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Sample records for critical angular velocity

  1. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  2. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel B Snider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly-tunable wing-steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuro-mechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  3. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Samuel B; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  4. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-09-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics classrooms, the direction of an angular velocity vector is taught by the right-hand rule, a mnemonic tool intended to aid memory. A setup constructed for instructional purposes may provide students with a more easily understood and concrete method to observe the direction of the angular velocity. This article attempts to demonstrate the angular velocity vector using the observable motion of a screw mounted to a remotely operated toy car.

  5. Interferometric measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the measurement of the angular velocity of walking humans using a millimeter-wave correlation interferometer. Measurement of the angular velocity of moving objects is a desirable function in remote sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques, however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of-arrival estimation algorithms. A new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry has recently been developed which measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency of the interferometer signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. In this paper, the theory of the interferometric measurement of angular velocity is covered and simulations of the response of a walking human are presented. Simulations are produced using a model of a walking human to show the significant features associated with the interferometer response, which may be used in classification algorithms.

  6. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics…

  7. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  8. Spacecraft Angular Velocity Estimation Algorithm Based on Orientation Quaternion Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The spacecraft (SC mission involves providing the appropriate orientation and stabilization of the associated axes in space. One of the main sources of information for the attitude control system is the angular rate sensor blocks. One way to improve a reliability of the system is to provide a back up of the control algorithms in case of failure of these blocks. To solve the problem of estimation of SP angular velocity vector in the inertial system of coordinates with a lack of information from the angular rate sensors is supposed the use of orientation data from the star sensors; in this case at each clock of the onboard digital computer. The equations in quaternions are used to describe the kinematics of rotary motion. Their approximate solution is used to estimate the angular velocity vector. Methods of modal control and multi-dimensional decomposition of a control object are used to solve the problem of observation and identification of the angular rates. These methods enabled us to synthesize the SP angular velocity vector estimation algorithm and obtain the equations, which relate the error quaternion with the calculated estimate of the angular velocity. Mathematical modeling was carried out to test the algorithm. Cases of different initial conditions were simulated. Time between orientation quaternion measurements and angular velocity of the model was varied. The algorithm was compared with a more accurate algorithm, built on more complete equations. Graphs of difference in angular velocity estimation depending on the number of iterations are presented. The difference in angular velocity estimation is calculated from results of the synthesized algorithm and the algorithm for more accurate equations. Graphs of error distribution for angular velocity estimation with initial conditions being changed are also presented, and standard deviations of estimation errors are calculated. The synthesized algorithm is inferior in accuracy assessment to

  9. Measuring average angular velocity with a smartphone magnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pili, Unofre; Violanda, Renante

    2018-02-01

    The angular velocity of a spinning object is, by standard, measured using a device called a tachometer. However, by directly using it in a classroom setting, the activity is likely to appear as less instructive and less engaging. Indeed, some alternative classroom-suitable methods for measuring angular velocity have been presented. In this paper, we present a further alternative that is smartphone-based, making use of the real-time magnetic field (simply called B-field in what follows) data gathering capability of the B-field sensor of the smartphone device as the timer for measuring average rotational period and average angular velocity. The in-built B-field sensor in smartphones has already found a number of uses in undergraduate experimental physics. For instance, in elementary electrodynamics, it has been used to explore the well-known Bio-Savart law and in a measurement of the permeability of air.

  10. Alignment of angular velocity sensors for a vestibular prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DiGiovanna Jack

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vestibular prosthetics transmit angular velocities to the nervous system via electrical stimulation. Head-fixed gyroscopes measure angular motion, but the gyroscope coordinate system will not be coincident with the sensory organs the prosthetic replaces. Here we show a simple calibration method to align gyroscope measurements with the anatomical coordinate system. We benchmarked the method with simulated movements and obtain proof-of-concept with one healthy subject. The method was robust to misalignment, required little data, and minimal processing.

  11. Critical velocity experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, R. B.

    1988-01-01

    Published data from active space experiments designed to demonstrate the Alfven critical-velocity effect are compiled in graphs and compared with the predictions of numerical simulations. It is found that the discrepancies in the ionization yields obtained in shaped-charge releases of alkali metals are related to the macroscopic limits of time and energy in such releases. It is argued that the total ionization yield is an inadequate measure of the critical-velocity effect, and a new criterion based on eta, the efficiency of energy transfer from the recently ionized neutrals to a heated electron population, is proposed: the effect would be verified if eta values of 10 percent or greater were observed.

  12. Phase Resolved Angular Velocity Control of Cross Flow Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Cross flow turbines have a number of operational advantages for the conversion of kinetic energy in marine or fluvial currents, but they are often less efficient than axial flow devices. Here a control scheme is presented in which the angular velocity of a cross flow turbine with two straight blades is prescribed as a function of azimuthal blade position, altering the time-varying effective angle of attack. Flume experiments conducted with a scale model turbine show approximately an 80% increase in turbine efficiency versus optimal constant angular velocity and constant resistive torque control schemes. Torque, drag, and lateral forces on one- and two-bladed turbines are analyzed and interpreted with bubble flow visualization to develop a simple model that describes the hydrodynamics responsible for the observed increase in mean efficiency. Challenges associated with implementing this control scheme on commercial-scale devices are discussed. If solutions are found, the performance increase presented here may impact the future development of cross flow turbines.

  13. A Computational Technique to Determine the Angular Displacement, Velocity and Momentum of a Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, James G.; Wilson, Barry D.

    The angular momentum of a human body derived from both the angular velocity and angular displacement, utilizing cinematographic records has not been adequately assessed, prior to this study. Miller (1970) obtained the angular momentum but only during the airborne phase of activity. The method used by Ramey (1973) involved a force platform, but…

  14. Changing law of launching pitching angular velocity of rotating missile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide accurate launching pitching angular velocity (LPAV for the exterior trajectory optimization design, multi-flexible body dynamics (MFBD technology is presented to study the changing law of LPAV of the rotating missile based on spiral guideway. An MFBD virtual prototype model of the rotating missile launching system is built using multi-body dynamics modeling technology based on the built flexible body models of key components and the special force model. The built model is verified with the frequency spectrum analysis. With the flexible body contact theory and nonlinear theory of MFBD technology, the research is conducted on the influence of a series of factors on LPAV, such as launching angle change, clearance between launching canister and missile, thrust change, thrust eccentricity and mass eccentricity, etc. Through this research, some useful values of the key design parameters which are difficult to be measured in physical tests are obtained. Finally, a simplified mathematical model of the changing law of LPAV is presented through fitting virtual test results using the linear regression method and verified by physical flight tests. The research results have important significance for the exterior trajectory optimization design.

  15. Task Space Angular Velocity Blending for Real-Time Trajectory Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Richard A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is embodied in a method of controlling a robot manipulator moving toward a target frame F(sub 0) with a target velocity v(sub 0) including a linear target velocity v and an angular target velocity omega(sub 0) to smoothly and continuously divert the robot manipulator to a subsequent frame F(sub 1) by determining a global transition velocity v(sub 1), the global transition velocity including a linear transition velocity v(sub 1) and an angular transition velocity omega(sub 1), defining a blend time interval 2(tau)(sub 0) within which the global velocity of the robot manipulator is to be changed from a global target velocity v(sub 0) to the global transition velocity v(sub 1) and dividing the blend time interval 2(tau)(sub 0) into discrete time segments (delta)t. During each one of the discrete time segments delta t of the blend interval 2(tau)(sub 0), a blended global velocity v of the manipulator is computed as a blend of the global target velocity v(sub 0) and the global transition velocity v(sub 1), the blended global velocity v including a blended angular velocity omega and a blended linear velocity v, and then, the manipulator is rotated by an incremental rotation corresponding to an integration of the blended angular velocity omega over one discrete time segment (delta)t.

  16. Critical Landau Velocity in Helium Nanodroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, N.B.; Smolarek, S.; Loginov, E.; Mateo, D.; Hernando, A.; Pi, M.; Barranco, M.; Buma, W.J.; Drabbels, M.

    2013-01-01

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective

  17. Intracycle angular velocity control of cross-flow turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven L.; Polagye, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, are attractive for power generation from wind and water currents. Some cross-flow turbine designs optimize unsteady fluid forces and maximize power output by controlling blade kinematics within one rotation. One established method is to dynamically pitch the blades. Here we introduce a mechanically simpler alternative: optimize the turbine rotation rate as a function of angular blade position. We demonstrate experimentally that this approach results in a 59% increase in power output over standard control methods. Analysis of fluid forcing and blade kinematics suggest that power increase is achieved through modification of the local flow conditions and alignment of fluid force and rotation rate extrema. The result is a low-speed, structurally robust turbine that achieves high efficiency and could enable a new generation of environmentally benign turbines for renewable power generation.

  18. Satellite Angular Velocity Estimation Based on Star Images and Optical Flow Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarmine Fasano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components.

  19. Satellite angular velocity estimation based on star images and optical flow techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Accardo, Domenico; Grassi, Michele

    2013-09-25

    An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components.

  20. India plate angular velocity and contemporary deformation rates from continuous GPS measurements from 1996 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jade, Sridevi; Shrungeshwara, T S; Kumar, Kireet; Choudhury, Pallabee; Dumka, Rakesh K; Bhu, Harsh

    2017-09-12

    We estimate a new angular velocity for the India plate and contemporary deformation rates in the plate interior and along its seismically active margins from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from 1996 to 2015 at 70 continuous and 3 episodic stations. A new India-ITRF2008 angular velocity is estimated from 30 GPS sites, which include stations from western and eastern regions of the plate interior that were unrepresented or only sparsely sampled in previous studies. Our newly estimated India-ITRF2008 Euler pole is located significantly closer to the plate with ~3% higher angular velocity than all previous estimates and thus predicts more rapid variations in rates and directions along the plate boundaries. The 30 India plate GPS site velocities are well fit by the new angular velocity, with north and east RMS misfits of only 0.8 and 0.9 mm/yr, respectively. India fixed velocities suggest an approximate of 1-2 mm/yr intra-plate deformation that might be concentrated along regional dislocations, faults in Peninsular India, Kachchh and Indo-Gangetic plain. Relative to our newly-defined India plate frame of reference, the newly estimated velocities for 43 other GPS sites along the plate margins give insights into active deformation along India's seismically active northern and eastern boundaries.

  1. Critical Landau velocity in helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Nils B; Smolarek, Szymon; Loginov, Evgeniy; Mateo, David; Hernando, Alberto; Pi, Marti; Barranco, Manuel; Buma, Wybren J; Drabbels, Marcel

    2013-10-11

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective excitations of the helium atoms in the liquid. In the present work we determine to what extent this concept can still be applied to nanometer-scale, finite size helium systems. To this end, atoms and molecules embedded in helium nanodroplets of various sizes are accelerated out of the droplets by means of optical excitation, and the speed distributions of the ejected particles are determined. The measurements reveal the existence of a critical velocity in these systems, even for nanodroplets consisting of only a thousand helium atoms. Accompanying theoretical simulations based on a time-dependent density functional description of the helium confirm and further elucidate this experimental finding.

  2. A Missile-Borne Angular Velocity Sensor Based on Triaxial Electromagnetic Induction Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to solve the problem of the limited measuring range for angular motion parameters of high-speed rotating projectiles in the field of guidance and control, a self-adaptive measurement method for angular motion parameters based on the electromagnetic induction principle is proposed. First, a framework with type bent “I-shape” is used to design triaxial coils in a mutually orthogonal way. Under the condition of high rotational speed of a projectile, the induction signal of the projectile moving across a geomagnetic field is acquired by using coils. Second, the frequency of the pulse signal is adjusted self-adaptively. Angular velocity and angular displacement are calculated in the form of periodic pulse counting and pulse accumulation, respectively. Finally, on the basis of that principle prototype of the sensor is researched and developed, performance of measuring angular motion parameters are tested on the sensor by semi-physical and physical simulation experiments, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the sensor has a wide measuring range of angular velocity from 1 rps to 100 rps with a measurement error of less than 0.3%, and the angular displacement measurement error is lower than 0.2°. The proposed method satisfies measurement requirements for high-speed rotating projectiles with an extremely high dynamic range of rotational speed and high precision, and has definite value to engineering applications in the fields of attitude determination and geomagnetic navigation.

  3. Resolving Two Dimensional Angular Velocity within a Rotary Tumbler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminiak, Nathaniel; Helminiak, David; Cariapa, Vikram; Borg, John

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a horizontally oriented cylindrical tumbler, filled at variable depth with cylindrical media, was rotated at various constant speeds. A monoplane layer of media was photographed with a high-speed camera and images were post processed with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) algorithms in order to resolve both the translational and rotational flow fields. Although the translational velocity fields have been well characterized, contemporary resources enabled the ability to expand upon and refine data regarding rotational characteristics of particles within a rotary tumbler. The results indicate that particles rotate according to intermittent no-slip interactions between the particles and solid body rotation. Particles within the bed, not confined to solid body rotation, exhibited behavior indicative of gearing between particles; each reacting to the tangential component of contact forming rotation chains. Furthermore, it was observed that solid body interactions corresponded to areas of confined motion, as areas of high interaction dissuaded no-slip rotation, while areas of developing flow tended towards no-slip rotation. Special thanks to: NASA Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium Program as well as Marquette University OPUS College of Engineering.

  4. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-09-18

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  5. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Pasciuto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  6. Effect of grain size and angularity on seismic velocity in unconsolidated sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvardoost, R.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Bonal, N.; Patterson, D.

    2016-12-01

    Near surface seismic interpretation of weathering profiles in crystalline rock assumes a seismic response controlled by multiple factors, including mineral grain shape, size distribution, packing, composition, burial depth and pore fluids. In particular, we consider experimentally in the lab, the role particle angularity and grain size may play in the observed P-wave velocity. We estimate P-wave velocity in 'sand' boxes (0.49 × 0.35 × 0.25 m) that contain homogeneous, angular, crushed, quartz sand and silt of 8 different mean grain sizes, ranging from 0.04 to 1.2 mm, as well as a glass-bead reference case. We use an in-house, calibrated, piezo-ceramic stack as a seismic source and a piezo-electric-film as a sensor (1- 5 kHz). In dry conditions, preliminary results imply a power-law relationship between Vp and average angular grain size and a larger transmission velocity for the rounded beads, despite their lower moduli. We consider a modified Biot model as well as the Hertz-Mindlin model to predict seismic velocity in angular quartz of different grain sizes and fluid content.

  7. Anomalous Resistance in Critical Ionization Velocity Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Badin, V. I.

    2001-01-01

    To describe the generation of the electric field by a discontinuity of the Hall current, an equation of the third order is obtained using the electric charge conservation and Ohm laws. The solutions of this equation are used to model the electric impulses detected in experiments aimed to verify Alfven's hypothesis on the critical ionization velocity at collisions of neutral gas with magnetized plasma. A quantitative agreement with experiment is attained and the main features of measured signa...

  8. Critical velocity in swimmers of different ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzato, Alex; Marcolin, Giuseppe; Rubini, Alessandro; Olivato, Nicola; Fava, Simone; Paoli, Antonio; Bosco, Gerardo

    2017-06-08

    In swimming one of the most employed training speed among coaches is the non-invasive Theoretical Critical Velocity (TCV) defined as the velocity that can be maintained continuously without exhaustion. We calculated the 4mmol/L lactate Critical Velocity (MCV) in a group of swimmers of different ages (Young, Elite and Master), and compared results to the predicted TCV defined starting from the 200 and 400 m freestyle best seasonal performances. A steady-state test consisted in 20 repetitions of 100 m each was performed to study the effect of the imposed MCV in the three athletes' categories. TCV mean values resulted slightly higher than MCV mean values. A strong correlation between TCV and MCV was found considering the whole sample (r= 0.96, p test was 4.2 mmol/l, 3.3 mmol/l and 4.9 mmol/l respectively for Young, Elite and Master groups. TCV is a reliable, practical and quick parameter that well approximate the anaerobic threshold pace. MCV underestimated the fixed 4mmol/L lactate threshold pace in the elite swimmers and overestimate it in the master swimmers. Further investigation is needed to understand more in detail TCV applicability for athletes of different ages.

  9. Test-retest reliability of lower limb isokinetic endurance in COPD: A comparison of angular velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fernanda; Lépine, Pierre-Alexis; Garceau-Bolduc, Corine; Coats, Valérie; Allard, Étienne; Maltais, François; Saey, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the test-retest reliability of quadriceps isokinetic endurance testing at two knee angular velocities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). After one familiarization session, 14 patients with moderate to severe COPD (mean age 65±4 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) 55%±18% predicted) performed two quadriceps isokinetic endurance tests on two separate occasions within a 5-7-day interval. Quadriceps isokinetic endurance tests consisted of 30 maximal knee extensions at angular velocities of 90° and 180° per second, performed in random order. Test-retest reliability was assessed for peak torque, muscle endurance, work slope, work fatigue index, and changes in FEV1 for dyspnea and leg fatigue from rest to the end of the test. The intraclass correlation coefficient, minimal detectable change, and limits of agreement were calculated. High test-retest reliability was identified for peak torque and muscle total work at both velocities. Work fatigue index was considered reliable at 90° per second but not at 180° per second. A lower reliability was identified for dyspnea and leg fatigue scores at both angular velocities. Despite a limited sample size, our findings support the use of a 30-maximal repetition isokinetic muscle testing procedure at angular velocities of 90° and 180° per second in patients with moderate to severe COPD. Endurance measurement (total isokinetic work) at 90° per second was highly reliable, with a minimal detectable change at the 95% confidence level of 10%. Peak torque and fatigue index could also be assessed reliably at 90° per second. Evaluation of dyspnea and leg fatigue using the modified Borg scale of perceived exertion was poorly reliable and its clinical usefulness is questionable. These results should be useful in the design and interpretation of future interventions aimed at improving muscle endurance in COPD.

  10. The validity of an assessment of maximum angular velocity of knee extension (KE) using a gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Takeshi; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shiba, Yoshitaka; Omuro, Kazuya; Inaba, Yasuko; Kojima, Motonaga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is more important to assess the muscular power of the lower extremities than the strength, no simplified method for doing so has been found. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the assessment of the angular velocity of KE using a gyroscope. Participants included 105 community-dwelling older people (55 women, 50 men, age ± standard deviation (SD) 75±5.3). Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationships between the angular velocity of KE and functional performance measurements, a self-efficacy scale and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The data from the gyroscope were significantly correlated with some physical functions such as muscle strength (r=0.304, pgyroscope could be a feasible and meaningful measurement in the geriatrics field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A magnetospheric critical velocity experiment - Particle results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, R. B.; Newell, P. T.

    1986-01-01

    In March of 1983, a barium injection sounding rocket experiment (The Star of Lima) was conducted to investigate Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) hypothesis in space. Included in the instrumented payload was a particle detection experiment consisting of five retarding potential analyzers. Despite conditions that appeared to be optimal for the critical velocity effect, the particle data, in agreement with optical observations, indicates that a fractional ionization of only approximately .0005 was observed, indicating that the conditions required for the effect to occur are still not well understood. However many of the required phenomena associated with the CIV effect were observed; in particular a superthermal electron population was formed at the expense of ion drift kinetic energy in the presence of intense electrostatic waves near the lower hybrid frequency. The amount of ionization produced is plausibly consistent with the observed electron flux, but could also be accounted for by residual solar UV at the injection point. It is shown based on the data set that one obvious explanation for the low ionization efficiency, namely that the ionizing superthermal electrons may rapidly escape along field lines, can be ruled out.

  12. Do isokinetic angular velocity and contraction types affect the predictors of different anaerobic power tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapici, Aysegul; Findikoglu, Gulin; Dundar, Ugur

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the most important predictor isokinetic muscle strength determined by different angular velocities and contraction types (i.e. concentric and eccentric) for selected anaerobic power tests in volleyball players. Twenty male and ten female amateur volleyball players participated in this study. Selected anaerobic power tests included Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT), squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ). Peak torque values were obtained at 60, 120, 240˚/s for concentric contraction of quadriceps (Qconc) and Hamstring (Hconc) and at 60˚/s for eccentric contraction of quadriceps (Qecc) and Hconc. Moderate to good correlations (r:0.409 to r:0.887) were found between anaerobic tests and isokinetic data including peak torque and total work of both Hconc and Qconc at 60, 120, 240°/s and Qecc at 60°/s (Pstrength of the relation increases with increasing angular velocity. However, both Qecc and Hconc were significant indicators for CMJ and SJ. Training with higher isokinetic angular velocities and with eccentric contraction is desirable in a training program that has a goal of improving anaerobic performance in volleyball players.

  13. On the connection between energy velocity, reverberation time and angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanzial, Domenico; Schiffrer, Giuliano

    2010-03-01

    The decay of a steady acoustic field in an enclosure is studied both theoretically and experimentally. Our main result is that the initial part of any local sound decay is driven by an exponential function of time whose rate constant is equal in modulus to the inverse of the mean energy velocity divergence. This is empirically demonstrated by experimental analysis of both 1-D and 3-D case studies, thus showing that the reverberation time is strictly connected with the sound energy velocity field and can be determined from its differential properties. A further property of the mean energy velocity is found: it is related not only with the reverberation time, but also with the angular momentum density and with the non-uniform distribution of energy.

  14. Quaternion-based study of angular velocity of the cardiac vector during myocardial ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, Pablo Daniel; Arini, Pedro David

    2017-12-01

    Early detection of acute ischaemia through non-invasive methods remains a challenge in health research. Ischaemic condition caused by a decrease in the blood supply in a cardiac region induces hypoxia and metabolic abnormalities that contribute to the electrical instability of the heart and to the development of slow conduction in damaged tissue. Herein, a percutaneous transluminal coronary angiography (PTCA) is considered as a model of supply ischaemia. We use the concept of quaternion to develop a robust method for assessing the angular velocity of cardiac vector in the orthogonal XYZ leads obtained from 92 patients undergoing the PTCA procedure. The maxima of angular velocity in both ventricular depolarization and repolarization are combined with traditional linear velocity indexes in order to obtain a detector of ischaemic episodes (Ischaemia Detector, ID). ID achieves 98%/100% of sensitivity/specificity when differentiating healthy subjects from patients with early ischaemia. Furthermore, it also shows high accuracy when the comparison is made between ischaemic subjects and patients with different non-ischaemic pathologic ST-deviations which are known to cause false positives, reaching 95%/98% of sensitivity/specificity. Moreover, the study of significant reductions (p<0.001) of angular velocity components allows extraction of distinct ischaemic common features which are useful for analyzing the dependence of vectorcardiogram signal on each site of occlusion. The sensitivity of injury location reaches values of 88% (RCA), 87% (LAD) and 80% (LCx). The high performance of the proposed method establishes a promising outcome for application in computerized assistance in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Repeating firing fields of CA1 neurons shift forward in response to increasing angular velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Stephen L; Nitz, Douglas A

    2014-01-01

    Self-motion information influences spatially-specific firing patterns exhibited by hippocampal neurons. Moreover, these firing patterns can repeat across similar subsegments of an environment, provided that there is similarity of path shape and head orientations across subsegments. The influence of self-motion variables on repeating fields remains to be determined. To investigate the role of path shape and angular rotation on hippocampal activity, we recorded the activity of CA1 neurons from rats trained to run on spiral-shaped tracks. During inbound traversals of circular-spiral tracks, angular velocity increases continuously. Under this condition, most neurons (74%) exhibited repeating fields across at least three adjacent loops. Of these neurons, 86% exhibited forward shifts in the angles of field centers relative to centers on preceding loops. Shifts were absent on squared-spiral tracks, minimal and less reliable on concentric-circle tracks, and absent on outward-bound runs on circular-spiral tracks. However, outward-bound runs on the circular-spiral track in the dark were associated with backward shifts. Together, the most parsimonious interpretation of the results is that continuous increases or decreases in angular velocity are particularly effective at shifting the center of mass of repeating fields, although it is also possible that a nonlinear integration of step counts contributes to the shift. Furthermore, the unexpected absence of field shifts during outward journeys in light (but not darkness) suggests visual cues around the goal location anchored the map of space to an allocentric reference frame.

  16. Cosmic web alignments with the shape, angular momentum and peculiar velocities of dark matter haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Contreras, Sergio; Padilla, Nelson

    2014-09-01

    We study the alignment of dark matter haloes with the cosmic web characterized by the tidal and velocity shear fields. We focus on the alignment of their shape, angular momentum and peculiar velocities. We use a cosmological N-body simulation that allows us to study dark matter haloes spanning almost five orders of magnitude in mass (109-1014) h-1 M⊙ and spatial scales of (0.5-1.0) h-1 Mpc to define the cosmic web. The strongest alignment is measured for halo shape along the smallest tidal eigenvector, e.g. along filaments and walls, with a signal that gets stronger as the halo mass increases. In the case of the velocity shear field only massive haloes >1012 h-1 M⊙ tend to have their shapes aligned along the largest tidal eigenvector, i.e. perpendicular to filaments and walls. For the angular momentum we find alignment signals only for haloes more massive than 1012 h-1 M⊙ both in the tidal and velocity shear fields where the preferences is to be parallel to the middle eigenvector; perpendicular to filaments and parallel to walls. Finally, the peculiar velocities show a strong alignment along the smallest tidal eigenvector for all halo masses; haloes move along filaments and walls. The same alignment is present with the velocity shear, albeit weaker and only for haloes less massive than 1012 h-1 M⊙. Our results show that the two different algorithms used to define the cosmic web describe different physical aspects of non-linear collapse and should be used in a complementary way to understand the cosmic web influence on galaxy evolution.

  17. Interdependence of torque, joint angle, angular velocity and muscle action during human multi-joint leg extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel; Herzog, Walter; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2014-08-01

    Force and torque production of human muscles depends upon their lengths and contraction velocity. However, these factors are widely assumed to be independent of each other and the few studies that dealt with interactions of torque, angle and angular velocity are based on isolated single-joint movements. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine force/torque-angle and force/torque-angular velocity properties for multi-joint leg extensions. Human leg extension was investigated (n = 18) on a motor-driven leg press dynamometer while measuring external reaction forces at the feet. Extensor torque in the knee joint was calculated using inverse dynamics. Isometric contractions were performed at eight joint angle configurations of the lower limb corresponding to increments of 10° at the knee from 30 to 100° of knee flexion. Concentric and eccentric contractions were performed over the same range of motion at mean angular velocities of the knee from 30 to 240° s(-1). For contractions of increasing velocity, optimum knee angle shifted from 52 ± 7 to 64 ± 4° knee flexion. Furthermore, the curvature of the concentric force/torque-angular velocity relations varied with joint angles and maximum angular velocities increased from 866 ± 79 to 1,238 ± 132° s(-1) for 90-50° knee flexion. Normalised eccentric forces/torques ranged from 0.85 ± 0.12 to 1.32 ± 0.16 of their isometric reference, only showing significant increases above isometric and an effect of angular velocity for joint angles greater than optimum knee angle. The findings reveal that force/torque production during multi-joint leg extension depends on the combined effects of angle and angular velocity. This finding should be accounted for in modelling and optimisation of human movement.

  18. Critical velocity, lactate concentration and rowing performanc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Franchini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available There is, in the literature, a search for simple and non-expensive tests to determine the intensity equivalent to maximal lactate steady state (MLSS. The critical velocity (CV has been an indirect method used to determine MLSS. However, the few studies that applied CV in rowing did not verify its validity to estimate MLSS. Therefore, this study had the purposes of testing the validity of CV in determining MLSS velocity as well as of analyzing its predictive value in rowing performance. Therefore, eleven male rowers were submitted to three trials to exhaustion for CV determination. A 2000-m test in a rowing ergometer was used as performance criteria. Later, the subjects performed a continuous test at the CV, with blood lactate concentration (LA being measured during the test. During the continuous test, the LA linearly increased from rest (2 ± 0.,2 mmol.L-1 to the 10th minute (10.9 ± 3.7 mmol.L-1 with slightly higher values (11.6 ± 2.3 mmol.L-1 at the mean time to exhaustion (10.4 ± 3 min, showing that CV does not correspond to MLSS. The correlation coefficient between CV and mean velocity at the 2000-m test (r = 0.87; p RESUMO Existe, na literatura, a busca por testes simples e baratos para determinar a intensidade equivalente à máxima fase estável do lactato sangüíneo (MFELS. A velocidade crítica (VC tem sido um dos métodos indiretos utilizados para determinar a MFELS. No entanto, os poucos estudos que utilizaram a VC no remo, não verificaram sua validade para estimar a MFELS. Assim, esse estudo teve como objetivos verificar a validade da VC para determinar a velocidade da MFELS e analisar seu valor preditivo para o desempenho no remo. Para isso, onze atletas de remo do sexo masculino foram submetidos a três estímulos até a exaustão para a identificação da VC. Uma prova de 2000 m no ergômetro de remo foi usada como critério de desempenho. Posteriormente, os sujeitos realizaram um teste contínuo na VC, sendo mensurada a

  19. Influence of Tennis Racquet Kinematics on Ball Topspin Angular Velocity and Accuracy during the Forehand Groundstroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunku Kwon, Robin Pfister, Ronald L. Hager, Iain Hunter, Matthew K. Seeley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Forehand groundstroke effectiveness is important for tennis success. Ball topspin angular velocity (TAV and accuracy are important for forehand groundstroke effectiveness, and have been extensively studied, previously; despite previous, quality studies, it was unclear whether certain racquet kinematics relate to ball TAV and shot accuracy during the forehand groundstroke. This study evaluated potential relationships between (1 ball TAV and (2 forehand accuracy, and five measures of racquet kinematics: racquet head impact angle (i.e., closed or open face, horizontal and vertical racquet head velocity before impact, racquet head trajectory (resultant velocity direction, relative to horizontal before impact, and hitting zone length (quasi-linear displacement, immediately before and after impact. Thirteen collegiate-level tennis players hit forehand groundstrokes in a biomechanics laboratory, where racquet kinematics and ball TAV were measured, and on a tennis court, to assess accuracy. Correlational statistics were used to evaluate potential relationships between racquet kinematics, and ball TAV (mixed model and forehand accuracy (between-subjects model; α = 0.05. We observed an average (1 racquet head impact angle, (2 racquet head trajectory before impact, relative to horizontal, (3 racquet head horizontal velocity before impact, (4 racquet head vertical velocity before impact, and (5 hitting zone length of 80.4 ± 3.6˚, 18.6 ± 4.3˚, 15.4 ± 1.4 m·s-1, 6.6 ± 2.2 m·s-1, and 79.8 ± 8.6 mm, respectively; and an average ball TAV of 969 ± 375 revolutions per minute. Only racquet head impact angle and racquet head vertical velocity, before impact, significantly correlated with ball TAV (p < 0.01. None of the observed racquet kinematics significantly correlated to the measures of forehand accuracy. These results confirmed mechanical logic and indicate that increased ball TAV is associated with a more closed racquet head impact angle (ranging

  20. Rotation of the elastic Earth: the role of the angular-velocity-dependence of the elasticity-caused perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yoshio

    2009-12-01

    We calculate the so-called convective term, which shows up in the expression for the angular velocity of the elastic Earth, within the Andoyer formalism. The term emerges due to the fact that the elasticity-caused perturbation depends not only on the instantaneous orientation of the Earth but also on its instantaneous angular velocity. We demonstrate that this term makes a considerable contribution into the overall angular velocity. At the same time the convective term turns out to be automatically included into the correction to the nutation series due to the elasticity, if the series is defined by the perturbation of the figure axis (and not of the rotational axis) in accordance with the current IAU resolution. Hence it is not necessary to take the effect of the convective term into consideration in the perturbation of the elastic Earth as far as the nutation is related to the motion of the figure axis.

  1. Current plate motions relative to the hotspots consistent with the MORVEL global set of plate relative angular velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard G.; Kreemer, Corné; Demets, Charles; Argus, Donald F.

    2010-05-01

    Estimates of plate motions relative to the hotspots are useful in investigations of plate driving forces, motion between hotspots, and in estimating the net-rotation of the lithosphere. HS3B-MORVEL is a new set of angular velocities of the plates relative to the hotspots. In HS3B-MORVEL, relative plate angular velocities are constrained to be consistent with those of MORVEL, which is a new closure-enforced global set of angular velocities. MORVEL describes the geologically current motions of 25 plates, 18 of which are determined solely from marine geophysical data, which typically average motion over hundreds of thousands to millions of years [DeMets, Gordon, and Argus 2010]. Seven other plates are tied in partly or entirely through geodetic data. The HS3B data set builds on the HS3 data set, which includes two volcanic propagation rates and eleven segment trends and is determined from the age and location of volcanoes from four plates [Gripp and Gordon, 2002]. In HS3B we adjust the volcanic propagation rates from HS3 for a 10% bias in K/Ar age dates. In HS3B-MORVEL, the angular velocity relative to the hotspots of eight plates—Eurasia, Nubia, Somalia, Lwandle, Antarctica, Sundaland, Amur, and Yangtze—all differ insignificantly from zero. The motion of the other 17 plates differ significantly from zero (p<0.05). The net rotation of the lithosphere is ≈0.1°/Myr lower than found for HS3-NUVEL1A. We construct two further sets of absolute plate angular velocities. The first set of angular velocities, T57-MORVEL, is determined from the data set of Morgan and Phipps Morgan [2006], which consists of 57 trends of widely distributed hotspot tracks. All angular velocities in T57-MORVEL lie outside the 95% confidence limits of the corresponding HS3B-MORVEL angular velocity. We consider two hypotheses to explain this discrepancy: (1) Pacific hotspots move relative to non-Pacfic hotspots at ≈5-15 mm/yr, or (2) anachronism—some T57 trends may average plate motion over

  2. Knee Muscle Strength at Varying Angular Velocities and Associations with Gross Motor Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n =…

  3. (abstract) Modeling the Critical Velocity Ionization Experiment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Murphy, G.; Biasca, R.

    1993-01-01

    Proper interpretation of critical velocity ionization experiments depends upon understanding the expected results from in-situ or remote sensors. In particular, the 1991 shuttle based CIV experiment had diagnostics.

  4. Review of the critical ionization velocity effect in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P. T.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown under a variety of conditions that when a neutral gas passes through a magnetized plasma with a relative velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field that is greater than a critical velocity, anomalously high ionization of the neutrals occurs. The conditions under which the same effect is to be expected in space plasmas is still unclear. The experimental evidence for the occurrence of the critical ionization velocity effect in space is summarized, and various areas in which it has been proposed that the effect should be significant are discussed.

  5. Microneurographically recorded Ia discharge from the tibial nerve mainly transmits the angular velocity of the ankle joint in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, S; Iwase, S; Mano, T; Fukuda, H; Mochida, J

    2004-08-01

    Investigations of the Ia afferent discharge in clarifying problems in disused and malused skeletal muscles have been carried out mainly in muscles of the upper extremities. However, such problems actually occur more frequently in the antigravity muscles of the lower extremities, such as the triceps surae muscle. An analysis of microneurographically recorded Ia discharges from the tibial nerve innervating the triceps surae muscle during dynamic movement of the ankle joint indicated that they mainly transmitted information on the angular velocity of the joint. However, the information on the position sense of the joint was not as well transmitted through Ia discharges. There was no correlation between the joint angle and the static response. However, the dynamic response of a Ia afferent was well correlated to the angular velocity. It is concluded that the human proprioception of the triceps surae muscle was not dependent on the position of the ankle joint, but largely on its movement by the stretching of the muscle.

  6. A simulation study of the critical ionization velocity process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The critical ionization velocity process is studied by first investigating a coupled system of equations describing the production of several ion species and electrons by impact ionization, their collisions with neutrals, and the heating of electrons. Analytic relations derived from this were tested with the help of a particle simulation, including collisional processes between neutrals and plasma particles. It was found that resistive heating of electrons plays an important role when the density of the neutrals is high, and that electron heating due to lower hybrid waves is significant when the neutral density is low. In both cases, the control of the plasma production rate by the ratio of the beam velocity to the critical velocity was verified.

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Ji

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth.

  8. Identification of Plate Blocks Based on a Cluster Analysis of GNSS Data in the Angular Velocity Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A.; Okazaki, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Iwata, T.; Fukahata, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The motion of a rigid plate on a sphere is expressed as rotation around an axis. Recently, statistical approaches were proposed to identify boundaries of crustal blocks from observed GNSS data. Simpson et al. (2012) showed the advantage of clustering algorithm to distinguish block boundaries. Savage and Simpson (2013) extended the study by adding an iterative algorithm to take account of the effects of a sphere. These studies successfully showed a way to identify block structures in the West Coast of the U.S.However, it is still difficult to apply the methods to global GNSS data so as to identify plate blocks. So, we developed a method to tackle this problem. First, we formulated the relationship among the geographical location of the GNSS station, observed velocity at the GNSS station, and candidates of the Euler pole. The relationship shows that the candidates of the Euler pole are expressed as a straight line in the angular velocity space, because the cross product of an Euler pole vector and a position vector of a GNSS station should be an observed velocity vector. We can expect that lines that correspond to GNSS data crosses at a point in the angular velocity space as long as these data belong to the same crustal block. We used an octree algorithm and graph clustering algorithm to spot crossing points. Each cross point represents a cluster, namely a crustal block.In order to assess the validity of our method, we applied it to GNSS data in the West Coast of U.S. where, four segments were identified in Simpson et al. (2012), and we obtained the same result as them. We confirmed that our new formulation reduces to the existing formulation in the velocity space when the scale of a clustering region is much smaller than the entire Earth.For application to global scale, we performed a numerical experiment. We deployed 360 observation stations on the earth mostly uniformly and calculated velocities at stations from six imaginary Euler poles. We translated calculated

  9. CIV experiments on ATLAS-1. [Critical Ionization Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. A.; Burch, J. L.; Choueiri, E. Y.; Kawashima, N.

    1993-01-01

    A test of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) theory was made with neutral xenon releases from the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators hollow cathode plasma contactor onboard the Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis during the ATLAS-1 mission. The gas velocity perpendicular to the Earth's magnetic field was essentially the orbital velocity (7.5 km/s), and thus it exceeded the CIV for xenon. The releases were observed with onboard instrumentation. A factor of 60 enhancement was seen in the Langmuir probe current. Calculations confirmed that release conditions generally satisfied criteria for CIV and predicted a maximum factor of 20 increase in plasma density. Thus, CIV effects were likely to have occurred during the ATLAS-I experiments.

  10. An asymptotic state of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, C. K.; Machida, S.; Smith, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The paper considers the problem of how the momentum of ions created by electron impact ionization of neutrals moving at a speed v(0) perpendicular to the magnetic field through a background plasma is coupled to this plasma. It has been found that the plasma accelerates, and the relative velocity between neutrals and plasma decreases. If this decrease is rapid and large enough, the critical ionization velocity (CIV) phenomenon may turn off. Equations for the evolution of plasma density, electron and ion thermal energy, and plasma velocity have been derived. It was found that the CIV process reaches an asymptotic quasi-steady state, in which the ionization rate reaches a constant value which depends on the properties of the surrounding medium and the value of v(0).

  11. Metabolic responses at various intensities relative to critical swimming velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubekis, Argyris G; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2013-06-01

    To avoid any improper training load, the speed of endurance training needs to be regularly adjusted. Both the lactate threshold (LT) velocity and the velocity corresponding to the maximum lactate steady state (MLSS) are valid and reliable indices of swimming aerobic endurance and commonly used for evaluation and training pace adjustment. Alternatively, critical velocity (CV), defined as the velocity that can be maintained without exhaustion and assessed from swimming performance of various distances, is a valid, reliable, and practical index of swimming endurance, although the selection of the proper distances is a determinant factor. Critical velocity may be 3-6 and 8-11% faster compared with MLSS and LT, respectively. Interval swimming at CV will probably show steady-lactate concentration when the CV has been calculated by distances of 3- to 15-minute duration, and this is more evident in adult swimmers, whereas increasing or decreasing lactate concentration may appear in young and children swimmers. Therefore, appropriate corrections should be made to use CV for training pace adjustment. Findings in young and national level adult swimmers suggest that repetitions of distances of 100-400 m, and velocities corresponding to a CV range of 98-102% may be used for pacing aerobic training, training at the MLSS, and possibly training for improvement of VO2max. Calculation of CV from distances of 200-400, 50-100-200-400, or 100-800 m is an easy and practical method to assess aerobic endurance. This review intends to study the physiological responses and the feasibility of using CV for aerobic endurance evaluation and training pace adjustment, to help coaches to prescribe training sets for different age-group swimmers.

  12. SR90, strontium shaped-charge critical ionization velocity experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescott, Eugene M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans; Swift, Daniel W.; Valenzuela, Arnoldo; Rees, David

    1990-01-01

    In May 1986 an experiment was performed to test Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) effect in free space, using the first high explosive shaped charge with a conical liner of strontium metal. The release, made at 540 km altitude at dawn twilight, was aimed at 48 deg to B. The background electron density was 1.5 x 10(exp 4) cu cm. A faint field-aligned Sr(+) ion streak with tip velocity of 2.6 km/s was observed from two optical sites. Using two calibration methods, it was calculated that between 4.5 x 10(exp 20) and 2 x 10(exp 21) ions were visible. An ionization time constant of 1920 s was calculated for Sr from the solar UV spectrum and ionization cross section which combined with a computer simulation of the injection predicts 1.7 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions in the low-velocity part of the ion streak. Thus all the observed ions are from solar UV ionization of the slow (less than critical) velocity portion of the neutral jet. The observed neutral Sr velocity distribution and computer simulations indicate that 2 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions would have been created from the fast (greater than critical) part of the jet. They would have been more diffuse, and were not observed. Using this fact it was estimated that any CIV ions created were less than 10(exp 21). It was concluded that future Sr CIV free space experiments should be conducted below the UV shadow height and in much larger background plasma density.

  13. Influence of the magnus force on the motion of a spherical solid with a large angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, V. A.; Solomenko, A. D.; Yatsenko, V. P.

    1993-09-01

    The influence of the initial angular velocity imparted by an electric motor to a spherical solid on its deviation from the vertical in fall is investigated experimentally. Values of the coefficient CM in the formula for the Magnus force at which the trajectories of sphere motion are in agreement with the experimental data are found by calculation. It is established that as the Reynolds number Reω grows the coefficient CM decreases; with Reω˜3·104 CM is 10% of the quantity C{M/0} found by Rubinov and Keller for small Reynolds numbers.

  14. On the turbulent heating and the threshold condition in the critical ionization velocity interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, E.; Papadopoulos, K.; Piel, A.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of the nonlinear treatment of the ion beam instability and the modified two-stream instability, threshold conditions for the critical ionization velocity interaction are derived. There are three different regimes of interaction: (1) additional ionization for relative velocities smaller than the critical velocity, (2) the self-sustained discharge for velocities greater than the critical velocity which indeed turns out as a sharp threshold, and (3) an explosive growth regime for velocities exceeding 1.5 times the critical velocity. Additional charge exchange collisions of ions and energy loss of electrons due to excitation do not change the basic threshold behavior but modify the value of the critical velocity.

  15. Star of Condor - A strontium critical velocity experiment, Peru, 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T.; Foeppl, H.; Valenzuela, A.

    1986-01-01

    'Star of Condor' was a critical velocity experiment using Sr vapor produced in a radial shaped charge, which was carried to 571.11 km altitude on a Taurus-Tomahawk rocket launched from Punto Lobos, Peru, and detonated in the plane of the magnetic field lines so that all ranges of pitch angles from parallel to B to perpendicular to B were covered. Sr has a critical velocity of 3.3 km/s, and from observation, 42.5 percent of the neutral Sr gas had a velocity component perpendicular to B exceeding that value. No Sr ion emissions were detected shortly after the burst with usual TV integration times. However, about 10 min after the detonation a faint field-aligned streak was discovered with long TV integration times. The brightness is estimated as 5 R, which, combined with the streak geometry, implies an ion production of 2.4 x 10 to the 19th ions. This is only 0.0036 percent ionization of the Sr vapor. All the ions could easily have been produced by thermal ionization from the original detonation thermal distribution. The breakup of the Sr gas into small bloblike structures may have allowed the high-energy electrons to escape before an ionization cascade could be produced. For whatever reason, the Alfven mechanism proposed for space plasmas in the absence of laboratory walls did not produce an ionization cascade in the experiment.

  16. Reactive scattering of halogen molecules. [Angular and velocity distributions, stabilities 6. 8 to 17. 7 kcal/mole, FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, J.J.

    1976-11-01

    A study of the endoergic, bimolecular reactions of F/sub 2/ with I/sub 2/, ICl, and HI in a crossed molecular beam experiment is described. The trihalogens IIF, ClIF, and HIF were directly observed as the products of these reactions. At high collision energies a second reactive channel producing IF becomes important. Product angular and velocity distributions show that this IF does not result from a four-center exchange reaction. Measured threshold energies for the formation of IIF, ClIF, and HIF yield lower bounds to the stabilities of these molecules, with respect to the separated atoms, of 69, 81, and 96 kcal/mole, respectively. Analysis of product center-of-mass angular distributions indicates that a slightly nonlinear approach is most effective in bringing about reaction to form the stable triatomic radical. Also described is a crossed molecular beam study of the Cl + Br/sub 2/ ..-->.. BrCl + Br reaction at collision energies from 6.8 to 17.7 kcal/mole. The results indicate that this reaction has the characteristics of an exoergic reaction on an attractive potential energy surface with early energy release. Reagent translational energy is very efficiently channeled into product internal energy. At high collision energy the reaction appears to approach the spectator stripping limit. Finally, a series of computer programs which can be used to carry out the requisite data analysis for crossed molecular beam reactive scattering experiments are described. These programs recover the reactive scattering center-of-mass flux distribution from the measured angular and velocity distributions of the products.

  17. High-Q microsphere resonators for angular velocity sensing in gyroscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Panlong [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science and Dynamic Measurement, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030051 (China); School of Science, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Zheng, Yongqiu [Science and Technology on Electronic Test and Measurement Laboratory, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Yan, Shubin, E-mail: shubin-yan@nuc.edu.cn; Xue, Chenyang, E-mail: xuechenyang@nuc.edu.cn; Liu, Jun, E-mail: liuj@nuc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science and Dynamic Measurement, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Science and Technology on Electronic Test and Measurement Laboratory, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Wang, Wanjun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    A resonator gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect is proposed using a core unit that is generated by water-hydrogen flame melting. The relationship between the quality factor Q and diameter D is revealed. The Q factor of the spectral lines of the microsphere cavity coupling system, which uses tapered fibers, is found to be 10{sup 6} or more before packaging with a low refractive curable ultraviolet polymer, although it drops to approximately 10{sup 5} after packaging. In addition, a rotating test platform is built, and the transmission spectrum and discriminator curves of a microsphere cavity with Q of 3.22×10{sup 6} are measured using a semiconductor laser (linewidth less than 1 kHz) and a real-time proportional-integral circuit tracking and feedback technique. Equations fitting the relation between the voltage and angular rotation rate are obtained. According to the experimentally measured parameters, the sensitivity of the microsphere-coupled system can reach 0.095{sup ∘}/s.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Angular Velocity Estimation During the Robotic Servicing Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Julie K.; Queen, Steven Z.; VanEepoel, John M.; Sanner, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    During the Hubble Robotic Servicing Mission, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) attitude and rates are necessary to achieve the capture of HST by the Hubble Robotic Vehicle (HRV). The attitude and rates must be determined without the HST gyros or HST attitude estimates. The HRV will be equipped with vision-based sensors, capable of estimating the relative attitude between HST and HRV. The HST attitude is derived from the measured relative attitude and the HRV computed inertial attitude. However, the relative rate between HST and HRV cannot be measured directly. Therefore, the HST rate with respect to inertial space is not known. Two approaches are developed to estimate the HST rates. Both methods utilize the measured relative attitude and the HRV inertial attitude and rates. First, a nonlinear estimator is developed. The nonlinear approach estimates the HST rate through an estimation of the inertial angular momentum. Second, a linearized approach is developed. The linearized approach is based on more traditional Extended Kalman filter techniques. Simulation test results for both methods are given.

  19. Application in prestiction friction compensation for angular velocity loop of inertially stabilized platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhiyong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the influence of the nonlinear friction on the gimbaled servo-system of an inertial stabilized platforms (ISPs with DC motor direct-drive, the methods of modeling and compensation of the nonlinear friction are proposed. Firstly, the inapplicability of LuGre model when trying to interpret the backward angular displacement in the prestiction regime is observed experimentally and the reason is deduced theoretically. Then, based on the dynamic model of direct-drive ISPs, a modified LuGre model is proposed to describe the characteristic of the friction in the prestiction regime. Furthermore, the state switch condition of the three friction regimes including presliding, gross sliding and prestiction is presented. Finally, a composite compensation controller including a nonlinear friction observer and a feedforward compensator based on the novel LuGre model is designed to restrain the nonlinear friction and to improve the control precision. Experimental results indicate that compared with those of the conventional proportion–integration–differentiation (PID control method and the PID plus LuGre model-based friction compensation method, the dwell-time has decreased from 0.2 s to almost 0 s, the position error decreased to 86.7% and the peak-to-peak value of position error decreased to 80% after the novel compensation controller is added. It concludes that the composite compensation controller can greatly improve the control precision of the dynamic sealed ISPs.

  20. Critical ionization velocity interaction in the CRIT I rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Marklund, G.; Haerendel, G.; Kelley, M.; Pfaff, R.

