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Sample records for critical angular velocity

  1. Eilenberger equation for rotating superfluid 3He and calculation of the upper critical angular velocity Ω/sub c/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schopohl, N.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of Gorkov's formulation of superconductivity theory, generalized Eilenberger equations are derived which apply to rotating superfluid 3 He in the presence of a magnetic field h and finite superflow v. In analyogy to conventional type II superconductors, the possibility of vortex solutions in discussed. An implicit equation determining the upper critical angular velocity Ω/sub c/2 as a function of temperature T, magnetic field h, and superflow v parallel to the rotation axis is-inferred from the linearized Eilenberger equations. In contrast to the case of slowly rotating 3 He-A, the solution of the eigenvalue problem determining the order parameter Δ near the the upper critical angular velocity admits no coreless vortex no coreless solutions. The space-dependent amplitude of the order parameter is analogous to Abrikosov's vortex array solution, while the spin-orbit part is given either by a polar-state type or an Anderson-Brinkman-Morel (ABM)-state-type eigensolution. Among the possible eigensolutions the polar-state type yields for vanishing superflow v the highest critical rotation frequency. For finite superflow v parallel to the rotation axis, however, the ABM-state-type solution is stabilized in comparison to the polar state for Vertical BarvVertical Bar> or approx. =0.2π(Tc/sub c/0/T/sub F/)v/sub f/ at zero temperature

  2. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel B Snider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly-tunable wing-steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuro-mechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  3. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  4. Angular velocity and centripetal acceleration relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Martín; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    During the last few years, the growing boom of smartphones has given rise to a considerable number of applications exploiting the functionality of the sensors incorporated in these devices. A sector that has unexpectedly taken advantage of the power of these tools is physics teaching, as reflected in several recent papers. In effect, the use of smartphones has been proposed in several physics experiments spanning mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, oscillations, and waves, among other subjects. Although mechanical experiments have received considerable attention, most of them are based on the use of the accelerometer. An aspect that has received less attention is the use of rotation sensors or gyroscopes. An additional advance in the use of these devices is given by the possibility of obtaining data using the accelerometer and the gyroscope simultaneously. The aim of this paper is to consider the relation between the centripetal acceleration and the angular velocity. Instead of using a formal laboratory setup, in this experiment a smartphone is attached to the floor of a merry-go-round, found in many playgrounds. Several experiments were performed with the roundabout rotating in both directions and with the smart-phone at different distances from the center. The coherence of the measurements is shown.

  5. Measuring Average Angular Velocity with a Smartphone Magnetic Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pili, Unofre; Violanda, Renante

    2018-01-01

    The angular velocity of a spinning object is, by standard, measured using a device called a tachometer. However, by directly using it in a classroom setting, the activity is likely to appear as less instructive and less engaging. Indeed, some alternative classroom-suitable methods for measuring angular velocity have been presented. In this paper,…

  6. The Effects of Isokinetic Strength Training on Strength at Different Angular Velocities: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Kocahan

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: It was shown that angular velocity is important in isokinetic training, and that training at high angular velocities provides strength increases at lower angular velocities, but would not increase strength at angular velocities above the training level. For this reason, it is thought that in the preparation of an isokinetic strength training protocol, angular velocities need to be taken into account. For any athlete, the force at the angular velocity required in her/his sports branch needs to be considered.

  7. Variation in angular velocity and angular acceleration of a particle in rectilinear motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashood, K K; Singh, V A

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity and angular acceleration associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a straight line. We present some details of our observations. A formal derivation of ω and α is presented which reveals ‘surprising’ and non-intuitive aspects, namely non-monotonic behaviour with an associated extremum. The special case of constant velocity is studied and we find that angular acceleration associated with it also has an extremum. We discuss a plausible source of difficulty. (paper)

  8. Measuring average angular velocity with a smartphone magnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pili, Unofre; Violanda, Renante

    2018-02-01

    The angular velocity of a spinning object is, by standard, measured using a device called a tachometer. However, by directly using it in a classroom setting, the activity is likely to appear as less instructive and less engaging. Indeed, some alternative classroom-suitable methods for measuring angular velocity have been presented. In this paper, we present a further alternative that is smartphone-based, making use of the real-time magnetic field (simply called B-field in what follows) data gathering capability of the B-field sensor of the smartphone device as the timer for measuring average rotational period and average angular velocity. The in-built B-field sensor in smartphones has already found a number of uses in undergraduate experimental physics. For instance, in elementary electrodynamics, it has been used to explore the well-known Bio-Savart law and in a measurement of the permeability of air.

  9. A Simple Piece of Apparatus to Aid the Understanding of the Relationship between Angular Velocity and Linear Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Yasin

    2011-01-01

    One of the subjects that is confusing and difficult for students to fully comprehend is the concept of angular velocity and linear velocity. It is the relationship between linear and angular velocity that students find difficult; most students understand linear motion in isolation. In this article, we detail the design, construction and…

  10. Phase Resolved Angular Velocity Control of Cross Flow Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Cross flow turbines have a number of operational advantages for the conversion of kinetic energy in marine or fluvial currents, but they are often less efficient than axial flow devices. Here a control scheme is presented in which the angular velocity of a cross flow turbine with two straight blades is prescribed as a function of azimuthal blade position, altering the time-varying effective angle of attack. Flume experiments conducted with a scale model turbine show approximately an 80% increase in turbine efficiency versus optimal constant angular velocity and constant resistive torque control schemes. Torque, drag, and lateral forces on one- and two-bladed turbines are analyzed and interpreted with bubble flow visualization to develop a simple model that describes the hydrodynamics responsible for the observed increase in mean efficiency. Challenges associated with implementing this control scheme on commercial-scale devices are discussed. If solutions are found, the performance increase presented here may impact the future development of cross flow turbines.

  11. Critical Landau Velocity in Helium Nanodroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, N.B.; Smolarek, S.; Loginov, E.; Mateo, D.; Hernando, A.; Pi, M.; Barranco, M.; Buma, W.J.; Drabbels, M.

    2013-01-01

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective

  12. The critical ionization velocity - a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.; Brenning, N.; Raadu, M.A.

    1982-12-01

    A list of all relevant contributions, known to the authors, concerning the critical ionization velocity phenomena is presented. The contributions are classified and described in a few sentences. (Authors)

  13. Study of the mode of angular velocity damping for a spacecraft at non-standard situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, A. A.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2012-07-01

    Non-standard situation on a spacecraft (Earth's satellite) is considered, when there are no measurements of the spacecraft's angular velocity component relative to one of its body axes. Angular velocity measurements are used in controlling spacecraft's attitude motion by means of flywheels. The arising problem is to study the operation of standard control algorithms in the absence of some necessary measurements. In this work this problem is solved for the algorithm ensuring the damping of spacecraft's angular velocity. Such a damping is shown to be possible not for all initial conditions of motion. In the general case one of two possible final modes is realized, each described by stable steady-state solutions of the equations of motion. In one of them, the spacecraft's angular velocity component relative to the axis, for which the measurements are absent, is nonzero. The estimates of the regions of attraction are obtained for these steady-state solutions by numerical calculations. A simple technique is suggested that allows one to eliminate the initial conditions of the angular velocity damping mode from the attraction region of an undesirable solution. Several realizations of this mode that have taken place are reconstructed. This reconstruction was carried out using approximations of telemetry values of the angular velocity components and the total angular momentum of flywheels, obtained at the non-standard situation, by solutions of the equations of spacecraft's rotational motion.

  14. Angular velocity determination of spinning solar sails using only a sun sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The direction of the sun is the easiest and most reliable observation vector for a solar sail running in deep space exploration. This paper presents a new method using only raw measurements of the sun direction vector to estimate angular velocity for a spinning solar sail. In cases with a constant spin angular velocity, the estimation equation is formed based on the kinematic model for the apparent motion of the sun direction vector; the least-squares solution is then easily calculated. A performance criterion is defined and used to analyze estimation accuracy. In cases with a variable spin angular velocity, the estimation equation is developed based on the kinematic model for the apparent motion of the sun direction vector and the attitude dynamics equation. Simulation results show that the proposed method can quickly yield high-precision angular velocity estimates that are insensitive to certain measurement noises and modeling errors.

  15. Angular velocity of a spheroid log rolling in a simple shear at small Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibohm, Jan; Candelier, Fabien; Rosen, Tomas; Einarsson, Jonas; Lundell, Fredrik; Mehlig, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the angular velocity of a small neutrally buoyant spheroid log rolling in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the angular velocity ω -> equals half the fluid vorticity. We compute by singular perturbation theory how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity in an unbounded shear, and how this reduction depends upon the shape of the spheroid (on its aspect ratio). In addition we determine the angular velocity by direct numerical simulations. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory at small but not too small values of the shear Reynolds number, for all aspect ratios considered. For the special case of a sphere we find ω / s = - 1 / 2 + 0 . 0540Re 3 / 2 where s is the shear rate and Re is the shear Reynolds number. This result differs from that derived by Lin et al. who obtained a numerical coefficient roughly three times larger.

  16. Critical ionisation velocity effects in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1979-08-01

    Critical ionisation velocity effects are relevant to astrophysical situations where neutral gas moves through a magnetised plasma. The experimental significance of the critical velocity is well established and the physical basis is now becoming clear. The underlying mechanism depends on the combined effects of electron impact ionisation and electron energisation by collective plasma interactions. For low density plasmas a theory based on a circular process involving electron heating through a modified two stream instability has been developed. Several applications of critical velocity effects to astrophysical plasmas have been discussed in the literature. The importance of the effect in any particular case may be determined from a detailed consideration of energy and momentum balance, using appropriate atomic rate coefficients and taking full account of collective plasma processes. (Auth.)

  17. Intracycle angular velocity control of cross-flow turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven L.; Polagye, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, are attractive for power generation from wind and water currents. Some cross-flow turbine designs optimize unsteady fluid forces and maximize power output by controlling blade kinematics within one rotation. One established method is to dynamically pitch the blades. Here we introduce a mechanically simpler alternative: optimize the turbine rotation rate as a function of angular blade position. We demonstrate experimentally that this approach results in a 59% increase in power output over standard control methods. Analysis of fluid forcing and blade kinematics suggest that power increase is achieved through modification of the local flow conditions and alignment of fluid force and rotation rate extrema. The result is a low-speed, structurally robust turbine that achieves high efficiency and could enable a new generation of environmentally benign turbines for renewable power generation.

  18. Satellite Angular Velocity Estimation Based on Star Images and Optical Flow Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarmine Fasano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components.

  19. Spacecraft angular velocity estimation algorithm for star tracker based on optical flow techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yujie; Li, Jian; Wang, Gangyi

    2018-02-01

    An integrated navigation system often uses the traditional gyro and star tracker for high precision navigation with the shortcomings of large volume, heavy weight and high-cost. With the development of autonomous navigation for deep space and small spacecraft, star tracker has been gradually used for attitude calculation and angular velocity measurement directly. At the same time, with the dynamic imaging requirements of remote sensing satellites and other imaging satellites, how to measure the angular velocity in the dynamic situation to improve the accuracy of the star tracker is the hotspot of future research. We propose the approach to measure angular rate with a nongyro and improve the dynamic performance of the star tracker. First, the star extraction algorithm based on morphology is used to extract the star region, and the stars in the two images are matched according to the method of angular distance voting. The calculation of the displacement of the star image is measured by the improved optical flow method. Finally, the triaxial angular velocity of the star tracker is calculated by the star vector using the least squares method. The method has the advantages of fast matching speed, strong antinoise ability, and good dynamic performance. The triaxial angular velocity of star tracker can be obtained accurately with these methods. So, the star tracker can achieve better tracking performance and dynamic attitude positioning accuracy to lay a good foundation for the wide application of various satellites and complex space missions.

  20. Evolution of rotating stars. III. Predicted surface rotation velocities for stars which conserve total angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endal, A.S.; Sofia, S.

    1979-01-01

    Predicted surface rotation velocities are presented for Population I stars at 10, 7, 5, 3, and 1.5M/sub sun/. The surface velocities have been computed for three different cases of angular momentum redistribution: no radial redistribution (rotation on decoupled shells), complete redistribution (rigid-body rotation), and partial redistribution as predicted by detailed consideration of circulation currents in rotation stars. The velocities for these cases are compared to each other and to observed stellar rotation rates (upsilon sin i).Near the main sequence, rotational effects can substantially reduce the moment of inertia of a star, so nonrotating models consistently underestimate the expected velocities for evolving stars. The magnitude of these effects is sufficient to explain the large numbers of Be stars and, perhaps, to explain the bimodal distribution of velocities observed for the O stars.On the red giant branch, angular momentum redistribution reduces the surface velocity by a factor of 2 or more, relative to the velocity expected for no radial redistribution. This removes the discrepancy between predicted and observed rotation rates for the K giants and makes it unlikely that these stars lose significant amounts of angular momentum by stellar winds. Our calculations indicate that improved observations (by the Fourier-transform technique) of the red giants in the Hyades cluster can be used to determine how angular momentum is redistributed by convection

  1. Measuring the Angular Velocity of a Propeller with Video Camera Using Electronic Rolling Shutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncontact measurement for rotational motion has advantages over the traditional method which measures rotational motion by means of installing some devices on the object, such as a rotary encoder. Cameras can be employed as remote monitoring or inspecting sensors to measure the angular velocity of a propeller because of their commonplace availability, simplicity, and potentially low cost. A defect of the measurement with cameras is to process the massive data generated by cameras. In order to reduce the collected data from the camera, a camera using ERS (electronic rolling shutter is applied to measure angular velocities which are higher than the speed of the camera. The effect of rolling shutter can induce geometric distortion in the image, when the propeller rotates during capturing an image. In order to reveal the relationship between the angular velocity and the image distortion, a rotation model has been established. The proposed method was applied to measure the angular velocities of the two-blade propeller and the multiblade propeller. The experimental results showed that this method could detect the angular velocities which were higher than the camera speed, and the accuracy was acceptable.

  2. Rotating Hele-Shaw cell with a time-dependent angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Pedro H. A.; Alvarez, Victor M. M.; Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2017-12-01

    Despite the large number of existing studies of viscous flows in rotating Hele-Shaw cells, most investigations analyze rotational motion with a constant angular velocity, under vanishing Reynolds number conditions in which inertial effects can be neglected. In this work, we examine the linear and weakly nonlinear dynamics of the interface between two immiscible fluids in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell, considering the action of a time-dependent angular velocity, and taking into account the contribution of inertia. By using a generalized Darcy's law, we derive a second-order mode-coupling equation which describes the time evolution of the interfacial perturbation amplitudes. For arbitrary values of viscosity and density ratios, and for a range of values of a rotational Reynolds number, we investigate how the time-dependent angular velocity and inertia affect the important finger competition events that traditionally arise in rotating Hele-Shaw flows.

  3. A Missile-Borne Angular Velocity Sensor Based on Triaxial Electromagnetic Induction Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to solve the problem of the limited measuring range for angular motion parameters of high-speed rotating projectiles in the field of guidance and control, a self-adaptive measurement method for angular motion parameters based on the electromagnetic induction principle is proposed. First, a framework with type bent “I-shape” is used to design triaxial coils in a mutually orthogonal way. Under the condition of high rotational speed of a projectile, the induction signal of the projectile moving across a geomagnetic field is acquired by using coils. Second, the frequency of the pulse signal is adjusted self-adaptively. Angular velocity and angular displacement are calculated in the form of periodic pulse counting and pulse accumulation, respectively. Finally, on the basis of that principle prototype of the sensor is researched and developed, performance of measuring angular motion parameters are tested on the sensor by semi-physical and physical simulation experiments, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the sensor has a wide measuring range of angular velocity from 1 rps to 100 rps with a measurement error of less than 0.3%, and the angular displacement measurement error is lower than 0.2°. The proposed method satisfies measurement requirements for high-speed rotating projectiles with an extremely high dynamic range of rotational speed and high precision, and has definite value to engineering applications in the fields of attitude determination and geomagnetic navigation.

  4. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms. PMID:26393606

  5. Angular velocity of a sphere in a simple shear at small Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibohm, J.; Candelier, F.; Rosén, T.; Einarsson, J.; Lundell, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the angular velocity of a small neutrally buoyant spheroid log rolling in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the angular velocity ω equals half the fluid vorticity. We compute by singular perturbation theory how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity in an unbounded shear, and how this reduction depends upon the shape of the spheroid (on its aspect ratio). In addition we determine the angular velocity by direct numerical simulations. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory at small but not too small values of the shear Reynolds number Res, for all aspect ratios considered. For the special case of a sphere we find ω /s =-1 /2 +0.0540 Res3 /2 where s is the shear rate. The O (Res3 /2) correction differs from that derived by Lin et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 44, 1 (1970), 10.1017/S0022112070001659], who obtained a numerical coefficient roughly three times larger.

  6. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-09-18

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  7. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Pasciuto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  8. Critical velocities in He II for independently varied superfluid and normal fluid velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the critical velocity in pure superflow and compare to the theoretical prediction; to measure the first critical velocity for independently varied superfluid and normal fluid velocities; and to investigate the propagation of the second critical velocity from the thermal counterflow line through the V/sub n/,-V/sub s/ quadrant. The experimental apparatus employed a thermal counterflow heater to adjust the normal fluid velocity, a fountain pump to vary the superfluid velocity, and a level sensing capacitor to measure the superfluid velocity. The results of the pure superfluid critical velocity measurements indicate that this velocity is temperature independent contrary to Schwarz's theory. It was found that the first critical velocity for independently varied V/sub n/ and V/sub s/ could be described by a linear function of V/sub n/ and was otherwise temperature independent. It was found that the second critical velocity could only be distinguished near the thermal counterflow line

  9. Analyzing angular distributions for two-step dissociation mechanisms in velocity map imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Daniel B; Butler, Lynne M; Alligood, Bridget W; Butler, Laurie J

    2013-08-15

    Increasingly, velocity map imaging is becoming the method of choice to study photoinduced molecular dissociation processes. This paper introduces an algorithm to analyze the measured net speed, P(vnet), and angular, β(vnet), distributions of the products from a two-step dissociation mechanism, where the first step but not the second is induced by absorption of linearly polarized laser light. Typically, this might be the photodissociation of a C-X bond (X = halogen or other atom) to produce an atom and a momentum-matched radical that has enough internal energy to subsequently dissociate (without the absorption of an additional photon). It is this second step, the dissociation of the unstable radicals, that one wishes to study, but the measured net velocity of the final products is the vector sum of the velocity imparted to the radical in the primary photodissociation (which is determined by taking data on the momentum-matched atomic cophotofragment) and the additional velocity vector imparted in the subsequent dissociation of the unstable radical. The algorithm allows one to determine, from the forward-convolution fitting of the net velocity distribution, the distribution of velocity vectors imparted in the second step of the mechanism. One can thus deduce the secondary velocity distribution, characterized by a speed distribution P(v1,2°) and an angular distribution I(θ2°), where θ2° is the angle between the dissociating radical's velocity vector and the additional velocity vector imparted to the product detected from the subsequent dissociation of the radical.

  10. Fatigue influences lower extremity angular velocities during a single-leg drop vertical jump

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Shiozawa, Junya; Toda, Yuka; Yamada, Kaori

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Fatigue alters lower extremity landing strategies and decreases the ability to attenuate impact during landing. The purpose of this study was to reveal the influence of fatigue on dynamic alignment and joint angular velocities in the lower extremities during a single leg landing. [Subjects and Methods] The 34 female college students were randomly assigned to either the fatigue or control group. The fatigue group performed single-leg drop vertical jumps before, and after, the fatigue...

  11. Determination of angular rotation velocity of Dar'e wind turbine with straight blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershina, A.K.; Ershin, Sh.A.; Upnanov, T.K.

    1999-01-01

    In the report the method of angular velocity determination for wind turbine of given capacity with allowing for an average seasonal wind velocity and all geometrical and dynamical characteristics of the unit is presented. It is noted, that this wind turbine has following advantages: wind direction does not plays role due to vertical axis position of the turbine; electric generator and other equipment are arranged on the ground, that reduce construction's weight, expedite of servicing and repair; the wind turbine has high coefficient of wind energy use (ξ max =0.45)

  12. Angular beam width of a slit-diffracted wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, Edwin H

    2012-01-01

    Taking magnetostatic surface wave diffraction as an example, this paper theoretically investigates the 2D diffraction pattern arising in the far-field region of a ferrite slab in the case of a plane wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities incident on a wide, arbitrarily oriented slit in an opaque screen. A universal analytical formula for the angular width of a diffracted beam is derived, which is valid for magnetostatic and other types of waves in anisotropic media and structures (including metamaterials) in 2D geometries. It is shown that the angular width of a diffracted beam in an anisotropic medium can not only take values greater or less than λ 0 /D (where λ 0 is the incident wavelength, and D is the slit width), but can also be zero under certain conditions. (methodological notes)

  13. Multiple Model Adaptive Attitude Control of LEO Satellite with Angular Velocity Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrooei, Abolfazl; Kazemi, Mohammad Hosein

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the multiple model adaptive control is utilized to improve the transient response of attitude control system for a rigid spacecraft. An adaptive output feedback control law is proposed for attitude control under angular velocity constraints and its almost global asymptotic stability is proved. The multiple model adaptive control approach is employed to counteract large uncertainty in parameter space of the inertia matrix. The nonlinear dynamics of a low earth orbit satellite is simulated and the proposed control algorithm is implemented. The reported results show the effectiveness of the suggested scheme.

  14. Interdependence of torque, joint angle, angular velocity and muscle action during human multi-joint leg extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel; Herzog, Walter; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2014-08-01

    Force and torque production of human muscles depends upon their lengths and contraction velocity. However, these factors are widely assumed to be independent of each other and the few studies that dealt with interactions of torque, angle and angular velocity are based on isolated single-joint movements. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine force/torque-angle and force/torque-angular velocity properties for multi-joint leg extensions. Human leg extension was investigated (n = 18) on a motor-driven leg press dynamometer while measuring external reaction forces at the feet. Extensor torque in the knee joint was calculated using inverse dynamics. Isometric contractions were performed at eight joint angle configurations of the lower limb corresponding to increments of 10° at the knee from 30 to 100° of knee flexion. Concentric and eccentric contractions were performed over the same range of motion at mean angular velocities of the knee from 30 to 240° s(-1). For contractions of increasing velocity, optimum knee angle shifted from 52 ± 7 to 64 ± 4° knee flexion. Furthermore, the curvature of the concentric force/torque-angular velocity relations varied with joint angles and maximum angular velocities increased from 866 ± 79 to 1,238 ± 132° s(-1) for 90-50° knee flexion. Normalised eccentric forces/torques ranged from 0.85 ± 0.12 to 1.32 ± 0.16 of their isometric reference, only showing significant increases above isometric and an effect of angular velocity for joint angles greater than optimum knee angle. The findings reveal that force/torque production during multi-joint leg extension depends on the combined effects of angle and angular velocity. This finding should be accounted for in modelling and optimisation of human movement.

  15. Influence of Tennis Racquet Kinematics on Ball Topspin Angular Velocity and Accuracy during the Forehand Groundstroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sunku; Pfister, Robin; Hager, Ronald L; Hunter, Iain; Seeley, Matthew K

    2017-12-01

    Forehand groundstroke effectiveness is important for tennis success. Ball topspin angular velocity (TAV) and accuracy are important for forehand groundstroke effectiveness, and have been extensively studied, previously; despite previous, quality studies, it was unclear whether certain racquet kinematics relate to ball TAV and shot accuracy during the forehand groundstroke. This study evaluated potential relationships between (1) ball TAV and (2) forehand accuracy, and five measures of racquet kinematics: racquet head impact angle (i.e., closed or open face), horizontal and vertical racquet head velocity before impact, racquet head trajectory (resultant velocity direction, relative to horizontal) before impact, and hitting zone length (quasi-linear displacement, immediately before and after impact). Thirteen collegiate-level tennis players hit forehand groundstrokes in a biomechanics laboratory, where racquet kinematics and ball TAV were measured, and on a tennis court, to assess accuracy. Correlational statistics were used to evaluate potential relationships between racquet kinematics, and ball TAV (mixed model) and forehand accuracy (between-subjects model; α = 0.05). We observed an average (1) racquet head impact angle, (2) racquet head trajectory before impact, relative to horizontal, (3) racquet head horizontal velocity before impact, (4) racquet head vertical velocity before impact, and (5) hitting zone length of 80.4 ± 3.6˚, 18.6 ± 4.3˚, 15.4 ± 1.4 m·s -1 , 6.6 ± 2.2 m·s -1 , and 79.8 ± 8.6 mm, respectively; and an average ball TAV of 969 ± 375 revolutions per minute. Only racquet head impact angle and racquet head vertical velocity, before impact, significantly correlated with ball TAV (p < 0.01). None of the observed racquet kinematics significantly correlated to the measures of forehand accuracy. These results confirmed mechanical logic and indicate that increased ball TAV is associated with a more closed racquet head impact angle (ranging from

  16. Influence of Tennis Racquet Kinematics on Ball Topspin Angular Velocity and Accuracy during the Forehand Groundstroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunku Kwon, Robin Pfister, Ronald L. Hager, Iain Hunter, Matthew K. Seeley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Forehand groundstroke effectiveness is important for tennis success. Ball topspin angular velocity (TAV and accuracy are important for forehand groundstroke effectiveness, and have been extensively studied, previously; despite previous, quality studies, it was unclear whether certain racquet kinematics relate to ball TAV and shot accuracy during the forehand groundstroke. This study evaluated potential relationships between (1 ball TAV and (2 forehand accuracy, and five measures of racquet kinematics: racquet head impact angle (i.e., closed or open face, horizontal and vertical racquet head velocity before impact, racquet head trajectory (resultant velocity direction, relative to horizontal before impact, and hitting zone length (quasi-linear displacement, immediately before and after impact. Thirteen collegiate-level tennis players hit forehand groundstrokes in a biomechanics laboratory, where racquet kinematics and ball TAV were measured, and on a tennis court, to assess accuracy. Correlational statistics were used to evaluate potential relationships between racquet kinematics, and ball TAV (mixed model and forehand accuracy (between-subjects model; α = 0.05. We observed an average (1 racquet head impact angle, (2 racquet head trajectory before impact, relative to horizontal, (3 racquet head horizontal velocity before impact, (4 racquet head vertical velocity before impact, and (5 hitting zone length of 80.4 ± 3.6˚, 18.6 ± 4.3˚, 15.4 ± 1.4 m·s-1, 6.6 ± 2.2 m·s-1, and 79.8 ± 8.6 mm, respectively; and an average ball TAV of 969 ± 375 revolutions per minute. Only racquet head impact angle and racquet head vertical velocity, before impact, significantly correlated with ball TAV (p < 0.01. None of the observed racquet kinematics significantly correlated to the measures of forehand accuracy. These results confirmed mechanical logic and indicate that increased ball TAV is associated with a more closed racquet head impact angle (ranging

  17. Knee Muscle Strength at Varying Angular Velocities and Associations with Gross Motor Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n =…

  18. Effects of Adaptation on Discrimination of Whisker Deflection Velocity and Angular Direction in a Model of the Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak J. Patel

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Two important stimulus features represented within the rodent barrel cortex are velocity and angular direction of whisker deflection. Each cortical barrel receives information from thalamocortical (TC cells that relay information from a single whisker, and TC input is decoded by barrel regular-spiking (RS cells through a feedforward inhibitory architecture (with inhibition delivered by cortical fast-spiking or FS cells. TC cells encode deflection velocity through population synchrony, while deflection direction is encoded through the distribution of spike counts across the TC population. Barrel RS cells encode both deflection direction and velocity with spike rate, and are divided into functional domains by direction preference. Following repetitive whisker stimulation, system adaptation causes a weakening of synaptic inputs to RS cells and diminishes RS cell spike responses, though evidence suggests that stimulus discrimination may improve following adaptation. In this work, I construct a model of the TC, FS, and RS cells comprising a single barrel system—the model incorporates realistic synaptic connectivity and dynamics and simulates both angular direction (through the spatial pattern of TC activation and velocity (through synchrony of the TC population spikes of a deflection of the primary whisker, and I use the model to examine direction and velocity selectivity of barrel RS cells before and after adaptation. I find that velocity and direction selectivity of individual RS cells (measured over multiple trials sharpens following adaptation, but stimulus discrimination using a simple linear classifier by the RS population response during a single trial (a more biologically meaningful measure than single cell discrimination over multiple trials exhibits strikingly different behavior—velocity discrimination is similar both before and after adaptation, while direction classification improves substantially following adaptation. This is the

  19. Estimating the angular velocity of a rigid body moving in the plane from tangential and centripetal acceleration measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardou, Philippe; Angeles, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Two methods are available for the estimation of the angular velocity of a rigid body from point-acceleration measurements: (i) the time-integration of the angular acceleration and (ii) the square-rooting of the centripetal acceleration. The inaccuracy of the first method is due mainly to the accumulation of the error on the angular acceleration throughout the time-integration process, which does not prevent that it be used successfully in crash tests with dummies, since these experiments never last more than one second. On the other hand, the error resulting from the second method is stable through time, but becomes inaccurate whenever the rigid body angular velocity approaches zero, which occurs in many applications. In order to take advantage of the complementarity of these two methods, a fusion of their estimates is proposed. To this end, the accelerometer measurements are modeled as exact signals contaminated with bias errors and Gaussian white noise. The relations between the variables at stake are written in the form of a nonlinear state-space system in which the angular velocity and the angular acceleration are state variables. Consequently, a minimum-variance-error estimate of the state vector is obtained by means of extended Kalman filtering. The performance of the proposed estimation method is assessed by means of simulation. Apparently, the resulting estimation method is more robust than the existing accelerometer-only methods and competitive with gyroscope measurements. Moreover, it allows the identification and the compensation of any bias error in the accelerometer measurements, which is a significant advantage over gyroscopes

  20. Critical angular momentum dependence of the fission barriers and the stability of superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magda, M.T.; Sandulescu, A.

    1978-10-01

    Measured complete fusion and evaporation cross section data are used to determine the critical angular momenta for which the fission barriers are vanishing in the region of nuclei with Z = 102 - 116. It is shown that, in order to fit these data, larger values of the critical angular momenta are obtained for superheavy nuclei (Z = 110 - 112) than for heavy ones (Z = 102 - 107), which indicates a relatively higher stability against fission for superheavy nuclei, in agreement with the theoretically predicted island of stability. (author)

  1. Angular distributions of plasma edge velocity and integrated intensity: Update on specific impulse for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V.

    2005-04-01

    This work concludes our discussion of the image processing technique developed earlier for determination of specific impulse (Isp) for Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP). The plasma plumes are recorded with a time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. The plasma was formed in vacuum (˜ 3×10-3 Torr) by focusing output pulses of a laser system (100-ps pulsewidth at 532 nm wavelength and ˜35 mJ energy) on surfaces of C (graphite), Al, Si, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sn, and Pb elements. Angular profiles for integrated intensity and plasma expansion velocity were determined for the tested elements. Such profiles were used further for assessment of specific impulse. Specific impulses derived from angular distributions of plasma expansion velocity and integral intensity appeared in excellent agreement with the data derived earlier from force measurements.

  2. Angular distributions of plasma edge velocity and integrated intensity: Update on specific impulse for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V.

    2005-01-01

    This work concludes our discussion of the image processing technique developed earlier for determination of specific impulse (Isp) for Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP). The plasma plumes are recorded with a time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. The plasma was formed in vacuum (∼ 3x10-3 Torr) by focusing output pulses of a laser system (100-ps pulsewidth at 532 nm wavelength and ∼35 mJ energy) on surfaces of C (graphite), Al, Si, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sn, and Pb elements. Angular profiles for integrated intensity and plasma expansion velocity were determined for the tested elements. Such profiles were used further for assessment of specific impulse. Specific impulses derived from angular distributions of plasma expansion velocity and integral intensity appeared in excellent agreement with the data derived earlier from force measurements

  3. Vibration-dependent angular anisotropy in the photodetachment of O{sub 2}{sup -}, viewed with velocity-map imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, S T; Cavanagh, S J; Lewis, B R [Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Gascooke, J R [School of Chemistry, Physics and Earth Sciences, Flinders University, SA 5001 (Australia); Mabbs, R [Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St Louis MO 63930-4899 (United States); Sanov, A, E-mail: Stephen.Gibson@anu.edu.a, E-mail: Steven.Cavanagh@anu.edu.a [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721-0041 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The photodetachment spectrum of O{sub 2}{sup -} has been measured at a number of wavelengths using velocity-map imaging. The electron kinetic-energy resolution (< 5 meV) is sufficient to resolve the anion fine-structure splitting, vibrational and electronic structure. The electron angular distribution varies with the electron kinetic-energy, with a different behaviour for each vibronic band.

  4. Critical gravitational collapse with angular momentum. II. Soft equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Carsten; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2018-03-01

    We study critical phenomena in the collapse of rotating ultrarelativistic perfect fluids, in which the pressure P is related to the total energy density ρ by P =κ ρ , where κ is a constant. We generalize earlier results for radiation fluids with κ =1 /3 to other values of κ , focusing on κ power-law scalings of the black-hole mass. We do see systematic effects in the black-hole angular momentum, but it is not clear yet if these are due to the predicted nontrivial scaling functions, or to nonlinear effects at sufficiently large initial angular momentum (which we do not account for in our theoretical model).

  5. Isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps peak torque ratio: the influence of sport modality, gender, and angular velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marilia Dos Santos; De Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Koffes, Fabiana De Carvalho; Mascarin, Naryana Cristina; Benedito-Silva, Ana Amélia; Da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H/Q) peak torque ratios evaluated at different angular velocities between men and women who participate in judo, handball or soccer. A total of 166 athletes, including 58 judokas (26 females and 32 males), 39 handball players (22 females and 17 males), and 69 soccer players (17 females and 52 males), were evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer. The H/Q isokinetic peak torque ratios were calculated at angular velocities of 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ and 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. In the analysis by gender, female soccer players produced lower H/Q peak torque ratios at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ than males involved in the same sport. However, when H/Q peak torque ratio was assessed at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹, there were no significant differences between the sexes. In the analysis by sport, there were no differences among females at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹. In contrast, male soccer players had significantly higher H/Q peak torque ratios than judokas (66 ± 12% vs. 57 ± 14%, respectively). Female handball players produced significantly lower peak torque ratios at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹ than judokas or soccer players, whereas males presented no ratio differences among sports At 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. In the analysis by velocity, women's muscular ratios assessed at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ were significantly lower than at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹ for all sports; among men, only judokas presented lower ratios at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ than at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. The present results suggest that sport modality and angular velocity influence the isokinetic strength profiles of men and women.

  6. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Ji

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth.

  7. Smearing model and restoration of star image under conditions of variable angular velocity and long exposure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; You, Zheng; Wang, Xiaochu; Li, Bin

    2014-03-10

    The star tracker is one of the most promising attitude measurement devices widely used in spacecraft for its high accuracy. High dynamic performance is becoming its major restriction, and requires immediate focus and promotion. A star image restoration approach based on the motion degradation model of variable angular velocity is proposed in this paper. This method can overcome the problem of energy dispersion and signal to noise ratio (SNR) decrease resulting from the smearing of the star spot, thus preventing failed extraction and decreased star centroid accuracy. Simulations and laboratory experiments are conducted to verify the proposed methods. The restoration results demonstrate that the described method can recover the star spot from a long motion trail to the shape of Gaussian distribution under the conditions of variable angular velocity and long exposure time. The energy of the star spot can be concentrated to ensure high SNR and high position accuracy. These features are crucial to the subsequent star extraction and the whole performance of the star tracker.

  8. The critical ionization velocity mechnism for the case of gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1982-08-01

    The theory of the critical ionization velocity mechnisms is discussed. In the case of gas mixture the critical velocity is expected to depend on the ionization cross sections. An analytic approximation is introduced which can be used to set limits on a generalized expression for the critical velocity of gas mixtures. (Author)

  9. CAN THE CURRICULUM BE USED TO ESTIMATE CRITICAL VELOCITY IN YOUNG COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to assess critical velocity using the swimmer curriculum in front crawl events and to compare critical velocity to the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and to the velocity of a 30 min test. The sample included 24 high level male swimmers ranged between 14 and 16 years old. For each subject the critical velocity, the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and the mean velocity of a 30 min test were determined. The critical velocity was also estimated by considering the best performance of a swimmer over several distances based on the swimmer curriculum. Critical velocity including 100, 200 and 400 m events was not different from the velocity of 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration. Critical velocity including all the swimmer events was not different from the velocity of a 30 min test. The assessment of critical velocity based upon the swimmer curriculum would therefore seem to be a good approach to determine the aerobic ability of a swimmer. The selection of the events to be included in critical velocity assessment must be a main concern in the evaluation of the swimmer

  10. High-Q microsphere resonators for angular velocity sensing in gyroscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Panlong; Zheng, Yongqiu; Yan, Shubin; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wanjun

    2015-01-01

    A resonator gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect is proposed using a core unit that is generated by water-hydrogen flame melting. The relationship between the quality factor Q and diameter D is revealed. The Q factor of the spectral lines of the microsphere cavity coupling system, which uses tapered fibers, is found to be 10 6 or more before packaging with a low refractive curable ultraviolet polymer, although it drops to approximately 10 5 after packaging. In addition, a rotating test platform is built, and the transmission spectrum and discriminator curves of a microsphere cavity with Q of 3.22×10 6 are measured using a semiconductor laser (linewidth less than 1 kHz) and a real-time proportional-integral circuit tracking and feedback technique. Equations fitting the relation between the voltage and angular rotation rate are obtained. According to the experimentally measured parameters, the sensitivity of the microsphere-coupled system can reach 0.095 ∘ /s

  11. Measurements on multichannel arrays. The angular dependence of the absolute intensity and the velocity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Verster, N.F.

    1974-01-01

    Three multichannel arrays with channel-diameters of 16, 50 and 140μm have been investigated using O 2 with flow rates of 4 10 -5 through 8 10 -3 torr l s -1 mm -2 . All experimental values of the peaking factor K are described by one experimental curve if the peaking factor is reduced by K*=KT, where T is the Clausing factor, and then is plotted vs. the reduced entrance density eta*=L/lambda, where lambda is the mean free path corresponding to the entrance density and L is the length of the channel. At eta*=1 the experimental curve lies 40% below Giordmaine and Wang theory, and this deviation increases slightly with increasing eta*. In the plot of the reduced half-width-half-maximum THETAsub(1/2)sup(*)=THETAsub(1/2)T -1 vs. eta* all data are also well represented by a single experimental curve. The center-line velocity distribution is described in terms of a deformation function GAMMA(v), to be applied to the Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution from an ideal orifice

  12. MKENO-DAR: a direct angular representation Monte Carlo code for criticality safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Komuro, Yuichi; Tsunoo, Yukiyasu; Nakayama, Mitsuo.

    1984-03-01

    Improving the Monte Carlo code MULTI-KENO, the MKENO-DAR (Direct Angular Representation) code has been developed for criticality safety analysis in detail. A function was added to MULTI-KENO for representing anisotropic scattering strictly. With this function, the scattering angle of neutron is determined not by the average scattering angle μ-bar of the Pl Legendre polynomial but by the random work operation using probability distribution function produced with the higher order Legendre polynomials. This code is avilable for the FACOM-M380 computer. This report is a computer code manual for MKENO-DAR. (author)

  13. Optical observations on critical ionization velocity experiments in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.

