.

  19. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining

  20. Photosynthetic antenna engineering to improve crop yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Henning; Gabilly, Stéphane T; Niyogi, Krishna K; Lemaux, Peggy G; Melis, Anastasios

    2017-05-01

    Evidence shows that decreasing the light-harvesting antenna size of the photosystems in tobacco helps to increase the photosynthetic productivity and plant canopy biomass accumulation under high-density cultivation conditions. Decreasing, or truncating, the chlorophyll antenna size of the photosystems can theoretically improve photosynthetic solar energy conversion efficiency and productivity in mass cultures of algae or plants by up to threefold. A Truncated Light-harvesting chlorophyll Antenna size (TLA), in all classes of photosynthetic organisms, would help to alleviate excess absorption of sunlight and the ensuing wasteful non-photochemical dissipation of excitation energy. Thus, solar-to-biomass energy conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in high-density cultures can be increased. Applicability of the TLA concept was previously shown in green microalgae and cyanobacteria, but it has not yet been demonstrated in crop plants. In this work, the TLA concept was applied in high-density tobacco canopies. The work showed a 25% improvement in stem and leaf biomass accumulation for the TLA tobacco canopies over that measured with their wild-type counterparts grown under the same ambient conditions. Distinct canopy appearance differences are described between the TLA and wild type tobacco plants. Findings are discussed in terms of concept application to crop plants, leading to significant improvements in agronomy, agricultural productivity, and application of photosynthesis for the generation of commodity products in crop leaves.

  1. Numerical simulation of cropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Hutchinson, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cropping is a cutting process whereby opposing aligned blades create a shearing failure by exerting opposing forces normal to the surfaces of a metal sheet or plate. Building on recent efforts to quantify cropping, this paper formulates a plane strain elastic-plastic model of a plate subject to s...

  2. Winter cover crops decrease weediness in organic cropping systems

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Helena; Talgre, Liina; Eremeev, Vyacheslav; Alaru, Maarika; Maeorg, Erkki; Luik, Anne

    2017-01-01

    By inserting cover crops into organic cropping systems, the number and biomass of weeds decreased. Winter cover crops clearly have a suppressive effect on weeds by providing competition for light, water and space.

  3. Pendulous Crop in Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PD Ebling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPendulous crop is a physiological disorder, which etiology is still unknown and it is characterized by abnormal dilation of the crop of poultry. This article aims at reporting a case of high incidence of pendulous crop in male and female broilers Cobb 500, as well as to discuss its possible causes and consequences. In an experiment with broilers performed at the experimental facilities of Laboratório de Ensino Zootécnico of UFRGS, a high incidence (9.5% of pendulous crop was observed. Genetic predisposition is the most frequently documented and accepted cause of that condition. Despite presenting the same live weight as normal broilers, birds with pendulous crop had lower carcass weight due to dehydration and malnourishment, and should be culled after diagnosis. Therefore, further studies on the origin and control of this physiological disorder are warranted.

  4. Tillage System and Cover Crop Effects on Soil Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    depths, pore characteristics did not differ significantly among tillage treatments. At the 12- to 16-cm depth, negative effects of reduced tillage (D and H) were recorded for total porosity and air-filled porosity at −10 kPa (that is, >30-μm pores). Generally, the use of a cover crop increased air......Information about the quantitative effect of conservation tillage combined with a cover crop on soil structure is still limited. This study examined the effect of these management practices on soil pore characteristics of a sandy loam soil in a long-term field trial. The tillage treatments (main....... The cover crop thus alleviated the effect of tillage pan compaction in all tillage treatments....

  5. Can Integrated Watershed Management Contribute to Improvement of Public Health? A Cross-Sectional Study from Hilly Tribal Villages in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S. Nerkar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Tribal people living in hilly areas suffer from water scarcity in many parts of the world, including India. Water scarcity adversely impacts all aspects of life, including public health. Implementation of an Integrated Watershed Management Programme (IWMP can help solve the problems arising out of water scarcity in such areas. However, the knowledge about and views of the water scarcity sufferers on the public health implications of IWMP have not been well documented. This cross-sectional study was performed in six purposively selected tribal villages located in Maharashtra, India. In three of the villages IWMP had been implemented (IWMV, but not in the other three (NWMV. The head of each household in all villages was interviewed using a questionnaire covering various public health aspects relevant to the villages. A total of 286/313 (92% households participated in the study. Compared to NWMV, respondents in IWMV experienced significantly lesser prolonged water scarcity (OR = 0.39, had greater number of toilets (OR = 6.95, cultivated more variety of crops (OR = 2.61, had lower migration (OR = 0.59, higher number of girls continuing education (OR = 3.04 and better utilized modern healthcare facilities in the antenatal, natal and postnatal period (OR = 3.75, 2.57, 4.88 respectively. Thus, tribal people in IWMP-implemented villages reported advantages in many aspects of public health.

  6. Can integrated watershed management contribute to improvement of public health? A cross-sectional study from hilly tribal villages in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerkar, Sandeep S; Pathak, Ashish; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Tamhankar, Ashok J

    2015-02-27

    Tribal people living in hilly areas suffer from water scarcity in many parts of the world, including India. Water scarcity adversely impacts all aspects of life, including public health. Implementation of an Integrated Watershed Management Programme (IWMP) can help solve the problems arising out of water scarcity in such areas. However, the knowledge about and views of the water scarcity sufferers on the public health implications of IWMP have not been well documented. This cross-sectional study was performed in six purposively selected tribal villages located in Maharashtra, India. In three of the villages IWMP had been implemented (IWMV), but not in the other three (NWMV). The head of each household in all villages was interviewed using a questionnaire covering various public health aspects relevant to the villages. A total of 286/313 (92%) households participated in the study. Compared to NWMV, respondents in IWMV experienced significantly lesser prolonged water scarcity (OR=0.39), had greater number of toilets (OR=6.95), cultivated more variety of crops (OR=2.61), had lower migration (OR=0.59), higher number of girls continuing education (OR=3.04) and better utilized modern healthcare facilities in the antenatal, natal and postnatal period (OR=3.75, 2.57, 4.88 respectively). Thus, tribal people in IWMP-implemented villages reported advantages in many aspects of public health.

  7. An Appraisal of Poverty Alleviation Programmes in Nigeria | Forae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper analyses Nigerias past poverty alleviation measures as well as assessing the reasons for their inability to achieve set goals and targets. It is also aimed at formulating a framework for building and implementing future poverty alleviation strategies in Nigeria. The paper suggests a participatory approach to the ...

  8. Impact of government poverty alleviation programmes on the socio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite these programmes, poverty still exists among Nigerians especially the youth. This study therefore examines the impact of government poverty alleviation programmes on the youth. The population of the study comprised of all youths who have benefited from government poverty alleviation programmes. The Random ...

  9. Poverty alleviation with economic growth strategy: Prospects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poverty alleviation with economic growth strategy: Prospects and challenges in contemporary Nigeria. ... Journal of Social Development in Africa ... approaches to poverty alleviation in these countries is that they are determined largely by making a choice between growth-promoting policies and poverty-focused strategies.

  10. Managing Education for Poverty Alleviation Through Gender Parity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing education for poverty alleviation will only succeed by empowering female s through equal access to education as males. Several policies, seminars, workshops, declarations and summits have concluded that poverty alleviation and enhanced global economy can be achieved through gender equality in access to ...

  11. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity.

  12. An Online Alternative to Alleviate Communication Apprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyit Ahmet Çapan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety is an affective factor commonly associated with one’s overall performance in a foreign language. As a component of foreign language anxiety, communication apprehension specifically correlates with successful oral production. A plethora of research (Bailey, Onwuegbuzie & Daley, 2003; Foss & Reitzel, 1988 has indicated that high levels of communication apprehension negatively affects one’s L2 communication abilities. Thus, this study intends to remedy negative effects of communication apprehension on EFL learners by virtual meetings held through computer-mediated communication. The participants (N: 18 in this study were selected through purposive sampling. The study employed both quantitative and qualitative techniques. To analyze the data collected, a non-parametric test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, was utilized. The results indicated that computer-mediated communication via voice over IP tools made a significant contribution to alleviate communication apprehension levels in the participants with varying degrees of apprehension levels. The study yielded the most drastic reduction in the high apprehension group, since the participants in this group made a significant progress and ended up with moderate levels of communication apprehension. Also, the participants’ self-reports revealed that computer-mediated communication yielded remarkably positive changes in their attitudes towards communicating in the target language. Moreover, the study revealed that computer-mediated communication helped to increase their intercultural awareness. Finally, participants provided a bunch of practical suggestions as possible solutions for reducing communication apprehension.

  13. Alleviating Pressure on Water Resources: A new approach could be attempted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shikun; Wang, Yubao; Wang, Feifei; Liu, Jing; Luan, Xiaobo; Li, Xiaolei; Zhou, Tianwa; Wu, Pute

    2015-09-01

    Water and food safety are two major challenges which the world faces today. Traditional water management focuses on the reduction of water use through improvements in water saving technologies. However, quantitative research is needed to evaluate the effects of changing food consumption patterns on water resources. Here we report the water saving effects of changing diet pattern of the major crops and animal products in mainland China. By using the concepts of water footprint (WF) per weight unit and per calorie unit, provided by 13 primary crop and animal products, the WFs of the 13 agricultural products in each province are compared, and their water/energy conversion efficiencies are analyzed. Then, impacts of different scenarios of changing diet pattern on water consumption were explored. Results show that there are obvious differences between the WF per weight and calorie unit provided by crop and animal products due to the nutritional properties of the agricultural products. Promoting water savings from the food consumption side could give a positive feedback on water consumption. Scenario analysis of adjustments to the diet pattern proves that it is potentially feasible to reach the objective of alleviating stress on water resources while guaranteeing nutritional value of the residents.

  14. Applied crop protection 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Nielsen, Bent Jørgen; Jensen, Peter Kryger

    This publication contains results from crop protection trials which were carried out at the Department of Agroecology within the area of agricultural crops. Most of the results come from field trials, but results from greenhouse and semi-field trials are also included. The report contains results...... that throw light upon: • Effects of new pesticides • Results of different control strategies, including how to control specific pests, as part of an integrated control strategy involving both cultivars and control thresholds • Results with pesticide resistance • Trial results from different cropping systems...

  15. Recruitment and Baseline Characteristics of American Indian Tribal College Students Participating in a Tribal College Tobacco and Behavioral Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won S; Nazir, Niaman; Pacheco, Christina M; Filippi, Melissa K; Pacheco, Joseph; White Bull, Julia; Nance, Christi; Faseru, Babalola; Greiner, K Allen; Daley, Christine Makosky

    2016-06-01

    American Indians (AIs) have the highest cigarette smoking rates of any racial/ethnic group in the United States. Although the overall smoking prevalence in the United States for nonminority populations has decreased over the past several decades, the same pattern is not observed among AIs. The purpose of this observational study was to collect cigarette smoking and related information from American Indian tribal college students to inform tailored interventions. We conducted a repeated cross-sectional survey of American Indian tribal college students, Tribal College Tobacco and Behavior Survey (TCTABS), with a focus on recruiting all incoming freshman at three participating tribal colleges in the Midwest and Northern Plains regions. A total of 1256 students participated in the baseline surveys between April 2011 and October 2014. The overall smoking prevalence of this sample was 34.7%, with differences by region (Northern Plains-44.0% and Midwest-28%). The majority, 87.5% of current smokers reported smoking 10 or less cigarettes per day, 41% reported smoking menthol cigarettes, 52% smoked Marlboro brand, and the mean age of their first cigarette was 14 years. The majority, 62% had made at least one quit attempt in the past year. The overwhelming majority of respondents, regardless of their smoking status, thought that the current smoking prevalence on campus was greater than 41% and approximately one-third believed that it was as high as 61%. Very few studies of smoking have been conducted in this population and results from our study confirm the need for effective interventions. AIs have the highest cigarette smoking rates compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Furthermore, limited studies have examined the epidemiology of cigarette smoking among tribal college students. This study addresses health disparities related to smoking among college students by examining the demographic, cultural, and environmental characteristics of smoking and

  16. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, David B.; Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.

    2001-08-17

    This report consists of activities/events conducted in response to the Objectives and Tasks described in the 1999 contract Statement Of Work for the Planning and Planning and Design (P and D) and Maintenance (O and M) activities of the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH). The report follows the format of the contract for ease in finding accomplishments. Although specific emphasis will be placed on activities related directly to the NPTH, activities from other artificial production related projects might also be noted because of overlap in staff duties and production facilities. Additionally, the project leader's role has evolved as other Tribal fisheries projects have been developed and assigned to the Production Division, Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM), and Nez Perce Tribe (NPT). Thus, implementation of the project leader role for the NPTH actually entails specific duties of the Production Division Director and the Production Division Coordinator, as well as the Hatchery Division Coordinator.

  17. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Karen Sandoval, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the project was to: create a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU); involve and create relationships among individuals and departments at CSU; empower Native communities to run their own affairs; establish programs for the benefit of Tribes; and create Native American Program Development Office at CSU. The intern lists the following as the project results: revised a Native American Program Development document; confirmation from 45 departments across campus for Summit attendance [Tribal Human Resource Development Summit]; created initial invitee list from CSU departments and colleges; and informed CERT and CSU staff of results. Much of the response from the campus community has been positive and enthusiastic. They are ready to develop new Native American programs on campus, but need the awareness of what they can do to be respectful of Tribal needs.

  18. Accuracy of Weight Perception Among American Indian Tribal College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Heather D; Pacheco, Christina; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Daley, Christine; Greiner, K Allen; Choi, Won S

    2016-11-01

    National data indicate a higher prevalence of obesity among American Indian (AI) populations and greater disparity of morbidity and mortality among younger age groups compared with other ethnicities. Diet and physical activity are important obesity preventive behaviors, but no published data exist that describe these behaviors in relation to obesity in AI young adults at tribal colleges. Study purposes were to: (1) identify fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity practices of AI young adults from three U.S. tribal colleges according to BMI categories; (2) identify the accuracy of body weight perceptions; and (3) identify predictor variables for weight misperception. In this observational study during 2011-2014, a total of 1,256 participants were recruited from three participating U.S. tribal colleges to complete an online survey addressing issues related to diet, physical activity, and weight perception. Reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI categories, and differences between BMI categories were examined. Gender differences related to accuracy of weight perception by BMI categories were also examined. Analyses were conducted in 2016. Based on self-reported height and weight, 68% of the sample was overweight or obese (BMI ≥25) and mean BMI was 28.9 (SD=6.9). Most did not meet recommendations for fruit intake (78.7%), vegetable intake (96.6%), or physical activity (65.6%). More than half (53.7%%) who were overweight/obese underestimated their weight category. Men more often underestimated their weight category (54.2%) than women (35.1%). Interventions are needed to improve weight-related lifestyle behaviors of AI tribal college students. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Melinda Jacquez, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the intern project was to write a comprehensive booklet on all state legislation proposed in 1995 on Native American issues. A second purpose was to contact tribal governments and request an ordinance, law or resolution on hazardous and nuclear waste transportation. This intern report contains a summary of bills proposed in 37 state legislatures pertaining to Native American issues. Time ran out before the second project objective could be met.

  20. Monitoring and evaluation plan for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, C.R.

    1996-08-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has proposed to build and operate the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in the Clearwater River subbasin of Idaho for the purpose of restoring self-sustaining populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon to their native habitats. The project comprises a combination of incubation and rearing facilities, satellite rearing facilities, juvenile and adult collection sites, and associated production and harvest management activities. As currently conceived, the NPTH program will produce approximately 768,000 spring chinook parr, 800,000 summer chinook fry, and 2,000,000 fall chinook fry on an annual basis. Hatchery fish would be spawned, reared, and released under conditions that promote wild-type characteristics, minimize genetic changes in both hatchery and wild chinook populations, and minimize undesirable ecological interactions. The primary objective is to enable hatchery-produced fish to return to reproduce naturally in the streams in which they are released. These and other characteristics of the project are described in further detail in the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan, the 1995 Supplement to the Master Plan, and the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement. The report in hand is referred to in project literature as the NPTH Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. This report describes monitoring and evaluation activities that will help NPTH managers determine whether they were successful in restoring chinook salmon populations and avoiding adverse ecological impacts.

  1. NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF PRESCHOOL TRIBAL CHILDREN IN NORTH KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu V

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Tribals are one of the most vulnerable groups in India. Under-nutrition and various morbidities go hand in hand, particularly in children. Nutritional status is a sensitive indicator of community health and nutrition. The present study is an attempt to assess the nutritional status of pre-school children of Kozhikode district in Kerala. The objectives of this study were 1. To study the prevalence of malnutrition among the preschool tribal children 2. To study the associated risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was a community-based, cross- sectional. Study was carried out in randomly selected 10 panchayaths in Kozhikode. Cluster sampling method was used. Anthropometric measurements were taken. Various indices of nutritional status were expressed in standard deviation units (z scores from the reference median. RESULTS More than half of the children say 57.6% (152/246 had deficits in at least one of the two anthropometric indicators. The prevalence of underweight and stunting was 47.3% and .38.6% respectively. The analysis showed significant associations between under-nutrition and educational status of mother, tribe to which the child belonged, large family size, high birth order and low preschool attendance. CONCLUSION The findings of the present study revealed the widespread prevalence of under-nutrition among pre-school tribal children and highlight a need for an integrated approach towards improving the child health as well as nutritional status in this area.

  2. Against Schooling: Viewpoints of Tribal Students of Kanavu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teena AUGUSTINE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Achieving what we believe to be the true purpose of education is a challenge in any society, particularly so in a society as diverse as contemporary India. Most attempts in this field are focussed on improving the access of children to education, but substantive questions such as: What is a school to a child? Does he/she enjoy learning? are seldom addressed prior to drafting any curriculum or policy. Even where they are, the exploration tends to be qualitatively poor and devoid of stake holders views. Alternative educational organisations might offer a perspective on the crisis education seems to be in today, with children lacking lifeskills, governments grappling with retention, disparities across gender and caste and declining standards of education. Kanavu is an educational organisation managed by tribal youth in Cheengode village of Wayanad, a hilly district in the southern state of Kerala, India. These are children who dropped out of mainstream schooling. In the light of efforts to mainstream tribal students into government schools and to control escalating dropout rates, this paper tries to understand the perspectives of the tribal students of Kanavu on schooling and their reasons for resisting mainstream schooling. This paper is a result of a 4 day visit and extensive correspondence the authors have had with this alternative learning organisation.

  3. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho)

    1996-06-01

    This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe`s culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle.

  4. Cereal Crops Research Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the Cereal Crops Research Unit is to 1) conduct basic research to identify and understand the biological processes affecting the growth, development...

  5. Why may allopregnanolone help alleviate loneliness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, S; Cacioppo, J T

    2015-12-01

    Impaired biosynthesis of Allopregnanolone (ALLO), a brain endogenous neurosteroid, has been associated with numerous behavioral dysfunctions, which range from anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors to aggressive behavior and changes in responses to contextual fear conditioning in rodent models of emotional dysfunction. Recent animal research also demonstrates a critical role of ALLO in social isolation. Although there are likely aspects of perceived social isolation that are uniquely human, there is also continuity across species. Both human and animal research show that perceived social isolation (which can be defined behaviorally in animals and humans) has detrimental effects on physical health, such as increased hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) activity, decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, and increased depressive behavior. The similarities between animal and human research suggest that perceived social isolation (loneliness) may also be associated with a reduction in the synthesis of ALLO, potentially by reducing BDNF regulation and increasing HPA activity through the hippocampus, amygdala, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), especially during social threat processing. Accordingly, exogenous administration of ALLO (or ALLO precursor, such as pregnenolone), in humans may help alleviate loneliness. Congruent with our hypothesis, exogenous administration of ALLO (or ALLO precursors) in humans has been shown to improve various stress-related disorders that show similarities between animals and humans i.e., post-traumatic stress disorders, traumatic brain injuries. Because a growing body of evidence demonstrates the benefits of ALLO in socially isolated animals, we believe our ALLO hypothesis can be applied to loneliness in humans, as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Agent Reward Shaping for Alleviating Traffic Congestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumer, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Traffic congestion problems provide a unique environment to study how multi-agent systems promote desired system level behavior. What is particularly interesting in this class of problems is that no individual action is intrinsically "bad" for the system but that combinations of actions among agents lead to undesirable outcomes, As a consequence, agents need to learn how to coordinate their actions with those of other agents, rather than learn a particular set of "good" actions. This problem is ubiquitous in various traffic problems, including selecting departure times for commuters, routes for airlines, and paths for data routers. In this paper we present a multi-agent approach to two traffic problems, where far each driver, an agent selects the most suitable action using reinforcement learning. The agent rewards are based on concepts from collectives and aim to provide the agents with rewards that are both easy to learn and that if learned, lead to good system level behavior. In the first problem, we study how agents learn the best departure times of drivers in a daily commuting environment and how following those departure times alleviates congestion. In the second problem, we study how agents learn to select desirable routes to improve traffic flow and minimize delays for. all drivers.. In both sets of experiments,. agents using collective-based rewards produced near optimal performance (93-96% of optimal) whereas agents using system rewards (63-68%) barely outperformed random action selection (62-64%) and agents using local rewards (48-72%) performed worse than random in some instances.

  7. Arctigenin alleviates ER stress via activating AMPK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Sun, Xiao-xiao; Ye, Ji-ming; He, Li; Yan, Shou-sheng; Zhang, Hao-hao; Hu, Li-hong; Yuan, Jun-ying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective effects of arctigenin (ATG), a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan from Arctium lappa L (Compositae), against ER stress in vitro and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: A cell-based screening assay for ER stress regulators was established. Cell viability was measured using MTT assay. PCR and Western blotting were used to analyze gene and protein expression. Silencing of the CaMKKβ, LKB1, and AMPKα1 genes was achieved by RNA interference (RNAi). An ATP bioluminescent assay kit was employed to measure the intracellular ATP levels. Results: ATG (2.5, 5 and 10 μmol/L) inhibited cell death and unfolded protein response (UPR) in a concentration-dependent manner in cells treated with the ER stress inducer brefeldin A (100 nmol/L). ATG (1, 5 and 10 μmol/L) significantly attenuated protein synthesis in cells through inhibiting mTOR-p70S6K signaling and eEF2 activity, which were partially reversed by silencing AMPKα1 with RNAi. ATG (1-50 μmol/L) reduced intracellular ATP level and activated AMPK through inhibiting complex I-mediated respiration. Pretreatment of cells with the AMPK inhibitor compound C (25 μmol/L) rescued the inhibitory effects of ATG on ER stress. Furthermore, ATG (2.5 and 5 μmol/L) efficiently activated AMPK and reduced the ER stress and cell death induced by palmitate (2 mmol/L) in INS-1 β cells. Conclusion: ATG is an effective ER stress alleviator, which protects cells against ER stress through activating AMPK, thus attenuating protein translation and reducing ER load. PMID:22705729

  8. Common state mechanisms regulating tribal tobacco taxation and sales, the USA, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Hillary; Chriqui, Jamie; Leider, Julien; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2016-10-01

    Native American tribes, as sovereign nations, are exempt from state tobacco excise taxation, and self-govern on-reservation activity in the USA. Under Federal law, state excise taxes are owed by non-members purchasing tobacco on tribal land, but states are limited in how they enforce or collect these taxes. This study highlights the various policy approaches that states have taken to regulate tobacco sales on tribal lands given jurisdictional challenges. State laws (statutes, regulations and case law), Attorney General opinions, and revenue notices and rulings effective as of 1 January 2015 for all 50 states and the District of Columbia were compiled using Boolean searches in Lexis-Nexis and Westlaw. Laws were limited to those addressing taxation compacts or tobacco sales involving tribal entities. Master Settlement Agreement laws and non-codified tribal codes/compacts were excluded. Twenty of the 34 states with tribal lands address tribal tobacco sales. Fourteen states address intergovernmental compacts: 11 are tobacco specific, and suggest or require specific provisions. Fifteen states address tribal tax stamps: 2 explicitly prohibit stamping tribally sold products, 9 stamp all products, and 4 stamp some. Prepayment of excise tax is required in 12 states: 6 on all products, 4 on products in excess of quota, and 2 on products sold by non-tribal retailers. 6 states use quotas to limit tax-free tobacco available to tribes. Many states with a tribal presence have no formal strategies for non-members purchasing tobacco on tribal lands. Formalising policies and harmonising tax rates may assist states in collecting tax revenue from non-tribal consumers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization - Human Capacity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irenia Quitiquit

    2012-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to create jobs and to provide tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance for energy efficiency. The project will establish a Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program to provide training, outreach and education on energy assistance and conservation to low-income families. The Tribes' mission, under its Strategic Energy Plan of 2008, is to promote tribal efficiency, reduce energy costs, create jobs, economic opportunities, and incorporate energy planning in construction and economic development.