    1990-01-01

    In the rocket experiment CRIT I, launched from Wallops Island on May 13, 1986, two identical Barium-shaped charges were fired from distances of 1.3 km and 3.6 km towards the main experiment payload, which was separated from a sub-payload by a couple of km along the magnetic field. The relevance of earlier proposed mechanisms for electron heating in ionospheric critical velocity experiments is investigated in the light of the CRIT I results. It is concluded that both the 'homogeneous' and the 'ionizing front' models can be applied, in different parts of the stream. It is also possible that a third, entirely different, mechanism may contribute to the electron heating. This mechanism involves direct energization of electrons in the magnetic-field-aligned component of the dc electric field.

  1. CAN THE CURRICULUM BE USED TO ESTIMATE CRITICAL VELOCITY IN YOUNG COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to assess critical velocity using the swimmer curriculum in front crawl events and to compare critical velocity to the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and to the velocity of a 30 min test. The sample included 24 high level male swimmers ranged between 14 and 16 years old. For each subject the critical velocity, the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and the mean velocity of a 30 min test were determined. The critical velocity was also estimated by considering the best performance of a swimmer over several distances based on the swimmer curriculum. Critical velocity including 100, 200 and 400 m events was not different from the velocity of 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration. Critical velocity including all the swimmer events was not different from the velocity of a 30 min test. The assessment of critical velocity based upon the swimmer curriculum would therefore seem to be a good approach to determine the aerobic ability of a swimmer. The selection of the events to be included in critical velocity assessment must be a main concern in the evaluation of the swimmer

  2. Convergence of the Critical Cooling Rate for Protoplanetary Disk Fragmentation Achieved: The Key Role of Numerical Dissipation of Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongping; Mayer, Lucio; Meru, Farzana

    2017-09-01

    We carry out simulations of gravitationally unstable disks using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and the novel Lagrangian meshless finite mass (MFM) scheme in the GIZMO code. Our aim is to understand the cause of the nonconvergence of the cooling boundary for fragmentation reported in the literature. We run SPH simulations with two different artificial viscosity implementations and compare them with MFM, which does not employ any artificial viscosity. With MFM we demonstrate convergence of the critical cooling timescale for fragmentation at {β }{crit}≈ 3. Nonconvergence persists in SPH codes. We show how the nonconvergence problem is caused by artificial fragmentation triggered by excessive dissipation of angular momentum in domains with large velocity derivatives. With increased resolution, such domains become more prominent. Vorticity lags behind density, due to numerical viscous dissipation in these regions, promoting collapse with longer cooling times. Such effect is shown to be dominant over the competing tendency of artificial viscosity to diminish with increasing resolution. When the initial conditions are first relaxed for several orbits, the flow is more regular, with lower shear and vorticity in nonaxisymmetric regions, aiding convergence. Yet MFM is the only method that converges exactly. Our findings are of general interest, as numerical dissipation via artificial viscosity or advection errors can also occur in grid-based codes. Indeed, for the FARGO code values of {β }{crit} significantly higher than our converged estimate have been reported in the literature. Finally, we discuss implications for giant planet formation via disk instability.

  3. Equilibrium Points and Related Periodic Motions in the Restricted Three-Body Problem with Angular Velocity and Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Perdios

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a modification of the restricted three-body problem in which the angular velocity variation is considered in the case where the primaries are sources of radiation. In particular, the existence and stability of its equilibrium points in the plane of motion of the primaries are studied. We find that this problem admits the well-known five planar equilibria of the classical problem with the difference that the corresponding collinear points may be stable depending on the parameters of the problem. For all planar equilibria, sufficient parametric conditions for their stability have been established which are used for the numerical determination of the stability regions in various parametric planes. Also, for certain values of the parameters of the problem for which the equilibrium points are stable, the short and long period families have been computed. To do so, semianalytical expressions have been found for the determination of appropriate initial conditions. Special attention has been given to the continuation of the long period family, in the case of the classical restricted three-body problem, where we show numerically that periodic orbits of the short period family, which are bifurcation points with the long period family, are connected through the characteristic curve of the long period family.

  4. Adaptive angular-velocity Vold-Kalman filter order tracking - Theoretical basis, numerical implementation and parameter investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, M.-Ch.; Chu, W.-Ch.; Le, Duc-Do

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents an alternative Vold-Kalman filter order tracking (VKF_OT) method, i.e. adaptive angular-velocity VKF_OT technique, to extract and characterize order components in an adaptive manner for the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. The order/spectral waveforms to be tracked can be recursively solved by using Kalman filter based on the one-step state prediction. The paper comprises theoretical derivation of computation scheme, numerical implementation, and parameter investigation. Comparisons of the adaptive VKF_OT scheme with two other ones are performed through processing synthetic signals of designated order components. Processing parameters such as the weighting factor and the correlation matrix of process noise, and data conditions like the sampling frequency, which influence tracking behavior, are explored. The merits such as adaptive processing nature and computation efficiency brought by the proposed scheme are addressed although the computation was performed in off-line conditions. The proposed scheme can simultaneously extract multiple spectral components, and effectively decouple close and crossing orders associated with multi-axial reference rotating speeds.

  5. Angular Displacement and Velocity Sensors Based on Coplanar Waveguides (CPWs Loaded with S-Shaped Split Ring Resonators (S-SRR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Naqui

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, angular displacement and angular velocity sensors based on coplanar waveguide (CPW transmission lines and S-shaped split ring resonators (S-SRRs are presented. The sensor consists of two parts, namely a CPW and an S-SRR, both lying on parallel planes. By this means, line-to-resonator magnetic coupling arises, the coupling level being dependent on the line-to-resonator relative angular orientation. The line-to-resonator coupling level is the key parameter responsible for modulating the amplitude of the frequency response seen between the CPW ports in the vicinity of the S-SRR fundamental resonance frequency. Specifically, an amplitude notch that can be visualized in the transmission coefficient is changed by the coupling strength, and it is characterized as the sensing variable. Thus, the relative angular orientation between the two parts is measured, when the S-SRR is attached to a rotating object. It follows that the rotation angle and speed can be inferred either by measuring the frequency response of the S-SRR-loaded line, or the response amplitude at a fixed frequency in the vicinity of resonance. It is in addition shown that the angular velocity can be accurately determined from the time-domain response of a carrier time-harmonic signal tuned at the S-SRR resonance frequency. The main advantage of the proposed device is its small size directly related to the small electrical size of the S-SRR, which allows for the design of compact angular displacement and velocity sensors at low frequencies. Despite the small size of the fabricated proof-of-concept prototype (electrically small structures do not usually reject signals efficiently, it exhibits good linearity (on a logarithmic scale, sensitivity and dynamic range.

  6. Angular Displacement and Velocity Sensors Based on Coplanar Waveguides (CPWs) Loaded with S-Shaped Split Ring Resonators (S-SRR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqui, Jordi; Coromina, Jan; Karami-Horestani, Ali; Fumeaux, Christophe; Martín, Ferran

    2015-04-23

    In this paper, angular displacement and angular velocity sensors based on coplanar waveguide (CPW) transmission lines and S-shaped split ring resonators (S-SRRs) are presented. The sensor consists of two parts, namely a CPW and an S-SRR, both lying on parallel planes. By this means, line-to-resonator magnetic coupling arises, the coupling level being dependent on the line-to-resonator relative angular orientation. The line-to-resonator coupling level is the key parameter responsible for modulating the amplitude of the frequency response seen between the CPW ports in the vicinity of the S-SRR fundamental resonance frequency. Specifically, an amplitude notch that can be visualized in the transmission coefficient is changed by the coupling strength, and it is characterized as the sensing variable. Thus, the relative angular orientation between the two parts is measured, when the S-SRR is attached to a rotating object. It follows that the rotation angle and speed can be inferred either by measuring the frequency response of the S-SRR-loaded line, or the response amplitude at a fixed frequency in the vicinity of resonance. It is in addition shown that the angular velocity can be accurately determined from the time-domain response of a carrier time-harmonic signal tuned at the S-SRR resonance frequency. The main advantage of the proposed device is its small size directly related to the small electrical size of the S-SRR, which allows for the design of compact angular displacement and velocity sensors at low frequencies. Despite the small size of the fabricated proof-of-concept prototype (electrically small structures do not usually reject signals efficiently), it exhibits good linearity (on a logarithmic scale), sensitivity and dynamic range.

  7. Regression relationships of landing height with ground reaction forces, knee flexion angles, angular velocities and joint powers during double-leg landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, C H; Lee, Peter V S; Goh, James C H

    2009-10-01

    Ground reaction forces (GRF), knee flexion angles, angular velocities and joint powers are unknown at large landing heights, which are infeasible for laboratory testing. However, this information is important for understanding lower extremity injury mechanisms. We sought to determine regression relationships of landing height with these parameters during landing so as to facilitate estimation of these parameters at large landing heights. Five healthy male subjects performed landing tasks from heights of 0.15-1.05 m onto a force-plate. Motion capture system was used to obtain knee flexion angles during landing via passive markers placed on the lower body. An iterative regression model, involving simple linear/exponential/natural logarithmic functions, was used to fit regression equations to experimental data. Peak GRF followed an exponential regression relationship (R(2)=0.90-0.99, pKnee flexion angle at initial contact and at peak GRF had an inverse-exponential regression relationship (R(2)=0.81-0.99, pknee flexion angular velocity and landing height (R(2)=0.86-0.96, pknee joint power demonstrated a substantial linear relationship (R(2)=0.98-1.00, pknee flexion angles, angular velocities and joint power may synergistically lead to an exacerbated lower extremity injury risk at large landing heights.

  8. The manifestation of Alfven's hypothesis of critical ionization velocity in the performance of MPD thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, E. Y.; Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    The role of Alfven's critical ionization velocity in the performance of the self-field MPD thruster has been investigated. The existence of a well defined characteristic velocity can be attributed to an ionization process involving the production of a population of suprathermal electrons by an electrostatic instability. It is shown that for the MPD thruster plasma, suprathermalization of electrons via this electrostatic instability can only happen if ions are initially accelerated to velocities larger than the Alfven critical ionization velocity. When this occurs the mechanism will be initiated and the ions decelerated to velocities near the critical velocity. This mechanism ceases to be limiting when all neutrals are ionized. A model of MPD thruster terminal behavior, incorporating Alfven's hypothesis, is presented. Experiments with three different propellants reveal that operation at values of the current squared to total mass flow ratio corresponding to the Alfven critical velocity is marked by a transition wherein low frequency voltage oscillations and a notable change in the voltage-current dependence occurs. One major result of this study is the demonstration that the Alfven critical velocity is not a fundamental limitation on MPD exhaust velocity.

  9. Aerobic evaluation of young swimmers using the critical velocity test a brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDES, RICARDO

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Critical velocity is the maximal swimming velocity that could be maintained for a long time without exhaustion.As it is considered to be well related with the exercise intensity corresponding to the individual anaerobicthreshold, critical velocity has been used to monitor the swimmer’s aerobic performance. However, studiesconducted in age-group swimmers are scarce and some literature does not use a long distance test as required forobtaining reliable critical velocity results. The aim of the present study was to assess critical velocity in 11-14years old swimmers in order to characterize their aerobic capacity. So, 56 girls and 62 boys performed 200 and800m front crawl tests at maximum intensity, being critical velocity assessed by the slope of the regression linebetween the test distances and the respective times. Critical velocity values were 1.21±0.06, 1.28±0.05 and1.25±0.06 m/s for the girls, boys and total group, with significant differences being observed between gendergroups. As expected, these results were lower than the values presented in the literature for older swimmers.However, some of these studies that reported significantly higher critical velocity values used short distancestests for its assessment, which could lead to the overestimation of the final results. It is suggested the use of theindividual critical velocity converted in 100m time to implement specific training series for aerobic capacitydevelopment, as well as for the more precise definition of training volumes and intensities. Thus, the usedcritical velocity test could be considered a useful training strategy used to increase swimmers conditioning

  10. Measurement and analysis of instantaneous torque and angular velocity variations of a low speed two stroke diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Espadafor, Francisco J.; A. Becerra Villanueva, José; Palomo Guerrero, Daniel; Torres García, Miguel; Carvajal Trujillo, Elisa; Fernández Vacas, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the potential of using direct measurement of engine torque for diagnostic purposes in large engines - in this case applied to power generation. The procedures for measuring and analyzing the instantaneous torque, the angular displacement on the generator output end and the angular displacement on its free end for a ten-cylinder, low speed two stroke diesel engine are presented. Angular speed oscillations are frequently used for combustion engine diagnostics although they cannot be used to measure engine power directly. In addition, and for engines with huge inertia generators such as those used in power plants, speed oscillations are very low and this reduces the signal to noise ratio and makes the evaluation of the instantaneous angular speed very noisy. In the work described here, torque and angular displacement measurements carried out at the same point and with the same engine conditions are compared and the superior performance of torque is demonstrated. Harmonic analysis of instantaneous torque allowed the identification of the dynamic characteristics of the power train of the diesel group and clearly suggests that this signal can be used as a diagnostic tool for excitation, combustion malfunctions, or for the mechanical characteristics of the system and crankshaft stiffness. The torque distortion introduced by the generator due to the discontinuity imposed by the pole pairs is also observed in the torque signal, suggesting that the torque signal can be used to identify generator malfunction.

  11. Using second-sound shock waves to probe the intrinsic critical velocity of liquid helium II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T. N.

    1983-01-01

    A critical velocity truly intrinsic to liquid helium II is experimentally sought in the bulk fluid far from the apparatus walls. Termed the 'fundamental critical velocity,' it necessarily is caused by mutual interactions which operate between the two fluid components and which are activated at large relative velocities. It is argued that flow induced by second-sound shock waves provides the ideal means by which to activate and isolate the fundamental critical velocity from other extraneous fluid-wall interactions. Experimentally it is found that large-amplitude second-sound shock waves initiate a breakdown in the superfluidity of helium II, which is dramatically manifested as a limit to the maximum attainable shock strength. This breakdown is shown to be caused by a fundamental critical velocity. Secondary effects include boiling for ambient pressures near the saturated vapor pressure or the formation of helium I boundary layers at higher ambient pressures. When compared to the intrinsic critical velocity discovered in highly restricted geometries, the shock-induced critical velocity displays a similar temperature dependence and is the same order of magnitude.

  12. The critical velocity of a body towed by a cable from an airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, C; De Haas, T P

    1937-01-01

    It is sufficient to consider only the equations of motion of the towed body whereas those of the cable may be left out of consideration. The result obtained makes it possible to determine which factors affect the critical velocity and what modifications of the instrument are necessary for extending the upper limit of that velocity.

  13. Correlation between critical force and critical velocity and their respective stroke rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Kokubun

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The critical power model has been utilized to estimate the anaerobic and aerobic capacities in swimming. There are studies which evidence the applicability of swimming velocity, force during tethered swimming and stroke rate data to the critical power model. However, the relationship among these estimates derived from freestyle and tethered swimming needs to be established. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between critical force (FCRIT obtained from tethered swimming and critical velocity (VCRIT during freestyle swimming (VCRIT, and their respective critical stroke rates (FBrCRIT. Eleven swimmers of both sexes (16.6 ± 1.3 years, 60 ± 10 kg, 172 ± 8 cm underwent maximal tests to exhaustion in the tethered system and to as fast as possible trials during 200 and 400 m freestyle swimming. There were estimates of: 1 FCRIT and CIAnaer fi tting the three known equations derived from the critical power model (hyperbolic forcetime F-t, linear force-1/time F-1/t, linear impulse-time I-t; 2 VCRIT and CNAnaer during the freestyle tests using the linear distance-time relationship (d-t and; 3 FBrCRIT and CBrAnaer during both kinds of tests (tethered and freestyle. The tethered performance data presented a good fi tting to the critical power model: FCRIT (R2 of 0.98, 0.97 and 0.99 and FBrCRIT-TETHERED (R2 of 0.96, 0.90 and 0.99. There was a high correlation between VCRIT and FCRIT (r= 0.89-0.91. Nevertheless, there was no signifi cant correlation among the estimates of FBrCRIT-TETHERED and FBrCRIT-FREESTYLE, neither among the anaerobic variables. These results indicate that FCRIT can be considered a reliable aerobic capacity index. However, the FBrCRIT-TETHERED did not approach this capacity, despite the good fi tting to the critical power model. RESUMO O modelo da potência crítica tem sido utilizado para estimar a capacidade anaeróbia e aeróbia na natação. Há estudos demonstrando que a velocidade de nado livre, for

  14. Diagnostics of Cold-Sprayed Particle Velocities Approaching Critical Deposition Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauer, G.; Singh, R.; Rauwald, K.-H.; Schrüfer, S.; Wilson, S.; Vaßen, R.

    2017-10-01

    In cold spraying, the impact particle velocity plays a key role for successful deposition. It is well known that only those particles can achieve successful bonding which have an impact velocity exceeding a particular threshold. This critical velocity depends on the thermomechanical properties of the impacting particles at impacting temperature. The latter depends on the gas temperature in the torch but also on stand-off distance and gas pressure. In the past, some semiempirical approaches have been proposed to estimate particle impact and critical velocities. Besides that, there are a limited number of available studies on particle velocity measurements in cold spraying. In the present work, particle velocity measurements were performed using a cold spray meter, where a laser beam is used to illuminate the particles ensuring sufficiently detectable radiant signal intensities. Measurements were carried out for INCONEL® alloy 718-type powders with different particle sizes. These experimental investigations comprised mainly subcritical spray parameters for this material to have a closer look at the conditions of initial deposition. The critical velocities were identified by evaluating the deposition efficiencies and correlating them to the measured particle velocity distributions. In addition, the experimental results were compared with some values estimated by model calculations.

  15. Angular dependence of critical current density and magnetoresistance of sputtered high-T{sub c}-films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geerkens, A.; Frenck, H.J.; Ewert, S. [Technical Univ. of Cottbus (Germany)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The angular dependence of the critical current density and the magnetoresistance of high-T{sub c}-films in high and low magnetic fields and for different temperatures were measured to investigate the flux pinning and the superconducting properties. A comparison of the results for the different superconductors shows their increasing dependence on the angle {Theta} between the magnetic field and the c-axis of the film due to the anisotropy of the chosen superconductor. Furthermore the influence of the current direction to the {Theta}-rotation plane is discussed.

  16. On the Critical Ionization Velocity Effect in Interstellar Space and Possible Detection of Related Continuum Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar neutral hydrogen (HI) emission spectra manifest several families of linewidths whose numerical values (34, 13 & 6 km/s) appear to be related to the critical ionization velocities (CIVs) of the most abundant interstellar atomic species. Extended new analysis of HI emission profiles shows that the 34 km/s wide component, probably corresponding to the CIV for helium, is pervasive. The 34 km/s wide linewidth family is found in low-velocity (local) neutral hydrogen (HI) profiles as we...

  17. CRITICAL VELOCITY OF CONTROLLABILITY OF SLIDING FRICTION BY NORMAL OSCILLATIONS IN VISCOELASTIC CONTACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Popov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction can be reduced substantially by applying ultrasonic vibration in the sliding plane or in the normal direction. This effect is well known and used in many applications ranging from press forming to ultrasonic actuators. One of the characteristics of the phenomenon is that, at a given frequency and amplitude of oscillation, the observed friction reduction diminishes with increasing sliding velocity. Beyond a certain critical sliding velocity, there is no longer any difference between the coefficients of friction with or without vibration. This critical velocity depends on material and kinematic parameters and is a key characteristic that must be accounted for by any theory of influence of vibration on friction. Recently, the critical sliding velocity has been interpreted as the transition point from periodic stick-slip to pure sliding and was calculated for purely elastic contacts under uniform sliding with periodic normal loading. Here we perform a similar analysis of the critical velocity in viscoelastic contacts using a Kelvin material to describe viscoelasticity. A closed-form solution is presented, which contains previously reported results as special cases. This paves the way for more detailed studies of active control of friction in viscoelastic systems, a previously neglected topic with possible applications in elastomer technology and in medicine.

  18. Critical velocity as a measure of aerobic fitness in women's rugby sevens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Anthea C; Presland, Jarrod; Rattray, Ben; Pyne, David B

    2014-01-01

    To compare a field-based critical velocity running test to routine laboratory (treadmill VO₂ max test) and field-based (Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, Yo-Yo IR1) aerobic fitness tests in women's rugby sevens (7's) players. To quantify the degree of association between field-based fitness test scores and GPS-derived analysis of performance data in competition. Single cohort, cross-sectional study involving 22 female Australian Rugby 7's National team players. Players underwent fitness testing comparing the critical velocity test (100 m, 400 m, 1500 m runs) to the Yo-Yo IR1 and a treadmill VO₂ max test. GPS data was obtained during the National Championships using a subgroup of 12 players and compared with each player's fitness test scores. The critical velocity test was highly correlated with the Yo-Yo IR1 test (r=0.86, 0.69-0.94; 90% confidence interval) and all variables of the VO₂ max test, however mean values were substantially different between tests (Yo-Yo IR1: 4.3 ± 0.1 ms(-1), vVO₂ max: 3.7 ± 0.3 ms(-1), critical velocity: 3.2 ± 0.3 ms(-1)). Average speed, obtained from GPS data, was largely correlated with both the Yo-Yo IR1 (r=0.62, 0.10-0.87) and critical velocity (r=0.51, -0.06-0.83) tests. Total game distance correlated moderately with the Yo-Yo IR1 (r=0.49, -0.09-0.82) and critical velocity (r=0.36, -0.25-0.76). The critical velocity test is an appropriate aerobic fitness test, yields results similar to the Yo-Yo IR1, and correlates moderately with rugby 7's game data. However the Yo-Yo IR1 and critical velocity test scores cannot be used interchangeably. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Competing atomic processes in Ba and Sr injection critical velocity experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P. T.; Torbert, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect requires a superthermal electron population to ionize through collisional impact. Such superthermal electrons can however lose energy to competing atomic processes, as well as to ionization, thus limiting the efficiency of the effect. Considering Ba and Sr magnetospheric injection experiments designed to test the CIV theory, it is found that in both cases roughly 60 percent of the superthermal electron energy is lost on exciting line radiation. Moreover, energy loss to background neutral oxygen places a strict limit on the injected cloud densities for which critical velocity effects are possible; a finding which explains the consistently negative results in radial injection experiments.

  20. Sediment deposit thickness and its effect on critical velocity for incipient motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, C H J; Lau, T L; Ab Ghani, A; Chan, N W

    2016-10-01

    The understanding of how the sediment deposit thickness influences the incipient motion characteristic is still lacking in the literature. Hence, the current study aims to determine the effect of sediment deposition thickness on the critical velocity for incipient motion. An incipient motion experiment was conducted in a rigid boundary rectangular flume of 0.6 m width with varying sediment deposition thickness. Findings from the experiment revealed that the densimetric Froude number has a logarithmic relationship with both the thickness ratios ts/d and ts/y0 (ts: sediment deposit thickness; d: grain size; y0: normal flow depth). Multiple linear regression analysis was performed using the data from the current study to develop a new critical velocity equation by incorporating thickness ratios into the equation. The new equation can be used to predict critical velocity for incipient motion for both loose and rigid boundary conditions. The new critical velocity equation is an attempt toward unifying the equations for both rigid and loose boundary conditions.

  1. Angular Emission Function of a City and Skyglow Modeling: A Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio

    2016-12-01

    The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is a common approach to solving the transfer of electromagnetic energy in heterogeneous disperse media, such as atmospheric environment. One-dimensional RTE is a linear boundary value problem that is well suited to plane-parallel atmosphere with no diffuse intensity entering the top of the atmosphere. In nighttime regime, the ground-based light sources illuminate the atmosphere at its bottom interface. However, the light-pollution models conventionally use radiant intensity function rather than radiance. This might potentially result in a number of misconceptions. We focused on similarities and fundamental differences between both functions and clarified distinct consequences for the modeling of skyglow from finite-sized and semi-infinite light-emitting flat surfaces. Minimum requirements to be fulfilled by a City Emission Function (CEF) are formulated to ensure a successful solution of standard and inverse problems. It has been shown that the horizon radiance of a flat surface emitting in accordance with Garstang’s function (GEF) would exceed any limit, meaning that the GEF is not an appropriate tool to model skyglow from distant sources. We developed two alternative CEFs to remedy this problem through correction of direct upward emissions; the most important strengths of the modified CEFs are detailed in this paper. Numerical experiments on sky luminance under well-posed and ill-posed boundary conditions were made for two extreme uplight fractions (F) and for three discrete distances from the city edge. The errors induced by replacing radiance with radiant intensity function in the RTE are generally low (15%-30%) if F is as large as 0.15, but alteration of the luminance may range over 1-3 orders of magnitude if F approaches zero. In the latter case, the error margin can increase by a factor of 10-100 or even 1000, even if the angular structure of luminance patterns suffers only weak changes. This is why such a shift in

  2. A Critical Review of Position- and Velocity-Based Concepts of Postural Control During Upright Stance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portela Fellipe Machado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Postural control during quiet standing has been modeled by concepts using kinematic variables estimated from center of pressure (COP signals. The concept of position-based postural control has had particular ramifications in the literature, although a more recent concept of velocity-based control has been proposed as being more relevant. Methods. This study reviews the literature investigating these concepts and their respective quantitative methods alongside current supporting evidence and criticisms. Results. The position-based control concept suggests the existence of two control loops that alternate whenever certain thresholds are exceeded. Such a theory is supported by studies describing the time delay between the skeletal muscle activation and CoP displacement. However, this concept has been criticized to be the result of statistical artifacts due to it not being adapted to the analysis of bounded time series. Conversely, the velocity-based control concept claims that velocity is the most relevant kinematic variable for postural control. Such a theory suggests that postural adjustments are executed to change the trajectory of the CoP whenever the velocity crosses a threshold. Both theories have their major methodological limitations, while interpretation of data from the position-based concept is difficult, velocity-based thresholds are empirical and still need verification in different motor tasks and populations. Conclusions. Given the observed similarities and mutual exclusivity of both concepts, there is a need for the development of methods that can quantitatively analyze stabilometric signals while simultaneously considering both kinematic variables.

  3. Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jensen, Niels G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

  4. Non-solar UV produced ions observed optically from the 'Crit I' critical velocity ionization experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Rees, D.; Valenzuela, A.; Brenning, N.

    1990-01-01

    A critical velocity ionization experiment was carried out with a heavily instrumented rocket launched from Wallops Island on May 13, 1986. Two neutral barium beams were created by explosive shaped charges released from the rocket and detonated at 48 deg to B at altitudes near 400 km and below the solar UV cutoff. Critical velocity ionization was expected to form a detectable ion jet along the release field line, but, instead, an ion cloud of fairly uniform intensity was observed stretching from the release field line across to where the neutral barium jet reached sunlight. The process creating these ions must have been present from the time of the release; the efficiency is estimated to be equivalent to an ionization time constant of 1800 sec. This ionization is most likely from collisions between the neutral barium jet and the ambient atmospheric oxygen, and, if so, the cross section for collisional ionization is 9 x 10 to the -18th sq cm.

  5. Second sound shock waves and critical velocities in liquid helium 2. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    Large amplitude second-sound shock waves were generated and the experimental results compared to the theory of nonlinear second-sound. The structure and thickness of second-sound shock fronts are calculated and compared to experimental data. Theoretically it is shown that at T = 1.88 K, where the nonlinear wave steepening vanishes, the thickness of a very weak shock must diverge. In a region near this temperature, a finite-amplitude shock pulse evolves into an unusual double-shock configuration consisting of a front steepened, temperature raising shock followed by a temperature lowering shock. Double-shocks are experimentally verified. It is experimentally shown that very large second-sound shock waves initiate a breakdown in the superfluidity of helium 2, which is dramatically displayed as a limit to the maximum attainable shock strength. The value of the maximum shock-induced relative velocity represents a significant lower bound to the intrinsic critical velocity of helium 2.

  6. Charge exchange contamination of CRIT-II barium CIV experiment. [critical ionization velocity in ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Meyerott, R. E.; Rairden, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have been recently performed which attempted to confirm critical ionization velocity (CIV) ionization by deploying chemicals at high velocity in the ionosphere. Specifically, the CRIT-II rocket performed a barium release in the ionosphere, where observations of Ba(+) resonant emissions following the release are believed to have resulted from the CIV process. Calculations are presented which suggest a significant fraction (if not all) of the Ba(+) observed likely resulted from charge exchange with the thermosphere ions and not through CIV processes. The results presented here are pertinent to other CIV experiments performed in the ionosphere. It is recommended that laboratory measurements should be made of the charge exchange cross section between O(+) and Ba as well as other metal vapors used in CIV experiments.

  7. The electromagnetic effect on the critical ionization velocity process. [in earth atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Goertz, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects on the critical ionization velocity (CIV) process become important when the neutral gas velocity V(n) exceeds the local Alfven speed V(A). The electron heating due to unstable lower hybrid waves necessary for CIV still occurs, but the efficiency of the electron heating is significantly reduced when the electromagnetic effect comes into play. This is verified by a series of simulation runs using two-dimensional electromagnetic particle code combined with PANIC. The significance of the electromagnetic effects for the occurrence of CIV in the comet-solar wind interaction and other space phenomena is briefly discussed. It is found that the comet environment is marginal for the excitation of CIV.

  8. Droplet squeezing through a narrow constriction: Minimum impulse and critical velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Drapaca, Corina; Chen, Xiaolin; Xu, Jie

    2017-07-01

    Models of a droplet passing through narrow constrictions have wide applications in science and engineering. In this paper, we report our findings on the minimum impulse (momentum change) of pushing a droplet through a narrow circular constriction. The existence of this minimum impulse is mathematically derived and numerically verified. The minimum impulse happens at a critical velocity when the time-averaged Young-Laplace pressure balances the total minor pressure loss in the constriction. Finally, numerical simulations are conducted to verify these concepts. These results could be relevant to problems of energy optimization and studies of chemical and biomedical systems.

  9. Simulation study of the ionizing front in the critical ionization velocity phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Goertz, C. K.; Lu, G.

    1988-01-01

    The simulation of the critical ionization velocity for a neutral gas cloud moving across the static magnetic field is presented. A low-beta plasma is studied, using a two and a half-dimensional electrostatic code linked with the Plasma and Neutral Interaction Code (Goertz and Machida, 1987). The physics of the ionizing front and the instabilities which occur there are discussed. Results are presented from four numerical runs designed so that the effects of the charge separation field can be distinguished from the wave heating.

  10. Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment XANI onboard the INTERCOSMOS 24 - ``ACTIVE'' satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankov, L.; Gousheva, M.; Lefterov, A.; Binev, G.; Vassileva, A.; Potanin, Yu.; Dubinin, E.

    1993-10-01

    Satellite INTERCOSMOS-24 ``ACTIVE'' was launched on September 30 1989, with an initial apogee 2500 km, perigee 530 km and an orbital inclination of 82.2°. Under ``ACTIVE'' project, a wide number of plasma diagnostics instruments were especially designed to study the ionospheric response to high power VLF transmitter emissions, by means of satellite-subsatellite system during this mission. As a separate part of this project, a Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment called XANI (Xenon ANomalous Ionization) had been carried out to study neutral gas/plasma interaction processes in the ionosphere using neutral Xe gas injection. Seven Xe gas release experiments had been realized at daytime high latitude ionosphere. In this paper an Ion Drift Meter (IDM) and Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) data concerning transverse ion drift velocity vector measurements and total ion density variations during gas release experiment are shown. Two examples of the RPA data, taken after the beginning of Xe injection, show some prompt ionization at the ionization front about 30% in comparison with the background ion concentration. Horizontal ion drift of few hundred meters per second, transversal to the satellite velocity vector, had been observed at the ionization front.

  11. An assessment of the conditions for critical velocity ionization at the weakly magnetized planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that critical velocity ionization (CVI) may occur in the magnetosheaths of weakly magnetized planets where the solar wind flows through the planets' upper atmospheres. One can examine this possibility for Venus and Mars by using magnetosheath flow and exosphere models to determine whether the criteria for CVI are met. These criteria include Brenning's empirical condition on the cross-field flow velocity (it must not exceed the local magnetosonic velocity) and the 'Townsend condition' requiring that the integrated probability of impact ionization by a hot electron be greater than 1 along a streamline past the planet. Application of the Spreiter-Stahara gas dynamic flow model and the Nagy and coworkers' models for the exospheres lead to the conclusion that the conditions can be met in a limited region near Venus. However, evidence for CVI has not been identified in in-situ data. Since key details of the planet-solar wind interaction can be explained in terms of photoionization alone, other signatures of the process must be sought in the observations if the presence of CVI is to be positively inferred.

  12. Comparison between critical velocity and anaerobic threshold in deep water running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Oliveira

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The comparison between critical velocity and anaerobic threshold has not been investigated in deep water running. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare these two variables in this activity. Ten subjects of both sexes (23.1 ± 2.2 years, 174.0 ± 10.0 cm, 66.5 ± 18.7 kg and without previous practice in the activity weresubmitted to: 1 two to four familiarization sessions; 2 a progressive test, starting with velocity of 0.15 m.s-1 and increments of 0,05 m.s-1 every three minutes; 3 three tests of constant velocities in different days, with velocities ranging from 0.25 to 0.40 m.s-1. The comparison between anaerobic threshold (velocity at 3.5 mM and critical velocity (identified by three different equations was performed by analysis of variance and the Bland-Altman method. No significant differences were identified among the variables (p = 0.28, however, the limits of agreement provided by the Bland-Altman plots were very large (between –0.054 e +0.080 m.s-1. These results suggest caution when using the critical velocity to estimate the anaerobic threshold. RESUMO A comparação entre velocidade crítica e limiar anaeróbio não tem sido realizada em atividades como corrida aquática. Assim, o objetivo desse estudo foi comparar essas duas variáveis, ambas identificadas nesse tipo de exercício. Dez sujeitos de ambos os sexos (23,1 ± 2,2 anos, 174,0 ± 10,0 cm, 66,5 ± 18,7 kg, sem experiência prévia na modalidade, foram submetidos a: 1 de duas a quatro sessões de familiarização; 2 um teste de intensidade progressiva, com velocidade inicial de 0,15 m.s-1 e incrementos de 0,05 m.s-1 a cada três minutos; 3 três testes de velocidade constante, realizados em dias diferentes, com velocidades entre 0,25 a 0,40m.s-1. A comparação entre o limiar anaeróbio (velocidade referente a 3,5mM e a velocidade crítica (obtida por três equações diferentes foi feita pela análise de variância (ANOVA e técnica de Bland-Altman. Não foram

  13. Optical observations on the CRIT-II Critical Ionization Velocity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1990-01-01

    A rocket borne Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV0 experiment was carried out from Wallops Island at dusk on May 4, 1989. Two barium shaped charges were released below the solar terminator (to prevent photoionization) at altitudes near 400 km. The ambient ionospheric electron density was 50,000/cu cm. The neutral barium jet was directed upward and at an angle of nominally 45 degrees to B which gives approximately 3 x 10 to the 23rd neutrals with super critical velocity. Ions created by a CIV process in the region of the neutral jet would travel up along B into sunlight where they can be detected optically. Well defined ion clouds (max. brightness 750 R) were observed in both releases. An ionization rate of 0.8 percent/sec (125 sec ionization time constant) can account for the observed ion cloud near the release field line, but the ionization rate falls off with increasing distance from the release. It is concluded that a CIV process was present in the neutral jet out to about 50 km from the release, which is significantly further than allowed by current theories.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulations of the critical ionization velocity effect in finite size clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Lu, G.; Goertz, C. K.; Nishikawa, K. - I.

    1994-01-01

    The critical ionization velocity (CIV) mechanism in a finite size cloud is studied with a series of electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. It is observed that an initial seed ionization, produced by non-CIV mechanisms, generates a cross-field ion beam which excites a modified beam-plasma instability (MBPI) with frequency in the range of the lower hybrid frequency. The excited waves accelerate electrons along the magnetic field up to the ion drift energy that exceeds the ionization energy of the neutral atoms. The heated electrons in turn enhance the ion beam by electron-neutral impact ionization, which establishes a positive feedback loop in maintaining the CIV process. It is also found that the efficiency of the CIV mechanism depends on the finite size of the gas cloud in the following ways: (1) Along the ambient magnetic field the finite size of the cloud, L (sub parallel), restricts the growth of the fastest growing mode, with a wavelength lambda (sub m parallel), of the MBPI. The parallel electron heating at wave saturation scales approximately as (L (sub parallel)/lambda (sub m parallel)) (exp 1/2); (2) Momentum coupling between the cloud and the ambient plasma via the Alfven waves occurs as a result of the finite size of the cloud in the direction perpendicular to both the ambient magnetic field and the neutral drift. This reduces exponentially with time the relative drift between the ambient plasma and the neutrals. The timescale is inversely proportional to the Alfven velocity. (3) The transvers e charge separation field across the cloud was found to result in the modulation of the beam velocity which reduces the parallel heating of electrons and increases the transverse acceleration of electrons. (4) Some energetic electrons are lost from the cloud along the magnetic field at a rate characterized by the acoustic velocity, instead of the electron thermal velocity. The loss of energetic electrons from the cloud seems to be larger in the direction of

  15. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A plume of nitrous oxide gas is released from a compressed gas canister mounted on the increased capacity adaptive payload carrier 1 (ICAPC-1) on the forward port side of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). The gas release is part of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment conducted during STS-39. The Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS-II) 'parked' about two kilometers (km) away, is taking infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometric spatial, spectral, and temporal measurements of the gas plumes. Surrounding the CIV ICAPC-1 are: the ICAPC-2 payload support subsystem, radiometer, and Langmuir probe also mounted on the port side; the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (just beyond gas beam); and the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS).

  16. Numerical quasi-linear study of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Goertz, C. K.

    1993-01-01

    The critical ionization velocity (CIV) for a neutral barium (Ba) gas cloud moving across the static magnetic field is studied numerically using quasi-linear equations and a parameter range which is typical for the shaped-charge Ba gas release experiments in space. For consistency the charge exchange between the background oxygen ions and neutral atoms and its reverse process, as well as the excitation of the neutral Ba atoms, are included. The numerical results indicate that when the ionization rate due to CIV becomes comparable to the charge exchange rate the energy lost to the ionization and excitation collisions by the superthermal electrons exceeds the energy gain from the waves that are excited by the ion beam. This results in a CIV yield less than the yield by the charge exchange process.

  17. Interpretation of the electric fields measured in an ionospheric critical ionization velocity experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Marklund, G.; Haerendel, G.; Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R.

    1991-01-01

    The quasi-dc electric fields measured in the CRIT I ionospheric release experiment are studied. In the experiment, two identical barium shaped charges were fired toward a main payload, and three-dimensional measurements of the electric field inside the streams were made. The relevance of proposed mechanisms for electron heating in the critical ionization velocity (CIV) mechanism is addressed. It is concluded that both the 'homogeneous' and the 'ionizing front' models probably are valid, but in different parts of the streams. It is also possible that electrons are directly accelerated by a magnetic field-aligned component of the electric field. The coupling between the ambient ionosphere and the ionized barium stream is more complicated that is usually assumed in CIV theories, with strong magnetic-field-aligned electric fields and probably current limitation as important processes.

  18. Results of critical velocity experiments with barium, strontium, and calcium releases from CRRES satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Delamere, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) chemical release program in September 1990, two Ba and also one each Sr and Ca canisters of a boron-titanium thermite mixture, which vaporizes the element on ignition, were released near perigee after dusk in the South Pacific to study the critical velocity effect proposed by Alfven. The critical velocities of these three elements are 2.7, 3.5, and 5.4 km/s respectively, all well below the orbital velocity of 9.4 km/s. On September 10, 1990, a Sr and Ba pair (G-13, or critical ionization velocity (CIV) I) was released near Rarotonga at approximately 515 km altitude in a background electron density of 3.4 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. On September 14, 1990, G-14 or CIV II released a Ca and Ba pair west of New Caledonia near 595 km at an electron density of 1.5 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. Ions of all three elements were observed with low-light level imagers from two aircraft after they had transited up the magnetic field lines into the sunlight. Emissions from the spherically expanding neutral gas shells below the solar terminator, observed with cameras filtered for the Ba(+) ion line at 4554 A and also in unfiltered imagers for approximately 15 s after release, are probably due to excitation by hot electrons created in the CIV process. The ions created clearly lost much of their energy, which we now show can be explained by elastic collisions: Ba(+) + O. Inventories of the observed ions indicate yields of 0.15% and 1.84% for Ba in the first and second experiments, 0.02% for Sr and 0.27% for Ca. Ionization from all the releases continued along the satellite trajectory much longer (greater than 45 s) than expected for a CIV process. The ion production along the satellite track versus time typically shows a rapid rise to a peak in a few seconds followed by an exponential decrease to a level essentially constant rate. The characteristic distances for CIV I and II are 47 and 62 km, respectively. We interpret the

  19. The critical velocity effect as a cause for the H\\alpha emission from the Magellanic stream

    OpenAIRE

    Konz, C.; Lesch, H.; Birk, G. T.; Wiechen, H.

    2000-01-01

    Observations show significant H\\alpha-emissions in the Galactic halo near the edges of cold gas clouds of the Magellanic Stream. The source for the ionization of the cold gas is still a widely open question. In our paper we discuss the critical velocity effect as a possible explanation for the observed H\\alpha-emission. The critical velocity effect can yield a fast ionization of cold gas if this neutral gas passes through a magnetized plasma under suitable conditions. We show that for paramet...

  20. Star of Lima - Overview and optical diagnostics of a barium Alfven critical velocity experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T.; Foeppl, H.; Valenzuela, A.

    1986-01-01

    The Alfven critical velocity mechanism for ionization of a neutral gas streaming across the magnetic field has been demonstrated in laboratory experiments. In March 1983, two rocket-borne experiments with Ba and Sr tested the effect in the wall-less laboratory of space from Punto Lobos, Peru, near 430 km altitude. 'Star of Lima' used a conical Ba shaped charge aimed at an instrument payload about 2 km away. Because of rocket overperformance the detonation occurred in partial sunlight, so that less than 21.6 percent of the ionizing UV was present. Particle and field measurements indicate the production of hot electrons and waves in the energy and frequency range that are respectively predicted to produce a cascade of ionization by the Alfven mechanism. However, the ionization fluxes and wave energy density did not reach cascade levels, and optical observations indicate that only 2.5 to 5 x 10 to the 20th Ba ions were produced. A substantial portion and perhaps all of the ionization could have been produced by solar UV. The failure of the Alfven process in this experiment is not well understood.

  1. Augmentation of Critical Heat Flux of High Velocity Liquid Jet Flow utilizing Flat-Narrow Rectangular Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hisashi; Koizumi, Yasuo; Ohtake, Hiroyasu

    Sub-cooled flow boiling heat transfer experiments were performed for narrow-flat flow passages of 2 mm wide and 0.2 mm high. A heat transfer surface of 2 mm × 2 mm was placed at the just downstream of the flow channel outlet. A fast wall plane-jet was formed on the heat transfer surface and space for vapor generated on the heat transfer surface to leave freely form the plane jet was provided The experiments covered the flow rate from 5 m⁄s through 20 m⁄s and the inlet sub-cooling from 30 K through 70 K. Critical heat fluxes were greatly augmented about twice compared with those in the previous experiments where the heat transfer surface was located at the outlet end of the same flow channel as that in the present experiments. This has indicated that the present idea of the flow system is effective to enhance the critical heat flux. When the flow velocity was slower than 10 m⁄s, a large secondary bubble that was formed as a result of coalescence of many primary bubbles on the heat transfer surface covered the heat transfer surface. The large-coalesced bubble triggered the occurrence of the critical heat flux. When the flow velocity became faster than 10 m⁄s, the heat transfer surface was covered with many tiny-primary bubbles even at the critical heat flux condition. The critical heat fluxes in the present experiments were much larger than predictions of correlations. The triggering mechanism of the critical heat flux condition was proposed based on the observation mentioned above. It has two parts; for low flow velocity and for high flow velocity. The boundary is 10 m⁄s. In both cases, disappearance of a liquid film under the bubble due to evaporation is related to the appearance of the critical heat flux condition. The predicted critical heat fluxes were larger than that measured, however, qualitatively agreed well.

  2. Spiking and Excitatory/Inhibitory Input Dynamics of Barrel Cells in Response to Whisker Deflections of Varying Velocity and Angular Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mainak

    2018-01-15

    The spiking of barrel regular-spiking (RS) cells is tuned for both whisker deflection direction and velocity. Velocity tuning arises due to thalamocortical (TC) synchrony (but not spike quantity) varying with deflection velocity, coupled with feedforward inhibition, while direction selectivity is not fully understood, though may be due partly to direction tuning of TC spiking. Data show that as deflection direction deviates from the preferred direction of an RS cell, excitatory input to the RS cell diminishes minimally, but temporally shifts to coincide with the time-lagged inhibitory input. This work constructs a realistic large-scale model of a barrel; model RS cells exhibit velocity and direction selectivity due to TC input dynamics, with the experimentally observed sharpening of direction tuning with decreasing velocity. The model puts forth the novel proposal that RS→RS synapses can naturally and simply account for the unexplained direction dependence of RS cell inputs - as deflection direction deviates from the preferred direction of an RS cell, and TC input declines, RS→RS synaptic transmission buffers the decline in total excitatory input and causes a shift in timing of the excitatory input peak from the peak in TC input to the delayed peak in RS input. The model also provides several experimentally testable predictions on the velocity dependence of RS cell inputs. This model is the first, to my knowledge, to study the interaction of direction and velocity and propose physiological mechanisms for the stimulus dependence in the timing and amplitude of RS cell inputs. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimating the accuracy of the technique of reconstructing the rotational motion of a satellite based on the measurements of its angular velocity and the magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, M. Yu.; Volkov, O. N.; Monakhov, M. I.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The paper has studied the accuracy of the technique that allows the rotational motion of the Earth artificial satellites (AES) to be reconstructed based on the data of onboard measurements of angular velocity vectors and the strength of the Earth magnetic field (EMF). The technique is based on kinematic equations of the rotational motion of a rigid body. Both types of measurement data collected over some time interval have been processed jointly. The angular velocity measurements have been approximated using convenient formulas, which are substituted into the kinematic differential equations for the quaternion that specifies the transition from the body-fixed coordinate system of a satellite to the inertial coordinate system. Thus obtained equations represent a kinematic model of the rotational motion of a satellite. The solution of these equations, which approximate real motion, has been found by the least-square method from the condition of best fitting between the data of measurements of the EMF strength vector and its calculated values. The accuracy of the technique has been estimated by processing the data obtained from the board of the service module of the International Space Station ( ISS). The reconstruction of station motion using the aforementioned technique has been compared with the telemetry data on the actual motion of the station. The technique has allowed us to reconstruct the station motion in the orbital orientation mode with a maximum error less than 0.6° and the turns with a maximal error of less than 1.2°.

  4. Magnetorotational Turbulence Transports Angular Momentum in Stratified Disks with Low Magnetic Prandtl Number but Magnetic Reynolds Number above a Critical Value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist.

    2012-02-14

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) may dominate outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks, allowing material to fall onto the central object. Previous work has established that the MRI can drive a mean-field dynamo, possibly leading to a self-sustaining accretion system. Recently, however, simulations of the scaling of the angular momentum transport parameter {alpha}{sub SS} with the magnetic Prandtl number Pm have cast doubt on the ability of the MRI to transport astrophysically relevant amounts of angular momentum in real disk systems. Here, we use simulations including explicit physical viscosity and resistivity to show that when vertical stratification is included, mean field dynamo action operates, driving the system to a configuration in which the magnetic field is not fully helical. This relaxes the constraints on the generated field provided by magnetic helicity conservation, allowing the generation of a mean field on timescales independent of the resistivity. Our models demonstrate the existence of a critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub crit}, below which transport becomes strongly Pm-dependent and chaotic, but above which the transport is steady and Pm-independent. Prior simulations showing Pm-dependence had Rm < Rm{sub crit}. We conjecture that this steady regime is possible because the mean field dynamo is not helicity-limited and thus does not depend on the details of the helicity ejection process. Scaling to realistic astrophysical parameters suggests that disks around both protostars and stellar mass black holes have Rm >> Rm{sub crit}. Thus, we suggest that the strong Pm dependence seen in recent simulations does not occur in real systems.

  5. Predicting maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) from the critical velocity test in female collegiate rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Kristina L; Fukuda, David H; Smith, Abbie E; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the critical velocity (CV) test and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) and develop a regression equation to predict VO2max based on the CV test in female collegiate rowers. Thirty-five female (mean ± SD; age, 19.38 ± 1.3 years; height, 170.27 ± 6.07 cm; body mass, 69.58 ± 0.3 1 kg) collegiate rowers performed 2 incremental VO2max tests to volitional exhaustion on a Concept II Model D rowing ergometer to determine VO2max. After a 72-hour rest period, each rower completed 4 time trials at varying distances for the determination of CV and anaerobic rowing capacity (ARC). A positive correlation was observed between CV and absolute VO2max (r = 0.775, p VO2max (r = 0.414, p = 0.040). Based on the significant correlation analysis, a linear regression equation was developed to predict the absolute VO2max from CV and ARC (absolute VO2max = 1.579[CV] + 0.008[ARC] - 3.838; standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 0.192 L·min(-1)). Cross validation analyses were performed using an independent sample of 10 rowers. There was no significant difference between the mean predicted VO2max (3.02 L·min(-1)) and the observed VO2max (3.10 L·min(-1)). The constant error, SEE and validity coefficient (r) were 0.076 L·min(-1), 0.144 L·min(-1), and 0.72, respectively. The total error value was 0.155 L·min(-1). The positive relationship between CV, ARC, and VO2max suggests that the CV test may be a practical alternative to measuring the maximal oxygen uptake in the absence of a metabolic cart. Additional studies are needed to validate the regression equation using a larger sample size and different populations (junior- and senior-level female rowers) and to determine the accuracy of the equation in tracking changes after a training intervention.