    1993-01-01

    A number of Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiments have been performed in space. CIV has been observed in laboratory experiments, but experiments in space have been inconclusive. Most space experiments have used barium which ionizes easily, and with emission lines from both neutrals and ions in the visible optical observations can be made from the ground. Also other elements, such as xenon, strontium and calcium, have been used. High initial ionization in some barium release experiments has been claimed due to CIV. However, a number of reactions between barium and the ambient plasma have been suggested as more likely processes. Currently the most popular process in this debate is charge exchange with O + . This process has a large cross section, but is it large enough? The cross section for charge exchange with calcium should be even larger, but in a double release of barium and calcium (part of the NASA CRRES release experiments) most ionization was observed from the barium release. Moreover, if charge exchange is the dominant process, the amount of ionization should relate to the oxygen ion density, and that does not appear to be the case. Other processes, such as associative ionization, have also been proposed, but yields are uncertain because the reaction rates are very poorly known

  14. Angular and velocity analysis of the three-fold events in the Xe+Cu reaction at 45 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Fiandri, M.L.; Fuschini, E.; Manduci, L.; Mastinu, P.F.; Milazzo, P.M.; Gramegna, F.; Ferrero, A.M.J.; Gulminelli, F.; Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Scardaoni, R.; Buttazzo, P.; Margagliotti, G.V.; Vannini, G.; Auger, G.; Plagnol, E.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of the angular and velocity distributions of the intermediate mass fragments produced in the reaction Xe+Cu at 45 MeV/u is presented. Events coming from central collisions are selected and compared with predictions of different models based on a statistical deexcitation of an equilibrated source. The angular and velocity correlations show that the experimental production of three nearly-equal mass fragments cannot be explained by a sequential binary decay and is compatible with a multifragmentation mechanism. ((orig.))

  15. The effect of angular velocity and cycle on the dissipative properties of the knee during passive cyclic stretching: a matter of viscosity or solid friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordez, A; McNair, P J; Casari, P; Cornu, C

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms behind changes in mechanical parameters following stretching are not understood clearly. This study assessed the effects of joint angular velocity on the immediate changes in passive musculo-articular properties induced by cyclic stretching allowing an appreciation of viscosity and friction, and their contribution to changes in torque that occur. Ten healthy subjects performed five passive knee extension/flexion cycles on a Biodex dynamometer at five preset angular velocities (5-120 deg/s). The passive torque and knee angle were measured, and the potential elastic energy stored during the loading and the dissipation coefficient were calculated. As the stretching velocity increased, so did stored elastic energy and the dissipation coefficient. The slope of the linear relationship between the dissipation coefficient and the angular velocity was unchanged across repetitions indicating that viscosity was unlikely to be affected. A difference in the y-intercept across repetitions 1 and 5 was indicative of a change in processes associated with solid friction. Electromyographical responses to stretching were low across all joint angular velocities. Torque changes during cyclic motion may primarily involve solid friction which is more indicative of rearrangement/slipping of collagen fibers rather than the redistribution of fluid and its constituents within the muscle. The findings also suggest that it is better to stretch slowly initially to reduce the amount of energy absorption required by tissues, but thereafter higher stretching speeds can be undertaken.

  16. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SuperMat, Via Salvador Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  17. Energy and angular responses of the criticality accident detector using a plastic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, operates a spent fuel reprocessing plant and MOX (Plutonium-Uranium Mixed Oxide) fuel fabrication plants. Criticality accident detectors have been installed in these facilities. The detector, the Toshiba RD120, is composed of a plastic scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, and an operational amplifier. The alarm triggering point is set to 1.0-3.6 mGy·h -1 in photon dose rate to detect the minimum accident of concern. However, a plastic scintillator is principally sensitive not only to primary photons but also to neutrons by secondary photons and heavy charged particles produced in the detector itself. The authors calculated energy and angular responses of the RD120 criticality accident detector to photons and neutrons using Monte Carlo computer codes. The response to primary photons was evaluated with the MCNP-4B and EGS4 calculations, and photon and X-ray irradiation experiments. The response to neutrons that produce secondary photons and heavy charged particles from neutron interactions was computed using the MCNP-4B and SCINFUL, respectively. As a result, reliable response functions were obtained. These results will be a great help in reassessing the coverage area and in determining the appropriate triggering dose rate level in criticality accidents. (author)

  18. Angular dependence of the upper critical field in Bi2Sr2CuO6+δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedeneev, S.I.; Ovchinnikov, Yu.N.

    2002-01-01

    The angular dependence of the upper critical field has been investigated in a wide range of temperatures in very high-quality Bi 2 Sr 2 CuO 6+δ single crystals with critical temperature ≅ 9 K in magnetic fields up to 28 T. Although the typical value of the normal state resistivity ratio ≅ 10 4 , the anisotropy ratio of the upper critical fields is much smaller. A model is proposed based on a strong anisotropy and a small transparency between superconducting layers [ru

  19. Critical Velocity for Shear Localization in A Mature Mylonitic Rock Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M.; van den Ende, M.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Highly localized slip zones, seen within ductile shear zones developed in nature, such as pseudotachylite bands occurring within mylonites, are widely recognized as evidence for earthquake nucleation and/or propagation within and overprinting the ductile regime. To understand brittle/frictional localization processes in ductile shear zones and to connect these to earthquake nucleation and propagation processes, we performed large velocity step-change tests on a brine-saturated, 80:20 (wt. %) halite and muscovite gouge mixture, after forming a mature mylonitic structure through pressure solution creep at low-velocity. The sharp increase in sliding strength that occurs in response to an instantaneous upward velocity-step (direct effect) is an important parameter in determining the potential for and nature of seismic rupture nucleation. We obtained reproducible results regarding low velocity mechanical behavior compared with previous work of Niemeijer and Spiers, [2006], but also obtained new insights into the effects of sudden increases in slip velocity on localization and strength evolution, at velocities above a specific critical velocity Vc ( 20 μm/sec). We found that once a ductile, mylonitic structure has developed in a shear zone, subsequent cataclastic deformation at high velocity (> Vc) is consistently localized in a narrow zone characterized by fine grains of halite aligned in arrays between foliated muscovite Due to this intense localization, structures presumably developed under low velocity conditions were still preserved in large parts of the gouge body. This switch to localized deformation is controlled by the imposed velocity, and becomes most apparent at velocities over Vc. In addition, the direct effect a decreases rapidly when the velocity exceeds Vc. This implies that slip can localize and accelerate towards seismic velocities more or less instantly once Vc is exceeded. Obtaining a measure for Vc in natural faults is therefore of key importance

  20. Experimental comparison of the critical ionization velocity in atomic and molecular gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.

    1978-08-01

    The critical ionization velocity usub(c) of Ne, Kr, Xe, Cl 2 , O 2 , CO, CO 2 , NH 3 and H 2 O is investigated experimentally in a coaxial plasma gun. Together with experimental data obtained in earlier experiments the present results make it possible to make a systematic comparison between the critical ionization velocity for atomic and molecular gases. It is found that atomic and molecular gases tend to have values of critical ionization velocity which are respectively smaller and larger than the theoretical values. The current dependence of usub(c) is found to be different for atomic and molecular gases. A number of atomic and molecular processes relevant to the experiment are discussed

  1. CRITICAL VELOCITY OF CONTROLLABILITY OF SLIDING FRICTION BY NORMAL OSCILLATIONS IN VISCOELASTIC CONTACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Popov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction can be reduced substantially by applying ultrasonic vibration in the sliding plane or in the normal direction. This effect is well known and used in many applications ranging from press forming to ultrasonic actuators. One of the characteristics of the phenomenon is that, at a given frequency and amplitude of oscillation, the observed friction reduction diminishes with increasing sliding velocity. Beyond a certain critical sliding velocity, there is no longer any difference between the coefficients of friction with or without vibration. This critical velocity depends on material and kinematic parameters and is a key characteristic that must be accounted for by any theory of influence of vibration on friction. Recently, the critical sliding velocity has been interpreted as the transition point from periodic stick-slip to pure sliding and was calculated for purely elastic contacts under uniform sliding with periodic normal loading. Here we perform a similar analysis of the critical velocity in viscoelastic contacts using a Kelvin material to describe viscoelasticity. A closed-form solution is presented, which contains previously reported results as special cases. This paves the way for more detailed studies of active control of friction in viscoelastic systems, a previously neglected topic with possible applications in elastomer technology and in medicine.

  2. Angular dependence of critical current density and magnetoresistance of sputtered high-T{sub c}-films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geerkens, A.; Frenck, H.J.; Ewert, S. [Technical Univ. of Cottbus (Germany)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The angular dependence of the critical current density and the magnetoresistance of high-T{sub c}-films in high and low magnetic fields and for different temperatures were measured to investigate the flux pinning and the superconducting properties. A comparison of the results for the different superconductors shows their increasing dependence on the angle {Theta} between the magnetic field and the c-axis of the film due to the anisotropy of the chosen superconductor. Furthermore the influence of the current direction to the {Theta}-rotation plane is discussed.

  3. Anisotropy of the Elastic Properties of Normal and Pathological Myocardium: Angular Dependence of Ultrasonic Backscatter, Attenuation, and Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Edward Dennis

    The focus of this thesis is the measurement of anisotropies in the ultrasonic parameters of soft tissues. The goal is to contribute to a better understanding of the physics which underlies the interaction of ultrasonic waves with inhomogeneous and anisotropic media. Broadband measurements using a piezoelectric transducer are reported for investigations of excised specimens of human and canine myocardial tissue. Emphasis is placed on identifying the effect that the muscle fiber orientation, relative to the direction of insonification, has on the propagation and scattering properties of ultrasonic waves. Results of the anisotropy of backscatter, the anisotropy of attenuation, and the anisotropy of quasilongitudinal velocity are presented for data obtained in 2^ circ increments through the full 360 ^circ relative to the myofibers. Measured velocities are used in conjunction with measured specimen densities to determine the elastic stiffness constants c_{11} and c_ {33} and to estimate specific mechanical moduli for thin layers of myocardium.

  4. Droplet size and velocity at the exit of a nozzle with two-component near critical and critical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemonnier, H.; Camelo-Cavalcanti, E.S.

    1993-01-01

    Two-component critical flow modelling is an important issue for safety studies of various hazardous industrial activities. When the flow quality is high, the critical flow rate prediction is sensitive to the modelling of gas droplet mixture interfacial area. In order to improve the description of these flows, experiments were conducted with air-water flows in converging nozzles. The pressure was 2 and 4 bar and the gas mass quality ranged between 100% and 20%. The droplets size and velocity have been measured close to the outlet section of a nozzle with a 10 mm diameter throat. Subcritical and critical conditions were observed. These data are compared with the predictions of a critical flow model which includes an interfacial area model based on the classical ideas of Hinze and Kolmogorov. (authors). 9 figs., 12 refs

  5. Angular spectrum characters of high gain non-critical phase match optical parametric oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian-Hui; Liu Qiang; Gong Ma-Li

    2011-01-01

    The angular spectrum gain characters and the power magnification characters of high gain non-walk-off colinear optical parametric oscillators have been studied using the non-colinear phase match method for the first time. The experimental results of the KTiOAsO 4 and the KTiOPO 4 crystals are discussed in detail. At the high energy single resonant condition, low reflective ratio of the output mirror for the signal and long non-linear crystal are beneficial for small divergence angles. This method can also be used for other high gain non-walk-off phase match optical parametric processes. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  6. Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jensen, Niels G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

  7. Angular and magnetic field dependences of critical current in irradiated YBaCuO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrusenko, Yu.

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of mechanisms responsible for the current-carrying capability of irradiated high-temperature superconductors (HTSC) was realized. For the purpose, experiments were made to investigate the effect of point defects generated by high-energy electron irradiation on the critical temperature and the critical current in high-Tc superconducting single crystals YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x . The transport current density measured in HTSC single crystals YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x by the dc-method was found to exceed 80000 A/cm 2 . The experiments have demonstrated a more than 30-fold increase in the critical current density in single crystals irradiated with 2.5 MeV electrons to a dose of 3·10 18 el/cm 2 . Detailed studies were made into the anisotropy of critical current and the dependence of critical current on the external magnetic field strength in irradiated single crystals. A high efficiency of point defects as centers of magnetic vortex pinning in HTSC single crystals was first demonstrated.

  8. Critical velocities in fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in an elastic foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ch. K.; Rao, L. B.

    2017-07-01

    The problem of stability of fluid-conveying carbon nanotubes embedded in an elastic medium is investigated in this paper. A nonlocal continuum mechanics formulation, which takes the small length scale effects into consideration, is utilized to derive the governing fourth-order partial differential equations. The Fourier series method is used for the case of the pinned-pinned boundary condition of the tube. The Galerkin technique is utilized to find a solution of the governing equation for the case of the clamped-clamped boundary. Closed-form expressions for the critical flow velocity are obtained for different values of the Winkler and Pasternak foundation stiffness parameters. Moreover, new and interesting results are also reported for varying values of the nonlocal length parameter. It is observed that the nonlocal length parameter along with the Winkler and Pasternak foundation stiffness parameters exert considerable effects on the critical velocities of the fluid flow in nanotubes.

  9. Some necessary parameters for a critical velocity interaction between the ionospheric plasma and a xenon cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.

    1979-12-01

    The conditions for an experiment to study the critical ionization velocity effect in the interaction between a Xenon cloud, released from a satellite, and the ionospheric plasma are investigated. The model used is based on the assumption that there exists an effective process that transfers the energy, that is available in the relative motion, to the electrons. Some necessary conditions to obtain significant heating or deceleration of the plasma penetrating the cloud are calculated. The conditions are mainly given by the energy available in the relative motion and the rates of the different binary collision processes involved. As the released gas cloud expands the possibilities for a critical velocity interaction will exist only within a certain range of cloud radii. It is shown that the charge transfer collision cross section between the ionospheric ions and the cloud atoms is an important parameter and that Xenon is a very suitable gas in that respect. (author)

  10. A Simple Method for Determination of Critical Swimming Velocity in Swimming Flume

    OpenAIRE

    高橋, 繁浩; 若吉, 浩二; Shigehiro, TAKAHASHI; Kohji, WAKAYOSHI; 中京大学; 奈良教育大学教育学部

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a simple method for determination of critical swimming velocity (Vcri). Vcri is defined by Wakayoshi et al. (1992) as the swimming speed which could theoretically be maintained forever without exhaustion, and is expressed as the slope of a regression line between swimming distance (D) and swimming time (T) obtained at various swimming speeds. To determine Vcri, 20 well-trained swimmers were measured at several swimming speeds ranging from 1.25 m/se...

  11. Velocity-tunable slow beams of cold O2 in a single spin-rovibronic state with full angular-momentum orientation by multistage Zeeman deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Schmutz, H.; Motsch, M.; Merkt, F.

    2012-08-01

    Cold samples of oxygen molecules in supersonic beams have been decelerated from initial velocities of 390 and 450 m s-1 to final velocities in the range between 150 and 280 m s-1 using a 90-stage Zeeman decelerator. (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced-multiphoton-ionization (REMPI) spectra of the 3sσ g 3Π g (C) ? two-photon transition of O2 have been recorded to characterize the state selectivity of the deceleration process. The decelerated molecular sample was found to consist exclusively of molecules in the J ‧‧ = 2 spin-rotational component of the X ? ground state of O2. Measurements of the REMPI spectra using linearly polarized laser radiation with polarization vector parallel to the decelerator axis, and thus to the magnetic-field vector of the deceleration solenoids, further showed that only the ? magnetic sublevel of the N‧‧ = 1, J ‧‧ = 2 spin-rotational level is populated in the decelerated sample, which therefore is characterized by a fully oriented total-angular-momentum vector. By maintaining a weak quantization magnetic field beyond the decelerator, the polarization of the sample could be maintained over the 5 cm distance separating the last deceleration solenoid and the detection region.

  12. Critical ionisation velocity and the dynamics of a coaxial plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamics of an ionising wave in a coaxial plasma gun with an azimuthal bias magnetic field is analysed in a theoretical model. Only the radial dependence is treated and instead of including a treatment of the energy balance two separate physical assumptions are made. In the first case it is assumed that the total internal electric field is given by the critical ionisation velocity condition and in the second that the ionisation rate is constant. For consistency wall sheaths are assumed to match the internal plasma potential to that of the walls. On the basis of momentum and particle balance the radial dependence of the electron density, current density, electric field and drift velocity are found. An electron source is required at the cathode and the relative contribution from ionisation within the plasma is deduced. The assumption that there are no ion sources at the electrodes leads to a restriction on the possible values of the axial electric field. (author)

  13. Angular correlation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, A.J.

    1974-01-01

    An outline of the theory of angular correlations is presented, and the difference between the modern density matrix method and the traditional wave function method is stressed. Comments are offered on particular angular correlation theoretical techniques. A brief discussion is given of recent studies of gamma ray angular correlations of reaction products recoiling with high velocity into vacuum. Two methods for optimization to obtain the most accurate expansion coefficients of the correlation are discussed. (1 figure, 53 references) (U.S.)

  14. Experimental investigation of critical velocity in a parallel plate research reactor fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Alfredo J.A.; Scuro, Nikolas L.; Andrade, Delvonei A., E-mail: ajcastro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The fuel elements of a MTR (Material Testing Reactor) type nuclear reactor are mostly composed of aluminum coated fuel plates containing the core of uranium silica (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) dispersed in an aluminum matrix. These plates have a thickness of the order of millimeters and are much longer in relation to their thickness. They are arranged in parallel in the assembly of the fuel element to form channels between them a few millimeters in thickness, through which there is a flow of the coolant. This configuration, combined with the need for a flow at high flow rates to ensure the cooling of the fuel element in operation, may create problems of mechanical failure of fuel plate due to the vibration induced by the flow in the channels. In the case of critical velocity excessive permanent deflections of the plates can cause blockage of the flow channel in the reactor core and lead to overheating in the plates. For this study an experimental bench capable of high volume flows and a test section that simulates a plate-like fuel element with three cooling channels were developed. The dimensions of the test section were based on the dimensions of the Fuel Element of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), whose project is being coordinated by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN). The experiments performed attained the objective of reaching Miller's critical velocity condition. The critical velocity was reached with 14.5 m/s leading to the consequent plastic deformation of the flow channel plates. (author)

  15. Droplet squeezing through a narrow constriction: Minimum impulse and critical velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Drapaca, Corina; Chen, Xiaolin; Xu, Jie

    2017-07-01

    Models of a droplet passing through narrow constrictions have wide applications in science and engineering. In this paper, we report our findings on the minimum impulse (momentum change) of pushing a droplet through a narrow circular constriction. The existence of this minimum impulse is mathematically derived and numerically verified. The minimum impulse happens at a critical velocity when the time-averaged Young-Laplace pressure balances the total minor pressure loss in the constriction. Finally, numerical simulations are conducted to verify these concepts. These results could be relevant to problems of energy optimization and studies of chemical and biomedical systems.

  16. The MASSIVE Survey - V. Spatially resolved stellar angular momentum, velocity dispersion, and higher moments of the 41 most massive local early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Melanie; Ma, Chung-Pei; Thomas, Jens; Greene, Jenny E.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Ito, Jennifer; Blakeslee, John P.; Janish, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    We present spatially resolved two-dimensional stellar kinematics for the 41 most massive early-type galaxies (ETGs; MK ≲ -25.7 mag, stellar mass M* ≳ 1011.8 M⊙) of the volume-limited (D McDonald Observatory, covering a 107 arcsec × 107 arcsec field of view (often reaching 2 to 3 effective radii). We measure the 2D spatial distribution of each galaxy's angular momentum (λ and fast or slow rotator status), velocity dispersion (σ), and higher order non-Gaussian velocity features (Gauss-Hermite moments h3 to h6). Our sample contains a high fraction (˜80 per cent) of slow and non-rotators with λ ≲ 0.2. When combined with the lower mass ETGs in the ATLAS3D survey, we find the fraction of slow rotators to increase dramatically with galaxy mass, reaching ˜50 per cent at MK ˜ -25.5 mag and ˜90 per cent at MK ≲ -26 mag. All of our fast rotators show a clear anticorrelation between h3 and V/σ, and the slope of the anticorrelation is steeper in more round galaxies. The radial profiles of σ show a clear luminosity and environmental dependence: the 12 most luminous galaxies in our sample (MK ≲ -26 mag) are all brightest cluster/group galaxies (except NGC 4874) and all have rising or nearly flat σ profiles, whereas five of the seven `isolated' galaxies are all fainter than MK = -25.8 mag and have falling σ. All of our galaxies have positive average h4; the most luminous galaxies have average h4 ˜ 0.05, while less luminous galaxies have a range of values between 0 and 0.05. Most of our galaxies show positive radial gradients in h4, and those galaxies also tend to have rising σ profiles. We discuss the implications for the relationship among dynamical mass, σ, h4, and velocity anisotropy for these massive galaxies.

  17. Analytical study on the criticality of the stochastic optimal velocity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Masahiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Tokihiro, Tetsuji

    2006-01-01

    In recent works, we have proposed a stochastic cellular automaton model of traffic flow connecting two exactly solvable stochastic processes, i.e., the asymmetric simple exclusion process and the zero range process, with an additional parameter. It is also regarded as an extended version of the optimal velocity model, and moreover it shows particularly notable properties. In this paper, we report that when taking optimal velocity function to be a step function, all of the flux-density graph (i.e. the fundamental diagram) can be estimated. We first find that the fundamental diagram consists of two line segments resembling an inversed-λ form, and next identify their end-points from a microscopic behaviour of vehicles. It is notable that by using a microscopic parameter which indicates a driver's sensitivity to the traffic situation, we give an explicit formula for the critical point at which a traffic jam phase arises. We also compare these analytical results with those of the optimal velocity model, and point out the crucial differences between them

  18. Simulation study of the ionizing front in the critical ionization velocity phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, S.; Goertz, C.K.; Lu, G.

    1988-01-01

    Simulations of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) for a neutral gas cloud moving across the static magnetic field are made. We treat a low-β plasma and use a 2-1/2 D electrostatic code linked with our Plasma and Neutral Interaction Code (PANIC). Our study is focused on the understanding of the interface between the neutral gas cloud and the surrounding plasma where the strong interaction takes place. We assume the existence of some hot electrons in the ambient plasma to provide a seed ionization for CIV. When the ionization starts a sheath-like structure is formed at the surface of the neutral gas (Ionizing Front). In that region the crossfield component of the electric field causes the electron to E x B drift with a velocity of the order of the neutral gas velocity times the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Thus the kinetic energy of the drifting electrons can be large enough for electron impact ionization. In addition a diamagnetic drift of the electron occurs due to the number density and temperature inhomogeneity in the ionization front. These drift currents excite the lower-hybrid waves with the wave k-vectors almost perpendicular to the neutral flow and magnetic field again resulting in electron heating and additional ionization. The overall structure is studied by developing a simple analytic model as well as making simulation runs. (author)

  19. Optical observations on the CRIT-II Critical Ionization Velocity Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.; Wescott, E.M.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1990-01-01

    A rocket borne Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment was carried out from Wallops Island at dusk on May 4, 1989. Two barium shaped charges were released below the solar terminator (to prevent photoionization) at altitudes near 400 km. The ambient ionospheric electron density was 5x10 5 cm -3 . The neutral barium jet was directed upwards and at an angle of nominally 45 degrees to B which gives approximately 3x10 23 neutrals with super critical velocity. Ions created by a CIV process in the region of the neutral jet would travel up along B into sunlight where they can be detected optically. Well defined ion clouds (max. brightness 750 R) were observed in both releases. An ionization rate of 0.8%s -1 (125s ionization time constant) can account for the observed ion cloud near the release field line, but the ionization rate falls off with increasing distance from the release. It is concluded that a CIV process was present in the neutral jet out to about 50 km from the release, which is significantly further than allowed by current theories

  20. Transport of Tank 241-SY-101 Waste Slurry: Effects of Dilution and Temperature on Critical Pipeline Velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KP Recknagle; Y Onishi

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the methods and results of calculations performed to predict the critical velocity and pressure drop required for the two-inch pipeline transfer of solid/liquid waste slurry from underground waste storage Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY- 102 at the Hanford Site. The effects of temperature and dilution on the critical velocity were included in the analysis. These analyses show that Tank 241-SY-101 slurry should be diluted with water prior to delivery to Tank 241-SY-102. A dilution ratio of 1:1 is desirable and would allow the waste to be delivered at a critical velocity of 1.5 ft/sec. The system will be operated at a flow velocity of 6 ft/sec or greater therefore, this velocity will be sufficient to maintain a stable slurry delivery through the pipeline. The effect of temperature on the critical velocity is not a limiting factor when the slurry is diluted 1:1 with water. Pressure drop at the critical velocity would be approximately two feet for a 125-ft pipeline (or 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline). At 6 ft/sec, the pressure drop would be 20 feet over a 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline

  1. Magnetic field-aligned plasma expansion in critical ionization velocity space experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.

    1989-01-01

    Motivated by the recent Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiments in space, the temporal evolution of a plasma cloud released in an ambient plasma is studied. Time-dependent Vlasov equations for both electrons and ions, along with the Poisson equation for the self-consistent electric field parallel to the ambient magnetic field, are solved. The initial cloud is assumed to consist of cold, warm, and hot electrons with temperatures T/sub c/ ≅ 0.2 eV, T/sub w/ ≅ 2 eV, and T/sub h/ ≅ 10 eV, respectively. It is found that the minor hot electrons escape the cloud, and their velocity distribution function shows the typical time-of-flight dispersion feature - that is, the larger the distance from the cloud, the larger is the average drift velocity of the escaping electrons. The major warm electrons expand along the magnetic field line with the corresponding ion-acoustic speed. The combined effect of the escaping hot electrons and the expanding warm ones sets up an electric potential structure which accelerates the ambient electrons into the cloud. Thus, the energy loss due to the electron escape is partly replenished. The electric field distribution in the potential structure depends on the stage of the evolution; before the rarefaction waves propagating from the edges of the cloud reach its center, the electric fields point into the cloud. After this stage the cloud divides into two subclouds, with each having their own bipolar electric fields. Effects of collisions on the evolution of plasma clouds are also discussed. The relevance of the results seen from the calculations are discussed in the context of recent space experiments on CIV

  2. Critical ionization velocity as a mechanism for producing Titan's plasma tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeev, A.A.; Khabibrakhmanov, I.KH.

    1984-01-01

    The phenomenon of a critical ionization velocity may explain the anomalous interaction between the magnetospheric plasma corotating with Saturn and the atmosphere of Titan. Although the dominant role will be played by the lower-hybrid instability due to the counterstreaming of the magnetospehric plasma and newly formed atmospheric ions, charge-separation effects caused by the very large Larmor radius of the new nitrogen ions also may trigger instability. The kinetic energy of the newly formed ions will be conveyed to the electrons by plasma waves generated in the counterflow, thereby exciting the atmospheric atoms to emit radiation. The limiting plasma density and electron temperature in Titan's plasma tail and the frequency spectrum of the waves that develop are determined and compared against the Voyager measurements. 11 references

  3. Angular dependence of the upper critical field in Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CuO sub 6 sub + subdelta

    CERN Document Server

    Vedeneev, S I

    2002-01-01

    The angular dependence of the upper critical field has been investigated in a wide range of temperatures in very high-quality Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CuO sub 6 sub + subdelta single crystals with critical temperature approx = 9 K in magnetic fields up to 28 T. Although the typical value of the normal state resistivity ratio approx = 10 sup 4 , the anisotropy ratio of the upper critical fields is much smaller. A model is proposed based on a strong anisotropy and a small transparency between superconducting layers

  4. Critical velocity and anaerobic paddling capacity determined by different mathematical models and number of predictive trials in canoe slalom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Leonardo H D; Ferrari, Homero G; Reis, Ivan G M; Scariot, Pedro P M; Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia B

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze if different combinations of trials as well as mathematical models can modify the aerobic and anaerobic estimates from critical velocity protocol applied in canoe slalom. Fourteen male elite slalom kayakers from Brazilian canoe slalom team (K1) were evaluated. Athletes were submitted to four predictive trials of 150, 300, 450 and 600 meters in a lake and the time to complete each trial was recorded. Critical velocity (CV-aerobic parameter) and anaerobic paddling capacity (APC-anaerobic parameter) were obtained by three mathematical models (Linear1=distance-time; Linear 2=velocity-1/time and Non-Linear = time-velocity). Linear 1 was chosen for comparison of predictive trials combinations. Standard combination (SC) was considered as the four trials (150, 300, 450 and 600 m). High fits of regression were obtained from all mathematical models (range - R² = 0.96-1.00). Repeated measures ANOVA pointed out differences of all mathematical models for CV (p = 0.006) and APC (p = 0.016) as well as R² (p = 0.033). Estimates obtained from the first (1) and the fourth (4) predictive trials (150 m = lowest; and 600 m = highest, respectively) were similar and highly correlated (r=0.98 for CV and r = 0.96 for APC) with the SC. In summary, methodological aspects must be considered in critical velocity application in canoe slalom, since different combinations of trials as well as mathematical models resulted in different aerobic and anaerobic estimates. Key pointsGreat attention must be given for methodological concerns regarding critical velocity protocol applied on canoe slalom, since different estimates were obtained depending on the mathematical model and the predictive trials used.Linear 1 showed the best fits of regression. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge and considering practical applications, this model is the easiest one to calculate the estimates from critical velocity protocol. Considering this, the abyss between science

  5. Prediction of critical transport velocity for preventing sand deposition in gas-oil multiphase production and well systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, O.O.; Reinicke, K.M. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering; Teodoriu, C. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-10-23

    The critical transport velocity is one of the key parameters for gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well system design and safe operation. Existing American Petroleum Institute Recommended Practice 14E (API RP 14E) for the sizing of multiphase flow systems suggests an equation to calculate threshold transport velocity. This equation only considers mixture density and does not account for factors such as fluid properties, gas-liquid flow patterns, sand loading, sand particle size, size distributions, shape factor and density. This work presents an improved computational methodology, which can be applied to estimate the critical transport velocity required to ensure efficient performance of gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well systems. The improved method is based on the modelling of three-phase gas-oil-sand pipe flow physics from first principle. Computations of the critical transport velocities show reasonable agreement with values calculated from mechanistic model (Danielson, 2007) for a relatively wide range of design and operating conditions. Compared with the mechanistic model (Danielson, 2007), the present method has no imposed limitations to the range of applicability. It is also takes into adequate account the effects of operating pressure, flow geometry, sand particle size, size distribution and shape factor, which have considerable influence on the critical transport velocity in gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well systems. (orig.)

  6. Continued Evaluation of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 12518

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will be governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. In 2010 Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to accurately identify critical velocities in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of >50 micrometers. In 2011 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated to identify critical velocities for slurries containing fast-settling, high-density particles with a mean particle diameter of <15 micrometers. This two-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  7. An overview of atomic and molecular processes in critical velocity ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, S.T.; Murad, E.; McNeil, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) is a multistep process involving plasma physics and plasma chemistry. The authors present an overview of the time development of some atomic and molecular processes in CIV. In the pre-onset stage, metastable states play an important role: They provide an energy pooling mechanism allowing low energy electrons to participate in the ionization processes; they may explain the low energy threshold as well as the fast time scale in the onset of CIV. For a sustaining CIV to occur, Townsend's criterion has to be satisfied. The kinetic energies of the neutrals are transformed to plasma wave energies via beam-plasma instabilities, and the plasma waves that heat the electrons result in a tail formation. Excitation of neutrals with subsequent radiation is an important energy loss mechanism. Finite beam size also limits the instability growth rate. In the propagation of CIV, ion-molecule reactions and molecular dissociative recombination are important. Ion-molecule reactions change the temporal chemical composition in a CIV process and help explain some results in CIV experiments. Molecular dissociative recombination reduces the plasma density, lowers the effective neutral mass, and loses energy via excitation and radiation; it tends to quench the propagation of CIV. Depending on various parameters, oscillatory behavior of CIV may occur

  8. Critical Velocity for Stick-Slip Motion of an Elastic Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan; Robbins, Mark

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study stick-slip motion of an elastic slider over a rigid substrate covered by a thin film. We study the variation of force with time and the critical velocity vc above which steady sliding is observed as a function of the mass M, size, geometry and stiffness of the slider. The results resolve a controversy over the relationship between vc and M. When the cross-section of the slider is independent of height above the contact, vc becomes independent of M as M increases.^1 However, when the cross-section rises with distance from the contact, as in the Surface Force Apparatus,^2 the stiffness is dominated by regions near the contact. In this case, the slider is effectively rigid and vc decreases as M-1/2 as predicted by Robbins and Thompson.^3 ^1B. N. J. Persson, Sliding Friction: Physical Principles and Applications (Springer, Berlin, 1998). ^2M. L. Gee, P. M. McGuiggan, J. N. Israelachvili and A. M. Homola, J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1895 (1990). ^3M. O. Robbins and P. A. Thompson, Science 253, 916 (1991).

  9. An evaluation method of critical velocity for self-excited vibration of cross-shaped tube bundle in cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Fumio; Nishihara, Takashi; Yasuo, Akira; Morita, Ryo

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of the cross-shaped tube bundle as a lower plenum component of pressure vessel is examined to develop a next generation LWR in Japanese electric utilities. The flow-induced vibration characteristics are not understood well. Methods to evaluate turbulence induced vibration and vortex induced vibration were proposed by CRIEPI. In this study, vibration response is obtained experimentally to propose a method to evaluate self-excited vibration of cross-shaped tube bundle. The self-excited vibration was found to be generated when nondimensional flow velocity was above a critical value. The nondimensional critical velocity of normal configuration is 15% smaller than that of staggered configuration, which means that the nondimensional critical velocity of normal configuration can give conservative evaluation. The result of Reynolds number Re=6.2 x 10 4 agrees well with that of Re=6.8 x 10 5 , in which region, the effect of Reynolds number on the critical velocity is small. (author)

  10. Water velocity and the nature of critical flow in large rapids on the Colorado River, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magirl, Christopher S.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Smart, Graeme M.; Webb, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Rapids are an integral part of bedrock‐controlled rivers, influencing aquatic ecology, geomorphology, and recreational value. Flow measurements in rapids and high‐gradient rivers are uncommon because of technical difficulties associated with positioning and operating sufficiently robust instruments. In the current study, detailed velocity, water surface, and bathymetric data were collected within rapids on the Colorado River in eastern Utah. With the water surface survey, it was found that shoreline‐based water surface surveys may misrepresent the water surface slope along the centerline of a rapid. Flow velocities were measured with an ADCP and an electronic pitot‐static tube. Integrating multiple measurements, the ADCP returned velocity data from the entire water column, even in sections of high water velocity. The maximum mean velocity measured with the ADCP was 3.7 m/s. The pitot‐static tube, while capable of only point measurements, quantified velocity 0.39 m below the surface. The maximum mean velocity measured with the pitot tube was 5.2 m/s, with instantaneous velocities up to 6.5 m/s. Analysis of the data showed that flow was subcritical throughout all measured rapids with a maximum measured Froude number of 0.7 in the largest measured rapids. Froude numbers were highest at the entrance of a given rapid, then decreased below the first breaking waves. In the absence of detailed bathymetric and velocity data, the Froude number in the fastest‐flowing section of a rapid was estimated from near‐surface velocity and depth soundings alone.

  11. Angular non-critical phase-matching second-harmonic-generation characteristics of RECOB (RE = Tm, Y, Gd, Sm, Nd and La) crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Zhengping; Yu, Fapeng; Qi, Hongwei; Yang, Xiuqin; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Zhao, Xian; Xu, Xinguang

    2017-05-15

    For the first time, the angular non-critical phase-matching (A-NCPM) second-harmonic-generation (SHG) characteristics of a family of monoclinic oxoborate crystals, RECa 4 O(BO 3 ) 3 (RECOB, RE = Tm, Y, Gd, Sm, Nd and La), were comprehensively investigated. For all of the realizable A-NCPM SHG styles, the feature parameters including PM wavelength, angular, wavelength and temperature acceptance bandwidths, have been derived from the theory and verified by the experiments. We discovered that the closer the ion radius between RE 3+ and Ca 2+ , the smaller the birefringence, and the better the A-NCPM SHG properties. As a result, for the Type-I SHG on Y-axis which has the largest effective nonlinear optical coefficient (d eff ) among the three realizable A-NCPM styles, NdCOB crystal presents the longest PM wavelength (927 nm), the largest angular acceptance bandwidth (Δθ⋅l 1/2 = 84.3 mrad·cm 1/2 , Δϕ⋅l 1/2 = 58.8 mrad·cm 1/2 ), and the broadest wavelength acceptance bandwidth (8.7 nm). This discovery will contribute to the design of new NCPM materials, at the same time the parameter formula will be helpful for the theoretical prediction of NCPM performance.

  12. Effects of equilibrium point displacement in limit cycle oscillation amplitude, critical frequency and prediction of critical input angular velocity in minimal brake system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Hamed Faghanpour; Ganji, Davood Domiri

    2017-04-01

    In the present paper, brake squeal phenomenon as a noise resource in automobiles was studied. In most cases, the modeling work is carried out assuming that deformations were small; thus, equilibrium point is set zero and linearization is performed at this point. However, the equilibrium point under certain circumstances is not zero; therefore, huge errors in prediction of brake squeal may occur. In this work, large motion domains with respect to linearization importance were subjected to investigation. Nonlinear equations of motion were considered and behavior of system for COF's model was analyzed by studying amplitude and frequency of limited cycle oscillation.

  13. A one-dimensional model to describe flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to super critical impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Romero, A.; Rodríguez-Martínez, J. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to dynamic tension. We explore loading rates above the critical impact velocity: the wave initiated in the impacted end by the applied velocity is the trigger for the localization of plastic deformation. The problem has been addressed using two kinds of numerical simulations: (1) one-dimensional finite difference calculations and (2) axisymmetric finite element computations. The latter calculations have been used to validate the capacity of the finite difference model to describe plastic flow localization at high impact velocities. The finite difference model, which highlights due to its simplicity, allows to obtain insights into the role played by the strain rate and temperature sensitivities of the material in the process of dynamic flow localization. Specifically, we have shown that viscosity can stabilize the material behavior to the point of preventing the appearance of the critical impact velocity. This is a key outcome of our investigation, which, to the best of the authors' knowledge, has not been previously reported in the literature.

  14. Estimating the accuracy of the technique of reconstructing the rotational motion of a satellite based on the measurements of its angular velocity and the magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, M. Yu.; Volkov, O. N.; Monakhov, M. I.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The paper has studied the accuracy of the technique that allows the rotational motion of the Earth artificial satellites (AES) to be reconstructed based on the data of onboard measurements of angular velocity vectors and the strength of the Earth magnetic field (EMF). The technique is based on kinematic equations of the rotational motion of a rigid body. Both types of measurement data collected over some time interval have been processed jointly. The angular velocity measurements have been approximated using convenient formulas, which are substituted into the kinematic differential equations for the quaternion that specifies the transition from the body-fixed coordinate system of a satellite to the inertial coordinate system. Thus obtained equations represent a kinematic model of the rotational motion of a satellite. The solution of these equations, which approximate real motion, has been found by the least-square method from the condition of best fitting between the data of measurements of the EMF strength vector and its calculated values. The accuracy of the technique has been estimated by processing the data obtained from the board of the service module of the International Space Station ( ISS). The reconstruction of station motion using the aforementioned technique has been compared with the telemetry data on the actual motion of the station. The technique has allowed us to reconstruct the station motion in the orbital orientation mode with a maximum error less than 0.6° and the turns with a maximal error of less than 1.2°.

  15. Skeleton sled velocity profiles: a novel approach to understand critical aspects of the elite athletes' start phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colyer, Steffi L; Stokes, Keith A; Bilzon, James L J; Salo, Aki I T

    2018-06-01

    The development of velocity across the skeleton start is critical to performance, yet poorly understood. We aimed to understand which components of the sled velocity profile determine performance and how physical abilities influence these components. Thirteen well-trained skeleton athletes (>85% of athletes in the country) performed dry-land push-starts alongside countermovement jump and sprint tests at multiple time-points. A magnet encoder attached to the sled wheel provided velocity profiles, which were characterised using novel performance descriptors. Stepwise regression revealed four variables (pre-load velocity, pre-load distance, load effectiveness, velocity drop) to explain 99% variance in performance (β weights: 1.70, -0.81, 0.25, -0.07, respectively). Sprint times and jump ability were associated (r ± 90% CI) with pre-load velocity (-0.70 ± 0.27 and 0.88 ± 0.14, respectively) and distance (-0.48 ± 0.39 and 0.67 ± 0.29, respectively), however, unclear relationships between both physical measures and load effectiveness (0.33 ± 0.44 and -0.35 ± 0.48, respectively) were observed. Athletes should develop accelerative ability to attain higher velocity earlier on the track. Additionally, the loading phase should not be overlooked and may be more influenced by technique than physical factors. Future studies should utilise this novel approach when evaluating skeleton starts or interventions to enhance performance.