  10. Tribal Militias: An Effective Tool to Counter Al-Qaida and Its Affiliates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    tribes,” which is reflected in the composition of the military, police, bu- reaucracy, and funding for specific tribal regions. Iraqi tribal society is...Sahwa. As part of a new carrot -and-stick policy, Al-Qaida continued to attack Sahwa commanders, while it re- duced its direct economic competition with...Cigar Editor for Production Dr. James G. Pierce Publications Assistant Ms. Rita A. Rummel ***** Composition Mrs. Jennifer E. Nevil TRIBAL MILITIAS: AN

  11. Radioactivity in food crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  12. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  13. The alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on heat stress susceptibility of two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Rosenqvist, Eva S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Wollenweber4 1Department of Bioenergy, Tamilnadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India. 2Department of Food Science, Aarhus University, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Årslev, Denmark 3Institute of Agricultural Sciences and Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Hojbakkegaard Allé 9, 2630 Taastrup, Denmark 4......Institute for Agroecology, Aarhus University, Forsøgsvej 1, 4200 Slagelse, Denmark *Presenting author This study analysed the alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on stress-induced decreases in photosynthesis and changes in carbohydrate metabolism in two wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) of different...... crop performance under various climatic stresses....

  14. Melatonin Has the Potential to Alleviate Cinnamic Acid Stress in Cucumber Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanqi Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid (CA, which is a well-known major autotoxin secreted by the roots in cucumber continuous cropping, has been proven to exhibit inhibitory regulation of plant morphogenesis and development. Melatonin (MT has been recently demonstrated to play important roles in alleviating plant abiotic stresses. To investigate whether MT supplementation could improve cucumber seedling growth under CA stress, we treated cucumber seeds and seedlings with/without MT under CA- or non-stress conditions, and then tested their effects on cucumber seedling growth, morphology, nutrient element content, and plant hormone. Overall, 10 μM MT best rescued cucumber seedling growth under 0.4 mM CA stress. MT was found to alleviate CA-stressed seedling growth by increasing the growth rates of cotyledons and leaves and by stimulating lateral root growth. Additionally, MT increased the allocation of newly gained dry weight in roots and improved the tolerance of cucumber seedlings to CA stress by altering the nutrient elements and hormone contents of the whole plant. These results strongly suggest that the application of MT can effectively improve cucumber seedling tolerance to CA stress through the perception and integration of morphology, nutrient element content and plant hormone signaling crosstalk.

  15. Exogenous application of ascorbic acid alleviates chilling injury in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L. cv. Shahroudi flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Bayat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important limiting factors in spread of apricot in Iran is late spring frost, which damages flower bud and decrease total yield of crop. It has been found that ascorbic acid (AA plays a beneficial role during plant response to chilling and freezing stresses. To evaluate the effects of AA on alleviating of cold stress, the flower buds of Prunus armeniaca L. cv. Shahroudi were sprayed at pink cluster stage with AS at 4 levels (0, 100, 200 and 300 mg. L-1 and were then exposed to artificial cold stress (4 h at –4 °C or without cold stress (+ 25°C. Experimental attributes including electrolyte leakage (EL of flower buds and percentage of damage of pistil, anthers and petals to temperature treatments were determined. The results showed that at - 4°C the lowest and highest percentage of damage and EL of flower buds were observed in application of 200 and 0 mg. L-1 AA, respectively. The highest and lowest percentage of damage of flower organs and EL were obtained in application of 300 and 200 mg. L-1 AA, respectively at + 25 °C. Based on the results of this experiment, AA alleviates the negative effect of cold stress on EL and flower organ damages in apricot cv. Shahroudi, depending on the concentrations of AA used.

  16. Aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdarrifa calyx alleviates anemia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdarrifa calyx alleviates anemia and organ damage in Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rats. IA Umar, E Daikwo, NG Maryoms, A Gidado, LB Buratai, FS Saka, MA Ibrahim ...

  17. THE IMPACT OF FOREIGN REMITTANCES ON POVERTY ALLEVIATION: GLOBAL EVIDENCE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muhammad Azam; Muhammad Haseeb; Shamzaeffa Samsudin

    2016-01-01

    ...). The FMOLS estimates reveal that increase in income leads to decrease in poverty. Foreign remittances are found to have positive impact on poverty alleviation and statistically significant only for upper middle income countries...

  18. Entrepreneurship Development and Poverty Alleviation: An Empirical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Delwar Hussain; Rosni Bakar; Abul Bashar Bhuiyan

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to corroborate the relationship between entrepreneurship development and poverty alleviation constructed on empirical reviews. In this study, we conducted general search to accumulate empirical literatures by the name of entrepreneurship development and poverty alleviation in different online database sources such as Google Scholars, Springer Link, Wiley, Science Direct, JSTOR, Emerald full text, Scopus, and EBSCO HOST etc. We found innovation, entrepreneursh...

  19. 75 FR 59057 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations, Cotton Crop Insurance Provisions and Macadamia Nut Crop...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AB96 Common Crop Insurance Regulations, Cotton Crop Insurance Provisions and Macadamia Nut Crop Insurance Provisions; Correction AGENCY: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation... make corrections relating to the insurance of cotton and macadamia nuts that published March 30, 2010...

  20. Responding to Public Health Emergencies on Tribal Lands: Jurisdictional Challenges and Practical Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Justin B

    2015-01-01

    Response to public health emergencies on tribal lands poses a unique challenge for state and tribal public health officials. The complexity and intensely situation-specific nature of federal Indian jurisprudence leaves considerable question as to which government entity, state or tribal, has jurisdiction on tribal lands to undertake basic emergency measures such as closure of public spaces, quarantine, compulsory medical examination, and investigation. That jurisdictional uncertainty, coupled with cultural differences and an often troubled history of tribal-state relations, threatens to significantly impede response to infectious disease outbreaks or other public health emergencies on tribal lands. Given that tribal communities may be disproportionately impacted by public health emergencies, it is critical that tribal, state, and local governments engage with each other in coordinated planning for public health threats. This Article is offered as a catalyst for such planning efforts. The Article identifies some of the most pressing jurisdictional issues that may confront governments responding to a public health emergency on tribal lands, with the aim of highlighting the nature of the problem and the need for action. The Article goes on to examine the most promising means of addressing jurisdictional uncertainty: intergovernmental agreements. Already utilized in many areas of shared interest between tribe and state, intergovernmental agreements offer neighboring state, local, and tribal governments a vehicle for delineating roles and authorities in an emergency, and may lay the groundwork for sharing resources. The Article surveys various representative tribal public health intergovernmental agreements, and concludes with suggestions for tribes and state or local governments looking to craft their own agreements.

  1. Biochar Application in Malaysian Sandy and Acid Sulfate Soils: Soil Amelioration Effects and Improved Crop Production over Two Cropping Seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theeba Manickam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of biochar as an agricultural soil improvement was tested in acid sulfate and sandy soils from Malaysia, cropped with rice and corn. Malaysia has an abundance of waste rice husks that could be used to produce biochar. Rice husk biochar was produced in a gasifier at a local mill in Kelantan as well as in the laboratory using a controlled, specially designed, top lift up draft system (Belonio unit. Rice husk biochar was applied once to both soils at two doses (2% and 5%, in a pot set up that was carried out for two cropping seasons. Positive and significant crop yield effects were observed for both soils, biochars and crops. The yield effects varied with biochar type and dosage, with soil type and over the cropping seasons. The yield increases observed for the sandy soil were tentatively attributed to significant increases in plant-available water contents (from 4%–5% to 7%–8%. The yield effects in the acid sulfate soil were likely a consequence of a combination of (i alleviation of plant root stress by aluminum (Ca/Al molar ratios significantly increased, from around 1 to 3–5 and (ii increases in CEC. The agricultural benefits of rice husk biochar application to Malaysian soils holds promise for its future use.

  2. 75 FR 62839 - Award of a Single-Source Expansion Supplement to the Tribal Law and Policy Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... based strategies and resources that strengthen Tribal child and family services. The Fostering... between for Tribal leaders, child welfare and court staff in the licensing and maintaining of title I-VE...

  3. Addressing crop interactions within cropping systems in LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goglio, Pietro; Brankatschk, Gerhard; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman

    2018-01-01

    management and emissions, and (3) functional unit issues. The LCA approaches presented are as follows: cropping system, allocation approaches, crop-by-crop approach, and combined approaches. The various approaches are described together with their advantages and disadvantages, applicability......, and cannot be applied for intercropping and agroforestry systems. The allocation approaches take into account the cropping system effects by establishing a mathematical relationship between crops present in the cropping systems. The model for integrative life-cycle assessment in agriculture (MiLA) approach...

  4. Plant biotechnology: transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R; Jones, Huw D; Halford, Nigel G

    2008-01-01

    Transgenesis is an important adjunct to classical plant breeding, in that it allows the targeted manipulation of specific characters using genes from a range of sources. The current status of crop transformation is reviewed, including methods of gene transfer, the selection of transformed plants and control of transgene expression. The application of genetic modification technology to specific traits is then discussed, including input traits relating to crop production (herbicide tolerance and resistance to insects, pathogens and abiotic stresses) and output traits relating to the composition and quality of the harvested organs. The latter include improving the nutritional quality for consumers as well as the improvement of functional properties for food processing.

  5. 77 FR 31592 - Applications for New Awards; State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Grant Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... Applications for New Awards; State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Grant Competition AGENCY: Office... State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal... Application Package: You can obtain an application package via the Internet or from the Education Publications...

  6. Oaths of Office in Tribal Constitutions: Swearing Allegiance, but to Whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, David E.; Lightfoot, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    No comprehensive analysis of tribal constitutions has ever been conducted, so this project aims to begin filling this significant gap in American, constitutional, and comparative politics research. In this study, the authors examine only one small but significant element of Native constitutions: oaths of office for incoming tribal government…

  7. Product recovery from tree grade 1 northern red oak on Menominee tribal lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    John P. Dwyer; Daniel C. Dey

    2007-01-01

    Since 1854 the Menominee Tribal people have practiced some level of forest management on their lands. In April of 2000, Menominee Tribal Enterprises (MTE) forestry staff along with federal, state, and university researchers began a comprehensive study of value in northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.). One of the objectives of this study was to relate...

  8. 77 FR 46106 - Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-18891] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Listening Sessions...: Indian Affairs will conduct listening sessions with Indian tribes to obtain oral and written comments... tribal listening sessions. We will consider all comments received [[Page 46107

  9. 75 FR 10496 - Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement; Announcement Type: New Funding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement... Self- Governance Program (TSGP), as authorized by Public Law 106-260, the Tribal Self-Governance... is designed to promote Self-Governance by enabling Tribes to assume control of Indian Health Service...

  10. 77 FR 43353 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self-Governance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self- Governance Program... for Tribal Self-Governance Program authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0143. This information...-Governance, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Mail Stop 355-G SIB, Washington, DC 20240; telephone: (202) 219...

  11. 77 FR 47405 - Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation... (OTSG) is accepting limited competition Negotiation Cooperative Agreement applications for the Tribal... (Compacts and Funding Agreements) on behalf of the IHS Director. To begin the Self-Governance negotiations...

  12. Individual tenure rights, citizenship, and conflicts: Outcomes from tribal India's forest governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bose, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how the new Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act 2006 shapes tribal households' claims to forest land rights in tribal India. It analyses the micro-dynamics of the Forest Rights Act using three dimensions: individual tenure

  13. 77 FR 76076 - Information Security Oversight Office; State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector... matters relating to the Classified National Security Information Program for State, Local, Tribal, and... number of individuals planning to attend must be submitted to the Information Security Oversight Office...

  14. UH conservation agriculture project working to help tribal communities in India and Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    University of Hawaii at Manoa; Water Resources Research Center

    2011-01-01

    This bulletin features a two-page summary of SANREM CRSP’s Sustainable Management of Agro-ecological Resources for Tribal Societies (SMARTS) project for India and Nepal. It includes a map of India and photos from their work in Kendujhar. It was distributed freely on UH Manoa campus and among project participants. LTRA-11 (CAPS among tribal societies in India and Nepal)

  15. Beyond Legitimation: A Tribal Response to Maori Education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Huia Tomlins

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an intervention strategy, initiated under the New Zealand Government's tribal partnership scheme, which promotes a culture-based/place-based approach to education in mainstream schools and early childhood centres in one tribal region. Through place-based education children are immersed in local heritage, including language…

  16. Parents' Attitude toward Daughters' Education in Tribal Area of Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdar, Muhammad Ayub; Ali, Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    The paper aimed to investigate the parents' attitudes toward their daughters' education in tribal areas of district Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan). To achieve the objectives four research questions were established. Focus of the questions was to examine the significance of girls' education for tribal parents. Existing and expected role of tribal…

  17. Broadening the Meaning of Citizenship Education: Native Americans and Tribal Nationhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes Writer, Jeanette

    2010-01-01

    The reality of tribal nationhood and the dual citizenship that Native Americans carry in their tribal nations and the United States significantly expands the definition and parameters of citizen education. Citizenship education means including and understanding the historical and political contexts of all U.S. citizens--especially, those…

  18. 78 FR 37828 - Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Thompson Avenue, TMP ] Suite 360, Rockville, MD 20852. Applicants submitting Tribal resolutions after or... additional proof of applicant status documents required such as Tribal resolutions, proof of non-profit... tracking number as proof of contact. The tracking number is helpful if there are technical issues that...

  19. 78 FR 27341 - Restrictions on Legal Assistance With Respect to Criminal Proceedings in Tribal Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... sufficient legal training to preside over criminal proceedings; affording the defendant the right to... 45 CFR Part 1614 Restrictions on Legal Assistance With Respect to Criminal Proceedings in Tribal... represent eligible persons in any and all criminal proceedings in tribal courts. Previously, the LSC Act and...

  20. 76 FR 44394 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit... availability of $15,075,000 in funding provided by the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program... establishing the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit Program) (TTP). This...

  1. 77 FR 14465 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit... Surface and Air Transportation Programs Extension Act of 2011, Public Law No.112-30 continues the... establishing the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit Program or TTP). This...

  2. 77 FR 28616 - Tribal Consultation Sessions-Department of the Interior Information Technology Infrastructure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... Office of the Secretary Tribal Consultation Sessions--Department of the Interior Information Technology... obtain tribal input on the 2012 Information Technology ] transformation realignment proposal as well as on how Information Technology transformation should be implemented in the coming years. DATES: See...

  3. 77 FR 43106 - Tribal Consultation Sessions-Department of the Interior Information Technology Infrastructure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Office of the Secretary Tribal Consultation Sessions--Department of the Interior Information Technology... sessions. The purpose of the sessions is to obtain tribal input on the 2012 Information Technology transformation realignment proposal as well as on how Information Technology transformation should be implemented...

  4. Tribal College Transfer Student Success at Four-Year Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makomenaw, Matthew Van Alstine

    2010-01-01

    Tribal colleges, which are often community colleges, have been successful in helping American Indian students achieve academic success. The current study was designed to understand what happens to American Indian tribal college students when they transfer to four-year Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). The research question that guides the…

  5. Cover crops support ecological intensification of arable cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Raphaël A; Dorn, Brigitte; Jossi, Werner; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2017-02-03

    A major challenge for agriculture is to enhance productivity with minimum impact on the environment. Several studies indicate that cover crops could replace anthropogenic inputs and enhance crop productivity. However, so far, it is unclear if cover crop effects vary between different cropping systems, and direct comparisons among major arable production systems are rare. Here we compared the short-term effects of various cover crops on crop yield, nitrogen uptake, and weed infestation in four arable production systems (conventional cropping with intensive tillage and no-tillage; organic cropping with intensive tillage and reduced tillage). We hypothesized that cover cropping effects increase with decreasing management intensity. Our study demonstrated that cover crop effects on crop yield were highest in the organic system with reduced tillage (+24%), intermediate in the organic system with tillage (+13%) and in the conventional system with no tillage (+8%) and lowest in the conventional system with tillage (+2%). Our results indicate that cover crops are essential to maintaining a certain yield level when soil tillage intensity is reduced (e.g. under conservation agriculture), or when production is converted to organic agriculture. Thus, the inclusion of cover crops provides additional opportunities to increase the yield of lower intensity production systems and contribute to ecological intensification.

  6. Cover crops support ecological intensification of arable cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Raphaël A.; Dorn, Brigitte; Jossi, Werner; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.

    2017-02-01

    A major challenge for agriculture is to enhance productivity with minimum impact on the environment. Several studies indicate that cover crops could replace anthropogenic inputs and enhance crop productivity. However, so far, it is unclear if cover crop effects vary between different cropping systems, and direct comparisons among major arable production systems are rare. Here we compared the short-term effects of various cover crops on crop yield, nitrogen uptake, and weed infestation in four arable production systems (conventional cropping with intensive tillage and no-tillage; organic cropping with intensive tillage and reduced tillage). We hypothesized that cover cropping effects increase with decreasing management intensity. Our study demonstrated that cover crop effects on crop yield were highest in the organic system with reduced tillage (+24%), intermediate in the organic system with tillage (+13%) and in the conventional system with no tillage (+8%) and lowest in the conventional system with tillage (+2%). Our results indicate that cover crops are essential to maintaining a certain yield level when soil tillage intensity is reduced (e.g. under conservation agriculture), or when production is converted to organic agriculture. Thus, the inclusion of cover crops provides additional opportunities to increase the yield of lower intensity production systems and contribute to ecological intensification.

  7. Welfare Eligibility: Programs Treat Indian Tribal Trust Fund Payments Inconsistently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    renewa- ble and over t ime will be depleted. Timber as well its oil and gas market s have been depressed for the last few years, a Iia Official told us... self -support of the blind and disabled. In addition, tribal trust distributions are excluded. Benefits Eligible individuals receive monthly cash...8217 ’r’I .’)L orcdP6 the purcrhase Lcc the exr: -uded amrount- ray ix- c, c 000 dcp JL"’ri or the nrxber and amournt of -,-he pa~irerit . - ’I 4r deprec

  8. Adoption of Indigenous Dairy Management Practices among Tribal Farm Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigasil M. Sangma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted among the tribal farm women of West Garo Hills District of Meghalaya, India with the objective to determine the extent of adoption of indigenous dairy management practices. Proportionate random sampling was used in selection of 120 respondents. Practices having rationality for adoption of indigenous dairy management practices were collected and the data were analyzed using percentage analysis. The findings revealed that majority of the respondents adopted care and management of dry and pregnant cows. This was followed by adoption of other practices viz.., selection of breed and feeding, care during and after calving and milking technique

  9. The Drivers of Women Farmers' Participation in Cash Crop Production: The Case of Women Smallholder Farmers in Northern Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Hudu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Participation in labour markets and high-value crops among men and women smallholder farmers has always been an important strategy for poverty alleviation and attainment of food and income security. In contributing to the generation of gender-disaggregated empirical literature, this paper examined determinants of women smallholder…

  10. 25 CFR 900.96 - How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about BIA and IHS excess property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about... Property § 900.96 How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about BIA and IHS excess property? The Secretary shall not less than annually send to Indian tribes and tribal organizations a listing of...

  11. 25 CFR 900.103 - How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about property that has been designated as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about... or tribal organizations learn about property that has been designated as excess or surplus government property? The Secretary shall furnish, not less than annually, to Indian tribes or tribal organizations...

  12. 25 CFR 36.111 - Can a tribe, tribal governing body, or local school board waive the homeliving standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe, tribal governing body, or local school board... tribe, tribal governing body, or local school board waive the homeliving standards? A tribal governing body or local school board may waive some or all of the standards established by this part if the body...

  13. 25 CFR 30.111 - When should the tribal governing body or school board request technical assistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When should the tribal governing body or school board... When should the tribal governing body or school board request technical assistance? In order to maximize the time the tribal governing body or school board has to develop an alternative definition of AYP...

  14. 25 CFR 30.106 - How does a tribal governing body or school board propose an alternative definition of AYP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a tribal governing body or school board propose... Definition of Ayp § 30.106 How does a tribal governing body or school board propose an alternative definition of AYP? If a tribal governing body or school board decides that the definition of AYP in § 30.104 is...

  15. 25 CFR 30.105 - May a tribal governing body or school board use another definition of AYP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a tribal governing body or school board use another... May a tribal governing body or school board use another definition of AYP? Yes. A tribal governing body or school board may waive all or part of the Secretary's definition of academic content and...

  16. 25 CFR 166.504 - Are there any other administrative or tribal fees, taxes, or assessments that must be paid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Administrative and Tribal Fees § 166.504 Are there any other administrative or tribal fees, taxes, or assessments that must be paid? Yes. The permittee... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are there any other administrative or tribal fees, taxes...

  17. 25 CFR 900.43 - What are the general financial management system standards that apply to a tribal organization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Standards for Financial... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the general financial management system standards that apply to a tribal organization carrying out a self-determination contract? 900.43 Section 900...

  18. 25 CFR 900.40 - When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management standards and management systems evaluated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management... Organization Management Systems General § 900.40 When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management... Indian tribe or tribal organization submits an initial contract proposal. (b) Management systems are...

  19. 45 CFR 309.75 - What administrative and management procedures must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What administrative and management procedures must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV-D plan? 309.75 Section 309.75 Public Welfare... ENFORCEMENT (IV-D) PROGRAM Tribal IV-D Plan Requirements § 309.75 What administrative and management...

  20. 45 CFR 309.130 - How will Tribal IV-D programs be funded and what forms are required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Secretary: (i) Funds have been committed to other budget items; (ii) A high rate of unemployment; (iii) A... is subject to review at any time during the funding period and may be revoked, if changing... change in Tribal IV-D budget estimate results from a change in the Tribal IV-D plan, the Tribe or Tribal...

  1. Biotechnology Towards Energy Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritopoulou, Theoni; Roka, Loukia; Alexopoulou, Efi; Christou, Myrsini; Rigas, Stamatis; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Milioni, Dimitra

    2016-03-01

    New crops are gradually establishing along with cultivation systems to reduce reliance on depleting fossil fuel reserves and sustain better adaptation to climate change. These biological assets could be efficiently exploited as bioenergy feedstocks. Bioenergy crops are versatile renewable sources with the potential to alternatively contribute on a daily basis towards the coverage of modern society's energy demands. Biotechnology may facilitate the breeding of elite energy crop genotypes, better suited for bio-processing and subsequent use that will improve efficiency, further reduce costs, and enhance the environmental benefits of biofuels. Innovative molecular techniques may improve a broad range of important features including biomass yield, product quality and resistance to biotic factors like pests or microbial diseases or environmental cues such as drought, salinity, freezing injury or heat shock. The current review intends to assess the capacity of biotechnological applications to develop a beneficial bioenergy pipeline extending from feedstock development to sustainable biofuel production and provide examples of the current state of the art on future energy crops.

  2. Mycorrhiza and crop production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayman, D.S.

    1980-10-09

    This article describes recent research with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza, a symbiotic fungus-root association. The suggestion that the symbiotic association may be harnessed to achieve more economical use of phosphate fertilizers is discussed and the results from various test crops are given.

  3. Application of bacteria from non-cultivated plants to promote growth, alter root architecture and alleviate salt stress of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, I; White, J F

    2017-04-01

    Cotton seeds are frequently treated with acid to remove fibres and reduce seed-transmitted diseases. This process also eliminates beneficial bacteria on the seed surface. The goal of this research was to seek and apply beneficial bacteria to acid delinted cotton seeds to evaluate their growth-promoting and salt stress alleviating effects in seedlings. Bacteria were isolated from non-cultivated plants in the Malvaceae. Seeds were collected from Portia tree (Thespesia populnea) and wild cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) from coastal and arid areas of Puerto Rico. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Curtobacterium oceanosedimentum and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans were inoculated onto acid delinted cotton seeds. Bacteria increased cotton seed germination and length of emerging seedling radicles. Cotton seeds were inoculated with B. amyloliquefaciens to evaluate growth and root architecture of non-stressed and salt stressed seedlings. Inoculating cotton seeds with B. amyloliquefaciens led to a greater percentage of seedlings with expanded cotyledons after 8 days, enhanced primary and lateral root growth, and altered root architecture. Similar results were obtained when okra seeds were inoculated with B. amyloliquefaciens. The data supported the hypothesis that non-cultivated plants in the Malvaceae growing in stressful environments possess bacteria that promote growth, alter root architecture and alleviate salt stress of cotton and okra seedlings. This study demonstrated the effects of applying beneficial bacteria on acid delinted cotton seeds. Inoculating seeds with salt stress alleviating bacteria could improve the growth of crop seedlings that are vulnerable to soil salinization. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Final Technical Report. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Audits of Tribally-Owned Governmental Buildings and Residential Tribal Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Jeffrey W. [Sault Sainte Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Marie, MI (United States)

    2015-03-27

    The Tribe is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings and low income housing sites. In 2009, the Tribe applied to the U. S. Department of Energy for funding to conduct energy audits of Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Findings from the energy audits would define the extent and types of energy efficiency improvements needed, establish a basis for energy priorities, strategies and action plans, and provide a benchmark for measuring improvements from energy efficiency implementations. In 2010, the DOE awarded a grant in the amount of $95,238 to the Tribe to fund the energy audits of nine governmental buildings and to pay for travel expenses associated with attendance and participation at the DOE annual program reviews. In 2011, the Tribe applied for and was awarded a DOE grant in the amount of $75,509 to conduct energy audits of the remaining 30 Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Repeating mobilization steps performed during the first DOE energy audits grant, the Tribe initiated the second round of governmental building energy audits by completing energy auditor procurement. The selected energy auditor successfully passed DOE debarment and Sault Tribe background clearances. The energy audits contract was awarded to U. P. Engineers and Architects, Inc. of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The Tribe continued mobilizing for the energy audits by providing the energy auditor with one year of electric, gas and water utility invoice copies per building, as well as supplemental building information, such as operating hours. The Tribe also contacted building occupants to coordinate scheduling for the on-site energy audit inspections and arranged for facilities management personnel to guide the energy auditor through the buildings and answer questions regarding building systems.