  6. High efficiency angular non-critical phase matching for Ti:sapphire laser realized on LaCa4O(BO3)3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. Q.; Yu, F. P.; Qi, H. W.; Han, S.; Zhang, F.; Wang, Z. P.; Yu, X. Q.; Zhao, X.; Xu, X. G.

    2014-09-01

    Angular non-critical phase-matching (A-NCPM) second harmonic generation (SHG) for a Ti:sapphire laser was realized on LaCa4O(BO3)3 (LaCOB) single crystals, grown by the Czochralski pulling method. Properties including the wavelength, bandwidth, effective nonlinear optical (NLO) coefficient (deff), and acceptance angle were evaluated. At ambient temperature of 20 °C, the type-I NCPM (808 nm wavelength) was obtained along the y axis of LaCOB crystals, where the effective nonlinear optical coefficient (deff), PM waveband, and angular acceptance were found to be of the order of 0.59 pm/V, 803~818 nm and 50.6 mrad cm1/2 (ΔϕL), respectively. Moreover, high single-pass SHG conversion efficiency (44.6%) was achieved for 24.8 mm long Y-cut samples at 808 nm, using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire fundamental laser.

  7. Skeleton sled velocity profiles: a novel approach to understand critical aspects of the elite athletes' start phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colyer, Steffi L; Stokes, Keith A; Bilzon, James L J; Salo, Aki I T

    2017-02-28

    The development of velocity across the skeleton start is critical to performance, yet poorly understood. We aimed to understand which components of the sled velocity profile determine performance and how physical abilities influence these components. Thirteen well-trained skeleton athletes (>85% of athletes in the country) performed dry-land push-starts alongside countermovement jump and sprint tests at multiple time-points. A magnet encoder attached to the sled wheel provided velocity profiles, which were characterised using novel performance descriptors. Stepwise regression revealed four variables (pre-load velocity, pre-load distance, load effectiveness, velocity drop) to explain 99% variance in performance (β weights: 1.70, -0.81, 0.25, -0.07, respectively). Sprint times and jump ability were associated (r ± 90% CI) with pre-load velocity (-0.70 ± 0.27 and 0.88 ± 0.14, respectively) and distance (-0.48 ± 0.39 and 0.67 ± 0.29, respectively), however, unclear relationships between both physical measures and load effectiveness (0.33 ± 0.44 and -0.35 ± 0.48, respectively) were observed. Athletes should develop accelerative ability to attain higher velocity earlier on the track. Additionally, the loading phase should not be overlooked and may be more influenced by technique than physical factors. Future studies should utilise this novel approach when evaluating skeleton starts or interventions to enhance performance.

  8. A critical examination of the maximum velocity of shortening used in simulation models of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2010-12-01

    The maximum velocity of shortening of a muscle is an important parameter in musculoskeletal models. The most commonly used values are derived from animal studies; however, these values are well above the values that have been reported for human muscle. The purpose of this study was to examine the sensitivity of simulations of maximum vertical jumping performance to the parameters describing the force-velocity properties of muscle. Simulations performed with parameters derived from animal studies were similar to measured jump heights from previous experimental studies. While simulations performed with parameters derived from human muscle were much lower than previously measured jump heights. If current measurements of maximum shortening velocity in human muscle are correct, a compensating error must exist. Of the possible compensating errors that could produce this discrepancy, it was concluded that reduced muscle fibre excursion is the most likely candidate.

  9. A model to predict the critical velocity for liquid loss from a receding meniscus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Timothy A.; Schuetter, Scott D.; Nellis, Gregory F.; Van Peski, Chris K.

    2006-10-01

    This paper is a revision of the authors' previous work entitled "Experimental characterization of the receding meniscus under conditions associated with immersion lithography," presented in Optical Microlithography XIX, edited by Donis G. Flagello, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 6154 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 2006) 61540R. Several engineering challenges accompany the insertion of the immersion fluid in a production tool, one of the most important being the confinement of a relatively small amount of liquid to the under-lens region. The semiconductor industry demands high throughput, leading to relatively large wafer scan velocities and accelerations. These result in large viscous and inertial forces on the three-phase contact line between the liquid, air, and substrate. If the fluid dynamic forces exceed the resisting surface tension force then residual liquid is deposited onto the substrate that has passed beneath the lens. Liquid deposition is undesirable; as the droplets evaporate they will deposit impurities on the substrate. In an immersion lithography tool, these impurities may be transmitted to the printed pattern as defects. A substantial effort was undertaken relative to the experimental investigation of the static and dynamic contact angle under conditions that are consistent with immersion lithography. A semi-empirical model is described here in order to predict the velocity at which liquid loss occurs. This model is based on fluid physics and correlated to measurements of the dynamic and static contact angles. The model describes two regimes, an inertial and a capillary regime, that are characterized by two distinct liquid loss processes. The semi-empirical model provides the semiconductor industry with a useful predictive tool for reducing defects associated with film pulling.

  10. The determination of critical rest interval from the intermittent critical velocity test in club-level collegiate hockey and rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, David H; Smith, Abbie E; Kendall, Kristina L; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2011-04-01

    The intermittent critical velocity (ICV) test is used to quantify the relationship between velocity and time to exhaustion, yielding an aerobic parameter (ICV), an anaerobic parameter (anaerobic running capacity [ARC]), and critical rest interval (CRI). Critical rest interval is the theoretical rest period needed to maintain repeated bouts of exercise for an extended period of time without inducing fatigue during intermittent treadmill running. Fourteen collegiate, club-level male participants (mean ± SD; age: 21.4 ± 1.8 years; weight: 82.8 ± 5.9 kg; body fat: 11.8 ± 5.4%; and VO2max: 51.2 ± 2.8 ml · kg · min), primarily hockey and rugby players, completed the ICV test, using 15-second repeated sprints to exhaustion during separate sessions of treadmill running at varying supramaximal intensities. The time and total distance for each running session were used to determine ICV and ARC via linear regression. The CRI was calculated using the relationship between total distance during the ICV test and the number of intervals completed. Mean ICV and ARC (± SD) values were calculated as 4.80 ± 0.3 m · s and 154.1 ± 36 m, respectively. The mean ICV values were significantly different from the mean peak velocity (± SD) (4.67 ± 0.17 m · s) achieved during the VO2max test (p = 0.011). The CRI was calculated as mean ± SD: 33.9 ± 1.9 seconds. Body fat percentage measured by air displacement plethysmography (BOD POD®; r = -0.649; p = 0.012), lean body mass (r = -0.556; p = 0.039), fat mass (r = -0.634; p = 0.015), body weight (r = -0.669; p = 0.006), and relative VO2max (r = 0.562; p = 0.036) were significantly correlated with ICV. The ARC (r = 0.804; p = 0.001) and velocity at ventilatory threshold (r = -0.630; p = 0.016) were significantly correlated with CRI. The ability to quantify CRI, an additional variable derived from the ICV test, provides a possible measure that can be used in the prescription and evaluation of training methods.

  11. Effective Viscosity of Liquid Helium4 - With Minute He3 Impurity at Temperatures from 0.05K to 2K and at Velocities Spanning the Critical Velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    the goals of the FBM navigation system do not exist today . The present instruments are characterized by inaccuracies that tend to grow unacceptably with...excitation voltage e and amplifier gain G, and forex a linear system the DC output voltage e is directly proportional to theo angular displacement de0 e (4.4

  12. The Effect of Material Property on the Critical Velocity of Randomly Excited Nonlinear Axially Travelling Functionally Graded Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abedi

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, the critical axial speeds of three types of sigmoid, power law and exponential law functionally graded plates for both isotropic and orthotropic cases are obtained via a completely analytic method. The plates are subjected to lateral white noise excitation and show evidence of large deformations. Due to randomness, the conventional deterministic methods fail and a statistical approach must be selected. Here, the probability density function is evaluated analytically for prescribed plates and used to investigate the critical axial velocity of them. Specifically the effect of in-plane forces, mean value of lateral load and the material property on the critical axial speed are studied and discussed for both isotropic and orthotropic functionally graded plates. Since the governing equation is transformed to a non dimensional format, the results can be used for a wide range of plate dimensions. It is shown that the material heterogeneity palys an essential and significant role in increasing or decreasing the critical speed of both isotropic and orthotropic functionally graded plates.

  13. The CIV processes in the CRIT experiments. [reconciliation of Critical Ionization Velocity hypothesis with sounding rocket observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1992-01-01

    A qualitative analysis is conducted to reconcile the experimental data from critical ionization velocity (CIV) studies with CIV theories. The experimental data are reviewed demonstrating that: (1) the wave frequency is variable and low; (2) the wave polarization is almost isotropic; (3) electron energization is not easily reconciled with the observed wave spectrum; and (4) ambient electron density plays a role in determining CIV triggering conditions. Analytical treatment is given to the dispersion relation of the lower hybrid wave (LWH) instability driven by the streaming of an ion beam generated by the interaction of the neutral cloud with the ambient atmosphere. By incorporating the LWH instabilities of strong turbulence and finite-size effects into theoretical CIV relationships, the observations can be interpreted. The issues raised by the experimental data are understood within the context of a hypothesis of backward propagating nonlinearly collapsing wavepackets.

  14. Probing the critical zone using passive- and active-source estimates of subsurface shear-wave velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, R. P.; Taylor, N. J.; Pasquet, S.; Dueker, K. G.; Riebe, C. S.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2016-12-01

    Geophysical imaging is rapidly becoming popular for quantifying subsurface critical zone (CZ) architecture. However, a diverse array of measurements and measurement techniques are available, raising the question of which are appropriate for specific study goals. Here we compare two techniques for measuring S-wave velocities (Vs) in the near surface. The first approach quantifies Vs in three dimensions using a passive source and an iterative residual least-squares tomographic inversion. The second approach uses a more traditional active-source seismic survey to quantify Vs in two dimensions via a Monte Carlo surface-wave dispersion inversion. Our analysis focuses on three 0.01 km2 study plots on weathered granitic bedrock in the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. Preliminary results indicate that depth-averaged velocities from the two methods agree over the scales of resolution of the techniques. While the passive- and active-source techniques both quantify Vs, each method has distinct advantages and disadvantages during data acquisition and analysis. The passive-source method has the advantage of generating a three dimensional distribution of subsurface Vs structure across a broad area. Because this method relies on the ambient seismic field as a source, which varies unpredictably across space and time, data quality and depth of investigation are outside the control of the user. Meanwhile, traditional active-source surveys can be designed around a desired depth of investigation. However, they only generate a two dimensional image of Vs structure. Whereas traditional active-source surveys can be inverted quickly on a personal computer in the field, passive source surveys require significantly more computations, and are best conducted in a high-performance computing environment. We use data from our study sites to compare these methods across different scales and to explore how these methods can be used to better understand subsurface CZ architecture.

  15. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (μm). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  16. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-06-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ≥14 micrometers (μm). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS’ System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  17. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Monte Carlo Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Critical Ionization Velocity Experiments in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Biasca, R.; Liewer, P. C.

    1996-01-01

    Although the existence of the critical ionization velocity (CIV) is known from laboratory experiments, no agreement has been reached as to whether CIV exists in the natural space environment. In this paper we move towards more realistic models of CIV and present the first fully three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulations of typical space-based CIV experiments. In our model, the released neutral gas is taken to be a spherical cloud traveling across a magnetized ambient plasma. Simulations are performed for neutral clouds with various sizes and densities. The effects of the cloud parameters on ionization yield, wave energy growth, electron heating, momentum coupling, and the three-dimensional structure of the newly ionized plasma are discussed. The simulations suggest that the quantitative characteristics of momentum transfers among the ion beam, neutral cloud, and plasma waves is the key indicator of whether CIV can occur in space. The missing factors in space-based CIV experiments may be the conditions necessary for a continuous enhancement of the beam ion momentum. For a typical shaped charge release experiment, favorable CIV conditions may exist only in a very narrow, intermediate spatial region some distance from the release point due to the effects of the cloud density and size. When CIV does occur, the newly ionized plasma from the cloud forms a very complex structure due to the combined forces from the geomagnetic field, the motion induced emf, and the polarization. Hence the detection of CIV also critically depends on the sensor location.

  18. An alternative approach to the Army Physical Fitness Test two-mile run using critical velocity and isoperformance curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, David H; Smith, Abbie E; Kendall, Kristina L; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of critical velocity (CV) and isoperformance curves as an alternative to the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) two-mile running test. Seventy-eight men and women (mean +/- SE; age: 22.1 +/- 0.34 years; VO2(MAX): 46.1 +/- 0.82 mL/kg/min) volunteered to participate in this study. A VO2(MAX) test and four treadmill running bouts to exhaustion at varying intensities were completed. The relationship between total distance and time-to-exhaustion was tracked for each exhaustive run to determine CV and anaerobic running capacity. A VO2(MAX) prediction equation (Coefficient of determination: 0.805; Standard error of the estimate: 3.2377 mL/kg/min) was developed using these variables. Isoperformance curves were constructed for men and women to correspond with two-mile run times from APFT standards. Individual CV and anaerobic running capacity values were plotted and compared to isoperformance curves for APFT 2-mile run scores. Fifty-four individuals were determined to receive passing scores from this assessment. Physiological profiles identified from this procedure can be used to assess specific aerobic or anaerobic training needs. With the use of time-to-exhaustion as opposed to a time-trial format used in the two-mile run test, pacing strategies may be limited. The combination of variables from the CV test and isoperformance curves provides an alternative to standardized time-trial testing.

  19. Rate of change of angular bearing as the relevant property in a horizontal interception task during locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Matthieu; Musch, Eliane; Thiery, Evert; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2002-12-01

    The authors ran 3 experiments to investigate how catchers deal with the horizontal component of the ball's trajectory in an interception task during locomotion. The experiments were built upon the finding that velocity adaptations are based upon changes in the horizontal angular position or velocity of the ball with respect to the observer (M. Lenoir, M. Janssens, E. Musch, E. Thiery, J. Uyttenhove, 1999) a potential underlying information source for that strategy is described. In Experiment 1, actor (N = 10 participants)and ball approached each other along the legs of a V-shaped track. When the velocity and the initial angular bearing of the ball were varied, the observed behavior fitted with nulling the horizontal angular velocity of the ball: A positive or negative angular velocity was compensated by a velocity change. Evidence was obtained that those adaptations are modulated by a critical change in, rather than by a critical state of, the environment-actor system. In Experiment 2, the distance between the head and an artificial end-effector was varied. Irrespective of that distance, participants (N = 7) accelerated and decelerated in order to keep the angular velocity of the ball with respect to the end-effector close to constant. The ecological relevance of that constant bearing angle strategy was confirmed in Experiment 3: Participants (N = 7) in that experiment freely ran to catch fly balls. The present results support the concept that one can explain with a limited number of control variables an actor's behavior in an interception task during self-motion.

  20. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The angular momentum of the intermediate nucleus formed in incomplete fusion was deduced from the isomeric cross-section ratio by considering the statistical de-excitation of the incompletely fused composite nucleus. The data show that incomplete fusion is associated with angular momenta slightly smaller than critical ...

  1. Professional AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to AngularJS, Google's open-source client-side framework for app development. Most of the existing guides to AngularJS struggle to provide simple and understandable explanations for more advanced concepts. As a result, some developers who understand all the basic concepts of AngularJS struggle when it comes to building more complex real-world applications. Professional AngularJS provides a thorough understanding of AngularJS, covering everything from basic concepts, such as directives and data binding, to more advanced concepts like transclusion, build systems, and auto

  2. Negative velocity fluctuations and non-equilibrium fluctuation relation for a driven high critical current vortex state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Biplab; Shaw, Gorky; Banerjee, S S; Majumdar, Sayantan; Sood, A K; Grover, A K

    2017-07-17

    Under the influence of a constant drive the moving vortex state in 2H-NbS2 superconductor exhibits a negative differential resistance (NDR) transition from a steady flow to an immobile state. This state possesses a high depinning current threshold ([Formula: see text]) with unconventional depinning characteristics. At currents well above [Formula: see text], the moving vortex state exhibits a multimodal velocity distribution which is characteristic of vortex flow instabilities in the NDR regime. However at lower currents which are just above [Formula: see text], the velocity distribution is non-Gaussian with a tail extending to significant negative velocity values. These unusual negative velocity events correspond to vortices drifting opposite to the driving force direction. We show that this distribution obeys the Gallavotti-Cohen Non-Equilibrium Fluctuation Relation (GC-NEFR). Just above [Formula: see text], we also find a high vortex density fluctuating driven state not obeying the conventional GC-NEFR. The GC-NEFR analysis provides a measure of an effective energy scale (E eff ) associated with the driven vortex state. The E eff corresponds to the average energy dissipated by the fluctuating vortex state above [Formula: see text]. We propose the high E eff value corresponds to the onset of high energy dynamic instabilities in this driven vortex state just above [Formula: see text].

  3. Can the Critical Power Model Explain the Increased Peak Velocity/Power During Incremental Test After Concurrent Strength and Endurance Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Benedito S; Greco, Camila C

    2017-08-01

    Denadai, BS and Greco, CC. Can the critical power model explain the increased peak velocity/power during incremental test after concurrent strength and endurance training? J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2319-2323, 2017-The highest exercise intensity that can be maintained at the end of a ramp or step incremental test (i.e., velocity or work rate at V[Combining Dot Above]O2max - Vpeak/Wpeak) can be used for endurance performance prediction and individualization of aerobic training. The interindividual variability in Vpeak/Wpeak has been attributed to exercise economy, anaerobic capacity, and neuromuscular capability, alongside the major determinant of aerobic capacity. Interestingly, findings after concurrent strength and endurance training performed by endurance athletes have challenged the actual contribution of these variables. The critical power model usually derived from the performance of constant-work rate exercise can also explain tolerance to a ramp incremental exercise so that, Vpeak/Wpeak can be predicted accurately. However, there is not yet discussion of possible concomitant improvements in the parameters of the critical power model and Vpeak/Wpeak after concurrent training and whether they can be associated with and therefore depend on different neuromuscular adaptations. Therefore, this brief review presents some evidence that the critical power model could explain the improvement of Vpeak/Wpeak and should be used to monitor aerobic performance enhancement after different concurrent strength- and endurance-training designs.

  4. A kinematic model for calculating the magnitude of angular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we have formulated a model for calculating the magnitude of angular momentum transfer in a steady-state accretion disk using only two parameters; the transport coefficient of vorticity,w and the rate of change of angular velocity with radial distance, dW/ dR . With this model, the mass accretion rate in an accretion disk ...

  5. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  6. Angular dynamics of small crystals in viscous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, J.; Einarsson, J.; Mehlig, B.

    2017-01-01

    The angular dynamics of a very small ellipsoidal particle in a viscous flow decouples from its translational dynamics and the particle angular velocity is given by Jeffery's theory. It is known that cuboid particles share these properties. In the literature a special case is most frequently discussed, namely that of axisymmetric particles with a continuous rotation symmetry. Here we compute the angular dynamics of crystals that possess a discrete rotation symmetry and certain mirror symmetries but do not have a continuous rotation symmetry. We give examples of such particles that nevertheless obey Jeffery's theory. However, there are other examples where the angular dynamics is determined by a more general equation of motion.

  7. Angular momentum conservation for dynamical black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2006-11-01

    Angular momentum can be defined by rearranging the Komar surface integral in terms of a twist form, encoding the twisting around of space-time due to a rotating mass, and an axial vector. If the axial vector is a coordinate vector and has vanishing transverse divergence, it can be uniquely specified under certain generic conditions. Along a trapping horizon, a conservation law expresses the rate of change of angular momentum of a general black hole in terms of angular momentum densities of matter and gravitational radiation. This identifies the transverse-normal block of an effective gravitational-radiation energy tensor, whose normal-normal block was recently identified in a corresponding energy conservation law. Angular momentum and energy are dual, respectively, to the axial vector and a previously identified vector, the conservation equations taking the same form. Including charge conservation, the three conserved quantities yield definitions of an effective energy, electric potential, angular velocity and surface gravity, satisfying a dynamical version of the so-called first law of black-hole mechanics. A corresponding zeroth law holds for null trapping horizons, resolving an ambiguity in taking the null limit.

  8. Induced Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  9. The Effects of a Sport-Specific Maximal Strength and Conditioning Training on Critical Velocity, Anaerobic Running Distance, and 5-km Race Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Bettina; Stevens, Liesbeth; Colpus, Mark; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Naclerio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a sport-specific maximal 6-wk strength and conditioning program on critical velocity (CV), anaerobic running distance (ARD), and 5-km time-trial performance (TT). 16 moderately trained recreational endurance runners were tested for CV, ARD, and TT performances on 3 separate occasions (baseline, midstudy, and poststudy). Participants were randomly allocated into a strength and conditioning group (S&C; n = 8) and a comparison endurance-training-only group (EO; n = 8). During the first phase of the study (6 wk), the S&C group performed concurrent maximal strength and endurance training, while the EO group performed endurance-only training. After the retest of all variables (midstudy), both groups subsequently, during phase 2, performed another 6 wk of endurance-only training that was followed by poststudy tests. No significant change for CV was identified in either group. The S&C group demonstrated a significant decrease for ARD values after phases 1 and 2 of the study. TT performances were significantly different in the S&C group after the intervention, with a performance improvement of 3.62%. This performance increase returned close to baseline after the 6-wk endurance-only training. Combining a 6-wk resistance-training program with endurance training significantly improves 5-km TT performance. Removing strength training results in some loss of those performance improvements.

  10. Quantum Heuristics of Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Leblond, Jean-Marc

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the quantization of angular momentum components, Heisenberg-type inequalities for their spectral dispersions, and the quantization of the angular momentum modulus, without using operators or commutation relations. (MLH)

  11. Angular momentum evolution of galaxies in EAGLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Theuns, Tom; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Cortese, Luca; Padilla, Nelson D.; Davis, Timothy A.; Contreras, Sergio; Croton, Darren

    2017-02-01

    We use the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulation suite to study the specific angular momentum of galaxies, j, with the aims of (i) investigating the physical causes behind the wide range of j at fixed mass and (ii) examining whether simple, theoretical models can explain the seemingly complex and non-linear nature of the evolution of j. We find that j of the stars, jstars, and baryons, jbar, are strongly correlated with stellar and baryon mass, respectively, with the scatter being highly correlated with morphological proxies such as gas fraction, stellar concentration, (u-r) intrinsic colour, stellar age and the ratio of circular velocity to velocity dispersion. We compare with available observations at z = 0 and find excellent agreement. We find that jbar follows the theoretical expectation of an isothermal collapsing halo under conservation of specific angular momentum to within ≈50 per cent, while the subsample of rotation-supported galaxies are equally well described by a simple model in which the disc angular momentum is just enough to maintain marginally stable discs. We extracted evolutionary tracks of the stellar spin parameter of EAGLE galaxies and found that the fate of their jstars at z = 0 depends sensitively on their star formation and merger histories. From these tracks, we identified two distinct physical channels behind low jstars galaxies at z = 0: (i) galaxy mergers, and (ii) early star formation quenching. The latter can produce galaxies with low jstars and early-type morphologies even in the absence of mergers.

  12. Escape Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Vlacic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this project, we investigated if it is feasible for a single staged rocket with constant thrust to attain escape velocity. We derived an equation for the velocity and position of a single staged rocket that launches vertically. From this equation, we determined if an ideal model of a rocket is able to reach escape velocity.

  13. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. AngularJS directives

    CERN Document Server

    Vanston, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This book uses a practical, step-by-step approach, starting with how to build directives from the ground up before moving on to creating web applications comprised of multiple modules all working together to provide the best user experience possible.This book is intended for intermediate JavaScript developers who are looking to enhance their understanding of single-page web application development with a focus on AngularJS and the JavaScript MVC frameworks.It is expected that readers will understand basic JavaScript patterns and idioms and can recognize JSON formatted data.

  15. Intracycle Angular Velocity Control of Cross-Flow Turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Strom, Benjamin; Polagye, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, have numerous features that make them attractive for wind and marine renewable energy. To maximize power output, the turbine blade kinematics may be controlled during the course of the blade revolution, thus optimizing the unsteady fluid dynamic forces. Dynamically pitching the blades, similar to blade control in a helicopter, is an established method. However, this technique adds undesirable mechanical complexity to the turbine, increasing cost and reducing durability. Here we introduce a novel alternative requiring no additional moving parts: we optimize the turbine rotation rate as a function of blade position resulting in motion (including changes in the effective angle of attack) that is precisely timed to exploit unsteady fluid effects. We demonstrate experimentally that this approach results in a 79% increase in power output over industry standard control methods. Analysis of the fluid forcing and blade kinematics show that maximal power is ach...

  16. Angular Distribution of GRBs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Balázs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the complete randomness of the angular distribution of BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs. Based on their durations and peak fluxes, we divided the BATSE sample into 5 subsamples (short1, short2, intermediate, long1, long2 and studied the angular distributions separately. We used three methods to search for non-randomness in the subsamples: Voronoi tesselation, minimal spanning tree, and multifractal spectra. To study any non-randomness in the subsamples we defined 13 test-variables (9 from Voronoi tesselation, 3 from the minimal spanning tree and one from the multifractal spectrum. We made Monte Carlo simulations taking into account the BATSE’s sky-exposure function. We tested therandomness by introducing squared Euclidean distances in the parameter space of the test-variables. We recognized that the short1, short2 groups deviate significantly (99.90%, 99.98% from the fully random case in the distribution of the squared Euclidean distances but this is not true for the long samples. In the intermediate group, the squared Euclidean distances also give significant deviation (98.51%.

  17. Critically-rotating accretors and non-conservative evolution in Algols

    OpenAIRE

    Deschamps, R.; Siess, Lionel; Davis, Philip; Jorissen, Alain

    2013-01-01

    During the mass-transfer phase in Algol systems, a large amount of mass and angular momentum are accreted by the gainer star which can be accelerated up to its critical Keplerian velocity. The fate of the gainer once it reaches this critical value is unclear. We investigate the orbital and stellar spin evolution in semi-detached binary systems, specifically for systems with rapidly rotating accretors. Our aim is to better distinguish between the different spin-down mechanisms proposed which c...

  18. Demonstrating the Conservation of Angular Momentum Using Model Cars Moving along a Rotating Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an exciting non-traditional experiment for our introductory physics laboratories to help students to understand the principle of conservation of angular momentum. We used electric toy cars moving along a long rotating rod. As the cars move towards the centre of the rod, the angular velocity of this system increases.…

  19. WESTERBORK OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS - THE DATA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP

    1991-01-01

    The results of Westerbork * observations of small-scale structure in high-velocity clouds (HVCs) at 1' angular and 1 km s-1 velocity resolution are presented in the form of a table of observational parameters, maps of hydrogen column density, velocity-right ascension cuts, and histograms of the

  20. Closed-form overturning limit of rigid block under critical near-fault ground motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko eNabeshima

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A closed-form limit on the input level of the double impulse as a substitute of a near-fault ground motion is derived for the overturning of a rigid block. The rocking vibration of the rigid block is formulated by using the conservation law of angular momentum and the conservation law of mechanical energy. The initial rotational velocity after the first impulse and the rotational velocity after the impact are determined by the conservation law of angular momentum. The velocity change after the second impulse is also characterized by the conservation law of angular momentum. The maximum angles of rotation of the rigid block in both the clockwise and anti-clockwise directions, which are needed for the computation of the overturning limit, are derived by the conservation law of mechanical energy. This enables us to avoid the computation of complicated non-linear time-history responses. The critical timing of the second impulse to the first impulse is characterized by the time of impact after the first impulse. It is clarified that the action of the second impulse just after the impact corresponds to the critical timing. It is derived from the closed-form expression of the critical velocity amplitude limit of the double impulse that its limit is proportional to the square root of size, i.e. the scale effect.

  1. Vorticity Measurement using LG Laser Beams with Orbital Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooochesfahani, Manoochehr; Pouya, Shahram; Safaripour, Alireza; Ryabtsev, Anton; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-11-01

    We present direct measurement of vorticity in a fluid flow based on angular velocity measurement of microparticles contained in the fluid. The method uses Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) laser beams that possess orbital angular momentum (OAM), a spatial (azimuthal) modulation of the beam phase front, and takes advantage of the rotational Doppler shift from microparticles intersecting the beam focus. Results are shown for the flow field of solid body rotation, where the flow vorticity is known precisely. This work was supported by AFOSR Award Number FA9550-14-1-0312.

  2. AngularJS testing cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for developers who have an understanding of the basic principles behind both AngularJS and test-driven development. You, as a developer, are interested in eliminating the fear related to either introducing tests to an existing codebase or starting out testing on a fresh AngularJS application. If you're a team leader or part of a QA team with the responsibility of ensuring full test coverage of an application, then this book is ideal for you to comprehend the full testing scope required by your developers. Whether you're new to or are well versed with AngularJS, this book

  3. Gas kinematics, morphology and angular momentum in the FIRE simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Quataert, Eliot; Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Chan, T. K.; Fitts, Alex; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea

    2018-01-01

    We study the z = 0 gas kinematics, morphology and angular momentum content of isolated galaxies in a suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations from the FIRE project spanning Mstar = 106-11 M⊙. Gas becomes increasingly rotationally supported with increasing galaxy mass. In the lowest mass galaxies (Mstar < 108 M⊙), gas fails to form a morphological disc and is primarily dispersion and pressure supported. At intermediate masses (Mstar = 108-10 M⊙), galaxies display a wide range of gas kinematics and morphologies, from thin, rotating discs to irregular spheroids with negligible net rotation. All the high-mass (Mstar = 1010-11 M⊙) galaxies form rotationally supported gas discs. Many of the haloes whose galaxies fail to form discs harbour high angular momentum gas in their circumgalactic medium. The ratio of the specific angular momentum of gas in the central galaxy to that of the dark matter halo increases significantly with galaxy mass, from 〈jgas〉/〈jDM〉 ∼ 0.1 at M_star=10^{6-7} M_{⊙} to 〈jgas〉/〈jDM〉 ∼ 2 at Mstar = 1010-11 M⊙. The reduced rotational support in the lowest mass galaxies owes to (a) stellar feedback and the UV background suppressing the accretion of high angular momentum gas at late times, and (b) stellar feedback driving large non-circular gas motions. We broadly reproduce the observed scaling relations between galaxy mass, gas rotation velocity, size and angular momentum, but may somewhat underpredict the incidence of disky, high angular momentum galaxies at the lowest observed masses (Mstar = (106-2 × 107) M⊙). Stars form preferentially from low angular momentum gas near the galactic centre and are less rotationally supported than gas. The common assumption that stars follow the same rotation curve as gas thus substantially overestimates the simulated galaxies' stellar angular momentum, particularly at low masses.

  4. Orbital velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Modestino, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The trajectory and the orbital velocity are determined for an object moving in a gravitational system, in terms of fundamental and independent variables. In particular, considering a path on equipotential line, the elliptical orbit is naturally traced, verifying evidently the keplerian laws. The case of the planets of the solar system is presented.

  5. Instant AngularJS starter

    CERN Document Server

    Menard, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This book is written in an easytoread style, with a strong emphasis on realworld, practical examples. Stepbystep explanations are provided for performing important tasks.This book is for web developers familiar with JavascriptIt doesn't cover the history of AngularJS, and it's not a pitch to convince you that AngularJS is the best framework on the entire web. It's a guide to help you learn everything you need to know about AngularJS in as few pa

  6. Angular Limb Deformities: Growth Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrel, Taralyn M

    2017-08-01

    Angular limb deformities are common in foals; however, the importance of the deformity and if treatment is required depend on the degree of deformity relative to normal conformation for stage of growth, the breed and discipline expectations, age, and response to conservative therapies. This article addresses the importance of the foal conformation examination to determine which foals need surgical intervention to correct an angular deformity and when. Techniques for surgical growth retardation include the transphyseal staple, screw and wire transphyseal bridge, and transphyseal screw. Appropriate timing for intervention for each location and complications associated with each procedure are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamical critical scaling of electric field fluctuations in the greater cusp and magnetotail implied by HF radar observations of F-region Doppler velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Akasofu's solar wind ε parameter describes the coupling of solar wind energy to the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Analysis of fluctuations in ε using model independent scaling techniques including the peaks of probability density functions (PDFs and generalised structure function (GSF analysis show the fluctuations were self-affine (mono-fractal, single exponent scaling over 9 octaves of time scale from ~46 s to ~9.1 h. However, the peak scaling exponent α0 was a function of the fluctuation bin size, so caution is required when comparing the exponents for different data sets sampled in different ways. The same generic scaling techniques revealed the organisation and functional form of concurrent fluctuations in azimuthal magnetospheric electric fields implied by SuperDARN HF radar measurements of line-of-sight Doppler velocity, vLOS, made in the high-latitude austral ionosphere. The PDFs of vLOS fluctuation were calculated for time scales between 1 min and 256 min, and were sorted into noon sector results obtained with the Halley radar, and midnight sector results obtained with the TIGER radar. The PDFs were further sorted according to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field, as well as ionospheric regions of high and low Doppler spectral width. High spectral widths tend to occur at higher latitude, mostly on open field lines but also on closed field lines just equatorward of the open-closed boundary, whereas low spectral widths are concentrated on closed field lines deeper inside the magnetosphere. The vLOS fluctuations were most self-affine (i.e. like the solar wind ε parameter on the high spectral width field lines in the noon sector ionosphere (i.e. the greater cusp, but suggested multi-fractal behaviour on closed field lines in the midnight sector (i.e. the central plasma sheet. Long tails in the PDFs imply that "microbursts" in ionospheric convection

  8. Characterization of the Bell-Shaped Vibratory Angular Rate Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfang Fan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The bell-shaped vibratory angular rate gyro (abbreviated as BVG is a novel shell vibratory gyroscope, which is inspired by the Chinese traditional bell. It sensitizes angular velocity through the standing wave precession effect. The bell-shaped resonator is a core component of the BVG and looks like the millimeter-grade Chinese traditional bell, such as QianLong Bell and Yongle Bell. It is made of Ni43CrTi, which is a constant modulus alloy. The exciting element, control element and detection element are uniformly distributed and attached to the resonator, respectively. This work presents the design, analysis and experimentation on the BVG. It is most important to analyze the vibratory character of the bell-shaped resonator. The strain equation, internal force and the resonator's equilibrium differential equation are derived in the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. When the input angular velocity is existent on the sensitive axis, an analysis of the vibratory character is performed using the theory of thin shells. On this basis, the mode shape function and the simplified second order normal vibration mode dynamical equation are obtained. The coriolis coupling relationship about the primary mode and secondary mode is established. The methods of the signal processing and control loop are presented. Analyzing the impact resistance property of the bell-shaped resonator, which is compared with other shell resonators using the Finite Element Method, demonstrates that BVG has the advantage of a better impact resistance property. A reasonable means of installation and a prototypal gyro are designed. The gyroscopic effect of the BVG is characterized through experiments. Experimental results show that the BVG has not only the advantages of low cost, low power, long work life, high sensitivity, and so on, but, also, of a simple structure and a better impact resistance property for low and medium angular velocity measurements.

  9. Angular momentum in QGP holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The quark chemical potential is one of the fundamental parameters describing the quark–gluon plasma produced by sufficiently energetic heavy-ion collisions. It is not large at the extremely high temperatures probed by the LHC, but it plays a key role in discussions of the beam energy scan programmes at the RHIC and other facilities. On the other hand, collisions at such energies typically (that is, in peripheral collisions give rise to very high values of the angular momentum density. Here we explain that holographic estimates of the quark chemical potential of a rotating sample of plasma can be very considerably improved by taking the angular momentum into account.

  10. The Effects of a 6-Week Strength Training on Critical Velocity, Anaerobic Running Distance, 30-M Sprint and Yo-Yo Intermittent Running Test Performances in Male Soccer Players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Karsten

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of a moderate intensity strength training on changes in critical velocity (CV, anaerobic running distance (D', sprint performance and Yo-Yo intermittent running test (Yo-Yo IR1 performances.two recreational soccer teams were divided in a soccer training only group (SO; n = 13 and a strength and soccer training group (ST; n = 13. Both groups were tested for values of CV, D', Yo-Yo IR1 distance and 30-m sprint time on two separate occasions (pre and post intervention. The ST group performed a concurrent 6-week upper and lower body strength and soccer training, whilst the SO group performed a soccer only training.after the re-test of all variables, the ST demonstrated significant improvements for both, YoYo IR1 distance (p = 0.002 and CV values (p<0.001 with no significant changes in the SO group. 30-m sprint performance were slightly improved in the ST group with significantly decreased performance times identified in the SO group (p<0.001. Values for D' were slightly reduced in both groups (ST -44.5 m, 95% CI = -90.6 to 1.6; SO -42.6 m, 95% CI = -88.7 to 3.5.combining a 6-week moderate strength training with soccer training significantly improves CV, Yo-Yo IR1 whilst moderately improving 30-m sprint performances in non-previously resistance trained male soccer players. Critical Velocity can be recommended to coaches as an additional valid testing tool in soccer.

  11. The Effects of a 6-Week Strength Training on Critical Velocity, Anaerobic Running Distance, 30-M Sprint and Yo-Yo Intermittent Running Test Performances in Male Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Bettina; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Kandemir, Gokhan; Hazir, Tahir; Klose, Andreas; Naclerio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of a moderate intensity strength training on changes in critical velocity (CV), anaerobic running distance (D'), sprint performance and Yo-Yo intermittent running test (Yo-Yo IR1) performances. two recreational soccer teams were divided in a soccer training only group (SO; n = 13) and a strength and soccer training group (ST; n = 13). Both groups were tested for values of CV, D', Yo-Yo IR1 distance and 30-m sprint time on two separate occasions (pre and post intervention). The ST group performed a concurrent 6-week upper and lower body strength and soccer training, whilst the SO group performed a soccer only training. after the re-test of all variables, the ST demonstrated significant improvements for both, YoYo IR1 distance (p = 0.002) and CV values (p<0.001) with no significant changes in the SO group. 30-m sprint performance were slightly improved in the ST group with significantly decreased performance times identified in the SO group (p<0.001). Values for D' were slightly reduced in both groups (ST -44.5 m, 95% CI = -90.6 to 1.6; SO -42.6 m, 95% CI = -88.7 to 3.5). combining a 6-week moderate strength training with soccer training significantly improves CV, Yo-Yo IR1 whilst moderately improving 30-m sprint performances in non-previously resistance trained male soccer players. Critical Velocity can be recommended to coaches as an additional valid testing tool in soccer.

  12. Angular Motion Estimation Using Dynamic Models in a Gyro-Free Inertial Measurement Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otmar Loffeld

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we summarize the results of using dynamic models borrowed from tracking theory in describing the time evolution of the state vector to have an estimate of the angular motion in a gyro-free inertial measurement unit (GF-IMU. The GF-IMU is a special type inertial measurement unit (IMU that uses only a set of accelerometers in inferring the angular motion. Using distributed accelerometers, we get an angular information vector (AIV composed of angular acceleration and quadratic angular velocity terms. We use a Kalman filter approach to estimate the angular velocity vector since it is not expressed explicitly within the AIV. The bias parameters inherent in the accelerometers measurements’ produce a biased AIV and hence the AIV bias parameters are estimated within an augmented state vector. Using dynamic models, the appended bias parameters of the AIV become observable and hence we can have unbiased angular motion estimate. Moreover, a good model is required to extract the maximum amount of information from the observation. Observability analysis is done to determine the conditions for having an observable state space model. For higher grades of accelerometers and under relatively higher sampling frequency, the error of accelerometer measurements is dominated by the noise error. Consequently, simulations are conducted on two models, one has bias parameters appended in the state space model and the other is a reduced model without bias parameters.

  13. Angular motion estimation using dynamic models in a gyro-free inertial measurement unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwan, Ezzaldeen; Knedlik, Stefan; Loffeld, Otmar

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the results of using dynamic models borrowed from tracking theory in describing the time evolution of the state vector to have an estimate of the angular motion in a gyro-free inertial measurement unit (GF-IMU). The GF-IMU is a special type inertial measurement unit (IMU) that uses only a set of accelerometers in inferring the angular motion. Using distributed accelerometers, we get an angular information vector (AIV) composed of angular acceleration and quadratic angular velocity terms. We use a Kalman filter approach to estimate the angular velocity vector since it is not expressed explicitly within the AIV. The bias parameters inherent in the accelerometers measurements' produce a biased AIV and hence the AIV bias parameters are estimated within an augmented state vector. Using dynamic models, the appended bias parameters of the AIV become observable and hence we can have unbiased angular motion estimate. Moreover, a good model is required to extract the maximum amount of information from the observation. Observability analysis is done to determine the conditions for having an observable state space model. For higher grades of accelerometers and under relatively higher sampling frequency, the error of accelerometer measurements is dominated by the noise error. Consequently, simulations are conducted on two models, one has bias parameters appended in the state space model and the other is a reduced model without bias parameters.

  14. AngularJS test-driven development

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This book is for developers who want to learn about AngularJS development by applying testing techniques. You are assumed to have a basic knowledge and understanding of HTML, JavaScript, and AngularJS.

  15. The Limit Deposit Velocity model : A new approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.; Ramsdell, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    In slurry transport of settling slurries in Newtonian fluids, it is often stated that one should apply a line speed above a critical velocity, because blow this critical velocity there is the danger of plugging the line. There are many definitions and names for this critical velocity. It is referred

  16. AngularJS web application development

    CERN Document Server

    Darwin, Peter Bacon

    2013-01-01

    The book will be a step-by-step guide showing the readers how to build a complete web app with AngularJSJavaScript developers who want to learn AngularJS for developing web apps. Knowledge of JavaScript and HTML is expected. No knowledge of AngularJS is required.

  17. Dependency injection with AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Knol, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This book is a practical, hands-on approach to using dependency injection and implementing test-driven development using AngularJS. Dependency Injection with AngularJS is aimed at developers who are aware of AngularJS but need to get started with using it in real life applications. Also, developers who want to get into test-driven development with AngularJS can use this book as practical guide. Even if you know about dependency injection, it can serve as a good reference on how it is used within AngularJS. Readers are expected to have some experience with JavaScript.

  18. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  19. The role of angular momentum conservation law in statistical mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Dubrovskii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the limits of Khinchin ideas [A.Y. Khinchin, Mathematical Foundation of Statistical Mechanics. NY, Ed. Dover, 1949] the importance of momentum and angular momentum conservation laws was analyzed for two cases: for uniform magnetic field and when magnetic field is absent. The law of momentum conservation does not change the density of probability distribution in both cases, just as it is assumed in the conventional theory. It is shown that in systems where the kinetic energy depends only on particle momenta canonically conjugated with Cartesian coordinates being their diagonal quadric form,the angular momentum conservation law changes the density of distribution of the system only in case the full angular momentum of a system is not equal to zero. In the gas of charged particles in a uniform magnetic field the density of distribution also varies if the angular momentum is zero [see Dubrovskii I.M., Condensed Matter Physics, 2206, 9, 23]. Two-dimensional gas of charged particles located within a section of an endless strip filled with gas in magnetic field is considered. Under such conditions the angular momentum is not conserved. Directional particle flows take place close to the strip boundaries, and, as a consequence, the phase trajectory of the considered set of particles does not remain within the limited volume of the phase space. In order to apply a statistical thermodynamics method, it was suggested to consider near-boundary trajectories relative to a reference system that moves uniformly. It was shown that if the diameter of an orbit having average thermal energy is much smaller than a strip width, the corrections to thermodynamic functions are small depending on magnetic field. Only the average velocity of near-boundary particles that form near-boundary electric currents creating the paramagnetic moment turn out to be essential.

  20. Management of angular cheilitis for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajriani Fajriani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Angular cheilitis is one type of oral soft tissue disease that can occur in both children and adults, the condition is characterized by cracks and inflammation in both corners of the mouth. Although this disease does not cause severe disruption but quite disturbing activity and also one's physical appearance. Angular cheilitis light will disappear on their own over time.Severe conditions that can cause pain and bleading. aims to give feedback on peers about managment angular cheilitis in children.

  1. Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available . As the angular acceleration takes place in a bounded space, the azimuthal degree of freedom, such fields accelerate periodically as they propagate. Notably, the amount of angular acceleration is not limited by paraxial considerations, may be tailored for large...

  2. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Quaternion Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1998-01-01

    In most spacecraft (SC) there is a need to know the SC angular rate. Precise angular rate is required for attitude determination, and a coarse rate is needed for attitude control damping. Classically, angular rate information is obtained from gyro measurements. These days, there is a tendency to build smaller, lighter and cheaper SC, therefore the inclination now is to do away with gyros and use other means and methods to determine the angular rate. The latter is also needed even in gyro equipped satellites when performing high rate maneuvers whose angular-rate is out of range of the on board gyros or in case of gyro failure. There are several ways to obtain the angular rate in a gyro-less SC. When the attitude is known, one can differentiate the attitude in whatever parameters it is given and use the kinematics equation that connects the derivative of the attitude with the satellite angular-rate and compute the latter. Since SC usually utilize vector measurements for attitude determination, the differentiation of the attitude introduces a considerable noise component in the computed angular-rate vector.

  3. Responsive web design with AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Sandeep Kumar

    2014-01-01

    If you are an AngularJS developer who wants to learn about responsive web application development, this book is ideal for you. Responsive Web Design with AngularJS is intended for web developers or designers with a basic knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

  4. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, L.

    2017-02-01

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  5. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantities...

  6. Angular Momentum of Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Kirsty M.; Obreschkow, Danail; Oh, Se-Heon

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of baryonic mass {M}{{b}} and specific angular momentum (sAM) {j}{{b}} in 14 rotating dwarf Irregular (dIrr) galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS sample. These measurements, based on 21 cm kinematic data from the Very Large Array and stellar mass maps from the Spitzer Space Telescope, extend previous AM measurements by more than two orders of magnitude in {M}{{b}}. The dwarf galaxies show systematically higher {j}{{b}} values than expected from the {j}{{b}}\\propto {M}{{b}}2/3 scaling of spiral galaxies, representative of a scale-free galaxy formation scenario. This offset can be explained by decreasing baryon mass fractions {f}{{M}}={M}{{b}}/{M}{dyn} (where {M}{dyn} is the dynamical mass) with decreasing {M}{{b}} (for {M}{{b}}< {10}11 {M}⊙ ). We find that the sAM of neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) alone is about 2.5 times higher than that of the stars. The M-j relation of H I is significantly steeper than that of the stars, as a direct consequence of the systematic variation of the H I fraction with {M}{{b}}.

  7. Does high harmonic generation conserve angular momentum?

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Avner; Diskin, Tzvi; Sidorenko, Pavel; Cohen, Oren

    2013-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is a unique and useful process in which infrared or visible radiation is frequency up converted into the extreme ultraviolet and x ray spectral regions. As a parametric process, high harmonic generation should conserve the radiation energy, momentum and angular momentum. Indeed, conservation of energy and momentum have been demonstrated. Angular momentum of optical beams can be divided into two components: orbital and spin (polarization). Orbital angular momentum is assumed to be conserved and recently observed deviations were attributed to propagation effects. On the other hand, conservation of spin angular momentum has thus far never been studied, neither experimentally nor theoretically. Here, we present the first study on the role of spin angular momentum in extreme nonlinear optics by experimentally generating high harmonics of bi chromatic elliptically polarized pump beams that interact with isotropic media. While observing that the selection rules qualitatively correspond...

  8. Electromagnetic radiation in a medium with a velocity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, V. O.; Tereshin, A. A.; Bazleva, D. D.

    2016-04-01

    A relativistic expression has been obtained for the curvature of trajectory of the wave vector of an electromagnetic wave in a moving optically transparent medium. It has been shown that the curvature of the trajectory and angular deviation of rays appear in a homogeneous isotropic medium if the gradient of the velocity field in the medium is nonzero. The bending of the trajectory in the medium with the velocity gradient is a firstorder effect in the ratio u/ c.

  9. Star/disk interaction and angular momentum evolution model for solar-like stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallet Florian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic field in young stellar object is undoubtedly the most important component when one dealing with the angular momentum evolution. It controls this latter one from the pre-main sequence, during the so-called disk locking phase where the stars magnetically interact with their surrounding disk, to the main-sequence through powerful stellar winds that remove angular momentum from the stellar surface. We present new models for the rotational evolution of solar-like stars between 1 Myr and 10 Gyr with the aim to reproduce the distributions of rotational periods observed for star forming regions and young open clusters within this age range. We based our simulation on a recent model dedicated to the study of the angular momentum evolution of solar-type stars. This model include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetized stellar winds and a specific dynamo and mass-loss prescription are used to link the angular momentum loss-rate to angular velocity evolution. The model additionally allows for a core/envelope decoupling with an angular momentum transfer between these two regions. Since this former model didn’t include any physical star/disk interaction description, two star/disk interaction processes are eventually added to it in order to reproduce the apparent small angular velocities to which the stellar surface is subject during the disk accretion phase. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow, median and fast rotators including two star/disk interaction scenarios that are the magnetospheric ejection and the accretion powered stellar winds processes. The models appear to fail at reproducing the rotational behaviour of solar-type stars except when a more intense magnetic field is used during the disk accretion phase.