  16. First-order chiral to non-chiral transition in the angular dependence of the upper critical induction of the Scharnberg–Klemm p-wave pair state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Gu, Q; Lörscher, C; Klemm, R A

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the temperature T and angular (θ, ϕ) dependencies of the upper critical induction B c2 (θ, ϕ, T) for parallel-spin superconductors with an axially symmetric p-wave pairing interaction pinned to the lattice and a dominant ellipsoidal Fermi surface (FS). For all FS anisotropies, the chiral Scharnberg–Klemm (SK) state B c2 (θ, ϕ, T) exceeds that of the chiral Anderson–Brinkman–Morel (ABM) state and exhibits a kink at θ = θ * (T, ϕ), indicative of a first-order transition from its chiral, nodal-direction behavior to its non-chiral, antinodal-direction behavior. Applicabilities to Sr 2 RuO 4 , UCoGe and the candidate topological superconductor Cu x Bi 2 Se 3 are discussed. (fast track communication)

  17. Thermal-hydraulic behavior of physical quantities at critical velocities in a nuclear research reactor core channel using plate type fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidi Ali Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal-hydraulic study presented here relates to a channel of a nuclear reactor core. This channel is defined as being the space between two fuel plates where a coolant fluid flows. The flow velocity of this coolant should not generate vibrations in fuel plates. The aim of this study is to know the distribution of the temperature in the fuel plates, in the cladding and in the coolant fluid at the critical velocities of Miller, of Wambsganss, and of Cekirge and Ural. The velocity expressions given by these authors are function of the geometry of the fuel plate, the mechanical characteristics of the fuel plate’s material and the thermal characteristics of the coolant fluid. The thermal-hydraulic study is made under steady-state; the equation set-up of the thermal problem is made according to El Wakil and to Delhaye. Once the equation set-up is validated, the three critical velocities are calculated and then used in the calculations of the different temperature profiles. The average heat flux and the critical heat flux are evaluated for each critical velocity and their ratio reported. The recommended critical velocity to be used in nuclear channel calculations is that of Wambsganss. The mathematical model used is more precise and all the physical quantities, when using this critical velocity, stay in safe margins.

  18. Effective Viscosity of Liquid Helium4 - With Minute He3 Impurity at Temperatures from 0.05K to 2K and at Velocities Spanning the Critical Velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    cryogenic systems which not only functioned with efficiency , but were a work of art. Mr. Dauwalter ms contribution to these programs has been considerable...excitation voltage e and amplifier gain G, and forex a linear system the DC output voltage e is directly proportional to theo angular displacement de0 e (4.4

  19. The Effect of Material Property on the Critical Velocity of Randomly Excited Nonlinear Axially Travelling Functionally Graded Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abedi

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, the critical axial speeds of three types of sigmoid, power law and exponential law functionally graded plates for both isotropic and orthotropic cases are obtained via a completely analytic method. The plates are subjected to lateral white noise excitation and show evidence of large deformations. Due to randomness, the conventional deterministic methods fail and a statistical approach must be selected. Here, the probability density function is evaluated analytically for prescribed plates and used to investigate the critical axial velocity of them. Specifically the effect of in-plane forces, mean value of lateral load and the material property on the critical axial speed are studied and discussed for both isotropic and orthotropic functionally graded plates. Since the governing equation is transformed to a non dimensional format, the results can be used for a wide range of plate dimensions. It is shown that the material heterogeneity palys an essential and significant role in increasing or decreasing the critical speed of both isotropic and orthotropic functionally graded plates.

  20. Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  1. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (μm). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  2. Negative velocity fluctuations and non-equilibrium fluctuation relation for a driven high critical current vortex state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Biplab; Shaw, Gorky; Banerjee, S S; Majumdar, Sayantan; Sood, A K; Grover, A K

    2017-07-17

    Under the influence of a constant drive the moving vortex state in 2H-NbS 2 superconductor exhibits a negative differential resistance (NDR) transition from a steady flow to an immobile state. This state possesses a high depinning current threshold ([Formula: see text]) with unconventional depinning characteristics. At currents well above [Formula: see text], the moving vortex state exhibits a multimodal velocity distribution which is characteristic of vortex flow instabilities in the NDR regime. However at lower currents which are just above [Formula: see text], the velocity distribution is non-Gaussian with a tail extending to significant negative velocity values. These unusual negative velocity events correspond to vortices drifting opposite to the driving force direction. We show that this distribution obeys the Gallavotti-Cohen Non-Equilibrium Fluctuation Relation (GC-NEFR). Just above [Formula: see text], we also find a high vortex density fluctuating driven state not obeying the conventional GC-NEFR. The GC-NEFR analysis provides a measure of an effective energy scale (E eff ) associated with the driven vortex state. The E eff corresponds to the average energy dissipated by the fluctuating vortex state above [Formula: see text]. We propose the high E eff value corresponds to the onset of high energy dynamic instabilities in this driven vortex state just above [Formula: see text].

  3. Professional AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to AngularJS, Google's open-source client-side framework for app development. Most of the existing guides to AngularJS struggle to provide simple and understandable explanations for more advanced concepts. As a result, some developers who understand all the basic concepts of AngularJS struggle when it comes to building more complex real-world applications. Professional AngularJS provides a thorough understanding of AngularJS, covering everything from basic concepts, such as directives and data binding, to more advanced concepts like transclusion, build systems, and auto

  4. An application of liquid sublayer dryout mechanism to the prediction of critical heat flux under low pressure and low velocity conditions in round tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Won; Yang, Jae-Young; Baik, Se-Jin

    1997-01-01

    Based on several experimental evidences for nucleate boiling in annular film and the existence of residual liquid film flow rate at the critical heat flux (CHF) location, the liquid sublayer dryout (LSD) mechanism under annular film is firstly introduced to evaluate the CHF data at low pressure and low velocity (LPLV) conditions, which would not be predicted by a normal annular film dryout (AFD) model. In this study, the CHF occurrence due to annular film separation or breaking down is phenomenologically modelled by applying the LSD mechanism to this situation. In this LSD mechanism, the liquid sublayer thickness, the incoming liquid velocity to the liquid sublayer, and the axial distance from the onset of annular flow to the CHF location are used as the phenomena-controlling parameters. From the model validation on the 1406 CHF data points ranging over P = 0.1 - 2 MPa, G = 4 - 499 kg/m 2 s, L/D = 4 - 402, most of CHF data (more than 1000 points) are predicted within ±30% error bounds by the LSD mechanism. However, some calculation results that critical qualities are less than 0.4 are considerably overestimated by this mechanism. These overpredictions seem to be caused by inadequate CHF mechanism classification criteria and an insufficient consideration of the flow instability effect on CHF. Further studies for a new classification criterion screening the CHF data affected by flow instabilities and a new bubble detachment model for LPLV conditions are needed to improve the model accuracy. (author)

  5. Rotational speedups accompanying angular deceleration of a superfluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    Exact calculations of the angular deceleration of superfluid vortex arrays show momentary speedups in the angular velocity caused by coherent, multiple vortex loss at the boundary. The existence and shape of the speedups depend on the vortex friction, the deceleration rate, and the pattern symmetry. The phenomenon resembles, in several ways, that observed in pulsars

  6. Significant Variation of Post-critical SsPmp Amplitude as a Result of Variation in Near-surface Velocity: Observations from the Yellowknife Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragut, G.; Liu, T.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years Virtual Deep Seismic Sounding (VDSS) emerged as a novel method to image the Moho, which uses the post-critical reflection P waves at the Moho generated by teleseismic S waves at the free surface near the receivers (SsPmp). However, observed SsPmp sometimes have significantly lower amplitude than predicted, raising doubts among the seismic community on the theoretical basis of the method. With over two decades of continuous digital broadband records and major subduction zones in the range of 30-50 degrees, the Yellowknife Array in northern Canada provides a rich opportunity for observation of post-critical SsPmp. We analyze S wave coda of events with epicenter distances of 30-50°, and pay special attention to earthquakes in a narrow azimuth range that ­­­encompasses the Kamchatka Peninsula. Among 21 events with strong direct S energy on the radial components, we observe significant variation of SsPmp energy. After associating the SsPmp energy with the virtual source location of each event, we observe a general trend of decreasing SsPmp energy from NE to SW. As the trend coincides with the transition from exposed basement of the Slave Craton to Paleozoic platform covered by Phanerozoic sediment, we interpret the decreasing SsPmp energy as a result of lower S velocity at the virtual sources, which reduces S-to-P reflection coefficients. We plan to include more events from the Aleutian Islands, the virtual sources of which are primarily located in the Paleozoic platform. This will allow us to further investigate the relationship between SsPmp amplitude and near-surface velocity.

  7. Rotations and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyborg, P.; Froyland, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of rotational invariance and the properties of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. In particular, the problem of addition of angular momenta is treated in detail, and tables of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients are included

  8. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  9. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  10. Electron angular distribution axial channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokonov, A.Kh.; Khokonov, M.Kh.

    1989-01-01

    Angular distributions of ultra-relativistic electrons are calculated in the assumption about presence of statistical equilibrium. Analysis is based on numerical solution of Fokker-Planck type kinetic equation. It is shown that in contrast to case of amorphous medium, the multiple scattering at axial channeling of negative particles results in self-focusing of the initial beam particles and due to it number of electrons moving at an angles to the chain, which are smaller, than critical angle of channeling, may increase by several times as compared to the initial one

  11. Optical Angular Momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-01-01

    For many years the Institute of Physics has published books on hot topics based on a collection of reprints from different journals, including some remarks by the editors of each volume. The book on Optical Angular Momentum, edited by L Allen, S M Barnett and M J Padgett, is a recent addition to the series. It reproduces forty four papers originally published in different journals and in a few cases it provides direct access to works not easily accessible to a web navigator. The collection covers nearly a hundred years of progress in physics, starting from an historic 1909 paper by Poynting, and ending with a 2002 paper by Padgett, Barnett and coworkers on the measurement of the orbital angular momentum of a single photon. The field of optical angular momentum has expanded greatly, creating an interdisciplinary attraction for researchers operating in quantum optics, atomic physics, solid state physics, biophysics and quantum information theory. The development of laser optics, especially the control of single mode sources, has made possible the specific design of optical radiation modes with a high degree of control on the light angular momentum. The editors of this book are important figures in the field of angular momentum, having contributed to key progress in the area. L Allen published an historical paper in 1999, he and M J Padgett (together with M Babiker) produced few years ago a long review article which is today still the most complete basic introduction to the angular momentum of light, while S M Barnett has contributed several high quality papers to the progress of this area of physics. The editors' choice provides an excellent overview to all readers, with papers classified into eight different topics, covering the basic principles of the light and spin and orbital angular momentum, the laboratory tools for creating laser beams carrying orbital angular momentum, the optical forces and torques created by laser beams carrying angular momentum on

  12. Angular Accelerating White Light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available wavelength dependence. By digitally simulating free-space propagation on the SLM, The authors compare the effects of real and digital propagation on the angular rotation rates of the resulting optical fields for various wavelengths. The development...

  13. Angular trap for macroparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksyonov, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    Properties of angular macroparticle traps were investigated in this work. These properties are required to design vacuum arc plasma filters. The correlation between trap geometry parameters and its ability to absorb macroparticles were found. Calculations allow one to predict the behaviour of filtering abilities of separators which contain such traps in their design. Recommendations regarding the use of angular traps in filters of different builds are given.

  14. An utilization of liquid sublayer dryout mechanism in predicting critical heat flux under low pressure and low velocity conditions in round tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Won; Baik, Se-Jin; Ro, Tae-Sun

    2000-01-01

    From a theoretical assessment of extensive critical heat flux (CHF) data under low pressure and low velocity (LPLV) conditions, it was found out that lots of CHF data would not be well predicted by a normal annular film dryout (AFD) mechanism, although their flow patterns were identified as annular-mist flow. To predict these CHF data, a liquid sublayer dryout (LSD) mechanism has been newly utilized in developing the mechanistic CHF model based on each identified CHF mechanism. This mechanism postulates that the CHF occurrence is caused by dryout of the thin liquid sublayer resulting from the annular film separation or breaking down due to nucleate boiling in annular film or hydrodynamic fluctuation. In principle, this mechanism well supports the experimental evidence of residual film flow rate at the CHF location, which can not be explained by the AFD mechanism. For a comparative assessment of each mechanism, the CHF model based on the LSD mechanism is developed together with that based on the AFD mechanism. The validation of these models is performed on the 1406 CHF data points ranging over P=0.1-2 MPa, G=4-499 kg m -2 s -1 , L/D=4-402. This model validation shows that 1055 and 231 CHF data are predicted within ±30 error bound by the LSD mechanism and the AFD mechanism, respectively. However, some CHF data whose critical qualities are <0.4 or whose tube length-to-diameter ratios are <70 are considerably overestimated by the CHF model based on the LSD mechanism. These overestimations seem to be caused by an inadequate CHF mechanism classification and an insufficient consideration of the flow instability effect on CHF. Further studies for a new classification criterion screening the CHF data affected by flow instabilities as well as a new bubble detachment model for LPLV conditions, are needed to improve the model accuracy.

  15. Velocity of lordosis angle during spinal flexion and extension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Consmüller

    Full Text Available The importance of functional parameters for evaluating the severity of low back pain is gaining clinical recognition, with evidence suggesting that the angular velocity of lordosis is critical for identification of musculoskeletal deficits. However, there is a lack of data regarding the range of functional kinematics (RoKs, particularly which include the changing shape and curvature of the spine. We address this deficit by characterising the angular velocity of lordosis throughout the thoracolumbar spine according to age and gender. The velocity of lumbar back shape changes was measured using Epionics SPINE during maximum flexion and extension activities in 429 asymptomatic volunteers. The difference between maximum positive and negative velocities represented the RoKs. The mean RoKs for flexion decreased with age; 114°/s (20-35 years, 100°/s (36-50 years and 83°/s (51-75 years. For extension, the corresponding mean RoKs were 73°/s, 57°/s and 47°/s. ANCOVA analyses revealed that age and gender had the largest influence on the RoKs (p<0.05. The Epionics SPINE system allows the rapid assessment of functional kinematics in the lumbar spine. The results of this study now serve as normative data for comparison to patients with spinal pathology or after surgical treatment.

  16. Fission fragment angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenne, D. De

    1991-01-01

    Most of the energy released in fission is converted into translational kinetic energy of the fragments. The remaining excitation energy will be distributed among neutrons and gammas. An important parameter characterizing the scission configuration is the primary angular momentum of the nascent fragments. Neutron emission is not expected to decrease the spin of the fragments by more than one unit of angular momentum and is as such of less importance in the determination of the initial fragment spins. Gamma emission is a suitable tool in studying initial fragment spins because the emission time, number, energy, and multipolarity of the gammas strongly depend on the value of the primary angular momentum. The main conclusions of experiments on gamma emission were that the initial angular momentum of the fragments is large compared to the ground state spin and oriented perpendicular to the fission axis. Most of the recent information concerning initial fragment spin distributions comes from the measurement of isomeric ratios for isomeric pairs produced in fission. Although in nearly every mass chain isomers are known, only a small number are suitable for initial fission fragment spin studies. Yield and half-life considerations strongly limit the number of candidates. This has the advantage that the behavior of a specific isomeric pair can be investigated for a number of fissioning systems at different excitation energies of the fragments and fissioning nuclei. Because most of the recent information on primary angular momenta comes from measurements of isomeric ratios, the global deexcitation process of the fragments and the calculation of the initial fragment spin distribution from measured isomeric ratios are discussed here. The most important results on primary angular momentum determinations are reviewed and some theoretical approaches are given. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Angular dispersion and energy loss of H+ and He+ in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantero, Esteban

    2006-01-01

    In this master thesis the effects produced when a light ion beam traverses a thin metallic film were studied.In particular, the interactions of low energy (E ≤ 10 keV) light ions (H + ,H 2 + , D + , He + ) with monocrystalline and also polycrystalline gold samples were investigated.In first place, the dependence of the stopping power with projectiles' velocity was studied, analyzing the threshold effect in the excitation of the 5d electrons in the channelling regime for energies between 0,4 and 9 keV.Next, the angular dispersion of ions in polycrystalline and monocrystalline films was measured and analyzed.Comparisons for different energies and projectiles were done, studying molecular and isotopic effects.Using Lindhard's channeling theory, a scale law for the angular dispersion of angles greater than the critical angle was found.Additionally, the angular dependence of the energy loss and the energy loss straggling of protons transmitted through monocrystals were measured.To explain the angular variations of these magnitudes a theoretical model based on the electronic density fluctuations inside the channel was developed [es

  18. A galactic disk as a two-fluid system: Consequences for the critical stellar velocity dispersion and the formation of condensations in the gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jog, C.J.; Solomon, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    We examine the consequences of treating a galactic disk as a two-fluid system for the stability of the entire disk and for the stability and form of the gas in the disk. We find that the existence of even a small fraction of the total disk surface density in a cold fluid (that is, the gas) makes it much harder to stabilize the entire two-fluid disk. (C/sub s/,min)/sub 2-f/, the critical stellar velocity dispersion for a two-fluid disk in an increasing function of μ/sub g//μ/sub s/, the gas fraction, and μ/sub t//kappa, where μ/sub g/, μ/sub s/, and μ/sub t/ are the gaseous, stellar, and total disk surface densities and kappa is the epicyclic frequency. In the Galaxy, we find that (C/sub s/,min)/sub 2-f/ as a function of R peaks when μ/sub t//kappa peaks-at galactocentric radii of Rapprox.5-7 kpc; two-fluid instabilities are most likely to occur in this region. This region is coincident with the peak in the molecular cloud distribution in the Galaxy. At the higher effective gas density resulting from the growth of a two-fluid instability, the gas may become unstble, even when originally the gas by itself is stable. The wavelength of a typical (induced) gas instability in the inner galaxy is approx.400 pc, and it contains approx.10 7 M/sub sun/ of interstellar matter; these instabilities may be identified with clusters of giant molecular clouds. We suggest that many of the spiral features seen in gas-rich spiral galaxies may be material arms or arm segments resulting from sheared two-fluid gravitational instabilities. The analysis presented here is applicable to any general disk galaxy consisting of stars and gas

  19. Time variations of the angular momentum of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatten, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Time variations of density models of the Sun are investigated. This is an attempt to estimate the changing moment of inertia of the Sun in order to calculate the internal solar angular velocity based upon Newton's equation of motion. Previous estimates of dI/dt disagree with those based upon central densities in a homologously contracting model. It is shown that the homologously contracting model leads to large errors in dI/dt. Based upon an integration of Sears's solar model, dI/dt=-5.5 x 10 34 gm cm 2 s -1 . This suggests a core angular velocity of /sub thetar-italic/ = (0.15 +- 0.03) x 10 -3 s -1 , corresponding to a period of 0.5 +- 0.1 days, assuming a constant angular velocity with time. The brackets indicate a weighting which is discussed

  20. Measurement crankshaft angular speed of an OM403 engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biočanin Stojko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the methodology of the measurement of the angular speed of the crankshaft of a ten-cylinder diesel OM403 engine is presented, with regular and irregular engine operation. The angular velocity was measured under laboratory conditions, on already installed measuring equipment from the laboratory and on the break of a well known brand-Schenck, by using an optoelectronic incremental rotary encoder, a data acquisition module and the LabVIEW software for synchronization and management of the measuring equipment. The goal of this paper is to give a practical contribution to researches of measuring of crankshaft angular speed of the crankshaft engine OM 403.

  1. Velocity Structure and 3D Finite Element Modeling for Critical Instability of Gas Hydrate-related Slipstream Submarine Slide, offshore Vancouver Island, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    LONG, S.; He, T.; Lan, K.; Spence, G.; Yelisetti, S.

    2016-12-01

    The previous study indicated that Slipstream submarine landslide is one of a gas hydrate-related slope failures on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin, off Vancouver Island, Canada. The OBS data collected during SeaJade project were used to derive the subseafloor Vp & Vs structures. The anomalous high Vp of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 (± 10) mbsf closely matches the estimated depth of the glide plane. The modelled Vs above the BSR at a depth of 265-275 mbsf is about 100-150 m/s higher than a theoretical 100% water saturated background value, indicating that the hydrate acts as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment. Also, the Vp & Vs above BSR both indicate a consistent 40% saturation of gas hydrate. On the basis of high accurate submarine bathymetry obtained by multibeam sounding system, the submarine landform before slump is reconstructed by comparing the slump headwall geometry with surrounding ridges. Using the elastic moduli determined from Vp & Vs, the stress status was calculated by the finite element method for different conditions and confirmed that the undersea sliding process related with gas hydrate starts from the toe of the slope and then progressively retreats to the place of current headwall, in a series of triangular blocks or wedges. The shear stress are then compared with the frame shear strength of geological model, which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges The simulation results found that the ridge was stable under its own weight, but gas hydrate saturation decrease and pore-water pressure increase will greatly reduce shear strength of sediments and may cause a landslide. Since the study area is in the earthquake belt, the large seismic acceleration will greatly affect pore pressure distribution within the ridge. The simulation results indicated that the shallow high-velocity gas hydrate layer coincident with glide plane depth is more

  2. Angular momentum projected semiclassics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.

    1986-10-01

    By using angular momentum projected plane waves as wave functions, we derive semiclassical expressions for the single-particle propagator, the partition function, the nonlocal density matrix, the single-particle density and the one particle- one hole level density for fixed angular momentum and fixed z-component or summed over the z-components. Other quantities can be deduced from the propagator. In coordinate space (r, r') the relevant quantities depend on vertical stroker - r 3 vertical stroke instead of vertical stroker - r'vertical stroke and in Wigner space (R, P) they become proportional to the angular momentum constraints δ(vertical strokeRxPvertical stroke/ℎ - l) and δ((RxP) z /ℎ - m). As applications we calculate the single-particle and one particle- one hole level densities for harmonic oscillator and Hill-Wheeler box potentials and the imaginary part of the optical potential and its volume integral with an underlying harmonic oscillator potential and a zero range two-body interaction. (orig.)

  3. On the angular momentum in star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horedt, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the rotation of interstellar clouds which are in a stage immediately before star formation. Cloud collisions seem to be the principal cause of the observed rotation of interstellar clouds. The rotational motion of the clouds is strongly influenced by turbulence. Theories dealing with the resolution of the angular momentum problem in star formation are classified into five major groups. The old idea that the angular momentum of an interstellar cloud passes during star formation into the angular momentum of double star systems and/or circumstellar clouds, is developed. It is suggested that a rotating gas cloud contracts into a ring-like structure which fragments into self-gravitating subcondensations. By collisions and gas accretion these subcondensations accrete into binary systems surrounded by circumstellar clouds. Using some rough approximations the authors find analytical expressions for the semi-major axis of the binary system and for the density of the circumstellar clouds as a function of the initial density and of the initial angular velocity of an interstellar cloud. The obtained values are well within the observational limits. (Auth.)

  4. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom’s angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light’s OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light–matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069766

  6. AngularJS directives

    CERN Document Server

    Vanston, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This book uses a practical, step-by-step approach, starting with how to build directives from the ground up before moving on to creating web applications comprised of multiple modules all working together to provide the best user experience possible.This book is intended for intermediate JavaScript developers who are looking to enhance their understanding of single-page web application development with a focus on AngularJS and the JavaScript MVC frameworks.It is expected that readers will understand basic JavaScript patterns and idioms and can recognize JSON formatted data.

  7. Angular Distribution of GRBs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Balázs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the complete randomness of the angular distribution of BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs. Based on their durations and peak fluxes, we divided the BATSE sample into 5 subsamples (short1, short2, intermediate, long1, long2 and studied the angular distributions separately. We used three methods to search for non-randomness in the subsamples: Voronoi tesselation, minimal spanning tree, and multifractal spectra. To study any non-randomness in the subsamples we defined 13 test-variables (9 from Voronoi tesselation, 3 from the minimal spanning tree and one from the multifractal spectrum. We made Monte Carlo simulations taking into account the BATSE’s sky-exposure function. We tested therandomness by introducing squared Euclidean distances in the parameter space of the test-variables. We recognized that the short1, short2 groups deviate significantly (99.90%, 99.98% from the fully random case in the distribution of the squared Euclidean distances but this is not true for the long samples. In the intermediate group, the squared Euclidean distances also give significant deviation (98.51%.

  8. Perturbed angular correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The electric quadrupolar interaction in some hafnium complexes, measured at the metal nucleus level is studied. For that purpose, the technique of γ-γ perturbed angular correlation is used: the frequencies of quadrupolar interaction are compared with some hafnium α-hydroxicarboxilates, namely glycolate, lactate, mandelate and benzylate; the influence of the temperature on the quadrupolar coupling on the hafnium tetramandelate is studied; finally, the effects associated with the capture of thermal neutrons by hafnium tetramandelate are examined locally at the nuclear level. The first group of results shows significant differences in a series of complexes derived from glycolic acid. On the other hand, the substitution of the protons in hafnium tetramandelate structure by some alkaline cations permits to verify a correlation between the variations in the quadrupolar coupling and the electronegativities of the substituent elements. Measurements at high temperatures show that this complex is thermally stable at 100 and 150 0 C. It is possible to see the appearance of two distinct sites for the probe nucleus, after heating the sample at 100 0 C for prolonged time. This fact is attributed to a probable interconversion among the postulated structural isomers for the octacoordinated compounds. Finally, measurements of angular correlation on the irradiated complex show that there is an effective destruction of the target molecule by neutron capture [pt

  9. Galaxy angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.A.

    1974-01-01

    In order to test the theories which purport to explain the origin of galaxy angular momentum, this study presents new data for about 1000 individual galaxies in eight rich clusters. The clusters which are studied include Virgo, A 119, A 400, A 1656 (Coma), A 2147, A 2151 (Hercules), A 2197, and A 2199. Selected samples of these data are used to investigate systematic alignment effects in clusters of galaxies and to investigate the intrinsic ellipticities of E, SO, and spiral galaxies. The following new results are reported: Galaxies in the cluster A 2197 show a significant alignment effect (chi 2 probability less than 0.0002), and the preferential direction of alignment corresponds approximately to the major axis of the overall cluster elongation. None of the other seven clusters show any significant alignment trends. The spiral galaxy samples in four clusters (Virgo, A 1656, A 2151, and A 2197) were large enough to analyze the number distributions of forward and reverse winding spirals. Large and small spiral galaxies have identical ellipticity distributions. Large E and SO galaxies tend to be more spherical, and small E and SO galaxies more flattened. The intrinsic ellipticities of E, SO, and spiral galaxies are the same for galaxies in the ''field'' and for galaxies in rich clusters. Six models of galaxy formation are reviewed, and the major []mphasis is placed on how each model explains the origin of galaxy angular momentum. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  10. Gravitational Field of Ultrarelativistic Objects with Angular Momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fursaev, Dmitri V

    2006-01-01

    A brief review of recently found gyraton metrics which describe the gravitational field of objects having an angular momentum and moving with the velocity of light is given. The gyraton metrics belong to a class of exact plane wave solutions of four and higher dimensional Einstein equations in vacuum or in the presence of a negative cosmological constant

  11. Gravitational Field of Ultrarelativistic Objects with Angular Momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fursaev, Dmitri V [Dubna International University and Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141 980, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2006-03-01

    A brief review of recently found gyraton metrics which describe the gravitational field of objects having an angular momentum and moving with the velocity of light is given. The gyraton metrics belong to a class of exact plane wave solutions of four and higher dimensional Einstein equations in vacuum or in the presence of a negative cosmological constant.

  12. Angular mining conveyor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sender, A; Mura, A; Liduchowski, L; Zok, P; Skolik, W; Szyngiel, S; Rojek, H; Gajda, B; Major, M; Stanislawski, P; Sliwiok, H; Sikora, J

    1988-10-19

    Angular mining conveyor provided with a drag chain extending along the axis of its path of movement, and a corner member, inside which the drag chain is led in a forced way, characterized in that the drag chain, where its path curves around the corner member, is located by supporting of the vertical links of the chain along the required curved section of the conveyor path around said corner member, and the supporting line of the links is so chosen, that, within the said curved section of the conveyor path, a space is maintained between the vertical end surface of the scrapers and the outer curved surface of the radially inner side wall of a corner trough associated with the corner member, through which corner trough the scrapers pass. 10 figs.

  13. Global Plate Velocities from the Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Philipsen, Steven

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed 204 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the global GPS network spanning January 1991 through March 1996. On the basis of these GPS coordinate solutions, we have estimated velocities for 38 sites, mostly located on the interiors of the Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Eurasia, Nazca, North America, Pacific, and South America plates. The uncertainties of the horizontal velocity components range from 1.2 to 5.0 mm/yr. With the exception of sites on the Pacific and Nazca plates, the GPS velocities agree with absolute plate model predictions within 95% confidence. For most of the sites in North America, Antarctica, and Eurasia, the agreement is better than 2 mm/yr. We find no persuasive evidence for significant vertical motions (less than 3 standard deviations), except at four sites. Three of these four were sites constrained to geodetic reference frame velocities. The GPS velocities were then used to estimate angular velocities for eight tectonic plates. Absolute angular velocities derived from the GPS data agree with the no net rotation (NNR) NUVEL-1A model within 95% confidence except for the Pacific plate. Our pole of rotation for the Pacific plate lies 11.5 deg west of the NNR NUVEL-1A pole, with an angular speed 10% faster. Our relative angular velocities agree with NUVEL-1A except for some involving the Pacific plate. While our Pacific-North America angular velocity differs significantly from NUVEL-1A, our model and NUVEL-1A predict very small differences in relative motion along the Pacific-North America plate boundary itself. Our Pacific-Australia and Pacific- Eurasia angular velocities are significantly faster than NUVEL-1A, predicting more rapid convergence at these two plate boundaries. Along the East Pacific Pise, our Pacific-Nazca angular velocity agrees in both rate and azimuth with NUVFL-1A.

  14. On the spherical harmonic expansion of the neutron angular distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depken, Sven

    1959-03-15

    The neutron (one-velocity) angular distribution function is expanded in terms of spherical harmonic tensors. The solution to the equations of the moments is given explicitly and the result is applied to the plane, spherical and cylinder symmetrical cases.

  15. On the spherical harmonic expansion of the neutron angular distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depken, Sven

    1959-03-01

    The neutron (one-velocity) angular distribution function is expanded in terms of spherical harmonic tensors. The solution to the equations of the moments is given explicitly and the result is applied to the plane, spherical and cylinder symmetrical cases

  16. Demonstrating the Conservation of Angular Momentum Using Model Cars Moving along a Rotating Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an exciting non-traditional experiment for our introductory physics laboratories to help students to understand the principle of conservation of angular momentum. We used electric toy cars moving along a long rotating rod. As the cars move towards the centre of the rod, the angular velocity of this system increases.…

  17. Angular integrals in d dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, Gabor

    2011-01-15

    We discuss the evaluation of certain d dimensional angular integrals which arise in perturbative field theory calculations. We find that the angular integral with n denominators can be computed in terms of a certain special function, the so-called H-function of several variables. We also present several illustrative examples of the general result and briefly consider some applications. (orig.)

  18. Angular momentum in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cresswell, A.; Zimmerman, R.L.; Oregon Univ., Eugene

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that the correct expressions for the angular momentum flux carried by gravitational radiation should follow directly from the momentum currents. Following this approach, the authors compute the angular momentum associated with several different choices of energy-momentum prescriptions. (author)

  19. Angular integrals in d dimensions.

    OpenAIRE

    Somogyi, G.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the evaluation of certain d dimensional angular integrals which arise in perturbative field theory calculations. We find that the angular integral with n denominators can be computed in terms of a certain special function, the so-called H-function of several variables. We also present several illustrative examples of the general result and briefly consider some applications.

  20. Angular integrals in d dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the evaluation of certain d-dimensional angular integrals which arise in perturbative field theory calculations. We find that the angular integral with n denominators can be computed in terms of a certain special function, the so-called H-function of several variables. We also present several illustrative examples of the general result and briefly consider some applications.

  1. Angular integrals in d dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Gábor

    2011-08-01

    We discuss the evaluation of certain d-dimensional angular integrals which arise in perturbative field theory calculations. We find that the angular integral with n denominators can be computed in terms of a certain special function, the so-called H-function of several variables. We also present several illustrative examples of the general result and briefly consider some applications.

  2. Angular integrals in d dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the evaluation of certain d dimensional angular integrals which arise in perturbative field theory calculations. We find that the angular integral with n denominators can be computed in terms of a certain special function, the so-called H-function of several variables. We also present several illustrative examples of the general result and briefly consider some applications. (orig.)

  3. Angular Momentum in Dwarf Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Popolo A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the “angular momentum catastrophe” in the framework of interaction among baryons and dark matter through dynamical friction. By means of Del Popolo (2009 model we simulate 14 galaxies similar to those investigated by van den Bosch, Burkert and Swaters (2001, and calculate the distribution of their spin parameters and the angular momenta. Our model gives the angular momentum distribution which is in agreement with the van den Bosch et al. observations. Our result shows that the “angular momentum catastrophe” can be naturally solved in a model that takes into account the baryonic physics and the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the baryonic clumps and dark matter through dynamical friction.

  4. Critical mass flux for flaming ignition of dead, dry wood as a function of external radiant heat flux and oxidizer flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara McAllister; Mark Finney; Jack Cohen

    2010-01-01

    Extreme weather often contributes to crown fires, where the fire spreads from one tree crown to the next as a series of piloted ignitions. An important aspect in predicting crown fires is understanding the ignition of fuel particles. The ignition criterion considered in this work is the critical mass flux criterion – that a sufficient amount of pyrolysis gases must be...

  5. Angular momentum of dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurapati, Sushma; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Pustilnik, Simon; Kamphuis, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Mass and specific angular momentum are two fundamental physical parameters of galaxies. We present measurements of the baryonic mass and specific angular momentum of 11 void dwarf galaxies derived from neutral hydrogen (HI) synthesis data. Rotation curves were measured using 3D and 2D tilted ring fitting routines, and the derived curves generally overlap within the error bars, except in the central regions where, as expected, the 3D routines give steeper curves. The specific angular momentum of void dwarfs is found to be high compared to an extrapolation of the trends seen for higher mass bulge-less spirals, but comparable to that of other dwarf irregular galaxies that lie outside of voids. As such, our data show no evidence for a dependence of the specific angular momentum on the large scale environment. Combining our data with the data from the literature, we find a baryonic threshold of ˜109.1 M⊙ for this increase in specific angular momentum. Interestingly, this threshold is very similar to the mass threshold below which the galaxy discs start to become systematically thicker. This provides qualitative support to the suggestion that the thickening of the discs, as well as the increase in specific angular momentum, are both results of a common physical mechanism, such as feedback from star formation. Quantitatively, however, the amount of star formation observed in our dwarfs appears insufficient to produce the observed increase in specific angular momentum. It is hence likely that other processes, such as cold accretion of high angular momentum gas, also play a role in increasing the specific angular momentum.

  6. The Effects of a 6-Week Strength Training on Critical Velocity, Anaerobic Running Distance, 30-M Sprint and Yo-Yo Intermittent Running Test Performances in Male Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Bettina; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Kandemir, Gokhan; Hazir, Tahir; Klose, Andreas; Naclerio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of a moderate intensity strength training on changes in critical velocity (CV), anaerobic running distance (D'), sprint performance and Yo-Yo intermittent running test (Yo-Yo IR1) performances. two recreational soccer teams were divided in a soccer training only group (SO; n = 13) and a strength and soccer training group (ST; n = 13). Both groups were tested for values of CV, D', Yo-Yo IR1 distance and 30-m sprint time on two separate occasions (pre and post intervention). The ST group performed a concurrent 6-week upper and lower body strength and soccer training, whilst the SO group performed a soccer only training. after the re-test of all variables, the ST demonstrated significant improvements for both, YoYo IR1 distance (p = 0.002) and CV values (psoccer training significantly improves CV, Yo-Yo IR1 whilst moderately improving 30-m sprint performances in non-previously resistance trained male soccer players. Critical Velocity can be recommended to coaches as an additional valid testing tool in soccer.

  7. PELE侵彻10 mm厚均质装甲钢的极限穿透速度和后效研究%Critical Penetration Velocity and Aftereffect of PELE Penetrating RHA With 10 mm Thickness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何俊; 程春; 郑绍君; 王复利; 王韦霞; 蒋洪章

    2017-01-01

    为了研究小口径集束钨丝壳体PELE对10 mm厚均值装甲钢的极限穿透速度和穿靶后的后效情况,应用PELE垂直侵彻薄靶的理论模型对直径23 mm集束钨丝PELE侵彻10 mm厚均质装甲钢进行了理论计算,利用23 mm口径弹道炮进行了侵彻试验研究.研究结果表明:弹丸侵彻10 mm厚均质装甲钢的极限穿透速度为623.7 m/s;当着靶速度为685.2 m/s以上时,该弹丸侵彻10 mm厚均质装甲后可产生良好的横向效应,试验结果和理论计算结果基本吻合.%In order to study the critical penetration velocity and aftereffect of small-caliber cluster tungsten-fiber penetrator with enhanced lateral efficiency ( PELE ) penetrating rolled homogeneous armor ( RHA) with 10 mm thickness, the theoretical calculation of cluster tungsten-fiber PELE of 23 mm diameter penetrating RHA with 10 mm thickness was carried out by using the theoretical model of PELE vertically penetrating thin metallic plate. The penetration experiment by using ballistic gun with 23 mm caliber was conducted. The results show that the critical penetration velocity is 623. 7 m/s,and the PELE can produce good aftereffect after penetrating RHA with 10 mm thickness while the impact velocity is more than 685. 2 m/s. The experimental result accords with the theoretical calculation result.

  8. AngularJS testing cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for developers who have an understanding of the basic principles behind both AngularJS and test-driven development. You, as a developer, are interested in eliminating the fear related to either introducing tests to an existing codebase or starting out testing on a fresh AngularJS application. If you're a team leader or part of a QA team with the responsibility of ensuring full test coverage of an application, then this book is ideal for you to comprehend the full testing scope required by your developers. Whether you're new to or are well versed with AngularJS, this book

  9. The Csub(N) method in cylindrical geometry and one-velocity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavenoky, A.

    1975-01-01

    The Csub(N) method of solving the transport equation has been developed at Saclay during the last few years: its main advantage is that the computing time is independent of the size of the media considered. This method is based on a lemma proved by Placzek: an integral equation is provided for the angular flux at the boundaries of the media, its kernel is the infinite medium Green's function. The knowledge of the angular flux at the boundaries of the media allows the fluxes to be calculated at any point. The report is devoted to the application to classical problems in one velocity cylindrical geometry: albedo of the inner and outer problems, extrapolation length for the Milne problem, critical radius [fr

  10. Angular momentum from tidal torques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Efstathiou, G.; Cambridge Univ., England)

    1987-01-01

    The origin of the angular momentum of bound objects in large N-body simulations is studied using three sets of models. One model with white-noise initial conditions is analyzed as well as two in which the initial conditions have more power on large scales, as predicted in models with cold dark matter. The growth and distribution of angular momentum in individual objects is studied and it is found that the specific angular momentum distribution of bound clumps increases in a near linear fashion with radius while the orientation of the angular momentum in the inner high-density regions is often poorly correlated with that of the outer parts. It is also found that the dimensionless spin parameter is insensitive to the initial perturbation spectrum and has a median value of about 0.05. 61 references

  11. Lidar Orbital Angular Momentum Sensor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The recognition in recent decades that electromagnetic fields have angular momentum (AM) in the form of not only polarization (or spin AM) but also orbital (OAM) has...