  5. Tribal linkage and race data quality for American Indians in a state cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer C; Soliman, Amr S; Tadgerson, Dan; Copeland, Glenn E; Seefeld, David A; Pingatore, Noel L; Haverkate, Rick; Banerjee, Mousumi; Roubidoux, Marilyn A

    2009-06-01

    Racial misclassification of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals as non-AI/AN in cancer registries presents problems for cancer surveillance, research, and public health practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of tribal linkages in enhancing the quality of racial information in state cancer registries. Registry Plus Link Plus 2.0 probabilistic record linkage software was used to link the Michigan state cancer registry data (1985-2004; 1,031,168 cancer cases) to the tribal membership roster (40,340 individuals) in July of 2007. A data set was created containing AI/AN cancer cases identified by the state registry, Indian Health Service (IHS) linkages, and tribal linkage. The differences between these three groups of individuals were compared by distribution of demographic, diagnostic, and county-level characteristics using multilevel analysis (conducted in 2007-2008). From 1995 to 2004, the tribal enrollment file showed linkages to 670 cancer cases (583 individuals) and the tribal linkage led to the identification of 190 AI/AN cancer cases (168 individuals) that were classified as non-AI/AN in the registry. More than 80% of tribal members were reported as non-AI/AN to the registry. Individuals identified by IHS or tribal linkages were different from those reported to be AI/AN in terms of stage at diagnosis, tumor confirmation, and characteristics of the county of diagnosis, including contract health services availability, tribal health services availability, and proportion of AI/AN residents. The data linkage between tribal and state cancer registry data sets improved racial classification validity of AI/AN Michigan cancer cases. Assessing tribal linkages is a simple, noninvasive way to improve the accuracy of state cancer data for AI/AN populations and to generate tribe-specific cancer information.

  6. Cosmetic ethnobotany practiced by tribal women of Kashmir Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamayun Shaheen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Himalayan mountain populations have been dependent upon indigenous plant resources for their health care for many years. Tribal women are interested in use of local herbs for cosmetic purposes. The present work is based on the results of research conducted on cosmetic uses of some important plants by the tribal women in District Poonch, Azad Kashmir Pakistan. Materials and Methods: An ethno botanical survey was carried out during summer 2012. The data were collected from 310 female informants from 16 villages using questionnaire method and semi structured interviews. Results: A total of 39 plants species belonging to 20 families, being used for various cosmetic purposes were recorded. Indigenous species are traditionally used by the locals for problems including acne (16%, hair growth (11%, bad breath (12%, facial spots (9%, allergy, (9%, fairness (8%, wrinkles (8%, eye and lip care (9%. Seventy different recipes were recorded to be practiced by locals using herbal parts. The major plant parts utilized in herbal recipes included fruit (32.8%, Leaves (25.2%, seeds (13.4% and roots (8.9%. Women of older (>30 years age group showed greater (67% response regarding knowledge and practice of cosmetic herbs. Conclusion: This study was the 1st ever project focusing on cosmetic perspectives of ethno-botany in the area. Our study contributes to an improved understanding of ignored aspect of cosmetic ethnobotany among the local women. Further detailed investigations are recommended to record and preserve precious ethno-botanical knowledge of the area.

  7. Analysis of intra-country virtual water trade strategy to alleviate water scarcity in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, M.; Yang, H.; Mousavi, J.; Schulin, R.; Binder, C. R.; Abbaspour, K. C.

    2010-08-01

    Increasing water scarcity has posed a major constraint to sustain food production in many parts of the world. To study the situation at the regional level, we took Iran as an example and analyzed how an intra-country "virtual water trade strategy" (VWTS) may help improve cereal production as well as alleviate the water scarcity problem. This strategy calls, in part, for the adjustment of the structure of cropping pattern (ASCP) and interregional food trade where crop yield and crop water productivity as well as local economic and social conditions are taken into account. We constructed a systematic framework to assess ASCP at the provincial level under various driving forces and constraints. A mixed-integer, multi-objective, linear optimization model was developed and solved by linear programming. Data from 1990-2004 were used to account for yearly fluctuations of water availability and food production. Five scenarios were designed aimed at maximizing the national cereal production while meeting certain levels of wheat self-sufficiency under various water and land constraints in individual provinces. The results show that under the baseline scenario, which assumes a continuation of the existing water use and food policy at the national level, some ASCP scenarios could produce more wheat with less water. Based on different scenarios in ASCP, we calculated that 31% to 100% of the total wheat shortage in the deficit provinces could be supplied by the wheat surplus provinces. As a result, wheat deficit provinces would receive 3.5 billion m3 to 5.5 billion m3 of virtual water by importing wheat from surplus provinces.

  8. Analysis of intra-country virtual water trade strategy to alleviate water scarcity in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faramarzi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Increasing water scarcity has posed a major constraint to sustain food production in many parts of the world. To study the situation at the regional level, we took Iran as an example and analyzed how an intra-country "virtual water trade strategy" (VWTS may help improve cereal production as well as alleviate the water scarcity problem. This strategy calls, in part, for the adjustment of the structure of cropping pattern (ASCP and interregional food trade where crop yield and crop water productivity as well as local economic and social conditions are taken into account. We constructed a systematic framework to assess ASCP at the provincial level under various driving forces and constraints. A mixed-integer, multi-objective, linear optimization model was developed and solved by linear programming. Data from 1990–2004 were used to account for yearly fluctuations of water availability and food production. Five scenarios were designed aimed at maximizing the national cereal production while meeting certain levels of wheat self-sufficiency under various water and land constraints in individual provinces. The results show that under the baseline scenario, which assumes a continuation of the existing water use and food policy at the national level, some ASCP scenarios could produce more wheat with less water. Based on different scenarios in ASCP, we calculated that 31% to 100% of the total wheat shortage in the deficit provinces could be supplied by the wheat surplus provinces. As a result, wheat deficit provinces would receive 3.5 billion m3 to 5.5 billion m3 of virtual water by importing wheat from surplus provinces.

  9. Governing the GM crop revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Paarlberg, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    Will developing countries adopt policies that promote the planting of genetically modified (GM) crops, or will they select policies that slow the spread of the GM crop revolution? The evidence so far is mixed. In some prominent countries such as China, policies are in place that encourage the independent development and planting of GM crops. Yet in a number of other equally prominent countries the planting of GM crops is not yet officially approved. The inclination of developing countries to ...

  10. Use of Alleviating Maneuvers for Periocular Facial Dystonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, Caroline L S; Casswell, Edward J; Salam, Tahrina; Hersh, Dov; Ortiz-Perez, Santiago; Ezra, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Patients with benign essential blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm are known to use botulinum toxin injections and alleviating maneuvers to help control their symptoms. The clinical correlates between the use of botulinum toxin injections and the use of alleviating maneuvers are not well established. To determine whether the use of alleviating maneuvers for benign essential blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm correlates with disease severity or botulinum toxin treatment. A prospective cross-sectional observational study (designed in September 2013) of 74 patients with benign essential blepharospasm and 56 patients with hemifacial spasm who were consecutively recruited from adnexal clinics at Moorfields Eye Hospital (January-June 2014) to complete a questionnaire and undergo a clinical review. Data analysis was performed in December 2015. Prevalence and type of alleviating maneuvers used for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm, dystonia severity, and dose and frequency of botulinum toxin injections. Of the 74 patients with blepharospasm, 39 (52.7%) used alleviating maneuvers (mean [SD] age, 70.4 [9.1] years); of the 56 patients with hemifacial spasm, 25 (44.6%) used alleviating maneuvers (mean [SD] age, 66.5 [12.7] years). The most commonly used maneuver was the touching of facial areas (35 of 64 patients [54.7%]); other maneuvers included covering the eyes (6 of 64 patients [9.4%]), singing (5 of 64 patients [7.8%]), and yawning (5 of 64 patients [7.8%]). Patients with blepharospasm who used alleviating maneuvers scored higher on the Jankovic Rating Scale (median score, 5 vs 4; Hodges-Lehmann median difference, 1 [95% CI, 0-2]; P = .01) and the Blepharospasm Disability Index severity score (median score, 11 vs 4; Hodges-Lehmann median difference, 4 [95% CI, 1-7]; P = .01) than patients with blepharospasm who did not use alleviating maneuvers. Patients with hemifacial spasm who used alleviating maneuvers scored higher on the 7-item Hemifacial Spasm Quality of

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Chromium in Alleviating Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yinan; Clark, Suzanne; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular anomalies and is a major health problem approaching global epidemic proportions. Insulin resistance, a prediabetic condition, precedes the onset of frank type 2 diabetes and offers potential avenues for early intervention to treat the disease. Although lifestyle modifications and exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, compliance has proved to be difficult, warranting pharmacological interventions. However, most of the currently available drugs that improve insulin sensitivity have adverse effects. Therefore, attractive strategies to alleviate insulin resistance include dietary supplements. One such supplement is chromium, which has been shown reduce insulin resistance in some, but not all, studies. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of chromium in alleviating insulin resistance remain elusive. This review examines emerging reports on the effect of chromium, as well as molecular and cellular mechanisms by which chromium may provide beneficial effects in alleviating insulin resistance. PMID:22423897

  12. CROPS : high tech agricultural robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bontsema, J.; Hemming, J.; Pekkeriet, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the EU-funded CROPS (Clever Robots for Crops) project high tech robots are developed for site-specific spraying and selective harvesting of fruit and fruit vegetables. The harvesting robots are being designed to harvest high-value crops such as greenhouse vegetables, fruits in orchards and grapes

  13. [Ecological effects of cover crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaobing; Song, Chunyu; Herbert, Stephen J; Xing, Baoshan

    2002-03-01

    This paper reviewed the effects of cover crops in reducing soil loss, surface runoff, NO3- leaching and water pollution, and elucidated roles of cover crops in controlling pest insects, weeds and diseases, and increasing soil nutrients. The potential roles and appropriate application of cover crops in sustainable development of agriculture were also discussed.

  14. Salt resistant crop plants

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, Stuart J.

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker- assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement.

  15. Salt resistant crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Stuart J; Negrão, Sónia; Tester, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker-assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. IMPORTANCE OF MAIZE CROPPING

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Dhary Yousif EL-JUBOURI

    2012-01-01

    The Corn, wheat and rice together are the main crops. It is a plant that responds well to chemical and organic fertilization and the irrigation. But compliance is sensitive to optimum sowing time and integrated control of weeds, pests and diseases (2). The maize is the most important plant product, from the point of view commercially and is used primarily as fodder. The maize is an important source of vegetable oil and has many applications in industry, the manufacture of diverse items: cosme...

  17. The Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy Initiative: Findings From a Collaborative, Participatory Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sheryl; D'Silva, Joanne; Hernandez, Carol; Villaluz, Nicole Toves; Martinez, Jaime; Matter, Chris

    2017-07-01

    While the reduction in the overall U.S. smoking prevalence has been declared one of the top 10 public health achievements of the past century, the growing disparity in smoking between American Indians and the general population is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Minnesota in particular has very high smoking rates among American Indians (59%). Tribal Nations in Minnesota share a past of attempted cultural genocide and a present of restoring the strength of their cultural teachings, including the prominence of traditional tobacco as a sacred "first medicine." The Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy initiative works to address this complex and challenging context. This article describes results of a participatory evaluation from 2010 to 2013 in four Minnesota Tribal Nations-three Ojibwe and one Dakota. Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy coordinators used their cultural knowledge to develop community-level strategies, identifying appropriate strategies from best practices on tobacco advocacy, while drawing on the strengths of their own sovereignty and sacred tobacco traditions. Tribal coordinators generated support for policy change by conducting culturally relevant education, engaging tribal members, and nurturing relationships. This approach resulted in norm changes, practices toward restoring traditional tobacco, informal policies, and tribal resolutions to advance smoke-free policies.

  18. Excise tax differences at Oklahoma smoke shops: an opportunity for inter-tribal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Fritz L; Chaloupka, Frank J; Beebe, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Oklahoma's tribal tobacco shops are distributed throughout the state, including in urban areas. During the time frame of this study, state excise tax rates for cigarettes varied by tribe and region, and took five distinct levels, ranging from 5.75 cents to $1.03 per pack. To describe the pricing behavior of these smoke shops in a way that could support potential increases in the tribal taxation of cigarettes within the state. Two waves (2010 and 2011) of site visits were conducted, covering nearly all tribal smoke shops in the northeastern quarter of the state, an area containing the city of Tulsa and 60% of all tribal outlets. Researchers recorded representative prices and verified the tax rate paid (via tax stamp) for each shop. Data were analyzed in 2013. Lower-taxed tribal cigarettes tended to be priced at discounts that were even greater than the differential in tax rates. For example, across waves, the average pack of Marlboros from a shop with a 5.75-cent tax stamp sold for 52 cents less than the same pack from a 25.75-cent shop and 60 cents less than from a 51.5-cent shop. The minimal inter-tribal price response to the discontinuation of large quantities of contraband cigarette sales suggests that inter-tribal price competition in the Tulsa area is not as intense as expected. Ample scope exists for either unilateral or coordinated cross-tribal tax and price increases that will increase tribal cigarette tax revenue collections and improve public health. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support &apos

  20. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for

  1. Companion cropping with potato onion enhances the disease resistance of tomato against Verticillium dahliae

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Xuepeng; Wu, Xia; Zhou, Xingang; Liu, Shouwei; Shen, Yanhui; Wu, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Intercropping could alleviate soil-borne diseases, however, few studies focused on the immunity of the host plant induced by the interspecific interactions. To test whether or not intercropping could enhance the disease resistance of host plant, we investigated the effect of companion cropping with potato onion on tomato Verticillium wilt caused by Verticillium dahliae (V. dahliae). To investigate the mechanisms, the root exudates were collected from tomato and potato onion which were grown t...

  2. BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM CATCH CROPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Larsen, Søren U.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2014-01-01

    Catch crop cultivation combined with its use for biogas production would increase renewable energy production in the form of methane, without interfering with the production of food and fodder crops. The low biomass yield of catch crops is the main limiting factor for using these crops as co......-substrate in manure-based biogas plants and the profit obtained from the sale of biogas barely compensates for the harvest costs. A new agricultural strategy to harvest catch crops together with the residual straw of the main crop was investigated to increase the biomass and thereby the methane yield per hectare...... biomass. Leaving the straw on the field until harvest of the catch crop in the autumn could benefit biogas production due to the organic matter degradation of the straw taking place on the field during the autumn months. This new agricultural strategy may be a good alternative to achieve economically...

  3. Building Healthy Tribal Nations in Montana and Wyoming Through Collaborative Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Steve R.; Belcourt, Gordon M.; Langwell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a collaborative approach to reducing health disparities affecting Montana and Wyoming tribal nations while promoting health-protective practices and interventions among these populations. Under the auspices of the Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council, a consortium has undertaken activities to (1) establish the research infrastructure necessary for conducting ongoing health disparities research, (2) develop a target research agenda that addresses tribally identified priority health issues and tests the feasibility of interventions, (3) develop increased research skills and cultural competency through mentoring activities, and (4) develop effective collaborative relationships. All research projects are user-defined and -authorized, and participation is voluntary. PMID:15855453

  4. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01

    In October of 1997, The construction of the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was complete. No spawning activity was recorded for the spring of 1998. On June 14, 1999 the first spawn at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was successful. A total of seven nests were fertilized that produced approximately 144,000 fry. The second spawn occurred on July 13, 1999 and a total of six nests were fertilized producing approximately 98,0000 fry. The total amount of largemouth bass fry produced at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was 242,000.

  5. 283 Poverty Alleviation Programmes and Economic Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Abstract. This study investigates into the impact of government programmes towards poverty alleviation on the inhabitants of Nigeria with special reference to. Asa and Ilorin West Local Government Areas of Kwara State. A focus group discussion (FGD) of 4 groups (2 males and 2 females) was conducted from.

  6. Constraints to poverty alleviation among fishermen and women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted in Lagos and Ogun States. Attention was focussed on the constraints to poverty alleviation among the fishermen and women. A total of two hundred and fifteen (215) fishermen and women were surveyed from Lagos and Ogun States Agricultural Development Programmes (125 and 90 ...

  7. Poverty Alleviation Through Rural – Urban Linkages : Lessons And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the main aspects of rural poverty is the lack of access to basic infrastructure and services. Governments tend to develop infrastructure and provide services to the urban areas mostly because of economies of scale. Linking urban and rural areas is one of the core elements of urban and rural poverty alleviation.

  8. Enabling Bio-Innovation for Poverty Alleviation in Asia | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    At first glance, Asia seems to have all the organizations, skills, policies and facilities essential for bio-innovation. However, these are not generally put to the service of the millions of poor who lack access to technology. This project aims to stimulate research on bio-innovation for poverty alleviation, sustainable employment ...

  9. Effect of Dry Season Tomato Farming on Poverty Alleviation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Generally, the study examines the effect of dry season tomato farming on poverty alleviation among women farmers in Niger State, Nigeria. Specifically, it examines the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the women dry season tomato farmers, their major sources of resources for tomato farming, marketing ...

  10. Assessment Of Small Scale Farmers\\' Strategies In Alleviating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the strategies employed by farmers in alleviating poverty in Delta State, Nigeria. An interview schedule was used to collect data from 90 randomly selected farmers. Findings showed that majority of the respondents were males (86.7%) with majority having low education. Majority of respondents were ...

  11. World Bank Development Policies and Poverty Alleviation in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper looks at how World Bank policies affect the outcomes of efforts at alleviating widespread poverty in Africa. It questions the repercussion of these policies on the stability of African economies by analyzing the survey of the literature. From the evidence gathered from Africa and specific countries on the continent, the ...

  12. The extracts of pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas ) alleviate Ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the widespread industrial compounds, which has adverse effects on animal and human health. The study was aimed to explore the effects of Crassostrea gigas extracts (CGE) in alleviating ovarian functional disorders of female rats with exposure to BPA and the underlying possible ...

  13. Ascorbic Acid and Beta-Carotene Alleviate Oxidative Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascorbic Acid and Beta-Carotene Alleviate Oxidative Effect of London King Size® Cigarette Smoke on Tissue Lipids. ... Malondialdehyde production in the tissues was reduced by ascorbic acid and or beta-carotene given daily to the rats. It is implied that ascorbic acid or ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njhbs.v2i1.11451.

  14. Resilience offers escape from trapped thinking on poverty alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Steven J.; Haider, L. Jamila; Engström, Gustav; Schlüter, Maja

    2017-01-01

    The poverty trap concept strongly influences current research and policy on poverty alleviation. Financial or technological inputs intended to “push” the rural poor out of a poverty trap have had many successes but have also failed unexpectedly with serious ecological and social consequences that can reinforce poverty. Resilience thinking can help to (i) understand how these failures emerge from the complex relationships between humans and the ecosystems on which they depend and (ii) navigate diverse poverty alleviation strategies, such as transformative change, that may instead be required. First, we review commonly observed or assumed social-ecological relationships in rural development contexts, focusing on economic, biophysical, and cultural aspects of poverty. Second, we develop a classification of poverty alleviation strategies using insights from resilience research on social-ecological change. Last, we use these advances to develop stylized, multidimensional poverty trap models. The models show that (i) interventions that ignore nature and culture can reinforce poverty (particularly in agrobiodiverse landscapes), (ii) transformative change can instead open new pathways for poverty alleviation, and (iii) asset inputs may be effective in other contexts (for example, where resource degradation and poverty are tightly interlinked). Our model-based approach and insights offer a systematic way to review the consequences of the causal mechanisms that characterize poverty traps in different agricultural contexts and identify appropriate strategies for rural development challenges. PMID:28508077

  15. Rural-Urban Migration, Remittances and Rural Poverty Alleviation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the linkages between rural-urban migration, remittances and poverty alleviation in Kondoa District, Tanzania. It established that the successful migrants sent remittances to their places of origin in rural areas. These helped receiving households in reducing poverty. The study concluded that the ...

  16. Methylglyoxal alleviates cadmium toxicity in wheat (Triticum aestivum L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Duan, Xiang-Qiu; Xia, Yan-Mei; Wang, Yue; Zhou, Zhi-Hao; Min, Xiong

    2017-02-01

    Methylglyoxal alleviates cadmium toxicity in wheat (Triticum aestivum L) by improving plant growth. For a long time, the reactive α, β-carbonyl ketoaldehyde methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO; MG) has been regarded as merely a toxic metabolite in plants, but, now, emerging as a signal molecule in plants. In this study, cadmium (Cd) stress decreased plant height, root length, fresh weight (FW), and dry weight (DW) in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that Cd had toxic effects on the growth of wheat seedlings. The toxic effects of Cd were alleviated by exogenously applied MG in a dosage dependent fashion, and 700 mM MG reached significant differences, but this alleviating effect was eliminated by the treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, MG scavenger), suggesting that MG could mitigate Cd toxicity in wheat. This study reported for the first time that MG could alleviate Cd toxicity in wheat, uncovering a new possible physiological function for MG, and opening a novel line of research in plant stress biology.

  17. Contribution of food security projects on poverty alleviation to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite South Africa's economic growth having been accelerated considerably in the country, poverty levels have not decreased as one would have experienced. Food Security Projects initiated by the government of South Africa in order to help alleviate poverty within Limpopo Province have proved unsustainable and ...

  18. Salvianolic acid b alleviating myocardium injury in ischemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salvianolic acid b alleviating myocardium injury in ischemia reperfusion rats. ... increased contents of myocardium antioxidant enzymes activities; western blot results showed that Sal B ameliorate the increased Bax and caspase-3 protins expressions and decreased Bcl-2 proteins expression and ratios of Bcl-2 to Bax.

  19. The Contributions Of Nalt -Nusho Programme To Poverty Alleviation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was undertaken to investigate beneficiaries\\' and staff perceptions of the contributions of Nsukka Area Leaders of Thought /United Self-Help Organisation (NALT-NUSHO) programme to poverty alleviation in Enugu North Agricultural Zone of Enugu State. Data were collected from 110 respondents comprising 84 ...

  20. Wealth Creation and Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria: The Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the Role of Information Technology (IT) in thecreation of wealth and poverty alleviation in Nigeria. The design of the studywas a descriptive survey, carried out at Nwafor Orizu College of Education,Nsugbe in Anambra State of Nigeria. One hundred and ninety three (193)respondents formed the ...

  1. Aerobic exercises alleviate symptoms of fatigue related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aerobic exercises alleviate symptoms of fatigue related to inflammatory cytokines in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. ... Measurements of fatigue symptoms and markers of systemic inflammation were assessed before and at the end of the study for all participants in both groups. Results: The mean values of inflammatory ...

  2. Alleviating poverty in the dry zones of Sri Lanka

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    This paper describes the experience gained by the dry zone Agricultural Project in four Dry Zone districts of Sri Lanka in alleviating ... aspects. It was established that one of the reasons for the success of the project is the partnership strategy it has adopted in both ... increasing migration of youth to other areas in search of.

  3. 75 FR 65423 - Crop Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ..., for a producer ] in a disaster county as of October 22, 2010. Subsequent crops, replacement crops.... Replacement crop means the planting or approved prevented planting of any crop for harvest following the... cotton, soybeans, or sweet potatoes not in a recognized double- cropping sequence. Replacement crops are...