  10. Angular momentum conservation for dynamical black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2006-01-01

    Angular momentum can be defined by rearranging the Komar surface integral in terms of a twist form, encoding the twisting around of space-time due to a rotating mass, and an axial vector. If the axial vector is a coordinate vector and has vanishing transverse divergence, it can be uniquely specified under certain generic conditions. Along a trapping horizon, a conservation law expresses the rate of change of angular momentum of a general black hole in terms of angular momentum densities of ma...

  11. Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ) Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes Christian Schulze,1 Filippus S. Roux,2 Angela Dudley,2 Ronald Rop,3 Michael Duparre´,1 and Andrew Forbes2,4,* 1Institute of Applied Optics, Friedrich Schiller University, Fro¨belstieg 1, 07743 Jena... from the transverse acceleration discussed before. We tailor our “twisted light” (fields carrying orbital angular momentum) to have a nonlinear phase variation with azimuthal angle, which we show is the building block for angular accelerating light...

  12. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitive, specific, and label-free classification of microscopic cells and organisms is one of the outstanding problems in biology. Today, instruments such as the flow cytometer use a combination of light scatter measurements at two distinct angles to infer the size and internal complexity...... of cells at rates of more than 10,000 per second. However, by examining the entire angular light scattering spectrum it is possible to classify cells with higher resolution and specificity. Current approaches to performing these angular spectrum measurements all have significant throughput limitations...... Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering (REALS), this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof...

  13. Mastering AngularJD for .NET developers

    CERN Document Server

    Majid, Mohammad Wadood

    2015-01-01

    This book is envisioned for traditional developers and programmers who want to develop client-side applications using the AngularJS framework and ASP.NET Web API 2 with Visual Studio. .NET developers who have already built web applications or web services and who have a fundamental knowledge of HTML, JavaScript, and CSS and want to explore single-page applications will also find this guide useful. Basic knowledge of AngularJS would be helpful.

  14. Broadband measurement of translational and angular vibrations using a single continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Muhammad; Sabra, Karim G

    2012-09-01

    A continuous scanning laser Doppler velocimetry (CSLDV) technique is used to measure the low frequency broadband vibrations associated with human skeletal muscle vibrations (typically f laser beam over distances that are short compared to the characteristic wavelengths of the vibrations. The high frequency scan (compared to the vibration frequency) enables the detection of broadband translational and angular velocities at a single point using amplitude demodulation of the CSDLV signal. For instance, linear scans allow measurement of the normal surface velocity and one component of angular velocity vector, while circular scans allow measurement of an additional angular velocity component. This CSLDV technique is first validated here using gel samples mimicking soft tissues and then applied to measure multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) of a subject's hand exhibiting fatigue-induced tremor. Hence this CSLDV technique potentially provides a means for measuring multiple DOF of small human body parts (e.g., fingers, tendons, small muscles) for various applications (e.g., haptic technology, remote surgery) when the use of skin-mounted sensors (e.g. accelerometers) can be problematic due to mass-loading artifacts or tethering issues.

  15. Angular distributions of ions channeled in the <1 0 0> Si crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovic, S; Kokkoris, M; Neskovic, N

    2002-01-01

    In this study we analyze the angular distributions of Ne sup 1 sup 0 sup + ions channeled in the Si crystals. The ion energy is 60 MeV and the crystal thickness is varied from 286 to 3435 nm. This thickness range corresponds to the reduced crystal thickness range from 0.5 to 6, i.e. from the second to the twelfth rainbow cycle. The angular distributions were obtained via the numerical solution of the ion equations of motion and the computer simulation method. The analysis shows that the angular distribution has a periodic behavior. We also analyze the transmission patterns corresponding to the angular distributions. These patterns should be compared to the experimental patterns obtainable by a two-dimensional position sensitive detector. We demonstrate that, when the ion beam divergence is sufficiently large, i.e. much larger than the critical angle for channeling, the channeling star effect occurs in the transmission patterns.

  16. The role of pelvis and thorax rotation velocity in baseball pitching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaff, E; Hoozemans, M; Nijhoff, M.; Davidson, M; Hoezen, M; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the relative timing of pelvis and thorax rotations in achieving high throwing velocities in baseball pitching. During the preseason, a kinematic analysis was performed on eight pitchers. Peak angular velocities of the pelvis and thorax were

  17. How much mass and angular momentum can the progenitors of carbon-enriched stars accrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrozis, E.; Abate, C.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2017-10-01

    The chemically peculiar barium stars, CH stars, and most carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars are all believed to be the products of mass transfer in binary systems from a now extinct asymptotic giant branch (AGB) primary star. The mass of the AGB star and the orbital parameters of the system are the key factors usually considered when determining how much mass is transferred onto the lower-mass main-sequence companion. What is usually neglected, however, is the angular momentum of the accreted material, which should spin up the accreting star. If the star reaches critical rotation, further accretion should cease until the excess angular momentum is somehow dealt with. If the star cannot redistribute or lose the angular momentum while the primary is on the AGB, the amount of mass accreted could be much lower than otherwise expected. Here we present calculations, based on detailed stellar evolution models, of the mass that can be accreted by putative progenitors of Ba and CEMP stars before they reach critical rotation under the assumption that no angular momentum loss occurs during the mass transfer. We consider different accretion rates and values of specific angular momentum. The most stringent limits on the accreted masses result from considering accretion from a Keplerian accretion disk, which is likely present during the formation of most extrinsically-polluted carbon-enriched stars. Our calculations indicate that in this scenario only about 0.05 M⊙ of material can be added to the accreting star before it reaches critical rotation, which is much too low to explain the chemical enrichment of many Ba and CEMP stars. Either the specific angular momentum of the accreted material has to effectively be lower by about a factor of ten than the Keplerian value, or significant angular momentum losses must occur for substantial accretion to take place.

  18. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...... estimator automatically compensates for the axial velocity, when determining the transverse velocity by using fourth order moments rather than second order moments. The estimation is optimized by using a lag different from one in the estimation process, and noise artifacts are reduced by using averaging...... of RF samples. Further, compensation for the axial velocity can be introduced, and the velocity estimation is done at a fixed depth in tissue to reduce spatial velocity dispersion....

  19. Angular momentum exchange in white dwarf binaries accreting through direct impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepinsky, J. F. [Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, The University of Scranton, Scranton, PA 18510 (United States); Kalogera, V., E-mail: jeremy.sepinsky@scranton.edu, E-mail: vicky@northwestern.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    We examine the exchange of angular momentum between the component spins and the orbit in semi-detached double white dwarf binaries undergoing mass transfer through direct impact of the transfer stream. We approximate the stream as a series of discrete massive particles ejected in the ballistic limit at the inner Lagrangian point of the donor toward the accretor. This work improves upon similar earlier studies in a number of ways. First, we self-consistently calculate the total angular momentum of the orbit at all times. This includes changes in the orbital angular momentum during the ballistic trajectory of the ejected mass, as well as changes during the ejection/accretion due to the radial component of the particle's velocity. Second, we calculate the particle's ballistic trajectory for each system, which allows us to determine the precise position and velocity of the particle upon accretion. We can then include specific information about the radius of the accretor as well as the angle of impact. Finally, we ensure that the total angular momentum is conserved, which requires the donor star spin to vary self-consistently. With these improvements, we calculate the angular momentum change of the orbit and each binary component across the entire parameter space of direct impact double white dwarf binary systems. We find a significant decrease in the amount of angular momentum removed from the orbit during mass transfer, as well as cases where this process increases the angular momentum of the orbit at the expense of the spin angular momentum of the donor. We conclude that, unlike earlier claims in the literature, mass transfer through direct impact need not destabilize the binary and that the quantity and sign of the orbital angular momentum transfer depends on the binary properties, particularly the masses of the double white dwarf binary component stars. This stabilization may significantly impact the population synthesis calculations of the expected

  20. Transverse angular momentum in topological photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Min; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Fu-Li; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2018-01-01

    Engineering local angular momentum of structured light fields in real space enables applications in many fields, in particular, the realization of unidirectional robust transport in topological photonic crystals with a non-trivial Berry vortex in momentum space. Here, we show transverse angular momentum modes in silicon topological photonic crystals when considering transverse electric polarization. Excited by a chiral external source with either transverse spin angular momentum or transverse phase vortex, robust light flow propagating along opposite directions is observed in several kinds of sharp-turn interfaces between two topologically-distinct silicon photonic crystals. A transverse orbital angular momentum mode with alternating phase vortex exists at the boundary of two such photonic crystals. In addition, unidirectional transport is robust to the working frequency even when the ring size or location of the pseudo-spin source varies in a certain range, leading to the superiority of the broadband photonic device. These findings enable one to make use of transverse angular momentum, a kind of degree of freedom, to achieve unidirectional robust transport in the telecom region and other potential applications in integrated photonic circuits, such as on-chip robust delay lines.

  1. GEODVEL, MORVEL, and the velocity of Earth's center (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, D.; Gordon, R. G.; Demets, C.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of plate velocities from geodesy depend on the velocity of Earth’s center, which is the point relative to which geodetic site motions are described. In GEODVEL [Argus et al. 2010], a set of estimates of the velocities of 11 plates from space observations from GPS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS over 25 yr, we define Earth’s center to be (CE) the mass center of solid Earth. We simultaneously estimate the angular velocities of the plates and the velocity of CE assuming that, besides plate motion, the parts of the plate interiors not near the late Pleistocene ice sheets are not moving horizontally relative to CE, that is, that these parts of the plate interiors are rigid laterally. We find the velocity of CE to differ significantly from the velocity of CM in ITRF2005 and ITRF2008. The velocity of CE that we estimate is likely nearer the velocity of (CM) the composite mass center of solid Earth, oceans, and atmosphere than the estimates in ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 because (1) no phenomena can sustain a velocity between CE and CM, (2) the plate interiors are indeed nearly rigid, and (3) estimates of the velocity of CM from SLR observation of satellite LAGEOS differ between ITRF2000 and ITRF2005 by an unacceptably large 1.8 mm/yr. Plate velocities in GEODVEL differ significantly from those in geologically current plate motion model MORVEL [DeMets et al. 2010], which is estimated mainly from transform azimuths and spreading rates from magnetic anomalies 1 to 3 Myr. The median vector difference between the GEODVEL and MORVEL sets of angular velocities is 0.046 °/Myr, which is on average ≈2.5 mm/yr along Earth’s surface. The biggest change in plate velocity since 3 Ma is that the east component of velocity of the Nazca plate has slowed. A second big change is that the north component of velocity of Nubia, Arabia, and India relative to Eurasia has slowed, because continental crust is difficult to subduct. The velocities of composite plates (e.g. Nubia, Somalia and

  2. Angular Spectral Analysis and Lowpass Filtering of Aeromagnetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total-field aeromagnetic data over the western half of the Bornu basin and its surrounding areas were analyzed using angular spectral analysis, upward continuation and lowpass filtering techniques. Results revealed several angular spectral peaks at various angular orientations. The angular orientations correlated with the ...

  3. Data-oriented development with AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Waikar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    This book helps beginner-level AngularJS developers organize AngularJS applications by discussing important AngularJS concepts and best practices. If you are an experienced AngularJS developer but haven't written directives or haven't created custom HTML controls before, then this book is ideal for you.

  4. Rotational Angles and Velocities During Down the Line and Diagonal Across Court Volleyball Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Brown

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The volleyball spike is an explosive movement that is frequently used to end a rally and earn a point. High velocity spikes are an important skill for a successful volleyball offense. Although the influence of vertical jump height and arm velocity on spiked ball velocity (SBV have been investigated, little is known about the relationship of shoulder and hip angular kinematics with SBV. Other sport skills, like the baseball pitch share similar movement patterns and suggest trunk rotation is important for such movements. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of both shoulder and hip angular kinematics with ball velocity during the volleyball spike. Methods: Fourteen Division I collegiate female volleyball players executed down the line (DL and diagonally across-court (DAC spikes in a laboratory setting to measure shoulder and hip angular kinematics and velocities. Each spike was analyzed using a 10 Camera Raptor-E Digital Real Time Camera System.  Results: DL SBV was significantly greater than for DAC, respectively (17.54±2.35 vs. 15.97±2.36 m/s, p<0.05.  The Shoulder Hip Separation Angle (S-HSA, Shoulder Angular Velocity (SAV, and Hip Angular Velocity (HAV were all significantly correlated with DAC SBV. S-HSA was the most significant predictor of DAC SBV as determined by regression analysis.  Conclusions: This study provides support for a relationship between a greater S-HSA and SBV. Future research should continue to 1 examine the influence of core training exercise and rotational skill drills on SBV and 2 examine trunk angular velocities during various types of spikes during play.

  5. Close binary evolution. II. Impact of tides, wind magnetic braking, and internal angular momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. F.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Ekström, S.; Eggenberger, P.; Georgy, C.; Qin, Y.; Fragos, T.; Soerensen, M.; Barblan, F.; Wade, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Massive stars with solar metallicity lose important amounts of rotational angular momentum through their winds. When a magnetic field is present at the surface of a star, efficient angular momentum losses can still be achieved even when the mass-loss rate is very modest, at lower metallicities, or for lower-initial-mass stars. In a close binary system, the effect of wind magnetic braking also interacts with the influence of tides, resulting in a complex evolution of rotation. Aims: We study the interactions between the process of wind magnetic braking and tides in close binary systems. Methods: We discuss the evolution of a 10 M⊙ star in a close binary system with a 7 M⊙ companion using the Geneva stellar evolution code. The initial orbital period is 1.2 days. The 10 M⊙ star has a surface magnetic field of 1 kG. Various initial rotations are considered. We use two different approaches for the internal angular momentum transport. In one of them, angular momentum is transported by shear and meridional currents. In the other, a strong internal magnetic field imposes nearly perfect solid-body rotation. The evolution of the primary is computed until the first mass-transfer episode occurs. The cases of different values for the magnetic fields and for various orbital periods and mass ratios are briefly discussed. Results: We show that, independently of the initial rotation rate of the primary and the efficiency of the internal angular momentum transport, the surface rotation of the primary will converge, in a time that is short with respect to the main-sequence lifetime, towards a slowly evolving velocity that is different from the synchronization velocity. This "equilibrium angular velocity" is always inferior to the angular orbital velocity. In a given close binary system at this equilibrium stage, the difference between the spin and the orbital angular velocities becomes larger when the mass losses and/or the surface magnetic field increase. The

  6. Visual reaction times during prolonged angular acceleration parallel the subjective perception of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of prolonged angular acceleration on choice reaction time to an accelerating visual stimulus was investigated, with 10 commercial airline pilots serving as subjects. The pattern of reaction times during and following acceleration was compared with the pattern of velocity estimates reported during identical trials. Both reaction times and velocity estimates increased at the onset of acceleration, declined prior to the termination of acceleration, and showed an aftereffect. These results are inconsistent with the torsion-pendulum theory of semicircular canal function and suggest that the vestibular adaptation is of central origin.

  7. Chirality and angular momentum in optical radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, Matt M

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops, in precise quantum electrodynamic terms, photonic attributes of the "optical chirality density", one of several measures long known to be conserved quantities for a vacuum electromagnetic field. The analysis lends insights into some recent interpretations of chiroptical experiments, in which this measure, and an associated chirality flux, have been treated as representing physically distinctive "superchiral" phenomena. In the fully quantized formalism the chirality density is promoted to operator status, whose exploration with reference to an arbitrary polarization basis reveals relationships to optical angular momentum and helicity operators. Analyzing multi-mode beams with complex wave-front structures, notably Laguerre-Gaussian modes, affords a deeper understanding of the interplay between optical chirality and optical angular momentum. By developing theory with due cognizance of the photonic character of light, it emerges that only the spin angular momentum of light is engaged in such...

  8. Energy angular momentum closed-loop guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patera, Russell P.

    2015-03-01

    A novel guidance algorithm for launch vehicle ascent to the desired mission orbit is proposed. The algorithm uses total specific energy and orbital angular momentum as new state vector parameters. These parameters are ideally suited for the ascent guidance task, since the guidance algorithm steers the launch vehicle along a pre-flight optimal trajectory in energy angular momentum space. The guidance algorithm targets apogee, perigee, inclination and right ascension of ascending node. Computational complexities are avoided by eliminating time in the guidance computation and replacing it with angular momentum magnitude. As a result, vehicle acceleration, mass, thrust, length of motor burns, and staging times are also eliminated from the pitch plane guidance calculations. The algorithm does not involve launch vehicle or target state propagation, which results in minimal computational effort. Proof of concept of the new algorithm is presented using several numerical examples that illustrate performance results.

  9. Signal processing related to the vestibulo-ocular reflex during combined angular rotation and linear translation of the head

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, R. A.; Chen-Huang, C.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The contributions of vestibular nerve afferents and central vestibular pathways to the angular (AVOR) and linear (LVOR) vestibulo-ocular reflex were studied in squirrel monkeys during fixation of near and far targets. Irregular vestibular afferents did not appear to be necessary for the LVOR, since when they were selectively silenced with galvanic currents the LVOR was essentially unaffected during both far- and near-target viewing. The linear translation signals generated by secondary AVOR neurons in the vestibular nuclei were, on average, in phase with head velocity, inversely related to viewing distance, and were nearly as strong as AVOR-related signals. We suggest that spatial-temporal transformation of linear head translation signals to angular eye velocity commands is accomplished primarily by the addition of viewing distance multiplied, centrally integrated, otolith regular afferent signals to angular VOR pathways.

  10. Whole-body angular momentum during stair walking using passive and powered lower-limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickle, Nathaniel T; Wilken, Jason M; Aldridge, Jennifer M; Neptune, Richard R; Silverman, Anne K

    2014-10-17

    Individuals with a unilateral transtibial amputation have a greater risk of falling compared to able-bodied individuals, and falling on stairs can lead to serious injuries. Individuals with transtibial amputations have lost ankle plantarflexor muscle function, which is critical for regulating whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic balance. Recently, powered prostheses have been designed to provide active ankle power generation with the goal of restoring biological ankle function. However, the effects of using a powered prosthesis on the regulation of whole-body angular momentum are unknown. The purpose of this study was to use angular momentum to evaluate dynamic balance in individuals with a transtibial amputation using powered and passive prostheses relative to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent and descent. Ground reaction forces, external moment arms, and joint powers were also investigated to interpret the angular momentum results. A key result was that individuals with an amputation had a larger range of sagittal-plane angular momentum during prosthetic limb stance compared to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent. There were no significant differences in the frontal, transverse, or sagittal-plane ranges of angular momentum or maximum magnitude of the angular momentum vector between the passive and powered prostheses during stair ascent or descent. These results indicate that individuals with an amputation have altered angular momentum trajectories during stair walking compared to able-bodied individuals, which may contribute to an increased fall risk. The results also suggest that a powered prosthesis provides no distinct advantage over a passive prosthesis in maintaining dynamic balance during stair walking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Converging evidence for the neuroanatomic basis of combinatorial semantics in the angular gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Amy R; Bonner, Michael F; Peelle, Jonathan E; Grossman, Murray

    2015-02-18

    Human thought and language rely on the brain's ability to combine conceptual information. This fundamental process supports the construction of complex concepts from basic constituents. For example, both "jacket" and "plaid" can be represented as individual concepts, but they can also be integrated to form the more complex representation "plaid jacket." Although this process is central to the expression and comprehension of language, little is known about its neural basis. Here we present evidence for a neuroanatomic model of conceptual combination from three experiments. We predicted that the highly integrative region of heteromodal association cortex in the angular gyrus would be critical for conceptual combination, given its anatomic connectivity and its strong association with semantic memory in functional neuroimaging studies. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that the process of combining concepts to form meaningful representations specifically modulates neural activity in the angular gyrus of healthy adults, independent of the modality of the semantic content integrated. We also found that individual differences in the structure of the angular gyrus in healthy adults are related to variability in behavioral performance on the conceptual combination task. Finally, in a group of patients with neurodegenerative disease, we found that the degree of atrophy in the angular gyrus is specifically related to impaired performance on combinatorial processing. These converging anatomic findings are consistent with a critical role for the angular gyrus in conceptual combination. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353276-09$15.00/0.

  12. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s−2. Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability.

  13. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model approach. The shell model calculations have been performed using the standard universal sd-shell (USD) interaction and the canonical ...

  14. Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Pessah, Martin; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    if the resolution were set equal to the natural dissipation scale in astrophysical disks. We conclude that, in order for MRI-driven turbulent angular momentum transport to be able to account for the large value of the effective alpha viscosity inferred observationally, the disk must be threaded by a significant...

  15. Angular and linear momentum of excited ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, P.; Kamra, A.; Cao, Y.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2013-01-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist

  16. Angular correlations near the Fermi energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, D.; Cebra, D.A.; Karn, J.; Parks, C.; Pradhan, A.; Plicht, J. van der; Westfall, G.D.; Wilson, W.K.; Tickle, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Angular correlations between light particles have been studied to probe the extent to which a thermally equilibrated system is formed in heavy ion collisions near the Fermi energy. Single-light-particle inclusive energy spectra and two-particle large-angle correlations were measured for 40 and 50

  17. Angular Spectrum Simulation of Pulsed Ultrasound Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang; Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    geometries for any kind of focusing and apodization. The Angular Spectrum Approach (ASA) is capable of simulating monochromatic non-linear acoustic wave propagation. However, for ultrasound imaging the time response of each specific point in space is required, and a pulsed ASA simulation with multi temporal...

  18. High-Velocity Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, Bart P.; Woerden, Hugo van; Oswalt, Terry D.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The high-velocity clouds (HVCs) are gaseous objects that do not partake in differential galactic rotation, but instead have anomalous velocities. They trace energetic processes on the interface between the interstellar material in the Galactic disk and intergalactic space. Three different processes

  19. Effect of Reduced Stiffness Dance Flooring on Lower Extremity Joint Angular Trajectories During a Ballet Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, James; Brummel, Sara; Newman, Mary; Scott, Shannon; Reinagel, Matthew; Smith, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    We carried out a study to investigate how low stiffness flooring may help prevent overuse injuries of the lower extremity in dancers. It was hypothesized that performing a ballet jump (sauté) on a reduced stiffness dance floor would decrease maximum joint flexion angles and negative angular velocities at the hips, knees, or ankles compared to performing the same jump on a harder floor. The participants were 15 young adult female dancers (age range 18 to 28, mean = 20.89 ± 2.93 years) with at least 5 years of continuous ballet experience and without history of serious lower body injury, surgery, or recent pain. They performed sautés on a (low stiffness) Harlequin ® WoodSpring Floor and on a vinyl-covered hardwood on concrete floor. Maximum joint flexion angles and negative velocities at bilateral hips, knees, and ankles were measured with the "Ariel Performance Analysis System" (APAS). Paired one-tailed t-tests yielded significant decreases in maximum knee angle (average decrease = 3.4° ± 4.2°, p = 0.026) and angular negative velocity of the ankles (average decrease = 18.7°/sec ± 27.9°/sec, p = 0.009) with low stiffness flooring. If the knee angle is less acute, then the length of the external knee flexion moment arm will also be shorter and result in a smaller external knee flexion moment, given an equal landing force. Also, high velocities of eccentric muscle contraction, which are necessary to control negative angular velocity of the ankle joint, are associated with higher risk of musculotendinous injury. Hence, our findings indicate that reduced floor stiffness may indeed help decrease the likelihood of lower extremity injuries.

  20. Two-particle angular correlations in $e^+ e^-$ interactions compared with QCD predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerruti, C; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Collins, P; Colomer, M; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Damgaard, G; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Gris, P; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Masik, J; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rakoczy, D; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Silvestre, R; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1998-01-01

    Two--particle angular correlations in jet cones have been measured in $e^+e^-$ annihilation into hadrons at LEP energies ($\\sqrt{s}=$ 91 and 183~GeV) and are compared with QCD predictions using the LPHD hypothesis. Two different functions have been tested. While the differentially normalized correlation function shows substantial deviations from the predictions, a globally normalized correlation function agrees well. The size of $\\alpha_S^{\\rm eff}$ (and other QCD parameters) and its running with the relevant angular scale, the validity of LPHD, and problems due to non--perturbative effects are discussed critically.

  1. Progress Toward A Very High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendyke, Clarence M.; Vourlidas, A.; Landi, E.; Seely, J.; Klimchuck, J.

    2007-07-01

    Recent imaging at arcsecond (TRACE) and sub-arcsecond (VAULT) spatial resolution clearly show that structures with fine spatial scales play a key role in the physics of the upper solar atmosphere. Both theoretical and observational considerations point to the importance of small spatial scales, impulsive energy release, strong dynamics, and extreme plasma nonuniformity. Fundamental questions regarding the nature, structure, properties and dynamics of loops and filamentary structures in the upper atmosphere have been raised. To address these questions, we are developing a next generation, VEry high angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS) as a sounding rocket instrument. VERIS will obtain the necessary high spatial resolution, high fidelity measurements of plasma temperatures, densities and velocities. With broad simultaneous temperature coverage, the VERIS observations will directly address unresolved issues relating to interconnections of various temperature solar plasmas. VERIS will provide the first ever subarcsecond spectra of transition region and coronal structures. It will do so with a sufficient spectral resolution of to allow centroided Doppler velocity determinations to better than 3 km/s. VERIS uses a novel two element, normal incidence optical design with highly reflective EUV coatings to access a spectral range with broad temperature coverage (0.03-15 MK) and density-sensitive line ratios. Finally, in addition to the spectra, VERIS will simultaneously obtain spectrally pure slot images (10x150 arcsec) in the +/-1 grating orders, which can be combined to make instantaneous line-of-sight velocity maps with 8km/s accuracy over an unprecedented field of view. The VERIS program is beginning the second year of its three year development cycle. All design activities and reviews are complete. Fabrication of all major components has begun. Brassboard electronics cards have been fabricated, assembled and tested. The paper presents the essential scientific

  2. Offset tolerance of an orbital angular momentum optical communication system with angular deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-li; Sang, Hong-qing; Cui, Xiao-Zhou; Chang, Huan; Li, Li; Wu, Guo-hua

    2017-06-01

    This work studied the offset tolerance (OT) with a particular focus on the angular deflection of an orbital angular momentum (OAM) system in free space. We derived an analytical expression of the OT for an angular-deflected Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam via Fourier series (FS) expansion and determined the upper bound of the OT for OAM-multiplexed systems. Next, we analyzed the effects of the beam waist, transmitted distance and OAM state number on the OT numerically. The calculation results indicate that the OT of the deflected beam is inversely proportional to the square root of the OAM number and approximately reciprocal to the propagation distance. Finally, we calculated the bit-error rate (BER) and aggregated capacity of multiplexed systems with different sets of channels. The results confirmed that the estimated upper bound is reasonable, especially for larger mode spacings. This work can provide guidance for the design and optimization of angular-deflected OAM-multiplexed communication systems.

  3. Soft Neurological Signs in Childhood by Measurement of Arm Movements Using Acceleration and Angular Velocity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Kaneko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft neurological signs (SNS are evident in the motor performance of children and disappear as the child grows up. Therefore SNS are used as criteria for evaluating age-appropriate development of neurological function. The aim of this study was to quantify SNS during arm movement in childhood. In this study, we focused on pronation and supination, which are arm movements included in the SNS examination. Two hundred and twenty-three typically developing children aged 4–12 years (107 boys, 116 girls and 18 adults aged 21–26 years (16 males, two females participated in the experiment. To quantify SNS during pronation and supination, we calculated several evaluation index scores: bimanual symmetry, compliance, postural stability, motor speed and mirror movement. These index scores were evaluated using data obtained from sensors attached to the participants’ hands and elbows. Each score increased as age increased. Results obtained using our system showed developmental changes that were consistent with criteria for SNS. We were able to successfully quantify SNS during pronation and supination. These results indicate that it may be possible to use our system as quantitative criteria for evaluating development of neurological function.

  4. Elbow joint angle and elbow movement velocity estimation using NARX-multiple layer perceptron neural network model with surface EMG time domain parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Retheep; Sivanandan, K S

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of elbow dynamics has been the object of numerous investigations. In this work a solution is proposed for estimating elbow movement velocity and elbow joint angle from Surface Electromyography (SEMG) signals. Here the Surface Electromyography signals are acquired from the biceps brachii muscle of human hand. Two time-domain parameters, Integrated EMG (IEMG) and Zero Crossing (ZC), are extracted from the Surface Electromyography signal. The relationship between the time domain parameters, IEMG and ZC with elbow angular displacement and elbow angular velocity during extension and flexion of the elbow are studied. A multiple input-multiple output model is derived for identifying the kinematics of elbow. A Nonlinear Auto Regressive with eXogenous inputs (NARX) structure based multiple layer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) model is proposed for the estimation of elbow joint angle and elbow angular velocity. The proposed NARX MLPNN model is trained using Levenberg-marquardt based algorithm. The proposed model is estimating the elbow joint angle and elbow movement angular velocity with appreciable accuracy. The model is validated using regression coefficient value (R). The average regression coefficient value (R) obtained for elbow angular displacement prediction is 0.9641 and for the elbow anglular velocity prediction is 0.9347. The Nonlinear Auto Regressive with eXogenous inputs (NARX) structure based multiple layer perceptron neural networks (MLPNN) model can be used for the estimation of angular displacement and movement angular velocity of the elbow with good accuracy.

  5. Antarctic Ice Velocity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This compilation of recent ice velocity data of the Antarctic ice sheet is intended for use by the polar scientific community. The data are presented in tabular form...

  6. Ultra-sensitive and super-resolving angular rotation measurement based on photon orbital angular momentum using parity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Cen, Longzhu; Zhang, Jiandong; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-15

    Photon orbital angular momentum has led to many novel insights and applications in quantum measurement. Photon orbital angular momentum can increase the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement. However, quantum measurement strategy can further surpass this limit and improve the resolution of angular rotation measurement. This Letter proposes and demonstrates a parity measurement method in angular rotation measurement scheme for the first time. Parity measurement can make the resolution superior to the limit of the existing method. The sensitivity can be improved with higher orbital angular momentum photons. Moreover, this Letter gives a detailed discussion of the change of resolution and sensitivity in the presence of photon loss.

  7. Nucleon form factors, generalized parton distributions and quark angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kroll, Peter [Bergische Univ., Wuppertal (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-02-15

    We extract the individual contributions from u and d quarks to the Dirac and Pauli form factors of the proton, after a critical examination of the available measurements of electromagnetic nucleon form factors. From this data we determine generalized parton distributions for valence quarks, assuming a particular form for their functional dependence. The result allows us to study various aspects of nucleon structure in the valence region. In particular, we evaluate Ji's sum rule and estimate the total angular momentum carried by valence quarks at the scale {mu}=2 GeV to be J{sup u}{sub v}=0.230{sup +0.009}{sub -0.024} and J{sup d}{sub v}=-0.004{sup +0.010}{sub -0.016}.

  8. Angular distributions of bremsstrahlung photons from ECR plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumwenda, M. J.; Ahn, J. K.; Lee, J. W.; Lugendo, I. J.; Kim, S. J.; Park, J. Y.; Won, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    High-energy bremsstrahlung photon emission beyond a critical energy from electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating has long attracted much attention, and its nature has yet been unsolved. We have measured bremsstrahlung photons from the 28-GHz ECR ion source at Busan Center of Korean Basic Science Institute. The gamma-ray detection system consists of three NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors placed 62 cm radially from the beam axis and a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector at the extraction port for monitoring the photon intensity along the beam axis. Bremsstrahlung photon energy spectra were measured at nine azimuthal angles at the RF power of 1 kW. Azimuthal angular distributions of bremsstrahlung photons were found to be in coincidence with the structure the ECR ion source and the shape of ECR plasma.

  9. Power spectra of the angular fractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xihua; Zhu, Yafen; Zhou, Yueming

    1993-09-01

    Based on the angular backbone taken from the triangular Sierpinski gasket, several seLf-similar structures are disigned, corresponding diffraction screens are made, and the Fraunhofer patterns as power spectra of them are given. Based upon a viewpoint of generative production and by means of the ui-branched displacement operation, we have found the recurrence formulae of spectral structure factor for these angular fractals. As a example, the recurrence formulae of power spectra for a coherent point group is given, corresponding a series of curves as well as an isogram are plotted. The analysis of result shows that the power spectra of this fractal point group has a rotation symmetry and a mirror symmetry, and appears a period doubling phenomenon which follows the process of generative production.

  10. Quantum entanglement of high angular momenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Plick, William N; Krenn, Mario; Schaeff, Christoph; Ramelow, Sven; Zeilinger, Anton

    2012-11-02

    Single photons with helical phase structures may carry a quantized amount of orbital angular momentum (OAM), and their entanglement is important for quantum information science and fundamental tests of quantum theory. Because there is no theoretical upper limit on how many quanta of OAM a single photon can carry, it is possible to create entanglement between two particles with an arbitrarily high difference in quantum number. By transferring polarization entanglement to OAM with an interferometric scheme, we generate and verify entanglement between two photons differing by 600 in quantum number. The only restrictive factors toward higher numbers are current technical limitations. We also experimentally demonstrate that the entanglement of very high OAM can improve the sensitivity of angular resolution in remote sensing.

  11. Transverse spectral velocity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    A transverse oscillation (TO)-based method for calculating the velocity spectrum for fully transverse flow is described. Current methods yield the mean velocity at one position, whereas the new method reveals the transverse velocity spectrum as a function of time at one spatial location. A convex array probe is used along with two different estimators based on the correlation of the received signal. They can estimate the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, but they also work at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The approach is validated using simulations of pulsatile flow using the Womersly-Evans flow model. The relative bias of the mean estimated frequency is 13.6% and the mean relative standard deviation is 14.3% at 90°, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with an experimental scanner and a convex array transducer. A pump generated artificial femoral and carotid artery flow in the phantom. The estimated spectra degrade when the angle is different from 90°, but are usable down to 60° to 70°. Below this angle the traditional spectrum is best and should be used. The conventional approach can automatically be corrected for angles from 0° to 70° to give fully quantitative velocity spectra without operator intervention.

  12. The Angular Trispectrum of the CMB

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wayne

    2001-01-01

    We study the general properties of the CMB temperature four-point function, specifically its harmonic analogue the angular trispectrum, and illustrate its utility in finding optimal quadratic statistics through the weak gravitational lensing effect. We determine the general form of the trispectrum, under the assumptions of rotational, permutation, and parity invariance, its estimators on the sky, and their Gaussian noise properties. The signal-to-noise in the trispectrum can be highly configu...

  13. Coherent Control of Photoelectron Wavepacket Angular Interferograms

    OpenAIRE

    Hockett, Paul; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Baumert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the cohere...

  14. Diffracted optical vortices by an angular aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    López H., Paula A.; Reyes Q., Zayda P.; Guzmán, Ángela M.; Torres M., Yezid; Mendoza C., Jesús H.

    2017-08-01

    The measurement of the topological charge of laser beams with orbital angular momentum (OAM) is key to many applications like deciphering information encoded in several channels. Current techniques useful for that purpose are interferometry, diffraction through different poligonal apertures like triangular or pentagonal and, azimuthal and radial decomposition. A less explored issue is the diffraction of OAM beams through circular sectors. Jack et al. studied the angular diffraction of Gaussian beams (whose OAM is null) through a circular sector. By means of a Fourier transform of the truncated Gaussian beam they showed that the orbital angular momentum spectrum of the transmitted beam has a sinc-shaped envelope centered at zero orbital angular momentum, the width of which increases as the central angle of the circular sector decreases. We analyze here the spectrum of a laser beam with integer OAM that has been diffracted by a circular sector. We present results for circular sectors of different central angles. For circular π-sector, we also study the influence of the transmittance in the OAM spectra of the transmitted beam, using straight borders of nanometric thin films of titanium oxide with different thicknesses. We use a spatial light modulator with a fork hologram placed on to generate the incoming OAM beam and measure the evolution of the intensity profile of the diffracted beam as it propagates away from the circular sector. The spectra of the diffracted OAM beams are shown numerically and experimentally to have a sinc shaped envelope centered at the OAM value of the incoming OAM wave.

  15. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    OpenAIRE

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzm?n, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approac...

  16. Sorting and quantifying orbital angular momentum of laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel tool for sorting the orbital angular momentum and to determine the orbital angular momentum density of laser beams, which is based on the use of correlation filters....

  17. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriage, Tobias; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John; Bennett, Charles; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from inflation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  18. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  19. Verification of angular dependence in MOSFET detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Clayton H.; Shorto, Julian M.B.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Nunes, Maíra G.; Silva Junior, Iremar A.; Yoriyaz, Hélio, E-mail: chsouza@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry is an essential tool for quality assurance programs, being a procedure commonly performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) or diodes. However, a type of dosimeter that has increasing popularity in recent years is the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector. MOSFET dosimeters fulfill all the necessary characteristics to realize in vivo dosimetry since it has a small size, good precision and feasibility of measurement, as well as easy handling. Nevertheless, its true differential is to allow reading of the dose in real time, enabling immediate intervention in the correction of physical parameters deviations and anticipation of small anatomical changes in a patient during treatment. In order for MOSFET dosimeter to be better accepted in clinical routine, information reporting performance should be available frequently. For this reason, this work proposes to verify reproducibility and angular dependence of a standard sensitivity MOSFET dosimeter (TN-502RD-H) for Cs-137 and Co-60 sources. Experimental data were satisfactory and MOSFET dosimeter presented a reproducibility of 3.3% and 2.7% (1 SD) for Cs-137 and Co-60 sources, respectively. In addition, an angular dependence of up to 6.1% and 16.3% for both radioactive sources, respectively. It is conclusive that MOSFET dosimeter TN-502RD-H has satisfactory reproducibility and a considerable angular dependence, mainly for the Co-60 source. This means that although precise measurements, special attention must be taken for applications in certain anatomical regions in a patient. (author)

  20. Angular light modulator using optical blinds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Zichao; Alhudaithy, Soliman; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Zibang; Guo, Kaikai; Bian, Liheng; Tomizawa, Yuji; Satonick, Peter; Hoshino, Kazunori; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-12-12

    Spatial light modulator (SLM) is widely used in imaging applications for modulating light intensity and phase delay. In this paper, we report a novel device concept termed angular light modulator (ALM). Different from the SLM, the reported ALM employs a tunable blind structure to modulate the angular components of the incoming light waves. For spatial-domain light modulation, the ALM can be directly placed in front of an image sensor for selecting different angular light components. In this case, we can sweep the slat angle of the blind structure and capture multiple images corresponding to different perspectives. These images can then be back-projected for 3D tomographic refocusing. By using a fixed slat angle, we can also convert the incident-angle information into intensity variations for wavefront sensing or introduce a translational shift to the defocused object for high-speed autofocusing. For Fourier-domain light modulation, the ALM can be placed at the pupil plane of an optical system for reinforcing the light propagating trajectories. We show that a pupil-plane-modulated system is able to achieve a better resolution for out-of-focus objects while maintaining the same resolution for in-focus objects. The reported ALM can be fabricated on the chip level and controlled by an external magnetic field. It may provide new insights for developing novel imaging and vision devices.

  1. Constraints on Radial Migration in Spiral Galaxies - II. Angular momentum distribution and preferential migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Kathryne J.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2018-01-01

    The orbital angular momentum of individual stars in galactic discs can be permanently changed through torques from transient spiral patterns. Interactions at the corotation resonance dominate these changes and have the further property of conserving orbital circularity. We derived in an earlier paper an analytic criterion that an unperturbed stellar orbit must satisfy in order for such an interaction to occur i.e. for it to be in a trapped orbit around corotation. We here use this criterion in an investigation of how the efficiency of induced radial migration for a population of disc stars varies with the angular momentum distribution of that population. We frame our results in terms of the velocity dispersion of the population, this being an easier observable than is the angular momentum distribution. Specifically, we investigate how the fraction of stars in trapped orbits at corotation varies with the velocity dispersion of the population, for a system with an assumed flat rotation curve. Our analytic results agree with the finding from simulations that radial migration is less effective in populations with `hotter' kinematics. We further quantify the dependence of this trapped fraction on the strength of the spiral pattern, finding a higher trapped fraction for higher amplitude perturbations.

  2. Angular momentum independence of the entropy sum and entropy product for AdS rotating black holes in all dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the angular momentum independence of the entropy sum and product for AdS rotating black holes based on the first law of thermodynamics and a mathematical lemma related to Vandermonde determinant. The advantage of this method is that the explicit forms of the spacetime metric, black hole mass and charge are not needed but the Hawking temperature and entropy formula on the horizons are necessary for static black holes, while our calculations require the expressions of metric and angular velocity formula. We find that the entropy sum is always independent of angular momentum for all dimensions and the angular momentum-independence of entropy product only holds for the dimensions d>4 with at least one rotation parameter ai=0, while the mass-free of entropy sum and entropy product for rotating black holes only stand for higher dimensions (d>4 and for all dimensions, respectively. On the other hand, we find that the introduction of a negative cosmological constant does not affect the angular momentum-free of entropy sum and product but the criterion for angular momentum-independence of entropy product will be affected.

  3. A novel methodology for the angular position identification of the unbalance force on asymmetric rotors by response polar plot analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín Ocampo, Jorge; Gutiérrez Wing, Enrique S.; Ramírez Moroyoqui, Félix J.; Abúndez Pliego, Arturo; Blanco Ortega, Andrés; Mayén, Jan

    2017-10-01

    It is well known that some mechanical systems, as a two pole generator, exhibit two different stiffness on the main inertial axis of its transverse section, which leads to complex vibration modes and complicates the determination of the angular position of the unbalance force and, consequently, the balancing process by conventional methods. Therefore, a methodology for the angular position identification of the unbalance force, based on a two-degrees-of-freedom mathematical simplified model of a rotor with unequal principal moments of inertia of the shaft transverse section, is proposed in this work. The methodology requires the analysis of the response polar plots of the rotor, as well as the information of the vibration response of at least four points from the response polar plot: vibration amplitude, phase angle and the angular velocity of the rotor. The identification of the unbalance force angular position was numerically and experimentally validated using the response polar plots experimentally acquired from a Jeffcott type rotor, which exhibits unequal principal moments of inertia of shaft transverse section and two inertial disks, which were analyzed for several unbalance force angular positions. The results showed slight differences between the identified and the experimental angular positions.

  4. Orbital angular momentum exchange in parametric down conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguenin, J. A. O.; Martinelli, M.; Caetano, D. P.; Coutinho Dos Santos, B.; Almeida, M. P.; Souto Ribeiro, P. H.; Nussenzveig, P.; Khoury, A. Z.

    2006-05-01

    Orbital angular momentum exchange, both in cavity free stimulated parametric down conversion and in an optical parametric oscillator, is studied. In both cases, the conditions for parametric amplification are discussed in terms of the orbital angular momentum exchange between the interacting fields. It is shown that in cavity free parametric down conversion, parametric amplification is conditioned to conserve orbital angular momentum. However, for parametric oscillation, cavity and anisotropy effects play a crucial role in the orbital angular momentum exchange between the interacting fields.

  5. Spherical angular spectrum and the fractional order Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellat-Finet, Pierre; Durand, Pierre-Emmanuel; Fogret, Eric

    2006-12-01

    The notion of a spherical angular spectrum leads to the decomposition of the field amplitude on a spherical emitter into a sum of spherical waves that converge onto the Fourier sphere of the emitter. Unlike the usual angular spectrum, the spherical angular spectrum is propagated as the field amplitude, in a way that can be expressed by a fractional order Fourier transform.

  6. High-velocity penetrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Ronald G.

    This paper summarizes the results of studies, coupled with a series of tests, that investigated rigid-body projectiles (penetrators) at high (up to 5500 ft/sec) velocities. Before these studies, it had been hypothesized that a velocity limit would be reached at which increasing the velocity would not commensurately increase depth of penetration into a target. It was further inferred that a given velocity/ penetration depth curve would avalanche into the hydrodynamic regime; that is, increasing the velocity past a certain point would decrease penetration performance. The test series utilized 1/2-in., 3-in., and 5 1/2-in. diameter, ogive-nose steel projectiles and grout and concrete targets. The tests confirmed that penetration depth increased as striking velocity increased to 4000 ft/sec. However, beyond striking velocities of 4000 ft/sec, asymmetric erosion and indentation of the projectile nose from the aggregate caused the projectile trajectories to deviate severely from the target centerline. These trajectory deviations caused the projectile to exit the side of the target, severely bend, break, or exhibit decreased penetration performance, confirming the hypothesis. Clearly, these results were dependent on the specific material and geometric parameters. The projectiles had 3.0 and 4.25 CRH (Caliber-Radius-Head) nose shapes and were heat-treated to R(sub c) 38-40. The grout targets had a maximum aggregate diameter of 3/16 in. and a nominal unconfined compressive strength of 2.5 ksi. The concrete targets had a maximum aggregate diameter of 3/4 in. and unconfined compressive strength of 5.5 ksi.

  7. A Role for the Left Angular Gyrus in Episodic Simulation and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Preston P; Madore, Kevin P; Schacter, Daniel L

    2017-08-23

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies indicate that episodic simulation (i.e., imagining specific future experiences) and episodic memory (i.e., remembering specific past experiences) are associated with enhanced activity in a common set of neural regions referred to as the core network. This network comprises the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and left angular gyrus, among other regions. Because fMRI data are correlational, it is unknown whether activity increases in core network regions are critical for episodic simulation and episodic memory. In the current study, we used MRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess whether temporary disruption of the left angular gyrus would impair both episodic simulation and memory (16 participants, 10 females). Relative to TMS to a control site (vertex), disruption of the left angular gyrus significantly reduced the number of internal (i.e., episodic) details produced during the simulation and memory tasks, with a concomitant increase in external detail production (i.e., semantic, repetitive, or off-topic information), reflected by a significant detail by TMS site interaction. Difficulty in the simulation and memory tasks also increased after TMS to the left angular gyrus relative to the vertex. In contrast, performance in a nonepisodic control task did not differ statistically as a function of TMS site (i.e., number of free associates produced or difficulty in performing the free associate task). Together, these results are the first to demonstrate that the left angular gyrus is critical for both episodic simulation and episodic memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Humans have the ability to imagine future episodes (i.e., episodic simulation) and remember episodes from the past (i.e., episodic memory). A wealth of neuroimaging studies have revealed that these abilities are associated with enhanced activity in a core network of neural regions, including the hippocampus, medial prefrontal

  8. Velocities in Solar Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  9. Application of the Angular Overlap Model to Lanthanide Phthalocyanines (Aplicacion Del Modelo de Traslape Angular a Ftalocinaninas de Lantanidos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-15

    IWORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) UNCLASSIFIED: Aplicacion Del Modelo De Traslape Angular A...Justificatio Aplicacion Del Medelo De Traslape Angular A By Ftalocinaninas De Lantanidos Disributon/ (Application of the Angular Overlap Model to...Control Data - DD Form 1473. Copies of the form are available from the cognizant contract administrator. APLICACION DEL MODELO DE TRASLAPE ANGULAR A

  10. Coding of Velocity Storage in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei B. Yakushin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Semicircular canal afferents sense angular acceleration and output angular velocity with a short time constant of ≈4.5 s. This output is prolonged by a central integrative network, velocity storage that lengthens the time constants of eye velocity. This mechanism utilizes canal, otolith, and visual (optokinetic information to align the axis of eye velocity toward the spatial vertical when head orientation is off-vertical axis. Previous studies indicated that vestibular-only (VO and vestibular-pause-saccade (VPS neurons located in the medial and superior vestibular nucleus could code all aspects of velocity storage. A recently developed technique enabled prolonged recording while animals were rotated and received optokinetic stimulation about a spatial vertical axis while upright, side-down, prone, and supine. Firing rates of 33 VO and 8 VPS neurons were studied in alert cynomolgus monkeys. Majority VO neurons were closely correlated with the horizontal component of velocity storage in head coordinates, regardless of head orientation in space. Approximately, half of all tested neurons (46% code horizontal component of velocity in head coordinates, while the other half (54% changed their firing rates as the head was oriented relative to the spatial vertical, coding the horizontal component of eye velocity in spatial coordinates. Some VO neurons only coded the cross-coupled pitch or roll components that move the axis of eye rotation toward the spatial vertical. Sixty-five percent of these VO and VPS neurons were more sensitive to rotation in one direction (predominantly contralateral, providing directional orientation for the subset of VO neurons on either side of the brainstem. This indicates that the three-dimensional velocity storage integrator is composed of directional subsets of neurons that are likely to be the bases for the spatial characteristics of velocity storage. Most VPS neurons ceased firing during drowsiness, but the firing

  11. Coding of Velocity Storage in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushin, Sergei B.; Raphan, Theodore; Cohen, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Semicircular canal afferents sense angular acceleration and output angular velocity with a short time constant of ≈4.5 s. This output is prolonged by a central integrative network, velocity storage that lengthens the time constants of eye velocity. This mechanism utilizes canal, otolith, and visual (optokinetic) information to align the axis of eye velocity toward the spatial vertical when head orientation is off-vertical axis. Previous studies indicated that vestibular-only (VO) and vestibular-pause-saccade (VPS) neurons located in the medial and superior vestibular nucleus could code all aspects of velocity storage. A recently developed technique enabled prolonged recording while animals were rotated and received optokinetic stimulation about a spatial vertical axis while upright, side-down, prone, and supine. Firing rates of 33 VO and 8 VPS neurons were studied in alert cynomolgus monkeys. Majority VO neurons were closely correlated with the horizontal component of velocity storage in head coordinates, regardless of head orientation in space. Approximately, half of all tested neurons (46%) code horizontal component of velocity in head coordinates, while the other half (54%) changed their firing rates as the head was oriented relative to the spatial vertical, coding the horizontal component of eye velocity in spatial coordinates. Some VO neurons only coded the cross-coupled pitch or roll components that move the axis of eye rotation toward the spatial vertical. Sixty-five percent of these VO and VPS neurons were more sensitive to rotation in one direction (predominantly contralateral), providing directional orientation for the subset of VO neurons on either side of the brainstem. This indicates that the three-dimensional velocity storage integrator is composed of directional subsets of neurons that are likely to be the bases for the spatial characteristics of velocity storage. Most VPS neurons ceased firing during drowsiness, but the firing rates of VO

  12. Angular momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Bouteiller, M Le; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Rax, J -M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extend in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laser- plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  13. Angular-Momentum Evolution in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, Cédric; Corde, Sébastien; Lehe, Rémi; Le Bouteiller, Madeleine; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Davoine, Xavier; Rax, J. M.; Rousse, Antoine; Malka, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laserplasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  14. Eccentricity samples: Implications on the potential and the velocity distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubarsi R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. No 176011: Dynamics and Kinematics of Celestial Bodies and Systems

  15. Eccentricity Samples: Implications on the Potential and the Velocity Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubarsi, R.; Stojanović, M.; Ninković, S.