  12. Angular distributions of ions channeled in the Si crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, S.; Korica, S.; Kokkoris, M.; Neskovic, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we analyze the angular distributions of Ne 10+ ions channeled in the Si crystals. The ion energy is 60 MeV and the crystal thickness is varied from 286 to 3435 nm. This thickness range corresponds to the reduced crystal thickness range from 0.5 to 6, i.e. from the second to the twelfth rainbow cycle. The angular distributions were obtained via the numerical solution of the ion equations of motion and the computer simulation method. The analysis shows that the angular distribution has a periodic behavior. We also analyze the transmission patterns corresponding to the angular distributions. These patterns should be compared to the experimental patterns obtainable by a two-dimensional position sensitive detector. We demonstrate that, when the ion beam divergence is sufficiently large, i.e. much larger than the critical angle for channeling, the channeling star effect occurs in the transmission patterns

  13. Dynamical critical scaling of electric field fluctuations in the greater cusp and magnetotail implied by HF radar observations of F-region Doppler velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Akasofu's solar wind ε parameter describes the coupling of solar wind energy to the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Analysis of fluctuations in ε using model independent scaling techniques including the peaks of probability density functions (PDFs and generalised structure function (GSF analysis show the fluctuations were self-affine (mono-fractal, single exponent scaling over 9 octaves of time scale from ~46 s to ~9.1 h. However, the peak scaling exponent α0 was a function of the fluctuation bin size, so caution is required when comparing the exponents for different data sets sampled in different ways. The same generic scaling techniques revealed the organisation and functional form of concurrent fluctuations in azimuthal magnetospheric electric fields implied by SuperDARN HF radar measurements of line-of-sight Doppler velocity, vLOS, made in the high-latitude austral ionosphere. The PDFs of vLOS fluctuation were calculated for time scales between 1 min and 256 min, and were sorted into noon sector results obtained with the Halley radar, and midnight sector results obtained with the TIGER radar. The PDFs were further sorted according to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field, as well as ionospheric regions of high and low Doppler spectral width. High spectral widths tend to occur at higher latitude, mostly on open field lines but also on closed field lines just equatorward of the open-closed boundary, whereas low spectral widths are concentrated on closed field lines deeper inside the magnetosphere. The vLOS fluctuations were most self-affine (i.e. like the solar wind ε parameter on the high spectral width field lines in the noon sector ionosphere (i.e. the greater cusp, but suggested multi-fractal behaviour on closed field lines in the midnight sector (i.e. the central plasma sheet. Long tails in the PDFs imply that "microbursts" in ionospheric convection

  14. Dynamical critical scaling of electric field fluctuations in the greater cusp and magnetotail implied by HF radar observations of F-region Doppler velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Akasofu's solar wind ε parameter describes the coupling of solar wind energy to the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Analysis of fluctuations in ε using model independent scaling techniques including the peaks of probability density functions (PDFs and generalised structure function (GSF analysis show the fluctuations were self-affine (mono-fractal, single exponent scaling over 9 octaves of time scale from ~46 s to ~9.1 h. However, the peak scaling exponent α0 was a function of the fluctuation bin size, so caution is required when comparing the exponents for different data sets sampled in different ways. The same generic scaling techniques revealed the organisation and functional form of concurrent fluctuations in azimuthal magnetospheric electric fields implied by SuperDARN HF radar measurements of line-of-sight Doppler velocity, vLOS, made in the high-latitude austral ionosphere. The PDFs of vLOS fluctuation were calculated for time scales between 1 min and 256 min, and were sorted into noon sector results obtained with the Halley radar, and midnight sector results obtained with the TIGER radar. The PDFs were further sorted according to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field, as well as ionospheric regions of high and low Doppler spectral width. High spectral widths tend to occur at higher latitude, mostly on open field lines but also on closed field lines just equatorward of the open-closed boundary, whereas low spectral widths are concentrated on closed field lines deeper inside the magnetosphere. The vLOS fluctuations were most self-affine (i.e. like the solar wind ε parameter on the high spectral width field lines in the noon sector ionosphere (i.e. the greater cusp, but suggested multi-fractal behaviour on closed field lines in the midnight sector (i.e. the central plasma sheet. Long tails in the PDFs imply that "microbursts" in ionospheric convection occur far more frequently, especially on open field lines, than can be

  15. Angular Momentum Transport in Turbulent Flow between Independently Rotating Cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paoletti, M. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular momentum flux (torque) in Taylor-Couette flow of water between independently rotating cylinders for all regions of the (Ω 1 , Ω 2 ) parameter space at high Reynolds numbers, where Ω 1 (Ω 2 ) is the inner (outer) cylinder angular velocity. We find that the Rossby number Ro=(Ω 1 -Ω 2 )/Ω 2 fully determines the state and torque G as compared to G(Ro=∞)≡G ∞ . The ratio G/G ∞ is a linear function of Ro -1 in four sections of the parameter space. For flows with radially increasing angular momentum, our measured torques greatly exceed those of previous experiments [Ji et al., Nature (London), 444, 343 (2006)], but agree with the analysis of Richard and Zahn [Astron. Astrophys. 347, 734 (1999)].

  16. Angular response of hot wire probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Mare, L; Jelly, T O; Day, I J

    2017-01-01

    A new equation for the convective heat loss from the sensor of a hot-wire probe is derived which accounts for both the potential and the viscous parts of the flow past the prongs. The convective heat loss from the sensor is related to the far-field velocity by an expression containing a term representing the potential flow around the prongs, and a term representing their viscous effect. This latter term is absent in the response equations available in the literature but is essential in representing some features of the observed response of miniature hot-wire probes. The response equation contains only four parameters but it can reproduce, with great accuracy, the behaviour of commonly used single-wire probes. The response equation simplifies the calibration the angular response of rotated slanted hot-wire probes: only standard King’s law parameters and a Reynolds-dependent drag coefficient need to be determined. (paper)

  17. Uncertainty principle for angular position and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Barnett, Stephen M; Yao, Eric; Leach, Jonathan; Courtial, Johannes; Padgett, Miles

    2004-01-01

    The uncertainty principle places fundamental limits on the accuracy with which we are able to measure the values of different physical quantities (Heisenberg 1949 The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory (New York: Dover); Robertson 1929 Phys. Rev. 34 127). This has profound effects not only on the microscopic but also on the macroscopic level of physical systems. The most familiar form of the uncertainty principle relates the uncertainties in position and linear momentum. Other manifestations include those relating uncertainty in energy to uncertainty in time duration, phase of an electromagnetic field to photon number and angular position to angular momentum (Vaccaro and Pegg 1990 J. Mod. Opt. 37 17; Barnett and Pegg 1990 Phys. Rev. A 41 3427). In this paper, we report the first observation of the last of these uncertainty relations and derive the associated states that satisfy the equality in the uncertainty relation. We confirm the form of these states by detailed measurement of the angular momentum of a light beam after passage through an appropriate angular aperture. The angular uncertainty principle applies to all physical systems and is particularly important for systems with cylindrical symmetry

  18. Electromagnetic angular positioner based on DC micromotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodnicki Maciej

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented works concerned launching of an angular positioner powered by an electromagnetic actuator, designed for performing angular micromovements within a range of few microradians. The principle of operation is based on balancing the electromagnetic torque of the motor with a torque that is twisting a compliant element. As electrodynamic actuators have no distinguished controlled positions, therefore in typical positioning systems desired positions are obtained applying a closed-loop position control. Usually, such systems employ also a feedback (dumping related to velocity of the moving elements, what simplifies forming of dynamics of the system. The design of the physical model employs a DC micromotor, whose rotor is coupled with a torsional torquemeter. A feedback signal is generated by resistive strain gauges. The paper presents a mathematical model of the positioning system, results of simulation study as well as results of experimental study. The simulation study indicates that it is possible to select such design features and such type of the micoromotor that a high dynamics of positioning is ensured.

  19. Angular momentum transfer in steady disk accretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatskij, V.G.

    1977-01-01

    The conditions of steady disk accretion have been investigated. The disk axisymmetric model is considered. It is shown that the gas is let at the outer boundary of the disk with the azimuthal velocity which is slightly less than the Kepler circular one. Gas possesses the motion quality moment which is transferred from the outer layers of the disk to the surface of the star. The steady state of the disk preserved until the inflow of the moment to the star increases its rotation velocity up to magnitudes close to the critical one

  20. Helicity and evanescent waves. [Energy transport velocity, helicity, Lorentz transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agudin, J L; Platzeck, A M [La Plata Univ. Nacional (Argentina); Albano, J R [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    1978-02-20

    It is shown that the projection of the angular momentum of a circularly polarized electromagnetic evanescent wave along the mean velocity of energy transport (=helicity) can be reverted by a Lorentz transformation, in spite of the fact that this velocity is c.

  1. Stellar Angular Momentum Distributions and Preferential Radial Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Rosemary; Daniel, Kathryne J.

    2018-04-01

    I will present some results from our recent investigations into the efficiency of radial migration in stellar disks of differing angular momentum distributions, within a given adopted 2D spiral disk potential. We apply to our models an analytic criterion that determines whether or not individual stars are in orbits that could lead to radial migration around the corotation resonance. We couch our results in terms of the local stellar velocity dispersion and find that the fraction of stars that could migrate radially decreases as the velocity dispersion increases. I will discuss implications and comparisons with the results of other approaches.

  2. Instant AngularJS starter

    CERN Document Server

    Menard, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This book is written in an easytoread style, with a strong emphasis on realworld, practical examples. Stepbystep explanations are provided for performing important tasks.This book is for web developers familiar with JavascriptIt doesn't cover the history of AngularJS, and it's not a pitch to convince you that AngularJS is the best framework on the entire web. It's a guide to help you learn everything you need to know about AngularJS in as few pa

  3. Angular momentum transfer in primordial discs and the rotation of the first stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Bromm, Volker

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the rotation velocity of the first stars by modelling the angular momentum transfer in the primordial accretion disc. Assessing the impact of magnetic braking, we consider the transition in angular momentum transport mode at the Alfvén radius, from the dynamically dominated free-fall accretion to the magnetically dominated solid-body one. The accreting protostar at the centre of the primordial star-forming cloud rotates with close to breakup speed in the case without magnetic fields. Considering a physically motivated model for small-scale turbulent dynamo amplification, we find that stellar rotation speed quickly declines if a large fraction of the initial turbulent energy is converted to magnetic energy (≳ 0.14). Alternatively, if the dynamo process were inefficient, for amplification due to flux freezing, stars would become slow rotators if the pre-galactic magnetic field strength is above a critical value, ≃10-8.2 G, evaluated at a scale of nH = 1 cm-3, which is significantly higher than plausible cosmological seed values (˜10-15 G). Because of the rapid decline of the stellar rotational speed over a narrow range in model parameters, the first stars encounter a bimodal fate: rapid rotation at almost the breakup level, or the near absence of any rotation.

  4. Massive star formation by accretion. II. Rotation: how to circumvent the angular momentum barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerlé, L.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Charbonnel, C.; Klessen, R. S.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Rotation plays a key role in the star-formation process, from pre-stellar cores to pre-main-sequence (PMS) objects. Understanding the formation of massive stars requires taking into account the accretion of angular momentum during their PMS phase. Aims: We study the PMS evolution of objects destined to become massive stars by accretion, focusing on the links between the physical conditions of the environment and the rotational properties of young stars. In particular, we look at the physical conditions that allow the production of massive stars by accretion. Methods: We present PMS models computed with a new version of the Geneva Stellar Evolution code self-consistently including accretion and rotation according to various accretion scenarios for mass and angular momentum. We describe the internal distribution of angular momentum in PMS stars accreting at high rates and we show how the various physical conditions impact their internal structures, evolutionary tracks, and rotation velocities during the PMS and the early main sequence. Results: We find that the smooth angular momentum accretion considered in previous studies leads to an angular momentum barrier and does not allow the formation of massive stars by accretion. A braking mechanism is needed in order to circumvent this angular momentum barrier. This mechanism has to be efficient enough to remove more than two thirds of the angular momentum from the inner accretion disc. Due to the weak efficiency of angular momentum transport by shear instability and meridional circulation during the accretion phase, the internal rotation profiles of accreting stars reflect essentially the angular momentum accretion history. As a consequence, careful choice of the angular momentum accretion history allows circumvention of any limitation in mass and velocity, and production of stars of any mass and velocity compatible with structure equations.

  5. Automated Angular Momentum Recoupling Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H. T.; Silbar, Richard R.

    1992-04-01

    We present a set of heuristic rules for algebraic solution of angular momentum recoupling problems. The general problem reduces to that of finding an optimal path from one binary tree (representing the angular momentum coupling scheme for the reduced matrix element) to another (representing the sub-integrals and spin sums to be done). The method lends itself to implementation on a microcomputer, and we have developed such an implementation using a dialect of LISP. We describe both how our code, called RACAH, works and how it appears to the user. We illustrate the use of RACAH for several transition and scattering amplitude matrix elements occurring in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics.

  6. Angular Momentum and Galaxy Formation Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j sstarf and mass M sstarf (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j sstarf reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j sstarf in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of ~100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j sstarf versus M sstarf. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j sstarf-M sstarf tracks, with log-slopes of ~0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of ~3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and ~7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j sstarf-M sstarf trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow separate, fundamental j sstarf

  7. Angular Momentum in Disk Wind Revealed in the Young Star MWC 349A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Claus, Brian; Watson, Linda; Moran, James, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Disk winds are thought to play a critical role in star birth. As winds extract excess angular momentum from accretion disks, matter in the disk can be transported inward to the star to fuel mass growth. However, observational evidence of wind carrying angular momentum has been very limited. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the young star MWC 349A in the H26 α and H30 α recombination lines. The high signal-to-noise ratios made possible by the maser emission process allow us to constrain the relative astrometry of the maser spots to milli-arcsecond precision. Previous observations of the H30 α line with the SMA and the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) showed that masers are distributed in the disk and wind. Our new high-resolution observations of the H26 α line reveal differences in spatial distribution from that of the H30 α line. H26 α line masers in the disk are excited in a thin annulus with a radius of about 25 au, while the H30 α line masers are formed in a slightly larger annulus with a radius of 30 au. This is consistent with expectations for maser excitation in the presence of an electron density variation of approximately R {sup −4}. In addition, the H30 α and H26 α line masers arise from different parts in the wind. This difference is also expected from maser theory. The wind component of both masers exhibits line-of-sight velocities that closely follow a Keplerian law. This result provides strong evidence that the disk wind extracts significant angular momentum, thereby facilitating mass accretion in the young star.

  8. EVOLUTION OF ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES OF A-TYPE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wuming; Bi Shaolan; Tian Zhijia; Meng Xiangcun

    2013-01-01

    The equatorial velocity of A-type stars undergoes an acceleration in the first third of the main sequence (MS) stage, but the velocity decreases as if the stars were not undergoing any redistribution of angular momentum in the external layers in the last stage of the MS phase. Our calculations show that the acceleration and the decrease of the equatorial velocity can be reproduced by the evolution of the differential rotation zero-age MS model with the angular momentum transport caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the MS stage. The acceleration results from the fact that the angular momentum stored in the interiors of the stars is transported outward. In the last stage, the core and the radiative envelope are uncoupling, and the rotation of the envelope is a quasi-solid rotation; the uncoupling and the expansion of the envelope indicate that the decrease of the equatorial velocity approximately follows the slope for the change in the equatorial velocity of the model without any redistribution of angular momentum. When the fractional age 0.3 ∼ MS ∼< 0.5, the equatorial velocity remains almost constant for stars whose central density increases with age in the early stage of the MS phase, while the velocity decreases with age for stars whose central density decreases with age in the early stage of the MS phase.

  9. High angular resolution at LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, A.; Arcidiacono, C.; Bertero, M.; Boccacci, P.; Davies, A. G.; Defrere, D.; de Kleer, K.; De Pater, I.; Hinz, P.; Hofmann, K. H.; La Camera, A.; Leisenring, J.; Kürster, M.; Rathbun, J. A.; Schertl, D.; Skemer, A.; Skrutskie, M.; Spencer, J. R.; Veillet, C.; Weigelt, G.; Woodward, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    High angular resolution from ground-based observatories stands as a key technology for advancing planetary science. In the window between the angular resolution achievable with 8-10 meter class telescopes, and the 23-to-40 meter giants of the future, LBT provides a glimpse of what the next generation of instruments providing higher angular resolution will provide. We present first ever resolved images of an Io eruption site taken from the ground, images of Io's Loki Patera taken with Fizeau imaging at the 22.8 meter LBT [Conrad, et al., AJ, 2015]. We will also present preliminary analysis of two data sets acquired during the 2015 opposition: L-band fringes at Kurdalagon and an occultation of Loki and Pele by Europa (see figure). The light curves from this occultation will yield an order of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution along the path of ingress and egress. We will conclude by providing an overview of the overall benefit of recent and future advances in angular resolution for planetary science.

  10. Angular momentum projection with Pfaffian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments to rewrite the Onishi formula for an evaluation of the so-called norm overlap kernel necessary in angular momentum projection are to be discussed. The essential ingredients in the development, that is, the Fermion coherent states, the Grassmann numbers, and the Pfaffian, are explained. (author)

  11. Angular overlap model in actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative foundations of the Angular Overlap Model in actinides based on ab initio calculations of the crystal field effect in the uranium (III) (IV) and (V) ions in various crystals are presented. The calculations justify some common simplifications of the model and fix up the relations between the AOM parameters. Traps and limitations of the AOM phenomenology are discussed

  12. Angular overlap model in actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J. (Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (PL). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych)

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative foundations of the Angular Overlap Model in actinides based on ab initio calculations of the crystal field effect in the uranium (III) (IV) and (V) ions in various crystals are presented. The calculations justify some common simplifications of the model and fix up the relations between the AOM parameters. Traps and limitations of the AOM phenomenology are discussed.

  13. Angular momentum in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The definition of angular momentum proposed in part I of this series (Prior. Proc. R. Soc. Lond.; A354:379 (1977)) is investigated when applied to rotating black holes. It is shown how to use the formula to evaluate the angular momentum of a stationary black hole. This acts as a description of a background space on which the effect of first matter and then gravitational perturbations is considered. The latter are of most interest and the rate of change of angular momentum, dJ/dt, is found as an expression in the shear induced in the event horizon by the perturbation and in its time integral. Teukolsky's solutions (Astrophys. J.; 185:635 (1973)) for the perturbed component of the Weyl tensor are then used to find this shear and hence to give an exact answer for dJ/dt. One of the implications of the result is a direct verification of Bekenstein's formula (Phys. Rev.; 7D:949 (1973)) relating in a simple way the rate of change of angular momentum to the rate of change of mass caused by a plane wave. A more general expression is also given for dM/dt. Considering only stationary perturbations, it is shown how to generalize the definition of angular momentum so as to include information about its direction as well. Three problems are particularly discussed - a single moon, two or more moons and a ring of matter causing the perturbation - since they provide illustrations of all the main features of the black hole's behaviour. In every case it is found that the black hole realigns its axis of rotation so that the final configuration is axisymmetric if possible; otherwise is slows down completely to reach a static state. (author)

  14. Characterization of the Bell-Shaped Vibratory Angular Rate Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfang Fan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The bell-shaped vibratory angular rate gyro (abbreviated as BVG is a novel shell vibratory gyroscope, which is inspired by the Chinese traditional bell. It sensitizes angular velocity through the standing wave precession effect. The bell-shaped resonator is a core component of the BVG and looks like the millimeter-grade Chinese traditional bell, such as QianLong Bell and Yongle Bell. It is made of Ni43CrTi, which is a constant modulus alloy. The exciting element, control element and detection element are uniformly distributed and attached to the resonator, respectively. This work presents the design, analysis and experimentation on the BVG. It is most important to analyze the vibratory character of the bell-shaped resonator. The strain equation, internal force and the resonator's equilibrium differential equation are derived in the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. When the input angular velocity is existent on the sensitive axis, an analysis of the vibratory character is performed using the theory of thin shells. On this basis, the mode shape function and the simplified second order normal vibration mode dynamical equation are obtained. The coriolis coupling relationship about the primary mode and secondary mode is established. The methods of the signal processing and control loop are presented. Analyzing the impact resistance property of the bell-shaped resonator, which is compared with other shell resonators using the Finite Element Method, demonstrates that BVG has the advantage of a better impact resistance property. A reasonable means of installation and a prototypal gyro are designed. The gyroscopic effect of the BVG is characterized through experiments. Experimental results show that the BVG has not only the advantages of low cost, low power, long work life, high sensitivity, and so on, but, also, of a simple structure and a better impact resistance property for low and medium angular velocity measurements.

  15. Velocity slice imaging for dissociative electron attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Dhananjay; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S.; Krishnakumar, E.; Chatterjee, A.

    2005-05-01

    A velocity slice imaging method is developed for measuring the angular distribution of fragment negative ions arising from dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to molecules. A low energy pulsed electron gun, a pulsed field ion extraction, and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector consisting of microchannel plates and a wedge-and-strip anode are used for this purpose. Detection and storage of each ion separately for its position and flight time allows analysis of the data offline for any given time slice, without resorting to pulsing the detector bias. The performance of the system is evaluated by measuring the angular distribution of O- from O2 and comparing it with existing data obtained using conventional technique. The capability of this technique in obtaining forward and backward angular distribution data is shown to have helped in resolving one of the existing problems in the electron scattering on O2.

  16. Observation of Coherent and Incoherent Dissociation Mechanisms in the Angular Distribution of Atomic Photofragment Alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracker, A.S.; Lee, Y.T.; Bracker, A.S.; Wouters, E.R.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.; Lee, Y.T.; Vasyutinskii, O.S.

    1998-01-01

    We have analyzed the recoil angle dependence of chlorine atom angular momentum alignment for the dissociation of chlorine molecules at 355nm. This angular distribution was isolated from ion image measurements, which map a three-dimensional velocity vector distribution of state-selectively-ionized photofragments into a two-dimensional spatial distribution. Using a general quantum mechanical method to simulate the alignment angular distribution, we show that there are clear contributions to alignment from both incoherent and coherent components of a perpendicular optical transition in the molecule. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  17. On Dunkl angular momenta algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feigin, Misha [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Glasgow,15 University Gardens, Glasgow G12 8QW (United Kingdom); Hakobyan, Tigran [Yerevan State University,1 Alex Manoogian, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Tomsk Polytechnic University,Lenin Ave. 30, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    We consider the quantum angular momentum generators, deformed by means of the Dunkl operators. Together with the reflection operators they generate a subalgebra in the rational Cherednik algebra associated with a finite real reflection group. We find all the defining relations of the algebra, which appear to be quadratic, and we show that the algebra is of Poincaré-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) type. We show that this algebra contains the angular part of the Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian and that together with constants it generates the centre of the algebra. We also consider the gl(N) version of the subalgebra of the rational Cherednik algebra and show that it is a non-homogeneous quadratic algebra of PBW type as well. In this case the central generator can be identified with the usual Calogero-Moser Hamiltonian associated with the Coxeter group in the harmonic confinement.

  18. Angular momentum in QGP holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The quark chemical potential is one of the fundamental parameters describing the quark–gluon plasma produced by sufficiently energetic heavy-ion collisions. It is not large at the extremely high temperatures probed by the LHC, but it plays a key role in discussions of the beam energy scan programmes at the RHIC and other facilities. On the other hand, collisions at such energies typically (that is, in peripheral collisions give rise to very high values of the angular momentum density. Here we explain that holographic estimates of the quark chemical potential of a rotating sample of plasma can be very considerably improved by taking the angular momentum into account.

  19. Angular momentum content of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaya, E.J.; Tully, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    A schema of galaxy formation is developed in which the environmental influence of large-scale structure plays a dominant role. This schema was motivated by the observation that the fraction of E and S0 galaxies is much higher in clusters than in low-density regions and by an inference that those spirals that are found in clusters probably have fallen in relatively recently from the low-density regions. It is proposed that the tidal field of the Local Supercluster acts to determine the morphology of galaxies through two complementary mechanisms. In the first place, the supercluster can apply torques to protogalaxies. Galaxies which collapsed while expanding away from the central cluster decoupled from the external tidal field and conserved the angular momentum that they acquired before collapse. Galaxies which formed in the cluster while the cluster collapsed continued to feel the tidal field. In the latter case, the spin of outer collapsing layers can be halted and reversed, and tends to cancel the spin of inner layers. The result is a reduction of the total angular momentum content of the galaxy. In addition, the supercluster tidal field can regulate accretion of fresh material onto the galaxies since the field creates a Roche limit about galaxies and material beyond this limit is lost. Any material that has not collapsed onto a galaxy by the time the galaxy falls into a cluster will be tidally stripped. The angular momentum content of that part of the protogalactic cloud which has not yet collapsed . continues to grow linearly with time due to the continued torquing by the supercluster and neighbors. Galaxies at large distances from the cluster core can continue to accrete this high angular momentum material until the present, but galaxies that enter the cluster are cut off from replenishing material

  20. Angular dependence of shallow dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical response of a detector is discussed and compared to measurements of shallow dose with tissue and phantom response detectors. A definite energy dependent angular response of dose and measurement was observed which could not be explained by simple trigonometric arguments. The response is back scatter dependent and must be considered in detector design and dose measurements. It is not possible for standard detectors to follow this response

  1. AngularJS test-driven development

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This book is for developers who want to learn about AngularJS development by applying testing techniques. You are assumed to have a basic knowledge and understanding of HTML, JavaScript, and AngularJS.

  2. Angular-momentum transport in nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolschin, G.; Ayik, S.; Noerenberg, W.

    1978-01-01

    Among the various relaxation processes that can be observed in heavy-ion collisions, the dissipation of relative angular momentum into intrinsic angular momentum of the fragments attracts increasing attention. Here we present a transport theoretical description of angular-momentum and mass transport that allows for a transparent interpretation of the data. (orig.) [de

  3. AngularJS web application development

    CERN Document Server

    Darwin, Peter Bacon

    2013-01-01

    The book will be a step-by-step guide showing the readers how to build a complete web app with AngularJSJavaScript developers who want to learn AngularJS for developing web apps. Knowledge of JavaScript and HTML is expected. No knowledge of AngularJS is required.

  4. Angular evolution of peripheral heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Chomaz, P.; Frascaria, N.; Garron, J.P.; Jacmart, J.C; Roynette, J.C

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectra and angular distributions of projectile-like fragments have been measured in the vicinity of the grazing angle for the 40 Ar+ 40 Ca and 40 Ar+ 208 Pb reactions at 44MeV/nucleon. Measurements of the 40 Ar+ 40 Ca system at 27MeV/nucleon and 20 Ne+ 208 Pb reaction at 44MeV/nucleon at one angle have also been performed. For fragments with charge and mass close to the projectile numerous deviations from the standard fragmentation model have been observed including rapidly changing shapes of the angular distributions with the fragment mass. Moreover the isotopic distributions and mean fragment velocities are strongly dependent on detection angle. A surface transfer reaction component dominant at the grazing angle can be separated from a second component which cannot be entirely accounted for by a simple fragmentation mechanism

  5. Alternative methods in criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicini, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis two new methods of calculating the criticality of a nuclear system are introduced and verified. Most methods of determining the criticality of a nuclear system depend implicitly upon knowledge of the angular flux, net currents, or moments of the angular flux, on the system surface in order to know the leakage. For small systems, leakage is the predominant element in criticality calculations. Unfortunately, in these methods the least accurate fluxes, currents, or moments are those occurring near system surfaces or interfaces. This is due to a mathematical inability to satisfy rigorously with a finite order angular polynomial expansion or angular difference technique the physical boundary conditions which occur on these surfaces. Consequently, one must accept large computational effort or less precise criticality calculations. The methods introduced in this thesis, including a direct leakage operator and an indirect multiple scattering leakage operator, obviate the need to know angular fluxes accurately at system boundaries. Instead, the system wide scalar flux, an integral quantity which is substantially easier to obtain with good precision is sufficient to obtain production, absorption, scattering, and leakage rates

  6. Alternative methods in criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicini, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two new methods of calculating the criticality of a nuclear system are introduced and verified. Most methods of determining the criticality of a nuclear system depend implicitly upon knowledge of the angular flux, net currents, or moments of the angular flux, on the system surface in order to know the leakage. For small systems, leakage is the predominant element in criticality calculations. Unfortunately, in these methods the least accurate fluxes, currents, or moments are those occuring near system surfaces or interfaces. This is due to a mathematical inability to satisfy rigorously with a finite order angular polynomial expansion or angular difference technique the physical boundary conditions which occur on these surfaces. Consequently, one must accept large computational effort or less precise criticality calculations. The methods introduced in this thesis, including a direct leakage operator and an indirect multiple scattering leakage operator, obviate the need to know angular fluxes accurately at system boundaries. Instead, the system wide scalar flux, an integral quantity which is substantially easier to obtain with good precision, is sufficient to obtain production, absorption, scattering, and leakage rates

  7. Análise das velocidades: referencial de 4mM, de equilíbrio de 30 min e velocidade crítica em nadadoras adolescentes Velocities analysis: 4 mM reference, 30 min steady-state and critical velocity in female adolescent swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilson Colantonio

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os resultados do cálculo da velocidade de limiar anaeróbio (Lan, correspondente a 4mM de lactato, obtidos em testes de 2 x 400m (V4-2, 4 x 400m (V4-4 e a velocidade crítica (VC relacionando-as com a velocidade média determinada no teste de 30 min (VMT30 em nadadoras adolescentes. METODOLOGIA: Participaram deste estudo 20 nadadoras (14,36 ± 1,22 anos; 52,75 ± 5,32kg; 159,97 ± 11,26cm; 22,5 ± 4,73% gordura corporal de nível regional e estadual com pelo menos dois anos de treinamento sistemático. Testes realizados: Teste de 30 min (VMT30, Teste de duas distâncias (V4-2, Teste de quatro distâncias (V4-4 e Velocidade Crítica (VC. Análise estatística: o procedimento adotado para a comparação de todas as metodologias, duas a duas, foi a técnica de análise de regressão simples. RESULTADOS: As velocidades médias dos testes foram: VMT30: 1,12 ± 0,06m/s; V4-2: 1,14 ± 0,12m/s; V4-4: 1,12 ± 0,06m/s e a VC média: 1,14 ± 0,07m/s. Análise de regressão simples entre as metodologias duas a duas: V4-4 e V4-2 (r = 0,324, VC e V4-2 (r = 0,058, VMT30 e V4-2 (r = 0,595, VC e V4-4 (r = 0,807, VMT30 e V4-4 (r = 0,796 e VMT30 e VC (r = 0,677. As retas de regressão ajustadas apresentaram em relação à bissetriz os valores de p = 0,3060; 0,1716 e 0,0058. CONCLUSÕES: A determinação da VMT30 constitui-se em um bom instrumento para a prescrição de treinamento para as nadadoras estudadas, o que nem sempre ocorre com o modelo V4-2; a [La] de 4mM com quatro pontos e o cálculo do limiar de lactato através da técnica de efeitos aleatórios, mostrou-se viável para a determinação do Lan para as nadadoras, quando comparada com a VMT30; a VC e V4-4 apresentaram boa correlação assim como a VC e VMT30.OBJECTIVE: To compare the results of the calculation of the anaerobic threshold velocity (AT, corresponding to 4 mM lactate, obtained in 2 x 400 m (V4-2, 4 x 400 m (V4-4 tests and critical velocity (CV relating to the mean

  8. Hot nuclei: high temperatures, high angular momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1991-01-01

    A review is made of the present status concerning the production of hot nuclei above 5 MeV temperature, concentrating mainly on the possible experimental evidences for the attainment of a critical temperature, on the existence of dynamical limitations to the energy deposition and on the experimental signatures for the formation of hot spinning nuclei. The data strongly suggest a nuclear disassembly in collisions involving very heavy ions at moderate incident velocities. Furthermore, hot nuclei seem to be quite stable against rotation on a short time scale. (author) 26 refs.; 12 figs

  9. Parameters determining maximum wind velocity in a tropical cyclone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, A.M.

    1984-09-01

    The spiral structure of a tropical cyclone was earlier explained by a tangential velocity distribution which varies inversely as the distance from the cyclone centre outside the circle of maximum wind speed. The case has been extended in the present paper by adding a radial velocity. It has been found that a suitable combination of radial and tangential velocities can account for the spiral structure of a cyclone. This enables parametrization of the cyclone. Finally a formula has been derived relating maximum velocity in a tropical cyclone with angular momentum, radius of maximum wind speed and the spiral angle. The shapes of the spirals have been computed for various spiral angles. (author)

  10. The role of angular momentum conservation law in statistical mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Dubrovskii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the limits of Khinchin ideas [A.Y. Khinchin, Mathematical Foundation of Statistical Mechanics. NY, Ed. Dover, 1949] the importance of momentum and angular momentum conservation laws was analyzed for two cases: for uniform magnetic field and when magnetic field is absent. The law of momentum conservation does not change the density of probability distribution in both cases, just as it is assumed in the conventional theory. It is shown that in systems where the kinetic energy depends only on particle momenta canonically conjugated with Cartesian coordinates being their diagonal quadric form,the angular momentum conservation law changes the density of distribution of the system only in case the full angular momentum of a system is not equal to zero. In the gas of charged particles in a uniform magnetic field the density of distribution also varies if the angular momentum is zero [see Dubrovskii I.M., Condensed Matter Physics, 2206, 9, 23]. Two-dimensional gas of charged particles located within a section of an endless strip filled with gas in magnetic field is considered. Under such conditions the angular momentum is not conserved. Directional particle flows take place close to the strip boundaries, and, as a consequence, the phase trajectory of the considered set of particles does not remain within the limited volume of the phase space. In order to apply a statistical thermodynamics method, it was suggested to consider near-boundary trajectories relative to a reference system that moves uniformly. It was shown that if the diameter of an orbit having average thermal energy is much smaller than a strip width, the corrections to thermodynamic functions are small depending on magnetic field. Only the average velocity of near-boundary particles that form near-boundary electric currents creating the paramagnetic moment turn out to be essential.

  11. Angular Positioning Sensor for Space Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Nicolas; Chapuis, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Angular position sensors are used on various rotating mechanisms such as solar array drive mechanisms, antenna pointing mechanisms, scientific instruments, motors or actuators.Now a days, potentiometers and encoders are mainly used for angular measurement purposes. Both of them have their own pros and cons.As alternative, Ruag Space Switzerland Nyon (RSSN) is developing and qualifying two innovative technologies of angular position sensors which offer easy implementation, medium to very high lifetime and high flexibility with regards to the output signal shape/type.The Brushed angular position sensor uses space qualified processes which are already flying on RSSN's sliprings for many years. A large variety of output signal shape can be implemented to fulfill customer requirements (digital, analog, customized, etc.).The contactless angular position sensor consists in a new radiation hard Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) based on the Hall effect and providing the angular position without complex processing algorithm.

  12. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  13. Angular distributions as lifetime probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Grossman, Yuval [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    If new TeV scale particles are discovered, it will be important to determine their width. There is, however, a problematic region, where the width is too small to be determined directly, and too large to generate a secondary vertex. For a collection of colored, spin polarized particles, hadronization depolarizes the particles prior to their decay. The amount of depolarization can be used to probe the lifetime in the problematic region. In this paper we apply this method to a realistic scenario of a top-like particle that can be produced at the LHC. We study how depolarization affects the angular distributions of the decay products and derive an equation for the distributions that is sensitive to the lifetime.

  14. Instrument for measuring flow velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffo, J.

    1977-01-01

    The design described here means to produce a 'more satisfying instrument with less cost' than comparable instruments known up to now. Instead of one single turbine rotor, two similar ones but with opposite blade inclination and sense of rotation are to be used. A cylindrical measuring body is carrying in its axis two bearing blocks whose shape is offering little flow resistance. On the shaft, supported by them, the two rotors run in opposite direction a relatively small axial distance apart. The speed of each rotor is picked up as pulse recurrence frequency by a transmitter and fed to an electronic measuring unit. Measuring errors as they are caused for single rotors by turbulent flow, profile distortion of the velocity, or viscous flow are to be eliminated by means of the contrarotating turbines and the subsequently added electronic unit, because in these cases the adulterating increase of the angular velocity of one rotor is compensated by a corresponding deceleration of the other rotor. The mean value then indicated by the electronic unit has high accurancy of measurement. (RW) [de

  15. Orbital angular momentum in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L.L.; Klimov, A.B.; Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We propose a comprehensive Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum. → We present a simple and useful toolkit for the practitioner. → We derive simple evolution equations in terms of a star product in the semiclassical limit. - Abstract: A comprehensive theory of the Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum is presented. Special attention is paid to the problems linked to rotational periodicity and angular-momentum discreteness.

  16. Management of Angular Cheilitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajriani Fajriani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Angular cheilitis is a type of oral soft tissue disease that can occur in children and adults, the condition is characterized by cracks and inflammation on both corners of the mouth. Although this disease can not cause severe disorder, it quite disturbs one's activity and physical appearance. Mild Angular cheilitis will recover itself over times. However severe conditions can cause pain and bleeding. This paper aims to inform colleagues about management of angular cheilitis in children.

  17. Management of angular cheilitis for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajriani Fajriani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Angular cheilitis is one type of oral soft tissue disease that can occur in both children and adults, the condition is characterized by cracks and inflammation in both corners of the mouth. Although this disease does not cause severe disruption but quite disturbing activity and also one's physical appearance. Angular cheilitis light will disappear on their own over time.Severe conditions that can cause pain and bleading. aims to give feedback on peers about managment angular cheilitis in children.

  18. AngularJS Performance: A Survey Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Miguel; Valente, Marco Tulio; Terra, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    AngularJS is a popular JavaScript MVC-based framework to construct single-page web applications. In this paper, we report the results of a survey with 95 professional developers about performance issues of AngularJS applications. We report common practices followed by developers to avoid performance problems (e.g., use of third-party or custom components), the general causes of performance problems in AngularJS applications (e.g., inadequate architecture decisions taken by AngularJS users), a...

  19. Critical scattering by bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler-Ferrari, N.; Nussenzveig, H.M.

    1986-11-01

    We apply the complex angular momentum theory to the problem of the critical scattering of light by spherical cavities in the high frequency limit (permittivity greater than the external media) (e.g, air bubble in water) (M.W.O.) [pt

  20. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  1. The Limit Deposit Velocity model, a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miedema Sape A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In slurry transport of settling slurries in Newtonian fluids, it is often stated that one should apply a line speed above a critical velocity, because blow this critical velocity there is the danger of plugging the line. There are many definitions and names for this critical velocity. It is referred to as the velocity where a bed starts sliding or the velocity above which there is no stationary bed or sliding bed. Others use the velocity where the hydraulic gradient is at a minimum, because of the minimum energy consumption. Most models from literature are one term one equation models, based on the idea that the critical velocity can be explained that way.

  2. Angular momentum transfer in deep inelastic heavy ion collisions. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, V.C.; Soares, P.C.; Oliveira, Edgar C. de; Gomes, Luiz Carlos

    1985-01-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation which describes the angular momentum transfer in deep inelastic heavy ion collisions is solved by a stochastic simulation procedure. The fusion cross section calculation is discussed. The calculations show that the critical orbital angular momentum does not play such a special role as in the deterministic case. The results of all the angular momentum transfer and their fluctuations are calculated and compared with experimental results for the reactions 86 Kr+ 154 Sm at 610 MeV, 165 Ho+ 148 Sm, and 165 Ho+ 176 Yb at 1400 MeV. (Author) [pt

  3. The velocity of sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the velocity of sound in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to determine the velocity measurements are described. Tables are presented of reported data on the velocity of sound in lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium. A formula is given for alkali metals, in which the sound velocity is a function of shear viscosity, atomic mass and atomic volume. (U.K.)

  4. Transverse and longitudinal angular momenta of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y., E-mail: k.bliokh@gmail.com [Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nonlinear Physics Centre, RSPhysE, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Nori, Franco [Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    We review basic physics and novel types of optical angular momentum. We start with a theoretical overview of momentum and angular momentum properties of generic optical fields, and discuss methods for their experimental measurements. In particular, we describe the well-known longitudinal (i.e., aligned with the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta in polarized vortex beams. Then, we focus on the transverse (i.e., orthogonal to the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta, which were recently actively discussed in theory and observed in experiments. First, the recently-discovered transverse spin  angular momenta appear in various structured fields: evanescent waves, interference fields, and focused beams. We show that there are several kinds of transverse spin angular momentum, which differ strongly in their origins and physical properties. We describe extraordinary features of the transverse optical spins and overview recent experiments. In particular, the helicity-independent transverse spin inherent in edge evanescent waves offers robust spin–direction coupling at optical interfaces (the quantum spin Hall effect of light). Second, we overview the transverse orbital angular momenta of light, which can be both extrinsic and intrinsic. These two types of the transverse orbital angular momentum are produced by spatial shifts of the optical beams (e.g., in the spin Hall effect of light) and their Lorentz boosts, respectively. Our review is underpinned by a unified theory of the angular momentum of light based on the canonical momentum and spin densities, which avoids complications associated with the separation of spin and orbital angular momenta in the Poynting picture. It allows us to construct a comprehensive classification of all known optical angular momenta based on their key parameters and main physical properties.