  4. Silicon alleviates deleterious effects of high salinity on the halophytic grass Spartina densiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Andrades-Moreno, Luis; Davy, Anthony J

    2013-02-01

    The non-essential element silicon is known to improve plant fitness by alleviating the effects of biotic and abiotic stresses, particularly in crops. However, its possible role in the exceptional tolerance of halophytes to salinity has not been investigated. This study reports the effect of Si supply on the salinity tolerance of the halophytic grass Spartina densiflora; plants were treated with NaCl (0-680 mM), with or without silicon addition of 500 μM, in a glasshouse experiment. Plant responses were examined using growth analysis, combined with measurements of gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic pigment concentrations. In addition, tissue concentrations of aluminium, calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, sodium, phosphorus and silicon were determined. Although high salinity decreased growth, this effect was alleviated by treatment with Si. Improved growth was associated with higher net photosynthetic rate (A), and greater water-use efficiency (WUE). Enhanced A at high salinity could be explained by beneficial effects of Si on the photochemical apparatus, and on chlorophyll concentrations. Ameliorative effects of Si were correlated with reduced sodium uptake, which was unrelated to a reduction in the transpiration rate, since Si-supplemented plants had higher stomatal conductances (G(s)). These plants also had higher tissue concentrations of essential nutrients, suggesting that Si had a positive effect on the mineral nutrient balance in salt-stressed plants. Si appears to play a significant role in salinity tolerance even in a halophyte, which has other, specific salt-tolerance mechanisms, through diverse protective effects on the photosynthetic apparatus, water-use efficiency and mineral nutrient balance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. GEOGLAM Crop Monitor Assessment Tool: Developing Monthly Crop Condition Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughey, K.; Becker Reshef, I.; Barker, B.; Humber, M. L.; Nordling, J.; Justice, C. O.; Deshayes, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) developed the Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative (GEOGLAM) to improve existing agricultural information through a network of international partnerships, data sharing, and operational research. This presentation will discuss the Crop Monitor component of GEOGLAM, which provides the Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS) with an international, multi-source, and transparent consensus assessment of crop growing conditions, status, and agro-climatic conditions likely to impact global production. This activity covers the four primary crop types (wheat, maize, rice, and soybean) within the main agricultural producing regions of the AMIS countries. These assessments have been produced operationally since September 2013 and are published in the AMIS Market Monitor Bulletin. The Crop Monitor reports provide cartographic and textual summaries of crop conditions as of the 28th of each month, according to crop type. This presentation will focus on the building of international networks, data collection, and data dissemination.

  6. Reform's stunted crop

    OpenAIRE

    Orden, David

    2002-01-01

    Congress is on the verge of finalizing a new long-term farm bill to replace legislation passed in 1996. The earlier legislation, when it was enacted, received attention for ist potential to end farm subsidies as they had been known. If Congress had adhered to the 1996 law, both the level and year-to-year variability of previous farm support outlays would have been reduced. Instead, when a three-year run of high crop prices collapsed in 1998, lawmakers began appropriating extra support payment...

  7. EPA Tribal Science Webinar Series Kick-off: Research, Traditional Knowledge and Community Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    The webinar series will develop a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities, by featuring a wide variety of expert guest speakers, from government, academic institutions and other organizations

  8. Scientific Framework for a Comprehensive Assessment of Tribal Water Resources in Western Washington

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Konrad, Christopher P

    2005-01-01

    Judicious management of water resources and protection of Tribal water rights requires information about the quantity and quality of water available in western Washington, the quantity of water needed...

  9. OPP Guidance for Submission of State and Tribal Water Quality Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guidance describes the process to submit state and tribal surface and groundwater monitoring data for consideration in exposure characterizations for ecological and and human health risk assessments and in risk management decisions for pesticides.

  10. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In Northern California, tribal governments and personnel of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1, have applied innovative context-sensitive solutions to meet a variety of transportation challenges along state highways tha...

  11. Grants Management Training Materials for Tribal Organizations Learner Manual Module 9: Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DBE Program is a requirement of every EPA assistance agreement. The program encourages federal dollars to flow down to disadvantaged businesses (such as Tribally-owned businesses) through a grant recipient’s purchases and procurements.

  12. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In Northern California, tribal governments and personnel of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1, have applied innovative context-sensitive solutions to meet a variety of transportation challenges along state highways tha...

  13. Report: EPA Needs an Agency-Wide Plan to Provide Tribal Solid Waste Management Capacity Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #11-P-0171, March 21, 2011. EPA cannot determine whether its efforts are assisting tribal governments in developing the capacity to manage solid waste or reduce the risks of open dumps in Indian country.

  14. Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Shiprock Wastewater Treatment Facility; Draft NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is proposing to issue a NPDES permit (No. NN0020621) to Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA) for the Shiprock wastewater treatment facility in San Juan County, New Mexico, within the northeastern portion of the Navajo Nation.

  15. 77 FR 45815 - Indian Child Welfare Act; Designated Tribal Agents for Service of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ...) 543-7400; Fax: (907) 543-5759; Email: [email protected] Allakaket Village, Emily Bergman, Tribal...-2233; Email: Emily.bergman@tananachiefs.org Legal Department, Tanana Chiefs Conference, 122 First...

  16. 78 FR 35961 - Pilot Project for Tribal Jurisdiction Over Crimes of Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... held accountable for their criminal behavior.\\3\\ \\1\\ Public Law 113-4, 127 Stat. 54 (2013); see Remarks... with applicable Executive Orders and Presidential Memoranda on tribal consultation. Third, generally...

  17. 5311(c) Tribal Transit Funding : Assessing Impacts and Determining Future Program Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The federal government has invested a significant amount of money in tribal transit in recent years. Since the enactment of the current highway bill (Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU)) i...

  18. Polythetic democracy: Tribal elections, bogus votes, and political imagination in the Naga uplands of Northeast India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wouters, Jelle J. P

    2015-01-01

      This article presents an ethnography of modern democracy by examining the particularistic substance and conceptions of "politics" and "the political" in the small, hilly, and tribal state of Nagaland...

  19. 76 FR 22412 - Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment... Economic Development (IEED) is submitting a proposed information collection related to funds provided under... Energy Development Capacity Program Grants. Brief Description of Collection: Indian tribes that would...

  20. 78 FR 71645 - Pilot Project for Tribal Jurisdiction over Crimes of Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... tribal provisions of VAWA 2013 are gender-neutral; but in the interests of brevity, this final notice..., notwithstanding the issuance of any patent, and, including rights-of-way running through the reservation, (b) all...

  1. 77 FR 41204 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office, National Archives...

  2. 78 FR 75376 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTP-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... Policy Advisory Committee (SLTP-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). ACTION..., Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTP-PAC). The meeting will be held to...

  3. 76 FR 80971 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration, Information...

  4. 76 FR 41826 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION...

  5. Geothermal access to federal and tribal lands: A progress report (Preprint)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, Barbara C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2002-09-01

    This paper traces the progress to date in resolving key barriers to geothermal energy use. It focuses primarily on two areas: improving geothermal access to federal lands and increasing understanding of the tribal aspects of geothermal energy use.

  6. Plant prebiotics and human health: Biotechnology to breed prebiotic-rich nutritious food crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangam Dwivedi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbiota in the gut play essential roles in human health. Prebiotics are non-digestible complex carbohydrates that are fermented in the colon, yielding energy and short chain fatty acids, and selectively promote the growth of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillae in the gastro-intestinal tract. Fructans and inulin are the best-characterized plant prebiotics. Many vegetable, root and tuber crops as well as some fruit crops are the best-known sources of prebiotic carbohydrates, while the prebiotic-rich grain crops include barley, chickpea, lentil, lupin, and wheat. Some prebiotic-rich crop germplasm have been reported in barley, chickpea, lentil, wheat, yacon, and Jerusalem artichoke. A few major quantitative trait loci and gene-based markers associated with high fructan are known in wheat. More targeted search in genebanks using reduced subsets (representing diversity in germplasm is needed to identify accessions with prebiotic carbohydrates. Transgenic maize, potato and sugarcane with high fructan, with no adverse effects on plant development, have been bred, which suggests that it is feasible to introduce fructan biosynthesis pathways in crops to produce health-imparting prebiotics. Developing prebiotic-rich and super nutritious crops will alleviate the widespread malnutrition and promote human health. A paradigm shift in breeding program is needed to achieve this goal and to ensure that newly-bred crop cultivars are nutritious, safe and health promoting.

  7. Improvement of red pepper yield and soil environment by summer catch aquatic crops in greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X. F.; Wang, L. Z.; Peng, J.; Wang, G. L.; Guo, X. S.; Wen, T. G.; Gu, D. L.; Wang, W. Z.; Wu, C. W.

    2016-08-01

    To investigate effects of the rotation of summer catch crops on remediation retrogressed soils in continuous cropping, a field experiment was conducted. Rice, water spinach, or cress were selected as summer catch crops; bare fallow during summer fallow was used as the control group. Results showed that aquatic crops grown in summer fallow period could effectively reduce soil bulk density and pH, facilitate soil nutrient release, and improve soil physical and chemical properties compared with those grown in fallow period. Paddy-upland rotation could improve soil microbial members and increase bacterial and actinomycete populations; by contrast, paddy-upland rotation could reduce fungal populations and enhance bacterium-to-fungus ratio. Paddy-upland rotation could also actively promote activities of soil enzymes, such as urease, phosphatase, invertase, and catalase. The proposed paddy-upland rotation significantly affected the growth of red pepper; the yield and quality of the grown red pepper were enhanced. Summer catch crops, such as rice, water spinach, and cress significantly increased pepper yield in the following growing season by 15.4%, 10.2% and 14.0%, respectively, compared with those grown in fallow treatment. Therefore, the proposed paddy-upland crop rotation could be a useful method to alleviate continuous cropping problems involved in cultivating red pepper in greenhouses.

  8. Introduction of Alley Cropping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugeng Parmadi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the efforts to preserve the sources of vegetarian, soil, and water is to rehabilitate the land and soil conservation. The aim of this rehabilitation is increasing and maintaining the produtivity of the land, so it can be preserved and used optimally. Therefore, it is necessary to a  develop a variety of good soil conservation, such as vegetative method and civil engineering. To find an appropriate technology, so it is necessary to develop some alternatives of soil conservation technique that are mainly implemented at dry land with its slope of more than 15% in the upstream area of discharge. One of the most suitable soil conservation technique today is Alley Cropping. Based on the research (trial and error in some areas, Alley Cropping could really provide a positive result in terms of erotion controlling and running off and maintain the land productivity. In addition, the technique is more easly operated and spends a cheaper cost than making a bench terrace.

  9. No Security Without Us: Tribes and Tribalism in Al Anbar Province, Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    tribal organization is disappearing in the urban setting, modern tribes maintain elements of tribal culture and retain the ability to mobilize...Faleh Jabar, “Shaykhs and Ideologues: Destruction and Reconstruction of Tribes under Patrimonial Totalitarianism in Iraq, 1968-1998,” in Tribes and...and the Albu Issa Tribe” (2006). Published electronically Jun. 2006. www.comw.org/warreport/fulltext/0709todd.pdf. 14 Philip Carl Salzman, Culture

  10. Comparative Economic and Gender, Labor Analysis of Conservation Agriculture Practices in Tribal Villages in India

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Cynthia; Chan, Catherine; Halbrendt, Jacqueline; Shariq, Linsey; Roul, Pravat; Idol, Travis; Ray, Chittanrajan; Evensen, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Marginal land use and subsequent natural resource degradation is a common issue among tribal villages in the Kendujhar district of India. In this study, Conservation Agriculture (CA) technologies at an experimental site, specifically the practices of intercropping and minimum tillage, were compared to conventional tillage practices of three tribal villages (145 households total) in this district. The impacts of CA implementation on gender, labor, and economic (yield and profitability) factors...

  11. The management of potable water supply : the case of Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority / Magwaza, D.W.

    OpenAIRE

    Magwaza, Duduzile Witness

    2011-01-01

    This mini–dissertation addresses the management of the potable water supply in the Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority's area of jurisdiction. The main objectives of the study were to determine the organisational structures and public policies governing the potable water supply in the uMhlathuze Local Municipality with a view to establishing the factors that hinder the provision of potable water to some parts of the Mkhwanazi Tribal Area and also determine how the present potable water situation is pe...

  12. Governmentality and Social Capital in Tribal/Federal Relations Regarding Heritage Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    discourse, in spite of overlapping goals. Using practice and agency theories and the concept of social capital (i.e., valued relations with others), we...overlapping goals. Using practice and agency theories and the concept of social capital (i.e., valued relations with others), we will develop a model...for improved tribal/federal heritage consultation; this will be accomplished by working collaboratively with tribal heritage specialists toward

  13. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  14. Barriers and Strategies for Healthy Food Choices among American Indian Tribal College Students: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Jill F; Stastny, Sherri; Brunt, Ardith; Agnew, Wanda

    2017-10-20

    American Indian and Alaskan Native individuals experience disproportionate levels of chronic health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and overweight and obesity that are influenced by dietary patterns and food choices. Understanding factors that influence healthy food choices among tribal college students can enrich education and programs that target dietary intake. To build an understanding of factors that influence healthy food choices among tribal college students at increased risk for college attrition. A nonexperimental cohort design was used for qualitative descriptive analysis. Participants (N=20) were purposively sampled, newly enrolled, academically underprepared tribal college students enrolled in a culturally relevant life skills course at an upper Midwest tribal college between September 2013 and May 2015. Participant demographic characteristics included various tribal affiliations, ages, and number of dependents. Participant responses to qualitative research questions about dietary intake, food choices, self-efficacy for healthy food choices, psychosocial determinants, and barriers to healthy food choices during telephone interviews were used as measures. Qualitative analysis included prestudy identification of researcher bias/assumptions, audiorecording and transcription, initial analysis (coding), secondary analysis (sorting and identifying meaning), and verification (comparative pattern analysis). Qualitative analysis revealed a variety of themes and subthemes about healthy food choices. Main themes related to barriers included taste, food gathering and preparation, and difficulty clarifying healthy food choices. Main themes related to strategies included taste, cultural traditions and practices, and personal motivation factors. Qualitative analysis identified barrier and strategy themes that may assist nutrition and dietetics practitioners working with tribal/indigenous communities, tribal college educators and health specialists, and tribal

  15. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2005 Annual Operation Plan, 2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, Harold R.; Lundberg, Jeffrey H.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-02-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  16. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2004 Annual Operation Plan, 2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, Harold R.; Penney, Aaron K.; Larson, Roy Edward (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  17. Plant senescence and crop productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Per L.; Culetic, Andrea; Boschian, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a developmental process which in annual crop plants overlaps with the reproductive phase. Senescence might reduce crop yield when it is induced prematurely under adverse environmental conditions. This review covers the role of senescence for the productivity of crop plants...... plants, the expression of the IPT gene under control of senescence-associated promoters has been the most successful. The promoters employed for senescence-regulated expression contain cis-elements for binding of WRKY transcription factors and factors controlled by abscisic acid. In most crops...

  18. Biofortification: High zinc wheat programme – The potential agricultural options for alleviating malnutrition in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Bux Baloch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The deficiency of micronutrients (zinc, iron, iodine and vitamin A is persistently afflicting millions of people living across Africa, Southern Americas, Asia and Pakistan. Among these, the zinc deficiency syndrome is occurring by 47.6, 41.3, and 39.2% in pregnant, non-pregnant and children under 5 years, respectively in Pakistan. The reason being that majority of the people subsists on cereal-based diets, i.e., wheat. The commercially grown wheat varieties contain zinc about 25 mg/g, whereas about 40 mg/g zinc is required in daily diet.The potential risk of zinc deficiency could be mitigated through certain interventions i.e., mineral drugs, food supplements, diversity in diets, production of fortified foods, and genetic biofortification of staple food crops. Among these, quantum increase in zinc content in wheat grains through genetic manipulation would be basics to alleviate zinc deficiency in the malnourished communities. The objective of the programme is to enhance the concentration of zinc nutrient from 25 to 40 mg/g in wheat grains through conventional plant breeding techniques.Pakistan Agricultural Research Council, Islamabad in collaboration with Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR and International Maize & Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT and HarvestPlus, Pakistan started R&D works to develop biofortified high zinc wheat varieties containing around 40 mg/g in the year 2009. The biofortified wheat crop is developed through conventional plant breeding techniques. The germplasm inherited with high zinc nutrient are crossed with high yielding and adopted to ecological conditions. The varieties are high yielding, and inheriting zinc around 40 mg/g in the grains under both irrigated and rainfed production environments. The Government of Punjab has also given high priority to develop and consume biofortified high zinc wheat in its multi-sectoral Nutrition Strategy Plan 2015, as potential agricultural option to

  19. Biofortification: High zinc wheat programme – The potential agricultural options for alleviating malnutrition in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Bux Baloch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The deficiency of micronutrients (zinc, iron, iodine and vitamin A is persistently afflicting millions of people living across Africa, Southern Americas, Asia and Pakistan. Among these, the zinc deficiency syndrome is occurring by 47.6, 41.3, and 39.2% in pregnant, non-pregnant and children under 5 years, respectively in Pakistan. The reason being that majority of the people subsists on cereal-based diets, i.e., wheat. The commercially grown wheat varieties contain zinc about 25 mg/g, whereas about 40 mg/g zinc is required in daily diet.The potential risk of zinc deficiency could be mitigated through certain interventions i.e., mineral drugs, food supplements, diversity in diets, production of fortified foods, and genetic biofortification of staple food crops. Among these, quantum increase in zinc content in wheat grains through genetic manipulation would be basics to alleviate zinc deficiency in the malnourished communities. The objective of the programme is to enhance the concentration of zinc nutrient from 25 to 40 mg/g in wheat grains through conventional plant breeding techniques.Pakistan Agricultural Research Council, Islamabad in collaboration with Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR and International Maize & Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT and HarvestPlus, Pakistan started R&D works to develop biofortified high zinc wheat varieties containing around 40 mg/g in the year 2009. The biofortified wheat crop is developed through conventional plant breeding techniques. The germplasm inherited with high zinc nutrient are crossed with high yielding and adopted to ecological conditions. The varieties are high yielding, and inheriting zinc around 40 mg/g in the grains under both irrigated and rainfed production environments. The Government of Punjab has also given high priority to develop and consume biofortified high zinc wheat in its multi-sectoral Nutrition Strategy Plan 2015, as potential agricultural option to

  20. Stable Food Crops Turning Into Commercial Crops: Case Studies Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stable Food Crops Turning Into Commercial Crops: Case Studies Of Teff, Wheat And Rice In Ethiopia. ... attention is needed to female headed households in the process of commercial transformation of subsistence agriculture. The development and institutionalization of marketing extension warrants due consideration.

  1. Stable Food Crops Turning Into Commercial Crops: Case studies of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RahelYilma

    Sustainable food security and welfare cannot be achieved through subsistence agriculture (Pingali, 1997). ... Hence, in this study,. 3 Teff is a grass-like fine seeded staple food crop grown in Ethiopia. 4 APA is the .... the suitability of the agro-ecology for the crop, while distance to milling service affects cost of consumption.

  2. 605 Salad crops: Root, bulb, and tuber Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root and tuber crops (potato, cassava, sweet potato, and yams) comprise 4 of the 10 major food staples of the world and serve as a major source of energy for the poor of developing nations. Minimal strain placed on agro ecosystems by root and tuber crops highlight their welcomed contribution to the ...

  3. Islamic Microfinance: an Interest free Microfinance Model for Poverty Alleviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Chakrabarty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical paper deals with Islamic microfinance and its rationality in Indian context as a panacea of Muslim poverty. Conventional microfinance system is very effective to alleviate poverty of developing countries. But it could not touch all community of people because of ‘interest’ component in debt and high degree of interest. Muslims dislike that microfinance which is based on ‘interest’ as it is strictly prohibited in Islam. Therefore the motto of financial inclusion is out of reach through conventional microfinance. An alternative interest free microfinance model has been developed in some part of world to include all Muslim poor people within the banking system. India is yet to adopt Islamic microfinance though 20% of total population is Muslim. The author strongly opines that India should adopt Islamic microfinance as a tool for poverty alleviation of Muslims as well as other communities.

  4. Sensor comparison study for load alleviating wind turbine pitch control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Knud Abildgaard; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Henriksen, Lars Christian

    2014-01-01

    of angle of attack and relative velocity at a radial position of the blades, and upstream inflow measurements from a spinner mounted light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor that enables preview of the incoming flow field. The results show that for stationary inflow conditions, the three different......As the size of wind turbines increases, the load alleviating capabilities of the turbine controller are becoming increasingly important. Load alleviating control schemes have traditionally been based on feedback from load sensor; however, recent developments of measurement technologies have enabled...... measurement types yield similar load reductions, but for varying inflow conditions, the LiDAR sensor-based controller yields larger load reductions than the two others. The results also show that the performance of the LiDAR sensor-based controller is very sensitive to uncertainties relating to the inflow...

  5. Poverty Alleviation Policies in Tanzania: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy Tsitsi Magombeyi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines poverty alleviation policies in Tanzania from 1980 to 2013. Trends in poverty and challenges faced by the country in reducing poverty have also been highlighted. Poverty-reduction policies that have been implemented in Tanzania can be categorized into three policy clusters. The first cluster covers policies that reduce income poverty and increase economic growth. The second cluster focuses on poverty alleviation policies that increase access to basic services such as education, health, water and sanitation, and social protection. The third cluster covers institutional capacity building, accountability and governance issues. Despite all the policies that have been implemented, Tanzania – like other emerging economies – still faces a number of challenges related to reducing poverty.

  6. Load alleviation of wind turbines by yaw misalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Knud Abildgaard; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    Vertical wind shear is one of the dominating causes of load variations on the blades of a horizontal axis wind turbine. To alleviate the varying loads, wind turbine control systems have been augmented with sensors and actuators for individual pitch control. However, the loads caused by a vertical...... wind shear can also be affected through yaw misalignment. Recent studies of yaw control have been focused on improving the yaw alignment to increase the power capture at below rated wind speeds. In this study, the potential of alleviating blade load variations induced by the wind shear through yaw...... misalignment is assessed. The study is performed through simulations of a reference turbine. The study shows that optimal yaw misalignment angles for minimizing the blade load variations can be identified for both deterministic and turbulent inflows. It is shown that the optimal yaw misalignment angles can...

  7. Soutien institutionnel à Research on Poverty Alleviation (REPOA ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Soutien institutionnel à Research on Poverty Alleviation (REPOA). REPOA est un organisme de recherche indépendant solidement établi et doté d'un système de gestion efficace qui est reconnu pour ses résultats de recherche de grande qualité et pertinents sur le plan des politiques. Il est de plus en plus sollicité.

  8. Active control landing gear for ground loads alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    An active landing gear has been created by connecting the hydraulic piston in an oleo strut to a hydraulic supply. A controller modulates the pressure in the oleo to achieve the desired dynamic characteristics. Tests on ground rigs (documented by a film) have demonstrated the successful alleviation of induced structural ground loads and the next step will be a flight test using a fighter aircraft.

  9. Biosolarization in garlic crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabeiro, Concepcion; Andres, Manuela; Wic, Consuelo

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important limitations of garlic cultivation is the presence of various soil pathogens. Fusarium proliferatum and Sclerotinium cepivorum and nematode Ditilenchus dipsaci cause such problems that prevent the repetition of the crop in the same field for at least 5 -8 years or soil disinfection is necessary. Chemical disinfection treatments have an uncertain future, in the European Union are reviewing their use, due to the effect on the non-pathogenic soil fauna. This situation causes a itinerant cultivation to avoid the limitations imposed by soil diseases, thereby increasing production costs. The Santa Monica Cooperative (Albacete, Spain) requested advice on possible alternative techniques, solarization and biosolarization. For which a trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness on the riverside area of the municipality. This place has recently authorized irrigation, which would allow the repeated cultivation of garlic if the incidence of soil diseases and the consequent soil fatigue could be avoided. Additionally, this work will serve to promote the cultivation of organic garlic. Last, but not least, the biosolarization technique allows to use waste from wineries, oil mills and mushroom crops. (Bello et al. 2003). The essay should serve as demonstrative proof for farmers' cooperative members. The specific objective for this first year is to assess, the effect on the global soil biota, on the final garlic production and quality and the effect of biosolarization to control soil pathogens. The trial is set on a cooperative's plot previously cultivated with corn. 5 treatments were set, defined by different amounts of organic matter applied, 7.5, 5, 2.5 kg m -2, a solarized with no organic matter, and a control without any treatment. The plot has inground sprinkler for full coverage with four sprinkler lines demarcating the five bands of differential treatment, randomly arranged. Organic matter was incorporated the August 14, 2013, then thoroughly

  10. Alleviation of chromium toxicity by hydrogen sulfide in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shafaqat; Farooq, Muhammad Ahsan; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Abbasi, G H; Zhang, Guoping

    2013-10-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to examine the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) in alleviating chromium (Cr) stress in barley. A 2-factorial design with 6 replications was selected, including 3 levels of NaHS (0 μM, 100 μM, and 200 μM) and 2 levels of Cr (0 μM and 100 μM) as treatments. The results showed that NaHS addition enhances plant growth and photosynthesis slightly compared with the control. Moreover, NaHS alleviated the inhibition in plant growth and photosynthesis by Cr stress. Higher levels of NaHS exhibited more pronounced effects in reducing Cr concentrations in roots, shoots, and leaves. Ultrastructural examination of plant cells supported the facts by indication of visible alleviation of cell disorders in both root and leaf with exogenous application of NaHS. An increased number of plastoglobuli, disintegration, and disappearance of thylakoid membranes and starch granules were visualized inside the chloroplast of Cr-stressed plants. Starch accumulation in the chloroplasts was also noticed in the Cr-treated cells, with the effect being much less in Cr + NaHS-treated plants. Hence, it is concluded that H2 S produced from NaHS can improve plant tolerance under Cr stress. © 2013 SETAC.