    2017-06-01

    Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples.

  16. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  17. Research on static angular stiffness measurement of flexible joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchao HUANG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Measurement accuracy of the angular stiffness of flexible joint is directly related to the control accuracy and sensitivity of gyro, but the traditional measurement methods have many problems. According to the principle of angular stiffness measurement of flexible joint, two static measurement methods of angular stiffness are proposed based on different loading ways, namely mechanical loading angular stiffness measurement and piezoelectric loading angular stiffness measurement. The mechanical loading angular stiffness measurement system is built by using a motor driven indexing feeding tilting table, the measure experiment if the angular stiffness of flexible joint is conducted, and the angular stiffness of flexible joint is measured. For the excessive fluctuation problem of the measure result in mechanical load test, a piezoelectric loading structure is designed and a measurement method employing piezoelectric actuator is proposed for angular stiffness measurement of flexible joint. Based on ANSYS Workbench, the displacement output of the piezoelectric loading structure is analyzed by simulations. The simulation results illustrate that the displacement output meets the requirement of static loading angular stiffness measurement of flexible joint, and the theoretical feasibility of piezoelectric loading angular stiffness measurement method is validated.

  18. Angular Rate Estimation Using a Distributed Set of Accelerometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyung Hong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A distributed set of accelerometers based on the minimum number of 12 accelerometers allows for computation of the magnitude of angular rate without using the integration operation. However, it is not easy to extract the magnitude of angular rate in the presence of the accelerometer noises, and even worse, it is difficult to determine the direction of a rotation because the angular rate is present in its quadratic form within the inertial measurement system equations. In this paper, an extended Kalman filter scheme to correctly estimate both the direction and magnitude of the angular rate through fusion of the angular acceleration and quadratic form of the angular rate is proposed. We also provide observability analysis for the general distributed accelerometers-based inertial measurement unit, and show that the angular rate can be correctly estimated by general nonlinear state estimators such as an extended Kalman filter, except under certain extreme conditions.

  19. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Jesus Eduardo; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2011-04-06

    Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs. By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone. Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  20. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  1. Angular momentum sensitive two-center interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchen, M; Glaser, L; Scholz, F; Walter, P; Deinert, S; Rothkirch, A; Seltmann, J; Viefhaus, J; Decleva, P; Langer, B; Knie, A; Ehresmann, A; Al-Dossary, O M; Braune, M; Hartmann, G; Meissner, A; Tribedi, L C; AlKhaldi, M; Becker, U

    2014-01-17

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  2. Angular Distributions of Discrete Mesoscale Mapping Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroszczyński, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents the results of analyses of numerical experiments concerning GPS signal propagation delays in the atmosphere and the discrete mapping functions defined on their basis. The delays were determined using data from the mesoscale non-hydrostatic weather model operated in the Centre of Applied Geomatics, Military University of Technology. A special attention was paid to investigating angular characteristics of GPS slant delays for low angles of elevation. The investigation proved that the temporal and spatial variability of the slant delays depends to a large extent on current weather conditions.

  3. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available . 3CSIR National Laser Centre, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. 4Institut Mines-Télécom/Télécom SudParis, 9 rue Charles Fourier, 91011 Evry, France. Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to C.R.-G. (email: carmelo..., Y. et al. Free-space optical communications using orbital-angular-momentum multiplexing combined with mimo-based spatial multiplexing. Opt. Lett. 40, 4210–4213 (2015). 19. Zhao, N., Li, X., Li, G. & Kahn, J. M. Capacity limits of spatially...

  4. The angular momentum of isolated white dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brassard P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a very brief report on an ongoing program aimed at mapping the internal rotation profiles of stars through asteroseismology. Three years ago, we developed and applied successfully a new technique to the pulsating GW Vir white dwarf PG 1159−035, and were able to infer that it rotates very slowly and rigidly over some 99% of its mass. We applied the same approach to the three other GW Vir pulsators with available rotational splitting data, and found similar results. We discuss the implications of these findings on the question of the angular momentum of white dwarfs resulting from single star evolution.

  5. Projection of angular momentum via linear algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Calvin W.; O'Mara, Kevin D.

    2017-12-01

    Projection of many-body states with good angular momentum from an initial state is usually accomplished by a three-dimensional integral. We show how projection can instead be done by solving a straightforward system of linear equations. We demonstrate the method and give sample applications to 48Cr and 60Fe in the p f shell. This new projection scheme, which is competitive against the standard numerical quadrature, should also be applicable to other quantum numbers such as isospin and particle number.

  6. Asymmetric Velocity Distributions from Halo Density Profiles in the Eddington Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Vergados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We show how to obtain the energy distribution f(E in our vicinity starting from WIMP density profiles in a self-consistent way by employing the Eddington approach and adding reasonable angular momentum dependent terms in the expression of the energy. We then show how we can obtain the velocity dispersions and the asymmetry parameter β in terms of the parameters describing the angular momentum dependence. From this expression, for f(E, we proceed to construct an axially symmetric WIMP a velocity distribution, which, for a gravitationally bound system, automatically has a velocity upper bound and is characterized by the same asymmetriy β. This approach is tested and clarified by constructing analytic expressions in a simple model, with adequate structure. We then show how such velocity distributions can be used in determining the event rates, including modulation, in both the standard and the directional WIMP searches.

  7. Influence of tungsten fiber’s slow drift on the measurement of G with angular acceleration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Wei-Huang; Zhan, Wen-Ze [School of Mechanical Engineering and Electronic Information, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xue, Chao [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Physics and Astronomy, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Shao, Cheng-Gang, E-mail: cgshao@mail.hust.edu.cn; Wu, Jun-Fei [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Milyukov, Vadim [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    In the measurement of the gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method, the equilibrium position of torsion pendulum with tungsten fiber undergoes a linear slow drift, which results in a quadratic slow drift on the angular velocity of the torsion balance turntable under feedback control unit. The accurate amplitude determination of the useful angular acceleration signal with known frequency is biased by the linear slow drift and the coupling effect of the drifting equilibrium position and the room fixed gravitational background signal. We calculate the influences of the linear slow drift and the complex coupling effect on the value of G, respectively. The result shows that the bias of the linear slow drift on G is 7 ppm, and the influence of the coupling effect is less than 1 ppm.

  8. Importance of energy and angular resolutions in top-hat electrostatic analysers for solar wind proton measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, R.; Marcucci, M. F.; Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Lavraud, B.; Louarn, P.; Salatti, M.

    2016-08-01

    We use a numerical code which reproduces the angular/energy response of a typical top-hat electrostatic analyser starting from solar wind proton velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by numerical simulations. The simulations are based on the Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical algorithm which integrates the Vlasov equation for the ion distribution function, while the electrons are treated as a fluid. A virtual satellite launched through the simulation box measures the particle VDFs. Such VDFs are moved from the simulation Cartesian grid to energy-angular coordinates to mimic the response of a real sensor in the solar wind. Different energy-angular resolutions of the analyser are investigated in order to understand the influence of the phase-space resolution in existing and upcoming space missions, with regards to determining the key parameters of plasma dynamics.

  9. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  10. Supramolecular architectures constructed using angular bipyridyl ligands

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, S A

    2003-01-01

    This work details the synthesis and characterization of a series of coordination frameworks that are formed using bidentate angular N-donor ligands. Pyrimidine was reacted with metal(ll) nitrate salts. Reactions using Cd(NO sub 3) sub 2 receive particular focus and the analogous reactions using the linear ligand, pyrazine, were studied for comparison. In all cases, two-dimensional coordination networks were prepared. Structural diversity is observed for the Cd(ll) centres including metal-nitrate bridging. In contrast, first row transition metal nitrates form isostructural one-dimensional chains with only the bridging N-donor ligands generating polymeric propagation. The angular ligand, 2,4-bis(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (dpt), was reacted with Cd(NO sub 3) sub 2 and Zn(NO sub 3) sub 2. Whereas Zn(NO sub 3) sub 2 compounds exhibit solvent mediated polymorphism, a range of structures were obtained for the reactions with Cd(NO sub 3) sub 2 , including the first example of a doubly parallel interpenetrated 4.8 sup...

  11. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhilei; CLASS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an array of telescopes that observe Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization over ~65% of the sky from the Atacama Desert, Chile in frequency bands at 40 GHz, 90 GHz, 150 GHz, and 220 GHz. Multi-frequency observation enables CLASS to distinguish CMB from galactic foregrounds. CLASS is making large angular scale CMB polarization measurements as part of a five-year survey that will constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio at the 0.01 level by measuring both the reionization and recombination peaks. CLASS will measure the optical depth to last scattering to near the cosmic variance limit, significantly improving on current constraints. Combining the CLASS optical depth measurement with higher resolution data will improve constraints on the sum of neutrino masses. CLASS will also provide the deepest wide-sky-area Galactic microwave polarization maps for Galactic studies. CLASS has been observing for over one year at 40 GHz frequency band. In my talk, I will introduce the science, design, and current status of the CLASS experiment.

  12. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an array of four telescopes designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. CLASS aims to detect the B-mode polarization from primordial gravitational waves predicted by cosmic inflation theory, as well as the imprint left by reionization upon the CMB E-mode polarization. This will be achieved through a combination of observing strategy and state-of-the-art instrumentation. CLASS is observing 70% of the sky to characterize the CMB at large angular scales, which will measure the entire CMB power spectrum from the reionization peak to the recombination peak. The four telescopes operate at frequencies of 38, 93, 145, and 217 GHz, in order to estimate Galactic synchrotron and dust foregrounds while avoiding atmospheric absorption. CLASS employs rapid polarization modulation to overcome atmospheric and instrumental noise. Polarization sensitive cryogenic detectors with low noise levels provide CLASS the sensitivity required to constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio down to levels of r ~ 0.01 while also measuring the optical depth the reionization to sample-variance levels. These improved constraints on the optical depth to reionization are required to pin down the mass of neutrinos from complementary cosmological data. CLASS has completed a year of observations at 38 GHz and is in the process of deploying the rest of the telescope array. This poster provides an overview and update on the CLASS science, hardware and survey operations.

  13. Fast diffusion imaging with high angular resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Chiou, Jr-Yuan George; Maier, Stephan E; Madore, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) is a well-established method to help reveal the architecture of nerve bundles, but long scan times and geometric distortions inherent to echo planar imaging (EPI) have limited its integration into clinical protocols. A fast imaging method is proposed here that combines accelerated multishot diffusion imaging (AMDI), multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE), and crossing fiber angular resolution of intravoxel structure (CFARI) to reduce spatial distortions and reduce total scan time. A multishot EPI sequence was used to improve geometrical fidelity as compared to a single-shot EPI acquisition, and acceleration in both k-space and diffusion sampling enabled reductions in scan time. The method is regularized and self-navigated for motion correction. Seven volunteers were scanned in this study, including four with volumetric whole brain acquisitions. The average similarity of microstructural orientations between undersampled datasets and their fully sampled counterparts was above 85%, with scan times below 5 min for whole-brain acquisitions. Up to 2.7-fold scan time acceleration along with four-fold distortion reduction was achieved. The proposed imaging strategy can generate HARDI results with relatively good geometrical fidelity and low scan duration, which may help facilitate the transition of HARDI from a successful research tool to a practical clinical one. Magn Reson Med 77:696-706, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. The torque-velocity relation of elite soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, G M; Vaz, M A; De La Rocha Freitas, C; Rassier, D E

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the torque-velocity (T-V) relationship during concentric and eccentric contractions of the lower limb muscles in professional soccer players. Soccer players (n=10) that were training systematically for at least 5 years were compared with moderately active individuals (n=13), that were not engaged in any systematic physical activity program in the last 5 years. Peak torque, and angle-specific torque at knee angles of 0.52 rad and 1.04 rad were evaluated during maximal concentric and eccentric contractions at 0.52 rad x sec(-1), 1.04 rad x sec(-1), 1.57 rad x sec(-1), 2.09 rad x sec(-1), 3.14 rad x sec(-1), 4.19 rad x sec(-1) and 5.23 rad x sec(-1) angular velocities. During concentric contractions, inverse hyperbolic relationships were fitted for the two groups [T = T(max) + (a x b)/(b + V)], with values for a and b of 1.4 and 347.6 for the control group, respectively, and 1.9 and 605.4 for the soccer players, respectively. When torque was measured at 0.52 rad, the torque-velocity relationship presented a plateau at low velocities in the two groups investigated. When torque was measured at 1.04 rad, the torque-velocity relationship presented a plateau at low velocities in the control group, in which force did not increase significantly as velocity was decreased. The plateau was not observed in soccer players. Peak torque and torque measured at 1.04 rad were higher in the soccer players than in the control group in all velocities investigated. However, the biggest difference was found in lower velocities of contraction. Soccer players produced a higher muscle torque in the lower limb than moderately active individuals, and this difference was bigger when the velocities were low.

  15. Inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar angular-momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2017-04-01

    Coupled with mean absolute vorticity Ω∗ (rotation and mean relative vorticity), inhomogeneous turbulent helicity is expected to contribute to the generation of global flow structure against the linear and angular momentum mixing due to turbulent or eddy viscosity. This inhomogeneous helicity effect was originally derived in Yokoi & Yoshizawa (1993) [1], and recently has been validated by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of rotating helical turbulence [2]. Turbulence effect enters the mean-vorticity equation through the turbulent vortexmotive force ⟨u'×ω'⟩ [u': velocity fluctuation, ω'(= ∇× u'): vorticity fluctuation], which is the vorticity counterpart of the electromotive force ⟨u'× b'⟩ (b': magnetic fluctuation) in the mean magnetic-field induction. The mean velocity induction δU is proportional to the vortexmotive force. According to the theoretical result [1,2], it is expressed as δU = -νT∇×Ω∗-ηT(∇2H)Ω∗, where ηT is the transport coefficient, H = ⟨u'ṡω'⟩ the turbulent helicity, and Ω∗ the mean absolute vorticity. The first term corresponds to the enhanced diffusion due to turbulent viscosity νT. The second term expresses the large-scale flow generation due to inhomogeneous helicity. Since helicity is self-generated in rotating stratified turbulence [3], an inhomogeneous helicity distribution is expected to exist in the solar convection zone. A rising flow with expansion near the surface of the Sun generates a strongly negative helicity there [4]. This spatial distribution of helicity would lead to a positive Laplacian of turbulent helicity (∇2H > 0) in the subsurface layer of the Sun. In the combination with the large-scale vorticity associated with the meridional circulation, the inhomogeneous helicity effect works for accelerating the mean velocity in the azimuthal direction. The relevance of this inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar convection zone is discussed further. References [1] Yokoi, N. and

  16. Cavity Enhanced Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Brian; Mills, Andrew; Porambo, Michael; McCall, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    Over the past several decades, velocity modulation spectroscopy has been used to study dozens of molecular ions of astronomical importance. This technique has been so productive because it provides the advantage of ion-neutral discrimination, which is critically important when interfering neutral molecules are many orders of magnitude more abundant, and when combined with heterodyne techniques, its sensitivity can approach the shot noise limit. Traditionally, velocity modulation experiments have utilized unidirectional multipass White cells to achieve up to about 8 passes through a positive column discharge cell. But by positioning the cell within an optical cavity, it is possible to obtain an effective path length orders of magnitude longer than was previously possible. We have demonstrated this novel technique using a Ti:Sapp laser in the near-IR to observe rovibronic transitions of N2+. By demodulating at twice the modulation frequency, 2nd derivative-like lineshapes are observed for ions that are velocity-modulated, while Gaussian lineshapes are observed for excited neutral that are concentration-modulated. The signals for N2+ and N2+* have been observed to be 78° out of phase with one another, so ion-neutral discrimination is retained. And due to the laser power enhancement and geometry of the optical cavity, Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy is now possible. Observed Lamb dips have widths of 50 MHz, and when combined with calibration by an optical frequency comb, this allows for determination of line centers to within 1 MHz. In our original demonstration of this technique, our sensitivity was limited by noise in the laser-cavity lock. Since then, we have integrated Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) by adding sidebands to the laser at an exact multiple of the cavity free spectral range, and demodulating at the sideband frequency before sending the signal to a lock-in amplifier for demodulating at twice the

  17. Critique of the angular momentum sum rules and a new angular momentum sum rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.L.G.; Leader, E.; Trueman, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the tensorial structure of the hadronic matrix elements of the angular momentum operators J. Well known results in the literature are shown to be incorrect, and we have taken pains to derive the correct expressions in three different ways, two involving explicit physical wave

  18. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  19. Scaling of spin relaxation and angular momentum dissipation in permalloy nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. A.; Kläui, M.; Heyne, L.; Möhrke, P.; Backes, D.; Rhensius, J.; Rüdiger, U.; Heyderman, L. J.; Thiele, J.-U.; Woltersdorf, G.; Back, C. H.; Fraile Rodríguez, A.; Nolting, F.; Mentes, T. O.; Niño, M. Á.; Locatelli, A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Cavill, S.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2009-10-01

    We study the relationship between the damping (α) and the nonadiabaticity of the spin transport (β) in permalloy nanowires. α is engineered by Ho doping, and from the characteristics of the current-induced domain-wall velocity, determined by high-resolution x-ray magnetic circular-dichroism photoemission electron microscopy, β due to spin relaxation is measured. We find that β scales with α and conclude that the spin relaxation that leads to nonadiabatic spin torque originates from the same underlying mechanism as the angular momentum dissipation that causes viscous damping.

  20. Uniform flow around a square cylinder using the Self-induced angular Moment Method turbulence model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Jens; Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Nielsen, Leif Otto

    2012-01-01

    The uniform flow around a square cylinder at Reynolds number 1e5 is simulated in a threedimensional domain by means of the newly developed Self-induced angular Moment Method, SMoM. The model does not utilize Reynolds averaging. No additional transport equations are introduced and no implicit...... distributions and velocity fields have been determined along with circumferential surface pressure correlations. All simulated quantities have been compared to experimental findings and state-of-the-art Large Eddy Simulations, LES. No LES simulations could be found in literature, which provided results...

  1. The key kinematic determinants of undulatory underwater swimming at maximal velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaboy, Chris; Naemi, Roozbeh; Brown, Susan; Psycharakis, Stelios; McCabe, Carla; Coleman, Simon; Sanders, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The optimisation of undulatory underwater swimming is highly important in competitive swimming performance. Nineteen kinematic variables were identified from previous research undertaken to assess undulatory underwater swimming performance. The purpose of the present study was to determine which kinematic variables were key to the production of maximal undulatory underwater swimming velocity. Kinematic data at maximal undulatory underwater swimming velocity were collected from 17 skilled swimmers. A series of separate backward-elimination analysis of covariance models was produced with cycle frequency and cycle length as dependent variables (DVs) and participant as a fixed factor, as including cycle frequency and cycle length would explain 100% of the maximal swimming velocity variance. The covariates identified in the cycle-frequency and cycle-length models were used to form the saturated model for maximal swimming velocity. The final parsimonious model identified three covariates (maximal knee joint angular velocity, maximal ankle angular velocity and knee range of movement) as determinants of the variance in maximal swimming velocity (adjusted-r2 = 0.929). However, when participant was removed as a fixed factor there was a large reduction in explained variance (adjusted r2 = 0.397) and only maximal knee joint angular velocity continued to contribute significantly, highlighting its importance to the production of maximal swimming velocity. The reduction in explained variance suggests an emphasis on inter-individual differences in undulatory underwater swimming technique and/or anthropometry. Future research should examine the efficacy of other anthropometric, kinematic and coordination variables to better understand the production of maximal swimming velocity and consider the importance of individual undulatory underwater swimming techniques when interpreting the data.

  2. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    array probe is used along with two different estimators based on the correlation of the received signal. They can estimate the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, but they also work at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The approach is validated using simulations of pulsatile...... flow using the Womersly–Evans flow model. The relative bias of the mean estimated frequency is 13.6% and the mean relative standard deviation is 14.3% at 90°, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with an experimental scanner and a convex array transducer....... A pump generated artificial femoral and carotid artery flow in the phantom. The estimated spectra degrade when the angle is different from 90°, but are usable down to 60° to 70°. Below this angle the traditional spectrum is best and should be used. The conventional approach can automatically be corrected...

  3. Interaction Between Thorax, Lumbar, and Pelvis Movements in the Transverse Plane During Gait at Three Velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Ya-Ting; Yoshida, Yasuyuki; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Suzuki, Shuji

    We determined the angular range of motion and the relative timing of displacement in the thorax, lumbar spine, and pelvis in the transverse plane during treadmill walking at three velocities. Nine healthy young females walked on a treadmill for three minutes at 0.40, 0.93, and 1.47 m/s. The position

  4. High-Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Woerden, Hugo; Schwarz, Ulrich J; Boer, Klaas S

    2005-01-01

    This book contains 17 chapters reviewing our knowledge of the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) as of 2004, bringing this together in one place for the first time. Each of the many different aspects of HVC research is addressed by one of the experts in that subfield. These include a historical overview of HVC research and analyses of the structure and kinematics of HVCs. Separate chapters address the intermediate-velocity clouds, the Magellanic Stream, and neutral hydrogen HVCs discovered in external galaxies. Reviews are presented of the Ha emission and of optical and UV absorption-line studies, followed by discussions of the hot Galactic Halo and of the interactions between HVCs and their surroundings. Four chapters summarize the ideas about the origin of the high-velocity gas, with detailed discussions of connections between HVCs and the Galactic Fountain, tidally-stripped material, and remnants of the Milky Way's formation. A chapter outlining what we do not know completes the book. The book comes at a time whe...

  5. Untangling Galaxy Components - The Angular Momentum Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Martha; Merrifield, Michael; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a new technique to decompose Integral Field spectral data cubes into separate bulge and disk components, allowing us to study the kinematic and stellar population properties of the individual components and how they vary with position. We present here the application of this method to a sample of fast rotator early type galaxies from the MaNGA integral field survey, and demonstrate how it can be used to explore key properties of the individual components. By extracting ages, metallicities and the angular momentum parameter lambda of the bulges and disks, we show how this method can give us new insights into the underlying structure of the galaxies and discuss what this can tell us about their evolution history.

  6. Angular filter refractometry analysis using simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angland, P; Haberberger, D; Ivancic, S T; Froula, D H

    2017-10-01

    Angular filter refractometry (AFR) is a novel technique used to characterize the density profiles of laser-produced, long-scale-length plasmas [Haberberger et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056304 (2014)]. A new method of analysis for AFR images was developed using an annealing algorithm to iteratively converge upon a solution. A synthetic AFR image is constructed by a user-defined density profile described by eight parameters, and the algorithm systematically alters the parameters until the comparison is optimized. The optimization and statistical uncertainty calculation is based on the minimization of the χ(2) test statistic. The algorithm was successfully applied to experimental data of plasma expanding from a flat, laser-irradiated target, resulting in an average uncertainty in the density profile of 5%-20% in the region of interest.

  7. Mean angular momenta in heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Scarlassara, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Bednarczyk, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Beghini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Corradi, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Montagnoli, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Mueller, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Napoli, D.R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Petrache, C.M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Varier, K.M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Soramel, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Udine, Udine (Italy); Spolaore, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Stefanini, A.M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Segato, G.F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Signorini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Zhang, H. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy)

    1995-02-06

    The results of the measurement of fusion cross sections {sigma}{sub fus} and mean angular momenta left angle l right angle for the five systems {sup 16}O+{sup 112}Cd, {sup 28}Si+{sup 94,100}Mo and {sup 58,64}Ni+{sup 64}Ni are reported. The direct comparison between the fusion excitation function and left angle l right angle (E) confirms consistency of the two independent observables. By analyzing the data in the framework of the coupled channels (CC) approach a good overall agreement between experiment and model predictions has been found. In particular the influence of 2n-transfer channels with positive Q-values is put in evidence. ((orig.)).

  8. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, P.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light-matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  9. Angular size-redshift: Experiment and calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhanyan, V. R.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the next attempt is made to clarify the nature of the Euclidean behavior of the boundary in the angular size-redshift cosmological test. It is shown experimentally that this can be explained by the selection determined by anisotropic morphology and anisotropic radiation of extended radio sources. A catalogue of extended radio sources with minimal flux densities of about 0.01 Jy at 1.4 GHz was compiled for conducting the test. Without the assumption of their size evolution, the agreement between the experiment and calculation was obtained both in the ΛCDM model (Ω m = 0.27, Ω v = 0.73) and the Friedman model (Ω = 0.1).

  10. Cierre angular primario: opciones quirúrgicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Pérez-González

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con el objetivo de exponer las principales opciones quirúrgicas en el tratamiento del cierre angular primario efectuando una búsqueda de los principales artículos científicos de los últimos años, así como de la literatura impresa que incluye el tema, siendo seleccionados los contenidos más relevantes para la confección del informe final. Las opciones de tratamiento incluyen la cirugía láser (iridotomía, iridoplastia y la cirugía incisional (filtrante, extracción del cristalino, dependiendo de los factores fisiopatológicos involucrados y la forma clínica en el momento del diagnóstico.

  11. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approach that allows over 100 modes to be encoded on a single hologram, across a wide wavelength range, in a wavelength independent manner. Our results offer a new tool that will prove useful in realizing higher bit rates for next generation optical networks.

  12. High orbital angular momentum harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, J; Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Mendonça, J T; Bingham, R; Norreys, P; Silva, L O

    2016-01-01

    We identify and explore a high orbital angular momentum (OAM) harmonics generation and amplification mechanism that manipulates the OAM independently of any other laser property, by preserving the initial laser wavelength, through stimulated Raman backscattering in a plasma. The high OAM harmonics spectra can extend at least up to the limiting value imposed by the paraxial approximation. We show with theory and particle-in-cell simulations that the orders of the OAM harmonics can be tuned according to a selection rule that depends on the initial OAM of the interacting waves. We illustrate the high OAM harmonics generation in a plasma using several examples including the generation of prime OAM harmonics. The process can also be realised in any nonlinear optical Kerr media supporting three-wave interactions.

  13. Angular filter refractometry analysis using simulated annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angland, P.; Haberberger, D.; Ivancic, S. T.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-10-01

    Angular filter refractometry (AFR) is a novel technique used to characterize the density profiles of laser-produced, long-scale-length plasmas [Haberberger et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056304 (2014)]. A new method of analysis for AFR images was developed using an annealing algorithm to iteratively converge upon a solution. A synthetic AFR image is constructed by a user-defined density profile described by eight parameters, and the algorithm systematically alters the parameters until the comparison is optimized. The optimization and statistical uncertainty calculation is based on the minimization of the χ2 test statistic. The algorithm was successfully applied to experimental data of plasma expanding from a flat, laser-irradiated target, resulting in an average uncertainty in the density profile of 5%-20% in the region of interest.

  14. Coherent Control of Photoelectron Wavepacket Angular Interferograms

    CERN Document Server

    Hockett, Paul; Baumert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  15. Nuclear scissors modes and hidden angular momenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbutsev, E. B., E-mail: balbuts@theor.jinr.ru; Molodtsova, I. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Schuck, P. [Université Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3–CNRS (France)

    2017-01-15

    The coupled dynamics of low-lying modes and various giant resonances are studied with the help of the Wigner Function Moments method generalized to take into account spin degrees of freedom and pair correlations simultaneously. The method is based on Time-Dependent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov equations. The model of the harmonic oscillator including spin–orbit potential plus quadrupole–quadrupole and spin–spin interactions is considered. New low-lying spin-dependent modes are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the scissors modes. A new source of nuclear magnetism, connected with counter-rotation of spins up and down around the symmetry axis (hidden angular momenta), is discovered. Its inclusion into the theory allows one to improve substantially the agreement with experimental data in the description of energies and transition probabilities of scissors modes.

  16. Angular Position Tracking Control of a Quadcopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Glazkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper dwells on tracking the quad-copter angular position with desired quality parameters of transient processes. The aerial vehicle is considered as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom.  A full rigid body quad-copter mathematical model is considered without the assumption of smallness of the Euler angles.Among the most well known methods of non-linear stabilization are feedback linearization and backstepping. The backstepping approach allows us to have an effective solution of the stabilization problems with uncertainties available in the system. However, in synthesis of the feedback through backstepping, there is still an urgent issue: how to ensure desirable quality of transients in the closed-loop system. The paper presents a solution of this problem using as an example the tracking a given (programmed change of the angular position of a quad-copter.The control algorithms obtained in this paper are implemented using the Rolling Spider MATLAB Toolbox (ROSMAT tool package on the Parrot Rolling Spider quad-copter. A numerical simulation and experiments have shown the efficiency of obtained control laws, with the transient processes taking into account the desired quality indicators. However, the experiments showed that lack of terms in the mathematical model to describe the aerodynamic effects, resulted in the instability of the quad-copter flight near the obstacle (the effect of the reflected airflow.Further research can be aimed at solving the control problem in question using a mathematical model of the quad-copter motion that takes into account various aerodynamic effects.One of the potential application areas for the theoretical results, obtained in the paper, is to solve the problems of automatic control of unmanned aerial vehicles.

  17. Angular Approach Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Andrew; Tokar, Sergiy; Gopal, Sahana; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Tarasov, Andrei I; Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Chiappini, Ciro; Rorsman, Patrik; Stevens, Molly M; Gorelik, Julia; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2016-05-24

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a super-resolution live imaging technique that uses a glass nanopipette as an imaging probe to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of cell surface. SICM can be used to analyze cell morphology at nanoscale, follow membrane dynamics, precisely position an imaging nanopipette close to a structure of interest, and use it to obtain ion channel recordings or locally apply stimuli or drugs. Practical implementations of these SICM advantages, however, are often complicated due to the limitations of currently available SICM systems that inherited their design from other scanning probe microscopes in which the scan assembly is placed right above the specimen. Such arrangement makes the setting of optimal illumination necessary for phase contrast or the use of high magnification upright optics difficult. Here, we describe the designs that allow mounting SICM scan head on a standard patch-clamp micromanipulator and imaging the sample at an adjustable approach angle. This angle could be as shallow as the approach angle of a patch-clamp pipette between a water immersion objective and the specimen. Using this angular approach SICM, we obtained topographical images of cells grown on nontransparent nanoneedle arrays, of islets of Langerhans, and of hippocampal neurons under upright optical microscope. We also imaged previously inaccessible areas of cells such as the side surfaces of the hair cell stereocilia and the intercalated disks of isolated cardiac myocytes, and performed targeted patch-clamp recordings from the latter. Thus, our new, to our knowledge, angular approach SICM allows imaging of living cells on nontransparent substrates and a seamless integration with most patch-clamp setups on either inverted or upright microscopes, which would facilitate research in cell biophysics and physiology. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transferring the attoclock technique to velocity map imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Weger, Matthias; Ludwig, André; Gallmann, Lukas; Keller, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Attosecond angular streaking measurements have revealed deep insights into the timing of tunnel ionization processes of atoms in intense laser fields. So far experiments of this type have been performed only with a cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectrometer (COLTRIMS). Here, we present a way to apply attosecond angular streaking experiments to a velocity map imaging spectrometer (VMIS) with few-cycle pulses at a repetition rate of 10 kHz and a high ionization yield per pulse. Three-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions from strong-field ionization of helium with an elliptically polarized, sub-10-fs pulse were retrieved by tomographic reconstruction from the momentum space electron images and used for the analysis in the polarization plane.

  19. A high-precision position-based calibration table as the reference for angular accelerometer calibration experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jatiningrum, D.; De Visser, C.C.; Van Paassen, M.M.; Mulder, M.

    2015-01-01

    With the role of angular accelerometers in future fault-tolerant flight control systems, an in-depth evaluation of their performance then becomes a critical issue from the perspective of control system design. In this paper, a position-based calibration table is utilized to provide a sufficiently

  20. Critical point of a rotating Bose–Einstein condensates in optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, Azza M., E-mail: elbadry.azza@yahoo.com; Soliman, Shemi S.M.; Hassan, Ahmed S.

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, we have considered the critical point (critical atoms’ number and the corresponding critical temperature) of rotating condensate bosons trapped in optical lattices. Our system is formed by loading three dimensional harmonically trapped boson atoms into a 1D (axial direction) or 2D (radial direction) optical lattice. The system subjected to rotating with angular velocity Ω around to the axial direction z-axis. We employ the semiclassical approximation to calculate the critical point. Effects of the optical lattice depth, direction (axial or radial) and the rotation rate on the critical point are investigated using the semiclassical approximation. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the critical point is changed in an optical lattice and depends crucially on the rotation rate. The effect of the finite size for one-dimensional optical lattice case, as required by experiment, is discussed. The outcome results furnish useful qualitatively theoretical results for the future Bose–Einstein condensation experiments in such traps.

  1. Influence of particle shape and angularity on the behaviour of granular materials: a numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouguier-Lehon, C.; Cambou, B.; Vincens, E.

    2003-12-01

    This paper analyses the influence of grain shape and angularity on the behaviour of granular materials from a two-dimensional analysis by means of a discrete element method (Contact Dynamics). Different shapes of grains have been studied (circular, isotropic polygonal and elongated polygonal shapes) as well as different initial states (density) and directions of loading with respect to the initial fabric. Simulations of biaxial tests clearly show that the behaviour of samples with isotropic particles can be dissociated from that of samples with anisotropic particles. Indeed, for isotropic particles, angularity just tends to strengthen the behaviour of samples and slow down either local or global phenomena. One of the main results concerns the existence of a critical state for isotropic grains characterized by an angle of friction at the critical state, a critical void ratio and also a critical anisotropy. This critical state seems meaningless for elongated grains and the behaviour of samples generated with such particles is highly dependent on the direction of loading with respect to the initial fabric. The study of local variables related to fabric and particle orientation gives more information. In particular, the coincidence of the principal axes of the fabric tensor with those of the stress tensor is sudden for isotropic particles. On the contrary, this process is gradually initiated for elongated particles. Copyright

  2. Principal modes of atmospheric circulation anomalies associated with global angular momentum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, In-Sik; Lau, K.-M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the variability of global atmospheric angular momentum (GAM) and its relationship with principal modes of three-dimensional atmospheric circulation anomalies. The data used are 5-day mean global wind fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts initialized dataset for 1980-1989. Significant seasonal variation of GAM is observed with maxima in April and November and a minimum during late July. The amplitude of the annual cycle is largest in the upper troposphere and decreases toward the surface. Although the lower tropospheric contribution to the total angular momentum is relatively small, its annual cycle is out of phase with those of the upper atmosphere and GAM. Also identified is a distinct semiannual component, with double peaks appearing in April and November. This signal is most noticeable in the upper troposphere above the 300-mb level. The principal modes of zonal-mean angular momentum and meridional circulation anomalies and their coupled modes are obtained by using empirical orthogonal function analysis and singular value decomposition. It is shown that the leading modes of the angular momentum and meridional circulation are coupled with each other and are responsible for much of the variability in GAM. The coupled modes represent fluctuations of upper-level subtropical zonal flow, which are linked to the modulation of Hadley circulation intensity in both hemispheres. It is found that GAM is highly correlated with the first eigenvector of upper-level streamfunction anomalies, which consists of a superrotational flow in the tropics and subtropics, except over the central Pacific where a 'blocked' flow with two subtropical anticyclonic circulation cells straddling the equator is found. Much of the blocked flow is due to the establishment of dipole anomalies in the velocity potential with centers over the central Pacific and the Maritime Continent on the interannual time scale. On the intraseasonal

  3. Orbital angular momentum filter of photon based on spin-orbital angular momentum coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dong-Xu; Zhang, Pei, E-mail: zhangpei@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Liu, Rui-Feng; Li, Hong-Rong; Gao, Hong; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-10-16

    Highlights: • We propose a scheme that can filter the orbital angular momentum of photons. • Our scheme filters the specific mode with destroying the mode. • Our scheme can theoretically filter infinity modes. • The orientation of Dove lens and HWP decides which mode will output. - Abstract: Determination of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of vortex beams has been hotly discussed. We propose a new type of method to determine the orbital angular momentum of photons, filtering. We present an OAM filter scheme which consists of a cavity with a polarization-based Mach–Zehnder interferometer inside. Our scheme can purify the specific OAM with unitary efficiency theoretically without the pre-knowledge of the OAM spectrum of the input light. We also implemented a proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of our scheme by cascading three interferometers. Our method offers a new way to determine the OAM spectrum of a light and this method can also be exploited to prepare the eigenstate of vortex beams.

  4. Effect of piano-key shape inlet on critical submergence at a vertical pipe intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemshi, R.; Kabiri-Samani, A.

    2012-11-01

    Intake vortices are the result of angular momentum conservation at the flow constriction, where angular velocity increases with a decrease in the cross sectional area. The common solution for avoiding air-entrainment and swirl is to provide sufficient submergence to the intake. If the required approach flow conditions can not be met to avoid swirl and air entrainment, other approaches for preventing vortices at water intakes are considered. There are several means of avoiding air-entrainment, where the most cost-effective option is often determined by a physical model study. Among the most economical and common measures of reducing the effect of air-entrainment and swirl strength, is the optimized shape of inlet for instance by installing a Piano-Key inlet over the pipe intake. If Piano-Key inlet is used, then, its' optimum geometry should be studied experimentally. Since there is not any realized guidance for the use of Piano-Key inlets in pipe intakes, hence, a comprehensive set of model experiments have been carried out using Piano-Key inlets with different dimensions, with respect to the vertical pipe intakes, and four different pipe diameters of (D=) 75, 100, 125 and 150 mm. Results showed that by employing a Piano-Key inlet over the vertical pipe intake, the critical submergence reduces significantly. Fianally, according to the results, the effect of Piano-Key inlet geometry on critical submergence were evaluated in the form of realized relationships which would be of practical interest for design engineers.

  5. CriticalEd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Caspar Mølholt; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    The best text method is commonly applied among music scholars engaged in producing critical editions. In this method, a comment list is compiled, consisting of variant readings and editorial emendations. This list is maintained by inserting the comments into a document as the changes are made...... such as Sibelius or Finale. It was hypothesized that it would be possible to develop a Sibelius plug-in, written in Manuscript 6, that would improve the critical editing work flow, but it was found that the capabilities of this scripting language were insufficient. Instead, a 3-part system was designed and built...

  6. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  7. Comparison between length and velocity gauges in quantum simulations of high-order harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    We solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for atomic hydrogen in an intense field using spherical coordinates with a radial grid and a spherical harmonic basis for the angular part. We present the high-order harmonic spectra based on three different forms, the dipole, dipole velocity......, and acceleration forms, and two gauges, the length and velocity gauges. The relationships among the harmonic phases obtained from the Fourier transform of the three forms are discussed in detail. Although quantum mechanics is gauge invariant and the length and velocity gauges should give identical results, the two...... gauges present different computation efficiencies, which reflects the different behavior in terms of characteristics of the physical couplings acting in the two gauges. In order to obtain convergence, more angular momentum states are required in the length gauge, while more grid points are required...

  8. Learning web development with Bootstrap and AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Radford, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Whether you know a little about Bootstrap or AngularJS, or you're a complete beginner, this book will enhance your capabilities in both frameworks and you'll build a fully functional web app. A working knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript is required to fully get to grips with Bootstrap and AngularJS.

  9. Cubature/ Unscented/ Sigma Point Kalman Filtering with Angular Measurement Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Cubature/ Unscented/ Sigma Point Kalman Filtering with Angular Measurement Models David Frederic Crouse Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Ave...measurement and process non- linearities, such as the cubature Kalman filter, can perform ex- tremely poorly in many applications involving angular... Kalman filtering is a realization of the best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE) that evaluates certain integrals for expected values using different forms

  10. Angular Momentum Transport in Quasi-Keplerian Accretion Disks ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The specific angular momentum (angular momentum per unit mass) carried by a parcel of gas ... have used the Einstein summation convention in equation (2). For the .... incorrect. 3.3 Correction proposed by HM. HM claim that this is because Frank et al. (1992) have used an incorrect expression for vrel (i.e., equation (10)).

  11. Epidemiology Of Angular Deformities Of The Knee In Children In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bony problems such as angular deformities and metabolic bone disease are of high frequency in Nigeria. Objective: The aim of this study was to define the pattern of presentation in children with angular deformities of the knee. Methodology: It was an 18-month prospective study involving children aged ...

  12. Poisson algebra of quasilocal angular momentum and its asymptotic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Oh, Seung Hun

    2018-01-01

    We study the previously proposed quasilocal angular momentum of gravitational fields in the absence of isometries. The quasilocal angular momentum L(ξ) has the following attractive properties; (i) it follows from Einstein’s constraint equations, (ii) it satisfies the Poisson algebra \

  13. Coordination of leg swing, thorax rotations, and pelvis rotations during gait: the organisation of total body angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Meijer, Onno G; van Dieën, Jaap H; Kingma, Idsart; Lamoth, Claudine J C

    2008-04-01

    In walking faster than 3 km/h, transverse pelvic rotation lengthens the step ("pelvic step"). It is often assumed that the thorax then starts to counter rotate to limit total body angular momentum around the vertical. But the relative timing of pelvis and thorax rotation during gait is insufficiently understood. The present study aimed at analysing how transverse pelvis and thorax rotations relate to the movements of the upper leg, and how these patterns contribute to total body angular momentum. Nine healthy male volunteers walked on a treadmill at nine different velocities, ranging from 2.0 km/h to 5.2 km/h. Full body kinematics were recorded. Femur-pelvis, pelvis-thorax, and femur-thorax relative phase were calculated, as well as transverse plane angular momentum of all body segments. The shift in pelvis-thorax coordination from in-phase to out of phase with increasing velocity was found to depend on the pelvis beginning to move in-phase with the femur, while the thorax continued to counter rotate with respect to the femur. Moreover, pelvic and thoracic contributions to total body angular momentum were low (less than 10%), while contributions of the legs and arms were much larger (approximately 90%), suggesting that pelvis-thorax coordination is relatively unimportant to the organisation of total body angular momentum. Taken together, these results may imply that our understanding of the pelvic step need to be changed. Moreover, the alterations in pelvis-thorax relative phase that were reported for different locomotor pathologies may depend on different mechanisms.

  14. Open Clusters as Laboratories: The Angular Momentum Evolution of Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, John R.

    1998-01-01

    The core group concentrated on three primary research topics: (1) ROSAT observation of the coronal activity of low mass stars in young open clusters; (2) the determination of stellar ages and the determination of the timescale for dissipation of circumstellar disks around young stars; and (3) the determination of rotation velocities of low mass stars in young open cluster and the inferred angular momentum evolution of low mass stars. With accurate ages for the clusters, we can then derive an independent estimate of the timescale for debris disks to dissipate. As the second half of that project, we are using the Caltech/UC/NASA Keck telescopes to obtain spectra of brown dwarf candidates in a number of nearby, young open clusters, from which we can determine new and accurate cluster ages. The final primary program that we have addressed was the determination of rotational velocities for low mass stars in our target open clusters. Our group has obtained rotational velocities for a large number of stars in several open clusters during this LTSA program, and we have published the results in several papers. One particularly time-consuming aspect of our program was the development of a database of the photometry and rotational velocities for nearby open clusters, which we have made available to the community.

  15. Impact of Wind Power on the Angular Stability of a Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djemai NAIMI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy conversion systems are very different in nature from conventional generators. Therefore dynamic studies must be addressed in order to integrate wind power into the power system. Angular stability assessment of wind power generator is one of main issues in power system security and operation. The angular stability for the wind power generator is determined by its corresponding Critical Clearing Time (CCT. In this paper, the effect of wind power on the transient fault behavior is investigated by replacing the power generated by two main types of wind turbine, increasing gradually a rate of wind power penetration and changing the location of wind resources. The simulation analysis was established on a 14 bus IEEE test system by PSAT/Matlab, which gives access to an extensive library of grid components, and relevant wind turbine model.

  16. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu; Tang, Liguo [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Li, Songhai [Sanya Key Laboratory of Marin Mammal and Marine Bioacoustics, Sanya Institute of Deep-Sea Science and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Sanya 57200 (China); Zhang, Sai [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2016-07-04

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  17. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravitational wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low-length. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of r = 0:01 and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, tau. (c) (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  18. Tracing the Angular Dependence of the CGM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattinger, Michael; Christensen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    The circumgalactic media (CGM) is enriched with metals through a process called the baryon cycle, which may play a significant role in the regulation of star formation. While the relationship between the CGM’s baryonic makeup and impact parameter is well documented, the relationship between the baryonic distribution of the CGM and the azimuthal angle out of the plane of the galaxy remains an open question. We investigated the angular distribution of baryons in the CGM by creating mock-absorption line spectra for a high-resolution simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy at redshift zero. By comparison with data from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph-Halos survey, we determined that our equivalent widths of HI, MgII, CIII, SiII, and SiIII are consistent with observations. Using our data, we found that low ionization state material is more prevalent at low azimuthal angles and that high ionization state material is more prevalent at high angles within the virial radius. We attributed this increased ionization to higher temperatures at high angles. We also found that the highest metallicity levels appear at high and low azimuthal angles, with lower metallicities at middle angles. This evidence supports the recycled accretion model of CGM baryon flow.

  19. Optical communications beyond orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Trichili, Abderrahmen; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Current optical communication technologies are predicted to face a bandwidth capacity limit in the near future. The nature of the limitation is fundamental rather than technological and is set by nonlinearities in optical fibers. One solution, suggested over 30 years ago, comprises the use of spatial modes of light as information carriers. Along this direction, light beams endowed with orbital angular momentum (OAM) have been demonstrated as potential information carriers in both, free space and fibres. However, recent studies suggest that purely OAM modes does not increase the bandwidth of optical communication systems. In fact, in all work to date, only the azimuthal component of transverse spatial modes has been used. Crucially, all transverse spatial modes require two degrees of freedom to be described; in the context of Laguerre-Gaussian (LGp`) beams these are azimuthal (l) and radial (p), the former responsible for OAM. Here, we demonstrate a technique where both degrees of freedom of LG modes are used as information carrier over free space. We transfer images encoded using 100 spatial modes in three wavelengths as our basis, and employ a spatial demultiplexing scheme that detects all 100 modes simultaneously. Our scheme is a hybrid of MIMO and SMM, and serves as a proof-of-principle demonstration. The cross-talk between the modes is small and independent of whether OAM modes are used or not.

  20. Current Global Absolute Plate Velocities Inferred from the Trends of Hotspot Tracks: Implications for Motion between Groups of Hotspots and Comparison and Combination with Absolute Velocities Inferred from the Orientation of Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Zheng, L.

    2016-12-01

    Hotspot tracks are widely used to estimate the absolute velocities of plates, i.e., relative to the lower mantle. Knowledge of current motion between hotspots is important for both plate kinematics and mantle dynamics and informs the discussion on the origin of the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend. Following Morgan & Morgan (2007), we focus only on the trends of young hotspot tracks and omit volcanic propagation rates. The dispersion of the trends can be partitioned into between-plate and within-plate dispersion. Applying the method of Gripp & Gordon (2002) to the hotspot trend data set of Morgan & Morgan (2007) constrained to the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities (DeMets et al., 2010) results in a standard deviation of the 56 hotspot trends of 22°. The largest angular misfits tend to occur on the slowest moving plates. Alternatively, estimation of best-fitting poles to hotspot tracks on the nine individual plates, results in a standard deviation of trends of only 13°, a statistically significant reduction from the introduction of 15 additional adjustable parameters. If all of the between-plate misfit is due to motion of groups of hotspots (beneath different plates), nominal velocities relative to the mean hotspot reference frame range from 1 to 4 mm/yr with the lower bounds ranging from 1 to 3 mm/yr and the greatest upper bound being 8 mm/yr. These are consistent with bounds on motion between Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hotspots over the past ≈50 Ma, which range from zero (lower bound) to 8 to 13 mm/yr (upper bounds) (Koivisto et al., 2014). We also determine HS4-MORVEL, a new global set of plate angular velocities relative to the hotspots constrained to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities, using a two-tier analysis similar to that used by Zheng et al. (2014) to estimate the SKS-MORVEL global set of absolute plate velocities fit to the orientation of seismic anisotropy. We find that the 95% confidence limits of HS4-MORVEL and SKS

  1. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  2. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a metallic superconductor, the linear dimension of the system is quite large and the transition from one phase to the ... This has been demonstrated in small metallic grains in which discontinuity is observed with large ... in the above studies critically depends on the inclusion of the quantal and statistical fluctuations [8,11].