  5. ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS. I. THE MILKY WAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imara, Nia; Blitz, Leo

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis comparing the velocity fields in molecular clouds and the atomic gas that surrounds them in order to address the origin of the gradients. To that end, we present first-moment intensity-weighted velocity maps of the molecular clouds and surrounding atomic gas. The maps are made from high-resolution 13 CO observations and 21 cm observations from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Galactic H I Survey. We find that (1) the atomic gas associated with each molecular cloud has a substantial velocity gradient-ranging from 0.02 to 0.07 km s -1 pc -1 -whether or not the molecular cloud itself has a substantial linear gradient. (2) If the gradients in the molecular and atomic gas were due to rotation, this would imply that the molecular clouds have less specific angular momentum than the surrounding H I by a factor of 1-6. (3) Most importantly, the velocity gradient position angles in the molecular and atomic gas are generally widely separated-by as much as 130 deg. in the case of the Rosette molecular cloud. This result argues against the hypothesis that molecular clouds formed by simple top-down collapse from atomic gas.

  6. Experimental determination of high angular momentum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, J.L.V.

    1985-01-01

    The current knowledge of the atomic nucleus structure is summarized. A short abstract of the nuclear properties at high angular momentum and a more detailed description of the experimental methods used in the study of high angular momenta is made. (L.C.) [pt

  7. Exposing Library Services with AngularJS

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob Voß; Moritz Horn

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the JavaScript framework AngularJS and specific AngularJS modules for accessing library services. It shows how information such as search suggestions, additional links, and availability can be embedded in any website. The ease of reuse may encourage more libraries to expose their services via standard APIs to allow usage in different contexts.

  8. Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available . As the angular acceleration takes place in a bounded space, the azimuthal degree of freedom, such fields accelerate periodically as they propagate. Notably, the amount of angular acceleration is not limited by paraxial considerations, may be tailored for large...

  9. Responsive web design with AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Sandeep Kumar

    2014-01-01

    If you are an AngularJS developer who wants to learn about responsive web application development, this book is ideal for you. Responsive Web Design with AngularJS is intended for web developers or designers with a basic knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

  10. Angular momentum projected wave-functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, R.; Haakansson, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    Angular momentum projection has become a vital link between intrinsic model-wavefunctions and the physical states one intends to describe. We discuss in general terms some aspects of angular momentum projection and present results from projection on e.g. cranking wavefunctions. Mass densities and spectroscopic factors are also presented for some cases. (author)

  11. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantities...

  12. Perturbed angular correlations and distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makaryunas, K.

    1976-01-01

    The present index comprises original works and review papers on the perturbed angular correlations (PAC) and distributions (PAD). The articles published in the Soviet and foreign journals as well as the materials of conferences, monographs and collections published in the USSR and abroad, the preprints produced by various institutes and abstracts of disertations are included from 1948 up to 1973. The whole material compiled in this index is divided into three parts. Part one is a bibliographic index. All papers in this part are divided into three sections. Section one comprises the papers devoted to the theoretical works on PAC, review papers, monographs, materials of conferences. Section two deals with the works of methodical character where correlation spectrometers as well as the treatment of experimental data are described. In section three experimental works with concrete nuclei are compiled. Part two gives the characteristic of works performed with concrete nuclei. This part is presented in the form of the table in which the works are systematized according to the chemical elements and isotopes. The table shows the characteristics of the nuclear levels used in the investigations by PAC as well as brief characteristics of experiments and results obtained. Part three - appendix contains alphabetic index of the authors, the list of the used editions with the abbreviations of the titles of these editions. The lists indicating the dynamic of the quantity of works on PAC and the distribution according to the literature sources are also given

  13. Angular correlation in positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arponen, J.; Pajanne, E.

    1978-01-01

    The angular correlation of the two gamma quanta emitted when a thermalized positron annihilates with metallic conduction electrons is investigated by applying the newly developed theory of electron gas as a system of interacting collective excitations. The method leads in a natural way to the appearance of high-momentum components (i.e. pair momentum p>psub(F) in the annihilation radiation already in the case of annihilation with conduction electrons only. The amount of these components is significant approximately (10 %) in a dilute electron gas (like alkali metals), but fairly irrelevant for higher densities. The momentum-dependence of the enhancement factor for a dense system (with rsub(s) approximately equal to 2) agrees well both with the earlier theories due to Kahana and others, and also with recent accurate experimental observations. As rsub(s) increases into the alkali-metal region, the enhancement factor for p< psub(F) becomes relatively more and more constant, in contrast with the trend in the Kahana theory. In this density regime the experimental results seem to vary widely, although most of them desagree with the present prediction. We discuss the possible discrepancy and try to account for the effects of the core annihilation by a simple model. (author)

  14. Angular momentum conservation for uniformly expanding flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, Sean A

    2007-01-01

    Angular momentum has recently been defined as a surface integral involving an axial vector and a twist 1-form, which measures the twisting around the spacetime due to a rotating mass. The axial vector is chosen to be a transverse, divergence-free, coordinate vector, which is compatible with any initial choice of axis and integral curves. Then a conservation equation expresses the rate of the change of angular momentum along a uniformly expanding flow as a surface integral of angular momentum densities, with the same form as the standard equation for an axial Killing vector, apart from the inclusion of an effective energy tensor for gravitational radiation

  15. EVIDENCE FOR INFALLING GAS OF LOW ANGULAR MOMENTUM TOWARD THE L1551 NE KEPLERIAN CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Saito, Masao [Joint ALMA Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Lim, Jeremy [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Saigo, Kazuya, E-mail: takakuwa@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [ALMA Project Office, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-10-10

    We report follow-up C{sup 18}O(3-2) line observations of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE with the Submillimeter Array in its compact and subcompact configurations. Our previous observations at a higher angular resolution in the extended configuration revealed a circumbinary disk exhibiting Keplerian motion. The combined data, with more extensive spatial coverage (∼140-2000 AU), verify the presence of a Keplerian circumbinary disk and reveal for the first time a distinct low-velocity (∼< ± 0.5 km s{sup –1} from the systemic velocity) component that displays a velocity gradient along the minor axis of the circumbinary disk. Our simple model that reproduces the main features seen in the position-velocity diagrams comprises a circumbinary disk exhibiting Keplerian motion out to a radius of ∼300 AU, beyond which the gas exhibits pure infall at a constant velocity of ∼0.6 km s{sup –1}. This velocity is significantly smaller than the expected free-fall velocity of ∼2.2 km s{sup –1} onto the L1551 NE protostellar mass of ∼0.8 M{sub ☉} at ∼300 AU, suggesting that the infalling gas is decelerated as it moves into regions of high gas pressure in the circumbinary disk. The discontinuity in angular momenta between the outer infalling gas and the inner Keplerian circumbinary disk implies an abrupt transition in the effectiveness at which magnetic braking is able to transfer angular momentum outward, a result perhaps of the different plasma β values and the ionization fractions between the outer and inner regions of the circumbinary disk.

  16. Staggering of angular momentum distribution in fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagno, Pierre; Litaize, Olivier

    2018-03-01

    We review here the role of angular momentum distributions in the fission process. To do so the algorithm implemented in the FIFRELIN code [?] is detailed with special emphasis on the place of fission fragment angular momenta. The usual Rayleigh distribution used for angular momentum distribution is presented and the related model derivation is recalled. Arguments are given to justify why this distribution should not hold for low excitation energy of the fission fragments. An alternative ad hoc expression taking into account low-lying collectiveness is presented as has been implemented in the FIFRELIN code. Yet on observables currently provided by the code, no dramatic impact has been found. To quantify the magnitude of the impact of the low-lying staggering in the angular momentum distribution, a textbook case is considered for the decay of the 144Ba nucleus with low excitation energy.

  17. Amplitude damping channel for orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the pioneering work on the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light, much attention has been devoted to the subject, with particular attention into the quantum aspects of information processing using OAM. Furthermore...

  18. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitive, specific, and label-free classification of microscopic cells and organisms is one of the outstanding problems in biology. Today, instruments such as the flow cytometer use a combination of light scatter measurements at two distinct angles to infer the size and internal complexity...... of cells at rates of more than 10,000 per second. However, by examining the entire angular light scattering spectrum it is possible to classify cells with higher resolution and specificity. Current approaches to performing these angular spectrum measurements all have significant throughput limitations...... Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering (REALS), this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof...

  19. Orbital-angular-momentum entanglement in turbulence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hamadou Ibrahim, A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The turbulence-induced decay of orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) entanglement between two photons is investigated numerically and experimentally. To compare our resultswith previouswork,we simulate the turbulent atmosphere with a single phase screen...

  20. Staggering of angular momentum distribution in fission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamagno Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We review here the role of angular momentum distributions in the fission process. To do so the algorithm implemented in the FIFRELIN code [?] is detailed with special emphasis on the place of fission fragment angular momenta. The usual Rayleigh distribution used for angular momentum distribution is presented and the related model derivation is recalled. Arguments are given to justify why this distribution should not hold for low excitation energy of the fission fragments. An alternative ad hoc expression taking into account low-lying collectiveness is presented as has been implemented in the FIFRELIN code. Yet on observables currently provided by the code, no dramatic impact has been found. To quantify the magnitude of the impact of the low-lying staggering in the angular momentum distribution, a textbook case is considered for the decay of the 144Ba nucleus with low excitation energy.

  1. Momentum and Angular Momentum Transfer in Oblique Impacts: Implications for Asteroid Rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Masahisa; Hasegawa, Sunao; Shirogane, Nobutoshi

    1996-09-01

    We conducted a series of high velocity oblique impact experiments (0.66-6.7 km/s) using polycarbonate (plastic) projectiles and targets made of mortar, aluminum alloy, and mild steel. We then calculated the efficiencies of momentum transfer for small cratering impacts. They are η = (M‧Vn‧)/(mvn) and ζ = (M‧Vt‧)/(mvt), wheremandvare the mass and velocity of a projectile, andM‧ andV‧ represent those of a postimpact target. Subscripts “n” and “t” denote the components normal and tangential to the target surface at the impact point, respectively. The main findings are: (1) η increases with increasing impact velocity; (2) η is larger for mortar than for ductile metallic targets; (3) ζ for mortar targets seems to increase with the impact velocity in the velocity range less than about 2 km/s and decrease with it in the higher velocity range; (4) ζ for the aluminum alloy targets correlates negatively with incident zenith angle of the projectile. In addition to these findings on the momentum transfer, we show theoretically that “ζL” can be expressed by η and ζ for small cratering impact. Here, ζLis the spin angular momentum that the target acquires at impact divided by the collisional angular momentum due to the projectile. This is an important parameter to study the collisional evolution of asteroid rotation. For a spherical target, ζLis shown to be well approximated by ζ.

  2. QCD angular correlations for muon pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajantie, K.; Raitio, R.; Lindfors, J.

    1978-01-01

    Angular distributions of muons are discussed in the framework of a QCD treatment of muon pair production in hadron-hadron collisions. The predicted angular effects are independent of the infrared behavior of QCD. Measuring them will permit one to determine whether the origin of the large transverse momentum of the pair is in the quark transverse momenta or in a constituent-constituent subprocess. (author)

  3. Mastering AngularJD for .NET developers

    CERN Document Server

    Majid, Mohammad Wadood

    2015-01-01

    This book is envisioned for traditional developers and programmers who want to develop client-side applications using the AngularJS framework and ASP.NET Web API 2 with Visual Studio. .NET developers who have already built web applications or web services and who have a fundamental knowledge of HTML, JavaScript, and CSS and want to explore single-page applications will also find this guide useful. Basic knowledge of AngularJS would be helpful.

  4. Angular Spectra of Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jung; Lazarian, A.

    2003-01-01

    It is believed that magnetic field lines are twisted and bend by turbulent motions in the Galaxy. Therefore, both Galactic synchrotron emission and thermal emission from dust reflects statistics of Galactic turbulence. Our simple model of Galactic turbulence, motivated by results of our simulations, predicts that Galactic disk and halo exhibit different angular power spectra. We show that observed angular spectra of synchrotron emission are compatible with our model. We also show that our mod...

  5. Rotational Angles and Velocities During Down the Line and Diagonal Across Court Volleyball Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Brown

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The volleyball spike is an explosive movement that is frequently used to end a rally and earn a point. High velocity spikes are an important skill for a successful volleyball offense. Although the influence of vertical jump height and arm velocity on spiked ball velocity (SBV have been investigated, little is known about the relationship of shoulder and hip angular kinematics with SBV. Other sport skills, like the baseball pitch share similar movement patterns and suggest trunk rotation is important for such movements. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of both shoulder and hip angular kinematics with ball velocity during the volleyball spike. Methods: Fourteen Division I collegiate female volleyball players executed down the line (DL and diagonally across-court (DAC spikes in a laboratory setting to measure shoulder and hip angular kinematics and velocities. Each spike was analyzed using a 10 Camera Raptor-E Digital Real Time Camera System.  Results: DL SBV was significantly greater than for DAC, respectively (17.54±2.35 vs. 15.97±2.36 m/s, p<0.05.  The Shoulder Hip Separation Angle (S-HSA, Shoulder Angular Velocity (SAV, and Hip Angular Velocity (HAV were all significantly correlated with DAC SBV. S-HSA was the most significant predictor of DAC SBV as determined by regression analysis.  Conclusions: This study provides support for a relationship between a greater S-HSA and SBV. Future research should continue to 1 examine the influence of core training exercise and rotational skill drills on SBV and 2 examine trunk angular velocities during various types of spikes during play.

  6. Pequena angular : Almada em relance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reading of the literary work of Almada Negreiros concerning its constantly changing procedures, and focusing the major examples of its writing in order to underline the fundamental unity of its creative nucleus which lies in an experimental practice. This author’s writings show the main literary practice created around Orpheu (1915, portuguese vanguard movement, by activating the linguistic and literary codes in order to renew the paradigms. Later Almada’s work adopts a quite different record on which modernity and tradition dialogue in a critical and original way. This particular attitude and style was called by Almada Naivety.

  7. Water velocity meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C. W.; Smith, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive drag sphere velocity meter with a zero to 6 ft/sec range measures steady-state flow. When combined with appropriate data acquisition system, it is suited to applications where large numbers of simultaneous measurements are needed for current mapping or velocity profile determination.

  8. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  9. Beam Angular Divergence Effects in Ion Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsky, T. N.; Hahto, S. K.; Bilbrough, D. G.; Jacobson, D. C.; Krull, W. A.; Goldberg, R. D.; Current, M. I.; Hamamoto, N.; Umisedo, S.

    2008-01-01

    An important difference between monomer ion beams and heavy molecular beams is a significant reduction in beam angular divergence and increased on-wafer angular accuracy for molecular beams. This advantage in beam quality stems from a reduction in space-charge effects within the beam. Such improved angular accuracy has been shown to have a significant impact on the quality and yield of transistor devices [1,12]. In this study, B 18 H x + beam current and angular divergence data collected on a hybrid scanned beam line that magnetically scans the beam across the wafer is presented. Angular divergence is kept below 0.5 deg from an effective boron energy of 200 eV to 3000 eV. Under these conditions, the beam current is shown analytically to be limited by space charge below about 1 keV, but by the matching of the beam emittance to the acceptance of the beam line above 1 keV. In addition, results of a beam transport model which includes variable space charge compensation are presented, in which a drift mode B 18 H x + beam is compared to an otherwise identical boron beam after deceleration. Deceleration is shown to introduce significant space-charge blow up resulting in a large on-wafer angular divergence. The divergence effects introduced by wafer charging are also discussed.

  10. Rotational velocities of low-mass stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, J.B.; Hartmann, L.W.; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA)

    1986-01-01

    The rotational velocities of stars provide important clues to how stars form and evolve. Yet until recently, studies of stellar rotation were limited to stars more massive than the sun. This is beginning to change, and an observational outline of the rotational velocity evolution of stars less massive than the sun can now be provided. Low-mass stars rotate slowly during the early stages of premain-sequence evolution, and spin up as they contract to the main sequence. This spin-up culminates in a brief period of very rapid rotation at an age of order 50 million years. Physical interpretation of this increase in rotation and the subsequent main-sequence spin-down are complicated by the possibility of differential internal rotation. The observed rapidity of spin-down among G dwarfs suggests that initially only the outer convective envelopes of these stars are slowed. The data suggest an intrinsic spread in angular momentum among young stars of the same mass and age, a spread which is apparently minimized by the angular-momentum loss mechanism in old low-mass stars. 83 references

  11. Rotational Angles and Velocities During Down the Line and Diagonal Across Court Volleyball Spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Justin R. Brown; Bader J. Alsarraf; Mike Waller; Patricia Eisenman; Charlie A. Hicks-Little

    2014-01-01

    The volleyball spike is an explosive movement that is frequently used to end a rally and earn a point. High velocity spikes are an important skill for a successful volleyball offense. Although the influence of vertical jump height and arm velocity on spiked ball velocity (SBV) have been investigated, little is known about the relationship of shoulder and hip angular kinematics with SBV. Other sport skills, like the baseball pitch share similar movement patterns and suggest trunk rotation is i...

  12. Control of Rotational Energy and Angular Momentum Orientation with an Optical Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Hannah M.; Murray, Matthew J.; Mullin, Amy S.

    2017-04-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to trap and spin molecules to an angular frequency of 30 THz with oriented angular momenta and extremely high rotational energy and then investigate their subsequent collision dynamics with transient high resolution IR spectroscopy. The optical centrifuge is formed by combining oppositely-chirped pulses of 800 nm light, and overlapping them spatially and temporally. Polarization-sensitive Doppler-broadened line profiles characterize the anisotropic kinetic energy release of the super rotor molecules, showing that they behave like molecular gyroscopes. Studies are reported for collisions of CO2 super rotors with CO2, He and Ar. These studies reveal how mass, velocity and rotational adiabaticity impact the angular momentum relaxation and reorientation. Quantum scattering calculations provide insight into the J-specific collision cross sections that control the relaxation. NSF-CHE 105 8721.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF ANGULAR MOMENTUM ON HALO PROFILES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Erik W; Rosenberg, Leslie J [Physics Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Quinn, Thomas R, E-mail: lentze@phys.washington.edu, E-mail: ljrosenberg@phys.washington.edu, E-mail: trq@astro.washington.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)

    2016-05-10

    The near universality of DM halo density profiles provided by N -body simulations proved to be robust against changes in total mass density, power spectrum, and some forms of initial velocity dispersion. Here we study the effects of coherently spinning up an isolated DM-only progenitor on halo structure. Halos with spins within several standard deviations of the simulated mean ( λ ≲ 0.20) produce profiles with negligible deviations from the universal form. Only when the spin becomes quite large ( λ ≳ 0.20) do departures become evident. The angular momentum distribution also exhibits a near universal form, which is also independent of halo spin up to λ ≲ 0.20. A correlation between these epidemic profiles and the presence of a strong bar in the virialized halo is also observed. These bar structures bear resemblance to the radial orbit instability in the rotationless limit.

  14. ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. M33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imara, Nia; Bigiel, Frank; Blitz, Leo

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis comparing the properties of 45 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in M33 and the atomic hydrogen (H I) with which they are associated. High-resolution Very Large Array observations are used to measure the properties of H I in the vicinity of GMCs and in regions where GMCs have not been detected. The majority of molecular clouds coincide with a local peak in the surface density of atomic gas, though 7% of GMCs in the sample are not associated with high surface density atomic gas. The mean H I surface density in the vicinity of GMCs is 10 M sun pc -2 and tends to increase with GMC mass as Σ HI ∝ M 0.27 GMC . Thirty-nine of the 45 H I regions surrounding GMCs have linear velocity gradients of ∼0.05 km s -1 pc -1 . If the linear gradients previously observed in the GMCs result from rotation, 53% are counterrotating with respect to the local H I. And if the linear gradients in these local H I regions are also from rotation, 62% are counterrotating with respect to the galaxy. If magnetic braking reduced the angular momentum of GMCs early in their evolution, the angular velocity of GMCs would be roughly one order of magnitude lower than what is observed. Based on our observations, we consider the possibility that GMCs may not be rotating. Atomic gas not associated with GMCs has gradients closer to 0.03 km s -1 pc -1 , suggesting that events occur during the course of GMC evolution that may increase the shear in the atomic gas.

  15. Angular momentum transport and dynamo action in the sun - Implications of recent oscillation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, P. A.; Morrow, C. A.; Deluca, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    The implications of a newly proposed picture of the sun's internal rotation (Brown et al., 1989; Morrow, 1988) for the distribution and transport of angular momentum and for the solar dynamo are considered. The new results, derived from an analysis of solar acoustic oscillations, affect understanding of how momentum is cycled in the sun and provide clues as to how and where the solar dynamo is driven. The data imply that the only significant radial gradient of angular velocity exists in a transitional region between the bottom of the convection zone, which is rotating like the solar surface, and the top of the deep interior, which is rotating rigidly at a rate intermediate between the equatorial and polar rates at the surface. Thus the radial gradient must change sign at the latitude where the angular velocity of the surface matches that of the interior. These inferences suggest that the cycle of angular momentum that produces the observed latitudinal differential rotation in the convection zone may be coupled to layers of the interior beneath the convection zone. 35 refs

  16. Angular distributions in quasi-fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetzenkirchen, K.; Kratz, J.V.; Lucas, R.; Poitou, J.; Gregoire, C.; Wirth, G.; Bruechle, W.; Suemmerer, K.

    1985-10-01

    Angular distributions for fission-like fragments were measured in the systems 50 Ti, 56 Fe + 208 Pb by applying an off-line KX-ray activation technique. The distributions d 2 sigma/dTHETAdZ exhibit forward-backward asymmetries that are strongly Z-dependent. They result from a process (quasi-fission) which yields nearly symmetric masses in times comparable to the rotational period of the composite system. A method for obtaining the variance of the tilting angular momentum, K 0 2 , from these skewed, differential angular distributions is described. The results indicate that the tilting mode is not fully excited in quasi-fission reactions. The results are compared to the sum of the variances of all statistical spin components, measured via γ-multiplicities. Integration of the angular distributions d 2 sigma/dTHETAdZ over all values of Z yields integral angular distributions dsigma/dTHETA and dsigma/dΩ symmetric around 90 0 . The associated unusually large anisotropies do not at all provide an adequate basis for tests or modifications of the transition state theory. A deconvolution of d 2 sigma/dTHETAdZ is performed with gaussian distributions depending on rotational angles ΔTHETA extending over a range of up to 540 0 . From the mean values a time scale for the evolution of K 0 is calculated. (orig.)

  17. Angular distribution of oriented nucleus fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.; Grechukhin, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of anisotropy of angular distribution of oriented 235 U nuclei thermal fission neutrons have been carried out. the neutrons were assumed to evaporate isotropically by completely accelerated fragements in the fragment system with only its small part, i. e. fission-producing neutrons, emitted at the moment of neck break. It has been found out that at low energies of neutrons Esub(n)=1-2 MeV the sensitivity of the angular distribution anisotropy to variations of spectrum of neutron evaporation from fragments and the magnitude of a share of fission-producing neutrons reaches approximately 100%, which at high energies, Esub(n) > 5 MeV it does not exceed approximately 20%. Therefore the angular distribution of fast neutrons to a greater degree of confidence may be used for restoring the angular distribution anisotropy of fragments while the angular distribution of low energy neutrons may be used for deriving information on the fission process, but only in case 6f the experiment accuracy is better than approximately 3%

  18. Transverse angular momentum in topological photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Min; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Fu-Li; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2018-01-01

    Engineering local angular momentum of structured light fields in real space enables applications in many fields, in particular, the realization of unidirectional robust transport in topological photonic crystals with a non-trivial Berry vortex in momentum space. Here, we show transverse angular momentum modes in silicon topological photonic crystals when considering transverse electric polarization. Excited by a chiral external source with either transverse spin angular momentum or transverse phase vortex, robust light flow propagating along opposite directions is observed in several kinds of sharp-turn interfaces between two topologically-distinct silicon photonic crystals. A transverse orbital angular momentum mode with alternating phase vortex exists at the boundary of two such photonic crystals. In addition, unidirectional transport is robust to the working frequency even when the ring size or location of the pseudo-spin source varies in a certain range, leading to the superiority of the broadband photonic device. These findings enable one to make use of transverse angular momentum, a kind of degree of freedom, to achieve unidirectional robust transport in the telecom region and other potential applications in integrated photonic circuits, such as on-chip robust delay lines.

  19. Angular cheilitis: A clinical and microbial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirima Oza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine clinical types and microbiological flora isolated from angular chelitis. Materials and Methods: An eroded and/or erythematous, with or without fissure formation, nonvesicular lesion radiating from the angle of the mouth was considered to be angular chelitis. A sample of the present study comprised of 40 patients having unilateral or bilateral angular chelitis and 20 healthy individuals without any lip lesions. Clinical examination was done. In both test and control groups, the sample for microbial analysis was obtained from angle of the mouth. Results: Clinically, four types of angular cheilitis lesions were found, Type I, II, III, and IV. The most common type of lesion found was Type I lesion. Microorganisms isolated from the lesion were Staphylococcus aureus, Candida or Streptococci in 33 (82.5% cases either in pure culture or mixed culture. Among these 33 patients, S. aureus was found in 25 (75.5% cases, Candida in 16 (48.4% cases, and Streptococci in 5 (13.5% cases, respectively. Out of 16 cases positive for Candida, in 13 cases further isolation of Candida was possible. Candida albicans was found in 6 cases and Candida stellastodia in 7 cases. In majority of the dentulous and edentulous patients, S. aureus showed profuse growth. Conclusions: There are microorganisms associated with angular cheilitis.

  20. Velocity Feedback Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient response such as ringing in a control system can be reduced or removed by velocity feedback. It is a useful control technique that should be covered in the relevant engineering laboratory courses. We developed velocity feedback experiments using two different low cost technologies, viz., operational amplifiers and microcontrollers. These experiments can be easily integrated into laboratory courses on feedback control systems or microcontroller applications. The intent of developing these experiments was to illustrate the ringing problem and to offer effective, low cost solutions for removing such problem. In this paper the pedagogical approach for these velocity feedback experiments was described. The advantages and disadvantages of the two different implementation of velocity feedback were discussed also.

  1. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  2. Anisotropic critical fields in superconducting superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, I.; Yang, Q.S.; Falco, C.M.; Schuller, I.K.

    1983-01-01

    The temperature and angular dependence of critical fields (H/sub c/) have been studied as a function of layer thickness for superconducting Nb/Cu superlattices. For layer thicknesses between 100 and 300 A, dimensional crossover has been observed in the temperature dependence of H/sub c/. Associated with the crossover we find a change in the angular dependence of H/sub c/ to that given by the effective-mass theory. This is the first time that a relationship has been found between dimensional crossover observed in the temperature dependence and that in the angular dependence of critical fields

  3. Close binary evolution. II. Impact of tides, wind magnetic braking, and internal angular momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. F.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Ekström, S.; Eggenberger, P.; Georgy, C.; Qin, Y.; Fragos, T.; Soerensen, M.; Barblan, F.; Wade, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Massive stars with solar metallicity lose important amounts of rotational angular momentum through their winds. When a magnetic field is present at the surface of a star, efficient angular momentum losses can still be achieved even when the mass-loss rate is very modest, at lower metallicities, or for lower-initial-mass stars. In a close binary system, the effect of wind magnetic braking also interacts with the influence of tides, resulting in a complex evolution of rotation. Aims: We study the interactions between the process of wind magnetic braking and tides in close binary systems. Methods: We discuss the evolution of a 10 M⊙ star in a close binary system with a 7 M⊙ companion using the Geneva stellar evolution code. The initial orbital period is 1.2 days. The 10 M⊙ star has a surface magnetic field of 1 kG. Various initial rotations are considered. We use two different approaches for the internal angular momentum transport. In one of them, angular momentum is transported by shear and meridional currents. In the other, a strong internal magnetic field imposes nearly perfect solid-body rotation. The evolution of the primary is computed until the first mass-transfer episode occurs. The cases of different values for the magnetic fields and for various orbital periods and mass ratios are briefly discussed. Results: We show that, independently of the initial rotation rate of the primary and the efficiency of the internal angular momentum transport, the surface rotation of the primary will converge, in a time that is short with respect to the main-sequence lifetime, towards a slowly evolving velocity that is different from the synchronization velocity. This "equilibrium angular velocity" is always inferior to the angular orbital velocity. In a given close binary system at this equilibrium stage, the difference between the spin and the orbital angular velocities becomes larger when the mass losses and/or the surface magnetic field increase. The

  4. Effects of Wall-Normal and Angular Momentum Injections in Airfoil Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Phillip M.; Taira, Kunihiko

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this computational study is to quantify the influence of wall-normal and angular momentum injections in suppressing laminar flow separation over a canonical airfoil. Open-loop control of fully separated, incompressible flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil at $\\alpha = 9^\\circ$ and $Re = 23,000$ is examined with large-eddy simulations. This study independently introduces wall-normal momentum and angular momentum into the separated flow using swirling jets through model boundary conditions. The response of the flow field and the surface vorticity fluxes to various combinations of actuation inputs are examined in detail. It is observed that the addition of angular momentum input to wall-normal momentum injection enhances the suppression of flow separation. Lift enhancement and suppression of separation with the wall-normal and angular momentum inputs are characterized by modifying the standard definition of the coefficient of momentum. The effect of angular momentum is incorporated into the modified coefficient of momentum by introducing a characteristic swirling jet velocity based on the non-dimensional swirl number. With this single modified coefficient of momentum, we are able to categorize each controlled flow into separated, transitional, and attached flows.

  5. Data-oriented development with AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Waikar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    This book helps beginner-level AngularJS developers organize AngularJS applications by discussing important AngularJS concepts and best practices. If you are an experienced AngularJS developer but haven't written directives or haven't created custom HTML controls before, then this book is ideal for you.

  6. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N c approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  7. Angular distributions in pre-equilibrium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Gupta, S.K.; Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay

    1982-10-01

    A new model is proposed for calculating angular distributions in preequilibrium reactions. In this model, as in the model of Feshbach et al. the system consisting of target plus projectile initially branches into two sets of states with either no particle in the continuum (multistep compound states) or with at least one particle in the continuum (multistep direct states). The two chains of states are treated independently by solving two sets of master equations. The multistep compound emission is assumed to be isotropic while the angular distribution of the multistep direct emission is described using the fast particle model of Mantzouranis et al. The angular distributions for 14.6 MeV neutrons calculated using this model are found to be in better agreement with the data than the fast particle model. (author)

  8. Angular momentum alignment in molecular beam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treffers, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown how the angular momentum alignment in a molecular beam can be determined using laser-induced fluorescence in combination with precession of the angular momenta in a magnetic field. After a general analysis of the method, some results are presented to illustrate the possibilities of the method. Experimental data are presented on the alignment production for Na 2 molecules that made a collision induced angular momentum transition. Magnitude as well as direction of the alignment have been determined for scattering with several scattering partners and for a large number of scattering angles and transitions. The last chapter deals with the total alignment production in a final J-state, i.e. without state selection of the initial rotational state. (orig.)

  9. Kinetic energy and angular momentum of free particles in the gyratonic pp-waves space-times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, J. W.; da Rocha-Neto, J. F.; Ulhoa, S. C.; Carneiro, F. L.

    2018-06-01

    Gyratonic pp-waves are exact solutions of Einstein’s equations that represent non-linear gravitational waves endowed with angular momentum. We consider gyratonic pp-waves that travel in the z direction and whose time dependence on the variable is given by Gaussians, so that the waves represent short bursts of gravitational radiation propagating in the z direction. We evaluate numerically the geodesics and velocities of free particles in the space-time of these waves, and find that after the passage of the waves both the kinetic energy and the angular momentum per unit mass of the particles are changed. Therefore there is a transfer of energy and angular momentum between the gravitational field and the free particles, so that the final values of the energy and angular momentum of the free particles may be smaller or larger in magnitude than the initial values.

  10. Approaching the O{sup -} photodetachment threshold with velocity-map imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, S J; Gibson, S T; Lewis, B R, E-mail: Steven.Cavanagh@anu.edu.a, E-mail: Stephen.Gibson@anu.edu.a [Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2009-11-01

    A series of photodetachment spectra from O{sup -} has been measured from near threshold to several eV using the technique of velocity-map imaging. With a resolving power of {Delta}E/E {<=} 0.38%, the energy and angular dependences for the six fine-structure transitions have been determined. For the first time, the energy and angular dependences of the cross section within a few meV of threshold have been determined.

  11. Ultrasonic velocity measurements in expanded liquid mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Inutake, M.; Fujiwaka, S.

    1977-10-01

    In this paper we present the first results of the sound velocity measurements in expanded liquid mercury. The measurements were made at temperatures up to 1600 0 C and pressures up to 1700 kg/cm 2 by means of an ultrasonic pulse transmission/echo technique which was newly developed for such high temperature/pressure condition. When the density is larger than 9 g/cm 3 , the observed sound velocity decreases linearly with decreasing density. At densities smaller than 9 g/cm 3 , the linear dependence on the density is no longer observed. The observed sound velocity approaches a minimum near the liquid-gas critical point (rho sub(cr) asymptotically equals 5.5 g/cm 3 ). The existing theories for sound velocity in liquid metals fail to explain the observed results. (auth.)

  12. Ghost Imaging Using Orbital Angular Momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵生妹; 丁建; 董小亮; 郑宝玉

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel encoding scheme in a ghost-imaging system using orbital angular momentum. In the signal arm, object spatial information is encoded as a phase matrix. For an N-grey-scale object, different phase matrices, varying from 0 to K with increment n/N, are used for different greyscales, and then they are modulated to a signal beam by a spatial light modulator. According to the conservation of the orbital angular momentum in the ghost imaging system, these changes will give different coincidence rates in measurement, and hence the object information can be extracted in the idler arm. By simulations and experiments, the results show that our scheme can improve the resolution of the image effectively. Compared with another encoding method using orbital angular momentum, our scheme has a better performance for both characters and the image object.%We present a novel encoding scheme in a ghost-imaging system using orbital angular momentum.In the signal arm,object spatial information is encoded as a phase matrix.For an N-grey-scale object,different phase matrices,varying from 0 to π with increment π/N,are used for different greyscales,and then they are modulated to a signal beam by a spatial light modulator.According to the conservation of the orbital angular momentum in the ghost imaging system,these changes will give different coincidence rates in measurement,and hence the object information can be extracted in the idler arm.By simulations and experiments,the results show that our scheme can improve the resolution of the image effectively.Compared with another encoding method using orbital angular momentum,our scheme has a better performance for both characters and the image object.

  13. Total angular momentum from Dirac eigenspinors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabados, Laszlo B

    2008-01-01

    The eigenvalue problem for Dirac operators, constructed from two connections on the spinor bundle over closed spacelike 2-surfaces, is investigated. A class of divergence-free vector fields, built from the eigenspinors, are found, which, for the lowest eigenvalue, reproduce the rotation Killing vectors of metric spheres, and provide rotation BMS vector fields at future null infinity. This makes it possible to introduce a well-defined, gauge invariant spatial angular momentum at null infinity, which reduces to the standard expression in stationary spacetimes. The general formula for the angular momentum flux carried away by the gravitational radiation is also derived

  14. Studying AGN Jets At Extreme Angular Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Gabriele

    2016-10-01

    RadioAstron is a 10m antenna orbiting on the Russian Speckt-R spacecraft, launched in 2011. Performing radio interferometry with a global array of ground telescopes, it is providing record angular resolution. The Key Science Project on AGN polarization is exploiting it to study in great detail the configuration of magnetic fields in AGN jets, and understand their formation and collimation. To date, the project has already achieved the highest angular resolution image ever obtained in Astronomy, and detected brightness temperatures exceeding the ones predicted by theory of AGN.

  15. Factorial correlators: angular scaling within QCD jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschanski, R.

    2001-01-01

    Factorial correlators measure the amount of dynamical correlation in the multiplicity between two separated phase-space windows. We present the analytical derivation of factorial correlators for a QCD jet described at the double logarithmic (DL) accuracy. We obtain a new angular scaling property for properly normalized correlators between two solid-angle cells or two rings around the jet axis. Normalized QCD factorial correlators scale with the angular distance and are independent of the window size. Scaling violations are expected beyond the DL approximation, in particular from the subject structure. Experimental tests are feasible, and thus would be welcome. (orig.)

  16. Whole-body angular momentum during stair walking using passive and powered lower-limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickle, Nathaniel T; Wilken, Jason M; Aldridge, Jennifer M; Neptune, Richard R; Silverman, Anne K

    2014-10-17

    Individuals with a unilateral transtibial amputation have a greater risk of falling compared to able-bodied individuals, and falling on stairs can lead to serious injuries. Individuals with transtibial amputations have lost ankle plantarflexor muscle function, which is critical for regulating whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic balance. Recently, powered prostheses have been designed to provide active ankle power generation with the goal of restoring biological ankle function. However, the effects of using a powered prosthesis on the regulation of whole-body angular momentum are unknown. The purpose of this study was to use angular momentum to evaluate dynamic balance in individuals with a transtibial amputation using powered and passive prostheses relative to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent and descent. Ground reaction forces, external moment arms, and joint powers were also investigated to interpret the angular momentum results. A key result was that individuals with an amputation had a larger range of sagittal-plane angular momentum during prosthetic limb stance compared to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent. There were no significant differences in the frontal, transverse, or sagittal-plane ranges of angular momentum or maximum magnitude of the angular momentum vector between the passive and powered prostheses during stair ascent or descent. These results indicate that individuals with an amputation have altered angular momentum trajectories during stair walking compared to able-bodied individuals, which may contribute to an increased fall risk. The results also suggest that a powered prosthesis provides no distinct advantage over a passive prosthesis in maintaining dynamic balance during stair walking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Soft Neurological Signs in Childhood by Measurement of Arm Movements Using Acceleration and Angular Velocity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Kaneko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft neurological signs (SNS are evident in the motor performance of children and disappear as the child grows up. Therefore SNS are used as criteria for evaluating age-appropriate development of neurological function. The aim of this study was to quantify SNS during arm movement in childhood. In this study, we focused on pronation and supination, which are arm movements included in the SNS examination. Two hundred and twenty-three typically developing children aged 4–12 years (107 boys, 116 girls and 18 adults aged 21–26 years (16 males, two females participated in the experiment. To quantify SNS during pronation and supination, we calculated several evaluation index scores: bimanual symmetry, compliance, postural stability, motor speed and mirror movement. These index scores were evaluated using data obtained from sensors attached to the participants’ hands and elbows. Each score increased as age increased. Results obtained using our system showed developmental changes that were consistent with criteria for SNS. We were able to successfully quantify SNS during pronation and supination. These results indicate that it may be possible to use our system as quantitative criteria for evaluating development of neurological function.

  18. Soft neurological signs in childhood by measurement of arm movements using acceleration and angular velocity sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Miki; Yamashita, Yushiro; Inomoto, Osamu; Iramina, Keiji

    2015-10-12

    Soft neurological signs (SNS) are evident in the motor performance of children and disappear as the child grows up. Therefore SNS are used as criteria for evaluating age-appropriate development of neurological function. The aim of this study was to quantify SNS during arm movement in childhood. In this study, we focused on pronation and supination, which are arm movements included in the SNS examination. Two hundred and twenty-three typically developing children aged 4-12 years (107 boys, 116 girls) and 18 adults aged 21-26 years (16 males, two females) participated in the experiment. To quantify SNS during pronation and supination, we calculated several evaluation index scores: bimanual symmetry, compliance, postural stability, motor speed and mirror movement. These index scores were evaluated using data obtained from sensors attached to the participants' hands and elbows. Each score increased as age increased. Results obtained using our system showed developmental changes that were consistent with criteria for SNS. We were able to successfully quantify SNS during pronation and supination. These results indicate that it may be possible to use our system as quantitative criteria for evaluating development of neurological function.