  11. EFFECTS OF SILICON ON ALLEVIATING ARSENIC TOXICITY IN MAIZE PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airon José da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a metalloid highly toxic to plants and animals, causing reduced plant growth and various health problems for humans and animals. Silicon, however, has excelled in alleviating stress caused by toxic elements in plants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Si in alleviating As stress in maize plants grown in a nutrient solution and evaluate the potential of the spectral emission parameters and the red fluorescence (Fr and far-red fluorescence (FFr ratio obtained in analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence in determination of this interaction. An experiment was carried out in a nutrient solution containing a toxic rate of As (68 μmol L-1 and six increasing rates of Si (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mmol L-1. Dry matter production and concentrations of As, Si, and photosynthetic pigments were then evaluated. Chlorophyll fluorescence was also measured throughout plant growth. Si has positive effects in alleviating As stress in maize plants, evidenced by the increase in photosynthetic pigments. Silicon application resulted in higher As levels in plant tissue; therefore, using Si for soil phytoremediation may be a promising choice. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis proved to be a sensitive tool, and it can be successfully used in the study of the ameliorating effects of Si in plant protection, with the Fr/FFr ratio as the variable recommended for identification of temporal changes in plants.

  12. Congestion Detection and Alleviation in Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Chughtai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple traffic flows in a dense environment of a mono-sink wireless sensor network (WSN experience congestion that leads to excessive energy consumption and severe packet loss. To address this problem, a Congestion Detection and Alleviation (CDA mechanism has been proposed. CDA exploits the features and the characteristics of the sensor nodes and the wireless links between them to detect and alleviate node- and link-level congestion. Node-level congestion is detected by examining the buffer utilisation and the interval between the consecutive data packets. However, link-level congestion is detected through a novel procedure by determining link utilisation using back-off stage of Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Avoidance (CSMA/CA. CDA alleviates congestion reactively by either rerouting the data traffic to a new less congested, more energy-efficient route or bypassing the affected node/link through ripple-based search. The simulation analysis performed in ns-2.35 evaluates CDA with Congestion Avoidance through Fairness (CAF and with No Congestion Control (NOCC protocols. The analysis shows that CDA improves packet delivery ratio by 33% as compared to CAF and 54% as compared to NOCC. CDA also shows an improvement in throughput by 16% as compared to CAF and 36% as compared to NOCC. Additionally, it reduces End-To-End delay by 17% as compared to CAF and 38% as compared to NOCC.

  13. A study of helicopter gust response alleviation by automatic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S.

    1983-01-01

    Two control schemes designed to alleviate gust-induced vibration are analytically investigated for a helicopter with four articulated blades. One is an individual blade pitch control scheme. The other is an adaptive blade pitch control algorithm based on linear optimal control theory. In both controllers, control inputs to alleviate gust response are superimposed on the conventional control inputs required to maintain the trim condition. A sinusoidal vertical gust model and a step gust model are used. The individual blade pitch control, in this research, is composed of sensors and a pitch control actuator for each blade. Each sensor can detect flapwise (or lead-lag or torsionwise) deflection of the respective blade. The acturator controls the blade pitch angle for gust alleviation. Theoretical calculations to predict the performance of this feedback system have been conducted by means of the harmonic method. The adaptive blade pitch control system is composed of a set of measurements (oscillatory hub forces and moments), an identification system using a Kalman filter, and a control system based on the minimization of the quadratic performance function.

  14. Foods provoking and alleviating symptoms in gastroparesis: patient experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wytiaz, Victoria; Homko, Carol; Duffy, Frank; Schey, Ron; Parkman, Henry P

    2015-04-01

    Nutritional counseling for gastroparesis focuses on reduction of meal size, fiber, and fat to control symptoms. The tolerance of gastroparesis patients for particular foods is largely anecdotal. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize foods provoking or alleviating gastroparesis symptoms. Gastroparesis patients completed: (1) Demographic Questionnaire; (2) Patient Assessment of Upper GI Symptoms; (3) Food Toleration and Aversion survey asking patients about experiences when eating certain foods utilizing a scale from -3 (greatly worsening symptoms) to +3 (greatly improving symptoms). Descriptive qualities (acidic, fatty, spicy, roughage-based, bitter, salty, bland, and sweet) were assigned to foods. Forty-five gastroparesis patients participated (39 idiopathic gastroparesis). Foods worsening symptoms included: orange juice, fried chicken, cabbage, oranges, sausage, pizza, peppers, onions, tomato juice, lettuce, coffee, salsa, broccoli, bacon, and roast beef. Saltine crackers, jello, and graham crackers moderately improved symptoms. Twelve additional foods were tolerated by patients (not provoking symptoms): ginger ale, gluten-free foods, tea, sweet potatoes, pretzels, white fish, clear soup, salmon, potatoes, white rice, popsicles, and applesauce. Foods provoking symptoms were generally fatty, acidic, spicy, and roughage-based. The foods shown to be tolerable were generally bland, sweet, salty, and starchy. This study identified specific foods that worsen as well as foods that may help alleviate symptoms of gastroparesis. Foods that provoked symptoms differed in quality from foods that alleviated symptoms or were tolerable. The results of this study illustrate specific examples of foods that aggravate or improve symptoms and provide suggestions for a gastroparesis diet.

  15. Factors Influencing Poverty Alleviation amongst Microfinance Adopting Households in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavhungu Abel Mafukata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the factors having the most influence on the alleviation of poverty amongst the households adopting microfinance in Zambia. Ninety nine (n=99 respondents were randomly and purposively selected from amongst 340 microfinance adopters of the so-called Micro Bankers Trust programme operating a microfinance business in the Makululu Compound of Kabwe, Zambia. Socio-demographic primary data were collected through face-to-face interviews based on a semi-structured questionnaire instrument. The data were entered into an excel spreadsheet for analysis. The descriptive data were thereafter exported and fitted to an empirical model. The descriptive results revealed that the majority of the respondents were married, unemployed, fairly educated younger women from larger-sized poor households who drew their household income mainly from microfinance activities. The majority of the respondents thought microfinance had improved their well-being in some crucial areas. The results of the empirical model found that some respondents were indeed alleviated from poverty through microfinance. Conclusion drawn in this paper is that microfinance does alleviate poverty of the poor.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in alleviation of salt stress: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelin, Heikham; Kapoor, Rupam; Giri, Bhoopander

    2009-12-01

    Salt stress has become a major threat to plant growth and productivity. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonize plant root systems and modulate plant growth in various ways. This review addresses the significance of arbuscular mycorrhiza in alleviation of salt stress and their beneficial effects on plant growth and productivity. It also focuses on recent progress in unravelling biochemical, physiological and molecular mechanisms in mycorrhizal plants to alleviate salt stress. The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in alleviating salt stress is well documented. This paper reviews the mechanisms arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi employ to enhance the salt tolerance of host plants such as enhanced nutrient acquisition (P, N, Mg and Ca), maintenance of the K(+) : Na(+) ratio, biochemical changes (accumulation of proline, betaines, polyamines, carbohydrates and antioxidants), physiological changes (photosynthetic efficiency, relative permeability, water status, abscissic acid accumulation, nodulation and nitrogen fixation), molecular changes (the expression of genes: PIP, Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, Lsnced, Lslea and LsP5CS) and ultra-structural changes. Theis review identifies certain lesser explored areas such as molecular and ultra-structural changes where further research is needed for better understanding of symbiosis with reference to salt stress for optimum usage of this technology in the field on a large scale. This review paper gives useful benchmark information for the development and prioritization of future research programmes.

  17. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIBAL BEAN (Canavalia virosa) AND ITS ALTERNATIVE TOFU AND TEMPEH FOOD PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Titiek F. Djaafar; Nurdeana Cahyaningrum; Heni Purwaningsih

    2013-01-01

    Increasing price of soybean becomes a serious problem for producers of traditional foods such as tempeh and tofu. These traditional foods are important protein sources for many Indonesian people. Tribal bean (Canavalia virosa) could be used as a substitution of soybean for tempeh and tofu processing. This study aimed to determine physico-chemical characteristics of tribal bean and its products such as tofu and tempeh. Tribal bean old pods were peeled manually in the Postharvest and Agricultur...

  18. Physico-chemical Characteristics of Tribal Bean (Canavalia Virosa) and Its Alternative Tofu and Tempeh Food Products

    OpenAIRE

    Djaafar, Titiek F; Cahyaningrum, Nurdeana; Purwaningsih, Heni

    2010-01-01

    Increasing price of soybean becomes a serious problem for producers of traditional foods such as tempeh and tofu. These traditional foods are important protein sources for many Indonesian people. Tribal bean (Canavalia virosa) could be used as a substitution of soybean for tempeh and tofu processing. This study aimed to determine physico-chemical characteristics of tribal bean and its products such as tofu and tempeh. Tribal bean old pods were peeled manually in the Postharvest and Agricultur...

  19. Impediments Involved in the Integration of Federally Administrated Tribal Areas (FATA) in the National Mainstream of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-11

    and its integration issues with the national mainstream of Pakistan to the forefront. 12World Lingo , “Federally Administered Tribal Areas -1947-79...automatically in the FATA.23 21World Lingo , “Federally Administered Tribal Areas -1947-79,” http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en...accessed 29 July 2009). World Lingo . “Federally Administered Tribal Areas -1947-79.” http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en

  20. Projected future distribution of date palm and its potential use in alleviating micronutrient deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Farzin; Kumar, Lalit; Nojoumian, Amir Hadi; Esmaeili, Atefeh; Toghyani, Mehdi

    2016-03-15

    Micronutrient deficiency develops when nutrient intake does not match nutritional requirements for maintaining healthy tissue and organ functions which may have long-ranging effects on health, learning ability and productivity. Inadequacy of iron, zinc and vitamin A are the most important micronutrient deficiencies. Consumption of a 100 g portion of date flesh from date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) has been reported to meet approximately half the daily dietary recommended intake of these micronutrients. This study investigated the potential distribution of P. dactylifera under future climates to address its potential long-term use as a food commodity to tackle micronutrient deficiencies in some developing countries. Modelling outputs indicated large shifts in areas conducive to date palm cultivation, based on global-scale alteration over the next 60 years. Most of the regions suffering from micronutrient deficiencies were projected to become highly conducive for date palm cultivation. These results could inform strategic planning by government and agricultural organizations by identifying areas to cultivate this nutritionally important crop in the future to support the alleviation of micronutrient deficiencies. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Mechanisms of silicon-mediated alleviation of drought and salt stress in plants: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Adrees, Muhammad; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Zia-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Qayyum, Muhammad Farooq; Abbas, Farhat

    2015-10-01

    Drought and salinity are the main abiotic stresses limiting crop yield and quality worldwide. Improving food production in drought- and salt-prone areas is the key to meet the increasing food demands in near future. It has been widely reported that silicon (Si), a second most abundant element in soil, could reduce drought and salt stress in plants. Here, we reviewed the emerging role of Si in enhancing drought and salt tolerance in plants and highlighted the mechanisms through which Si could alleviate both drought and salt stress in plants. Silicon application increased plant growth, biomass, photosynthetic pigments, straw and grain yield, and quality under either drought or salt stress. Under both salt and drought stress, the key mechanisms evoked are nutrient elements homeostasis, modification of gas exchange attributes, osmotic adjustment, regulating the synthesis of compatible solutes, stimulation of antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in plants. In addition, Si application decreased Na(+) uptake and translocation while increased K(+) uptake and translocation under salt stress. However, these mechanisms vary with plant species, genotype, growth conditions, duration of stress imposed, and so on. This review article highlights the potential for improving plant resistance to drought and salt stress by Si application and provides a theoretical basis for application of Si in saline soils and arid and semiarid regions worldwide. This review article also highlights the future research needs about the role of Si under drought stress and in saline soils.

  2. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuko eKomatsu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improving crop productivity, particularly under unfavorable environmental conditions. To better understand the mechanisms underlying stress response in crops, cell wall proteomic analyses are being increasingly utilized. In this review, the methods of purification and purity assays of cell wall protein fractions from crops are described, and the results of protein identification using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques are presented. Furthermore, protein composition of the cell walls of rice, wheat, maize and soybean are compared, and the role of cell wall proteins in crops under flooding and drought stress is discussed. This review will be useful for clarifying the role of the cell wall of crops in response to environmental stresses.

  3. Crop drying programme in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oztekin, S.; Bascetincelik, A.; Soysal, Y. [Cukurova Univ., Agricultural Machinery Dept., Adana (Turkey)

    1999-01-01

    The present status of agricultural crop drying practices in Turkey is investigated in this study. The emphasis of drying on market value, annual production and export values of some commercially important crops is given in a broad perspective. In the recent years, developing international market conditions in Europe, Middles East, and Central Asia has been encouraging to Turkey`s fresh and dry agricultural crop export due to the rapidly increasing internal and external market demands. Grapes, apricots, black tea, figs, red pepper, and medicinal and aromatic plants are the major exported agricultural crops, contributing annually 35 to 40 millions of USD$ to Turkey`s economics. From the view point of dried crop quality, drying of special crops are still an important topic for the agricultural sector. Traditionally used drying methods have many drawbacks. High air temperatures and relative humidity during the drying season promote the inset and mold development in harvested crops. Furthermore, the intensive solar radiation causes several quality reductions like vitamin losses of color changes in dried crops. Thus, the conventional drying methods do not meet the particular requirements of the related standards. To overcome these problems, producers should be made aware of the fact that the high quality of dried products can be sold to three of four fold prices and directed to the dryer investments. Moreover, the introduction of low cost and locally manufactured dryer offers a promising alternative to reduce the excessive postharvest losses and also improve the economical situation of the farmers. (Author)

  4. Analysis of rose crop production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.T.N.; Koning, de J.C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Measured and simulated dry-matter production of two rose crops different in cultivar and growing conditions were compared. Differences in dry-matter production between the two crops could be explained to a large extend by differences in harvest index, leaf area index, supplementary lighting and

  5. Genetic Engineering and Crop Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Helen C.; Frost, S.

    1991-01-01

    With a spotlight upon current agricultural difficulties and environmental dilemmas, this paper considers both the extant and potential applications of genetic engineering with respect to crop production. The nonagricultural factors most likely to sway the impact of this emergent technology upon future crop production are illustrated. (JJK)

  6. Crop Protection in Medieval Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadoks, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Mediterranean and West European pre-modern agriculture (agriculture before 1600) was by necessity ‘organic agriculture’. Crop protection is part and parcel of this agriculture, with weed control in the forefront. Crop protection is embedded in the medieval agronomy text books but specialised

  7. Soil erosion: perennial crop plantations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    Plantation agriculture is an important form of land-use in the tropics. Large areas of natural and regenerated forest have been cleared for growing oil palm, rubber, cocoa, coffee, and other perennial tree crops. These crops grown both on large scale plantations and by smallholders are important

  8. Cassava as an energy crop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Bech Pilgaard; Birch-Thomsen, Torben; Rasmussen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    of the Attieké cassava variety. Little competition with food crops is likely, as cassava most likely would replace cotton as primary cash crop, following the decline of cotton production since 2005 and hence food security concerns appear not to be an issue. Stated price levels to motivate an expansion of cassava...

  9. Archives: African Crop Science Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 98 ... Archives: African Crop Science Journal. Journal Home > Archives: African Crop Science Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 98 ...

  10. Climate Impacts of Cover Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardozzi, D.; Wieder, W. R.; Bonan, G. B.; Morris, C. K.; Grandy, S.

    2016-12-01

    Cover crops are planted in agricultural rotation with the intention of protecting soil rather than harvest. Cover crops have numerous environmental benefits that include preventing soil erosion, increasing soil fertility, and providing weed and pest control- among others. In addition to localized environmental benefits, cover crops can have important regional or global biogeochemical impacts by increasing soil organic carbon, changing emissions of greenhouse trace gases like nitrous oxide and methane, and reducing hydrologic nitrogen losses. Cover crops may additionally affect climate by changing biogeophysical processes, like albedo and latent heat flux, though these potential changes have not yet been evaluated. Here we use the coupled Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) - Community Land Model (CLM4.5) to test how planting cover crops in the United States may change biogeophysical fluxes and climate. We present seasonal changes in albedo, heat fluxes, evaporative partitioning, radiation, and the resulting changes in temperature. Preliminary analyses show that during seasons when cover crops are planted, latent heat flux increases and albedo decreases, changing the evaporative fraction and surface temperatures. Understanding both the biogeophysical changes caused by planting cover crops in this study and the biogeochemical changes found in other studies will give a clearer picture of the overall impacts of cover crops on climate and atmospheric chemistry, informing how this land use strategy will impact climate in the future.

  11. Helicopter gust alleviation, attitude stabilization, and vibration alleviation using individual-blade-control through a conventional swash plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, N. D.

    1985-01-01

    The novel active control system presented for helicopter rotor aerodynamic and aeroelastic problems involves the individual control of each blade in the rotating frame over a wide range of frequencies (up to the sixth harmonic of rotor speed). This Individual Blade Control (IBC) system controls blade pitch by means of broadband electrohydraulic actuators attached to the swash plate (in the case of three blades) or individually to each blade, using acceleratometer signals to furnish control commands to the actuators. Attention is given to IBC's application to blade lag, flapping, and bending dynamics. It is shown that gust alleviation, attitude stabilization, vibration alleviation, and air/ground resonance suppression, are all achievable with a conventional helicopter swash plate.

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizae alleviate negative effects of zinc oxide nanoparticle and zinc accumulation in maize plants--A soil microcosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fayuan; Liu, Xueqin; Shi, Zhaoyong; Tong, Ruijian; Adams, Catharine A; Shi, Xiaojun

    2016-03-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are considered an emerging contaminant when in high concentration, and their effects on crops and soil microorganisms pose new concerns and challenges. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (AMF) form mutualistic symbioses with most vascular plants, and putatively contribute to reducing nanotoxicity in plants. Here, we studied the interactions between ZnO NPs and maize plants inoculated with or without AMF in ZnO NPs-spiked soil. ZnO NPs had no significant adverse effects at 400 mg/kg, but inhibited both maize growth and AM colonization at concentrations at and above 800 mg/kg. Sufficient addition of ZnO NPs decreased plant mineral nutrient acquisition, photosynthetic pigment concentrations, and root activity. Furthermore, ZnO NPs caused Zn concentrations in plants to increase in a dose-dependent pattern. As the ZnO NPs dose increased, we also found a positive correlation with soil diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Zn. However, AM inoculation significantly alleviated the negative effects induced by ZnO NPs: inoculated-plants experienced increased growth, nutrient uptake, photosynthetic pigment content, and SOD activity in leaves. Mycorrhizal plants also exhibited decreased ROS accumulation, Zn concentrations and bioconcentration factor (BCF), and lower soil DTPA-extractable Zn concentrations at high ZnO NPs doses. Our results demonstrate that, at high contamination levels, ZnO NPs cause toxicity to AM symbiosis, but AMF help alleviate ZnO NPs-induced phytotoxicity by decreasing Zn bioavailability and accumulation, Zn partitioning to shoots, and ROS production, and by increasing mineral nutrients and antioxidant capacity. AMF may play beneficial roles in alleviating the negative effects and environmental risks posed by ZnO NPs in agroecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairgrieve, William; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2004-04-01

    The Colville Tribal Hatchery produced 62,335 pounds of trout during the contract period, however, only 46,092 pounds were liberated to lakes and streams. The remaining production will be carried over to 2004 to be planted as larger fish into reservation waters for the lakes opener. New raceways were completed in November and brought on line in the spring. These raceways currently hold the redband rainbow brood stock and will be spawned in 2004. Efforts are continuing to capture redbands from other streams in coordination with the monitoring and evaluation program. Creel was expanded by hiring a second creel clerk to give better coverage of reservation waters by reducing travel time. Marking continues on all fish planted from CTH and refinements continue to be made. The first tag retention study has been completed and the second study is now underway to determine long term tag recognition. Lakes continue to be surveyed to complete the baseline analysis of all reservation lakes and will be completed in 2004.

  14. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho).

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  15. Isolation and characterization of ACC deaminase-producing fluorescent pseudomonads, to alleviate salinity stress on canola (Brassica napus L.) growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Farzad; Khavazi, Kazem; Pazira, Ebrahim; Nejati, Alireza; Rahmani, Hadi Asadi; Sadaghiani, Hasan Rasuli; Miransari, Mohammad

    2009-04-01

    Salinity stress is of great importance in arid and semi-arid areas of the world due to its impact in reducing crop yield. Under salinity stress, the amount of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC), a precursor for ethylene production in plants, increases. Here, we conducted research under the hypothesis that isolated ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida can alleviate the stressful effects of salinity on canola (Brassica napus L.) growth. The experiments were conducted in the Soil and Water Research Institute, Tehran, Iran. Seven experimental stages were conducted to isolate and characterize ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens strains and to determine factors enhancing their growth and, consequently, their effects on the germination of canola seeds. Under salinity stress, in 14% of the isolates, ACC deaminase activity was observed, indicating that they were able to utilize ACC as the sole N-source. Bacterial strains differed in their ability to synthesize auxin and hydrogen cyanide compounds, as well as in their ACC deaminase activity. Under salinity stress, the rate of germinating seeds inoculated with the strains of ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and seedling growth was significantly higher. These results indicate the significance of soil biological activities, including the activities of plant growth-promoting bacteria, in the alleviation of soil stresses such as salinity on plant growth.

  16. Neonatal morbidity and mortality in tribal and rural communities in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu Niswade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Little is known about the natural history of neonates born in the rural and tribal areas in India. The Neonatal Disease Surveillance Study (NDSS measures the incidence of high-priority neonatal diseases, neonatal health events and associated risk factors to plan appropriate and effective actions. Materials and Methods: The NDSS is being conducted in Ramtek Revenue Block, Nagpur district, Maharashtra state, given its considerably high level of neonatal mortality. All households from five selected primary health centers were screened. Both active and passive surveillance systems were used for systematic collection of mother′s health during pregnancy and of baby′s health from birth to 4 months after birth. First-year results from November 2006 to October 2007 are presented. Results: Pregnancy outcomes were available for 1,136 women, with an overall neonatal mortality of 73 per 1,000 live births. The pregnancy outcomes varied by gestational age of the baby; miscarriages and abortions were higher in tribal than in non-tribal women, and tribal women had higher rates of low-birth weight (LBW neonates than non-tribal women. The main cause of neonatal mortality was LBW, followed by sepsis and respiratory illness. The mortality of non-tribal babies was most strongly associated with pre term. For tribal babies, mortality was also associated with maternal morbidity and delay in the initiation of breastfeeding. Interpretation and Conclusions: The NDSS provides valuable information on the potentially modifiable factors associated with increased likelihood of neonatal mortality and morbidity. The Neonatal Health Research Initiative is now developing community-based interventions to reduce the high rate of neonatal mortality and morbidity in the rural areas of India.

  17. Biofuel crops with CAM photosynthesis: Economic potential on moisture-limited lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Mark; Hartzell, Samantha; Porporato, Amilcare

    2017-04-01

    As the demand for food and renewable energy increases, the intelligent utilization of marginal lands is becoming increasingly critical. In marginal lands classified by limited rainfall or soil salinity, the cultivation of traditional C3 and C4 photosynthesis crops often is economically infeasible. However, in such lands, nontraditional crops with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis show great economic potential for cultivation. CAM crops including Opuntia (prickly pear) and Ananas (pineapple) achieve a water use efficiency which is three fold higher than C4 crops such as corn and 6-fold higher than C3 crops such as wheat, leading to a comparable annual productivity with only 20% of the water demand. This feature, combined with a shallow rooting depth and a high water storage capacity, allows CAM plants to take advantage of small, infrequent rainfall amounts in shallow, quickly draining soils. Furthermore, CAM plants typically have properties (e.g., high content of non-structural carbohydrates) that are favorable for biofuel production. Here, for marginal lands characterized by low soil moisture availability and/or high salinity, we assess the potential productivity and economic benefits of CAM plants. CAM productivity is estimated using a recently developed model which simulates CAM photosynthesis under a range of soil and climate conditions. From these results, we compare the energy and water resource inputs required by CAM plants to those required by more traditional C3 and C4 crops (corn, wheat, sorghum), and we evaluate the economic potential of CAM crops as sources of food, fodder, or biofuel in marginal soils. As precipitation events become more intense and infrequent, we show that even though marginal land area may increase, CAM crop cultivation shows great promise for maintaining high productivity with minimal water inputs. Our analysis indicates that on marginal lands, widespread cultivation of CAM crops as biofuel feedstock may help

  18. 78 FR 55171 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Processing Sweet Corn Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... Federal Crop Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC37 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Processing Sweet Corn Crop Insurance Provisions AGENCY: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) finalizes the Common Crop Insurance...

  19. 76 FR 75805 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Prune Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Federal Crop Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC36 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Prune Crop Insurance Provisions AGENCY: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) proposes to amend the Common Crop Insurance...

  20. 78 FR 13454 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Pecan Revenue Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... Federal Crop Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC35 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Pecan Revenue Crop Insurance Provisions AGENCY: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) finalizes the Common Crop Insurance Regulations...