  3. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  4. Velocity-resolved [Ne III] from X-ray irradiated Sz 102 microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun-Fan; Shang, Hsien [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10641, Taiwan (China); Walter, Frederick M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory J. [The Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-05-10

    Neon emission lines are good indicators of high-excitation regions close to a young stellar system because of their high ionization potentials and large critical densities. We have discovered [Ne III] λ3869 emission from the microjets of Sz 102, a low-mass young star in Lupus III. Spectroastrometric analyses of two-dimensional [Ne III] spectra obtained from archival high-dispersion (R ≈ 33, 000) Very Large Telescope/UVES data suggest that the emission consists of two velocity components spatially separated by ∼0.''3, or a projected distance of ∼60 AU. The stronger redshifted component is centered at ∼ + 21 km s{sup –1} with a line width of ∼140 km s{sup –1}, and the weaker blueshifted component at ∼ – 90 km s{sup –1} with a line width of ∼190 km s{sup –1}. The two components trace velocity centroids of the known microjets and show large line widths that extend across the systemic velocity, suggesting their potential origins in wide-angle winds that may eventually collimate into jets. Optical line ratios indicate that the microjets are hot (T ≲ 1.6 × 10{sup 4} K) and ionized (n{sub e} ≳ 5.7 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}). The blueshifted component has ∼13% higher temperature and ∼46% higher electron density than the redshifted counterpart, forming a system of an asymmetric pair of jets. The detection of the [Ne III] λ3869 line with the distinct velocity profile suggests that the emission originates in flows that may have been strongly ionized by deeply embedded hard X-ray sources, most likely generated by magnetic processes. The discovery of [Ne III] λ3869 emission along with other optical forbidden lines from Sz 102 supports the picture of wide-angle winds surrounding magnetic loops in the close vicinity of the young star. Future high-sensitivity X-ray imaging and high angular-resolution optical spectroscopy may help confirm the picture proposed.

  5. A Critical Characteristic in the Transverse Galloping Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaohui; Long, Yongjun; Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Shigang

    2015-01-01

    Transverse gallop is a common gait used by a large number of quadrupeds. This paper employs the simplified dimensionless quadrupedal model to discuss the underlying mechanism of the transverse galloping pattern. The model is studied at different running speeds and different values of leg stiffness, respectively. If the horizontal running speed reaches up to a critical value at a fixed leg stiffness, or if the leg stiffness reaches up to a critical value at a fixed horizontal speed, a key property would emerge which greatly reduces the overall mechanical forces of the dynamic system in a proper range of initial pitch angular velocities. Besides, for each horizontal speed, there is an optimal stiffness of legs that can reduce both the mechanical loads and the metabolic cost of transport. Furthermore, different body proportions and landing distance lags of a pair of legs are studied in the transverse gallop. We find that quadrupeds with longer length of legs compared with the length of the body are more suitable to employ the transverse galloping pattern, and the landing distance lag of a pair of legs could reduce the cost of transport and the locomotion frequency.

  6. A Critical Characteristic in the Transverse Galloping Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transverse gallop is a common gait used by a large number of quadrupeds. This paper employs the simplified dimensionless quadrupedal model to discuss the underlying mechanism of the transverse galloping pattern. The model is studied at different running speeds and different values of leg stiffness, respectively. If the horizontal running speed reaches up to a critical value at a fixed leg stiffness, or if the leg stiffness reaches up to a critical value at a fixed horizontal speed, a key property would emerge which greatly reduces the overall mechanical forces of the dynamic system in a proper range of initial pitch angular velocities. Besides, for each horizontal speed, there is an optimal stiffness of legs that can reduce both the mechanical loads and the metabolic cost of transport. Furthermore, different body proportions and landing distance lags of a pair of legs are studied in the transverse gallop. We find that quadrupeds with longer length of legs compared with the length of the body are more suitable to employ the transverse galloping pattern, and the landing distance lag of a pair of legs could reduce the cost of transport and the locomotion frequency.

  7. On Angular Sampling Methods for 3-D Spatial Channel Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Jämsä, Tommi; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses generating three dimensional (3D) spatial channel models with emphasis on the angular sampling methods. Three angular sampling methods, i.e. modified uniform power sampling, modified uniform angular sampling, and random pairing methods are proposed and investigated in detail....... The random pairing method, which uses only twenty sinusoids in the ray-based model for generating the channels, presents good results if the spatial channel cluster is with a small elevation angle spread. For spatial clusters with large elevation angle spreads, however, the random pairing method would fail...

  8. Control of Angular Intervals for Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    In angle-multiplexed holographic memory, the full width at half maximum of the Bragg selectivity curves is dependent on the angle formed between the medium and incident laser beams. This indicates the possibility of high density and high multiplexing number by varying the angular intervals between adjacent holograms. We propose an angular interval scheduling for closely stacking holograms into medium even when the angle range is limited. We obtained bit error rates of the order of 10-4 under the following conditions: medium thickness of 1 mm, laser beam wavelength of 532 nm, and angular multiplexing number of 300.

  9. Notes on the quantum theory of angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Feenberg, Eugene

    1999-01-01

    This classic, concise text has served a generation of physicists as an exceptionally useful guide to the mysteries of angular momenta and Clebsch-Gordon Coefficients. Derived from notes originally prepared to assist graduate students in reading research papers on atomic, molecular, and nuclear structure, the text first reviews the basic elements of quantum theory. It then examines the development of the fundamental commutation relations for angular momentum components and vector operators, and the ways in which matrix elements and eigenvalues of the angular momentum operators are worked out f

  10. Angular resolution of air-shower array-telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    A fundamental limit on the angular resolution of air shower array-telescopes is set by the finite number of shower particles coupled with the finite thickness of the particle swarm. Consequently the angular resolution which can be achieved in practice depends in a determinant manner on the size and number of detectors in an array-telescope, as well as on the detector separation and the timing resolution. It is also necessary to examine the meaning of particle density in whatever type of detector is used. Results are given which can be used to predict the angular resolution of a given instrument for showers of various sizes, and to compare different instruments.

  11. Where angular momentum goes in a precessing black hole binary

    OpenAIRE

    Lousto, Carlos O.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2013-01-01

    We evolve a set of 32 equal-mass black-hole binaries with collinear spins (with intrinsic spin magnitudes $|\\vec{S}_{1,2}/m^2_{1,2}|=0.8$) to study the effects of precession in the highly nonlinear plunge and merger regimes. We compare the direction of the instantaneous radiated angular momentum, $\\hat{\\delta J}_{\\rm rad}(t)$, to the directions of the total angular momentum, $\\hat{J}(t)$, and the orbital angular momentum, $\\hat{L}(t)$. We find that $\\hat{\\delta J}_{\\rm rad}(t)$ approximately ...

  12. Orbital angular momentum in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovic, Nenad

    Internet data traffic capacity is rapidly reaching limits imposed by nonlinear effects of single mode fibers currently used in optical communications. Having almost exhausted available degrees of freedom to orthogonally multiplex data in optical fibers, researchers are now exploring the possibility of using the spatial dimension of fibers, via multicore and multimode fibers, to address the forthcoming capacity crunch. While multicore fibers require complex manufacturing, conventional multi-mode fibers suffer from mode coupling, caused by random perturbations in fibers and modal (de)multiplexers. Methods that have been developed to address the problem of mode coupling so far, have been dependent on computationally intensive digital signal processing algorithms using adaptive optics feedback or complex multiple-input multiple-output algorithms. Here we study the possibility of using the orbital angular momentum (OAM), or helicity, of light, as a means of increasing capacity of future optical fiber communication links. We first introduce a class of specialty fibers designed to minimize mode coupling and show their potential for OAM mode generation in fibers using numerical analysis. We then experimentally confirm the existence of OAM states in these fibers using methods based on fiber gratings and spatial light modulators. In order to quantify the purity of created OAM states, we developed two methods based on mode-image analysis, showing purity of OAM states to be 90% after 1km in these fibers. Finally, in order to demonstrate data transmission using OAM states, we developed a 4-mode multiplexing and demultiplexing systems based on free-space optics and spatial light modulators. Using simple coherent detection methods, we successfully transmit data at 400Gbit/s using four OAM modes at a single wavelength, over 1.1 km of fiber. Furthermore, we achieve data transmission at 1.6Tbit/s using 10 wavelengths and two OAM modes. Our study indicates that OAM light can exist

  13. Processing of Instantaneous Angular Speed Signal for Detection of a Diesel Engine Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Charchalis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of diesel engine performance under its operating is critical for the prediction of malfunction development and subsequently functional failure detection. Analysis of instantaneous angular speed (IAS of the crankshaft is considered as one of the nonintrusive and effective methods of the detection of combustion quality deterioration. In this paper results of experimental verification of fuel system's malfunction detecting, using optical encoder for IAS recording are presented. The implemented method relies on the comparison of measurement results, recorded under healthy and faulty conditions of the engine. Elaborated dynamic model of angular speed variations enables us to build templates of engine behavior. Recorded during experiment, values of cylinder pressure were taken for the approximation of pressure basic waveform. The main task of data processing is smoothing the raw angular speed signal. The noise is due to sensor mount vibrations, signal emitter machining, engine body vibrations, and crankshaft torsional vibrations. Smoothing of the measurement data was carried out by the implementation of the Savitzky-Golay filter. Measured signal after smoothing was compared with the model of IAS run.

  14. Coupling liquids acoustic velocity effects on elastic metallic bioglass properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metiri, W.; Hadjoub, F.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of surface acoustic wave, SAW, velocities of coupling liquids on acoustical properties of several bulk metallic glasses, BMG, has been investigated using simulation program based on acoustic microscopy. Thus, we determined variations of critical angles at which the excitation of longitudinal mode, θL and Rayleigh mode, θR occurs as a function of wave velocities in different coupling liquids, Vliq. Linear relations of the form θi =ai0 +βiVliq were deduced. The importance of such formula, used with Snell's law, lies in the direct determination of SAW velocities and consequently mechanical properties of BMGs.

  15. Critical Magnetic Scattering of Neutrons in Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passell, L.; Blinowski, K.; Brun, T.

    1965-01-01

    Measurements of the angular and energy distributions of 4.28 Å neutrons scattered at small angles from iron at temperatures above the Curie temperature are described. The results are interpreted in terms of Van Hove's theory of critical magnetic scattering and yield information on the range of spin...

  16. Study on Improvement of Multibeam Backscatter Angular Response Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    YAN Jun; ZHANG Hongmei; ZHAO Jianhu; MENG Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Because multibeam backscatter data is greatly affected by the AR (angular response) and the AR correction models are not perfect in the complex seabed, the multibeam image quality is seriously reduced...

  17. Design and Implementation of a Digital Angular Rate Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Peng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of detecting the attitude of a rotating carrier, the paper presents a novel, digital angular rate sensor. The sensor consists of micro-sensing elements (gyroscope and accelerometer, signal processing circuit and micro-processor (DSP2812. The sensor has the feature of detecting three angular rates of a rotating carrier at the same time. The key techniques of the sensor, including sensing construction, sensing principles, and signal processing circuit design are presented. The test results show that the sensor can sense rolling, pitch and yaw angular rate at the same time and the measurement error of yaw (or pitch angular rate and rolling rate of the rotating carrier is less than 0.5%.

  18. The mass and angular momentum of reconstructed metric perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Meent, Maarten

    2017-06-01

    We prove a key result regarding the mass and angular momentum content of linear vacuum perturbations of the Kerr metric obtained through the formalism developed by Chrzarnowski, Cohen, and Kegeles (CCK). More precisely, we prove that the Abbott-Deser mass and angular momentum integrals of any such perturbation vanish when that perturbation was obtained from a regular Fourier mode of the Hertz potential. As a corollary we obtain a generalization of previous results on the completion of the ‘no string’ radiation gauge metric perturbation generated by a point particle. We find that for any bound orbit around a Kerr black hole, the mass and angular momentum perturbations completing the CCK metric are simply the energy and angular momentum of the particle ‘outside’ the orbit and vanish ‘inside’ the orbit.

  19. Grating angle magnification enhanced angular sensor and scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ke-Xun (Inventor); Byer, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An angular magnification effect of diffraction is exploited to provide improved sensing and scanning. This effect is most pronounced for a normal or near-normal incidence angle in combination with a grazing diffraction angle, so such configurations are preferred. Angular sensitivity can be further enhanced because the width of the diffracted beam can be substantially less than the width of the incident beam. Normal incidence configurations with two symmetric diffracted beams are preferred, since rotation and vertical displacement can be readily distinguished. Increased sensitivity to vertical displacement can be provided by incorporating an interferometer into the measurement system. Quad cell detectors can be employed to provide sensitivity to rotation about the grating surface normal. A 2-D grating can be employed to provide sensitivity to angular displacements in two different planes (e.g., pitch and yaw). Combined systems can provide sensitivity to vertical displacement and to all three angular degrees of freedom.

  20. The decay of orbital angular momentum entanglement in atmospheric turbulence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, 8-12 July 2013 The decay of orbital angular momentum entanglement in atmospheric turbulence Roux FS CSIR, National Laser Centre, Pretoria, 0001 Corresponding email: FSroux...

  1. Superpositions of light fields carrying orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presented in this thesis is centred on the generation of superimposed optical fields which each carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) and the development of OAM measurement techniques. Optical fields which carry OAM have found applications...

  2. Effect of angular momentum conservation on hydrodynamic simulations of colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingcheng; Theers, Mario; Hu, Jinglei; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G; Ripoll, Marisol

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to most real fluids, angular momentum is not a locally conserved quantity in some mesoscopic simulation methods. Here we quantify the importance of this conservation in the flow fields associated with different colloidal systems. The flow field is analytically calculated with and without angular momentum conservation for the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method, and simulations are performed to verify the predictions. The flow field generated around a colloidal particle moving under an external force with slip boundary conditions depends on the conservation of angular momentum, and the amplitude of the friction force is substantially affected. Interestingly, no dependence on the angular momentum conservation is found for the flow fields generated around colloids under the influence of phoretic forces. Moreover, circular Couette flow between a no-slip and a slip cylinder is investigated, which allows us to validate one of the two existing expressions for the MPC stress tensor.

  3. The INCAS Project: An Innovative Contact-Less Angular Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislanzoni, L.; Di Cintio, A.; Solimando, M.; Parzianello, G.

    2013-09-01

    Angular Positions sensors are widely used in all spacecrafts, including re-entry vehicles and launchers, where mechanisms and pointing-scanning devices are required. The main applications are on mechanisms for TeleMeasure (TM) related to the release and deployment of devices, or on rotary mechanisms such as Solar Array Drive Mechanism (SADM) and Antenna Pointing Mechanism (APM). Longer lifetime (up to 7- 10 years) is becoming a new driver for the coming missions and contact technology sensors often incur in limitations due to the wear of the contacting parts [1].A Self-Compensating Absolute Angular Encoder was developed and tested in the frame of an ESA's ARTES 5.2 project, named INCAS (INnovative Contact-less Angular Sensor). More in particular, the INCAS sensor addresses a market need for contactless angular sensors aimed at replacing the more conventional rotary potentiometers, while featuring the same level of accuracy performances and extending the expected lifetime.

  4. Angular resolved light scattering microscopy on human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dennis; Stark, Julian; Kienle, Alwin

    2017-07-01

    Angular resolved scattering light measurements on chromosomes are compared to Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) simulations using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based geometrical models. This could present a novel, marker-free method for human chromosome karyotyping.

  5. Pluto Moons exhibit Orbital Angular Momentum Quantization per Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Pluto satellite system of the planet plus five moons is shown to obey the quan- tum celestial mechanics (QCM angular momentum per mass quantization condition predicted for any gravitationally bound system.

  6. Complex Permittivity Measurements of Textiles and Leather in a Free Space: An Angular-Invariant Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kapilevich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the complex permittivity measurements of textiles and leathers in a free space at 330 GHz. The destructive role of the Rayleigh scattering effect is considered and the angular-invariant limit for an incidence angle has been found out experimentally within 25–30 degrees. If incidence angle exceeds this critical parameter, the uncertainty caused by the Rayleigh scattering is drastically increased preventing accurate measurements of the real and imaginary parts of a bulky material. The phenomenon must be taken into consideration in predicting shielding effectiveness of materials covering hidden object in concealed threat detection with millimeter-wave radar systems.

  7. DEVELOPMENT BY COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF AN EQUAL CHANNEL ANGULAR PRESSING DIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Springer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Critical geometric parameters of an Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP die suitable to plate processing were optimized by making use of the DEFORM™ software. Following the simulation a die was manufactured and employed in the processing of 7 mm thick Al AA 1050 plates. Software output included the pressing forces and the equivalent deformation distribution within the plates, after one and four ECAP passes. Calculated pressing forces against the punch displacement were compared with the actual forces, whilst the deformation distribution is validated by Vickers microhardness measurements. From tensile tests and microstructural observation of the processed plates the die performance was found quite satisfactory.

  8. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  9. Temperature Dependence of Angular Momentum Transport Across Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-01-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasi-particles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among non-magnetic metals, fer...

  10. Unidentified angular recurrent ulceration responsive to antiviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmi Amtha; Siti Aliyah Pradono

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recurrent ulcer on angular area is usually called stomatitis angularis. It is caused by many factors such as vertical dimension reduce, vitamin B12, and immune system deficiency, C. albicans and staphylococcus involvement. Clinically is characterized by painful fissure with erythematous base without fever. Purpose: to describe an unidentified angular ulcer proceeded by recurrent ulcers with no response of topical therapy. Case: An 18-years old male came to Oral Medicine clinic in ...

  11. Maximum Velocities in Flexion and Extension Actions for Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessop David M.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Speed of movement is fundamental to the outcome of many human actions. A variety of techniques can be implemented in order to maximise movement speed depending on the goal of the movement, constraints, and the time available. Knowing maximum movement velocities is therefore useful for developing movement strategies but also as input into muscle models. The aim of this study was to determine maximum flexion and extension velocities about the major joints in upper and lower limbs. Seven university to international level male competitors performed flexion/extension at each of the major joints in the upper and lower limbs under three conditions: isolated; isolated with a countermovement; involvement of proximal segments. 500 Hz planar high speed video was used to calculate velocities. The highest angular velocities in the upper and lower limb were 50.0 rad·s-1 and 28.4 rad·s-1, at the wrist and knee, respectively. As was true for most joints, these were achieved with the involvement of proximal segments, however, ANOVA analysis showed few significant differences (p<0.05 between conditions. Different segment masses, structures and locations produced differing results, in the upper and lower limbs, highlighting the requirement of segment specific strategies for maximal movements.

  12. Generation of angular momentum in cold gravitational collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaiem, D.; Joyce, M.; Sylos Labini, F.; Worrakitpoonpon, T.

    2016-01-01

    During the violent relaxation of a self-gravitating system, a significant fraction of its mass may be ejected. If the time-varying gravitational field also breaks spherical symmetry, this mass can potentially carry angular momentum. Thus, starting initial configurations with zero angular momentum can, in principle, lead to a bound virialised system with non-zero angular momentum. Using numerical simulations we explore here how much angular momentum can be generated in a virialised structure in this way, starting from configurations of cold particles that are very close to spherically symmetric. For the initial configurations in which spherical symmetry is broken only by the Poissonian fluctuations associated with the finite particle number N, with N in range 103 to 105, we find that the relaxed structures have standard "spin" parameters λ ~ 10-3, and decreasing slowly with N. For slightly ellipsoidal initial conditions, in which the finite-N fluctuations break the residual reflection symmetries, we observe values λ ~ 10-2, I.e. of the same order of magnitude as those reported for elliptical galaxies. The net angular momentum vector is typically aligned close to normal to the major semi-axis of the triaxial relaxed structure and of the ejected mass. This simple mechanism may provide an alternative, or complement, to the so-called tidal torque theory for understanding the origin of angular momentum in astrophysical structures.

  13. Effect of nutritional intake towards Angular cheilitis of orphanage children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiani Rakhmayanthie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Angular cheilitis is one of the oral manifestations of iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiency. This manifestation frequently seen in people at first and second decade. The purpose of this study was to obtain the prevalence of angular cheilitis and its classifications related to the nutritional intake level in 6-18 years old children. Methods: This research was a descriptive study with 53 children between 6-18 years old from Muhammadiyah Orphanage Bandung as the samples. The oral cavity was examined clinically and their food consumption in a week was noted in Food Recall 24 hours and Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ in order to measure their nutritional intake level. Results: There are 23 children with angular cheilitis. 13% has iron and folate deficiencies, and 87% has iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies. Angular cheilitis types that has been found are Type I (39%, Type II (48% and Type III (13%. Conclusion: The prevalence of angular cheilitis in 6-18 years old children in Muhammadiyah Orphanage Bandung was moderately high, most of them were having iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies. Type II angular cheilitis was the most frequently seen.

  14. Kaleidoscopic motion and velocity illusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, P.A. van der

    2007-01-01

    A novel class of vivid motion and velocity illusions for contrast-defined shapes is presented and discussed. The illusions concern a starlike wheel that, physically, rotates with constant velocity between stationary starlike inner and outer shapes but that, perceptually, shows pulsations, jolts

  15. About the velocity operator for spinning particles in quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salesi, Giovanni [Universita Statale di Catania (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Recami, Erasmo; Rodrigues Junior, Waldyr A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Aplicada

    1995-12-01

    Starting from the formal expressions of the hydrodynamical (or local) quantities employed in the applications of Clifford Algebras to quantum mechanics, we introduce - in terms of the ordinary tensorial framework - a new definition for the field of a generic quantity. By translating from Clifford into sensor algebra, we also propose a new (non-relativistic) velocity operator for a spin 1/2 particle. This operator is the sum of the ordinary part p/m describing the mean motion (the motion of the center-of-mass), and of a second part associated with the so-called Zitterbewegung, which is the spin internal motion observed in the center-of-mass frame. This spin component of the velocity operator is non-zero not only in the Pauli theoretical framework in presence of external magnetic fields and spin precession, but also in the Schroedinger case, when the wave-function is a spin eigenstate. In the latter case, one gets a decomposition of the velocity field for the Madelueng fluid into two distinct parts: which constitutes the non-relativistic analogue of the Gordon decomposition for the Dirac current. We find furthermore that the Zitterbewegung motion involves a velocity field which is solenoidal, and that the local angular velocity is parallel to the spin vector. In presence of a non-constant spin vector (Pauli case) we have, besides the component normal to spin present even in the Schroedinger theory, also a component of the local velocity which is parallel to the rotor of the spin vector. (author). 19 refs.

  16. Friction model for the velocity dependence of nanoscale friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Nikhil S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2005-10-01

    The velocity dependence of nanoscale friction is studied for the first time over a wide range of velocities between 1 microm s(-1) and 10 mm s(-1) on large scan lengths of 2 and 25 microm. High sliding velocities are achieved by modifying an existing commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) setup with a custom calibrated nanopositioning piezo stage. The friction and adhesive force dependences on velocity are studied on four different sample surfaces, namely dry (unlubricated), hydrophilic Si(100); dry, partially hydrophobic diamond-like carbon (DLC); a partially hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of hexadecanethiol (HDT); and liquid perfluoropolyether lubricant, Z-15. The friction force values are seen to reverse beyond a certain critical velocity for all the sample surfaces studied. A comprehensive friction model is developed to explain the velocity dependence of nanoscale friction, taking into consideration the contributions of adhesion at the tip-sample interface, high impact velocity-related deformation at the contacting asperities and atomic scale stick-slip. A molecular spring model is used for explaining the velocity dependence of friction force for HDT.

  17. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  18. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  19. Interaction of linear and angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes of human subjects in response to transient motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulos, D; Gianna, C C; Bronstein, A M; Gresty, M A

    1996-08-01

    The possibility of synergistic interaction between the canal and otolith components of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was evaluated in human subjects by subtracting the response to pure angular rotation (AVOR) from the response to combined angular and translational motion (ALVOR) and comparing this difference with the VOR to isolated linear motion (LVOR). Assessments were made with target fixation at 60 cm and in darkness. Linear stimuli were acceleration steps attaining 0.25 g in less than 80 ms. To elicit responses to combined translational and angular head movements, the subjects were seated on a Barany chair with the head displaced forwards 40 cm from the axis of rotation. The chair was accelerated at approximately 300 deg/s2 to 127 deg/s peak angular velocity, the tangential acceleration of the head being comparable with that of isolated translation. Estimates of the contribution of smooth pursuit to responses in the light were made from comparisons of isolated pursuit of similar target trajectories. In the dark the slow phase eye movements evoked by combined canal-otolith stimuli were higher in magnitude by approximately a third than the sum of those produced by translation and rotation alone. In the light, the relative target displacement during isolated linear motion was similar to the difference in relative target displacements during eccentric and centred rotation. However, the gain of the translational component of compensatory eye movement during combined translational and angular motion was approximately unity, in contrast to the gain of the response to isolated linear motion, which was approximately a half. Pursuit performance was always poorer than target following during self-motion. The LVOR responses in the light were greater than the sum of the LVOR responses in the dark with pursuit eye movements. We conclude that, in response to transient motion, there is a synergistic enhancement of the translational VOR with concurrent canal

  20. Velocidade crítica como um método não invasivo para estimar a velocidade de lactato mínimo no ciclismo La velocidad crítica como un método no invasivo para estimar la velocidad de lactato mínimo en el ciclismo Critical velocity as a noninvasive method to estimate the lactate minimum velocity on cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolysson Carvalho Hiyane

    2006-12-01

    las combinaciones de series predictivas de 2 y 4 km (VC2/4, 2 y 6 km (VC2/6, 4 y 6 km (VC4/6 y 2, 4 y 6km (VC2/4/6. Para la identificación de VLM fue realizada una serie de 2km a máxima velocidad, seguida de 6 series incrementales de 2km con 1 minuto de pausa para dosaje de lac. La VLM fue identificada visualmente (VLMv y aplicando función polinomial (VLMp. No se observaron diferencias entre VLMv (33,3 ± 2,5km.h¹ y VLMp (33,1 ± 2,6km.h¹. A excepción de VC4/6 (34,6 ± 3,5km.h¹, los valores de VC2/4 (38,0 ± 2,2km.h¹, VC2/6 (36,1 ± 2,4km.h¹ y VC2/4/6 (36,1 ± 2,5km.h¹ difirieron de VLMp y VLMv. Concluimos que, a pesar de ser ~1km/h por encima de VLM, la VC identificada a partir de series predictivas de mayor duración (4 y 6km - aproximadamente 6 y 10 min no tienen diferencia estadística y presentan alta correlación y concordancia con VLM. A pesar de esto, es necesario investigar si la VC representa un equilibrio entre remoción y producción de lac durante los ejercicios de larga duración en ciclismo outdoor.The lactate minimum velocity (LMV represents the equilibrium point between blood lactate (lac production and removal. With the purpose of analyzing the validity of critical velocity (CV as a non-invasive method to estimate the LMV on outdoor cycling, 15 cyclists (67.9 ± 5.7 kg; 1.70 ± 0.1 m; 26.7 ± 4.2 years performed all-out tests on distances of 2, 4 and 6 km on velodrome. The CV was identified by distance-time model from combinations of 2 and 4 km (CV2/4, 2 and 6 km (CV2/6, 4 and 6 km (CV4/6 and 2, 4 and 6 km (CV2/4/6. The LMV was identified during 6 x 2 km incremental bouts after a latic acidosis induced by the all-out 2 km. The lower lac during test identified the LMV visually (LMVv and by applying a polynomial function (LMVp. No differences were observed between LMVv (33.3 ± 2.5 km.h¹ and LMVp (33.1 ± 2.6 km.h¹. Apart from CV4/6 (34.6 ± 3.5 km.h¹, the values of CV2/4 (38.0 ± 2.2 km.h¹, CV2/6 (36.1 ± 2.4 km.h¹ and CV2/4/6 (36.1

  1. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Kathrin, E-mail: k.mueller@fz-juelich.de; Fedosov, Dmitry A., E-mail: d.fedosov@fz-juelich.de; Gompper, Gerhard, E-mail: g.gompper@fz-juelich.de

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  2. New GNSS velocity field and preliminary velocity model for Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Ludeña, Marco P.; Staller, Alejandra; Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge M.; Belén Benito, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new preliminary velocity model of Ecuador based on the GNSS data of the REGME network (continuous monitoring GNSS network). To date, there is no velocity model available for the country. The only existing model in the zone is the regional model VEMOS2009 for South America and Caribbean (Drewes and Heidbach, 2012). This model was developed from the SIRGAS station positions, the velocities of the SIRGAS-CON stations, and several geodynamics projects performed in the region. Just two continuous GNSS (cGNSS) stations of Ecuador were taking into account in the VEMOS2009 model. The first continuous station of the REGME network was established in 2008. At present, it is composed by 32 continuous GNSS stations, covering the country. All the stations provided data during at least two years. We processed the data of the 32 GNSS stations of REGME for the 2008-2014 period, as well as 20 IGS stations in order to link to the global reference frame IGb08 (ITRF2008). GPS data were processed using Bernese 5.0 software (Dach et al., 2007). We obtained and analyzed the GNSS coordinate time series of the 32 REGME stations and we calculated the GPS-derived horizontal velocity field of the country. Velocities in ITRF2008 were transformed into a South American fixed reference frame, using the Euler pole calculated from 8 cGNSS stations throughout this plate. Our velocity field is consistent with the tectonics of the country and contributes to a better understanding of it. From the horizontal velocity field, we determined a preliminary model using the kriging geostatistical technique. To check the results we use the cross-validation method. The differences between the observed and estimated values range from ± 5 mm. This is a new velocity model obtained from GNSS data for Ecuador.

  3. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  4. The velocity peaks in the cold dark matter spectrum on earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikivie, P. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Tkachev, I.I.; Wang, Y. [NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Batavia, IL (United States)

    1995-04-13

    The cold dark matter spectrum on earth is expected to have peaks in velocity space. We obtain estimates for the sizes and locations of these peaks. To this end we have generalized the secondary infall model of galactic halo formation to include angular momentum of the dark matter particles. This new model is still spherically symmetric and it has self-similar solutions. Our results are relevant to direct dark matter search experiments.

  5. Transverse momentum asymmetry of the extracted electron in field ionization of a Hydrogen Atom with angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Artru, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The tunneling ionization of a hydrogen atom excited in the presence of a static electric field is investigated for the case where, before being extracted, the electron has an orbital angular momentum L perpendicular to the field E. The escaping electron has a nonzero mean transverse velocity in the direction of E cross . This asymmetry is similar to the Collins effect in the fragmentation into hadrons of a transversely polarized quark. In addition, the linear Stark effect make and oscillate in time. The degree of asymmetry is calculated at leading order in E for an initial state of maximum transverse . The conditions for the observation of this asymmetry are discussed.

  6. Velocity and Motion Control of a Self-Balancing Vehicle Based on a Cascade Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Velazquez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents balancing, velocity and motion control of a self-balancing vehicle. A cascade controller is implemented for both balancing control and angular velocity control. This controller is tested in simulations using a proposed mathematical model of the system. Motion control is achieved based on the kinematics of the robot. Control hardware is designed and integrated to implement the proposed controllers. Pitch is kept under 1° from the equilibrium position with no external disturbances. The linear cascade control is able to handle slight changes in the system dynamics, such as in the centre of mass and the slope on an inclined surface.

  7. A micromachined angular-acceleration sensor for geophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huafeng; Pike, W. T.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an angular-acceleration sensor that works as either an angular accelerometer or a gravity gradiometer and is based on the micro electromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The changes in the angle of the sensor mass are sensed by a rotational capacitive array transducer that is formed by electrodes on both the stator and rotor dies of the flip-chip-bonded MEMS chip (21 mm × 12.5 mm × 1 mm). The prototype was characterized, demonstrating a fundamental frequency of 27 Hz, a quality factor of 230 in air, and a sensitivity of 6 mV/(rad/s2). The demonstrated noise floor was less than 0.003 rad/s2/ √{ Hz } within a bandwidth of 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz, which is comparable with the conventional angular accelerometer and is better than the other reported MEMS sensors in low-frequency ranges. The features of small size and low cost suggest that this MEMS angular-acceleration sensor could be mounted on a drone, a satellite or even a Mars rover, and it is promising to be used for monitoring angular accelerations, aiding seismic recording, mapping gravity anomalies, and other geophysical applications for large-scale terrestrial and space deployments.

  8. Astrophysical applications of high angular resolution array-telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    The air shower array-telescopes which are currently being used to search for and study point sources of UHE gamma-rays have angular resolution similar to 1 deg, limited by either the small total area of particle detectors or poor timing resolution. As the signal to noise ratio depends sensitively on the angular resolution, it seems certain that this figure will quickly be surpassed when second generation instruments come into operation. Since the trajectories of galactic cosmic rays with E 100,000 GeV are practically straight lines on scales of 1 A.U. or less, these new instruments will be able to observe a shadow cast by the Moon (angular diameter 0.5 deg). Although the angular diameter of the Sun is practically the same, its shadow will be more complex because of its magnetic field. Thus, high angular resolution observations of the Sun afford a means of investigating the solar magnetic field, and also the charge composition of cosmic rays, including the ratio of antiprotons to protons.

  9. Interaction between thorax, lumbar, and pelvis movements in the transverse plane during gait at three velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ting; Yoshida, Yasuyuki; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Suzuki, Shuji

    2013-06-01

    We determined the angular range of motion and the relative timing of displacement in the thorax, lumbar spine, and pelvis in the transverse plane during treadmill walking at three velocities. Nine healthy young females walked on a treadmill for three minutes at 0.40, 0.93, and 1.47 m/s. The position of seven reflective markers and three rigs placed on the thorax, lumbar spine, and pelvis were recorded at 200 Hz by an eight-camera motion capture system. As gait velocity increased, stride length increased, cycle time decreased, and angular displacement in the thorax and L1 decreased but increased at the pelvis and L5 (all P thorax (P thorax and L1 and L3 were in-phase for shorter duration as gait velocity increased, and this reduction was especially large, approx. 32% (P thorax and pelvis. As gait velocity increased, the pelvis rotated earlier, causing the shortening of in-phase duration between thorax and pelvis. These data suggest that, as gait velocity increases, pelvis rotation dictates trunk rotation in the transverse plane during gait in healthy young females.

  10. Uncertainty assessment of 3D instantaneous velocity model from stack velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele Maesano, Francesco; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    3D modelling is a powerful tool that is experiencing increasing applications in data analysis and dissemination. At the same time the need of quantitative uncertainty evaluation is strongly requested in many aspects of the geological sciences and by the stakeholders. In many cases the starting point for 3D model building is the interpretation of seismic profiles that provide indirect information about the geology of the subsurface in the domain of time. The most problematic step in the 3D modelling construction is the conversion of the horizons and faults interpreted in time domain to the depth domain. In this step the dominant variable that could lead to significantly different results is the velocity. The knowledge of the subsurface velocities is related mainly to punctual data (sonic logs) that are often sparsely distributed in the areas covered by the seismic interpretation. The extrapolation of velocity information to wide extended horizons is thus a critical step to obtain a 3D model in depth that can be used for predictive purpose. In the EU-funded GeoMol Project, the availability of a dense network of seismic lines (confidentially provided by ENI S.p.A.) in the Central Po Plain, is paired with the presence of 136 well logs, but few of them have sonic logs and in some portion of the area the wells are very widely spaced. The depth conversion of the 3D model in time domain has been performed testing different strategies for the use and the interpolation of velocity data. The final model has been obtained using a 4 layer cake 3D instantaneous velocity model that considers both the initial velocity (v0) in every reference horizon and the gradient of velocity variation with depth (k). Using this method it is possible to consider the geological constraint given by the geometries of the horizons and the geo-statistical approach to the interpolation of velocities and gradient. Here we present an experiment based on the use of set of pseudo-wells obtained from the

  11. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    over the full region of interest and a real time image at a frame rate of 20 Hz can be displayed. Real time videos have been obtained from both our research systems and from commercial BK Medical scanners. The vector velocity images reveal the full complexity of the human blood flow. It is easy to see...... direction and the correct velocity magnitude for any orientation of the vessels. At complex geometries like bifurcations, branching and for valves the approach reveals how the velocity changes magnitude and direction over the cardiac cycle. Vector velocity reveals a wealth of new information that now...... is accessible to the ultrasound community. The displaying and studying of this information is challenging as complex flow changes rapidly over the cardiac cycle....

  12. Percolation systems away from the critical point

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In biased diffusion on percolation clusters, trap- ping in dead-end branches leads to asymptotic drift velocity becoming zero for strong bias, and very slow relaxation of velocity near the critical bias field. Keywords. Percolation; lattice animals; biased diffusion; Griffiths singularity. PACS Nos 64.60.Ak; 05.50.+q; 05.40.Fb; 02.50 ...

  13. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  14. Critical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  15. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-01-02

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Angular Magnetoresistance of Nanowires with Alternating Cobalt and Nickel Segments

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan

    2017-06-22

    Magnetization reversal in segmented Co/Ni nanowires with varying number of segments was studied using angular Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on isolated nanowires. The MR measurements offer an insight into the pinning of domain walls within the nanowires. Angular MR measurements were performed on nanowires with two and multiple segments by varying the angle between the applied magnetic field and nanowire (−90° ≤θ≤90°). The angular MR measurements reveal that at lower values of θ the switching fields are nearly identical for the multisegmented and two-segmented nanowires, whereas at higher values of θ, a decrease in the switching field is observed in the case of two segmented nanowires. The two segmented nanowires generally exhibit a single domain wall pinning event, whereas an increased number of pinning events are characteristic of the multisegmented nanowires at higher values of θ. In-situ magnetic force microscopy substantiates reversal by domain wall nucleation and propagation in multisegmented nanowires.

  17. A quantum memory for orbital angular momentum photonic qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, A.; Veissier, L.; Giner, L.; Giacobino, E.; Maxein, D.; Laurat, J.

    2014-03-01

    Among the optical degrees of freedom, the orbital angular momentum of light provides unique properties, including mechanical torque action, which has applications for light manipulation, enhanced sensitivity in imaging techniques and potential high-density information coding for optical communication systems. Recent years have also seen a tremendous interest in exploiting orbital angular momentum at the single-photon level in quantum information technologies. In pursuing this endeavour, we demonstrate here the implementation of a quantum memory for quantum bits encoded in this optical degree of freedom. We generate various qubits with computer-controlled holograms, store and retrieve them on demand using a dynamic electromagnetically induced transparency protocol. We further analyse the retrieved states by quantum tomography and thereby demonstrate fidelities exceeding the classical benchmark, confirming the quantum functioning of our storage process. Our results provide an essential capability for future networks exploring the promises of orbital angular momentum of photons for quantum information applications.

  18. Angular spectrum and localized model of Davis-type beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James A

    2013-03-01

    The angular spectrum of the Davis fifth-order linearly polarized, dual, and symmetrized fields of a focused Gaussian laser beam is obtained. Since the original Davis fields are not an exact solution of the vector wave equation and Maxwell's equations, a beam remodeling procedure within the angular spectrum is described that produces an exact solution. The spherical multipole beam shape coefficients of the remodeled beam are then obtained, and it is shown that in the weak focusing limit they simplify to the localized model Gaussian beam shape coefficients for both on-axis and off-axis beams. The angular spectrum method is then applied to a transversely confined electromagnetic beam with arbitrary profile in the focal plane, and to a general zero-order Bessel beam.

  19. Partial-wave expansions of angular spectra of plane waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James A

    2006-11-01

    Focused electromagnetic beams are frequently modeled by either an angular spectrum of plane waves or a partial-wave sum of spherical multipole waves. The connection between these two beam models is explored here. The partial-wave expansion of an angular spectrum containing evanescent components is found to possess only odd partial waves. On the other hand, the partial-wave expansion of an alternate angular spectrum constructed so as to be free of evanescent components contains all partial waves but describes a propagating beam with a small amount of standing-wave component mixed in. A procedure is described for minimizing the standing-wave component so as to more accurately model a purely forward propagating experimental beam.

  20. Tunable orbital angular momentum in high-harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, D; Ribič, P Rebernik; Adhikary, G; Camper, A; Chappuis, C; Cucini, R; DiMauro, L F; Dovillaire, G; Frassetto, F; Géneaux, R; Miotti, P; Poletto, L; Ressel, B; Spezzani, C; Stupar, M; Ruchon, T; De Ninno, G

    2017-04-05

    Optical vortices are currently one of the most intensively studied topics in optics. These light beams, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), have been successfully utilized in the visible and infrared in a wide variety of applications. Moving to shorter wavelengths may open up completely new research directions in the areas of optical physics and material characterization. Here, we report on the generation of extreme-ultraviolet optical vortices with femtosecond duration carrying a controllable amount of OAM. From a basic physics viewpoint, our results help to resolve key questions such as the conservation of angular momentum in highly nonlinear light-matter interactions, and the disentanglement and independent control of the intrinsic and extrinsic components of the photon's angular momentum at short-wavelengths. The methods developed here will allow testing some of the recently proposed concepts such as OAM-induced dichroism, magnetic switching in organic molecules and violation of dipolar selection rules in atoms.

  1. Isotropy of Angular Frequencies and Weak Chimeras with Broken Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The notion of a weak chimeras provides a tractable definition for chimera states in networks of finitely many phase oscillators. Here, we generalize the definition of a weak chimera to a more general class of equivariant dynamical systems by characterizing solutions in terms of the isotropy of their angular frequency vector—for coupled phase oscillators the angular frequency vector is given by the average of the vector field along a trajectory. Symmetries of solutions automatically imply angular frequency synchronization. We show that the presence of such symmetries is not necessary by giving a result for the existence of weak chimeras without instantaneous or setwise symmetries for coupled phase oscillators. Moreover, we construct a coupling function that gives rise to chaotic weak chimeras without symmetry in weakly coupled populations of phase oscillators with generalized coupling.

  2. Angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level density parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohil M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutron evaporation spectra alongwith γ-multiplicity has been measured from the 185Re* compound nucleus at the excitation energies ~27 and 37 MeV. Statistical model analysis of the experimental data has been carried out to extract the value of the inverse level density parameter k at different angular momentum regions (J corresponding to different γ-multiplicity. It is observed that, for the present system the value of k remains almost constant for different J. The present results on the angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level density (NLD parameter ã (=A/k, for nuclei with A ~180 is quite different from our earlier measurements in case of light and medium mass systems. The present analysis provides useful information to understand the angular momentum dependence of NLD at different nuclear mass regions.

  3. Origins and demonstrations of electrons with orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorran, Benjamin J.; Agrawal, Amit; Ercius, Peter A.; Grillo, Vincenzo; Herzing, Andrew A.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Linck, Martin; Pierce, Jordan S.

    2017-02-01

    The surprising message of Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)) was that photons could possess orbital angular momentum in free space, which subsequently launched advancements in optical manipulation, microscopy, quantum optics, communications, many more fields. It has recently been shown that this result also applies to quantum mechanical wave functions describing massive particles (matter waves). This article discusses how electron wave functions can be imprinted with quantized phase vortices in analogous ways to twisted light, demonstrating that charged particles with non-zero rest mass can possess orbital angular momentum in free space. With Allen et al. as a bridge, connections are made between this recent work in electron vortex wave functions and much earlier works, extending a 175 year old tradition in matter wave vortices. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  4. Spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion in dielectric metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, Robert Charles; Wintz, Daniel; Oscurato, Stefano Luigi; Zhu, Alexander Yutong; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Oh, Jaewon; Maddalena, Pasqualino; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Spin-to-orbital-angular-momentum conversion has attracted considerable interest as a tool to create exotic light beams, leading to the emergence of novel devices that implement this function. These converters exploit the geometrical phase to create helical beams of handedness determined by the chirality of the incident light. This property is finding important applications in quantum optics thanks to the demonstration of liquid crystal spin-to-orbital angular momentum converters (SOC) known as q-plates. Here we demonstrate high-efficiency SOCs in the visible based on dielectric metasurfaces that generate vortex beams with high and even fractional topological charge and show for the first time the simultaneous generation of collinear helical beams with different and arbitrary orbital angular momentum. We foresee that this versatile method of creating vortex beams, which circumvents the limitations of q-plates, will significant impact microscopy and vector beam shaping.

  5. ANGULAR LIGHT-SCATTERING STUDIES ON ISOLATED MITOCHONDRIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotterer, Gerald S.; Thompson, Thomas E.; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1961-01-01

    Angular light-scattering studies have been carried out on suspensions of isolated rat liver mitochondria. The angular scatter pattern has a large forward component, typical of large particles. Changes in dissymmetry and in the intensity of light scattered at 90° have been correlated with changes in optical density during the course of mitochondrial swelling and contraction. Such changes can be measured at mitochondrial concentrations much below those required for optical density measurements. Changes in mitochondrial geometry caused by factors "leaking" from mitochondria, not detectable by optical density measurements, have been demonstrated by measuring changes in dissymmetry. Angular light-scattering measurements therefore offer the advantages of increased sensitivity and of added indices of changes in mitochondrial conformation. PMID:19866589

  6. Coupling a small torsional oscillator to large optical angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, H.; Bhattacharya, M.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a new configuration for realizing torsional optomechanics: an optically trapped windmill-shaped dielectric interacting with Laguerre-Gaussian cavity modes containing both angular and radial nodes. In contrast to existing schemes, our method can couple mechanical oscillators smaller than the optical beam waist to the in-principle unlimited orbital angular momentum that can be carried by a single photon, and thus generate substantial optomechanical interactions. Combining the advantages of small mass, large coupling, and low clamping losses, our work conceptually opens the way for the observation of quantum effects in torsional optomechanics.

  7. Angular distribution of plasma in the vacuum arc ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, A G; Yushkov, G Yu; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents measurements of the angular distribution of the plasma components and different charge states of metal ions generated by a MEVVA-type ion source and measured by a time-of-flight mass-spectrometer. The experiments were performed for different cathode materials (Al, Cu, and Ti) and for different parameters of the vacuum arc discharge. The results are compared with prior results reported by other authors. The influence of different discharge parameters on the angular distribution in a vacuum arc source is discussed.

  8. Tehnologija Angular 2 na primeru vtičnika Wordpress

    OpenAIRE

    Kenda, Mario

    2017-01-01

    V diplomskem delu je predstavljena implementacija vtičnika Wordpress, ki zagotavlja hitro in predvsem enostavno rezervacijo željenega turističnega aranžmaja. To dosežemo s tehnologijama Angular 2 in TypeScript ter vsemi drugimi povezanimi tehnologijami za razvoj spletnih aplikacij. Uporabniški vmesnik aplikacije je implementiran v jezikih HTML in CSS ter ogrodjem Bootstrap. Interakcija z uporabnikom ter logika aplikacije pa je implementirana s tehnologijama Angular 2 in jezikom TypeScript.

  9. Implementing quantum walks using orbital angular momentum of classical light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sandeep K; Roux, Filippus S; Forbes, Andrew; Konrad, Thomas

    2013-06-28

    We present an implementation scheme for a quantum walk in the orbital angular momentum space of a laser beam. The scheme makes use of a ring interferometer, containing a quarter-wave plate and a q plate. This setup enables one to perform an arbitrary number of quantum walk steps. In addition, the classical nature of the implementation scheme makes it possible to observe the quantum walk evolution in real time. We use nonquantum entanglement of the laser beam's polarization with its orbital angular momentum to implement the quantum walk.

  10. Continuous Variable Entanglement and Squeezing of Orbital Angular Momentum States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Leuchs, Gerd; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2009-01-01

    We report the first experimental characterization of the first-order continuous variable orbital angular momentum states. Using a spatially nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator (OPO) we produce quadrature entanglement between the two first-order Laguerre-Gauss modes. The family of orbital...... angular momentum modes is mapped on an orbital Poincaré sphere, where the mode's position on the sphere is spanned by the three orbital parameters. Using a nondegenerate OPO we produce squeezing of these parameters, and as an illustration, we reconstruct the “cigar-shaped” uncertainty volume...

  11. Spatial distribution of angular momentum inside the nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorcé, Cédric; Mantovani, Luca; Pasquini, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    We discuss in detail the spatial distribution of angular momentum inside the nucleon. We show that the discrepancies between different definitions originate from terms that integrate to zero. Even though these terms can safely be dropped at the integrated level, they have to be taken into account when discussing distributions. Using the scalar diquark model, we illustrate our results and, for the first time, check explicitly that the equivalence between kinetic and canonical orbital angular momentum persists at the level of distributions, as expected in a system without gauge degrees of freedom.