  19. Design of channel experiment equipment for measuring coolant velocity of innovative research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Subekti; Endiah Puji Hastuti; Dedi Heriyanto

    2014-01-01

    The design of innovative high flux research reactor (RRI) requires high power so that the capability core cooling requires to be improved by designing the faster core coolant velocity near to the critical velocity limit. Hence, the critical coolant velocity as the one of the important parameter of the reactor safety shall be measured by special equipment to the velocity limit that may induce fuel element degradation. The research aims is to calculate theoretically the critical coolant velocity and to design the special experiment equipment namely EXNal for measuring the critical coolant velocity in fuel element subchannel of the RRI. EXNal design considers the critical velocity calculation result of 20.52 m/s to determine the variation of flow rate of 4.5-29.2 m 3 /h, in which the experiment could simulate the 1-4X standard coolant velocity of RSG-GAS as well as destructive test of RRI's fuel plate. (author)

  20. Effect of Reduced Stiffness Dance Flooring on Lower Extremity Joint Angular Trajectories During a Ballet Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, James; Brummel, Sara; Newman, Mary; Scott, Shannon; Reinagel, Matthew; Smith, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    We carried out a study to investigate how low stiffness flooring may help prevent overuse injuries of the lower extremity in dancers. It was hypothesized that performing a ballet jump (sauté) on a reduced stiffness dance floor would decrease maximum joint flexion angles and negative angular velocities at the hips, knees, or ankles compared to performing the same jump on a harder floor. The participants were 15 young adult female dancers (age range 18 to 28, mean = 20.89 ± 2.93 years) with at least 5 years of continuous ballet experience and without history of serious lower body injury, surgery, or recent pain. They performed sautés on a (low stiffness) Harlequin ® WoodSpring Floor and on a vinyl-covered hardwood on concrete floor. Maximum joint flexion angles and negative velocities at bilateral hips, knees, and ankles were measured with the "Ariel Performance Analysis System" (APAS). Paired one-tailed t-tests yielded significant decreases in maximum knee angle (average decrease = 3.4° ± 4.2°, p = 0.026) and angular negative velocity of the ankles (average decrease = 18.7°/sec ± 27.9°/sec, p = 0.009) with low stiffness flooring. If the knee angle is less acute, then the length of the external knee flexion moment arm will also be shorter and result in a smaller external knee flexion moment, given an equal landing force. Also, high velocities of eccentric muscle contraction, which are necessary to control negative angular velocity of the ankle joint, are associated with higher risk of musculotendinous injury. Hence, our findings indicate that reduced floor stiffness may indeed help decrease the likelihood of lower extremity injuries.

  1. Modified circular velocity law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghloul, Nazim

    2018-05-01

    A modified circular velocity law is presented for a test body orbiting around a spherically symmetric mass. This law exhibits a distance scale parameter and allows to recover both usual Newtonian behaviour for lower distances and a constant velocity limit at large scale. Application to the Galaxy predicts the known behaviour and also leads to a galactic mass in accordance with the measured visible stellar mass so that additional dark matter inside the Galaxy can be avoided. It is also shown that this circular velocity law can be embedded in a geometrical description of spacetime within the standard general relativity framework upon relaxing the usual asymptotic flatness condition. This formulation allows to redefine the introduced Newtonian scale limit in term of the central mass exclusively. Moreover, a satisfactory answer to the galactic escape speed problem can be provided indicating the possibility that one can also get rid of dark matter halo outside the Galaxy.

  2. Canonical three-body angular basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveenko, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    Three-body problems are basic for the quantum mechanics of molecular, atomic, or nuclear systems. We demonstrate that their variational solution for rotational states can be greatly simplified. A special choice of coordinates (hyperspherical) and of the kinematics (body-fixed coordinate frame) allows one to choose basis functions in a form that makes the angular coupling trivial. (author)

  3. Probabilistic calculation for angular dependence collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarino, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    This collision probabilistic method is broadly used in cylindrical geometry (in one- or two-dimensions). It constitutes a powerful tool for the heterogeneous Response Method where, the coupling current is of the cosine type, that is, without angular dependence at azimuthal angle θ and proportional to μ (cosine of the θ polar angle). (Author) [es

  4. Wigner Functions and Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Asmita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wigner distributions contain combined position and momentum space information of the quark distributions and are related to both generalized parton distributions (GPDs and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs. We report on a recent model calculation of the Wigner distributions for the quark and their relation to the orbital angular momentum.

  5. Wigner Functions and Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Asmita; Nair, Sreeraj; Ojha, Vikash Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Wigner distributions contain combined position and momentum space information of the quark distributions and are related to both generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs). We report on a recent model calculation of the Wigner distributions for the quark and their relation to the orbital angular momentum.

  6. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s−2. Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability.

  7. Angular-momentum-bearing modes in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-03-01

    The angular-momentum-bearing degrees of freedom involved in the fission process are identified and their influence on experimental observables is discussed. The excitation of these modes is treated in the ''thermal'' limit, and the resulting distributions of observables are calculated. Experiments demonstrating the role of these modes are presented and discussed. 61 refs., 12 figs

  8. Angular and linear momentum of excited ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, P.; Kamra, A.; Cao, Y.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2013-01-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist

  9. Angular distribution in ternary cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delion, D.S.; J.W. Goethe Univ., Frankfurt; Sandulescu, A.; J.W. Goethe Univ., Frankfurt; Greiner, W.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the spontaneous ternary cold fission of 252 Cf, accompanied by 4 He, 10 Be and 14 C. The light cluster decays from the first resonant eigenstate in the Coulomb potential plus a harmonic oscillator potential. We have shown that the angular distribution of the emitted light particle is strongly connected with its deformation and the equatorial distance. (author)

  10. Heteromodal conceptual processing in the angular gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Michael F; Peelle, Jonathan E; Cook, Philip A; Grossman, Murray

    2013-05-01

    Concepts bind together the features commonly associated with objects and events to form networks in long-term semantic memory. These conceptual networks are the basis of human knowledge and underlie perception, imagination, and the ability to communicate about experiences and the contents of the environment. Although it is often assumed that this distributed semantic information is integrated in higher-level heteromodal association cortices, open questions remain about the role and anatomic basis of heteromodal representations in semantic memory. Here we used combined neuroimaging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize the cortical networks underlying concept representation. Using a lexical decision task, we examined the processing of concepts in four semantic categories that varied on their sensory-motor feature associations (sight, sound, manipulation, and abstract). We found that the angular gyrus was activated across all categories regardless of their modality-specific feature associations, consistent with a heteromodal account for the angular gyrus. Exploratory analyses suggested that categories with weighted sensory-motor features additionally recruited modality-specific association cortices. Furthermore, DTI tractography identified white matter tracts connecting these regions of modality-specific functional activation with the angular gyrus. These findings are consistent with a distributed semantic network that includes a heteromodal, integrative component in the angular gyrus in combination with sensory-motor feature representations in modality-specific association cortices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ANGULAR MOMENTUM ACQUISITION IN GALAXY HALOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Bullock, James S.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; Diemand, Jürg; Wadsley, James; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2013-01-01

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to study the angular momentum acquisition of gaseous halos around Milky-Way-sized galaxies. We find that cold mode accreted gas enters a galaxy halo with ∼70% more specific angular momentum than dark matter averaged over cosmic time (though with a very large dispersion). In fact, we find that all matter has a higher spin parameter when measured at accretion than when averaged over the entire halo lifetime, and is well characterized by λ ∼ 0.1, at accretion. Combined with the fact that cold flow gas spends a relatively short time (1-2 dynamical times) in the halo before sinking to the center, this naturally explains why cold flow halo gas has a specific angular momentum much higher than that of the halo and often forms ''cold flow disks.'' We demonstrate that the higher angular momentum of cold flow gas is related to the fact that it tends to be accreted along filaments.

  12. W UMa stars and angular momentum loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilhu, O.; Rahunen, T.

    1980-01-01

    The structure and evolution of W UMa stars is still unsolved although considerable progress has been achieved in recent years. The authors aim is to find out whether it is possible to obtain more extreme mass ratios, what is the angular momentum needed and what is the time scale. (Auth.)

  13. A search for anisotrophy in the cosmic microwave background on intermediate angular scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, D. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Clapp, A. C.; Cottingham, D. A.; Fischer, M. L.; Gundersen, J. O.; Kreysa, E.; Lange, A. E.; Lubin, P. M.; Meinhold, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a search for anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background on angular scales near 1 deg are presented. Observations were simultaneously performed in bands centered at frequencies of 6, 9, and 12 per cm with a multifrequency bolometric receiver mounted on a balloon-borne telescope. The statistical sensitivity of the data is the highest reported to date at this angular scale, which is of critical importance for understanding the formation of structure in the universe. Signals in excess of random were observed in the data. The experiment, data analysis, and interpretation are described.

  14. Phoenix II energy extraction and angular multiplexing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, J.M.; Hays, G.N.

    1981-08-01

    The energy extraction efficiency as a function of input intensity has been determined from a large-volume HF amplifier. For an input intensity of 4 x 10 6 W/cm 2 , 1080 Joules was extracted from the amplifier. This corresponded to an energy extraction efficiency of 0.90. At the highest H 2 /F 2 /O 2 pressures used, 1700 Joules was obtained from this system when used in an oscillator configuration. These results also show evidence that energy extraction at low input intensities in large-volume HF amplifiers is strongly influenced by parasitic oscillations. The results also indicate that, for a long-pulse HF amplifier (60-nsec electron beam), the timing between the amplifier and oscillator to achieve optimum operating conditions is not very critical. This same amplifier, used in conjunction with a short-pulse, good-beam-quality oscillator-preamplifier chain, has also been used to evaluate pulse compression using angular multiplexing. Using two sequential 24-nsec pulses, the essential elements of angular multiplexing have been evaluated as a function of interpulse separation time. Included are energy extraction efficiency, overall temporal pulse distortion, leading-edge contrast-ratio distortion, and suppression of amplified spontaneous emission relative to a single, long-duration input pulse. For appropriate interpulse delay time, we show that distortionless amplification is possible with energy-extraction efficiency the same as is obtained using a single input beam having a pulse width equal to the duration of the amplifier gain

  15. Schematic memory components converge within angular gyrus during retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Isabella C; van Buuren, Mariët; Kroes, Marijn CW; Gutteling, Tjerk P; van der Linden, Marieke; Morris, Richard G; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-01-01

    Mental schemas form associative knowledge structures that can promote the encoding and consolidation of new and related information. Schemas are facilitated by a distributed system that stores components separately, presumably in the form of inter-connected neocortical representations. During retrieval, these components need to be recombined into one representation, but where exactly such recombination takes place is unclear. Thus, we asked where different schema components are neuronally represented and converge during retrieval. Subjects acquired and retrieved two well-controlled, rule-based schema structures during fMRI on consecutive days. Schema retrieval was associated with midline, medial-temporal, and parietal processing. We identified the multi-voxel representations of different schema components, which converged within the angular gyrus during retrieval. Critically, convergence only happened after 24-hour-consolidation and during a transfer test where schema material was applied to novel but related trials. Therefore, the angular gyrus appears to recombine consolidated schema components into one memory representation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09668.001 PMID:26575291

  16. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  17. Multidisc neutron velocity selector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosta, L.; Zsigmond, Gy.; Farago, B.; Mezei, F.; Ban, K.; Perendi, J.

    1987-12-01

    The prototype of a velocity selector for neutron monochromatization in the 4-20 A wavelength range is presented. The theoretical background of the multidisc rotor system is given together with a description of the mechanical construction and electronic driving system. The first tests and neutron measurements prove easy handling and excellent parameters. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. Coding of Velocity Storage in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei B. Yakushin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Semicircular canal afferents sense angular acceleration and output angular velocity with a short time constant of ≈4.5 s. This output is prolonged by a central integrative network, velocity storage that lengthens the time constants of eye velocity. This mechanism utilizes canal, otolith, and visual (optokinetic information to align the axis of eye velocity toward the spatial vertical when head orientation is off-vertical axis. Previous studies indicated that vestibular-only (VO and vestibular-pause-saccade (VPS neurons located in the medial and superior vestibular nucleus could code all aspects of velocity storage. A recently developed technique enabled prolonged recording while animals were rotated and received optokinetic stimulation about a spatial vertical axis while upright, side-down, prone, and supine. Firing rates of 33 VO and 8 VPS neurons were studied in alert cynomolgus monkeys. Majority VO neurons were closely correlated with the horizontal component of velocity storage in head coordinates, regardless of head orientation in space. Approximately, half of all tested neurons (46% code horizontal component of velocity in head coordinates, while the other half (54% changed their firing rates as the head was oriented relative to the spatial vertical, coding the horizontal component of eye velocity in spatial coordinates. Some VO neurons only coded the cross-coupled pitch or roll components that move the axis of eye rotation toward the spatial vertical. Sixty-five percent of these VO and VPS neurons were more sensitive to rotation in one direction (predominantly contralateral, providing directional orientation for the subset of VO neurons on either side of the brainstem. This indicates that the three-dimensional velocity storage integrator is composed of directional subsets of neurons that are likely to be the bases for the spatial characteristics of velocity storage. Most VPS neurons ceased firing during drowsiness, but the firing

  19. Eccentricity samples: Implications on the potential and the velocity distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubarsi R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. No 176011: Dynamics and Kinematics of Celestial Bodies and Systems

  20. THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF MAGNETIZED MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES: A TWO-DIMENSIONAL-THREE-DIMENSIONAL COMPARISON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dib, Sami; Csengeri, Timea; Audit, Edouard; Hennebelle, Patrick; Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a detailed study of the rotational properties of magnetized and self-gravitating dense molecular cloud (MC) cores formed in a set of two very high resolution three-dimensional (3D) MC simulations with decaying turbulence. The simulations have been performed using the adaptative mesh refinement code RAMSES with an effective resolution of 4096 3 grid cells. One simulation represents a mildly magnetically supercritical cloud and the other a strongly magnetically supercritical cloud. We identify dense cores at a number of selected epochs in the simulations at two density thresholds which roughly mimic the excitation densities of the NH 3 (J - K) = (1,1) transition and the N 2 H + (1-0) emission line. A noticeable global difference between the two simulations is the core formation efficiency (CFE) of the high-density cores. In the strongly supercritical simulations, the CFE is 33% per unit free-fall time of the cloud (t ff,cl ), whereas in the mildly supercritical simulations this value goes down to ∼6 per unit t ff,cl . A comparison of the intrinsic specific angular momentum (j 3D ) distributions of the cores with the specific angular momentum derived using synthetic two-dimensional (2D) velocity maps of the cores (j 2D ) shows that the synthetic observations tend to overestimate the true value of the specific angular momentum by a factor of ∼8-10. We find that the distribution of the ratio j 3D /j 2D of the cores peaks at around ∼0.1. The origin of this discrepancy lies in the fact that contrary to the intrinsic determination of j which sums up the individual gas parcels' contributions to the angular momentum, the determination of the specific angular momentum using the standard observational procedure which is based on a measurement on the global velocity gradient under the hypothesis of uniform rotation smoothes out the complex fluctuations present in the 3D velocity field. Our results may well provide a natural explanation for the

  1. Active Brownian particles with velocity-alignment and active fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Großmann, R; Schimansky-Geier, L; Romanczuk, P

    2012-01-01

    We consider a model of active Brownian particles (ABPs) with velocity alignment in two spatial dimensions with passive and active fluctuations. Here, active fluctuations refers to purely non-equilibrium stochastic forces correlated with the heading of an individual active particle. In the simplest case studied here, they are assumed to be independent stochastic forces parallel (speed noise) and perpendicular (angular noise) to the velocity of the particle. On the other hand, passive fluctuations are defined by a noise vector independent of the direction of motion of a particle, and may account, for example, for thermal fluctuations. We derive a macroscopic description of the ABP gas with velocity-alignment interaction. Here, we start from the individual-based description in terms of stochastic differential equations (Langevin equations) and derive equations of motion for the coarse-grained kinetic variables (density, velocity and temperature) via a moment expansion of the corresponding probability density function. We focus here on the different impact of active and passive fluctuations on onset of collective motion and show how active fluctuations in the active Brownian dynamics can change the phase-transition behaviour of the system. In particular, we show that active angular fluctuations lead to an earlier breakdown of collective motion and to the emergence of a new bistable regime in the mean-field case. (paper)

  2. Nucleon form factors, generalized parton distributions and quark angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kroll, Peter [Bergische Univ., Wuppertal (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-02-15

    We extract the individual contributions from u and d quarks to the Dirac and Pauli form factors of the proton, after a critical examination of the available measurements of electromagnetic nucleon form factors. From this data we determine generalized parton distributions for valence quarks, assuming a particular form for their functional dependence. The result allows us to study various aspects of nucleon structure in the valence region. In particular, we evaluate Ji's sum rule and estimate the total angular momentum carried by valence quarks at the scale {mu}=2 GeV to be J{sup u}{sub v}=0.230{sup +0.009}{sub -0.024} and J{sup d}{sub v}=-0.004{sup +0.010}{sub -0.016}.

  3. Nucleon form factors, generalized parton distributions and quark angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, Markus; Kroll, Peter; Regensburg Univ.

    2013-02-01

    We extract the individual contributions from u and d quarks to the Dirac and Pauli form factors of the proton, after a critical examination of the available measurements of electromagnetic nucleon form factors. From this data we determine generalized parton distributions for valence quarks, assuming a particular form for their functional dependence. The result allows us to study various aspects of nucleon structure in the valence region. In particular, we evaluate Ji's sum rule and estimate the total angular momentum carried by valence quarks at the scale μ=2 GeV to be J u v =0.230 +0.009 -0.024 and J d v =-0.004 +0.010 -0.016 .

  4. Multichannel system for angular distribution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Putz, K.

    A description is given of the individual blocks of the spectrometric apparatus used for measuring the angular distribution of particle spectra and excitation functions of (d,p) reactions at an electrostatic accelerator and the U-120 M cyclotron, both operating at the Nuclear Physics Institute of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences at Rez. Main attention was devoted to attaining maximum energy resolution at a high measurement efficiency, this by installing 8 independent spectrometric chains allowing simultaneous measurement of angular distribution in 8 points of the beam. The semiconductor detectors were cooled to -40 degC to -60 degC, which significantly reduced the level of inherent detector noise. An energy resolution of 13 keV was attained using Tesla detectors at a particle energy of 11 MeV. A brief review of data processing and software is given. (B.S.)

  5. Quantum entanglement of high angular momenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Plick, William N; Krenn, Mario; Schaeff, Christoph; Ramelow, Sven; Zeilinger, Anton

    2012-11-02

    Single photons with helical phase structures may carry a quantized amount of orbital angular momentum (OAM), and their entanglement is important for quantum information science and fundamental tests of quantum theory. Because there is no theoretical upper limit on how many quanta of OAM a single photon can carry, it is possible to create entanglement between two particles with an arbitrarily high difference in quantum number. By transferring polarization entanglement to OAM with an interferometric scheme, we generate and verify entanglement between two photons differing by 600 in quantum number. The only restrictive factors toward higher numbers are current technical limitations. We also experimentally demonstrate that the entanglement of very high OAM can improve the sensitivity of angular resolution in remote sensing.

  6. Behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, F.S.

    1982-07-01

    The present report begins with a brief overview of nuclear shapes and level structures at high-spin values. The new spectroscopy associated with angular-momentum alignments is described, and some of the exciting possibilities of this spectroscopy are explored. Nuclear moments of inertia are discussed and a somewhat different one is defined, together with a method for measuring it and some early results. Finally a few comments on the future prospects for high-spin physics are offered

  7. Chirality and angular momentum in optical radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Matt M.; Andrews, David L.

    2012-06-01

    This paper develops, in precise quantum electrodynamic terms, photonic attributes of the “optical chirality density,” one of several measures long known to be conserved quantities for a vacuum electromagnetic field. The analysis lends insights into some recent interpretations of chiroptical experiments, in which this measure, and an associated chirality flux, have been treated as representing physically distinctive “superchiral” phenomena. In the fully quantized formalism the chirality density is promoted to operator status, whose exploration with reference to an arbitrary polarization basis reveals relationships to optical angular momentum and helicity operators. Analyzing multimode beams with complex wave-front structures, notably Laguerre-Gaussian modes, affords a deeper understanding of the interplay between optical chirality and optical angular momentum. By developing theory with due cognizance of the photonic character of light, it emerges that only the spin-angular momentum of light is engaged in such observations. Furthermore, it is shown that these prominent measures of the helicity of chiral electromagnetic radiation have a common basis in differences between the populations of optical modes associated with angular momenta of opposite sign. Using a calculation of the rate of circular dichroism as an example, with coherent states to model the electromagnetic field, it is discovered that two terms contribute to the differential effect. The primary contribution relates to the difference in left- and right-handed photon populations; the only other contribution, which displays a sinusoidal distance dependence corresponding to the claim of nodal enhancements, is connected with the quantum photon number-phase uncertainty relation. From the full analysis, it appears that the term “superchiral” can be considered redundant.

  8. Coherent Control of Photoelectron Wavepacket Angular Interferograms

    OpenAIRE

    Hockett, Paul; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Baumert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the cohere...

  9. Adaptive Angular Sampling for SPECT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Nan; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach for performing adaptive angular sampling in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. It allows for a rapid determination of the optimum sampling strategy that minimizes image variance in regions-of-interest (ROIs). The proposed method consists of three key components: (a) a set of close-form equations for evaluating image variance and resolution attainable with a given sampling strategy, (b) a gradient-based algor...

  10. Angular distribution of laser ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Dabrowski, R.; Okamura, M.

    2010-01-01

    An expansion of a laser induced plasma is fundamental and important phenomena in a laser ion source. To understand the expanding direction, an array of Langmuir probes were employed. The chosen ion for the experiment was Ag 1+ which was created by a second harmonics of a Nd-YAG laser. The obtained angular distribution was about ±10 degree. This result also indicates a proper positioning of a solenoid magnet which enhances ion beam current.

  11. Coincident-inclusive electrofission angular correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda Neto, J.D.T.

    1983-08-01

    A method for the joint analysis of coincident and inclusive electrofission data, in order to minimize effects of the model dependence of data interpretation, is developed. Explicit calculations of the (e,e'f) angular correlations are presented. The potentialities of the method to the study of sub- and near-barrier properties of the fission process, and to the study of the giant resonances fission mode, are discussed. (Author) [pt

  12. Asymmetric Velocity Distributions from Halo Density Profiles in the Eddington Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    We show how to obtain the energy distribution f(E) in our vicinity starting from WIMP density profiles in a self-consistent way by employing the Eddington approach and adding reasonable angular momentum dependent terms in the expression of the energy. We then show how we can obtain the velocity dispersions and the asymmetry parameter β in terms of the parameters describing the angular momentum dependence. From this expression, for f(E), we proceed to construct an axially symmetric WIMP a velocity distribution, which, for a gravitationally bound system, automatically has a velocity upper bound and is characterized by the same asymmetriy β. This approach is tested and clarified by constructing analytic expressions in a simple model, with adequate structure. We then show how such velocity distributions can be used in determining the event rates, including modulation, in both the standard and the directional WIMP searches.

  13. Multidisk neutron velocity selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, B.

    1992-01-01

    Helical multidisk velocity selectors used for neutron scattering applications have been analyzed and tested experimentally. Design and performance considerations are discussed along with simple explanation of the basic concept. A simple progression is used for the inter-disk spacing in the 'Rosta' design. Ray tracing computer investigations are presented in order to assess the 'coverage' (how many absorbing layers are stacked along the path of 'wrong' wavelength neutrons) and the relative number of neutrons absorbed in each disk (and therefore the relative amount of gamma radiation emitted from each disk). We discuss whether a multidisk velocity selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration (i.e. the selector is turned by 180 0 around a vertical axis with the rotor spun in the reverse direction). Experimental tests and calibration of a multidisk selector are reported together with evidence that a multidisk selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration. (orig.)

  14. Constraints on radial migration in spiral galaxies - II. Angular momentum distribution and preferential migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Kathryne J.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2018-05-01

    The orbital angular momentum of individual stars in galactic discs can be permanently changed through torques from transient spiral patterns. Interactions at the corotation resonance dominate these changes and have the further property of conserving orbital circularity. We derived in an earlier paper an analytic criterion that an unperturbed stellar orbit must satisfy in order for such an interaction to occur, i.e. for it to be in a trapped orbit around corotation. We here use this criterion in an investigation of how the efficiency of induced radial migration for a population of disc stars varies with the angular momentum distribution of that population. We frame our results in terms of the velocity dispersion of the population, this being an easier observable than is the angular momentum distribution. Specifically, we investigate how the fraction of stars in trapped orbits at corotation varies with the velocity dispersion of the population, for a system with an assumed flat rotation curve. Our analytic results agree with the finding from simulations that radial migration is less effective in populations with `hotter' kinematics. We further quantify the dependence of this trapped fraction on the strength of the spiral pattern, finding a higher trapped fraction for higher amplitude perturbations.

  15. Revolution evolution: tracing angular momentum during star and planetary system formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Claire Louise

    2015-04-01

    Stars form via the gravitational collapse of molecular clouds during which time the protostellar object contracts by over seven orders of magnitude. If all the angular momentum present in the natal cloud was conserved during collapse, stars would approach rotational velocities rapid enough to tear themselves apart within just a few Myr. In contrast to this, observations of pre-main sequence rotation rates are relatively slow (∼ 1 - 15 days) indicating that significant quantities of angular momentum must be removed from the star. I use observations of fully convective pre-main sequence stars in two well-studied, nearby regions of star formation (namely the Orion Nebula Cluster and Taurus-Auriga) to determine the removal rate of stellar angular momentum. I find the accretion disc-hosting stars to be rotating at a slower rate and contain less specific angular momentum than the disc-less stars. I interpret this as indicating a period of accretion disc-regulated angular momentum evolution followed by near-constant rotational evolution following disc dispersal. Furthermore, assuming that the age spread inferred from the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram constructed for the star forming region is real, I find that the removal rate of angular momentum during the accretion-disc hosting phase to be more rapid than that expected from simple disc-locking theory whereby contraction occurs at a fixed rotation period. This indicates a more efficient process of angular momentum removal must operate, most likely in the form of an accretion-driven stellar wind or outflow emanating from the star-disc interaction. The initial circumstellar envelope that surrounds a protostellar object during the earliest stages of star formation is rotationally flattened into a disc as the star contracts. An effective viscosity, present within the disc, enables the disc to evolve: mass accretes inwards through the disc and onto the star while momentum migrates outwards, forcing the outer regions of the

  16. Positron annihilation and perturbed angular correlation studies of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jiazheng; Li Anli; Xu Yongjun; Wang Zhiqiang; Zhou Dongmei; Zheng Yongnan; Zhu Shengyun; Iwata, T.

    2002-01-01

    The positron annihilation and perturbed angular correlation techniques have been employed to study radiation damage in Si and Nb. The results obtained by the positron annihilation are consistent with those given by the perturbed angular correlation

  17. Sorting and quantifying orbital angular momentum of laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel tool for sorting the orbital angular momentum and to determine the orbital angular momentum density of laser beams, which is based on the use of correlation filters....

  18. High Angular Momentum Rydberg Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyker, Brendan

    2011-12-01

    High angular momentum Rydberg wave packets are studied. Application of carefully tailored electric fields to low angular momentum, high- n (n ˜ 300) Rydberg atoms creates coherent superpositions of Stark states with near extreme values of angular momentum, ℓ. Wave packet components orbit the parent nucleus at rates that depend on their energy, leading to periods of localization and delocalization as the components come into and go out of phase with each other. Monitoring survival probability signals in the presence of position dependent probing leads to observation of characteristic oscillations based on the composition of the wave packet. The discrete nature of electron energy levels is observed through the measurement of quantum revivals in the wave packet localization signal. Time-domain spectroscopy of these signals allows determination of both the population and phase of individual superposition components. Precise manipulation of wave packets is achieved through further application of pulsed electric fields. Decoherence effects due to background gas collisions and electrical noise are also detailed. Quantized classical trajectory Monte-Carlo simulations are introduced and agree remarkably well with experimental results.

  19. Verification of angular dependence in MOSFET detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Clayton H.; Shorto, Julian M.B.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Nunes, Maíra G.; Silva Junior, Iremar A.; Yoriyaz, Hélio, E-mail: chsouza@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry is an essential tool for quality assurance programs, being a procedure commonly performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) or diodes. However, a type of dosimeter that has increasing popularity in recent years is the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector. MOSFET dosimeters fulfill all the necessary characteristics to realize in vivo dosimetry since it has a small size, good precision and feasibility of measurement, as well as easy handling. Nevertheless, its true differential is to allow reading of the dose in real time, enabling immediate intervention in the correction of physical parameters deviations and anticipation of small anatomical changes in a patient during treatment. In order for MOSFET dosimeter to be better accepted in clinical routine, information reporting performance should be available frequently. For this reason, this work proposes to verify reproducibility and angular dependence of a standard sensitivity MOSFET dosimeter (TN-502RD-H) for Cs-137 and Co-60 sources. Experimental data were satisfactory and MOSFET dosimeter presented a reproducibility of 3.3% and 2.7% (1 SD) for Cs-137 and Co-60 sources, respectively. In addition, an angular dependence of up to 6.1% and 16.3% for both radioactive sources, respectively. It is conclusive that MOSFET dosimeter TN-502RD-H has satisfactory reproducibility and a considerable angular dependence, mainly for the Co-60 source. This means that although precise measurements, special attention must be taken for applications in certain anatomical regions in a patient. (author)

  20. Physics from angular projection of rectangular grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ashmeet

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model for the angular projection of a rectangular arrangement of points in a grid. This simple yet interesting, problem has both scholarly value and applications for data extraction techniques to study the physics of various systems. Our work may help undergraduate students to understand subtle points in the angular projection of a grid and describes various quantities of interest in the projection with completeness and sufficient rigour. We show that for certain angular ranges, the projection has non-distinctness, and calculate the details of such angles, and correspondingly, the number of distinct points and the total projected length. We focus on interesting trends obtained for the projected length of the grid elements and present a simple application of the model to determine the geometry of an unknown grid whose spatial extensions are known, using measurement of the grid projection at two angles only. Towards the end, our model is shown to have potential applications in various branches of physical sciences, including crystallography, astrophysics, and bulk properties of materials. (paper)

  1. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  2. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriage, Tobias; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John; Bennett, Charles; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from inflation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  3. Continuous particle spectra and their angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, Ch.V.; Jain, R.K.; Rama Rao, J.; Ernst, J.; Machner, H.

    1996-01-01

    The angular distribution of continuous particle spectra in pre-equilibrium reactions is still an unsolved problem, particularly so at forward angles. In the present work, the angular distributions of alpha particles emitted in (α, α',x) reactions in the target elements gold and rhodium have been studied in detail. Alpha particle beams of energy 60 MeV from the Variable Energy Cyclotron of Calcutta were used in these experiments. The theoretical calculations were done using an extended exciton model of Kalbach incorporated into the Computer Code PRECO-D2. The formalism used in the exciton model was modified to include division of pre equilibrium cross section into multi-step direct (MSD) and multi-step compound (MSC) components. These MSD and MSC cross sections were used to calculate the angular distributions in terms of Legendre polynomials whose coefficients are given by simple phenomenological relations. Even with a reasonable set of parameters, the agreement between theory and experiment was far from satisfactory at forward angles. Similar conclusion was also drawn in the case of continuous particle spectra of deuterons in (d, d'x) reactions at 25 MeV in various targets. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs

  4. Verification of angular dependence in MOSFET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Clayton H.; Shorto, Julian M.B.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Nunes, Maíra G.; Silva Junior, Iremar A.; Yoriyaz, Hélio

    2017-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry is an essential tool for quality assurance programs, being a procedure commonly performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) or diodes. However, a type of dosimeter that has increasing popularity in recent years is the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector. MOSFET dosimeters fulfill all the necessary characteristics to realize in vivo dosimetry since it has a small size, good precision and feasibility of measurement, as well as easy handling. Nevertheless, its true differential is to allow reading of the dose in real time, enabling immediate intervention in the correction of physical parameters deviations and anticipation of small anatomical changes in a patient during treatment. In order for MOSFET dosimeter to be better accepted in clinical routine, information reporting performance should be available frequently. For this reason, this work proposes to verify reproducibility and angular dependence of a standard sensitivity MOSFET dosimeter (TN-502RD-H) for Cs-137 and Co-60 sources. Experimental data were satisfactory and MOSFET dosimeter presented a reproducibility of 3.3% and 2.7% (1 SD) for Cs-137 and Co-60 sources, respectively. In addition, an angular dependence of up to 6.1% and 16.3% for both radioactive sources, respectively. It is conclusive that MOSFET dosimeter TN-502RD-H has satisfactory reproducibility and a considerable angular dependence, mainly for the Co-60 source. This means that although precise measurements, special attention must be taken for applications in certain anatomical regions in a patient. (author)

  5. Angular momentum independence of the entropy sum and entropy product for AdS rotating black holes in all dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the angular momentum independence of the entropy sum and product for AdS rotating black holes based on the first law of thermodynamics and a mathematical lemma related to Vandermonde determinant. The advantage of this method is that the explicit forms of the spacetime metric, black hole mass and charge are not needed but the Hawking temperature and entropy formula on the horizons are necessary for static black holes, while our calculations require the expressions of metric and angular velocity formula. We find that the entropy sum is always independent of angular momentum for all dimensions and the angular momentum-independence of entropy product only holds for the dimensions d>4 with at least one rotation parameter ai=0, while the mass-free of entropy sum and entropy product for rotating black holes only stand for higher dimensions (d>4 and for all dimensions, respectively. On the other hand, we find that the introduction of a negative cosmological constant does not affect the angular momentum-free of entropy sum and product but the criterion for angular momentum-independence of entropy product will be affected.

  6. A Role for the Left Angular Gyrus in Episodic Simulation and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Preston P; Madore, Kevin P; Schacter, Daniel L

    2017-08-23

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies indicate that episodic simulation (i.e., imagining specific future experiences) and episodic memory (i.e., remembering specific past experiences) are associated with enhanced activity in a common set of neural regions referred to as the core network. This network comprises the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and left angular gyrus, among other regions. Because fMRI data are correlational, it is unknown whether activity increases in core network regions are critical for episodic simulation and episodic memory. In the current study, we used MRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess whether temporary disruption of the left angular gyrus would impair both episodic simulation and memory (16 participants, 10 females). Relative to TMS to a control site (vertex), disruption of the left angular gyrus significantly reduced the number of internal (i.e., episodic) details produced during the simulation and memory tasks, with a concomitant increase in external detail production (i.e., semantic, repetitive, or off-topic information), reflected by a significant detail by TMS site interaction. Difficulty in the simulation and memory tasks also increased after TMS to the left angular gyrus relative to the vertex. In contrast, performance in a nonepisodic control task did not differ statistically as a function of TMS site (i.e., number of free associates produced or difficulty in performing the free associate task). Together, these results are the first to demonstrate that the left angular gyrus is critical for both episodic simulation and episodic memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Humans have the ability to imagine future episodes (i.e., episodic simulation) and remember episodes from the past (i.e., episodic memory). A wealth of neuroimaging studies have revealed that these abilities are associated with enhanced activity in a core network of neural regions, including the hippocampus, medial prefrontal

  7. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D., E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar, E-mail: membiela@mdp.edu.ar, E-mail: sanchez@mdp.edu.ar [IFIMAR (CONICET-UNMdP), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Deán Funes (7600) 3350 Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-03-01

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  8. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D.

    2015-01-01

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis

  9. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D. [IFIMAR (CONICET-UNMdP), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Deán Funes (7600) 3350 Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-03-27

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  10. Natural roller bearing fault detection by angular measurement of true instantaneous angular speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaudin, L.; Bonnardot, F.; Musy, O.; Doray, J. B.; Rémond, D.

    2010-10-01

    The challenge in many production activities involving large mechanical devices like power transmissions consists in reducing the machine downtime, in managing repairs and in improving operating time. Most online monitoring systems are based on conventional vibration measurement devices for gear transmissions or bearings in mechanical components. In this paper, we propose an alternative way of bearing condition monitoring based on the instantaneous angular speed measurement. By the help of a large experimental investigation on two different applications, we prove that localized faults like pitting in bearing generate small angular speed fluctuations which are measurable with optical or magnetic encoders. We also emphasize the benefits of measuring instantaneous angular speed with the pulse timing method through an implicit angular sampling which ensures insensitivity to speed fluctuation. A wide range of operating conditions have been tested for the two applications with varying speed, load, external excitations, gear ratio, etc. The tests performed on an automotive gearbox or on actual operating vehicle wheels also establish the robustness of the proposed methodology. By the means of a conventional Fourier transform, angular frequency channels kinematically related to the fault periodicity show significant magnitude differences related to the damage severity. Sideband effects are evidently seen when the fault is located on rotating parts of the bearing due to load modulation. Additionally, slip effects are also suspected to be at the origin of enlargement of spectrum peaks in the case of double row bearings loaded in a pure radial direction.

  11. The key kinematic determinants of undulatory underwater swimming at maximal velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaboy, Chris; Naemi, Roozbeh; Brown, Susan; Psycharakis, Stelios; McCabe, Carla; Coleman, Simon; Sanders, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The optimisation of undulatory underwater swimming is highly important in competitive swimming performance. Nineteen kinematic variables were identified from previous research undertaken to assess undulatory underwater swimming performance. The purpose of the present study was to determine which kinematic variables were key to the production of maximal undulatory underwater swimming velocity. Kinematic data at maximal undulatory underwater swimming velocity were collected from 17 skilled swimmers. A series of separate backward-elimination analysis of covariance models was produced with cycle frequency and cycle length as dependent variables (DVs) and participant as a fixed factor, as including cycle frequency and cycle length would explain 100% of the maximal swimming velocity variance. The covariates identified in the cycle-frequency and cycle-length models were used to form the saturated model for maximal swimming velocity. The final parsimonious model identified three covariates (maximal knee joint angular velocity, maximal ankle angular velocity and knee range of movement) as determinants of the variance in maximal swimming velocity (adjusted-r2 = 0.929). However, when participant was removed as a fixed factor there was a large reduction in explained variance (adjusted r2 = 0.397) and only maximal knee joint angular velocity continued to contribute significantly, highlighting its importance to the production of maximal swimming velocity. The reduction in explained variance suggests an emphasis on inter-individual differences in undulatory underwater swimming technique and/or anthropometry. Future research should examine the efficacy of other anthropometric, kinematic and coordination variables to better understand the production of maximal swimming velocity and consider the importance of individual undulatory underwater swimming techniques when interpreting the data.

  12. Dark halos formed via dissipationless collapse. I - Shapes and alignment of angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Michael S.; Quinn, Peter J.; Salmon, John K.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    1992-11-01

    We use N-body simulations on highly parallel supercomputers to study the structure of Galactic dark matter halos. The systems form by gravitational collapse from scale-free and more general Gaussian initial density perturbations in an expanding 400 Mpc-cubed spherical slice of an Einstein-deSitter universe. We analyze the structure and kinematics of about 100 of the largest relaxed halos in each of 10 separate simulations. A typical halo is a triaxial spheroid which tends to be more often prolate than oblate. These shapes are maintained by anisotropic velocity dispersion rather than by angular momentum. Nevertheless, there is a significant tendency for the total angular momentum vector to be aligned with the minor axis of the density distribution.

  13. CriticalEd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Caspar Mølholt; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    . Since the comments are not input sequentially, with regard to position, but in arbitrary order, this list must be sorted by copy/pasting the rows into place—an error-prone and time-consuming process. Scholars who produce critical editions typically use off-the-shelf music notation software......The best text method is commonly applied among music scholars engaged in producing critical editions. In this method, a comment list is compiled, consisting of variant readings and editorial emendations. This list is maintained by inserting the comments into a document as the changes are made......, consisting of a Sibelius plug-in, a cross-platform application, called CriticalEd, and a REST-based solution, which handles data storage/retrieval. A prototype has been tested at the Danish Centre for Music Publication, and the results suggest that the system could greatly improve the efficiency...