  1. Is genetically modified crop the answer for the next green revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Saikat Kumar; Dutta, Madhuleema; Goyal, Aakash; Bhowmik, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Jitendra; Nandy, Sanjib; Scagliusi, Sandra Mansun; Prasad, Rajib

    2010-01-01

    Post-green revolution advances made in biotechnology paved the way of cultivating the high-yielding, stress and disease resistant genetically modified (GM) varieties of wheat, rice, maize cotton and several other crops. The recent rapid commercialization of the genetically modified crops in Asia, Americas and Australia indicates the potentiality of this new technology. GM crops give higher yields and are rich in nutritional values containing vitamins and minerals and can thus can help to alleviate hunger and malnutrition of the growing population in the under developed and developing countries. It could also be possible to develop more biotic and abiotic stress resistant genotypes in these crops where it was difficult to develop due to the unavailability of genes of resistance in the crossing germplasms. However, further research and investigations are needed to popularize the cultivation of these crops in different parts of the world. This review provides an insight of the impact of GM crops on contemporary agriculture across the past few decades, traces its' history across time, highlights new achievements and breakthroughs and discusses the future implication of this powerful technology in the coming few decades.

  2. Automatic image cropping for republishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatle, Phil

    2010-02-01

    Image cropping is an important aspect of creating aesthetically pleasing web pages and repurposing content for different web or printed output layouts. Cropping provides both the possibility of improving the composition of the image, and also the ability to change the aspect ratio of the image to suit the layout design needs of different document or web page formats. This paper presents a method for aesthetically cropping images on the basis of their content. Underlying the approach is a novel segmentation-based saliency method which identifies some regions as "distractions", as an alternative to the conventional "foreground" and "background" classifications. Distractions are a particular problem with typical consumer photos found on social networking websites such as FaceBook, Flickr etc. Automatic cropping is achieved by identifying the main subject area of the image and then using an optimization search to expand this to form an aesthetically pleasing crop. Evaluation of aesthetic functions like auto-crop is difficult as there is no single correct solution. A further contribution of this paper is an automated evaluation method which goes some way towards handling the complexity of aesthetic assessment. This allows crop algorithms to be easily evaluated against a large test set.

  3. Recycling crop residues for use in recirculating hydroponic crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    As part of bioregenerative life support feasibility testing by NASA, crop residues are being used to resupply elemental nutrients to recirculating hydroponic crop production systems. Methods for recovering nutrients from crop residues have evolved from water soaking (leaching) to rapid aerobic bioreactor processing. Leaching residues recovered the majority of elements but it also recovered significant amounts of soluble organics. The high organic content of leachates was detrimental to plant growth. Aerobic bioreactor processing reduced the organic content ten-fold, which reduced or eliminated phytotoxic effects. Wheat and potato production studies were successful using effluents from reactors having with 8- to 1-day retention times. Aerobic bioreactor effluents supplied at least half of the crops elemental mass needs in these studies. Descriptions of leachate and effluent mineral content, biomass productivity, microbial activity, and nutrient budgets for potato and wheat are presented.

  4. Inclusion of AIDS educational messages in rites of passage ceremonies: reaching young people in tribal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, Nora; Mawar, Nita; Macnamara, Marina

    2006-01-01

    The impact of HIV on tribal populations has received little attention. Often living in remote areas, further isolated by language, tradition and endogamous marriage patters, members of such communities have been assumed to be at lower risk for HIV. However, there is growing awareness that tribal peoples are sometimes at considerable risk for HIV, as well as other sexually transmitted infections. Young people in such communities may be particularly vulnerable. Traditional practices may forbid discussion of sex at the same time as increasing exposure to outside influences bring new attitudes and expectations about sex and sexuality. Concerned about the implications of the HIV epidemic on tribal populations, a review was conducted of available data on the HIV epidemic within tribal groups. Based on findings from this review, we propose a largely unexplored avenue for reaching tribal populations: namely, the incorporation of the HIV and AIDS related messages into traditional coming of age ceremonies. Such an intervention however can be one component of a comprehensive approach to reaching these often hard-to-reach populations but it may be an especially effective way to reach young people within these communities.

  5. Analysis of the barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas Elisha

    Native American lands have significant renewable energy resource potential that could serve to ensure energy security and a low carbon energy future for the benefit of tribes as well as the United States. Economic and energy development needs in Native American communities match the energy potential. A disproportionate amount of Native American households have no access to electricity, which is correlated with high poverty and unemployment rates. Despite the vast resources and need for energy, the potential for renewable energy development has not fully materialized. This research explores this subject through three separate articles: 1) a case study of the Navajo Nation that suggests economic viability is not the only significant factor for low adoption of renewable energy on Navajo lands; 2) an expert elicitation of tribal renewable energy experts of what they view as barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands; and 3) a reevaluation of Native Nation Building Theory to include external forces and the role that inter-tribal collaboration plays with renewable energy development by Native nations. Major findings from this research suggests that 1) many Native nations lack the technical and legal capacity to develop renewable energy; 2) inter-tribal collaboration can provide opportunities for sharing resources and building technical, legal, and political capacity; and 3) financing and funding remains a considerable barrier to renewable energy development on tribal lands.

  6. Plant biotechnology for crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, K P

    1995-01-01

    The typical crop improvement cycle takes 10-15 years to complete and includes germplasm manipulations, genotype selection and stabilization, variety testing, variety increase, proprietary protection and crop production stages. Plant tissue culture and genetic engineering procedures that form the basis of plant biotechnology can contribute to most of these crop improvement stages. This review provides an overview of the opportunities presented by the integration of plant biotechnology into plant improvement efforts and raises some of the societal issues that need to be considered in their application.

  7. Scapuloplasty alleviates scapular pain resulting from lung cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hey-Ran; Lee, Pyung-Bok; Kim, Kyung-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Osteoplasty, a highly effective minimally invasive procedure that alleviates the painful effects of metastatic bone disease by injecting bone cement to support weakened bones, provides immediate and substantial pain relief. However, it is rarely performed in non-weight bearing flat bones such as the scapula. Fractures of the body of the scapula are rarely treated surgically, except for cases of marked displacement of fragments that limit the function of the scapula. According to the reported incidences of operative treatment of different scapula fracture types, 99% of all isolated scapula body fractures are treated nonoperatively A 54-year-old man had been experiencing metastatic bone pain in the lateral border, medial border, and medial infraspinatus fossa of the left scapula for the past 2 months; this pain originated from adenocarcinoma of the right lung. He could not sleep on his back even after completion of radiation therapy. We decided to perform scapuloplasty. The patient was placed in the prone position on a radiolucent table with an inflatable adjustable axillary pillow. Three 13-gauge, 10-cm long bone biopsy needles were simultaneously inserted from the 3 different entry points to fill the osteolytic lesion with the bone cement with fluoroscopic guidance under local anesthesia and intravenous analgesia. After confirming needle placement and ensuring that no contrast medium was extravasated, a total of 8 mL of the cement was injected. Immediately after the operation, the patient could lie on his back without pain. Scapuloplasty is a new variant of osteoplasty used to alleviate the painful effects of metastatic bone disease. It may be an option of shoulder motion-preserving minimally invasive procedure for alleviating intractable pain induced by lying on the back.

  8. How can we improve Mediterranean cropping systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benlhabib, O.; Yazar, A.; Qadir, M.

    2014-01-01

    dryland Mediterranean cropping systems, and to discuss and recommend sustainable cropping technologies that could be used at the small-scale farm level. Four crop management practices were evaluated: crop rotations, reduced tillage, use of organic manure, and supplemental and deficit irrigation. Among......In the Mediterranean region, crop productivity and food security are closely linked to the adaptation of cropping systems to multiple abiotic stresses. Limited and unpredictable rainfall and low soil fertility have reduced agricultural productivity and environmental sustainability. For this reason...... the tested interventions, incorporation of crop residues coupled with supplementary irrigation showed a significantly positive effect on crop productivity, yield stability and environmental sustainability....

  9. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Symptoms Alleviated by Renal Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Hansen, J. M.; Marckmann, P.

    2011-01-01

    are limited. Anecdotal reports have shown partial or complete resolution of NSF following successful renal transplantation early in the course of NSF. In this report, we describe alleviation of NSF symptoms in two women following successful renal transplantation more than 3 years after onset of NSF.......Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a rare, serious, and life-threatening disease of patients with severe renal impairment. Gadolinium-containing contrast agents have been shown to be the crucial trigger. There is no proven medical cure for the disease, and symptomatic treatment options...

  10. Tribal Science 2017 Webinar Series: Arctic Research, One Health and the Local Environmental Observer (LEO) Network: Ongoing Activities and Expansion to Lower 48

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA Sustainable and Healthy Communities Seminar Series presents the Tribal Science Webinar Series that will look to develop a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities.

  11. Entre foi et compromis tribal : 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dridi Moez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available On comprend mieux l’adhésion d’Oman à l’islam, entre 628 et 633 si on l’étudie dans son contexte historique et  en relation avec les enjeux politiques et économiques de l’époque. Depuis le ive siècle de l’ère chrétienne, la côte orientale de la péninsule arabique se trouvait dans l’aire d’influence de l’empire sassanide, et la région d’Oman, Mâzun, était administrée par un gouverneur perse, marzubân, contrôlant un « roi » arabe local. Centré sur les ports de Dabâ et Suhar (Suhâr, cette entité politique bénéficiait des revenus du commerce international avec l’Asie occidentale. Les premiers contacts épistolaires du Prophète Muhammad avec les chefs de tribus et rois locaux furent suivis par une série d’accords de reconnaissance de sa tutelle spirituelle nominale, sans que l’on puisse encore parler d’ « islamisation ». C’est seulement à la mort du Prophète, que la révolte de la ridda (« apostasie » provoqua, avec une intervention militaire directe de l’État mecquois, le départ des Perses et l’entrée véritable d’Oman dans l’islam.Between Faith and Tribal Compromise: How the Region of Oman entered IslamThe adhesion of Oman to Islam between 628 and 633 is better understood when it is studied in its historical context along with its relation to the major political and economic events of the period. Starting from the 4th c. of the Christian era, the Eastern coast of the Arabic peninsula was under the influence of the Sassanid Empire, the region of Oman, Mâzun, being administrated by the Persian government, marzubân, which controlled a local Arab « king ». This political entity, centered on the ports of Dabâ and Suhar, was deriving benefit from the revenue from international trade with West Asia. The first epistolary contacts of the prophet Muhammad with the local tribal leaders and kings were followed by a series of agreements recognizing his nominal spiritual

  12. Alleviating cotton stickiness-experience and future research topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Though cotton stickiness is manifested only in a small percentage of the world cotton crop, its presence can adversely affect every aspect of the cotton textile industry from production to yarn manufacturing. Reductions in production efficiency due to the presence of stickiness at the mill may be v...

  13. Aluminum toxicity in acid sulfate soil alleviated with biogenic liming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low crop yield from acid sulfate soil was caused by high concentrations of aluminum and iron in soil. Aluminum ion which cause root injury at root region inhibits the uptake of the nutrients by the root and lead to nutrient deficiency. Ground magnesium limestones can be applied to overcome this problem but incurred more ...

  14. African Crop Science Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submit your manuscript electronically to: The Secretariat, African Crop Science Journal, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Makerere University, ... Materials and Methods or Methodology, Results, Discussion (or Results and Discussion), Conclusion, Acknowledgement, References and Illustrations (Tables, ...

  15. Method for optimizing harvesting of crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    In order e.g. to optimize harvesting crops of the kind which may be self dried on a field prior to a harvesting step (116, 118), there is disclosed a method of providing a mobile unit (102) for working (114, 116, 118) the field with crops, equipping the mobile unit (102) with crop biomass measuring...... means (108) and with crop moisture content measurement means (106), measuring crop biomass (107a, 107b) and crop moisture content (109a, 109b) of the crop, providing a spatial crop biomass and crop moisture content characteristics map of the field based on the biomass data (107a, 107b) provided from...... moving the mobile unit on the field and the moisture content (109a, 109b), and determining an optimised drying time (104a, 104b) prior to the following harvesting step (116, 118) in response to the spatial crop biomass and crop moisture content characteristics map and in response to a weather forecast...

  16. A Special Issue of the Journal of Forestry—Tribal Forest Management: Innovations for Sustainable Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Dockry; Serra J. Hoagland

    2017-01-01

    Native American forests and tribal forest management practices have sustained indigenous communities, economies, and resources for millennia. These systems provide a wealth of knowledge and successful applications of long-term environmental stewardship and integrated, sustainable forest management. Tribal forestry has received an increasing amount of attention from...

  17. 25 CFR 44.110 - What Indian Self-Determination Act provisions apply to grants under the Tribally Controlled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What Indian Self-Determination Act provisions apply to grants under the Tribally Controlled Schools Act? 44.110 Section 44.110 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... Self-Determination Act provisions apply to grants under the Tribally Controlled Schools Act? (a) The...

  18. 25 CFR 900.45 - What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Management Systems § 900.45 What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's... tribe or tribal organization. The system shall contain sufficient information to identify contract...-determination contract. (d) Budget controls. The financial management system shall permit the comparison of...

  19. 42 CFR 137.401 - What role does Tribal consultation play in the IHS annual budget request process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What role does Tribal consultation play in the IHS annual budget request process? 137.401 Section 137.401 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...-GOVERNANCE Secretarial Responsibilities Budget Request § 137.401 What role does Tribal consultation play in...

  20. 26 CFR 31.3402(r)-1 - Withholding on distributions of Indian gaming profits to tribal members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... profits to tribal members. 31.3402(r)-1 Section 31.3402(r)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(r)-1 Withholding on distributions of Indian gaming profits to tribal members. (a) (1) General rule. Section 3402(r...

  1. 45 CFR 309.170 - What statistical and narrative reporting requirements apply to Tribal IV-D programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What statistical and narrative reporting... (IV-D) PROGRAM Statistical and Narrative Reporting Requirements § 309.170 What statistical and narrative reporting requirements apply to Tribal IV-D programs? (a) Tribes and Tribal organizations...

  2. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized support...

  3. 77 FR 70461 - Jackson Rancheria-Tribal Council Ordinance No. 2012-01-Sale, Consumption & Possession of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Tribe's economy, providing income to the Tribe and training and employment to its members. 6. The Tribal..., including all of its Tribal Business Enterprises. Severability, Amendment, and Sovereign Immunity 1. If any... sovereign immunity from unconsented suit or action. Effective Date This ordinance shall become effective...

  4. Malaria epidemiology in an area of stable transmission in tribal population of Jharkhand, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Manoj K; Prajapati, Brijesh K; Tiendrebeogo, Régis W

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malaria remains an important health problem in India with approximately 1 million cases in 2014. Of these, 7% occurred in the Jharkhand state mainly in the tribal population. METHODS: This study was conducted in Dumargarhi, a tribal village about 42 km east of Ranchi city, Jharkhand...... or complete out of phase pattern of the vector density peaks together with a high prevalence of parasite positive individuals in the study population explains the year-round malaria transmission in the study region. CONCLUSIONS: The collection of clinical data from a well-characterized tribal cohort from...... Jharkhand, India, has provided evidence for naturally acquired immunity against malaria in this hyperendemic region. The study also suggests that enforcement of existing control programmes can reduce the malaria burden further....

  5. Partnership for Environmental Technology Education: Tribal Colleges Initiative in Science and Environmental Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    The Tribal Colleges Initiatives in Science and Environmental Education (TCI) was developed in collaboration with the Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE). This program is focused on long-term, systematic change through assisting tribally-controlled colleges in improving science and technology infrastructure, faculty and curricula. The goals are to: develop new or enhance existing science and technology education programs within tribally-controlled colleges and affiliates with a focus on environmental education and technology; establish and maintain clearly defined and secure educational pathways for Native American students; produce more Native American environmental and advanced degree graduates who can contribute to meeting the environmental/natural resource management and economic development goals of Indian Nations; and enhance the general level of Native American scientific literacy through improved public access to information.

  6. Understanding Malnutrition of Tribal Children in India: The Role of Women's Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Avijit; Bhattacharjee, Nairita

    2016-01-01

    Child malnutrition is considered to be the key risk factor for illness during adolescence and is responsible for about one-third of child deaths globally. Historically tribal communities have lagged behind the general population in terms of most socioeconomic aspects, and one such aspect is the nutritional status of children. The present study analyzes regional variations in child malnutrition and its association with women's empowerment in the tribal communities of India. The investigation is based on secondary data compiled from India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS). Both bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to analyze data. We found a conditional inverse association between child malnutrition and women's empowerment in tribal communities. It is conditional in the sense that women's empowerment is effective when other factors supposed to influence nutritional status are proactive. Policy prescriptions are discussed.

  7. Role of magnesium in alleviation of aluminium toxicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Jayakumar; Babourina, Olga; Rengel, Zed

    2011-04-01

    Magnesium is pivotal for activating a large number of enzymes; hence, magnesium plays an important role in numerous physiological and biochemical processes affecting plant growth and development. Magnesium can also ameliorate aluminium phytotoxicity, but literature reports on the dynamics of magnesium homeostasis upon exposure to aluminium are rare. Herein existing knowledge on the magnesium transport mechanisms and homeostasis maintenance in plant cells is critically reviewed. Even though overexpression of magnesium transporters can alleviate aluminium toxicity in plants, the mechanisms governing such alleviation remain obscure. Possible magnesium-dependent mechanisms include (i) better carbon partitioning from shoots to roots; (ii) increased synthesis and exudation of organic acid anions; (iii) enhanced acid phosphatase activity; (iv) maintenance of proton-ATPase activity and cytoplasmic pH regulation; (v) protection against an aluminium-induced cytosolic calcium increase; and (vi) protection against reactive oxygen species. Future research should concentrate on assessing aluminium toxicity and tolerance in plants with overexpressed or antisense magnesium transporters to increase understanding of the aluminium-magnesium interaction.

  8. Puerarin Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments, and partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Puerarin, the main constituent of Puerariae Lobatae Radix, has been used extensively in China to treat hypertension and tumor. The current study examined the effects of puerarin on neuropathic pain using two most commonly used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI and diabetic neuropathy. We found that consecutive intrathecal administration of puerarin (4–100 nM for 7 days inhibited the mechanical and thermal nociceptive response induced by CCI and diabetes without interfering with the normal pain response. Meanwhile, in both models puerarin inhibited the activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal dorsal horn. Puerarin also reduced the upregulated levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in the spinal cord. In summary, puerarin alleviated CCI- and diabetes-induced neuropathic pain, and its effectiveness might be due to the inhibition of neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. The anti-inflammation effect of puerarin might be related to the suppression of spinal NF-κB activation and/or cytokines upregulation. We conclude that puerarin has a significant effect on alleviating neuropathic pain and thus may serve as a therapeutic approach for neuropathic pain.

  9. Resource Assessment for Afghanistan and Alleviation of Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, J. F.

    2002-05-01

    Mineral and water resources in Afghanistan may be the best means by which redevelopment of the country can be used to alleviate future terrorism. Remote-sensing analysis of snow, ice, resources, and topography in Afghanistan, and development of digital elevation models with ASTER imagery and previously classified, large scale topographic maps from the Department of Defense enable better assessment and forecasting resources in the country. Adequate resource assessment and planning is viewed as critical to alleviation of one cause of the problems associated with the fertilization of terrorism in Afghanistan. Long-term diminution of meltwater resources in Afghanistan is exemplified by the disastrous and famine-inducing droughts of the present time and three decades prior, as well as by the early Landsat assessment of glacier resources sponsored by USGS and now brought up-to-date with current imagery. Extensive cold-war projects undertaken by both the USSR and USA generated plentiful essential mineral, hydrocarbon, hydrogeological, and hydrological data, including an extensive stream gauging and vital irrigation network now adversly affected or destroyed entirely by decades of war. Analysis, measurement, prediction, rehabilitation, and reconstruction of critical resource projects are regarded as most critical elements in the war on terrorism in this portion of the world. The GLIMS (Global Land Ice Measurements from Space) Project, initially sponsored by USGS, has established our group as the Regional Center for Afghanistan and Pakistan, in which the above concepts serve as guiding research precepts.

  10. Tribal Colleges Initiative project. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Tribal Colleges Initiative (TCI) grant is in the second year of funding from the US Department of Energy Environmental Management program. This quarterly report includes activities for the first three months (April 1--June 30, 1998) of the Year 2 funding period. The TCI program office requested each Tribal College to write a quarterly report of activities at their respective institutions. These reports are attached. These institutions are Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), Crownpoint Institute of Technology (CIT) and the Dine` College (DC, formerly Navajo Community College). The purpose of this program is to offer educational opportunities to Native Americans in the environmental field.

  11. Pattern of Decision Making of Irula Tribal Farm Women in Nilgiris District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeetha Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to find out the pattern of decision making of the Irula  tribal farm women of Nilgiris district in farm and home. The study revealed that Irula tribal farm women took self decision in the case of irrigating fields (85.00 followed by using plant protection measures (83.33 in case of farm management and took self decision in cases like selection and preparation of food (100.00, decorating the house (70.00 They had least participation in decisions like construction of new house (63.33 followed by borrowing and giving loans (38.33.

  12. Estimating the Impact and Spillover Effect of Climate Change on Crop Yield in Northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchway, E.

    2016-12-01

    In tropical regions of the world human-induced climate change is likely to impact negatively on crop yields. To investigate the impact of climate change and its spillover effect on mean and variance of crop yields in northern Ghana, the Just and Pope stochastic production function and the Spatial Durbin model were adopted. Surprisingly, the results suggest that both precipitation and average temperature have positive effects on mean crop yield during the wet season. Wet season average temperature has a significant spillover effect in the region, whereas precipitation during the wet season has only one significant spillover effect on maize yield. Wet season precipitation does not have a strong significant effect on crop yield despite the rainfed nature of agriculture in the region. Thus, even if there are losers and winners as a result of future climate change at the regional level, future crop yield would largely depend on future technological development in agriculture, which may improve yields over time despite the changing climate. We argue, therefore, that technical improvement in farm management such as improved seeds and fertilizers, conservation tillage and better pest control, may have a more significant role in increasing observed crop productivity levels over time. So investigating the relative importance of non-climatic factors on crop yield may shed more light on where appropriate interventions can help in improving crop yields. Climate change, also, needs to be urgently assessed at the level of the household, so that poor and vulnerable people dependent on agriculture can be appropriately targeted in research and development activities whose object is poverty alleviation.

  13. Crop rotation modelling - A European model intercomparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollas, Chris; Kersebaum, Kurt C; Nendel, Claas

    2015-01-01

    , tillage, residues, intermediate or catch crops). We found that the continuous simulation of multi-year crop rotations yielded results of slightly higher quality compared to the simulation of single years and single crops. Intermediate crops (oilseed radish and grass vegetation) were simulated less...

  14. The Penobscot River and environmental contaminants: Assessment of tribal exposure through sustenance lifeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Valerie; Kusnierz, Daniel; Hillger, Robert; Ferrario, Joseph; Hughes, Thomas; Diliberto, Janet; Orazio, Carl E.; Dudley, Robert W.; Byrne, Christian; Sugatt, Richard; Warren, Sarah; DeMarini, David; Elskus, Adria; Stodola, Steve; Mierzykowski, Steve; Pugh, Katie; Culbertson, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    EPA in collaboration with the Penobscot Indian Nation, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USF&WS) collectively embarked on a four year research study to evaluate the environmental health of the riverine system by targeting specific cultural practices and using traditional science to conduct a preliminary contaminant screening of the flora and fauna of the Penobscot River ecosystem. This study was designed as a preliminary screening to determine if contaminant concentrations in fish, eel, snapping turtle, wood ducks, and plants in Regions of the Penobscot River relevant to where PIN tribal members hunt, fish and gather plants were high enough to be a health concern. This study was not designed to be a statistically validated assessment of contaminant differences among study sites or among species. The traditional methodology for health risk assessment used by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is based on the use of exposure assumptions (e.g. exposure duration, food ingestion rate, body weight, etc.) that represent the entire American population, either as a central tendency exposure (e.g. average, median) or as a reasonable maximum exposure (e.g. 95% upper confidence limit). Unfortunately, EPA lacked exposure information for assessing health risks for New England regional tribes sustaining a tribal subsistence way of life. As a riverine tribe, the Penobscot culture and traditions are inextricably tied to the Penobscot River watershed. It is through hunting, fishing, trapping, gathering and making baskets, pottery, moccasins, birch-bark canoes and other traditional practices that the Penobscot culture and people are sustained. The Penobscot River receives a variety of pollutant discharges leaving the Penobscot Indian Nation (PIN) questioning the ecological health and water quality of the river and how this may affect the practices that sustain their way of life

  15. Evaluation of Crop-Livestock Integration Systems among Farm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ... of crops and livestock. Keywords: Crop-livestock integration systems, adopted village, farm family. .... crop is planted at about the time when the first crop is being harvested. Crop residues ..... Agronomy Monograph, 54. Madison, WI.

  16. Recent advances in fruit crop genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang XU,Chaoyang LIU,Manosh Kumar BISWAS,Zhiyong PAN,Xiuxin DENG

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, dramatic progress has been made in the genomics of fruit crops. The publication of a dozen fruit crop genomes represents a milestone for both functional genomics and breeding programs in fruit crops. Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have revolutionized the manner and scale of genomics in fruit crops. Research on fruit crops is encompassing a wide range of biological questions which are unique and cannot be addressed in a model plant such as Arabidopsis....