  12. Investigating pointing tasks across angularly coupled display areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennecke, Fabian; De Luca, Alexander; Nguyen, Ngo Dieu Huong

    2013-01-01

    user performance still hold – in particular when pointing is performed across differently oriented areas. To answer this question, we conducted an experiment on an angularly coupled display – the Curve – with two input conditions: direct touch and indirect mouse pointer. Our findings show...... that the target position affects overall pointing speed and offset in both conditions. However, we also found that Fitts’ Law can in fact still be used to predict performance as on flat displays. Our results help designers to optimize user interfaces on angularly coupled displays when pointing tasks are involved....

  13. Magneto-thermal Reconnection Processes, Related Angular Momentum Transport issues and Formation of High Energy Particle Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, B.; Basu, B.; Fletcher, A.

    2016-10-01

    The two-fluid theory of magnetic reconnection, when the longitudinal electron thermal conductivity is relatively large, shows that the perturbed electron temperature tends to become singular in the presence of a reconnected field component and an electron temperature gradient. A transverse thermal diffusivity can remove this singularity while a finite ``inductivity'' can remove the singularity of the corresponding plasma displacement. Then i) a new ``magneto-thermal reconnection'' producing mode, driven by the electron temperature gradient, is found; ii) the characteristic widths of the layers where reconnection takes place remain significant even when the relevant macroscopic distances are very large; iii) modes with phase velocities both in the electron diamagnetic velocity direction and in the opposite one are found. Their growth rates depend on small dissipative factors. The found modes can extract angular momentum from the plasma and thereby sustain a ``spontaneous rotation'' process. Sponsored by the U.S. D.O.E.

  14. Gait phase varies over velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yancheng; Lu, Kun; Yan, Songhua; Sun, Ming; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2014-02-01

    We sought to characterize the percent (PT) of the phases of a gait cycle (GC) as velocity changes to establish norms for pathological gait characteristics with higher resolution technology. Ninety five healthy subjects (49 males and 46 females with age 34.9 ± 11.8 yrs, body weight 64.0 ± 11.7 kg and BMI 23.5 ± 3.6) were enrolled and walked comfortably on a 10-m walkway at self-selected slower, normal, and faster velocities. Walking was recorded with a high speed camera (250 frames per second) and the eight phases of a GC were determined by examination of individual frames for each subject. The correlation coefficients between the mean PT of the phases of the three velocities gaits and PT defined by previous publications were all greater than 0.99. The correlation coefficient between velocity and PT of gait phases is -0.83 for loading response (LR), -0.75 for mid stance (MSt), and -0.84 for pre-swing (PSw). While the PT of the phases of three velocities from this study are highly correlated with PT described by Dr. Jacquenlin Perry decades ago, actual PT of each phase varied amongst these individuals with the largest coefficient variation of 24.31% for IC with slower velocity. From slower to faster walk, the mean PT of MSt diminished from 35.30% to 25.33%. High resolution recording revealed ambiguity of some gait phase definitions, and these data may benefit GC characterization of normal and pathological gait in clinical practice. The study results indicate that one should consider individual variations and walking velocity when evaluating gaits of subjects using standard gait phase classification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A portable multi-channel recording system for analysis of acceleration and angular velocity in six dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, M; Yamashita, A; Ishii, T; Naruo, Y; Nagatomo, M

    1998-11-01

    A portable recording system was developed for analysis of more than three analog signals collected in field works. Stereo audio recorder, available as consumer products, was made use for a core cornponent of the system. For the two tracks of recording, a multiplexed analog signal is stored on one track, and reference code on the other track. The reference code indicates the start of one cycle for multiplexing and swiching point of each channel. Multiplexed signal is playbacked and decoded with a reference of the code to reconstruct original profiles of the signal. Since commercial stereo recorders have cut DC component off, a fixed reference voltage is inserted in the sequence of multiplexing. Change of voltage at switching from the reference to the data channel is measured from playbacked signal to get the original data with its DC component. Movement of vehicles and human head were analyzed by the system. It was verified to be capable to record and analyze multi-channel signal at a sampling rate more than 10Hz.

  16. Angular Velocity's Neural Network Observer of the Electric Drive of TVR - IM Type Implemented in Software Environment LabVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlova, Liudmila Evgenevna; Bolovin, Evgeny Vladimirovich; Payuk, Lyubov Anatoljevna

    2016-01-01

    One of the common ways to manage a smooth starting and stopping of asynchronous motors are soft-start system. For this provision is necessary to use a closed speed asynchronous electric drive of tiristor voltage regulator - induction motor (TVR-IM) type. Using real sensors significantly increases the cost of installation and also introduces a number of inconveniences in the operation of the actuator. Observer has clear advantages that are created on artificial neural network. Creating a neura...

  17. Angular Velocity's Neural Network Observer of the Electric Drive of TVR - IM Type Implemented in Software Environment LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, L.; Bolovin, E.; Payuk, L.

    2016-06-01

    One of the common ways to manage a smooth starting and stopping of asynchronous motors are soft-start system. For this provision is necessary to use a closed speed asynchronous electric drive of tiristor voltage regulator - induction motor (TVR-IM) type. Using real sensors significantly increases the cost of installation and also introduces a number of inconveniences in the operation of the actuator. Observer has clear advantages that are created on artificial neural network. Creating a neural network observer in program graphic programming LabVIEW will allow to evaluate the speed of rotation of the asynchronous electric.

  18. How Critical Is Critical Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent educational discourse is full of references to the value of critical thinking as a 21st-century skill. In music education, critical thinking has been discussed in relation to problem solving and music listening, and some researchers suggest that training in critical thinking can improve students' responses to music. But what exactly is…

  19. High-angular-resolution NH3 observations of the bipolar flow source near NGC 2071

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, T.; Stutzki, J.; Winnewisser, G.; Fukui, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The bipolar flow source near NGC 2071 in the NH3 (J, K) = (1,1) and (2,2) lines with about 40 arcsec angular resolution is observed using the Effelsberg 100m telescope. The column density distribution of the NH3 molecule shows an elongated structure of about 0.4 pc x 0.15 pc orthogonal to the high velocity CO bipolar flow with a small velocity gradient of about 1.4 km/s per pc along its major axis. The rotation temperature determined from intensity ratio of the (2,2) and the (1,1) lines peaks around the central infrared sources, which implies heating of the ambient cloud by those sources. An analysis of the NH3 profiles suggests that part of the NH3 emission comes from a disturbed, dense gas probably stripped off from the quiescent clumpy clouds by the outflowing material from the central infrared source(s). This may be interpreted that the elongated structure of the dense cloud is a result of the disintegration of a parental cloud by the bipolar outflow rather than that the structure collimates an isotropic outflow into the bipolar directions.

  20. Studies of the angular function of a Duncker-type induced motion illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell-Whelan, Max; Wenderoth, Peter; Wiese, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Duncker (1929/1955, Source Book of Gestalt Psychology, pp 161-172) demonstrated a laboratory version of induced motion. He showed that, when a stationary spot of light in a dark laboratory is enclosed in an oscillating rectangular frame, the frame is perceived as stationary and the dot appears to move in the direction opposite the true motion of the frame. Zivotofsky (2004, Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science 45 2867-2872) studied a more complex variant of the Duncker illusion, in which both the inducing and the test stimuli moved: a single red test dot moved horizontally left or right while a dense background set of black dots on a white background moved vertically up or down. When the background inducing dots moved up (down), the truly horizontally translating test dot appeared to drift at an angle down (up) from the horizontal. In experiment 1, we used two methods to measure the complete angular function of the Zivotofsky effect and found it to peak with an inducer-test direction separation of approximately 30 degrees, similar to the inducing angle that has been found to maximise other direction illusions. Experiment 2 tested and confirmed predictions regarding the effects of relative test and inducer speeds based on the vectorial subtraction of the inducing velocity from the test velocity.

  1. Relationship between Lower Limb Angular Kinematic Variables and the Effectiveness of Sprinting during the Acceleration Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Struzik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to reach a high running velocity over a short distance is essential to a high playing performance in team games. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between running time over a 10-meter section of a 30-meter sprint along a straight line and changes in the angle and angular velocity that were observed in the ankle, knee, and hip joints. The possible presence may help to optimize motion efficiency during acceleration sprint phase. Eighteen girls involved in team sports were examined in the study. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. The kinematic data were recorded using the Noraxon MyoMotion system. Statistically significant relationships were found between running time over a 10-meter section and the kinematic variables of hip and ankle joints. An excessively large flexion in hip joints might have an unfavorable effect on running time during the acceleration phase. Furthermore, in order to minimize running time during the acceleration phase, stride should be maintained along a line (a straight line rather than from side to side. It is also necessary to ensure an adequate range of motion in the hip and ankle joints with respect to the sagittal axis.

  2. The vorticity and angular momentum budgets of Asian summer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 113; Issue 3. The vorticity and angular momentum ... The flux convergence of omega and relative momenta over the monsoon domain is effectively balanced by pressure torque during the evolution and established phases. Nevertheless, the balance is stronger ...

  3. Implementing quantum walks using orbital angular momentum of classical light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goyal, SK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an implementation scheme for a quantum walk in the orbital angular momentum space of a laser beam. The scheme makes use of a ring interferometer, containing a quarter-wave plate and a q plate. This setup enables one to perform...

  4. Numerical simulation of side heating for controlling angular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Side heating; finite element analysis; element birth and death method; manual metal arc welding; angular distortions. ... Element birth and death technique is used to simulate the filler material deposition. ... Institute of Engineering Education and Research, Nashik (Affiliated to University of Pune), Nashik, 422 003, India ...

  5. Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) Focal Plane Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, D. T.; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Colazo, F.; Denis, K. L.; Dunner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Eimer, J.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background to search for and characterize the polarized signature of inflation. CLASS will operate from the Atacama Desert and observe approx.70% of the sky. A variable-delay polarization modulator provides modulation of the polarization at approx.10Hz to suppress the 1/f noise of the atmosphere and enable the measurement of the large angular scale polarization modes. The measurement of the inflationary signal across angular scales that spans both the recombination and reionization features allows a test of the predicted shape of the polarized angular power spectra in addition to a measurement of the energy scale of inflation. CLASS is an array of telescopes covering frequencies of 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. These frequencies straddle the foreground minimum and thus allow the extraction of foregrounds from the primordial signal. Each focal plane contains feedhorn-coupled transition-edge sensors that simultaneously detect two orthogonal linear polarizations. The use of single-crystal silicon as the dielectric for the on-chip transmission lines enables both high efficiency and uniformity in fabrication. Integrated band definition has been implemented that both controls the bandpass of the single-mode transmission on the chip and prevents stray light from coupling to the detectors.

  6. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a new interest has grown in recent years as its properties have become important in electron beam lithography [8] and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) [9]. Ob- servable properties of backscattered electrons (BEs) consist of their absolute yield per incident electron (the BE coefficient η), their angular and energy ...

  7. inheritance of resistance to angular leaf spot in yellow beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    African Crop Science Journal, Vol. 19, No. 4, pp. ... Department of Plant Science and Crop Protection, University of Nairobi, P. O. Box 30197-00100,. Nairobi ..... Colombia. Santos-Filho, H.P., Ferraz, H.P. and Vieira, C. 1976. Inheritance of resistance to angular leaf spot in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Annual Report of the Bean ...

  8. Angular momentum transport with twisted exciton wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoning; Lusk, Mark T.

    2017-10-01

    A chain of cofacial molecules with CN or CN h symmetry supports excitonic states with a screwlike structure. These can be quantified with the combination of an axial wave number and an azimuthal winding number. Combinations of these states can be used to construct excitonic wave packets that spiral down the chain with well-determined linear and angular momenta. These twisted exciton wave packets can be created and annihilated using laser pulses, and their angular momentum can be optically modified during transit. This allows for the creation of optoexcitonic circuits in which information, encoded in the angular momentum of light, is converted into excitonic wave packets that can be manipulated, transported, and then reemitted. A tight-binding paradigm is used to demonstrate the key ideas. The approach is then extended to quantify the evolution of twisted exciton wave packets in a many-body, multilevel time-domain density functional theory setting. In both settings, numerical methods are developed that allow the site-to-site transfer of angular momentum to be quantified.

  9. Dichroism for Orbital Angular Momentum using Stimulated Parametric Down Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Lowney, Joseph; Faccio, Daniele; Wright, Ewan M

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically analyze stimulated parametric down conversion as a means to produce dichroism based on the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of an incident signal field. The nonlinear interaction is shown to provide differential gain between signal states of differing OAM, the peak gain occurring at half the OAM of the pump field.

  10. Prospects of Measuring the Angular Power Spectrum of the Diffuse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ISM) of our galaxy. In this paper we briefly review the Tapered. Gridded Estimator (TGE) which can be used to quantify the angular power spectrum Cl of the sky signal directly from the visibilities mea- sured in radio-interferometric observations.

  11. Generation of ultraviolet radiation with wide angular tolerance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLBO) crystal for the first time for the generation of fourth harmonic (266 nm) of Nd:YAG and third harmonic. (226.7 nm) of a dye laser radiation by second harmonic generation and sum-frequency mixing with the angular tolerance as large as ...

  12. Generation of ultraviolet radiation with wide angular tolerance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tangential phase-matching has been realised in cesium lithium borate (CLBO) crystal for the first time for the generation of fourth harmonic (266 nm) of Nd:YAG and third harmonic (226.7 nm) of a dye laser radiation by second harmonic generation and sum-frequency mixing with the angular tolerance as large as 22 mrad ...

  13. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  14. The vorticity and angular momentum budgets of Asian summer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1School of Geography and Geology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1. 2Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016, India. The study delineates the vorticity and angular momentum balances of Asian summer monsoon dur- ing the evolution and ...

  15. Exact angular momentum projection based on cranked HFB solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enami, Kenichi; Tanabe, Kosai; Yosinaga, Naotaka [Saitama Univ., Urawa (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1998-03-01

    Exact angular momentum projection of cranked HFB solutions is carried out. It is reconfirmed from this calculation that cranked HFB solutions reproduce the intrinsic structure of deformed nucleus. The result also indicates that the energy correction from projection is important for further investigation of nuclear structure. (author)

  16. Angular momentum projection of tilted axis rotating states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, M.; Onishi, N.; Tajima, N. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Horibata, T.

    1998-03-01

    We applied an exact angular momentum projection to three dimensional cranked HFB (3d-CHFB) states. Tilted axis rotating states (TAR) and principal axis rotating states (PAR) are compared. It is shown that TAR is more adequate than PAR for description of the back bending phenomena driven by tilted rotation or wobbling motion. (author)

  17. Variation in aggressiveness of Phaeoisariopsis griseola and angular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aggressiveness of fifteen isolates of Phaeoisariopsis griseola and variations in angular leaf spot symptom development in common bean were studied. The isolates were selected based on their virulence and genetic differences and represented Andean, Afro-Andean and Mesoamerican groups of P. griseola.

  18. Equal channel angular pressing of pure aluminium—an analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) is a novel technique for producing ultra fine grain structures in submicron level by introducing a large amount of shear strain into the materials without changing the billet shape or dimensions. This process is well suited for aluminium alloys and is capable of producing ultra fine grain ...

  19. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons produced under the impact of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets are measured. The energy range of backscattered electrons is considered between B = 50 eV and 5000 eV. The angle of incidence α and take-off angle are chosen to have ...

  20. Determination Of Segmented Angular Shapes For Circular Areas Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These segmented angular shapes are not standardized, so depending on the make of the thermal equipment, suitable segments must be fabricated to fit. Moulds have to be fabricated and shapes cast out, using high temperature castables. These intricate procedures for the design and construction of circular segmented ...

  1. Classical Angular Momentum of Light: A Paradox and its Resolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 10. Classical Angular Momentum of Light: A Paradox and its Resolution. K Vijay Kumar N Kumar. Classroom Volume 8 Issue 10 October 2003 pp 69-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Strong eld ionization of naphthalene: angular shifts and molecular potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrovski, Darko; Maurer, Jochen; Christensen, Lauge

    We analyze the photoelectron momentum distributions from strong eld ionization of xed-in-space naphthalene molecules by circularly polarized laser pulses. By direct comparison between experiment and theory, we show that the angular shifts in the photoelectron momentum distributions are very...

  3. The operator method for angular momentum and SU3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekelen, H.A.M. van; Ruijgrok, Th.W.

    It is well known how Schwinger's1) operator method can be used to construct all representations of the angular momentum operators. We give a brief account of this method and show that it is very convenient for a short derivation of the general Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. The method is then applied

  4. Inheritance of resistance to angular leaf spot in yellow beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The backcross to Lusaka Yellow showed a 1:1 segregation ratio, while the backcrosses to Mexico 54 were all resistant. Pembela was susceptible to angular leaf spot, while the F1 were resistant. The ratio of 3:1 represents resistant : susceptible F2 populations. All backcrosses to Mexico 54 were resistant, confirming that ...

  5. Earth Rotation and Coupling to Changes in Atmospheric Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Richard D.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The research supported under the contract dealt primarily with: (a) the mechanisms responsible for the exchange of angular momentum between the solid Earth and atmosphere; (b) the quality of the data sets used to estimate atmospheric angular momentum; and (c) the ability of these data and of global climate models to detect low-frequency signals in the momentum and, hence, circulation of the atmosphere. Three scientific papers reporting on the results of this research were produced during the course of the contract. These papers identified the particular torques responsible for the peak in atmospheric angular momentum and length-of-day during the 1982-93 El Nino event, and, more generally, the relative roles of torques over land and ocean in explaining the broad spectrum of variability in the length-of-day. In addition, a tendency for interannual variability in atmospheric angular momentum to increase during the last several decades of the 20th century was found in both observations and a global climate model experiment.

  6. Photofission and electrofission. [Review, cross sections, fission yield, angular distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, B.L.

    1978-08-17

    Recent experimental progress in the fields of photofission and electrofission of actinide nuclei is summarized. In particular, experimental results which throw light on the delineation of the characteristics of the giant resonances are highlighted. Measurements of especial interest in this regard include photofission cross-section studies with monoenergetic photons and electrofission yield and angular-distribution studies. 36 references.

  7. Data visualization with D3 and AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Körner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    If you are a web developer with experience in AngularJS and want to implement interactive visualizations using D3.js, this book is for you. Knowledge of SVG or D3.js will give you an edge to get the most out of this book.

  8. Angular Deformities of the Knee in Children | Solagberu | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reports from Ibadan and Zaria showed variations in the types of angular deformities of the knee in children. This work was done to determine the varieties of the deformities and their causes at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital Ilorin, Nigeria and review the problem in Nigeria. A prospective analysis of all children with ...

  9. Angular Momentum across the Hubble sequence from the CALIFA survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Lyubenova, Mariya; van de Ven, Glenn

    We investigate the stellar angular momentum of galaxies across the Hubble sequence from the CALIFA survey. The distribution of CALIFA elliptical and lenticular galaxies in the λRe - ɛe diagram is consistent with that shown by the Atlas3D survey. Our data, however, show that the location of spiral

  10. Angular correlation of annihilation photons in ice single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Kvajic, G.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1971-01-01

    Linear-slit angular-correlation curves were obtained at - 148 °C for the [0001], [10¯10], and [11¯20] directions in single crystals of ice. Besides the narrow central peak, pronounced narrow side peaks were also observed. They occurred at angles θ=2πℏgz/mc, where gz is the projection of reciproca...

  11. Streamwise decrease of the 'unsteady' virtual velocity of gravel tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klösch, Mario; Gmeiner, Philipp; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Gravel tracers are usually inserted and transported on top of the riverbed, before they disperse vertically and laterally due to periods of intense bedload, the passage of bed forms, lateral channel migration and storage on bars. Buried grains have a lower probability of entrainment, resulting in a reduction of overall mobility, and, on average, in a deceleration of the particles with distance downstream. As a consequence, the results derived from tracer experiments and their significance for gravel transport may depend on the time scale of the investigation period, complicating the comparison of results from different experiments. We developed a regression method, which establishes a direct link between the transport velocity and the unsteady flow variables to yield an 'unsteady' virtual velocity, while considering the tracer slowdown with distance downstream in the regression. For that purpose, the two parameters of a linear excess shear velocity formula (the critical shear velocity u*c and coefficient a) were defined as functions of the travelled distance since the tracer's insertion. Application to published RFID tracer data from the Mameyes River, Puerto Rico, showed that during the investigation period the critical shear velocity u*c of tracers representing the median bed particle diameter (0.11 m) increased from 0.36 m s-1 to 0.44 m s-1, while the coefficient a decreased from the dimensionless value of 4.22 to 3.53, suggesting a reduction of the unsteady virtual velocity at the highest shear velocity in the investigation period from 0.40 m s-1 to 0.08 m s-1. Consideration of the tracer slowdown improved the root mean square error of the calculated mean displacements of the median bed particle diameter from 8.82 m to 0.34 m. As in previous work these results suggest the need of considering the history of transport when deriving travel distances and travel velocities, depending on the aim of the tracer study. The introduced method now allows estimating the

  12. Signal velocity in oscillator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantos, C. E.; Veerman, J. J. P.; Hammond, D. K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a system of coupled oscillators on the circle, which arises from a simple model for behavior of large numbers of autonomous vehicles where the acceleration of each vehicle depends on the relative positions and velocities between itself and a set of local neighbors. After describing necessary and sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability, we derive expressions for the phase velocity of propagation of disturbances in velocity through this system. We show that the high frequencies exhibit damping, which implies existence of well-defined signal velocitiesc+ > 0 and c- < 0 such that low frequency disturbances travel through the flock as f+(x - c+t) in the direction of increasing agent numbers and f-(x - c-t) in the other.

  13. Current Absolute Plate Velocities Inferred from Hotspot Tracks, Comparison with Absolute Velocities Inferred from Seismic Anisotropy, and Bounds on Rates of Motion Between Groups of Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Zheng, L.

    2015-12-01

    Hotspot tracks have been widely used to estimate the velocities of the plate relative to the lower mantle. Here we analyze the hotspot azimuth data set of Morgan and Phipps Morgan [2007] and show that the errors in plate velocity azimuths inferred from hotspot tracks in any one plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths in the same plate. We use a two-tier analysis to account for this correlated error. First, we determine an individual best-fitting pole for each plate. Second, we determine the absolute plate velocity by minimizing the misfit while constrained by the MORVEL relative plate velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]. Our preferred model, HS4-MORVEL, uses azimuths from 9 major plates, which are weighted equally. We find that the Pacific plate rotates 0.860.016°Ma-1 right handed about 63.3°S, 96.1°E. Angular velocities of four plates (Amur, Eurasia, Yangtze and Antarctic) differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.24°±0.014° Ma-1 right handed about 52.3S, 56.9E. The angular velocities differ insignificantly from the absolute angular velocities inferred from the orientation of seismic anisotropy [Zheng et al. 2014]. The within-plate dispersion of hotspot track azimuths is 14°, which is comparable to the within-plate dispersion found from orientations of seismic anisotropy. The between-plate dispersion is 6.9±2.4° (95% confidence limits), which is smaller than that found from seismic anisotropy. The between-plate dispersion of 4.5° to 9.3° can be used to place bounds on how fast hotspots under one plate move relative to hotspots under another plate. For an average plate absolute speed of ≈50 mm/yr, the between-plate dispersion indicates a rate of motion of 4 mm/yr to 8 mm/yr for the component of hotspot motion perpendicular to plate motion. This upper bound is consistent with prior work that indicated upper bounds on motion between Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots over the past 48 Ma of 8-13 mm

  14. Critical Jostling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pippin Barr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Games can serve a critical function in many different ways, from serious games about real world subjects to self-reflexive commentaries on the nature of games themselves. In this essay we discuss critical possibilities stemming from the area of critical design, and more specifically Carl DiSalvo’s adversarial design and its concept of reconfiguring the remainder. To illustrate such an approach, we present the design and outcomes of two games, Jostle Bastard and Jostle Parent. We show how the games specifically engage with two previous games, Hotline Miami and Octodad: Dadliest Catch, reconfiguring elements of those games to create interactive critical experiences and extensions of the source material. Through the presentation of specific design concerns and decisions, we provide a grounded illustration of a particular critical function of videogames and hope to highlight this form as another valuable approach in the larger area of videogame criticism.

  15. Equal Channel Angular Extrusion Simulation of High-Nb Containing β-γ TiAl Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai-qi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available TiAl alloys containing high Nb are significantly promising for high-temperature structural applications in aerospace and automotive industries. Unfortunately the low plasticity at room temperature limits their extensive applications. To improve the plasticity, not only optimizing the opposition, but also refining grain size through equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE is necessary. The equal channel angular extrusion simulation of Ti-44Al-8Nb-(Cr,Mn,B,Y(at% alloy was investigated by using the Deform-3D software. The influences of friction coefficient, extrusion velocity, and different channel angles on effective strain, damage factor, and the load on the die were analyzed. The results indicate that, with the increasing of friction coefficient, effective strain is enhanced. The extrusion velocity has little effect on the uniformity of effective strain; in contrast it has large influence on the damage factor. Thus smaller extrusion rate is more appropriate. Under the condition of different channel angles, the larger one results in the lower effective strain magnitude and better strain distribution uniformity.

  16. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  17. MAMPOSSt: Modelling Anisotropy and Mass Profiles of Observed Spherical Systems - I. Gaussian 3D velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamon, Gary A.; Biviano, Andrea; Boué, Gwenaël

    2013-03-01

    Mass modelling of spherical systems through internal kinematics is hampered by the mass-velocity anisotropy degeneracy inherent in the Jeans equation, as well as the lack of techniques that are both fast and adaptable to realistic systems. A new fast method, called Modelling Anisotropy and Mass Profiles of Observed Spherical Systems (MAMPOSSt), is developed and thoroughly tested. MAMPOSSt performs a maximum-likelihood fit of the distribution of observed tracers in projected phase space (projected radius and line-of-sight velocity). As in other methods, MAMPOSSt assumes a shape for the gravitational potential (or equivalently the total mass profile). However, instead of postulating a shape for the distribution function in terms of energy and angular momentum, or supposing Gaussian line-of-sight velocity distributions, MAMPOSSt assumes a velocity anisotropy profile and a shape for the 3D velocity distribution. The formalism is presented for the case of a Gaussian 3D velocity distribution. In contrast to most methods based on moments, MAMPOSSt requires no binning, differentiation, nor extrapolation of the observables. Tests on cluster-mass haloes from ΛCDM dissipationless cosmological simulations indicate that, with 500 tracers, MAMPOSSt is able to jointly recover the virial radius, tracer scale radius, dark matter scale radius and outer or constant velocity anisotropy with small bias (elliptical and dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  18. Automated topology classification method for instantaneous velocity fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depardon, S. [Direction de la Recherche et de l' Innovation Automobile, PSA Peugeot Citroen, Velizy-Villacoublay Cedex (France); Laboratoire d' Etudes Aerodynamiques, Teleport 2, 1 Av. Clement Ader, BP 40109, Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France); Lasserre, J.J. [Direction de la Recherche et de l' Innovation Automobile, PSA Peugeot Citroen, Velizy-Villacoublay Cedex (France); Brizzi, L.E.; Boree, J. [Laboratoire d' Etudes Aerodynamiques, Teleport 2, 1 Av. Clement Ader, BP 40109, Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France)

    2007-05-15

    Topological concepts provide highly comprehensible representations of the main features of a flow with a limited number of elements. This paper presents an automated classification method of instantaneous velocity fields based on the analysis of their critical points distribution and feature flow fields. It uses the fact that topological changes of a velocity field are continuous in time to extract large scale periodic phenomena from insufficiently time-resolved datasets. This method is applied to two test-cases: an analytical flow field and PIV planes acquired downstream a wall-mounted cube. (orig.)

  19. Critical Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2017-01-01

    Manipulation and mistakes in LCA studies are as old as the tool itself, and so is its critical review. Besides preventing misuse and unsupported claims, critical review may also help identifying mistakes and more justifiable assumptions as well as generally improve the quality of a study. It thus...

  20. Critical Muralism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosette, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the development and practices of Critical Muralists--community-educator-artist-leader-activists--and situates these specifically in relation to the Mexican mural tradition of los Tres Grandes and in relation to the history of public art more generally. The study examines how Critical Muralists address artistic and…

  1. Detection of polarization in the cosmic microwave background using DASI. Degree Angular Scale Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, J M; Leitch, E M; Pryke, C; Carlstrom, J E; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L

    The past several years have seen the emergence of a standard cosmological model, in which small temperature differences in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales of the order of a degree are understood to arise from acoustic oscillations in the hot plasma of the early Universe, arising from primordial density fluctuations. Within the context of this model, recent measurements of the temperature fluctuations have led to profound conclusions about the origin, evolution and composition of the Universe. Using the measured temperature fluctuations, the theoretical framework predicts the level of polarization of the CMB with essentially no free parameters. Therefore, a measurement of the polarization is a critical test of the theory and thus of the validity of the cosmological parameters derived from the CMB measurements. Here we report the detection of polarization of the CMB with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI). The polarization is deteced with high confidence, and its level and spatial distribution are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the standard theory.

  2. RECOVERY OF LARGE ANGULAR SCALE CMB POLARIZATION FOR INSTRUMENTS EMPLOYING VARIABLE-DELAY POLARIZATION MODULATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. J.; Marriage, T. A.; Appel, J. W.; Bennett, C. L.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Harrington, K.; Rostem, K.; Watts, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chuss, D. T. [Department of Physics, Villanova University, 800 E Lancaster, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Wollack, E. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Switzer, E. R., E-mail: Nathan.J.Miller@nasa.gov [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) are currently being implemented in experiments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on large angular scales because of their capability for providing rapid, front-end polarization modulation and control over systematic errors. Despite the advantages provided by the VPM, it is important to identify and mitigate any time-varying effects that leak into the synchronously modulated component of the signal. In this paper, the effect of emission from a 300 K VPM on the system performance is considered and addressed. Though instrument design can greatly reduce the influence of modulated VPM emission, some residual modulated signal is expected. VPM emission is treated in the presence of rotational misalignments and temperature variation. Simulations of time-ordered data are used to evaluate the effect of these residual errors on the power spectrum. The analysis and modeling in this paper guides experimentalists on the critical aspects of observations using VPMs as front-end modulators. By implementing the characterizations and controls as described, front-end VPM modulation can be very powerful for mitigating 1/f noise in large angular scale polarimetric surveys. None of the systematic errors studied fundamentally limit the detection and characterization of B-modes on large scales for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.01. Indeed, r < 0.01 is achievable with commensurately improved characterizations and controls.

  3. Recovery of Large Angular Scale CMB Polarization for Instruments Employing Variable-Delay Polarization Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Marriage, T. A.; Wollack, E. J.; Appel, J. W.; Bennett, C. L.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Fixsen, D. J.; Harrington, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) are currently being implemented in experiments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on large angular scales because of their capability for providing rapid, front-end polarization modulation and control over systematic errors. Despite the advantages provided by the VPM, it is important to identify and mitigate any time-varying effects that leak into the synchronously modulated component of the signal. In this paper, the effect of emission from a 300 K VPM on the system performance is considered and addressed. Though instrument design can greatly reduce the influence of modulated VPM emission, some residual modulated signal is expected. VPM emission is treated in the presence of rotational misalignments and temperature variation. Simulations of time-ordered data are used to evaluate the effect of these residual errors on the power spectrum. The analysis and modeling in this paper guides experimentalists on the critical aspects of observations using VPMs as front-end modulators. By implementing the characterizations and controls as described, front-end VPM modulation can be very powerful for mitigating 1/ f noise in large angular scale polarimetric surveys. None of the systematic errors studied fundamentally limit the detection and characterization of B-modes on large scales for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r= 0.01. Indeed, r less than 0.01 is achievable with commensurately improved characterizations and controls.

  4. Velocity-independent layer stripping of PP and PS reflection traveltimes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Tsvankin, I.

    Building accurate interval velocity models is critically important for seismic imaging and AVO (amplitude variation with offset) analysis. Here, we adapt the PP + PS = SS method to develop an exact technique for constructing the interval traveltime...

  5. Mobile phase viscosity and velocity dependence on protein retention using nonequilibrium chromatographic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Y C; Thomassin, M; Guinchard, C

    2001-09-01

    Nonequilibrium chromatography (NEC) is an alternative chromatographic procedure for the separation of macromolecules. The retardation of a protein series is studied using a phosphate buffer as a mobile phase with various concentrations of glycerol fraction (used as a viscosity modifier) at different mobile phase velocities and a C1 column with a very low packing particle diameter as a stationary phase. It is shown that the two factors (viscosity and velocity) of the mobile phase constituted important parameters in the retention mechanism of the proteins in NEC. The retardation velocity domain is divided into two regions. For low velocity regions, the protein retention decreased with a mobile phase velocity increase. This retention is enhanced above a critical value of the mobile phase velocity. The transition between the two well-known NEC methods, slalom chromatography and hydrodynamic chromatography, is clearly visualized for the first time for the protein retention of particular values of the mobile phase velocity.

  6. A transverse oscillation approach for estimation of three-dimensional velocity vectors, part II: experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    The 3-D transverse oscillation method is investigated by estimating 3-D velocities in an experimental flow-rig system. Measurements of the synthesized transverse oscillating fields are presented as well. The method employs a 2-D transducer; decouples the velocity estimation; and estimates the axial, transverse, and elevation velocity components simultaneously. Data are acquired using a research ultrasound scanner. The velocity measurements are conducted with steady flow in sixteen different directions. For a specific flow direction with [α, ß] = [45, 15]°, the mean estimated velocity vector at the center of the vessel is (v(x), v(y), v(z)) = (33.8, 34.5, 15.2) ± (4.6, 5.0, 0.6) cm/s where the expected velocity is (34.2, 34.2, 13.0) cm/s. The velocity magnitude is 50.6 ± 5.2 cm/s with a bias of 0.7 cm/s. The flow angles α and ß are estimated as 45.6 ± 4.9° and 17.6 ± 1.0°. Subsequently, the precision and accuracy are calculated over the entire velocity profiles. On average for all direction, the relative mean bias of the velocity magnitude is -0.08%. For α and ß, the mean bias is -0.2° and -1.5°. The relative standard deviations of the velocity magnitude ranges from 8 to 16%. For the flow angles, the ranges of the mean angular deviations are 5° to 16° and 0.7° and 8°.

  7. Effect of old age on human skeletal muscle force-velocity and fatigue properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Damien M.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the muscles of aged individuals contract with less force, have slower relaxation rates, and demonstrate a downward shift in their force-velocity relationship. The factors mediating age-related differences in skeletal muscle fatigue are less clear. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that age-related shifts in the force-velocity relationship impact the fatigue response in a velocity-dependent manner. Three fatigue protocols, consisting of intermittent, maximum voluntary knee extension contractions performed for 4 min, were performed by 11 young (23.5 ± 0.9 yr, mean ± SE) and 10 older (68.9 ± 4.3) women. The older group fatigued less during isometric contractions than the young group (to 71.1 ± 3.7% initial torque and 59.8 ± 2.5%, respectively; P = 0.02), while the opposite was true during contractions performed at a relatively high angular velocity of 270°·s−1 (old: 28.0 ± 3.9% initial power, young: 52.1 ± 6.9%; P Fatigue was not different (P = 0.74) between groups during contractions at an intermediate velocity, which was selected for each participant based on their force-velocity relationship. There was a significant association between force-velocity properties and fatigue induced by the intermediate-velocity fatigue protocol in the older (r = 0.72; P = 0.02) and young (r = 0.63; P = 0.04) groups. These results indicate that contractile velocity has a profound impact on age-related skeletal muscle fatigue resistance and suggest that changes in the force-velocity relationship partially mediate this effect. PMID:21868683

  8. Variable Mixed Orbital Character in the Photoelectron Angular Distribution of NO_{2}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Benjamin A.; Cavanagh, Steven J.; Lewis, Brenton R.; Gibson, Stephen T.

    2017-06-01

    NO_{2} a key component of photochemical smog and an important species in the Earth's atmosphere, is an example of a molecule which exhibits significant mixed orbital character in the HOMO. In photoelectron experiments the geometric properties of the parent anion orbital are reflected in the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD), an area of research that has benefited largely from the ability of velocity-map imaging (VMI) to simultaneously record both the energetic and angular information, with 100% collection efficiency. Photoelectron spectra of NO_{2}^{-}, taken over a range of wavelengths (355nm-520nm) with the ANU's VMI spectrometer, reveal an anomalous jump in the anisotropy parameter near threshold. Consequently, the orbital behavior of NO_{2}^{-} appears to be quite different near threshold compared to detachment at higher photon energies. This surprising effect is due to the Wigner Threshold law, which causes p orbital character to dominate the photodetachment cross-section near threshold, before the mixed s/d orbital character becomes significant at higher electron kinetic energies. By extending recent work on binary character models to form a more general expression, the variable mixed orbital character of NO_{2}^{-} is able to be described. This study provides the first multi-wavelength NO_{2} anisotropy data, which is shown to be in decent agreement with much earlier zero-core model predictions of the anisotropy parameter. K. J. Reed, A. H. Zimmerman, H. C. Andersen, and J. I. Brauman, J. Chem. Phys. 64, 1368, (1976). doi:10.1063/1.432404 D. Khuseynov, C. C. Blackstone, L. M. Culberson, and A. Sanov, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 124312, (2014). doi:10.1063/1.4896241 W. B. Clodius, R. M. Stehman, and S. B. Woo, Phys. Rev. A. 28, 760, (1983). doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.28.760 Research supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Project Grant DP160102585

  9. Astronomy at high angular resolution a compendium of techniques in the visible and near-infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Gaitee; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Schmidtobreick, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an essential compendium of astronomical high-resolution techniques. Recent years have seen considerable developments in such techniques, which are critical to advances in many areas of astronomy. As reflected in the book, these techniques can be divided into direct methods, interferometry, and reconstruction methods, and can be applied to a huge variety of astrophysical systems, ranging from planets, single stars and binaries to active galactic nuclei, providing angular resolution in the micro- to tens of milliarcsecond scales. Written by experts in their fields, the chapters cover adaptive optics, aperture masking imaging, spectra disentangling, interferometry, lucky imaging, Roche tomography, imaging with interferometry, interferometry of AGN, AGN reverberation mapping, Doppler- and magnetic imaging of stellar surfaces, Doppler tomography, eclipse mapping, Stokes imaging, and stellar tomography. This book is intended to enable a next generation of astronomers to apply high-resolution techni...

  10. Atmospheric turbulence compensation in orbital angular momentum communications: Advances and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuhui; Chen, Shi; Gao, Chunqing; Willner, Alan E.; Wang, Jian

    2018-02-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM)-carrying beams have recently generated considerable interest due to their potential use in communication systems to increase transmission capacity and spectral efficiency. For OAM-based free-space optical (FSO) links, a critical challenge is the atmospheric turbulence that will distort the helical wavefronts of OAM beams leading to the decrease of received power, introducing crosstalk between multiple channels, and impairing link performance. In this paper, we review recent advances in turbulence effects compensation techniques for OAM-based FSO communication links. First, basic concepts of atmospheric turbulence and theoretical model are introduced. Second, atmospheric turbulence effects on OAM beams are theoretically and experimentally investigated and discussed. Then, several typical turbulence compensation approaches, including both adaptive optics-based (optical domain) and signal processing-based (electrical domain) techniques, are presented. Finally, key challenges and perspectives of compensation of turbulence-distorted OAM links are discussed.

  11. Angular resolution of the gaseous micro-pixel detector Gossip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilevych, Y.; Blanco Carballo, V.; Dijk, M. van; Fransen, M.; Graaf, H. van der; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.; Koppert, W.; Nauta, S. [Nikhef, P.O. Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rogers, M. [Radboud University, P.O. Box 9102, 6500HC Nijmegen (Netherlands); Romaniouk, A.; Veenhof, R. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Gossip is a gaseous micro-pixel detector with a very thin drift gap intended for a high rate environment like at the pixel layers of ATLAS at the sLHC. The detector outputs not only the crossing point of a traversing MIP, but also the angle of the track, thus greatly simplifying track reconstruction. In this paper we describe a testbeam experiment to examine the angular resolution of the reconstructed track segments in Gossip. We used here the low diffusion gas mixture DME/CO{sub 2} 50/50. An angular resolution of 20 mrad for perpendicular tracks could be obtained from a 1.5 mm thin drift volume. However, for the prototype detector used at the testbeam experiment, the resolution of slanting tracks was worsened by poor time resolution of the pixel chip used.

  12. Angular resolution of the gaseous micro-pixel detector Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilevych, Y.; Blanco Carballo, V.; van Dijk, M.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.; Koppert, W.; Nauta, S.; Rogers, M.; Romaniouk, A.; Veenhof, R.

    2011-06-01

    Gossip is a gaseous micro-pixel detector with a very thin drift gap intended for a high rate environment like at the pixel layers of ATLAS at the sLHC. The detector outputs not only the crossing point of a traversing MIP, but also the angle of the track, thus greatly simplifying track reconstruction. In this paper we describe a testbeam experiment to examine the angular resolution of the reconstructed track segments in Gossip. We used here the low diffusion gas mixture DME/CO 2 50/50. An angular resolution of 20 mrad for perpendicular tracks could be obtained from a 1.5 mm thin drift volume. However, for the prototype detector used at the testbeam experiment, the resolution of slanting tracks was worsened by poor time resolution of the pixel chip used.

  13. Efficient polarization of high-angular-momentum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rochester, Simon; Raizen, Mark; Pustelny, Szymon; Auzinsh, Marcis; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    We propose methods of optical pumping that are applicable to open, high-angular-momentum transitions in atoms and molecules, for which conventional optical pumping would lead to significant population loss. Instead of applying circularly polarized cw light, as in conventional optical pumping, we propose to use techniques for coherent population transfer (e.g., adiabatic fast passage) to arrange the atoms so as to increase the entropy removed from the system with each spontaneous decay from the upper state. This minimizes the number of spontaneous-emission events required to produce a stretched state, thus reducing the population loss due to decay to other states. To produce a stretched state in a manifold with angular momentum J, conventional optical pumping requires about 2J spontaneous decays per atom; one of our proposed methods reduces this to about log_2(2J), while another of the methods reduces it to about one spontaneous decay, independent of J.

  14. A New Shape Description Method Using Angular Radial Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Whoi-Yul

    Shape is one of the primary low-level image features in content-based image retrieval. In this paper we propose a new shape description method that consists of a rotationally invariant angular radial transform descriptor (IARTD). The IARTD is a feature vector that combines the magnitude and aligned phases of the angular radial transform (ART) coefficients. A phase correction scheme is employed to produce the aligned phase so that the IARTD is invariant to rotation. The distance between two IARTDs is defined by combining differences in the magnitudes and aligned phases. In an experiment using the MPEG-7 shape dataset, the proposed method outperforms existing methods; the average BEP of the proposed method is 57.69%, while the average BEPs of the invariant Zernike moments descriptor and the traditional ART are 41.64% and 36.51%, respectively.

  15. Angular-dependent magnetization reversal processes in artificial spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, D. M.; Chadha, M.; Branford, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetization reversal in interconnected kagome artificial spin ice structures has been studied through experimental MOKE measurements and micromagnetic simulations. This reversal is mediated by the propagation of magnetic domain walls along the interconnecting bars, which either nucleate at the vertex or arrive following an interaction in a neighboring vertex. The physical differences in these processes show a distinct angular dependence allowing the different contributions to be identified. The configuration of the initial magnetization state, either locally or on a full sublattice of the system, controls the reversal characteristics of the array within a certain field window. This shows how the available magnetization reversal routes can be manipulated and the system can be trained.

  16. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.F.

    1981-11-01

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ..nu.. less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts.

  17. Angular distributions and total yield of laser ablated silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Nordskov, A.; Schou, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    The angular distribution of laser ablated silver has been measured in situ with a newly constructed setup with an array of microbalances. The distribution is strongly peaked in the forward direction corresponding to cospθ, where p varies between 5 and 9 for laser fluences from 2 to 7 J/cm2 at 355...... nm for a beam spot of 0.015 cm2. The total deposited yield is of the order 1015 Ag-atoms per pulse....

  18. BAO from Angular Clustering: Optimization and Mitigation of Theoretical Systematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocce, M.; et al.

    2018-01-13

    We study the theoretical systematics and optimize the methodology in Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) detections using the angular correlation function with tomographic bins. We calibrate and optimize the pipeline for the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 dataset using 1800 mocks. We compare the BAO fitting results obtained with three estimators: the Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE), Profile Likelihood, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The MLE method yields the least bias in the fit results (bias/spread $\\sim 0.02$) and the error bar derived is the closest to the Gaussian results (1% from 68% Gaussian expectation). When there is mismatch between the template and the data either due to incorrect fiducial cosmology or photo-$z$ error, the MLE again gives the least-biased results. The BAO angular shift that is estimated based on the sound horizon and the angular diameter distance agree with the numerical fit. Various analysis choices are further tested: the number of redshift bins, cross-correlations, and angular binning. We propose two methods to correct the mock covariance when the final sample properties are slightly different from those used to create the mock. We show that the sample changes can be accommodated with the help of the Gaussian covariance matrix or more effectively using the eigenmode expansion of the mock covariance. The eigenmode expansion is significantly less susceptible to statistical fluctuations relative to the direct measurements of the covariance matrix because the number of free parameters is substantially reduced [$p$ parameters versus $p(p+1)/2$ from direct measurement].

  19. QCD corrections to decay-lepton polar and azimuthal angular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. QCD corrections to order αs in the soft-gluon approximation to angular distributions of decay charged leptons in the process e·e tt, followed by semileptonic decay of t or t, are obtained in the e·e centre-of-mass frame. As compared to distributions in the top rest frame, these have the advantage that they would allow ...

  20. Metamaterials-based Salisbury screens with reduced angular sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Brian M.; Roberts, Christopher M.; Podolskiy, Viktor A.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate that the incorporation of nonlocal nanowire metamaterials into Salisbury screens allows for a substantial reduction of the dependence of incident angle on the absorption maximum. Realizations of angle-independent Salisbury screens for the near-IR, mid-IR, and GHz frequencies are proposed and their performances are analyzed analytically and numerically. It is shown that nonlocal effective medium theory adequately describes the angular dependence of nanowire-based Salisbury screens.

  1. Spatial Angular Compounding Technique for H-Scan Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairalseed, Mawia; Xiong, Fangyuan; Kim, Jung-Whan; Mattrey, Robert F; Parker, Kevin J; Hoyt, Kenneth

    2017-10-11

    H-Scan is a new ultrasound imaging technique that relies on matching a model of pulse-echo formation to the mathematics of a class of Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials. This technique may be beneficial in the measurement of relative scatterer sizes and in cancer therapy, particularly for early response to drug treatment. Because current H-scan techniques use focused ultrasound data acquisitions, spatial resolution degrades away from the focal region and inherently affects relative scatterer size estimation. Although the resolution of ultrasound plane wave imaging can be inferior to that of traditional focused ultrasound approaches, the former exhibits a homogeneous spatial resolution throughout the image plane. The purpose of this study was to implement H-scan using plane wave imaging and investigate the impact of spatial angular compounding on H-scan image quality. Parallel convolution filters using two different Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials that describe ultrasound scattering events are applied to the radiofrequency data. The H-scan processing is done on each radiofrequency image plane before averaging to get the angular compounded image. The relative strength from each convolution is color-coded to represent relative scatterer size. Given results from a series of phantom materials, H-scan imaging with spatial angular compounding more accurately reflects the true scatterer size caused by reductions in the system point spread function and improved signal-to-noise ratio. Preliminary in vivo H-scan imaging of tumor-bearing animals suggests this modality may be useful for monitoring early response to chemotherapeutic treatment. Overall, H-scan imaging using ultrasound plane waves and spatial angular compounding is a promising approach for visualizing the relative size and distribution of acoustic scattering sources. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Angular correlation of annihilation photons in frozen aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milosevic-Kvajic, M.; Mogensen, O. E.; Kvajic, G.

    1972-01-01

    Linear‐slit angular correlation curves were obtained at about −140°C for frozen aqueous solutions of HF, HCl, HBr, HI, NH3, FeCl2, FeCl3, NaI, H2SO4, NHO3, MnSO4, KMnO4, K2Cr2O7, NaOH, and LiOH. We found no appreciable influence of a 4% concentration of the last seven impurities. Only halide...

  3. Monitoring Location and Angular Orientation of a Pill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, John F.

    2012-01-01

    A mobile pill transmitter system moves through, or adjacent to, one or more organs in an animal or human body, while transmitting signals from its present location and/or present angular orientation. The system also provides signals from which the present roll angle of the pill, about a selected axis, can be determined. When the location coordinates angular orientation and the roll angle of the pill are within selected ranges, an aperture on the pill container releases a selected chemical into, or onto, the body. Optionally, the pill, as it moves, provides a sequence of visually perceptible images. The times for image formation may correspond to times at which the pill transmitter system location or image satisfies one of at least four criteria. This invention provides and supplies an algorithm for exact determination of location coordinates and angular orientation coordinates for a mobile pill transmitter (PT), or other similar device that is introduced into, and moves within, a GI tract of a human or animal body. A set of as many as eight nonlinear equations has been developed and applied, relating propagation of a wireless signal between either two, three, or more transmitting antennas located on the PT, to four or more non-coplanar receiving antennas located on a signal receiver appliance worn by the user. The equations are solved exactly, without approximations or iterations, and are applied in several environments: (1) association of a visual image, transmitted by the PT at each of a second sequence of times, with a PT location and PT angular orientation at that time; (2) determination of a position within the body at which a drug or chemical substance or other treatment is to be delivered to a selected portion of the body; (3) monitoring, after delivery, of the effect(s) of administration of the treatment; and (4) determination of one or more positions within the body where provision and examination of a finer-scale image is warranted.