  14. Angular dispersion and deflection function for heavy ion elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Zhen; Han Jianlong; Hu Zhengguo; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2007-01-01

    The differential cross sections for elastic scattering products of 17 F on 208 Pb have been measured. The angular dispersion plots of ln(dσ/dθ) versus θ 2 are obtained from the angular distribution of the elastic scattering differential cross sections. Systematical analysis on the angular dispersion for the available experimental data indicates that there is an angular dispersion turning angle at forward angular range within the grazing angle. This turning angle can be clarified as nuclear rainbow in classical deflection function. The exotic behaviour of the nuclear rainbow angle offers a new probe to investigate the halo and skin phenomena. (authors)

  15. Do Assimilated Drifter Velocities Improve Lagrangian Predictability in an Operational Ocean Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    extended Kalman filter . Molcard et al. (2005) used a statistical method to cor- relate model and drifter velocities. Taillandier et al. (2006) describe the... temperature and salinity observations. Trajectory angular differ- ences are also reduced. 1. Introduction The importance of Lagrangian forecasts was seen... Temperature , salinity, and sea surface height (SSH, measured along-track by satellite altimeters) observa- tions are typically assimilated in

  16. Generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory: correlations in molecular fluids with intrinsic angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J S; Daivis, Peter J; Dyre, Jeppe C; Todd, B D; Bruus, Henrik

    2013-01-21

    The extended Navier-Stokes theory accounts for the coupling between the translational and rotational molecular degrees of freedom. In this paper, we generalize this theory to non-zero frequencies and wavevectors, which enables a new study of spatio-temporal correlation phenomena present in molecular fluids. To discuss these phenomena in detail, molecular dynamics simulations of molecular chlorine are performed for three different state points. In general, the theory captures the behavior for small wavevector and frequencies as expected. For example, in the hydrodynamic regime and for molecular fluids with small moment of inertia like chlorine, the theory predicts that the longitudinal and transverse intrinsic angular velocity correlation functions are almost identical, which is also seen in the molecular dynamics simulations. However, the theory fails at large wavevector and frequencies. To account for the correlations at these scales, we derive a phenomenological expression for the frequency dependent rotational viscosity and wavevector and frequency dependent longitudinal spin viscosity. From this we observe a significant coupling enhancement between the molecular angular velocity and translational velocity for large frequencies in the gas phase; this is not observed for the supercritical fluid and liquid state points.

  17. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eduardo Lugo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs.By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone.Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  18. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Jesus Eduardo; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2011-04-06

    Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs. By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone. Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  19. The angular momentum of isolated white dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brassard P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a very brief report on an ongoing program aimed at mapping the internal rotation profiles of stars through asteroseismology. Three years ago, we developed and applied successfully a new technique to the pulsating GW Vir white dwarf PG 1159−035, and were able to infer that it rotates very slowly and rigidly over some 99% of its mass. We applied the same approach to the three other GW Vir pulsators with available rotational splitting data, and found similar results. We discuss the implications of these findings on the question of the angular momentum of white dwarfs resulting from single star evolution.

  20. Projection of angular momentum via linear algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Calvin W.; O'Mara, Kevin D.

    2017-12-01

    Projection of many-body states with good angular momentum from an initial state is usually accomplished by a three-dimensional integral. We show how projection can instead be done by solving a straightforward system of linear equations. We demonstrate the method and give sample applications to 48Cr and 60Fe in the p f shell. This new projection scheme, which is competitive against the standard numerical quadrature, should also be applicable to other quantum numbers such as isospin and particle number.

  1. Angular Position Tracking Control of a Quadcopter

    OpenAIRE

    T. V. Glazkov; A. E. Golubev

    2017-01-01

    The paper dwells on tracking the quad-copter angular position with desired quality parameters of transient processes. The aerial vehicle is considered as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom.  A full rigid body quad-copter mathematical model is considered without the assumption of smallness of the Euler angles.Among the most well known methods of non-linear stabilization are feedback linearization and backstepping. The backstepping approach allows us to have an effective solution of the s...

  2. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available :27674 | DOI: 10.1038/srep27674 www.nature.com/scientificreports Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum Abderrahmen Trichili1, Carmelo Rosales-Guzmán2, Angela Dudley2,3, Bienvenu Ndagano2, Amine Ben Salem1, Mourad Zghal1,4 & Andrew Forbes2 Mode....rosalesguzman@wits.ac.za) received: 29 March 2016 Accepted: 24 May 2016 Published: 10 June 2016 OPEN www.nature.com/scientificreports/ 2Scientific RepoRts | 6:27674 | DOI: 10.1038/srep27674 Results Consider a LG mode in cylindrical coordinates, at its waist plane (z = 0), described...

  3. Angular momentum in multi-step photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Adachi, Hajime; Kuwako, Akira; Nittoh, Koichi; Araki, Yoshio; Watanabe, Takashi; Yoguchi, Itaru.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of the angular momenta on the multi-step laser-ionization efficiency was investigated numerically for cases with and without the hyperfine interactions. For either cases the ionization efficiency proved to depend appreciably on the values of J in the excitation ladder. In this respect, we elaborated a simple and efficient method of determining J, which was based on the laser polarization dependence of the excitation rate. Application of this method to a couple of real excitation ladders proved its usefulness and reliability. (author)

  4. Statistical analysis of angular correlation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, R.A.A.M. de.

    1986-01-01

    Obtaining the multipole mixing ratio, δ, of γ transitions in angular correlation measurements is a statistical problem characterized by the small number of angles in which the observation is made and by the limited statistic of counting, α. The inexistence of a sufficient statistics for the estimator of δ, is shown. Three different estimators for δ were constructed and their properties of consistency, bias and efficiency were tested. Tests were also performed in experimental results obtained in γ-γ directional correlation measurements. (Author) [pt

  5. Time-dependent angularly averaged inverse transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Jollivet, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters in a time-dependent linear transport equation from knowledge of angularly averaged measurements performed at the boundary of a domain of interest. Such measurement settings find applications in medical and geophysical imaging. We show that the absorption coefficient and the spatial component of the scattering coefficient are uniquely determined by such measurements. We obtain stability results on the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters with respect to the measured albedo operator. The stability results are obtained by a precise decomposition of the measurements into components with different singular behavior in the time domain

  6. Angular momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.; Hensley, D.C.; Honkanen, K.; Semkow, T.M.; Abenante, V.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss angular-momentum distributions σ l for the compound nucleus 164 Yb deduced from measurements of γ-ray multiplicity for all significant evaporation residues from fusion of 64 Ni and 100 Mo and 16 O + 148 Sm. At the lowest bombarding energies the σ l extend to higher l values than do predictions that include coupling of the principal inelastic channels, even if the coupling strengths are increased to match the experimental excitation function. Likewise, σ l from an energy-dependent real potential fitted to the excitation function fails to reproduce the experimental σ l distribution. No effects attributed to superdeformation were observed

  7. Energy flow in angularly dispersive optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, M.; Dibble, W. E.; Glasgow, S. A.; Peatross, J.

    2001-01-01

    Light-pulse propagation in angularly dispersive systems is explored in the context of a center-of-mass definition of energy arrival time. In this context the time of travel is given by a superposition of group delays weighted by the spectral content of the pulse. With this description the time of travel from one point to the next for a pulse is found to be completely determined by the spectral content, independent of the state of chirp. The effect of sensor orientation on arrival time is also considered. [copyright] 2001 Optical Society of America

  8. Angular Speed of a Compact Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Mikolaj ``Mik''

    2006-09-01

    A spinning motion of a compact disc in a CD player offers an interesting and challenging problem in rotational kinematics with a nonconstant angular acceleration that can be incorporated into a typical introductory physics class for engineers and scientists. It can be used either as an example presented during the lecture, emphasizing application of calculus, or as a homework assignment that could be handled easily with the help of a spreadsheet, thus eliminating the calculus aspect altogether. I tried both approaches, and the spreadsheet study was favored by my students.

  9. Influence of tungsten fiber’s slow drift on the measurement of G with angular acceleration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Wei-Huang; Zhan, Wen-Ze [School of Mechanical Engineering and Electronic Information, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xue, Chao [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Physics and Astronomy, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Shao, Cheng-Gang, E-mail: cgshao@mail.hust.edu.cn; Wu, Jun-Fei [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Milyukov, Vadim [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    In the measurement of the gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method, the equilibrium position of torsion pendulum with tungsten fiber undergoes a linear slow drift, which results in a quadratic slow drift on the angular velocity of the torsion balance turntable under feedback control unit. The accurate amplitude determination of the useful angular acceleration signal with known frequency is biased by the linear slow drift and the coupling effect of the drifting equilibrium position and the room fixed gravitational background signal. We calculate the influences of the linear slow drift and the complex coupling effect on the value of G, respectively. The result shows that the bias of the linear slow drift on G is 7 ppm, and the influence of the coupling effect is less than 1 ppm.

  10. Angular distributions of evaporation residues from near-barrier fusion of 32,36S on a ≅100 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The angular distributions of evaporation residues from near-barrier fusion of 32,36 S ions with 92,94,96,98,100 Mo, 100,101,102,104 Ru, 103 Rh, and 104,105,106,108,110 Pd were measured in the range of 3 to 11 degrees in the laboratory system. The relative yield of the four most abundant exit evaporation channels has been extracted for all target-projectile combination at two bombarding energies, by fitting the angular distributions expected for each channel as obtained from the Monte-Carlo program TRANMI to the measured angular distribution of the evaporation residues. The total detection efficiency for the Munich-RF-Recoil Spectrometer was obtained from the relative yields, taking into account the effect due to multiple scattering, and compared with that obtained previously from the recoil velocity distributions. (orig./HSI) [de

  11. Flow velocity calculation to avoid instability in a typical research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Carlos Alberto de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Flow velocity through a research reactor core composed by MTR-type fuel elements is investigated. Core cooling capacity must be available at the same time that fuel-plate collapse must be avoided. Fuel plates do not rupture during plate collapse, but their lateral deflections can close flow channels and lead to plate over-heating. The critical flow velocity is a speed at which the plates collapse by static instability type failure. In this paper, critical velocity and coolant velocity are evaluated for a typical MTR-type flat plate fuel element. Miller's method is used for prediction of critical velocity. The coolant velocity is limited to 2/3 of the critical velocity, that is a currently used criterion. Fuel plate characteristics are based on the open pool Australian light water reactor. (author)

  12. 角动量的理论研究%Theoretical Studies on Angular Momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹芬芬

    2015-01-01

    研究一些物理问题时,我们会遇到质点或质点系相对于参考点或绕轴转动的情况,此时用速度、动量都不能解决,因此物理学中引入了新的物理量—角动量.角动量能准确地描述物体的转动状况,在量子领域中也能反映表征状态,并且在现代技术中有着广泛的应用.本文从角动量的定义出发,对质点对参考点、质点绕定轴、质点系绕定轴等不同情况下的角动量定理及守恒定律进行了研究,并对动量守恒和角动量守恒的区别与联系以及角动量的知识应用等进行了探讨.%In physics, mass points or mass point systems may revolve relative to the reference point or around the axis. In this case, neither velocity nor momentum can solve it, but angular momentum, a new physical concept of physics, is introduced, which precisely describes the revolution of an object, reflects its representational state in the quantum realm, and is therefore widely used in modern technologies. Based on the definition of angular momentum, this article studies the angular momentum theorems and the conservation laws governing in different circumstances such as the mass point relative to the reference point, the mass point around the fixed axis, the mass point system around the fixed axis, etc, and further probes the differences and commonality between momentum conservation and angular momentum conservation, and the application of angular momentum.

  13. Sensor Data Quality and Angular Rate Down-Selection Algorithms on SLS EM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Thomas; Smith, Austin; Oliver, T. Emerson

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch System Block 1 launch vehicle is equipped with an Inertial Navigation System (INS) and multiple Rate Gyro Assemblies (RGA) that are used in the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) algorithms. The INS provides the inertial position, velocity, and attitude of the vehicle along with both angular rate and specific force measurements. Additionally, multiple sets of co-located rate gyros supply angular rate data. The collection of angular rate data, taken along the launch vehicle, is used to separate out vehicle motion from flexible body dynamics. Since the system architecture uses redundant sensors, the capability was developed to evaluate the health (or validity) of the independent measurements. A suite of Sensor Data Quality (SDQ) algorithms is responsible for assessing the angular rate data from the redundant sensors. When failures are detected, SDQ will take the appropriate action and disqualify or remove faulted sensors from forward processing. Additionally, the SDQ algorithms contain logic for down-selecting the angular rate data used by the GNC software from the set of healthy measurements. This paper explores the trades and analyses that were performed in selecting a set of robust fault-detection algorithms included in the GN&C flight software. These trades included both an assessment of hardware-provided health and status data as well as an evaluation of different algorithms based on time-to-detection, type of failures detected, and probability of detecting false positives. We then provide an overview of the algorithms used for both fault-detection and measurement down selection. We next discuss the role of trajectory design, flexible-body models, and vehicle response to off-nominal conditions in setting the detection thresholds. Lastly, we present lessons learned from software integration and hardware-in-the-loop testing.

  14. A proposed measurement of optical orbital and spin angular momentum and its implications for photon angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Elliot

    2018-04-01

    The expression for the total angular momentum carried by a laser optical vortex beam, splits, in the paraxial approximation, into two terms which seem to represent orbital and spin angular momentum respectively. There are, however, two very different competing versions of the formula for the spin angular momentum, one based on the use of the Poynting vector, as in classical electrodynamics, the other related to the canonical expression for the angular momentum which occurs in Quantum Electrodynamics. I analyze the possibility that a sufficiently sensitive optical measurement could decide which of these corresponds to the actual physical angular momentum carried by the beam.

  15. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  16. Complex Permittivity Measurements of Textiles and Leather in a Free Space: An Angular-Invariant Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kapilevich, B.; Litvak, B.; Anisimov, M.; Hardon, D.; Pinhasi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the complex permittivity measurements of textiles and leathers in a free space at 330 GHz. The destructive role of the Rayleigh scattering effect is considered and the angular-invariant limit for an incidence angle has been found out experimentally within 25–30 degrees. If incidence angle exceeds this critical parameter, the uncertainty caused by the Rayleigh scattering is drastically increased preventing accurate measurements of the real and imaginary parts of a bulky mat...

  17. Orbital angular momentum of general astigmatic modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Jorrit; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    We present an operator method to obtain complete sets of astigmatic Gaussian solutions of the paraxial wave equation. In case of general astigmatism, the astigmatic intensity and phase distribution of the fundamental mode differ in orientation. As a consequence, the fundamental mode has a nonzero orbital angular momentum, which is not due to phase singularities. Analogous to the operator method for the quantum harmonic oscillator, the corresponding astigmatic higher-order modes are obtained by repeated application of raising operators on the fundamental mode. The nature of the higher-order modes is characterized by a point on a sphere, in analogy with the representation of polarization on the Poincare sphere. The north and south poles represent astigmatic Laguerre-Gaussian modes, similar to circular polarization on the Poincare sphere, while astigmatic Hermite-Gaussian modes are associated with points on the equator, analogous to linear polarization. We discuss the propagation properties of the modes and their orbital angular momentum, which depends on the degree of astigmatism and on the location of the point on the sphere

  18. [Sensitivity of four representative angular cephalometric measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xü, T; Ahn, J; Baumrind, S

    2000-05-01

    Examined the sensitivity of four representative cephalometric angles to the detection of different vectors of craniofacial growth. Landmark coordinate data from a stratified random sample of 48 adolescent subjects were used to calculate conventional values for changes between the pretreatment and end-of-treatment lateral cephalograms. By modifying the end-of-treatment coordinate values appropriately, the angular changes could be recalculated reflecting three hypothetical situations: Case 1. What if there were no downward landmark displacement between timepoints? Case 2. What if there were no forward landmark displacement between timepoints? Case 3. What if there were no Nasion change? These questions were asked for four representative cephalometric angles: SNA, ANB, NAPg and UI-SN. For Case 1, the associations (r) between the baseline and the modified measure for the three angles were very highly significant (P < 0.001) with r2 values no lower than 0.94! For Case 2, however, the associations were much weaker and no r value reached significance. These angular measurements are less sensitive for measuring downward landmark displacement than they are for measuring forward landmark displacement.

  19. Practical scaling law for photoelectron angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Dongsheng; Zhang Jingtao; Xu Zhizhan; Li Xiaofeng; Fu Panming; Freeman, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    A practical scaling law that predicts photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) is derived using angular distribution formulas which explicitly contain spontaneous emission. The scaling law is used to analyze recent PAD measurements in above-threshold ionization, and to predict results of future experiments. Our theoretical and numerical studies show that, in the non-relativistic regime and long-wavelength approximation, the shapes of PADs are determined by only three dimensionless numbers: (1) u p ≡U p /(ℎ/2π)ω, the ponderomotive number (ponderomotive energy in units of laser photon energy); (2) ε b ≡E b /(ℎ/2π)ω, the binding number (atomic binding energy in units of the laser photon energy); (3) j, the absorbed-photon number. The scaling law is shown to be useful in predictions of results from strong-field Kapitza-Dirac effect measurements; specifically, the application of this scaling law to recently reported Kapitza-Dirac diffraction is discussed. Possible experimental tests to verify the scaling law are suggested

  20. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an array of four telescopes designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. CLASS aims to detect the B-mode polarization from primordial gravitational waves predicted by cosmic inflation theory, as well as the imprint left by reionization upon the CMB E-mode polarization. This will be achieved through a combination of observing strategy and state-of-the-art instrumentation. CLASS is observing 70% of the sky to characterize the CMB at large angular scales, which will measure the entire CMB power spectrum from the reionization peak to the recombination peak. The four telescopes operate at frequencies of 38, 93, 145, and 217 GHz, in order to estimate Galactic synchrotron and dust foregrounds while avoiding atmospheric absorption. CLASS employs rapid polarization modulation to overcome atmospheric and instrumental noise. Polarization sensitive cryogenic detectors with low noise levels provide CLASS the sensitivity required to constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio down to levels of r ~ 0.01 while also measuring the optical depth the reionization to sample-variance levels. These improved constraints on the optical depth to reionization are required to pin down the mass of neutrinos from complementary cosmological data. CLASS has completed a year of observations at 38 GHz and is in the process of deploying the rest of the telescope array. This poster provides an overview and update on the CLASS science, hardware and survey operations.

  1. Inefficient Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers: Angular Momentum Belt in the Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Quataert, Eliot

    2018-04-01

    We present unstratified 3D MHD simulations of an accretion disk with a boundary layer (BL) that have a duration ˜1000 orbital periods at the inner radius of the accretion disk. We find the surprising result that angular momentum piles up in the boundary layer, which results in a rapidly rotating belt of accreted material at the surface of the star. The angular momentum stored in this belt increases monotonically in time, which implies that angular momentum transport mechanisms in the BL are inefficient and do not couple the accretion disk to the star. This is in spite of the fact that magnetic fields are advected into the BL from the disk and supersonic shear instabilities in the BL excite acoustic waves. In our simulations, these waves only carry a small fraction (˜10%) of the angular momentum required for steady state accretion. Using analytical theory and 2D viscous simulations in the R - ϕ plane, we derive an analytical criterion for belt formation to occur in the BL in terms of the ratio of the viscosity in the accretion disk to the viscosity in the BL. Our MHD simulations have a dimensionless viscosity (α) in the BL that is at least a factor of ˜100 smaller than that in the disk. We discuss the implications of these results for BL dynamics and emission.

  2. Angular correlation of the N+ ions produced in the dissociative double ionization of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezell, R.L.; Edwards, A.K.; Wood, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The double ionization of N 2 by He + projectiles was studied by measuring the angular correlation between the two N + ions emitted in the dissociation of N 2+ 2 molecular ions. If there were no recoil velocity imposed on the N 2+ 2 ion in the initial ionizing collision, and thermal effects were neglected, the pair of N + ions would have equal and opposite velocity vectors in the laboratory frame of reference. Measuring the coincidence yield of pairs of N + ions as a function of the angle between their velocity vectors permits an estimate to be made of the component of momentum transferred to the N 2+ 2 parent ions in the beam direction. The results presented in this report show the recoil velocity to be considerably less than the mean thermal velocity of N 2 molecules at room temperature. We also report mesurements of the relative cross section for N + production from N 2+ 2 as a function of the orientation of the N 2 target molecules relative to the projectile beam axis

  3. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  4. Tyre effective radius and vehicle velocity estimation: a variable structure observer solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Tannoury, C.; Plestan, F.; Moussaoui, S.; ROMANi, N. RENAULT

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an application of a variable structure observer for wheel effective radius and velocity of automotive vehicles. This observer is based on high order sliding approach allowing robustness and finite time convergence. Its originality consists in assuming a nonlinear relation between the slip ratio and the friction coefficient and providing an estimation of both variables, wheel radius and vehicle velocity, from measurement of wheel angular velocity and torque. These signals being available on major modern vehicle CAN (Controller Area Network) buses, this system does not require additional sensors. A simulation example is given to illustrate the relevance of this approach.

  5. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu; Tang, Liguo [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Li, Songhai [Sanya Key Laboratory of Marin Mammal and Marine Bioacoustics, Sanya Institute of Deep-Sea Science and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Sanya 57200 (China); Zhang, Sai [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2016-07-04

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  6. Angular momentum transport by heat-driven g-modes in slowly pulsating B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, R. H. D.; Goldstein, J.; Zweibel, E. G.

    2018-03-01

    Motivated by recent interest in the phenomenon of waves transport in massive stars, we examine whether the heat-driven gravity (g) modes excited in slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars can significantly modify the stars' internal rotation. We develop a formalism for the differential torque exerted by g modes, and implement this formalism using the GYRE oscillation code and the MESASTAR stellar evolution code. Focusing first on a 4.21M⊙ model, we simulate 1 000 yr of stellar evolution under the combined effects of the torque due to a single unstable prograde g mode (with an amplitude chosen on the basis of observational constraints), and diffusive angular momentum transport due to convection, overshooting, and rotational instabilities. We find that the g mode rapidly extracts angular momentum from the surface layers, depositing it deeper in the stellar interior. The angular momentum transport is so efficient that by the end of the simulation, the initially non-rotating surface layers are spun in the retrograde direction to ≈ 30 per cent of the critical rate. However, the additional inclusion of magnetic stresses in our simulations almost completely inhibits this spin-up. Expanding our simulations to cover the whole instability strip, we show that the same general behaviour is seen in all SPB stars. After providing some caveats to contextualize our results, we hypothesize that the observed slower surface rotation of SPB stars (as compared to other B-type stars) may be the direct consequence of the angular momentum transport that our simulations demonstrate.

  7. Sorting photons of different rotational Doppler shifts (RDS) by orbital angular momentum of single-photon with spin-orbit-RDS entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lixiang; She, Weilong

    2008-09-15

    We demonstrate that single photons from a rotating q-plate exhibit an entanglement in three degrees of freedom of spin, orbital angular momentum, and the rotational Doppler shift (RDS) due to the nonconservation of total spin and orbital angular momenta. We find that the rotational Doppler shift deltaomega = Omega((delta)s + deltal) , where s, l and Omega are quantum numbers of spin, orbital angular momentum, and rotating velocity of the q-plate, respectively. Of interest is that the rotational Doppler shift directly reflects the rotational symmetry of q-plates and can be also expressed as deltaomega = (Omega)n , where n = 2(q-1) denotes the fold number of rotational symmetry. Besides, based on this single-photon spin-orbit-RDS entanglement, we propose an experimental scheme to sort photons of different frequency shifts according to individual orbital angular momentum.

  8. Untangling Galaxy Components - The Angular Momentum Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Martha; Merrifield, Michael; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a new technique to decompose Integral Field spectral data cubes into separate bulge and disk components, allowing us to study the kinematic and stellar population properties of the individual components and how they vary with position. We present here the application of this method to a sample of fast rotator early type galaxies from the MaNGA integral field survey, and demonstrate how it can be used to explore key properties of the individual components. By extracting ages, metallicities and the angular momentum parameter lambda of the bulges and disks, we show how this method can give us new insights into the underlying structure of the galaxies and discuss what this can tell us about their evolution history.

  9. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockett, P; Wollenhaupt, M; Baumert, T

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light–matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable. (paper)

  10. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, P.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light-matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  11. Angular biasing in implicit Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, G.B.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion target experiments require an integrated approach in which laser irradiation and radiation transport in the hohlraum are solved simultaneously with the symmetry, implosion and burn of the fuel capsule. The Implicit Monte Carlo method has proved to be a valuable tool for the two dimensional radiation transport within the hohlraum, but the impact of statistical noise on the symmetric implosion of the small fuel capsule is difficult to overcome. We present an angular biasing technique in which an increased number of low weight photons are directed at the imploding capsule. For typical parameters this reduces the required computer time for an integrated calculation by a factor of 10. An additional factor of 5 can also be achieved by directing even smaller weight photons at the polar regions of the capsule where small mass zones are most sensitive to statistical noise

  12. Angular filter refractometry analysis using simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angland, P; Haberberger, D; Ivancic, S T; Froula, D H

    2017-10-01

    Angular filter refractometry (AFR) is a novel technique used to characterize the density profiles of laser-produced, long-scale-length plasmas [Haberberger et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056304 (2014)]. A new method of analysis for AFR images was developed using an annealing algorithm to iteratively converge upon a solution. A synthetic AFR image is constructed by a user-defined density profile described by eight parameters, and the algorithm systematically alters the parameters until the comparison is optimized. The optimization and statistical uncertainty calculation is based on the minimization of the χ 2 test statistic. The algorithm was successfully applied to experimental data of plasma expanding from a flat, laser-irradiated target, resulting in an average uncertainty in the density profile of 5%-20% in the region of interest.

  13. Intrinsic Orbital Angular Momentum States of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Ronald L.; Jach, Terrence; Vinson, John

    2018-03-01

    It has been shown that single-particle wave functions, of both photons and electrons, can be created with a phase vortex, i.e., an intrinsic orbital angular momentum (OAM). A recent experiment has claimed similar success using neutrons [C. W. Clark et al., Nature, 525, 504 (2015), 10.1038/nature15265]. We show that their results are insufficient to unambiguously demonstrate OAM, and they can be fully explained as phase contrast interference patterns. Furthermore, given the small transverse coherence length of the neutrons in the original experiment, the probability that any neutron was placed in an OAM state is vanishingly small. We highlight the importance of the relative size of the coherence length, which presents a unique challenge for neutron experiments compared to electron or photon work, and we suggest improvements for the creation of neutron OAM states.

  14. Nuclear scissors modes and hidden angular momenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbutsev, E. B., E-mail: balbuts@theor.jinr.ru; Molodtsova, I. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Schuck, P. [Université Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3–CNRS (France)

    2017-01-15

    The coupled dynamics of low-lying modes and various giant resonances are studied with the help of the Wigner Function Moments method generalized to take into account spin degrees of freedom and pair correlations simultaneously. The method is based on Time-Dependent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov equations. The model of the harmonic oscillator including spin–orbit potential plus quadrupole–quadrupole and spin–spin interactions is considered. New low-lying spin-dependent modes are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the scissors modes. A new source of nuclear magnetism, connected with counter-rotation of spins up and down around the symmetry axis (hidden angular momenta), is discovered. Its inclusion into the theory allows one to improve substantially the agreement with experimental data in the description of energies and transition probabilities of scissors modes.

  15. Angular Spectrum Simulation of Pulsed Ultrasound Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang; Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    frequencies must be performed. Combining it with Field II, the generation of non-linear simulation for any geometry with any excitation array transducer becomes feasible. The purpose of this paper is to make a general pulsed simulation software using the modified ASA. Linear and phased array transducers......The optimization of non-linear ultrasound imaging should in a first step be based on simulation, as this makes parameter studies considerably easier than making transducer prototypes. Such a simulation program should be capable of simulating non-linear pulsed fields for arbitrary transducer...... geometries for any kind of focusing and apodization. The Angular Spectrum Approach (ASA) is capable of simulating monochromatic non-linear acoustic wave propagation. However, for ultrasound imaging the time response of each specific point in space is required, and a pulsed ASA simulation with multi temporal...

  16. Angular momentum of dark matter black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frampton, Paul H., E-mail: paul.h.frampton@gmail.com

    2017-04-10

    We provide strongly suggestive evidence that the halo constituents of dark matter are Primordial Intermediate-Mass Black Holes (PIMBHs). PIMBHs are described by a Kerr metric with two parameters, mass M and angular momentum J. There has been little discussion of J since it plays no role in the upcoming attempt at PIMBH detection by microlensing. Nevertheless J does play a central role in understanding their previous lack of detection, especially by CMB distortion. We explain why bounds previously derived from lack of CMB distortion are too strong for PIMBHs with J non-vanishing and that, provided almost no dark matter black holes originate from stellar collapse, excessive CMB distortion is avoided.

  17. Angular reduction in multiparticle matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, D.R.; Parke, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    A general method for reduction of coupled spherical harmonic products is presented. When the total angular coupling is zero, the reduction leads to an explicitly real expression in the scalar products of the unit vector arguments of the spherical harmonics. For nonscalar couplings, the reduction gives Cartesian tensor forms for the spherical harmonic products; tensors built from the physical vectors in the original expression. The reduction for arbitrary couplings is given in closed form, making it amenable to symbolic manipulation on a computer. The final expressions do not depend on a special choice of coordinate axes, nor do they contain azimuthal quantum number summations, or do they have complex tensor terms for couplings to a scalar; consequently, they are easily interpretable from the properties of the physical vectors they contain

  18. Angular discretization errors in transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, P.; Yu, F.

    1992-01-01

    Elements of the information-based complexity theory are computed for several types of information and associated algorithms for angular approximations in the setting of a on-dimensional model problem. For point-evaluation information, the local and global radii of information are computed, a (trivial) optimal algorithm is determined, and the local and global error of a discrete ordinates algorithm are shown to be infinite. For average cone-integral information, the local and global radii of information are computed, the local and global error tends to zero as the underlying partition is indefinitely refined. A central algorithm for such information and an optimal partition (of given cardinality) are described. It is further shown that the analytic first-collision source method has zero error (for the purely absorbing model problem). Implications of the restricted problem domains suitable for the various types of information are discussed

  19. Topological photonic orbital-angular-momentum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhang, Chuanwei; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2018-04-01

    The large number of available orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) states of photons provides a unique resource for many important applications in quantum information and optical communications. However, conventional OAM switching devices usually rely on precise parameter control and are limited by slow switching rate and low efficiency. Here we propose a robust, fast, and efficient photonic OAM switch device based on a topological process, where photons are adiabatically pumped to a target OAM state on demand. Such topological OAM pumping can be realized through manipulating photons in a few degenerate main cavities and involves only a limited number of optical elements. A large change of OAM at ˜10q can be realized with only q degenerate main cavities and at most 5 q pumping cycles. The topological photonic OAM switch may become a powerful device for broad applications in many different fields and motivate a topological design of conventional optical devices.

  20. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  1. Angular Position Tracking Control of a Quadcopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Glazkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper dwells on tracking the quad-copter angular position with desired quality parameters of transient processes. The aerial vehicle is considered as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom.  A full rigid body quad-copter mathematical model is considered without the assumption of smallness of the Euler angles.Among the most well known methods of non-linear stabilization are feedback linearization and backstepping. The backstepping approach allows us to have an effective solution of the stabilization problems with uncertainties available in the system. However, in synthesis of the feedback through backstepping, there is still an urgent issue: how to ensure desirable quality of transients in the closed-loop system. The paper presents a solution of this problem using as an example the tracking a given (programmed change of the angular position of a quad-copter.The control algorithms obtained in this paper are implemented using the Rolling Spider MATLAB Toolbox (ROSMAT tool package on the Parrot Rolling Spider quad-copter. A numerical simulation and experiments have shown the efficiency of obtained control laws, with the transient processes taking into account the desired quality indicators. However, the experiments showed that lack of terms in the mathematical model to describe the aerodynamic effects, resulted in the instability of the quad-copter flight near the obstacle (the effect of the reflected airflow.Further research can be aimed at solving the control problem in question using a mathematical model of the quad-copter motion that takes into account various aerodynamic effects.One of the potential application areas for the theoretical results, obtained in the paper, is to solve the problems of automatic control of unmanned aerial vehicles.

  2. Supramolecular architectures constructed using angular bipyridyl ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Sarah Ann

    2003-01-01

    This work details the synthesis and characterization of a series of coordination frameworks that are formed using bidentate angular N-donor ligands. Pyrimidine was reacted with metal(ll) nitrate salts. Reactions using Cd(NO 3 ) 2 receive particular focus and the analogous reactions using the linear ligand, pyrazine, were studied for comparison. In all cases, two-dimensional coordination networks were prepared. Structural diversity is observed for the Cd(ll) centres including metal-nitrate bridging. In contrast, first row transition metal nitrates form isostructural one-dimensional chains with only the bridging N-donor ligands generating polymeric propagation. The angular ligand, 2,4-bis(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (dpt), was reacted with Cd(NO 3 ) 2 and Zn(NO 3 ) 2 . Whereas Zn(NO 3 ) 2 compounds exhibit solvent mediated polymorphism, a range of structures were obtained for the reactions with Cd(NO 3 ) 2 , including the first example of a doubly parallel interpenetrated 4.8 2 net. 4,7-phenanthroline, was reacted with various metal(ll) nitrates as well as cobalt(ll) and copper(ll) halides. The ability of 4,7-phenanthroline to act as both a N-donor ligand and a hydrogen bond acceptor has been discussed. Reactions of CuSCN with pyrimidine yield an unusual three-dimensional structure in which polymeric propagation is not a result of ligand bridging. The reaction of CuSCN with dpt yielded structural supramolecular isomers. (author)

  3. Angular momentum of circularly polarized light in dielectric media

    OpenAIRE

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2014-01-01

    A circularly polarized plane-wave is known to have no angular momentum when examined through Maxwell's equations. This, however, contradicts the experimentally observed facts, where finite segments of plane waves are known to be capable of imparting angular momentum to birefringent platelets. Using a superposition of four plane-waves propagating at slightly different angles to a common direction, we derive an expression for the angular momentum density of a single plane-wave in the limit when...

  4. Orbital angular momentum exchange in post-collision interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van der Burgt, P.J.M.; van Eck, J.; Heideman, H.G.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors study the exchange of orbital angular mementum between the scattered and the ejected electron. The angular distribution of electrons ejected by the He (2s 2 ) 2 S autoionizing state after its excitation via the He (2s2p 2 ) 2 D resonance is measured. Taking into accout interference with electrons from the direct ionization of helium, the authors are able to show that the measured anisotropic angular distribution is the result of an orbital angular momentum exchange during the post-collision interaction

  5. Wind-driven angular momentum loss in binary systems. I - Ballistic case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookshaw, Leigh; Tavani, Marco

    1993-01-01

    We study numerically the average loss of specific angular momentum from binary systems due to mass outflow from one of the two stars for a variety of initial injection geometries and wind velocities. We present results of ballistic calculations in three dimensions for initial mass ratios q of the mass-losing star to primary star in the range q between 10 exp -5 and 10. We consider injection surfaces close to the Roche lobe equipotential surface of the mass-losing star, and also cases with the mass-losing star underfilling its Roche lobe. We obtain that the orbital period is expected to have a negative time derivative for wind-driven secular evolution of binaries with q greater than about 3 and with the mass-losing star near filling its Roche lobe. We also study the effect of the presence of an absorbing surface approximating an accretion disk on the average final value of the specific angular momentum loss. We find that the effect of an accretion disk is to increase the wind-driven angular momentum loss. Our results are relevant for evolutionary models of high-mass binaries and low-mass X-ray binaries.

  6. Angularly resolved electron wave packet interferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varju, K; Johnsson, P; Mauritsson, J; Remetter, T; Ruchon, T; Ni, Y; Lepine, F; Kling, M; Khan, J; Schafer, K J; Vrakking, M J J; L'Huillier, A

    2006-01-01

    We study experimentally the ionization of argon atoms by a train of attosecond pulses in the presence of a strong infrared laser field, using a velocity map imaging technique. The recorded momentum distribution strongly depends on the delay between the attosecond pulses and the laser field. We interpret the interference patterns observed for different delays using numerical and analytical calculations within the strong field approximation

  7. Angularly resolved electron wave packet interferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varju, K [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Johnsson, P [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Mauritsson, J [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Remetter, T [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Ruchon, T [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Ni, Y [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lepine, F [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kling, M [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Khan, J [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schafer, K J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Vrakking, M J J [FOM-Institute AMOLF, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); L' Huillier, A [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2006-09-28

    We study experimentally the ionization of argon atoms by a train of attosecond pulses in the presence of a strong infrared laser field, using a velocity map imaging technique. The recorded momentum distribution strongly depends on the delay between the attosecond pulses and the laser field. We interpret the interference patterns observed for different delays using numerical and analytical calculations within the strong field approximation.

  8. A proposed measurement of optical orbital and spin angular momentum and its implications for photon angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot Leader

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The expression for the total angular momentum carried by a laser optical vortex beam, splits, in the paraxial approximation, into two terms which seem to represent orbital and spin angular momentum respectively. There are, however, two very different competing versions of the formula for the spin angular momentum, one based on the use of the Poynting vector, as in classical electrodynamics, the other related to the canonical expression for the angular momentum which occurs in Quantum Electrodynamics. I analyze the possibility that a sufficiently sensitive optical measurement could decide which of these corresponds to the actual physical angular momentum carried by the beam. Keywords: Photon, Angular momentum, Laser optics, Particle physics

  9. The influence of time dependent flight and maneuver velocities and elastic or viscoelastic flexibilities on aerodynamic and stability derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochrane, Alexander P. [Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Glasgow, University Avenue, Glasgow, Lanarkshire (United Kingdom); Merrett, Craig G. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Carleton Univ., 1125 Col. By Dr., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Hilton, Harry H. [Aerospace Engineering Department in the College of Engineering and Private Sector Program Division at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 104 South Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    The advent of new structural concepts employing composites in primary load carrying aerospace structures in UAVs, MAVs, Boeing 787s, Airbus A380s, etc., necessitates the inclusion of flexibility as well as viscoelasticity in static structural and aero-viscoelastic analyses. Differences and similarities between aeroelasticity and aero-viscoelasticity have been investigated in [2]. An investigation is undertaken as to the dependence and sensitivity of aerodynamic and stability derivatives to elastic and viscoelastic structural flexibility and as to time dependent flight and maneuver velocities. Longitudinal, lateral and directional stabilities are investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings one of the critical static parameters is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (V{sub REV}{sup E}). Since elastic formulations constitute viscoelastic initial conditions, viscoelastic reversal may occur at speeds V{sub REV<}{sup ≧}V{sub REV}{sup E}, but furthermore does so in time at 0 < t{sub REV} ≤ ∞. The influence of the twin effects of viscoelastic and elastic materials and of variable flight velocities on longitudinal, lateral, directional and spin stabilities are also investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are here extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings the critical parameter is the velocity at

  10. The influence of time dependent flight and maneuver velocities and elastic or viscoelastic flexibilities on aerodynamic and stability derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochrane, Alexander P.; Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of new structural concepts employing composites in primary load carrying aerospace structures in UAVs, MAVs, Boeing 787s, Airbus A380s, etc., necessitates the inclusion of flexibility as well as viscoelasticity in static structural and aero-viscoelastic analyses. Differences and similarities between aeroelasticity and aero-viscoelasticity have been investigated in [2]. An investigation is undertaken as to the dependence and sensitivity of aerodynamic and stability derivatives to elastic and viscoelastic structural flexibility and as to time dependent flight and maneuver velocities. Longitudinal, lateral and directional stabilities are investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings one of the critical static parameters is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (V REV E ). Since elastic formulations constitute viscoelastic initial conditions, viscoelastic reversal may occur at speeds V REV< ≧ V REV E , but furthermore does so in time at 0 < t REV ≤ ∞. The influence of the twin effects of viscoelastic and elastic materials and of variable flight velocities on longitudinal, lateral, directional and spin stabilities are also investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are here extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings the critical parameter is the velocity at which control reversal takes place

  11. Control rod velocity limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Carruth, J.C.; Dixon, R.C.; Spencer, S.S.; Zuloaga, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a velocity control arrangement for a reciprocable, vertically oriented control rod for use in a nuclear reactor in a fluid medium, the control rod including a drive hub secured to and extending from one end therefrom. The control device comprises: a toroidally shaped control member spaced from and coaxially positioned around the hub and secured thereto by a plurality of spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the toroidal member spaced therefrom in coaxial position. The side of the control member toward the control rod has a smooth generally conical surface. The side of the control member away from the control rod is formed with a concave surface constituting a single annular groove. The device also comprises inner and outer annular vanes radially spaced from one another and spaced from the side of the control member away from the control rod and positioned coaxially around and spaced from the hub and secured thereto by spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the vanes. The vanes are angled toward the control member, the outer edge of the inner vane being closer to the control member and the inner edge of the outer vane being closer to the control member. When the control rod moves in the fluid in the direction toward the drive hub the vanes direct a flow of fluid turbulence which provides greater resistance to movement of the control rod in the direction toward the drive hub than in the other direction

  12. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-01-01

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (σ*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  13. On linear relationship between shock velocity and particle velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandache, H.