  17. Physiological limits to zinc biofortification of edible crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip John White

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that almost one third of the world’s population lack sufficient Zn for adequate nutrition. This can be alleviated by increasing dietary Zn intakes through Zn-biofortification of edible crops. Biofortification strategies include the application of Zn-fertilisers or the development of crop genotypes that acquire more Zn from the soil and accumulate it in edible portions. Zinc concentrations in roots, leaves and stems can be increased through the application of Zn-fertilisers. Root Zn concentrations of up to 500-5000 mg kg-1 DM, and leaf Zn concentrations of up to 100-700 mg kg-1 dry matter (DM, can be achieved without loss of yield when Zn-fertilisers are applied to the soil. It is possible that greater Zn concentrations in non-woody shoot tissues can be attained using foliar Zn-fertilisers. By contrast, Zn concentrations in fruits, seeds and tubers are severely limited by low Zn mobility in the phloem and Zn concentrations higher than 30-100 mg kg-1 DM are rarely observed. However, genetically modified plants with improved abilities translocate Zn in the phloem might be used to biofortify these phloem-fed tissues. In addition, genetically modified plants with increased tolerance to high tissue Zn concentrations could be used to increase Zn concentrations in all edible produce and, thereby, increase dietary Zn intakes.

  18. 78 FR 53370 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Forage Seed Crop Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Federal Crop Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC24 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Forage... provides forage seed insurance. The provisions will be used in conjunction with the Common Crop Insurance... crop programs. The intended effect of this action is to convert the Forage Seed pilot crop insurance...

  19. 77 FR 27658 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Processing Sweet Corn Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Federal Crop Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC37 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Processing Sweet Corn Crop Insurance Provisions AGENCY: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) proposes to...

  20. Economic and Environmental Impact of Rice Blast Pathogen (Magnaporthe oryzae Alleviation in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawton Nalley

    Full Text Available Rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae is a key concern in combating global food insecurity given the disease is responsible for approximately 30% of rice production losses globally-the equivalent of feeding 60 million people. These losses increase the global rice price and reduce consumer welfare and food security. Rice is the staple crop for more than half the world's population so any reduction in rice blast would have substantial beneficial effects on consumer livelihoods. In 2012, researchers in the US began analyzing the feasibility of creating blast-resistant rice through cisgenic breeding. Correspondingly, our study evaluates the changes in producer, consumer, and environmental welfare, if all the rice produced in the Mid-South of the US were blast resistant through a process like cisgenics, using both international trade and environmental assessment modeling. Our results show that US rice producers would gain 69.34 million dollars annually and increase the rice supply to feed an additional one million consumers globally by eliminating blast from production in the Mid-South. These results suggest that blast alleviation could be even more significant in increasing global food security given that the US is a small rice producer by global standards and likely experiences lower losses from blast than other rice-producing countries because of its ongoing investment in production technology and management. Furthermore, results from our detailed life cycle assessment (LCA show that producing blast-resistant rice has lower environmental (fossil fuel depletion, ecotoxicity, carcinogenics, eutrophication, acidification, global warming potential, and ozone depletion impacts per unit of rice than non-blast resistant rice production. Our findings suggest that any reduction in blast via breeding will have significantly positive impacts on reducing global food insecurity through increased supply, as well as decreased price and environmental impacts in

  1. Economic and Environmental Impact of Rice Blast Pathogen (Magnaporthe oryzae) Alleviation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalley, Lawton; Tsiboe, Francis; Durand-Morat, Alvaro; Shew, Aaron; Thoma, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae) is a key concern in combating global food insecurity given the disease is responsible for approximately 30% of rice production losses globally-the equivalent of feeding 60 million people. These losses increase the global rice price and reduce consumer welfare and food security. Rice is the staple crop for more than half the world's population so any reduction in rice blast would have substantial beneficial effects on consumer livelihoods. In 2012, researchers in the US began analyzing the feasibility of creating blast-resistant rice through cisgenic breeding. Correspondingly, our study evaluates the changes in producer, consumer, and environmental welfare, if all the rice produced in the Mid-South of the US were blast resistant through a process like cisgenics, using both international trade and environmental assessment modeling. Our results show that US rice producers would gain 69.34 million dollars annually and increase the rice supply to feed an additional one million consumers globally by eliminating blast from production in the Mid-South. These results suggest that blast alleviation could be even more significant in increasing global food security given that the US is a small rice producer by global standards and likely experiences lower losses from blast than other rice-producing countries because of its ongoing investment in production technology and management. Furthermore, results from our detailed life cycle assessment (LCA) show that producing blast-resistant rice has lower environmental (fossil fuel depletion, ecotoxicity, carcinogenics, eutrophication, acidification, global warming potential, and ozone depletion) impacts per unit of rice than non-blast resistant rice production. Our findings suggest that any reduction in blast via breeding will have significantly positive impacts on reducing global food insecurity through increased supply, as well as decreased price and environmental impacts in production.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis alleviates detrimental effects of saline reclaimed water in lettuce plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Sánchez, J; Nicolás, E; Pedrero, F; Alarcón, J J; Maestre-Valero, J F; Fernández, F

    2014-07-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; Glomus iranicum var. tenuihypharum sp. nova) on the physiological performance and production of lettuce plants grown under greenhouse conditions and supplied with reclaimed water (RW; urban-treated wastewater with high electrical conductivity; 4.19 dS m(-1)). Four treatments, fresh water, fresh water plus AMF inoculation, RW and RW plus AMF inoculation, were applied and their effects, over time, analyzed. Root mycorrhizal colonization, plant biomass, leaf-ion content, stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis were assessed. Overall, our results highlight the significance of the AMF in alleviation of salt stress and their beneficial effects on plant growth and productivity. Inoculated plants increased the ability to acquire N, Ca, and K from both non-saline and saline media. Moreover, mycorrhization significantly reduced Na plant uptake. Under RW conditions, inoculated plants also showed a better performance of physiological parameters such as net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and water-use efficiency than non-mycorrhizal plants. Additionally, the high concentration of nutrients already dissolved in reclaimed water suggested that adjustments in the calculation of the fertigation should be conducted by farmers. Finally, this experiment has proved that mycorrhization could be a suitable way to induce salt stress resistance in iceberg lettuce crops as plants supplied with reclaimed water satisfied minimum legal commercial size thresholds. Moreover, the maximum values of Escherichia coli in the reclaimed water were close to but never exceeded the international thresholds established (Spanish Royal Decree 1620/2007; Italian Decree, 2003) and hence lettuces were apt for sale.

  3. Music-reading training alleviates crowding with musical notation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yetta Kwailing; Wong, Alan C-N

    2016-06-01

    Crowding refers to the disrupted recognition of an object by nearby distractors. Prior work has shown that real-world music-reading experts experience reduced crowding specifically for musical stimuli. However, it is unclear whether music-reading training reduced the magnitude of crowding or whether individuals showing less crowding are more likely to learn and excel in music reading later. To examine the first possibility, we tested whether crowding can be alleviated by music-reading training in the laboratory. Intermediate-level music readers completed 8 hr of music-reading training within 2 weeks. Their threshold duration for reading musical notes dropped by 44.1% after training to a level comparable with that of extant expert music readers. Importantly, crowding was reduced with musical stimuli but not with the nonmusical stimuli Landolt Cs. In sum, the reduced crowding for musical stimuli in expert music readers can be explained by music-reading training.

  4. Gust Load Alleviation with Robust Control for a Flexible Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods for gust alleviation of aircraft are mostly proposed based on a specific flight condition. In this paper, robust control laws are designed for a large flexible wing with uncertainty in Mach number and dynamic pressure. To accurately describe the aeroelastic model over a large flight envelope, a nonlinear parameter-varying model is developed which is a function of both Mach number and dynamic pressure. Then a linear fractional transformation is established accordingly and a modified model order reduction technique is applied to reduce the size of the uncertainty block. The developed model, in which the statistic nature of the gust is considered by using the Dryden power spectral density function, enables the use of μ-synthesis procedures for controller design. The simulations show that the μ controller can always effectively reduce the wing root shear force and bending moment at a given range of Mach number and dynamic pressure.

  5. Alleviation of hysteria in laying hens with dietary tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, S R; Ball, R O

    1990-01-01

    A commercial layer breeder flock that was suffering from hysteria was fed a diet containing 5 grams tryptophan/kg for six days. The incidence of episodes of hysteria declined from five times/hour on day 0 to once/hour on day 6 and none on day 8. Feed consumption increased from 107 g to 145 g/hen/day and egg production increased 23% during the six day feeding period. The tryptophan concentration in plasma doubled (from 95.6 to 188.2 mumol/mL). Plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine also increased. Birds that were not in lay, by postmortem examination, had significantly higher plasma valine concentrations (476.4 vs 372.7 mumol/mL). Tryptophan, serotonin and related metabolites increased in both the hypothalamic region and the remainder of the brain following tryptophan feeding, and subsequently declined. High levels of dietary tryptophan may be useful in alleviating hysteria in poultry. PMID:2357668

  6. STN DBS for Advanced Parkinson Disease Simultaneously Alleviates Cluster Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Huotarinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: STB DBS (deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is commonly used to treat advanced Parkinson disease (PD while posterior hypothalamic DBS for cluster headache (CH remains experimental. Methods: We present a case where a middle-aged man was diagnosed with both CH and PD and received medical treatment for both. The patient was treated with bilateral STN DBS after developing side effects related to L-dopa. Findings: STN DBS not only alleviated PD symptoms but also the CH, and hence the CH treatment could be withdrawn. During follow-up PD progressed but the effect on CH symptoms was sustained. Conclusions: The anatomical proximity of the medial STN and hypothalamus, their similar connectivity via the hyperdirect pathway, and the autonomic effects of STN DBS could explain symptom relief for both PD and CH.

  7. Personality and Coping in Peruvian volunteers for poverty alleviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Gastelumendi Gonçalves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between coping styles and strategies, and personality styles in a sample of 41 young volunteers of an institution that alleviates poverty in Lima. Peruvian adaptations of COPE and MIPS scales were administered. The results show that volunteers have higher scores on adaptive coping strategies. High scores in some particular personality styles were reported, which allowed to establish a personality profile of this group. According with theoretical framework, most coping strategies correlated with most personality styles, revealing four particular tendencies in these volunteers: they wish to have contact with other people, they usually see positive aspects of situations, they look forward for challenges, and they developed adaptive coping strategies.

  8. Aliskiren targets multiple systems to alleviate cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoyi; Guo, Dunwei; Wang, Qiang; You, Song; Qiao, Zhongpeng; Liu, Yong; Dai, Hang; Tang, Hua

    2016-11-01

    To examine the effects of aliskiren, a small-molecule renin inhibitor, on cancer cachexia and to explore the underlying mechanisms. A cancer cachexia model was established by subcutaneously injecting C26 mouse colon carcinoma cells into isogenic BALB/c mice. Aliskiren was administered intragastrically [10 mg/kg body weight (BW)] on day 5 (as a preventive strategy, AP group) or on day 12 (as a therapeutic strategy, AT group) after C26 injection. Mice that received no C26 injection (healthy controls, HC group) or only C26 injection but not aliskiren (cancer, CA group) were used as controls. BW, tumor growth, whole body functions, and survival were monitored daily in half of the mice in each group, whereas serum, tumors, and gastrocnemius muscles were harvested from the other mice after sacrifice on day 20 for further analysis. Aliskiren significantly alleviated multiple cachexia‑associated symptoms, including BW loss, tumor burden, muscle wasting, muscular dysfunction, and shortened survival. On the molecular level, aliskiren antagonized cachexia‑induced activation of the renin‑angiotensin system (RAS), systematic and muscular inflammation, oxidative stress, and autophagy‑lysosome as well as ubiquitin‑proteasome stimulation. In addition, early administration of aliskiren before cachexia development (AP group) resulted in more robust effects in alleviating cachexia or targeting underlying mechanisms than administration after cachexia development (AT group). Aliskiren exhibited potent anti‑cachexia activities. These activities were achieved through the targeting of at least four mechanisms underlying cachexia development: RAS activation, increase in systematic inflammation, upregulation of oxidative stress, and stimulation of autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP).

  9. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-12-01

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  10. 77 FR 43818 - Applications for New Awards; State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Grant Competition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Grant Competition; Reopening the Fiscal Year 2012 Competition AGENCY: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of...

  11. 76 FR 43701 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Tribal State Gaming Compact Process...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Tribal State Gaming Compact Process; Request for Comments AGENCIES: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... Indian Affairs (BIA) is seeking comments on renewal of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for...

  12. Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nominelli, Gregg R.

    2012-12-17

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. The Tribe's Comprehensive Strategic Plan seeks to diversify the Tribal Economy through the creation of alternative energy businesses, such as wind, solar and bio-mass facilities while protecting the waters of Lake Superior, tribal inland lakes and streams. In addition, the Community desired to utilize clean/green energy resources to promote the self-sufficiency of the Tribal Nation. The objective of the study is to preserve our environment and maintain our cultural goals of using the resources of the land wisely. To reduce our consumption of fossil fuels, mercury and carbon dioxide emissions, which harm our water and land; we have decided to evaluate the opportunities of utilizing wind power. Preliminary projections show that we may eliminate pollution from our land in a cost effective manner. This study will evaluate wind capacity and our current energy consumption while projecting the feasibility of converting to wind power for operations at our major facilities. This project will study the feasibility of wind power at two locations for the purpose of reducing the Tribe's reliance upon fossil fuels and creating business opportunities, jobs and revenue for the community.

  13. 77 FR 55860 - Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Indian Affairs will conduct a listening session with... session in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is the sixth in a series of listening sessions held since the beginning of...

  14. 77 FR 71016 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self-Governance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self- Governance Program... Self-Governance Program. The information collection is currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076... comments to Ken Reinfeld, Office of Self-Governance, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Mail Stop 355-G SIB...

  15. 78 FR 75923 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... within the CDC Office of the Director (OD), other CDC Center, Institute, and Office (CIO) leadership... following public health issue topics identified by tribal leaders: Native specimens, behavioral risk factors... director and roundtable discussions with CDC senior leadership, and tribes will have an opportunity to...

  16. 75 FR 10492 - Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative Agreement... Opportunity Description The purpose of the Negotiation Cooperative Agreement is to provide resources to Tribes...)). The Negotiation Cooperative Agreement provides a Tribe with funds to help cover the expenses involved...

  17. Conducting research with tribal communities: sovereignty, ethics, and data-sharing issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Anna; Harper, Barbara; Stone, Dave; O'Neill, Catherine; Berger, Patricia; Harris, Stuart; Donatuto, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    When conducting research with American Indian tribes, informed consent beyond conventional institutional review board (IRB) review is needed because of the potential for adverse consequences at a community or governmental level that are unrecognized by academic researchers. In this article, we review sovereignty, research ethics, and data-sharing considerations when doing community-based participatory health-related or natural-resource-related research with American Indian nations and present a model material and data-sharing agreement that meets tribal and university requirements. Only tribal nations themselves can identify potential adverse outcomes, and they can do this only if they understand the assumptions and methods of the proposed research. Tribes must be truly equal partners in study design, data collection, interpretation, and publication. Advances in protection of intellectual property rights (IPR) are also applicable to IRB reviews, as are principles of sovereignty and indigenous rights, all of which affect data ownership and control. Academic researchers engaged in tribal projects should become familiar with all three areas: sovereignty, ethics and informed consent, and IPR. We recommend developing an agreement with tribal partners that reflects both health-related IRB and natural-resource-related IPR considerations.

  18. It's Time to Talk: Tribal Colleges Tackle Culture of Silence about Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Compared to the general population, American Indians are experiencing an alarmingly increased rate of suicide, which some estimate at 50% higher than other ethnic groups. On the campuses of some tribal colleges, things look equally bleak, with 15% of students reporting that they seriously considered suicide over the past 12 months. While the…

  19. 28 CFR 90.51 - Program criteria for Indian tribal government discretionary grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... strengthening effective law enforcement and prosecution strategies to combat violent crimes against women, and to develop and strengthen victim services in cases involving violent crimes against women. (b... programs, including sexual assault and domestic violence victim services programs. Indian tribal government...

  20. 40 CFR 745.325 - Lead-based paint activities: State and Tribal program requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lead-based paint activities: State and... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES State and Indian Tribal Programs § 745.325 Lead-based paint activities: State and...

  1. Tribal Formulations for Treatment of Pain: A Study of the Bede ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Bedes form one of the largest tribal or indigenous communities in Bangladesh and are popularly known as the boat people or water gypsies because of their preference for living in boats. They travel almost throughout the whole year by boats on the numerous waterways of Bangladesh and earn their livelihood by ...

  2. The Future is Green: Tribal College Saving Water, Electricity--and Money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Gelvin

    2005-01-01

    Tribal colleges and universities around the country are harnessing natural sources of energy on their campuses. Renewable energy and sustainable building design have many advantages--they save money and provide healthier learning and working environments while allowing people to live in greater harmony with the earth. This article discusses…

  3. 75 FR 17745 - Tribal Management Grant Program; Announcement Type: New and Competing Continuation Discretionary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... Assistance Number(s): 93.228. Key Dates: Program Requirements Session: April 21-22 and May 5-6, 2010. Grant..., 2010. Receipt Date for Final Tribal Resolution: October 1, 2010. Review Date: October 4-8, 2010...-638, as amended. This program is described at 93.228 in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance...

  4. Self-Determination in Health Research: An Alaska Native Example of Tribal Ownership and Research Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Y. Hiratsuka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Alaska Native (AN and American Indian (AI people are underrepresented in health research, yet many decline to participate in studies due to past researcher misconduct. Southcentral Foundation (SCF, an Alaska Native-owned and operated health care organization, is transforming the relationship between researchers and the tribal community by making trust and accountability required features of health research in AN/AI communities. In 1998, SCF assumed ownership from the federal government of health services for AN/AI people in south central Alaska and transformed the health system into a relationship-based model of care. This change reimagines how researchers interact with tribal communities and established community oversight of all health research conducted with AN/AI people in the region. We describe the SCF research review process, which requires tribal approval of the research concept, full proposal, and dissemination products, as well as local institutional review board approval, and a researcher-signed contract. This review evaluates research through the lens of tribal principles, practices, and priorities. The SCF example provides a framework for other tribes and organizations seeking to reshape the future of health research in AN/AI communities.

  5. Welfare Eligibility: Programs Treat Indian Tribal Trust Fund Report to Congressional Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report was sought by the Conference Committee on the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985, concerned that federal law allows payments from tribal trust funds to be excluded when determining eligibility for welfare benefits to American Indians. Applicable federal laws and eligibility policies were reviewed to determine the…

  6. 25 CFR 1200.3 - What is the Department's policy on tribal management of trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... trust funds? 1200.3 Section 1200.3 Indians OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN INDIANS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AMERICAN INDIAN TRUST FUND MANAGEMENT REFORM ACT General Provisions § 1200.3 What is the Department's policy on tribal management of trust funds? (a) We will give tribes as much...

  7. Perception of the Effect of Leadership Styles on Organizational Commitment at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Amber M.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if a relationship exists between the perceived leadership style of supervisors and the organizational commitment level of the subordinate employees within Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). Additionally, the study examined whether a difference exists in the organizational commitment levels of TCU…

  8. Building Bridges: Perspectives on Partnership and Collaboration from the US Forest Service Tribal Relations Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Dockry; Sophia A. Gutterman; Mae A. Davenport

    2017-01-01

    American Indian tribes have inherent rights to national forestland and resources codified in treaties, the US Constitution, statutes, Presidential Executive Orders, and case law. These rights require a government-togovernment relationship between each tribe and the US Forest Service (USFS), which recognizes federal trust responsibilities and tribal sovereignty. This is...

  9. 249 The Effect of Inter-tribal Post Election Violence Conflict Trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    result of inter-ethnic conflicts on academic performance among secondary school students in Mt Elgon District, ... Are students who were affected by the inter-tribal conflict likely to seek assistance in counseling? ... traumatic events (PTEs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which indicated that female participants ...

  10. 77 FR 45370 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Gaming; Tribal Revenue Allocation Plans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Gaming; Tribal Revenue Allocation Plans; Gaming on Trust Lands AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request...

  11. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance Annual Report, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenema, David

    2003-03-01

    The Kalispel Tribal hatchery successfully spawned largemouth bass broodfish in spring 2002. Approximately 150,000 eggs were produced and hatched. These fry were started on brine shrimp for a period of ten days. At this time, the fry needed more abundance food supply. Cannibalism started and the hatchery staff transferred the remaining fry to the river in hopes that some fish would survive.

  12. Tribal CCDF Guide to "Financial Management, Grants Administration, and Program Accountability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care Bureau, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Tribal managers and staff working with Federal grants must be fully knowledgeable of all applicable Federal requirements and skilled in applying these requirements to the daily operation of their programs, whether starting a new program or striving to maintain a quality program which meets the intent of the enacting legislation. It is the…

  13. Grants Management Training Materials for Tribal Organizations Learner Manual Module 2: Assistance Agreement Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large part of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s mission is to partner with American Indians and Native Alaskans to protect the environment and public health.The goals of this mission are accomplished by awarding federal funds to Tribal Nations.

  14. 75 FR 26973 - Notice of Public Comment on Tribal Consultation Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start... (including Early Head Start) programs to participate in a formal Consultation Session with OHS leadership... be summarized in the report without attribution, along with topics of concern and recommendations...

  15. Taxation and Indian Sovereignty: A Look at the Matter of Taxation in a State Tribal Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Dolores, Ed.; Cordero, Andreita, Ed.

    Responding to a need expressed by New Mexico American Indian tribal leaders, this document defines and clarifies the status of reservations vis a vis the state's legal authority to impose tax. Divided into two major sections dealing with a current orientation to tax laws and the legal background upon which they are founded, this document also…

  16. Seeds of Mistrust: Tribal and Colonial Perspectives on Education in Chhotanagpur, 1834-circa 1850

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the project of tribal education in the British colonial state in the mid-nineteenth century and the shape into which it developed in Chhotanagpur, an obscure area of east India under the Presidency of Bengal. Known as the "Ruhr of India", it is now the southern part of the State of Jharkhand. Up to the 1840s there…

  17. Nursery manual for native plants: A guide for tribal nurseries - Volume 1: Nursery management

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Tara Luna; Thomas D. Landis

    2009-01-01

    In 2001, the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), through its Virtual Center for Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetics Resources (RNGR), invited Native Americans from across the United States to attend the Western Forest and Conservation Nursery Association annual meeting. About 25 tribal members, representing 20 tribes, attended the meeting at Fort...

  18. 45 CFR 286.75 - What must be included in the Tribal Family Assistance Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... eligibility criteria the Tribe has established, which includes a definition of “needy family,” including income and resource limits and the Tribe's definition of “Tribal member family” or “Indian family.” (2) A...

  19. Self-Determination in Health Research: An Alaska Native Example of Tribal Ownership and Research Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Beans, Julie A; Robinson, Renee F; Shaw, Jennifer L; Sylvester, Ileen; Dillard, Denise A

    2017-10-31

    Alaska Native (AN) and American Indian (AI) people are underrepresented in health research, yet many decline to participate in studies due to past researcher misconduct. Southcentral Foundation (SCF), an Alaska Native-owned and operated health care organization, is transforming the relationship between researchers and the tribal community by making trust and accountability required features of health research in AN/AI communities. In 1998, SCF assumed ownership from the federal government of health services for AN/AI people in south central Alaska and transformed the health system into a relationship-based model of care. This change reimagines how researchers interact with tribal communities and established community oversight of all health research conducted with AN/AI people in the region. We describe the SCF research review process, which requires tribal approval of the research concept, full proposal, and dissemination products, as well as local institutional review board approval, and a researcher-signed contract. This review evaluates research through the lens of tribal principles, practices, and priorities. The SCF example provides a framework for other tribes and organizations seeking to reshape the future of health research in AN/AI communities.

  20. 77 FR 39731 - Swinomish Indian Tribal Community-Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor Legalization, Regulation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... possession, sale and consumption of liquor within the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community's Indian country. This Code allows for the possession and sale of alcoholic beverages within the jurisdiction of the...-277, 67 Stat. 586, 18 U.S.C. 1161, as interpreted by the Supreme Court in Rice v. Rehner, 463 U.S. 713...

  1. Tribal formation on the Ethiopian fringe : toward a history of the 'Tishana'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, J.