  4. Electronic orbital angular momentum and magnetism of graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ji

    2013-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of graphene electrons in a perpendicular magnetic field is calculated and corresponding magnetic moment is used to investigate the magnetism of perfect graphene. Variation in magnetization demonstrates its decrease with carrier-doping, plateaus in a large field, and de Haas-van Alphen oscillation. Regulation of magnetism by a parallel electric field is presented. The OAM originates from atomic-scale electronic motion in graphene lattice, and vector hopping inter...

  5. Unveiling the orbital angular momentum and acceleration of electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloh, Roy; Tsur, Yuval; Remez, Roei; Lereah, Yossi; Malomed, Boris A; Shvedov, Vladlen; Hnatovsky, Cyril; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Arie, Ady

    2015-03-06

    New forms of electron beams have been intensively investigated recently, including vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum, as well as Airy beams propagating along a parabolic trajectory. Their traits may be harnessed for applications in materials science, electron microscopy, and interferometry, and so it is important to measure their properties with ease. Here, we show how one may immediately quantify these beams' parameters without need for additional fabrication or nonstandard microscopic tools. Our experimental results are backed by numerical simulations and analytic derivation.

  6. Holographic tool kit for optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    OpenAIRE

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Salem, Amine Ben; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission rate, more degrees of freedom are required to form a densely packed mode space. Here we move beyond OAM and demonstrate multiplexing and demultiplexing using both the radial and azimuthal degrees of freedom. We achieve this with a holographic approac...

  7. Viscous damping of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W. M. [Georgia Tech Fusion Research Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The Braginskii viscous stress tensor formalism was generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry in order to provide a representation for the viscous damping of toroidal rotation in tokamaks arising from various “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. In the process, it was verified that the parallel viscosity contribution to damping toroidal angular momentum still vanishes even in the presence of toroidal asymmetries, unless there are 3D radial magnetic fields.

  8. Fiber optic angular orientation sensor digital serial encoding

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Steven L.; Brininstool, Michael R.; Newmaster, Jeffrey T.; Hofler, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Patent Number: 5,042,157 A sensor provides remote angular orientation sensing. A rotational signal transmitted to a rotatable input shaft mounted in an encoder body causes the shaft to rotate. Light signals are transmitted through a digital code wheel mounted to the shaft. As the code wheel and shaft rotate, the light signals passing through the code wheel are superimposed with light pulses corresponding to incremental and directional changes of anuglar position of the code wheel with...

  9. Critical Proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Simon

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers how written language frames visual objects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s response to Raymond Roussel’s obsessive description, the essay proposes a model of criticism where description might press up against its objects. This critical closeness is then mapped across the conceptual art practice and art criticism of Ian Burn. Burn attends to the differences between seeing and reading, and considers the conditions which frame how we look at images, including how we look at, and through words. The essay goes on to consider Meaghan Morris’s writing on Lynn Silverman’s photographs. Both Morris and Burn offer an alternative to a parasitic model of criticism and enact a patient way of looking across and through visual landscapes.

  10. Critical proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers how written language frames visual objects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s response to Raymond Roussel’s obsessive description, the essay proposes a model of criticism where description might press up against its objects. This critical closeness is then mapped across the conceptual art practice and art criticism of Ian Burn. Burn attends to the differences between seeing and reading, and considers the conditions which frame how we look at images, including how we look at, and through words. The essay goes on to consider Meaghan Morris’s writing on Lynn Silverman’s photographs. Both Morris and Burn offer an alternative to a parasitic model of criticism and enact a patient way of looking across and through visual landscapes.

  11. How we are building a complex Angular 2 application at Inspire

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    In this talk, at first we will talk about some basic and advanced Angular 2 concepts, then we will share our experiences with Angular 2 that we had so far while building a complex library and web applications at Inspire.

  12. Batch-Orthogonal Locality-Sensitive Hashing for Angular Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianqiu; Yan, Shuicheng; Li, Jianmin; Gao, Guangyu; Tian, Qi; Zhang, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Sign-random-projection locality-sensitive hashing (SRP-LSH) is a widely used hashing method, which provides an unbiased estimate of pairwise angular similarity, yet may suffer from its large estimation variance. We propose in this work batch-orthogonal locality-sensitive hashing (BOLSH), as a significant improvement of SRP-LSH. Instead of independent random projections, BOLSH makes use of batch-orthogonalized random projections, i.e, we divide random projection vectors into several batches and orthogonalize the vectors in each batch respectively. These batch-orthogonalized random projections partition the data space into regular regions, and thus provide a more accurate estimator. We prove theoretically that BOLSH still provides an unbiased estimate of pairwise angular similarity, with a smaller variance for any angle in (0, π), compared with SRP-LSH. Furthermore, we give a lower bound on the reduction of variance. The extensive experiments on real data well validate that with the same length of binary code, BOLSH may achieve significant mean squared error reduction in estimating pairwise angular similarity. Moreover, BOLSH shows the superiority in extensive approximate nearest neighbor (ANN) retrieval experiments.

  13. Analysis of angular heat conduction in rotary heat regenerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, M.C.; Sphaier, L.A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Mecanica Teorica e Aplicada], Emails: lasphaier@mec.uff.br, marcelloreis@vm.uff.br

    2010-07-01

    Heat regenerators can be found in a considerable number of engineering applications, and are either used as pair of fixed matrices or as single rotary matrix. The thermal design of these devices is usually done considering models that rely on well-established simplifying assumptions. While most of these assumptions comprise reasonable considerations, some of them could lead to noticeable errors on some occasions. One such assumption is that there is no heat transfer between adjacent channels within the regenerator matrix. While this is quite reasonable for fixed-bed exchangers, this might not be a good choice for rotary exchangers on some occasions. Since rotary matrices can operate between two process streams presenting a large temperature difference between them, a large temperature gradient may develop within the plane normal to the flow direction, especially in the angular direction. This paper proposes a new model for simulating rotary heat regenerators, taking into account this previously unconsidered matrix heat conduction effect. A numerical solution of a test case with angular heat conduction is carried-out. With this solution, a parametric analysis is performed, showing how the effects that gradually increasing the angular heat conduction can affect the temperature distributions within the matrix and regenerator outlet. (author)

  14. Shocks in the relativistic transonic accretion with low angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suková, P.; Charzyński, S.; Janiuk, A.

    2017-12-01

    We perform 1D/2D/3D relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of accretion flows with low angular momentum, filling the gap between spherically symmetric Bondi accretion and disc-like accretion flows. Scenarios with different directional distributions of angular momentum of falling matter and varying values of key parameters such as spin of central black hole, energy and angular momentum of matter are considered. In some of the scenarios the shock front is formed. We identify ranges of parameters for which the shock after formation moves towards or outwards the central black hole or the long-lasting oscillating shock is observed. The frequencies of oscillations of shock positions which can cause flaring in mass accretion rate are extracted. The results are scalable with mass of central black hole and can be compared to the quasi-periodic oscillations of selected microquasars (such as GRS 1915+105, XTE J1550-564 or IGR J17091-3624), as well as to the supermassive black holes in the centres of weakly active galaxies, such as Sgr A*.

  15. Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation Measurements With GRIFFIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Andrew; The Griffin Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The assignment of spins and parities to excited nuclear states plays an important role in determining nuclear structure. There is a directional asymmetry in the emitted radiation from a γ- γ cascade that depends on the sequence of spin values for the nuclear states, the multipolarities, and the mixing ratios of the emitted γ-rays. These γ-ray angular correlations are used for the assignment of spins and parities to the nuclear states, and thus provide a powerful means to elucidate the structure of nuclei away from stability. The first in-beam test of gamma-gamma angular correlation measurements with the GRIFFIN spectrometer at TRIUMF-ISAC were performed with a radioactive beam of 66Ga. In the daughter nucleus 66Zn, mixing ratios were measured for various cascades, and are in excellent agreement with literature. The sensitivity to a pronounced 0+-2+-0+ angular correlation was also measured. The ability to assign spins for a 0+-2+-0+ cascade is important for the case of 62Ga superallowed Fermi β-decay where a recent measurement was made to clarify two conflicting measurements for the spin assignment of the 2.34 MeV excited state in the daughter. Work supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Research Council of Canada.

  16. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Delayed Quaternion Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, I. Y.; Harman, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared one that uses differentiated quaternion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements, which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quaternion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear part of the rotas rotational dynamics equation of a body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself. This non unique decomposition, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft (SC) dynamics model as a linear one and, thus, the application of a PseudoLinear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to compute recursively the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the rotational dynamics by a simple Markov model is also examined. In this paper special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quaternion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results are presented.

  17. Angular dependence of spin-orbit spin-transfer torques

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Ki-Seung

    2015-04-06

    In ferromagnet/heavy-metal bilayers, an in-plane current gives rise to spin-orbit spin-transfer torque, which is usually decomposed into fieldlike and dampinglike torques. For two-dimensional free-electron and tight-binding models with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, the fieldlike torque acquires nontrivial dependence on the magnetization direction when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling becomes comparable to the exchange interaction. This nontrivial angular dependence of the fieldlike torque is related to the Fermi surface distortion, determined by the ratio of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling to the exchange interaction. On the other hand, the dampinglike torque acquires nontrivial angular dependence when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling is comparable to or stronger than the exchange interaction. It is related to the combined effects of the Fermi surface distortion and the Fermi sea contribution. The angular dependence is consistent with experimental observations and can be important to understand magnetization dynamics induced by spin-orbit spin-transfer torques.

  18. A Novel Single-Excitation Capacitive Angular Position Sensor Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bo; Zhou, Bin; Song, Mingliang; Lin, Zhihui; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a high-precision capacitive angular position sensor (CAPS). The CAPS is designed to be excited by a single voltage to eliminate the matching errors of multi-excitations, and it is mainly composed of excitation electrodes, coupling electrodes, petal-form sensitive electrodes and a set of collection electrodes. A sinusoidal voltage is applied on the excitation electrodes, then the voltage couples to the coupling electrodes and sensitive electrodes without contact. The sensitive electrodes together with the set of collection electrodes encode the angular position to amplitude-modulated signals, and in order to increase the scale factor, the sensitive electrodes are patterned in the shape of petal-form sinusoidal circles. By utilizing a resolver demodulation method, the amplitude-modulated signals are digitally decoded to get the angular position. A prototype of the CAPS is fabricated and tested. The measurement results show that the accuracy of the sensor is 0.0036°, the resolution is 0.0009° and the nonlinearity over the full range is 0.008° (after compensation), indicating that the CAPS has great potential to be applied in high-precision applications with a low cost. PMID:27483278

  19. GR angular momentum in the quadratic spinor Lagrangian formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siao-Jing

    2016-08-01

    We inquire into the question of whether the quadratic spinor Lagrangian (QSL) formulation can describe the angular momentum for a general-relativistic system. The QSL Hamiltonian has previously been shown to be able to yield an energy-momentum quasilocalization which brings a proof of the positive gravitational energy when the spinor satisfies the conformal Witten equation. After inspection, we find that, under the constraint that the spinor on the asymptotic boundary is a constant, the QSL Hamiltonian is successful in giving an angular momentum quasilocalization. We also make certain the spinor in the Hamiltonian plays the role of a gauge field, a warrant of our permission to impose constraints on the spinor. Then, by some adjustment of the QSL Hamiltonian, we gain a covariant center-of-mass moment quasilocalization only under the condition that the displacement on the asymptotic boundary is a Killing boost vector. We expect the spinor expression will bring a proof of some connection between the gravitational energy and angular momentum.

  20. Can we unmask features of spasticity during gait in children with cerebral palsy by increasing their walking velocity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campenhout, Anja; Bar-On, Lynn; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Huenaerts, Catherine; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-03-01

    Spasticity is a velocity dependent feature present in most patients with cerebral palsy (CP). It is commonly measured in a passive condition. The aim of this study was to highlight markers of spasticity of gastrocnemius and hamstring muscles during gait by comparing the effect of increased walking velocity of CP and typical developing (TD) children. 53 children with spastic CP and 17 TD children were instructed to walk at self-selected speed, faster and as fast as possible without running. Kinematics, kinetics and electromyography (EMG) were collected and muscle length and muscle lengthening velocity (MLV) were calculated. To compare the data of both groups, a linear regression model was created which resulted in two non-dimensional gait velocities. A difference score (DS) was calculated between the high and low velocity values for both groups. 103 gait parameters were analyzed of which 16 had a statistically significant DS between TD and CP groups. The spastic gastrocnemius muscle presented at high velocity with a higher ankle angular velocity, plantar flexion moment, power absorption and increased EMG signal during loading response. The spastic hamstrings demonstrated at high velocity a delayed maximum knee extension moment at mid-stance and increasing hip extension moment and hip power generation. The hamstrings also presented with a lower MLV during swing phase. A limited number of gait parameters differ between CP and TD children when increasing walking velocity, giving indirect insight on the effect of spasticity on gait. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Implementation of the dynamic laser goniometer for noncontact measurement of angular movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohkman, Eugene; Burnashev, Mikhail; Filatov, Yuri; Pavlov, Petr

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic laser goniometer (LG) implementation for noncontact measurements of an object's angular position is presented. One of the possible implementations involves determining the time dependence of the scanning mirror's angular position. Another application is aimed at determining the oscillatory movement parameters on the test table. The results obtained in the course of the research show that the dynamic LG makes it possible to calibrate various kinds of test beds making angular oscillations or angular movement of arbitrary law.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF FLUORESCENT NUCLEAR TRACK DETECTORS AS CRITICALITY DOSIMETERS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J; Moreno, B; Van Hoey, O; Mihailescu, L-C; Vanhavere, F; Million, M; Fomenko, V; Akselrod, M

    2017-10-21

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) as criticality dosimeters for both neutrons and gamma are further characterized in terms of angular dependence and quick dose assessment. The power spectrum integral depth profiles obtained from stacks of fluorescent images acquired within FNTDs exposed to a broad spectrum neutron field at various angles are analyzed to determine a calibration curve for angular dependence. MCNPX simulations were shown to be in good agreement with experimental results. A prototype triage reader was also designed and tested for quick assessment of dose. An unfolding technique incorporating both energy dependence and angular dependence is discussed. The advantages and shortcomings of using FNTDs in the event of a criticality excursion accident are analyzed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Energy and angular dependence of thermoluminescent materials to beta monitoring; Dependencia energetica e angular de materiais termoluminescentes para monitoracao beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecatti, Sonia Garcia Pereira; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: scecatti@fundacentro.gov.br

    2006-11-15

    Energy and angular dependences of different thermoluminescent materials were studied with the objective to verify which type of detector would be the most appropriate for beta monitoring of workers. Three types of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy + teflon pellets were studied. The energy dependence was evaluated using standard beta radiation sources ({sup 147} Pm, {sup 2}''0{sup 4} Tl and {sup 90} Sr+{sup 90} Y). For the angular dependence study, the pellets were exposed to beta radiation of the {sup 9}'0 Sr+{sup 90} Y source, varying the incidence angle between 0 deg C and 90 deg C. In relation to the studied characteristics, the CaSO{sub 4}:Dy + 10% C dosimeters were the most adequate for use in beta monitoring of workers. (author)

  4. Cortical mechanisms of retinal and extraretinal smooth pursuit eye movements to different target velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Matthias; Sprenger, Andreas; Hohagen, Fritz; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Lencer, Rebekka

    2008-06-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM) are used to maintain focus upon moving targets. The generation of SPEM velocity is controlled by retinal information and extraretinal signals. Although there is a wealth of studies investigating retinal and extraretinal SPEM control, the main questions regarding the cortical mechanisms involved in the processing of SPEM to different stimulus velocities are still unresolved. We applied an innovative event-related fMRI-design by presenting target ramps at different velocities (5, 10, 15, 20 degrees/s) with both continuous target presentation and intervals of target blanking. The stimulus parameters were integrated into the statistical model and eye movements were registered to confirm SPEM performance. Our results clearly demonstrate that in humans the oculomotor network (V5, frontal and supplementary eye fields, lateral intraparietal area) is engaged in the processing of retinal and extraretinal SPEM velocity. Within this network neural activity increases with increasing target velocity. During extraretinal SPEM, additional engagement of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, angular gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus occurs. These regions encode cognitive functions such as memory, attention and monitoring. The activation of the inferior parietal cortex seems to be related to the interaction between velocity and blanking thereby underlining its relevance for task switching and sensorimotor transformation.

  5. Movement velocity vs. strength training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário C. Marques

    2017-06-01

    practice in strength training, but increasing evidence (Sanborn et al., 2000; Folland et al., 2002; Izquierdo et al., 2006; Drinkwater et al., 2007 shows that training to repetition failure does not necessarily produce better strength gains and that may even be counterproductive by inducing excessive fatigue, mechanical and metabolic strain (Fry, 2004. In fact, fatigue associated with training to failure not only significantly reduces the force that a muscle can generate, but also the nervous system’s ability to voluntarily activate the muscles (Häkkinen, 1993. Consequently, this approach, besides being very tiring and having shown no advantage over other lower effort types of training, it is unrealistic because it is practically impossible to know exactly how many repetitions can be done with a given absolute load without any initial reference. In addition, if in the first set the subject has completed the maximum number of repetitions, it will be very difficult or even impossible to perform properly the same number of reps in the following sets. Movement velocity is another variable which could be of great interest for monitoring exercise intensity, but surprisingly it has been vaguely mentioned in most studies to date. The importance that monitoring movement velocity for strength training programming have already been noticed in 1991 (González-Badillo, 1991. More recently, González-Badillo and Sánchez-Medina (2010, 2011 studied this hypothesis and confirmed that movement velocity provides as a determinant of the level of effort during resistance training as well as an indicator of the degree of fatigue. Unfortunately, the lack of use of this variable is likely because until recently it was not possible to accurately measure velocity in isoinertial strength training exercises/movements.  Indeed, most research that has addressed movement velocity in strength training was basically conducted using isokinetic apparatus which, unfortunately, is not an ideal or common

  6. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  7. Differences between Doppler velocities of ions and neutral atoms in a solar prominence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Hillier, A.

    2017-05-01

    Context. In astrophysical systems with partially ionized plasma, the motion of ions is governed by the magnetic field while the neutral particles can only feel the magnetic field's Lorentz force indirectly through collisions with ions. The drift in the velocity between ionized and neutral species plays a key role in modifying important physical processes such as magnetic reconnection, damping of magnetohydrodynamic waves, transport of angular momentum in plasma through the magnetic field, and heating. Aims: This paper aims to investigate the differences between Doppler velocities of calcium ions and neutral hydrogen in a solar prominence to look for velocity differences between the neutral and ionized species. Methods: We simultaneously observed spectra of a prominence over an active region in H I 397 nm, H I 434 nm, Ca II 397 nm, and Ca II 854 nm using a high dispersion spectrograph of the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida observatory. We compared the Doppler velocities, derived from the shift of the peak of the spectral lines presumably emitted from optically-thin plasma. Results: There are instances when the difference in velocities between neutral atoms and ions is significant, for example 1433 events ( 3% of sets of compared profiles) with a difference in velocity between neutral hydrogen atoms and calcium ions greater than 3σ of the measurement error. However, we also found significant differences between the Doppler velocities of two spectral lines emitted from the same species, and the probability density functions of velocity difference between the same species is not significantly different from those between neutral atoms and ions. Conclusions: We interpreted the difference of Doppler velocities as being a result of the motions of different components in the prominence along the line of sight, rather than the decoupling of neutral atoms from plasma. The movie attached to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Energy and angular dependence of thermoluminescent materials for beta monitoring; Dependencia energetica e angular de materiais termoluminescentes para monitoracao beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecatti, S.G.P. [Fundacao Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Seguranca e Medicina do Trabalho (FUNDACENTRO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Caldas, L.V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This work has as objective the study of the energy and angular dependence of different thermoluminescent (TL) materials for an appropriate choice of the material to be used for beta monitoring of workers. Three types of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy + Teflon pellets were studied. The energy dependence was verified using standard sources of beta radiation ({sup 147}Pm, {sup 204}Tl and {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y). For the angular dependence study the pellets were irradiated with beta radiation of the {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y source, varying the incidence angle between 0 deg C and 90 deg C. The CaSO{sub 4}: Dy (50 mg) and of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy (20 mg) pellets presented practically the same high energy dependence, while the CaSO{sub 4}:Dy + 10% C pellets presented a dependence with the energy of 60% in the studied interval. The TL response of the three materials presented an accentuated angular dependence starting from 45 deg C. The dosimeters of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy + 10% C showed to be the most adequate for use in beta monitoring of workers, in relation to the studied characteristics. (author)

  9. Divergence instability of pipes conveying fluid with uncertain flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Mehdi; Mirdamadi, Hamid Reza; Goli, Sareh

    2018-02-01

    This article deals with investigation of probabilistic stability of pipes conveying fluid with stochastic flow velocity in time domain. As a matter of fact, this study has focused on the randomness effects of flow velocity on stability of pipes conveying fluid while most of research efforts have only focused on the influences of deterministic parameters on the system stability. The Euler-Bernoulli beam and plug flow theory are employed to model pipe structure and internal flow, respectively. In addition, flow velocity is considered as a stationary random process with Gaussian distribution. Afterwards, the stochastic averaging method and Routh's stability criterion are used so as to investigate the stability conditions of system. Consequently, the effects of boundary conditions, viscoelastic damping, mass ratio, and elastic foundation on the stability regions are discussed. Results delineate that the critical mean flow velocity decreases by increasing power spectral density (PSD) of the random velocity. Moreover, by increasing PSD from zero, the type effects of boundary condition and presence of elastic foundation are diminished, while the influences of viscoelastic damping and mass ratio could increase. Finally, to have a more applicable study, regression analysis is utilized to develop design equations and facilitate further analyses for design purposes.

  10. Critical Vidders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svegaard, Robin Sebastian Kaszmarczyk

    2015-01-01

    This article will introduce and take a look at a specific subset of the fan created remix videos known as vids, namely those that deal with feminist based critique of media. Through examples, it will show how fans construct and present their critique, and finally broach the topic of the critical ...

  11. Unidentified angular recurrent ulceration responsive to antiviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Amtha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent ulcer on angular area is usually called stomatitis angularis. It is caused by many factors such as vertical dimension reduce, vitamin B12, and immune system deficiency, C. albicans and staphylococcus involvement. Clinically is characterized by painful fissure with erythematous base without fever. Purpose: to describe an unidentified angular ulcer proceeded by recurrent ulcers with no response of topical therapy. Case: An 18-years old male came to Oral Medicine clinic in RSCM who complained of angular recurrent ulcers since 3 years ago which developed on skin and bleed easily on mouth opening. Patient had fever before the onset of ulcers. Large, painful, irregular ulcers covered by red crustae on angular area bilaterally. Patient has been treated with various drugs without improvement and lead to mouth opening limitation. Intra oral shows herpetiformtype of ulcer and swollen of gingival. Case management: Provisional diagnosis was established as viral infection thus acyclovir 200 mg five times daily for two weeks and topical anti inflammation gel were administered. Blood test for IgG/IgM of HSV1 and HSV2 were non reactive, however ulceration showed a remarkable improvement. The ulcers healed completely after next 2 weeks with acyclovir. Conclusion: The angular ulceration on above patient failed to fulfill the criteria of stomatitis angularis or herpes labialis lesion. However it showed a good response to antiviral. Therefore, unidentified angular ulceration was appointed, as the lesion might be triggered by other type of human herpes virus or types of virus that response to acyclovir.Latar belakang: ulser rekuren pada sudut mulut biasanya disebut stomatitis angularis. Kelainan ini disebabkan oleh banyak faktor seperti berkurangnya dimensi vertikal, defisiensi vitamin B12 dan sistem kekebalan tubuh, infeksi C. albicans serta staphylococcus. Secara klinis kelainan ini ditandai dengan fisur sakit pada sudut mulut dengan dasar

  12. Spin O decay angular distribution for interfering mesons in electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G.

    1994-04-01

    Self analyzing meson electroproduction experiments are currently being planned for the CEBAF CLAS detector. These experiments deduce the spin polarization of outgoing unstable spin s (?)0 mesons from their decay angular distribution, W({theta},{psi}). The large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector permits kinematic tracking of a sufficient number of these events to accurately determine electroproduction amplitudes from the deduced polarization. Maximum polarization information is obtained from W({theta},{psi}) for decay into spin 0 daughters. The helicity of the decaying meson is transferred to the daughter`s relative orbital angular momentum m-projection; none is {open_quotes}absorbed{close_quotes} into daughter helicities. The decaying meson`s helicity maximally appears in W({theta},{psi}). W({theta},{psi}) for spin 0 daughters has been derived for (1) vector meson electroproduction and (2) general interfering mesons produced by incident pions. This paper derives W({theta},{psi}) for electroproduction of two interfering mesons that decay into spin 0 daughters. An application is made to the case of interfering scalar and vector mesons. The derivation is an extension of work by Schil using the general decay formalism of Martin. The expressions can be easily extended to the case of N interfering mesons since interference occurs pairwise in the observable W ({theta},{psi}), a quadratic function of the meson amplitudes. The derivation uses the virtual photon density matrix of Schil which is transformed by a meson electroproduction transition operator, T. The resulting density matrix for the interfering mesons is then converted into a corresponding statistical tensor and contracted into the efficiency tensor for spin 0 daughters.

  13. Analysis of angular reading distortions of photographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codarin, Gabriela F; Felicio, Lilian R; Coelho, Daniel M; Oliveira, Anamaria S

    2012-01-01

    Although photogrammetry is a widespread technique in the health field, despite of the methodological efforts distortions in the angular readings of the images are common. To measure the error of angular measurements in photo images with different digital resolutions in an object with pre-determined angles. We used a rubber ball with 52 cm in circumference. The object was previously marked with angles of 10°, 30°, 60° and 90° degrees. The photographic records were performed with the focal axis of the camera perpendicular and three meters away from the object, without the use of optical zoom and a resolution of 3, 5 and 10 Megapixels (Mp). All photographic records were stored and a previously trained experimenter using the computer program ImageJ analyzed the angular values of each photo. The measurements were performed twice within a fifteen-days interval. Subsequently, we calculated the accuracy, relative error and error in degrees values, precision and the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). When analyzing the angle of 10°, the average accuracy of measurements was higher for those records of 3 Mp resolution compared to 5 and 10 Mp resolutions. The ICC was considered excellent for all resolutions. With regards to the analyzed angles in photographic records, it was possible to verify that the 90-degree angle photographs were more accurate, had lower relative error and error in degrees, and were more precise, regardless of image resolution. The photographs records that were taken with a 3 Mp resolution provided great accuracy and precision measurements and lower errors values, suggesting to be the proper resolution to generate image of angles of 10º and 30º.

  14. Angular momentum and torque described with the complex octonion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Zi-Hua, E-mail: xmuwzh@xmu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2014-08-15

    The paper aims to adopt the complex octonion to formulate the angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the electromagnetic and gravitational fields. Applying the octonionic representation enables one single definition of angular momentum (or torque, force) to combine some physics contents, which were considered to be independent of each other in the past. J. C. Maxwell used simultaneously two methods, the vector terminology and quaternion analysis, to depict the electromagnetic theory. It motivates the paper to introduce the quaternion space into the field theory, describing the physical feature of electromagnetic and gravitational fields. The spaces of electromagnetic field and of gravitational field can be chosen as the quaternion spaces, while the coordinate component of quaternion space is able to be the complex number. The quaternion space of electromagnetic field is independent of that of gravitational field. These two quaternion spaces may compose one octonion space. Contrarily, one octonion space can be separated into two subspaces, the quaternion space and S-quaternion space. In the quaternion space, it is able to infer the field potential, field strength, field source, angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the gravitational field. In the S-quaternion space, it is capable of deducing the field potential, field strength, field source, current continuity equation, and electric (or magnetic) dipolar moment etc in the electromagnetic field. The results reveal that the quaternion space is appropriate to describe the gravitational features, including the torque, force, and mass continuity equation etc. The S-quaternion space is proper to depict the electromagnetic features, including the dipolar moment and current continuity equation etc. In case the field strength is weak enough, the force and the continuity equation etc can be respectively reduced to that in the classical field theory.

  15. Angular momentum and torque described with the complex octonion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Hua Weng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to adopt the complex octonion to formulate the angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the electromagnetic and gravitational fields. Applying the octonionic representation enables one single definition of angular momentum (or torque, force to combine some physics contents, which were considered to be independent of each other in the past. J. C. Maxwell used simultaneously two methods, the vector terminology and quaternion analysis, to depict the electromagnetic theory. It motivates the paper to introduce the quaternion space into the field theory, describing the physical feature of electromagnetic and gravitational fields. The spaces of electromagnetic field and of gravitational field can be chosen as the quaternion spaces, while the coordinate component of quaternion space is able to be the complex number. The quaternion space of electromagnetic field is independent of that of gravitational field. These two quaternion spaces may compose one octonion space. Contrarily, one octonion space can be separated into two subspaces, the quaternion space and S-quaternion space. In the quaternion space, it is able to infer the field potential, field strength, field source, angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the gravitational field. In the S-quaternion space, it is capable of deducing the field potential, field strength, field source, current continuity equation, and electric (or magnetic dipolar moment etc in the electromagnetic field. The results reveal that the quaternion space is appropriate to describe the gravitational features, including the torque, force, and mass continuity equation etc. The S-quaternion space is proper to depict the electromagnetic features, including the dipolar moment and current continuity equation etc. In case the field strength is weak enough, the force and the continuity equation etc can be respectively reduced to that in the classical field theory.

  16. Critical current studies of a HTS rectangular coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Z. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Chudy, M., E-mail: Michal.chudy@stuba.sk [Graduate School of Technology Management, University of Pretoria (South Africa); Institute of Power and Applied Electrical Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia); Ruiz, H.S. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Zhang, X.; Coombs, T. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Unique square pancake coil was manufactured. • Measurements in relatively high magnetic field were performed. • Different sections of the coil were characterized. • Parts of the coil which are limiting critical current were identified. - Abstract: Nowadays, superconducting high field magnets are used in numerous applications due to their superior properties. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are usually used for production of circular pancake or racetrack coils. However different geometries of HTS coils might be required for some specific applications. In this study, the HTS coil wound on a rectangular frame was fully characterized in homogeneous DC background field. The study contains measurements of critical current angular dependencies. The critical current of the entire coil and two selected strands under different magnitudes and orientations of external magnetic fields are measured. The critical regions of the coil in different angular regimes are determined. This study brings better understanding of the in- field performance of HTS coils wound on frames with right-angles.

  17. Velocity-specific and time-dependent adaptations following a standardized Nordic Hamstring Exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, T; Nodler, Y T; Severin, J; Knicker, A J; Strüder, H K

    2017-03-01

    The Nordic Hamstring Exercise (NHE) is effective for selective hamstring strengthening to improve muscle balance between knee flexors and extensors. The purpose of this study (within subject design of repeated measures) was to determine the effects of a standardized 4-week NHE training on thigh strength and muscle balance with concomitant kinetic and kinematic monitoring. Sixteen male sprinters (22 years, 181 cm, 76 kg) performed a standardized 4-week NHE training consisting of three sessions per week (each 3×3 repetitions). Six rope-assisted and six unassisted sessions were performed targeting at a constant knee extension angular velocity of ~15°/s across a ~90-100° knee joint range of motion. Kinetic (peak and mean moment, impulse) and kinematic parameters (eg, ROM to downward acceleration, ROMDWA ) were recorded during selected sessions. Unilateral isokinetic tests of concentric and eccentric knee flexors and extensors quantified muscle group-, contraction mode-, and velocity-specific training adaptations. Peak moments and contractional work demonstrated strong interactions of time with muscle group, contraction modes, and angular velocities (η²>.150). NHE training increased eccentric hamstring strength by 6%-14% as well as thigh muscle balance with biggest adaptations at 150°/s 2 weeks after NHE training. Throughout the training period significant increases (P.05). A 4-week NHE training significantly strengthened the hamstrings and improved muscle balance between knee flexors and extensors. Despite the slow training velocity, biggest adaptations emerged at the highest velocity 2 weeks after training ended. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A New Shape Memory Alloy Based Smart Encoder for Sensing of Direction and Angular Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishakh BHATTACHARYA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel technique for sensing direction, angle and velocity from rotation of shafts using simple Shape Memory Alloy (SMA based micro-switches. Due to electro-mechanical coupling of SMA wires reflected in controlled force generation capacity, the SMA based devices can provide better alternatives for traditional relays, solenoid valves and opto-coupler isolators. The control algorithm involved in this sensing technique, reads the switch status for shaft rotation and sense the angular displacement thereafter. One of the advantages, this new sensor offers is its inherent robustness to vibration in the host platform. Experiments are carried out under vibrating conditions and obtained results are compared with conventional optical incremental encoder. The result shows that SMA based angle encoder works efficiently and gives more accurate results under disturbance while optical encoders are quite sensitive to similar platform vibration. Due to its compactness and lightweight, this concept of SMA wire based angle sensor is envisaged to be suitable for structural health monitoring applications where discrete angle information is needed at low RPM.

  19. High angular resolution diffusion imaging with stimulated echoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) diffusion MRI can be advantageous over pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) for diffusion times that are long compared with T2 . It therefore has potential for biomedical diffusion imaging applications at 7T and above where T2 is short. However, gradient pulses...... angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data were acquired with and without the proposed compensation. The data were processed to derive standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps, which highlight the need for the compensation. Ignoring the other gradient pulses, a bias in DTI parameters from STEAM...

  20. Controlled angular redirection of light via nanoimprinted disordered gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buss, Thomas; Teisseire, Jérémie; Mazoyer, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced control of diffraction through transparent substrates is achieved via disordered gratings in a silica sol–gel film. Tailoring the degree of disorder allows tuning of the diffractive behavior from discrete orders into broad distributions over large angular range. Gratings of optical quality...... are formed by silica sol–gel nanoimprint lithography and an optical setup for the measurement of continuous diffraction patterns is presented. Sound agreement is found between measurements and simulation, validating both the approach for redirection of light and the fabrication process. The disordered...

  1. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Diffractive element design for resonant scanner angular correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Jed; Woods, Charles L.; Haji-Saeed, Bahareh; Pyburn, Dana; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Kierstead, John

    2006-09-01

    We propose an optical corrective element with zooming capability to convert nonlinear sinusoidal scanning into linear scanning. Such a device will be useful for linearizing the angular scan of a resonant mirror scanner. The design methodology is to create a graded index of refraction device as the reference design, with its index of refraction parameters based on the propagation of an electromagnetic field in inhomogeneous media. The algorithm for converting this refractive element to the corresponding binary diffractive version is also presented. Design and simulation data are shown.

  3. Designing and Optimizing Future Spaceborne Multi-angular, Polarimetric Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroy, S. B.; Nicholson, R. E.; D'Entremont, R. P.; Snell, H. E.

    2004-05-01

    Polarimetric measurements in the visible/near-infrared spectral region improve aerosol and cloud microphysical and compositional retrievals. The retrieval approaches exploit the unique polarimetric signatures of aerosols and clouds as function of scattering angle, thereby driving the requirement for data collection over a large range of scattering angles (ideally between 0 and 180 degrees). Scattering angle coverage is a function both of the sensor/sun/target geometry and the sensor architectural approach toward acquiring multi-angular data. These two functions must be considered when designing and implementing a spaceborne, multi-angular polarimetric sensor. The orbital geometry trade is dictated by the range of possible orbits and will quickly reduce to a subset of optimal orbital scenarios. However, the desired parameter of interest (aerosols vs. clouds properties), its spatial variability, and global extent must be considered when selecting an optimal orbit. For example, while a noon-equatorial crossing-time provides the best scattering angle coverage for the retrievals, the increased presence of clouds may preclude use of much of the data for characterizing aerosols. The sensor architectural trade investigates differing sensor approaches to providing sufficient scattering angle coverage. Current polarimetric sensor designs include both the over-lapping imagery approach (e.g. POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances - POLDER) and the single-pixel, scanning approach (e.g. Research Scanning Polarimeter - RSP). POLDER (a spaceborne sensor) traded the benefit of image data with a large swath width against the collection of simultaneous polarimetry. RSP (an airborne sensor) collects multi-angular data by scanning the air mass during over-flight with a set of polarimetric compensating mirrors. The RSP design allows for simultaneous polarimetry and potentially very large scattering angle ranges on orbit, but is restricted to a single-pixel detector

  4. Mach flow angularity probes for scramjet engine flow path diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Paul A.; Hiers, Robert S., Jr.

    Mach-flow angularity (MFA) probes were developed for use in scramjet flow path probe rakes. Prototype probes were fabricated to demonstrate the assembly processes (numerical control machining, furnace brazing, and electron beam welding). Tests of prototype probes confirmed the thermal durability margins and life cycle. Selected probes were calibrated in air at Mach numbers from 1.75 to 6.0. Acceptance criteria for the production probes stressed thermal durability and pressure (and, consequently, Mach number) measurement quality. This new water-cooled MFA probe has 0.397-cm shaft diameter and is capable of withstanding heat fluxes of 2.724 kW/sq cm.

  5. Spontaneous generation of angular momentum in holographic theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Yunes, Nicolás

    2013-05-24

    The Schwarzschild black two-brane in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter space is dual to a finite temperature state in three-dimensional conformal field theory. We show that the solution acquires a nonzero angular momentum density when a gravitational Chern-Simons coupling is turned on in the bulk, even though the solution is not modified. A similar phenomenon is found for the Reissner-Nordström black two-brane with axionic coupling to the gauge field. We discuss interpretation of this phenomenon from the point of view of the boundary three-dimensional conformal field theory.

  6. Estimating Discrete Power Angular Spectra in Multiprobe OTA Setups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2014-01-01

    The letter discusses over-the-air (OTA) testing for multiple-input–multiple-output (MIMO) capable terminals with emphasis on estimating discrete power angular spectrum modeled at the receiver (Rx) side in the test zone. Two techniques based on a uniform circular array (UCA) are proposed to obtain...... accurate direction-of-arrival estimates as well as power estimates of the impinging signals in the test zone. Simulation results match well with the target, as expected. Measurement results based on a virtual UCA in a practical 3-D multiprobe setup further support the simulation results. Possible reasons...... for the deviations between simulations and measurements are also investigated....

  7. Measurements of the angular distribution of diffuse irradiance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Nielsen, Kristian Pagh; Dragsted, Janne

    2015-01-01

    Advanced solar resource assessment and forecasting is necessary for optimal solar energy utilization. In order to investigate the short-term resource variability, for instance caused by clouds it is necessary to investigate how clouds affect the solar irradiance, including the angular distribution...... of the solar irradiance. The investigation is part of the Danish contribution to the taskforce 46 within the International Energy Agency and financed by the Danish Energy Agency. The investigation focuses on the distribution of the diffuse solar irradiance and is based on horizontal measurements of the solar...... irradiance from 8 different parts of the sky as well as horizontal measurements of the total beam and total diffuse irradiance....

  8. Nonstandard Higgs couplings from angular distributions in [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, Gerhard; Catà, Oscar; D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo

    We compute the fully differential rate for the Higgs-boson decay [Formula: see text], with [Formula: see text]. For these processes we assume the most general matrix elements within an effective Lagrangian framework. The electroweak chiral Lagrangian we employ assumes minimal particle content and Standard Model gauge symmetries, but it is otherwise completely general. We discuss how information on new physics in the decay form factors may be obtained that is inaccessible in the dilepton-mass spectrum integrated over angular variables. The form factors are related to the coefficients of the effective Lagrangian, which are used to estimate the potential size of new-physics effects.

  9. Balance velocities of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Ekholm, Simon

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetery data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail......, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning....

  10. VELOCITY ANISOTROPY IN THE NIGER VDELTTXFSEDIMENTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Intrinsic velocity anisotropy, Niger Delta, Thomsen's parameters, vertical i transverse isotropy (VT!) Introduction. In seismology, a layer is anisotropic if seismic waves propagate through it at different velocities in different directions. Sedimentary rocks possess some degree of intrinsic velocity anisotropy (Jones and.

  11. Dynamics of optically levitated microparticles in vacuum placed in 2D and 3D optical potentials possessing orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Mazilu, Michael; Chen, Mingzhou; Vettenburg, Tom; Auñón, Juan M.; Wright, Ewan M.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the transfer of orbital angular momentum to optically levitated microparticles in vacuum [1]. We prepare two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical potentials. In the former case the microparticle is placed within a Laguerre-Gaussian beam and orbits the annular beam profile with increasing angular velocity as the air drag coefficient is reduced. We explore the particle dynamics as a function of the topological charge of the levitating beam. Our results reveal that there is a fundamental limit to the orbital angular momentum that may be transferred to a trapped particle, dependent upon the beam parameters and inertial forces present. This effect was predicted theoretically [2] and can be understood considering the underlying dynamics arising from the link between the magnitude of the azimuthal index and the beam radius [3]. Whilst a Laguerre-Gaussian beam scales in size with azimuthal index `, recently we have created a "perfect" vortex beam whose radial intensity profile and radius are both independent of topological charge [4, 5]. As the Fourier transform of a perfect vortex yields a Bessel beam. Imaging a perfect vortex, with its subsequent propagation thus realises a complex three dimensional optical field. In this scenario we load individual silica microparticles into this field and observe their trajectories. The optical gradient and scattering forces interplay with the inertial and gravitational forces acting on the trapped particle, including the rotational degrees of freedom. As a result the trapped microparticle exhibits a complex three dimensional motion that includes a periodic orbital motion between the Bessel and the perfect vortex beam. We are able to determine the three dimensional optical potential in situ by tracking the particle. This first demonstration of trapping microparticles within a complex three dimensional optical potential in vacuum opens up new possibilities for fundamental studies of many-body dynamics, mesoscopic

  12. Critical reading and critical thinking Critical reading and critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loni Kreis Taglieber

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of no use due to the enormous amount of it. The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of

  13. Using remotely sensed data to estimate river characteristics including water-surface velocity and discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan M.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Legleiter, Carl; McDonald, Richard R.; Overstreet, Brandon; Conaway, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a project combining field studies and analyses directed at providing an assessment of the accuracy of remotely sensed methods for determining river characteristics such as velocity and discharge. In particular, we describe a remote sensing method for surface velocities using mid-wave thermal camera videography combined with image analysis. One of the critical problems in this work is determining a method for relating remotely measured water-surface velocities to vertically averaged velocities through a velocity index. We explore three similarity profiles that allow a relationship between surface and vertically averaged velocity to be found either using empirical results or simple roughness-to-depth ratios. To test the approaches we compare them in a situation where vertical structure is known over most of the flow depth through ADCP measurements. By determining best-fit profiles through the ADCP profiles, average values of the velocity index are found for the cross-sections where measurement were made. By comparing these to the predicted velocity indices from the three similarity profiles, we find that, although the differences between the various similarity profiles are substantial, they are smaller than differences associated with local nonuniformity and nonhydrostatic flow. Nevertheless, the velocity indices are accurate to about +/-5%, meaning that remotely sensed vertically averaged velocities can be computed to well within the current accuracy standard for such values when used for river gaging.

  14. Transferring linear motion of an optical wedge to rotational frequency shift in an orbital angular momentum interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qikun; Qiu, Xiaodong; Wu, Ziwen; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2017-08-01

    We build a modified Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) interferometer with an embedded Dove prism in one arm to observe the interference between two conjugate orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams. By inserting and moving an optical wedge vertically in the other arm, we find that its linear motion can induce a rotational frequency shift equivalently, as a consequence of phase transfer from the path difference to the azimuthal difference between two OAM beams. The micron-scale movement of the wedge is driven by a compact motorized translation stage and is manifested by a significant rotation of the interference petal-like patterns. Our scheme offers an accurate method to measure the optical wedge angle with a simple method of digital image processing. This work may also find potential applications in the field of velocity sensing or temperature sensing.

  15. Critical scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ., Dep. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Perry, S.C. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs.

  16. The engagement of optical angular momentum in nanoscale chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L.

    2017-09-01

    Wide-ranging developments in optical angular momentum have recently led to refocused attention on issues of material chirality. The connection between optical spin and circular polarization, linking to well-known and utilized probes of chirality such as circular dichroism, has prompted studies aiming to achieve enhanced means of differentiating enantiomers - molecules or particles of opposite handedness. A number of newly devised schemes for physically separating mirror-image components by optical methods have also been gaining traction, together with a developing appreciation of how the scale of physical dimensions ultimately determines any capacity to differentially select for material chirality. The scope of such enquiries has substantially widened on recognition that suitably structured, topologically charged beams of light - often known as `twisted light' or `optical vortices' can additionally convey orbital angular momentum. A case can be made that understanding the full scope and constraints upon chiroptical interactions in the nanoscale regime involves the resolution of CPT symmetry conditions governing the fundamental interactions between matter and photons. The principles provide a sound theoretical test-bed for new methodologies.

  17. Ion angular distribution simulation of the HEMP Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duras, Julia; Koch, Norbert; Kahnfeld, Daniel; Bandelow, Gunnar; Matthias, Paul; Lüskow, Karl Felix; Schneider, Ralf; Kemnitz, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Ion angular current and energy distributions are important parameters for ion thrusters, which are typically measured at a few tens of centimetres to a few meters distance from thruster exit. However, fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations are not able to simulate such domain sizes, due to high computational costs. Therefore, a parallelisation strategy of the code is presented to reduce computational time. To map diagnostics information from the domain boundary of the calculational domain to the positions of experimental diagnostics the concept of transfer functions is introduced. The calculated ion beam angular distributions in the plume region are quite sensitive to boundary conditions of the potential, possible additional source contributions, e.g. from secondary electron emission at vessel walls, and charge exchange collisions. This work was supported by the Bavarian State Ministry of Education Science and the Arts and the German Space Agency DLR. We also like to thank R. Heidemann from THALES Electron Devices GmbH, for interesting and stimulating discussions.

  18. ELECTRON ANGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS IN DISSOCIATIVE PHOTOIONIZATION OF THE HYDROGEN MOLECULE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon F. Pérez-Torres

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Se propone un método para calcular distribuciones angulares de electrones ionizados en la molécula de hidrógeno fija en el espacio sometida a pulsos láser intensos y ultracortos, basado en la solución desde primeros principios de la ecuación de Schrödinger dependiente del tiempo. Esta solución nos permite tener una visión temporal de la interferencias generadas en el canal de ionización disociativa (en el espectro de energía cinética de los protones debido a la presencia de la autoionización de estados doblemente excitados de la molécula de hidrógeno. Se muestra específicamente cómo la autoionización durante el proceso de fotoionización disociativa también puede inducir una asimetría en la distribución angular del electrón ionizado con respecto a la inversión nuclear, un efecto no intuitivo a pesar de estar tratando con un sistema homonuclear. 

  19. Network representations of angular regions for electromagnetic scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito G Daniele

    Full Text Available Network modeling in electromagnetics is an effective technique in treating scattering problems by canonical and complex structures. Geometries constituted of angular regions (wedges together with planar layers can now be approached with the Generalized Wiener-Hopf Technique supported by network representation in spectral domain. Even if the network representations in spectral planes are of great importance by themselves, the aim of this paper is to present a theoretical base and a general procedure for the formulation of complex scattering problems using network representation for the Generalized Wiener Hopf Technique starting basically from the wave equation. In particular while the spectral network representations are relatively well known for planar layers, the network modelling for an angular region requires a new theory that will be developed in this paper. With this theory we complete the formulation of a network methodology whose effectiveness is demonstrated by the application to a complex scattering problem with practical solutions given in terms of GTD/UTD diffraction coefficients and total far fields for engineering applications. The methodology can be applied to other physics fields.

  20. Particle field diagnose using angular multiplexing volume holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Zeren; Luo, Zhenxiong; Jun, Li; Zhong, Jie; Ye, Yan; Li, Shengfu; Zhu, Jianhua

    2017-08-01

    The problem of particle field diagnosing using holography can be met in many areas. But single frame hologram can only catch one moment of the fast event, which can't reveal the change process of an unrepeatable fast event. For events in different time-scale, different solution should be used. We did this work to record a laser induced particle field in the time-scale of tens of micron seconds. A laser of pulse sequence mode is applied to provide 10 pulses, the energy and time interval of whom is 150mJ and 1μs. Four pockels cells are employed to pick up the last four pulses for holographic recording, the other pulses are controlled to pre-expose the photopolymer based recording material, which can enhance photosensitivity of the photopolymer during the moment of holographic recording. The angular multiplexing technique and volume holography is accepted to avoid shifting the photopolymer between each shot. Another Q-switch YAG laser (pulse energy 100mJ, pulse width 10ns) is applied to produce the fast event. As a result, we successfully caught the motion process of the laser induced particle field. The time interval of each frame is 1μs, the angular range of the four references is 14°, and the diffraction efficiency of each hologram is less than 2%. After a basic analysis, this optical system could catch more holograms through a compact design.