    1990-01-01

    This article has two purposes: 1) to provide a first historical outline of the Tishana or Me'en, a small 'tribal' group living in southwestern Ethiopia, and 2) to illustrate the importance of a political economy approach for the explanation of such a process. Inspiration has been derived from the

  2. Creating a Learning Organization for State, Local, and Tribal Law Enforcement to Combat Violent Extremism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    1 B. PROBLEM STATEMENT .............................................................................5 C. RESEARCH...well as my mother, who has been my greatest lifelong proponent—both have provided me with my protective proclivities for every member of our great...part of entry-level or continuing education for state, local, or tribal (SLT) law enforcement personnel; however, currently, state and local law

  3. A Legacy of Sacrifice and Honor: Celebrating Tribal Resilience and Military Service at Haskell Nations University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Jacinta

    2017-01-01

    Haskell Indian Nations University opened 133 years ago, on September 17, 1884, as the U.S. Training and Industrial School--one of three original tribal boarding schools funded by the United States Congress. Three years later the school changed its name to Haskell Institute in honor of Chase Dudley Haskell, a U.S. representative from the Second…

  4. Nutritional and health status of adult women of the Lodha tribal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional and health status of adult women of the Lodha tribal population of Paschim Midnapore, West Bengal, India: Compared with nontribal women. ... The prevalence of anaemia among the Lodha women was very high (91.67%) and approximately five times higher than the women of general communities. Lodha ...

  5. 75 FR 51609 - Classified National Security Information Program for State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... security information shared by the Federal Government with State, local, tribal, and private sector (SLTPS... entity'' as defined in section 2 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 101(11)). (g) ``Private... President [[Page 51609

  6. 75 FR 34752 - Proposed Office of State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Proposed Office of State, Tribal, Local and... them. Consultation is an enhanced form of communication that emphasizes trust, respect, and shared... understanding and comprehension. CDC believes that consultation is integral to a deliberative process that...

  7. Prescription Pattern in the Department of Surgery in A Tribal District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescription Pattern in the Department of Surgery in A Tribal District Hospital of Andhra Pradesh, India. A Khade, MSM Bashir, A Sheethal. Abstract. Background: Usually, surgical management cannot be completed without the use of antimicrobial and analgesic drugs. Irrational prescription may lead to severe postoperative ...

  8. Fighting Eviction : Tribal Land Rights and Research-in-Action | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Fighting Eviction : Tribal Land Rights and Research-in-Action. Couverture du livre Fighting Eviction. Auteur(s) : Daniel Buckles et Rajeev Khedkar. Directeur(s) : Bansi Ghevde et Dnyaneshwar Patil. Maison(s) d'édition : Cambridge University Press India. 3 octobre 2012. ISBN : 9789382264538. 258 pages. L'Inde compte ...

  9. 75 FR 74078 - Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... the Tribal Energy Development Capacity (TEDC) program. Indian tribes, including Alaska Native regional... collection to Ashley Stockdale, Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development... development on Indian land from Indian tribes, including Alaska Native regional and village corporations under...

  10. Fighting Eviction: Tribal Land Rights and Research-in-Action | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    3 oct. 2012 ... It conveys the results of five years of IDRC-funded research on two compelling issues: the land and housing rights of tribal populations, and methods for engaging marginalized people in action research. “It illustrates what it means to do research with people rather than on people,” says co-author Daniel ...

  11. The cumulative MeHg and PCBs exposure and risk of tribal ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies have shown that the U.S. population continues to be exposed to methyl mercury (MeHg) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) due to the long half-life of those environmental contaminants. Fish intake of Tribal populations is much higher than the U.S. general population due to dietary habits and unique cultural practices. Large fish tissue concentration data sets from the Environmental Protections Agency’s (EPA’s) Office of Water, USGS’s EMMMA program, and other data sources, were integrated, analyzed, and combined with recent tribal fish intake data for exposure analyses using the dietary module within EPA’s SHEDS-Multimedia model. SHEDS-Multimedia is a physically-based, probabilistic model, which can simulate cumulative (multiple chemicals) or aggregate (single chemical) exposures over time for a population via various pathways of exposure for a variety of multimedia, multipathway environmental chemicals. Our results show that MeHg and total PCBs exposure of tribal populations from fish are about 3 to 10 and 5 to 15 times higher than the US general population, respectively, and that the estimated exposures pose potential health risks. The cumulative exposures of MeHg and total PCBs will be assessed to generate the joint exposure profiles for Tribal and US general populations. Model sensitivity analyses will identify the important contributions of the cumulative exposures of MeHg and total PCBs such as fish types, locations, and size, and key expos

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among tribal populations of India - Country scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Malay B; Colah, Roshan B; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-05-01

    It is believed that the tribal people, who constitute 8.6 per cent of the total population (2011 census of India), are the original inhabitants of India. Glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked genetic defect, affecting around 400 million people worldwide and is characterized by considerable biochemical and molecular heterogeneity. Deficiency of this enzyme is highly polymorphic in those areas where malaria is/has been endemic. G6PD deficiency was reported from India more than 50 years ago. t0 he prevalence varies from 2.3 to 27.0 per cent with an overall prevalence of 7.7 per cent in different tribal groups. Since the tribal populations live in remote areas where malaria is/has been endemic, irrational use of antimalarial drugs could result in an increased number of cases with drug induced haemolysis. Therefore, before giving antimalarial therapy, routine screening for G6PD deficiency should be undertaken in those tribal communities where its prevalence is high.

  13. Working Together: Wellness and Academic Achievement at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Bonnie; Magarati, Maya; Parker, Myra; Egashira, Leo; Kipp, Billie Jo

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the activities of the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI) at the University of Washington, Washington State, in collaborating with tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to examine alcohol, drug, and mental health issues among Native students. The authors provide first steps for the development of culturally…

  14. 78 FR 27284 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit... 5311(j) of MAP-21, Public Law 112-41 (July 6, 2012), authorizes the Public Transportation on Indian...) Fiscal Year 2013 Public Transportation on Indian Reservation Program: Request for comment, Announcement...

  15. 75 FR 27114 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit... availability of $15,074,963 million in funding provided by the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations.... Overview Section 3013 of SAFETEA-LU, amended 49 U.S.C. 5311(c) by establishing the Public Transportation on...

  16. Negotiating Ojibwe Treaty Rights: Toward a Critical Geopolitics of State-Tribal Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvern, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    In this article the author provides a case study of how differing geographical imaginations are at the center of state-tribal relations in the United States. Specifically, he focuses on the political conflict between the state of Wisconsin and the Wisconsin Ojibwe over the continuing existence and exercise of Ojibwe off-reservation hunting,…

  17. 25 CFR 20.208 - What if the tribal redesign plan leads to increased costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What if the tribal redesign plan leads to increased costs? 20.208 Section 20.208 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES... leads to increased costs? The tribe must meet any increase in cost to the General Assistance program...

  18. Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-06-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  19. 50 CFR 660.385 - Washington coastal tribal fisheries management measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Washington coastal tribal fisheries management measures. 660.385 Section 660.385 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST...

  20. Automated phenotyping of permanent crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeek, K. Thomas; Steddom, Karl; Zamudio, Joseph; Pant, Paras; Mullenbach, Tyler

    2017-05-01

    AGERpoint is defining a new technology space for the growers' industry by introducing novel applications for sensor technology and data analysis to growers of permanent crops. Serving data to a state-of-the-art analytics engine from a cutting edge sensor platform, a new paradigm in precision agriculture is being developed that allows growers to understand the unique needs of each tree, bush or vine in their operation. Autonomous aerial and terrestrial vehicles equipped with multiple varieties of remote sensing technologies give AGERpoint the ability to measure key morphological and spectral features of permanent crops. This work demonstrates how such phenotypic measurements combined with machine learning algorithms can be used to determine the variety of crops (e.g., almond and pecan trees). This phenotypic and varietal information represents the first step in enabling growers with the ability to tailor their management practices to individual plants and maximize their economic productivity.

  1. Faba bean in cropping systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen Jensen, Erik; Peoples, Mark B.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The grain legume (pulse) faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is grown world-wide as a protein source for food and feed. At the same time faba bean offers ecosystem services such as renewable inputs of nitrogen (N) into crops and soil via biological N2 fixation, and a diversification of cropping systems. Even...... though the global average grain yield has almost doubled during the past 50 years the total area sown to faba beans has declined by 56% over the same period. The season-to-season fluctuations in grain yield of faba bean and the progressive replacement of traditional farming systems, which utilized...... legumes to provide N to maintain soil N fertility, with industrialized, largely cereal-based systems that are heavily reliant upon fossil fuels (=N fertilizers, heavy mechanization) are some of the explanations for this decline in importance. Past studies of faba bean in cropping systems have tended...

  2. Crop responses to climatic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porter, John R.; Semenov, Mikhail A.

    2005-01-01

    production. However, crops can respond nonlinearly to changes in their growing conditions, exhibit threshold responses and are subject to combinations of stress factors that affect their growth, development and yield. Thus, climate variability and changes in the frequency of extreme events are important...... sufficient importance when assessing the impact of climate change for food and this is addressed. Using simulation models of wheat, the concentration of grain protein is shown to respond to changes in the mean and variability of temperature and precipitation events. The paper concludes with discussion...... resolution. This paper demonstrates the impacts of climate variability for crop production in a number of crops. Increasing temperature and precipitation variability increases the risks to yield, as shown via computer simulation and experimental studies. The issue of food quality has not been given...

  3. Multi-Crop Specific Area Frame Stratification Based on Geospatial Crop Planting Frequency Data Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boryan, C. G.; Yang, Z.; Willis, P.; Di, L.

    2016-12-01

    Area sampling frames (ASFs) are the basis of many statistical programs around the world. When an ASF's stratification is based on generalized percent cultivation, the ASF usually cannot identify the planting location of specific crops targeted for agricultural surveys. To improve the accuracy, objectivity and efficiency of crop survey estimates, an automated stratification method based on geospatial crop planting frequency data is proposed. The Crop Planting Frequency Data Layers are crop specific geospatial data sets derived from multi-year Cropland Data Layers. Therefore, the ASF stratification based on the crop planting frequency data is crop specific. This paper investigates using 2008-2013 geospatial Crop Frequency Data Layers to create a novel multi-crop specific stratification for South Dakota, U.S. The crop specific ASF stratification is developed based on crop frequency statistics calculated at the primary sampling unit (PSU) level based on the corn, soybean and wheat planting frequency data layers, three major crops in South Dakota. Strata are formed using a k means clustering algorithm. It is observed that the crop frequency based ASF stratification predicts corn, soybean and wheat planting patterns well as verified by 2014 Farm Service Agency (FSA) Common Land Unit (CLU) and 578 administrative data. This finding demonstrates that the novel multi-crop specific stratification based on crop planting frequency data is crop type independent and applicable to all major crops. Further, these results indicate that the new multi-crop specific ASF stratification has great potential to improve ASF accuracy, efficiency and crop estimates.

  4. Validation of crop weather models for crop assessment arid yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Input for the models comprised of weather, crop and soil data collected from five selected stations. Simulation results show that IRSIS model tends to over predict grain yields of maize, sorghum and wheat, a fact that could be attributed to the inadequacy of the model to accurately account for rainfall excess. On the other hand ...

  5. Progress update: crop development of biofortified staple food crops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over the past 15 years, biofortification, the process of breeding nutrients into food crops, has gained ample recognition as a cost-effective, complementary, feasible means of delivering micronutrients to populations that may have limited access to diverse diets, supplements, or commercially fortified foods. In 2008, a panel of ...

  6. Adverse weather impacts on arable cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Damages due to extreme or adverse weather strongly depend on crop type, crop stage, soil conditions and management. The impact is largest during the sensitive periods of the farming calendar, and requires a modelling approach to capture the interactions between the crop, its environment and the occurrence of the meteorological event. The hypothesis is that extreme and adverse weather events can be quantified and subsequently incorporated in current crop models. Since crop development is driven by thermal time and photoperiod, a regional crop model was used to examine the likely frequency, magnitude and impacts of frost, drought, heat stress and waterlogging in relation to the cropping season and crop sensitive stages. Risk profiles and associated return levels were obtained by fitting generalized extreme value distributions to block maxima for air humidity, water balance and temperature variables. The risk profiles were subsequently confronted with yields and yield losses for the major arable crops in Belgium, notably winter wheat, winter barley, winter oilseed rape, sugar beet, potato and maize at the field (farm records) to regional scale (statistics). The average daily vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and reference evapotranspiration (ET0) during the growing season is significantly lower (p methodology of defining meteorological risks and subsequently relating the risk to the cropping calendar will be demonstrated for major arable crops in Belgium. Physically based crop models assist in understanding the links between adverse weather events, sensitive crop stages and crop damage. Financial support was obtained from Belspo under research contract SD/RI/03A.

  7. Prevalence of diabetes and hypertension among a tribal population in Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Radhakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes and hypertension is affecting at an alarming rate in both rural and urban populations in India and very few studies had been carried out among the tribal population. Objective: To determine the prevalence rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension and its associated risk factors among the tribal population in Salem District in Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: A total of about 525 tribal population above 40 years of age from various tribal places in Yercaud. All of them were screened for diabetes, by checking the random blood glucose levels and blood pressure, body mass index, dietary patterns, and physical activity levels were also recorded. Their knowledge about diabetes was also assessed by a set of 10 questions. Results: Among the study population, people who had RBS ΃ 200 was 28 (male = 11 and female = 17 and between 140 and 200 were 39 (male = 18 and female = 21 and people whose were in the prehypertensive stage was 185 (males 92 and female 93 and people in the stage 1 hypertension was 102 (male = 47 and female = 54 and in stage 2 hypertension was 64 (male = 33 and female = 29. The co-morbidity (diabetes and hypertension was present in among 45 (male = 25 and female = 20. Among the study population only 1 was obese and 39 were overweight. Among the various risk factors smoking, alcohol and positive family history were found to have a statistical significant association for males whereas among females only the family history was found to have a statistically significant association for both diabetes and hypertension. The knowledge of diabetes among the study population was very poor. None of them were aware about the normal levels of blood sugar and the risk factors. Conclusion: The study documented that the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension is increasingly high in the tribal areas and their awareness levels were very poor.

  8. Prevalence of anemia among tribal women of reproductive age in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Kamath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Anaemia is a major public health problem in India. Many studies have emphasized on prevalence of anaemia among general population. This study has focussed to address the prevalence of anaemia among the tribal population in Udupi taluk. Anaemia among women in the reproductive age group is one of the causes for maternal morbidity and mortality in India. Aim: To estimate the prevalence of anemia among tribal women (aged 15 to 49 years. Settings and Design: A Community based cross sectional study was conducted among tribal women aged 14-49 years in Udupi taluk, Udupi district, Karnataka. Methods and Material: A cross sectional study during July 2012 to August 2012 was conducted. A sample size of 170 was calculated taking into consideration a relative error of 15% and the prevalence of anemia in Karnataka as 51% (as per the NFHS-3. Statistical analysis used: Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to analyse the data using SPSS 15. Results: The study sample had a mean hemoglobin value of 11.3 g/dL with 95% CI of (11 - 11.6, with a standard deviation of 2g/dL. The study reveals that in the sample of tribal women in the age group of 15-49 years, the prevalence of anemia was 55.9%. Among the subjects, 6 (3.5% were severely anemic, 33 (19.4% were moderately anemic and 56 (32.9% were mildly anemic. Conclusions: This study calls for an appropriate action and intervention in this tribal population to treat and prevent anaemia.

  9. Emergence of dengue in tribal villages of Mandla district, Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, P V; Shukla, M K; Kori, B K; Chand, G; Jain, L; Varun, B M; Dutta, D; Baruah, K; Singh, Neeru

    2015-05-01

    Dengue (DEN) is a rapidly spreading arboviral disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Although it is endemic in India, dengue virus (DENV) infection has not been reported from tribal areas of Madhya Pradesh. Investigations were conducted to establish the aetiology of sudden upsurge of cases with febrile illness in June 2013 from tribal villages of Mandla district of Madhya Pradesh, India. The rapid response team of the National Institute for Research in Tribal Health, Jabalpur, conducted clinical investigations and field surveys to collect the samples from suspected cases. Samples were tested using molecular and serological tools. Collected mosquitoes were identified and tested for the presence of virus using semi nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR). The sequences were analysed to identify serotype and genotype of the virus. Of the 648 samples collected from 18 villages of Mandla, 321 (49.53%) were found to be positive for dengue. The nRT-PCR and sequencing confirmed the aetiology as dengue virus type 2. Eighteen per cent of patients needed hospitalization and five deaths were attributed to dengue. The virus was also detected from Aedes aegypti mosquito, which was incriminated as a vector. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the dengue virus 2 detected belonged to cosmopolitan genotype of the virus. Dengue virus serotype 2 was detected as the aetiological agent in the outbreak in tribal villages of Mandla district of Madhya Pradesh. Conducive man-made environment favouring mosquitogenic conditions and seeding of virus could be the probable reasons for this outbreak. Urgent attention is needed to control this new threat to tribal population, which is already overburdened with other vector borne diseases.

  10. Strigolactones Improve Plant Growth, Photosynthesis, and Alleviate Oxidative Stress under Salinity in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. by Regulating Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. is a very important edible oil crop in the world, and the production is inhibited by abiotic stresses, such as salinity. Plant hormones can alleviate the stress by regulating the physiological processes and gene expression. To study the plant responses to salinity in combination with GR24, a synthesized strigolactone, the oilseed rape variety (Zhongshuang 11 replications were grown in the pots in a controlled growth chamber under three levels of salinity (0, 100, and 200 mM NaCl and 0.18 μM GR24 treatments at the seedling stage for 7 days. The results showed that salinity depressed the shoots and roots growth, whereas GR24 improved the growth under salt stress. Leaf chlorophyll contents and gas exchange parameters (net photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, and transpiration rate were also reduced significantly with increasing salinity, and these effects could be partially reversed by GR24 application. Additionally, GR24 treatment significantly increased and decreased the photosystem II quantum yield and non-photochemical quenching, respectively, under salinity stress conditions. The activities of peroxidase and superoxide dismutase increased, and lipid peroxidation measured by the level of malondialdehyde reduced due to GR24 application. The transcriptome analysis of root and shoot was conducted. Three hundred and forty-two common differentially expressed genes (DEGs after GR24 treatment and 166 special DEGs after GR24 treatment under salinity stress were identified in root and shoot. The DEGs in root were significantly more than that in shoot. Quantitative PCR validated that the stress alleviation was mainly related to the gene expression of tryptophan metabolism, plant hormone signal transduction, and photosynthesis.

  11. Recent advances in fruit crop genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang XU,Chaoyang LIU,Manosh Kumar BISWAS,Zhiyong PAN,Xiuxin DENG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, dramatic progress has been made in the genomics of fruit crops. The publication of a dozen fruit crop genomes represents a milestone for both functional genomics and breeding programs in fruit crops. Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have revolutionized the manner and scale of genomics in fruit crops. Research on fruit crops is encompassing a wide range of biological questions which are unique and cannot be addressed in a model plant such as Arabidopsis. This review summarizes recent achievements of research on the genome, transcriptome, proteome, miRNAs and epigenome of fruit crops.

  12. Economic impact of GM crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham; Barfoot, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A key part of any assessment of the global value of crop biotechnology in agriculture is an examination of its economic impact at the farm level. This paper follows earlier annual studies which examined economic impacts on yields, key costs of production, direct farm income and effects, and impacts on the production base of the four main crops of soybeans, corn, cotton and canola. The commercialization of genetically modified (GM) crops has continued to occur at a rapid rate, with important changes in both the overall level of adoption and impact occurring in 2012. This annual updated analysis shows that there have been very significant net economic benefits at the farm level amounting to $18.8 billion in 2012 and $116.6 billion for the 17-year period (in nominal terms). These economic gains have been divided roughly 50% each to farmers in developed and developing countries. GM technology have also made important contributions to increasing global production levels of the four main crops, having added 122 million tonnes and 230 million tonnes respectively, to the global production of soybeans and maize since the introduction of the technology in the mid-1990s. PMID:24637520

  13. Papaya: environment and crop physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is a principal horticultural crop of tropical and subtropical regions. Knowledge of how papaya responds to environmental factors provides a scientific basis for the development of management strategies to optimize fruit yield and quality. A better understanding of genotyp...

  14. Water, heat and crop growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feddes, R.A.

    1971-01-01

    To a large extent the results of a farmer's efforts to get higher crop yields will be determined by the prevailing environmental conditions, i.e. by the existing complex of physical, chemical and biological factors. The possibilities of an efficient use of these factors are enlarged by our

  15. Botrytis species on bulb crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorbeer, J.W.; Seyb, A.M.; Boer, de M.; Ende, van den J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. A number of Botrytis species are pathogens of bulb crops. Botrytis squamosa (teleomorph= Botrytotinia squamosa) causal agent of botrytis leaf blight and B. allii the causal agent of botrytis neck rot are two of the most important fungal diseases of onion. The taxonomics of several of the

  16. Defining and identifying crop landraces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camacho Villa, T.C.; Maxted, N.; Scholten, M.; Ford-Lloyd, B.

    2005-01-01

    Awareness of the need for biodiversity conservation is now universally accepted, but most often recent conservation activities have focused on wild species. Crop species and the diversity between and within them has significant socioeconomic as well as heritage value. The bulk of genetic diversity

  17. A Neglected Crop in Ghana.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    during germplasm collection trips on cultivation and uses are also presented. Key words: African yam bean, food security, germplasm, Ghana, legume, neglected crop. Introduction. African yam bean (Sphenostylis stenocarpa Hochst ex A. Rich) is a herba- ceous leguminous plant occurring throughout tropical Africa (Porter ...

  18. Biomass energy utilization in rural areas may contribute to alleviating energy crisis and global warming: A case study in a typical agro-village of Shandong, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y.H. [State Key Laboratory of Quantitative Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 Nanxincun, Xiangshan, Beijing 100093 (China); Li, Z.F. [State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, College of Agronomy, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China); Taishan Academy of Science and Technology, Tai' an, Shandong 271000 (China); Feng, S.F.; Wu, G.L.; Li, Y.; Li, C.H. [State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, College of Agronomy, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China); Lucas, M. [Rheinisch-Westfalisch Technische Hochschule, Aachen University, Aachen 52070 (Germany); Jiang, G.M. [State Key Laboratory of Quantitative Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 Nanxincun, Xiangshan, Beijing 100093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, College of Agronomy, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A biomass energy exploration experiment was conducted in Jiangjiazhuang, a typical agro-village in Shandong, China from 2005 to 2009. The route of this study was designed as an agricultural circulation as: crops {yields} crop residues {yields} ''Bread'' forage {yields} cattle {yields} cattle dung {yields} biogas digester {yields} biogas/digester residues {yields} green fertilizers {yields} crops. About 738.8 tons of crop residues are produced in this village each year. In 2005, only two cattle were fed in this village and 1.1% of the crop residues were used as forage. About 38.5% crop residues were used for livelihood energy, 24.5% were discarded and 29.7% were directly burned in the field. Not more than three biogas digesters were built and merely 2250 m{sup 3} biogas was produced a year relative to saving 1.6 tons standard coal and equivalent to reducing 4.3 tons CO{sub 2} emission. A total of US$ 4491 profits were obtained from cattle benefit, reducing fossil energies/chemical fertilizer application and increasing crop yield. After 5 years experiment, cattle capita had raised gradually up to 146 and some 62.3% crop residues were used as forage. The percentages used as livelihood energy, discarded and burned in the field decreased to 16.3%, 9.2% and 9.8%, respectively. Biogas digesters increased to 123 and 92,250 m{sup 3} biogas was fermented equal to saving 65.9 tons standard coal and reducing 177.9 tons CO{sub 2} emission. In total US$ 60,710 profits were obtained in 2009. In addition, about 989.9 tons green fertilizers were produced from biogas digesters and applied in croplands. The results suggested that livestock and biogas projects were promising strategies to consume the redundant agricultural residues, offer livelihood energy and increase the villagers' incomes. Biogas production and utilization could effectively alleviate energy crisis and CO{sub 2} emission, which might be a great contribution to reach the affirmatory carbon

  19. Active gust load alleviation system for flexible aircraft: Mixed feedforward/feedback approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mushfiqul; Hromcik, Martin; Hanis, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight flexible blended-wing-body (BWB) aircraft concept seems as a highly promising configuration for future high capacity airliners which suffers from reduced stiffness for disturbance loads such as gusts. A robust feedforward gust load alleviation system (GLAS) was developed to alleviate ...

  20. Role of melatonin in alleviating cold stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Vikramjit S; Shukla, Mukund R; Sherif, Sherif M; Murch, Susan J; Saxena, Praveen K

    2014-04-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has been implicated in abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in plants. However, information on the effects of melatonin in cold-stress tolerance in vivo is limited. In this study, the effect of melatonin was investigated in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana challenged with a cold stress at 4⁰C for 72 and 120 hr. Melatonin-treated plants (10 and 30 μm) had significantly higher fresh weight, primary root length, and shoot height compared with the nontreated plants. To aid in the understanding of the role of melatonin in alleviating cold stress, we investigated the effects of melatonin treatment on the expression of cold-related genes. Melatonin up-regulated the expression of C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought Response Element Binding factors (DREBs), a cold-responsive gene, COR15a, a transcription factor involved in freezing and drought-stress tolerance CAMTA1 and transcription activators of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related antioxidant genes, ZAT10 and ZAT12, following cold stress. The up-regulation of cold signaling genes by melatonin may stimulate the biosynthesis of cold-protecting compounds and contribute to the increased growth of plants treated with exogenous melatonin under cold stress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.