    1986-11-01

    We attempt to derive the linear relationship between shock velocity U s and particle velocity U p from thermodynamic considerations, taking into account an ideal gas equation of state and a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state for solids. 23 refs

  14. Velocity-resolved [Ne III] from X-ray irradiated Sz 102 microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun-Fan; Shang, Hsien [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10641, Taiwan (China); Walter, Frederick M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory J. [The Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-05-10

    Neon emission lines are good indicators of high-excitation regions close to a young stellar system because of their high ionization potentials and large critical densities. We have discovered [Ne III] λ3869 emission from the microjets of Sz 102, a low-mass young star in Lupus III. Spectroastrometric analyses of two-dimensional [Ne III] spectra obtained from archival high-dispersion (R ≈ 33, 000) Very Large Telescope/UVES data suggest that the emission consists of two velocity components spatially separated by ∼0.''3, or a projected distance of ∼60 AU. The stronger redshifted component is centered at ∼ + 21 km s{sup –1} with a line width of ∼140 km s{sup –1}, and the weaker blueshifted component at ∼ – 90 km s{sup –1} with a line width of ∼190 km s{sup –1}. The two components trace velocity centroids of the known microjets and show large line widths that extend across the systemic velocity, suggesting their potential origins in wide-angle winds that may eventually collimate into jets. Optical line ratios indicate that the microjets are hot (T ≲ 1.6 × 10{sup 4} K) and ionized (n{sub e} ≳ 5.7 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}). The blueshifted component has ∼13% higher temperature and ∼46% higher electron density than the redshifted counterpart, forming a system of an asymmetric pair of jets. The detection of the [Ne III] λ3869 line with the distinct velocity profile suggests that the emission originates in flows that may have been strongly ionized by deeply embedded hard X-ray sources, most likely generated by magnetic processes. The discovery of [Ne III] λ3869 emission along with other optical forbidden lines from Sz 102 supports the picture of wide-angle winds surrounding magnetic loops in the close vicinity of the young star. Future high-sensitivity X-ray imaging and high angular-resolution optical spectroscopy may help confirm the picture proposed.

  15. Velocity-resolved [Ne III] from X-ray irradiated Sz 102 microjets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chun-Fan; Shang, Hsien; Walter, Frederick M.; Herczeg, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Neon emission lines are good indicators of high-excitation regions close to a young stellar system because of their high ionization potentials and large critical densities. We have discovered [Ne III] λ3869 emission from the microjets of Sz 102, a low-mass young star in Lupus III. Spectroastrometric analyses of two-dimensional [Ne III] spectra obtained from archival high-dispersion (R ≈ 33, 000) Very Large Telescope/UVES data suggest that the emission consists of two velocity components spatially separated by ∼0.''3, or a projected distance of ∼60 AU. The stronger redshifted component is centered at ∼ + 21 km s –1 with a line width of ∼140 km s –1 , and the weaker blueshifted component at ∼ – 90 km s –1 with a line width of ∼190 km s –1 . The two components trace velocity centroids of the known microjets and show large line widths that extend across the systemic velocity, suggesting their potential origins in wide-angle winds that may eventually collimate into jets. Optical line ratios indicate that the microjets are hot (T ≲ 1.6 × 10 4 K) and ionized (n e ≳ 5.7 × 10 4 cm –3 ). The blueshifted component has ∼13% higher temperature and ∼46% higher electron density than the redshifted counterpart, forming a system of an asymmetric pair of jets. The detection of the [Ne III] λ3869 line with the distinct velocity profile suggests that the emission originates in flows that may have been strongly ionized by deeply embedded hard X-ray sources, most likely generated by magnetic processes. The discovery of [Ne III] λ3869 emission along with other optical forbidden lines from Sz 102 supports the picture of wide-angle winds surrounding magnetic loops in the close vicinity of the young star. Future high-sensitivity X-ray imaging and high angular-resolution optical spectroscopy may help confirm the picture proposed.

  16. Discrete time interval measurement system: fundamentals, resolution and errors in the measurement of angular vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez de León, F C; Meroño Pérez, P A

    2010-01-01

    The traditional method for measuring the velocity and the angular vibration in the shaft of rotating machines using incremental encoders is based on counting the pulses at given time intervals. This method is generically called the time interval measurement system (TIMS). A variant of this method that we have developed in this work consists of measuring the corresponding time of each pulse from the encoder and sampling the signal by means of an A/D converter as if it were an analog signal, that is to say, in discrete time. For this reason, we have denominated this method as the discrete time interval measurement system (DTIMS). This measurement system provides a substantial improvement in the precision and frequency resolution compared with the traditional method of counting pulses. In addition, this method permits modification of the width of some pulses in order to obtain a mark-phase on every lap. This paper explains the theoretical fundamentals of the DTIMS and its application for measuring the angular vibrations of rotating machines. It also displays the required relationship between the sampling rate of the signal, the number of pulses of the encoder and the rotating velocity in order to obtain the required resolution and to delimit the methodological errors in the measurement

  17. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High velocity properties of the dynamic frictional force between ductile metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Hollan, Brad L.; Germann, Timothy C.; Ravelo, Ramon J.

    2010-01-01

    The high velocity properties of the tangential frictional force between ductile metal interfaces seen in large-scale NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are characterized by interesting scaling behavior. In many cases a power law decrease in the frictional force with increasing velocity is observed at high velocities. We discuss the velocity dependence of the high velocity branch of the tangential force in terms of structural transformation and ultimate transition, at the highest velocities, to confined fluid behavior characterized by a critical strain rate. The particular case of an Al/Al interface is discussed.

  19. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  20. Considerations on the determining factors of the angular distribution of emitted particles in laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomi, I.; Motohiro, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Asaoka, T.

    2010-01-01

    Simulations of particles which are emitted in laser ablation have been performed by the method of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo to investigate the deposition profiles of the emitted particles. The influences of the temperature, pressure and stream velocity of the initial evaporated layer formed during laser ablation process on the profile of the deposited film have been examined. It is found that the temperature gives a minor influence on the deposition profile, whereas the stream velocity and the pressure of the initial evaporated layer have a greater impact on the deposition profile. The energy in the direction of surface normal (E perpendicular ) and that in the parallel direction of the surface (E || ) are shown to increase and decrease, respectively after the laser irradiation due to collisions between the emitted particles, and this trend is magnified as the pressure increases. As a consequence, the stream velocity in the direction of surface normal increases with the increase in the pressure. A mechanism of the phenomenon that a metal with a lower sublimation energy shows a broader angular distribution of emitted particles is presented. It is suggested that low density of evaporated layer of a metal with a low sublimation energy at its melting point decreases the number of collisions in the layer, leading to the low stream velocity in the direction of surface normal, which results in the broader deposition profile of the emitted particles.

  1. Fission fragment angular distributions and fission cross section validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Lou Sai

    2013-01-01

    The present knowledge of angular distributions of neutron-induced fission is limited to a maximal energy of 15 MeV, with large discrepancies around 14 MeV. Only 238 U and 232 Th have been investigated up to 100 MeV in a single experiment. The n-TOF Collaboration performed the fission cross section measurement of several actinides ( 232 Th, 235 U, 238 U, 234 U, 237 Np) at the n-TOF facility using an experimental set-up made of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC), extending the energy domain of the incident neutron above hundreds of MeV. The method based on the detection of the 2 fragments in coincidence allowed to clearly disentangle the fission reactions among other types of reactions occurring in the spallation domain. I will show the methods we used to reconstruct the full angular resolution by the tracking of fission fragments. Below 10 MeV our results are consistent with existing data. For example in the case of 232 Th, below 10 MeV the results show clearly the variation occurring at the first (1 MeV) and second (7 MeV) chance fission, corresponding to transition states of given J and K (total spin and its projection on the fission axis), and a much more accurate energy dependence at the 3. chance threshold (14 MeV) has been obtained. In the spallation domain, above 30 MeV we confirm the high anisotropy revealed in 232 Th by the single existing data set. I'll discuss the implications of this finding, related to the low anisotropy exhibited in proton-induced fission. I also explore the critical experiments which is valuable checks of nuclear data. The 237 Np neutron-induced fission cross section has recently been measured in a large energy range (from eV to GeV) at the n-TOF facility at CERN. When compared to previous measurements, the n-TOF fission cross section appears to be higher by 5-7 % beyond the fission threshold. To check the relevance of n-TOF data, we simulate a criticality experiment performed at Los Alamos with a 6 kg sphere of 237 Np. This

  2. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making ...

  3. Role of misalignment-induced angular chirp in the electro-optic detection of THz waves

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, D A; Pan, R; Snedden, E W; Graham, D M; Gillespie, W A; Jamison, S P

    2014-01-01

    A general description of electro-optic detection including non-collinear phase matching and finite transverse beam profiles is presented. It is shown theoretically and experimentally that non-collinear phase matching in ZnTe (and similar materials) produces an angular chirp in the chi((2))-generated optical signal. Due to this, in non-collinear THz and probe arrangements such as single-shot THz measurements or through accidental misalignment, measurement of an undistorted THz signal is critically dependent on having sufficient angular acceptance in the optical probe path. The associated spatial walk-off can also preclude the phase retardation approximation used in THz-TDS. The rate of misalignment-induced chirping in commonly used ZnTe and GaP schemes is tabulated, allowing ready analysis of a detection system. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America.

  4. The error model and experiment of measuring angular position error based on laser collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yangyang; Yang, Jing; Li, Jiakun; Feng, Qibo

    2018-01-01

    Rotary axis is the reference component of rotation motion. Angular position error is the most critical factor which impair the machining precision among the six degree-of-freedom (DOF) geometric errors of rotary axis. In this paper, the measuring method of angular position error of rotary axis based on laser collimation is thoroughly researched, the error model is established and 360 ° full range measurement is realized by using the high precision servo turntable. The change of space attitude of each moving part is described accurately by the 3×3 transformation matrices and the influences of various factors on the measurement results is analyzed in detail. Experiments results show that the measurement method can achieve high measurement accuracy and large measurement range.

  5. Impact of Wind Power on the Angular Stability of a Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djemai NAIMI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy conversion systems are very different in nature from conventional generators. Therefore dynamic studies must be addressed in order to integrate wind power into the power system. Angular stability assessment of wind power generator is one of main issues in power system security and operation. The angular stability for the wind power generator is determined by its corresponding Critical Clearing Time (CCT. In this paper, the effect of wind power on the transient fault behavior is investigated by replacing the power generated by two main types of wind turbine, increasing gradually a rate of wind power penetration and changing the location of wind resources. The simulation analysis was established on a 14 bus IEEE test system by PSAT/Matlab, which gives access to an extensive library of grid components, and relevant wind turbine model.

  6. Angular Momentum of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a Synthetic Rotational Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chunlei; Stringari, Sandro

    2018-05-01

    By applying a position-dependent detuning to a spin-orbit-coupled Hamiltonian with equal Rashba and Dresselhaus coupling, we exploit the behavior of the angular momentum of a harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensed atomic gas and discuss the distinctive role of its canonical and spin components. By developing the formalism of spinor hydrodynamics, we predict the precession of the dipole oscillation caused by the synthetic rotational field, in analogy with the precession of the Foucault pendulum, the excitation of the scissors mode, following the sudden switching off of the detuning, and the occurrence of Hall-like effects. When the detuning exceeds a critical value, we observe a transition from a vortex free, rigidly rotating quantum gas to a gas containing vortices with negative circulation which results in a significant reduction of the total angular momentum.

  7. Learning web development with Bootstrap and AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Radford, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Whether you know a little about Bootstrap or AngularJS, or you're a complete beginner, this book will enhance your capabilities in both frameworks and you'll build a fully functional web app. A working knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript is required to fully get to grips with Bootstrap and AngularJS.

  8. Schmidt decomposition for non-collinear biphoton angular wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, M V

    2015-01-01

    Schmidt modes of non-collinear biphoton angular wave functions are found analytically. The experimentally realizable procedure for their separation is described. Parameters of the Schmidt decomposition are used to evaluate the degree of the biphoton's angular entanglement. (paper)

  9. Isotropic gates in large gamma detector arrays versus angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, V.E.; Duchene, G.

    1997-01-01

    The quality of the angular distribution information extracted from high-fold gamma-gamma coincidence events is analyzed. It is shown that a correct quasi-isotropic gate setting, available at the modern large gamma-ray detector arrays, essentially preserves the quality of the angular information. (orig.)

  10. Angular momentum dependence of the distribution of shell model eigenenergies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, M.K.

    1974-01-01

    In the conventional shell model calculation the many-particle energy matrices are constructed and diagonalized for definite angular momentum and parity. However the resulting set of eigenvalues possess a near normal behavior and hence a simple statistical description is possible. Usually one needs only about four parameters to capture the average level densities if the size of the set is not too small. The parameters are essentially moments of the distribution. But the difficulty lies in the yet unsolved problem of calculating moments in the fixed angular momentum subspace. We have derived a formula to approximate the angular momentum projection dependence of any operator averaged in a shell model basis. This approximate formula which is a truncated series in Hermite polynomials has been proved very good numerically and justified analytically for large systems. Applying this formula to seven physical cases we have found that the fixed angular momentum projection energy centroid, width and higher central moments can be obtained accurately provided for even-even nuclei the even and odd angular momentum projections are treated separately. Using this information one can construct the energy distribution for fixed angular momentum projection assuming normal behavior. Then the fixed angular momentum level densities are deduced and spectra are extracted. Results are in reasonably good agreement with the exact values although not as good as those obtained using exact fixed angular momentum moments. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  11. Peculiar velocity effects in high-resolution microwave background experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challinor, Anthony; Leeuwen, Floor van

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the impact of peculiar velocity effects due to the motion of the solar system relative to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on high resolution CMB experiments. It is well known that on the largest angular scales the combined effects of Doppler shifts and aberration are important; the lowest Legendre multipoles of total intensity receive power from the large CMB monopole in transforming from the CMB frame. On small angular scales aberration dominates and is shown here to lead to significant distortions of the total intensity and polarization multipoles in transforming from the rest frame of the CMB to the frame of the solar system. We provide convenient analytic results for the distortions as series expansions in the relative velocity of the two frames, but at the highest resolutions a numerical quadrature is required. Although many of the high resolution multipoles themselves are severely distorted by the frame transformations, we show that their statistical properties distort by only an insignificant amount. Therefore, the cosmological parameter estimation is insensitive to the transformation from the CMB frame (where theoretical predictions are calculated) to the rest frame of the experiment

  12. Angular correlations near the Fermi energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, D.; Cebra, D.A.; Karn, J.

    1988-01-01

    Angular correlations between light particles have been studied to probe the extent to which a thermally equilibrated system is formed in heavy ion collisions near the Fermi energy. Single-light-particle inclusive energy spectra and two-particle large-angle correlations were measured for 40 and 50 MeV/nucleon C+C, Ag, and Au. The single-particle inclusive energy spectra are well fit by a three moving source parametrization. Two-particle large-angle correlations are shown to be consistent with emission from a thermally equilibrated source when the effects of momentum conservation are considered. Single-particle inclusive spectra and light-particle correlations at small relative momentum were measured for 35 MeV/nucleon N+Ag. Source radii were extracted from the two-particle correlation functions and were found to be consistent with previous measurements using two-particle correlations and the coalescence model. The temperature of the emitting source was extracted from the relative populations of states using the quantum statistical model and was found to be 4.8/sub -2.4//sup +2.8/ MeV, compared to the 14 MeV temperature extracted from the slopes of the kinetic energy spectra

  13. A new CMOS Hall angular position sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, R.S.; Drljaca, P. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Lausanne (Switzerland); Schott, C.; Racz, R. [SENTRON AG, Zug (Switzerland)

    2001-06-01

    The new angular position sensor consists of a combination of a permanent magnet attached to a shaft and of a two-axis magnetic sensor. The permanent magnet produces a magnetic field parallel with the magnetic sensor plane. As the shaft rotates, the magnetic field also rotates. The magnetic sensor is an integrated combination of a CMOS Hall integrated circuit and a thin ferromagnetic disk. The CMOS part of the system contains two or more conventional Hall devices positioned under the periphery of the disk. The ferromagnetic disk converts locally a magnetic field parallel with the chip surface into a field perpendicular to the chip surface. Therefore, a conventional Hall element can detect an external magnetic field parallel with the chip surface. As the direction of the external magnetic field rotates in the chip plane, the output voltage of the Hall element varies as the cosine of the rotation angle. By placing the Hall elements at the appropriate places under the disk periphery, we may obtain the cosine signals shifted by 90 , 120 , or by any other angle. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear structure at high angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, F.S.

    1976-08-01

    There is considerable interest in high angular-momentum states of nuclei, and some recent progress in three areas is discussed. Part I considers transitional nuclei, where two types of rotational bands--decoupled and strongly coupled--are found to occur very frequently. These can be described by several collective models, but the required potential-energy surfaces seem to differ somewhat from those calculated microscopically. In Part II the processes that might cause backbending (irregularities in the rotational levels of certain nuclei) are discussed, and alignment of individual nucleons now seems to be the cause in most cases. The mixing of the ground band with this aligned band can be studied in some detail using Coulomb excitation with very heavy ions. Part III deals with the very high-spin states where effective moments of inertia have been obtained for spins up to 50h. Also structure has been seen in the spectra around these spin values which can be tentatively related to calculated shell effects. 74 references, 61 figures

  15. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravitational wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low-length. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of r = 0:01 and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, tau. (c) (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  16. Angular-momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since about 1980 that fusion of heavy ions is greatly enhanced below the Coulomb barrier compared with normal barrier-penetration expectations. The excitation function for fusion of 64 Ni + 100 Mo measured in collaboration with a group at Washington University shows the effect clearly. The barrier energy is about 142 MeV; the lowest point is at about 90% of the barrier energy. The dotted curve is the prediction of a one-dimensional-barrier-penetration calculation of a type that reproduces the fusion of light projectiles very well. Several theoretical approaches have been successful in explaining the enhancement seen in much of the excitation-function data, but it cannot be said that a full understanding of the physics is in hand even after more than a decade of hard work. In fact, the reasonable success of several rather different models shows that the underlying phenomena are not well understood. Other types of data might be helpful in distinguishing among the many different theoretical approaches. An important kind of information not measured in most of the experiments is the dependence on ell, the angular momentum of the fusing system. We obtained such information on the cross sections, σ ell, as a function of ell for the fusion of 64 Ni and 100 Mo using the Spin Spectrometer. This paper will first review the experimental method and data and then present results from a more sophisticated analysis of the same data

  17. Cyclic transformation of orbital angular momentum modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlederer, Florian; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Malik, Mehul; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-01-01

    The spatial modes of photons are one realization of a QuDit, a quantum system that is described in a D-dimensional Hilbert space. In order to perform quantum information tasks with QuDits, a general class of D-dimensional unitary transformations is needed. Among these, cyclic transformations are an important special case required in many high-dimensional quantum communication protocols. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a cyclic transformation in the high-dimensional space of photonic orbital angular momentum (OAM). Using simple linear optical components, we show a successful four-fold cyclic transformation of OAM modes. Interestingly, our experimental setup was found by a computer algorithm. In addition to the four-cyclic transformation, the algorithm also found extensions to higher-dimensional cycles in a hybrid space of OAM and polarization. Besides being useful for quantum cryptography with QuDits, cyclic transformations are key for the experimental production of high-dimensional maximally entangled Bell-states. (paper)

  18. Angular momentum transport by tidal acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical expression of the braking torque on a Jacobian ellipsoid rotating steadily in an enviromental gas is given, based on the assumption that the ellipsoid rotates around its shortest principal axis with an angular momentum slightly larger than that at the bifurcation point of the Maclaurin spheroid. This braking torque is effected by the gravitational interaction between the ellipsoid matter and a spiral density configuration in the environmental gas. This spiral configuration which is called a tidal acoustic wave, is caused by the zone of silence effect in a supersonic flow. With respect to a coordinates system rotating with the ellipsoid, a supersonic region appears outside a certain radius. In this supersonic region, the effect of the non-axisymmetric fluctuation in the ellipsoid potential propagates along the downstream branches of the Mach waves. This one-sided response of the supersonic part causes the tidal acoustic wave. The discussion is restricted to the equatorial plane, and an acoustic approximation of the basic equations is used under the assumption that the self-gravity effect of the environmental gas is negligable in comparison to the main gravity of the ellipsoid. The results are applied to the pre- and post-Main sequence phases of a rotating star, and relating astrophysical problems are discussed. (Auth.)

  19. Angular momentum transport by tidal acoustic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, T [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1976-05-01

    An analytical expression of the braking torque on a Jacobian ellipsoid rotating steadily in an enviromental gas is given, based on the assumption that the ellipsoid rotates around its shortest principal axis with an angular momentum slightly larger than that at the bifurcation point of the Maclaurin spheroid. This braking torque is effected by the gravitational interaction between the ellipsoid matter and a spiral density configuration in the environmental gas. This spiral configuration which is called a tidal acoustic wave, is caused by the zone of silence effect in a supersonic flow. With respect to a coordinates system rotating with the ellipsoid, a supersonic region appears outside a certain radius. In this supersonic region, the effect of the non-axisymmetric fluctuation in the ellipsoid potential propagates along the downstream branches of the Mach waves. This one-sided response of the supersonic part causes the tidal acoustic wave. The discussion is restricted to the equatorial plane, and an acoustic approximation of the basic equations is used under the assumption that the self-gravity effect of the environmental gas is negligable in comparison to the main gravity of the ellipsoid. The results are applied to the pre- and post-Main sequence phases of a rotating star, and relating astrophysical problems are discussed.

  20. Angular distributions of sputtered particles from NiTi alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshev, I.; Hamishkeev, V.; Chernysh, V.S.; Postnikov, S.; Mamaev, B.

    1993-01-01

    The angular distributions of sputtered Ni and Ti from a polycrystalline NiTi (50-50%) alloy are investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. A difference in the angular distributions is observed with Ni being sputtered preferentially near the surface normal. A computer program for the calculation of the angular distributions of constituents sputtered from binary targets is created and used. The mechanisms responsible for the observed differences in the angular distributions are discussed. It is found that the collisional cascade theory is not directly applicable to the results of the constituents' angular distributions obtained in the presence of oxygen. The fitted coefficients of bombardment-induced segregation are found to be greater than the experimentally obtained ones. (author)

  1. Jet angularity measurements for single inclusive jet production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Lee, Kyle; Ringer, Felix

    2018-04-01

    We study jet angularity measurements for single-inclusive jet production at the LHC. Jet angularities depend on a continuous parameter a allowing for a smooth interpolation between different traditional jet shape observables. We establish a factorization theorem within Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) where we consistently take into account in- and out-of-jet radiation by making use of semi-inclusive jet functions. For comparison, we elaborate on the differences to jet angularities measured on an exclusive jet sample. All the necessary ingredients for the resummation at next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) accuracy are presented within the effective field theory framework. We expect semiinclusive jet angularity measurements to be feasible at the LHC and we present theoretical predictions for the relevant kinematic range. In addition, we investigate the potential impact of jet angularities for quark-gluon discrimination.

  2. Photon beam polarization and non-dipolar angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peshkin, M.

    1996-01-01

    Angular distributions of ejecta from unoriented atoms and molecules depend upon the polarization state of the incident x-rays as well as upon the dynamics of the physical systems being studied. I recommend a simple geometrical way of looking at the polarization and its effects upon angular distributions. The polarization is represented as a vector in a parameter space that faithfully represents the polarization of the beam. The simple dependence of the angular dependence of the angular distributions on the polarization vector enables easy extraction of the dynamical information contained in those angular distributions. No new physical results emerge from this geometrical approach, but known consequences of the symmetries appear in an easily visualized form that I find pleasing and that has proved to be useful for planning experiments and for analyzing data

  3. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  4. Optimal centralized and decentralized velocity feedback control on a beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, W P; Elliott, S J

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the optimization of a velocity feedback controller with a collocated force actuator, to minimize the kinetic energy of a simply supported beam. If the beam is excited at a single location, the optimum feedback gain varies with the position of the control system. It is shown that this variation depends partly on the location of the control force relative to the exciting force. If a distributed excitation is assumed, that is random in both time and space, a unique optimum value of the feedback gain can be found for a given control location. The effect of the control location on performance and the optimal feedback gain can then be examined and is found to be limited provided the control locations are not close to the ends of the beam. The optimization can also be performed for a multichannel velocity feedback system. Both a centralized and a decentralized controller are considered. It is shown that the difference in performance between a centralized and a decentralized controller is small, unless the control locations are closely spaced. In this case the centralized controller effectively feeds back a moment proportional to angular velocity as well as a force proportional to a velocity. It is also shown that the optimal feedback gain can be approximated on the basis of a limited model and that similar results can be achieved

  5. Determination of hydrogen cluster velocities and comparison with numerical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Täschner, A.; Köhler, E.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Khoukaz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of powerful hydrogen cluster jet targets in storage ring experiments led to the need of precise data on the mean cluster velocity as function of the stagnation temperature and pressure for the determination of the volume density of the target beams. For this purpose a large data set of hydrogen cluster velocity distributions and mean velocities was measured at a high density hydrogen cluster jet target using a trumpet shaped nozzle. The measurements have been performed at pressures above and below the critical pressure and for a broad range of temperatures relevant for target operation, e.g., at storage ring experiments. The used experimental method is described which allows for the velocity measurement of single clusters using a time-of-flight technique. Since this method is rather time-consuming and these measurements are typically interfering negatively with storage ring experiments, a method for a precise calculation of these mean velocities was needed. For this, the determined mean cluster velocities are compared with model calculations based on an isentropic one-dimensional van der Waals gas. Based on the obtained data and the presented numerical calculations, a new method has been developed which allows to predict the mean cluster velocities with an accuracy of about 5%. For this two cut-off parameters defining positions inside the nozzle are introduced, which can be determined for a given nozzle by only two velocity measurements

  6. Velocidade crítica como um método não invasivo para estimar a velocidade de lactato mínimo no ciclismo La velocidad crítica como un método no invasivo para estimar la velocidad de lactato mínimo en el ciclismo Critical velocity as a noninvasive method to estimate the lactate minimum velocity on cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolysson Carvalho Hiyane

    2006-12-01

    las combinaciones de series predictivas de 2 y 4 km (VC2/4, 2 y 6 km (VC2/6, 4 y 6 km (VC4/6 y 2, 4 y 6km (VC2/4/6. Para la identificación de VLM fue realizada una serie de 2km a máxima velocidad, seguida de 6 series incrementales de 2km con 1 minuto de pausa para dosaje de lac. La VLM fue identificada visualmente (VLMv y aplicando función polinomial (VLMp. No se observaron diferencias entre VLMv (33,3 ± 2,5km.h¹ y VLMp (33,1 ± 2,6km.h¹. A excepción de VC4/6 (34,6 ± 3,5km.h¹, los valores de VC2/4 (38,0 ± 2,2km.h¹, VC2/6 (36,1 ± 2,4km.h¹ y VC2/4/6 (36,1 ± 2,5km.h¹ difirieron de VLMp y VLMv. Concluimos que, a pesar de ser ~1km/h por encima de VLM, la VC identificada a partir de series predictivas de mayor duración (4 y 6km - aproximadamente 6 y 10 min no tienen diferencia estadística y presentan alta correlación y concordancia con VLM. A pesar de esto, es necesario investigar si la VC representa un equilibrio entre remoción y producción de lac durante los ejercicios de larga duración en ciclismo outdoor.The lactate minimum velocity (LMV represents the equilibrium point between blood lactate (lac production and removal. With the purpose of analyzing the validity of critical velocity (CV as a non-invasive method to estimate the LMV on outdoor cycling, 15 cyclists (67.9 ± 5.7 kg; 1.70 ± 0.1 m; 26.7 ± 4.2 years performed all-out tests on distances of 2, 4 and 6 km on velodrome. The CV was identified by distance-time model from combinations of 2 and 4 km (CV2/4, 2 and 6 km (CV2/6, 4 and 6 km (CV4/6 and 2, 4 and 6 km (CV2/4/6. The LMV was identified during 6 x 2 km incremental bouts after a latic acidosis induced by the all-out 2 km. The lower lac during test identified the LMV visually (LMVv and by applying a polynomial function (LMVp. No differences were observed between LMVv (33.3 ± 2.5 km.h¹ and LMVp (33.1 ± 2.6 km.h¹. Apart from CV4/6 (34.6 ± 3.5 km.h¹, the values of CV2/4 (38.0 ± 2.2 km.h¹, CV2/6 (36.1 ± 2.4 km.h¹ and CV2/4/6 (36.1

  7. Radial velocity asymmetries from jets with variable velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, A. H.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Velazquez, P. F.; Raga, A. C.; De Colle, F.

    2006-01-01

    We have computed a set of 3-D numerical simulations of radiatively cooling jets including variabilities in both the ejection direction (precession) and the jet velocity (intermittence), using the Yguazu-a code. In order to investigate the effects of jet rotation on the shape of the line profiles, we also introduce an initial toroidal rotation velocity profile. Since the Yguazu-a code includes an atomic/ionic network, we are able to compute the emission coefficients for several emission lines, and we generate line profiles for the Hα, [O I]λ6300, [S II]λ6716 and [N II]λ6548 lines. Using initial parameters that are suitable for the DG Tau microjet, we show that the computed radial velocity shift for the medium-velocity component of the line profile as a function of distance from the jet axis is strikingly similar for rotating and non-rotating jet models

  8. Seismic Wave Velocity in Earth's Shallow Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Eaton, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of the outer core indicate that it is composed of liquid Fe and Ni alloyed with a ~10% fraction of light elements such as O, S or Si. Recently, unusual features, such as sediment accumulation, immiscible fluid layers or stagnant convection, have been predicted in the shallow core region. Secular cooling and compositional buoyancy drive vigorous convection that sustains the geodynamo, although critical details of light-element composition and thermal regime remain uncertain. Seismic velocity models can provide important constraints on the light element composition, however global reference models, such as Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM), IASP91 and AK135 vary significantly in the 200 km below the core-mantle boundary. Past studies of the outermost core velocity structure have been hampered by traveltime uncertainties due to lowermost mantle heterogeneities. The recently published Empirical Transfer Function (ETF) method has been shown to reduce the uncertainty using a waveform stacking approach to improve global observations of SmKS teleseismic waves. Here, we apply the ETF method to achieve a precise top-of-core velocity measurement of 8.05 ± 0.03 km/s. This new model accords well with PREM. Since PREM is based on the adiabatic form of the Adams-Williamson equation, it assumes a well mixed (i.e. homogeneous) composition. This result suggests a lack of heterogeneity in the outermost core due to layering or stagnant convection.

  9. About the velocity operator for spinning particles in quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salesi, Giovanni [Universita Statale di Catania (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Recami, Erasmo; Rodrigues Junior, Waldyr A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Aplicada

    1995-12-01

    Starting from the formal expressions of the hydrodynamical (or local) quantities employed in the applications of Clifford Algebras to quantum mechanics, we introduce - in terms of the ordinary tensorial framework - a new definition for the field of a generic quantity. By translating from Clifford into sensor algebra, we also propose a new (non-relativistic) velocity operator for a spin 1/2 particle. This operator is the sum of the ordinary part p/m describing the mean motion (the motion of the center-of-mass), and of a second part associated with the so-called Zitterbewegung, which is the spin internal motion observed in the center-of-mass frame. This spin component of the velocity operator is non-zero not only in the Pauli theoretical framework in presence of external magnetic fields and spin precession, but also in the Schroedinger case, when the wave-function is a spin eigenstate. In the latter case, one gets a decomposition of the velocity field for the Madelueng fluid into two distinct parts: which constitutes the non-relativistic analogue of the Gordon decomposition for the Dirac current. We find furthermore that the Zitterbewegung motion involves a velocity field which is solenoidal, and that the local angular velocity is parallel to the spin vector. In presence of a non-constant spin vector (Pauli case) we have, besides the component normal to spin present even in the Schroedinger theory, also a component of the local velocity which is parallel to the rotor of the spin vector. (author). 19 refs.

  10. About the velocity operator for spinning particles in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesi, Giovanni; Recami, Erasmo; Rodrigues Junior, Waldyr A.

    1995-12-01

    Starting from the formal expressions of the hydrodynamical (or local) quantities employed in the applications of Clifford Algebras to quantum mechanics, we introduce - in terms of the ordinary tensorial framework - a new definition for the field of a generic quantity. By translating from Clifford into sensor algebra, we also propose a new (non-relativistic) velocity operator for a spin 1/2 particle. This operator is the sum of the ordinary part p/m describing the mean motion (the motion of the center-of-mass), and of a second part associated with the so-called Zitterbewegung, which is the spin internal motion observed in the center-of-mass frame. This spin component of the velocity operator is non-zero not only in the Pauli theoretical framework in presence of external magnetic fields and spin precession, but also in the Schroedinger case, when the wave-function is a spin eigenstate. In the latter case, one gets a decomposition of the velocity field for the Madelueng fluid into two distinct parts: which constitutes the non-relativistic analogue of the Gordon decomposition for the Dirac current. We find furthermore that the Zitterbewegung motion involves a velocity field which is solenoidal, and that the local angular velocity is parallel to the spin vector. In presence of a non-constant spin vector (Pauli case) we have, besides the component normal to spin present even in the Schroedinger theory, also a component of the local velocity which is parallel to the rotor of the spin vector. (author). 19 refs

  11. Fractals control in particle's velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongping; Liu Shutang; Shen Shulan

    2009-01-01

    Julia set, a fractal set of the literature of nonlinear physics, has significance for the engineering applications. For example, the fractal structure characteristics of the generalized M-J set could visually reflect the change rule of particle's velocity. According to the real world requirement, the system need show various particle's velocity in some cases. Thus, the control of the nonlinear behavior, i.e., Julia set, has attracted broad attention. In this work, an auxiliary feedback control is introduced to effectively control the Julia set that visually reflects the change rule of particle's velocity. It satisfies the performance requirement of the real world problems.

  12. Southern high-velocity stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augensen, H.J.; Buscombe, W.

    1978-01-01

    Using the model of the Galaxy presented by Eggen, Lynden-Bell and Sandage (1962), plane galactic orbits have been calculated for 800 southern high-velocity stars which possess parallax, proper motion, and radial velocity data. The stars with trigonometric parallaxes were selected from Buscombe and Morris (1958), supplemented by more recent spectroscopic data. Photometric parallaxes from infrared color indices were used for bright red giants studied by Eggen (1970), and for red dwarfs for which Rodgers and Eggen (1974) determined radial velocities. A color-color diagram based on published values of (U-B) and (B-V) for most of these stars is shown. (Auth.)

  13. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  14. Sound Velocity in Soap Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gong-Tao; Lü Yong-Jun; Liu Peng-Fei; Li Yi-Ning; Shi Qing-Fan

    2012-01-01

    The velocity of sound in soap foams at high gas volume fractions is experimentally studied by using the time difference method. It is found that the sound velocities increase with increasing bubble diameter, and asymptotically approach to the value in air when the diameter is larger than 12.5 mm. We propose a simple theoretical model for the sound propagation in a disordered foam. In this model, the attenuation of a sound wave due to the scattering of the bubble wall is equivalently described as the effect of an additional length. This simplicity reasonably reproduces the sound velocity in foams and the predicted results are in good agreement with the experiments. Further measurements indicate that the increase of frequency markedly slows down the sound velocity, whereas the latter does not display a strong dependence on the solution concentration

  15. Settling velocities in batch sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, A.M.; Thompson, B.E.

    1982-10-01

    The sedimentation of mixtures containing one and two sizes of spherical particles (44 and 62 μm in diameter) was studied. Radioactive tracing with 57 Co was used to measure the settling velocities. The ratio of the settling velocity U of uniformly sized particles to the velocity predicted to Stokes' law U 0 was correlated to an expression of the form U/U 0 = epsilon/sup α/, where epsilon is the liquid volume fraction and α is an empirical constant, determined experimentally to be 4.85. No effect of viscosity on the ratio U/U 0 was observed as the viscosity of the liquid medium was varied from 1x10 -3 to 5x10 -3 Pa.s. The settling velocities of particles in a bimodal mixture were fit by the same correlation; the ratio U/U 0 was independent of the concentrations of different-sized particles

  16. Solutions of the Wheeler-Feynman equations with discontinuous velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Daniel Câmara; De Luca, Jayme

    2015-01-01

    We generalize Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics with a variational boundary value problem for continuous boundary segments that might include velocity discontinuity points. Critical-point orbits must satisfy the Euler-Lagrange equations of the action functional at most points, which are neutral differential delay equations (the Wheeler-Feynman equations of motion). At velocity discontinuity points, critical-point orbits must satisfy the Weierstrass-Erdmann continuity conditions for the partial momenta and the partial energies. We study a special setup having the shortest time-separation between the (infinite-dimensional) boundary segments, for which case the critical-point orbit can be found using a two-point boundary problem for an ordinary differential equation. For this simplest setup, we prove that orbits can have discontinuous velocities. We construct a numerical method to solve the Wheeler-Feynman equations together with the Weierstrass-Erdmann conditions and calculate some numerical orbits with discontinuous velocities. We also prove that the variational boundary value problem has a unique solution depending continuously on boundary data, if the continuous boundary segments have velocity discontinuities along a reduced local space.

  17. Control of Angular Intervals for Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    In angle-multiplexed holographic memory, the full width at half maximum of the Bragg selectivity curves is dependent on the angle formed between the medium and incident laser beams. This indicates the possibility of high density and high multiplexing number by varying the angular intervals between adjacent holograms. We propose an angular interval scheduling for closely stacking holograms into medium even when the angle range is limited. We obtained bit error rates of the order of 10-4 under the following conditions: medium thickness of 1 mm, laser beam wavelength of 532 nm, and angular multiplexing number of 300.

  18. Angular absorption of iridium - ICW12 needles: practical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymczyk, W.; Lesiak, J.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis was made of two potential sources of error in Ir 192 dosimetry: the effect of angular absorption and the differences in the ionization constants found in literature. Corrections for selfabsorption in the ICW12 iridium source were determined from measurements and calculations. It was found that the decrease in the dose caused by the angular absorption in the central therapeutic area of a typical implantation can exceed 5 percent. The need for employing the concept of ''constant exposure rate'' is stressed as well as that for using angular absorption in the form of absorption. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  19. Nuclear spin measurement using the angular correlation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schapira, J.-P.

    The double angular correlation method is defined by a semi-classical approach (Biendenharn). The equivalence formula in quantum mechanics are discussed for coherent and incoherent angular momentum mixing; the correlations are described from the density and efficiency matrices (Fano). The ambiguities in double angular correlations can be sometimes suppressed (emission of particles with a high orbital momentum l), using triple correlations between levels with well defined spin and parity. Triple correlations are applied to the case where the direction of linear polarization of γ-rays is detected [fr

  20. On Angular Sampling Methods for 3-D Spatial Channel Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Jämsä, Tommi; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses generating three dimensional (3D) spatial channel models with emphasis on the angular sampling methods. Three angular sampling methods, i.e. modified uniform power sampling, modified uniform angular sampling, and random pairing methods are proposed and investigated in detail....... The random pairing method, which uses only twenty sinusoids in the ray-based model for generating the channels, presents good results if the spatial channel cluster is with a small elevation angle spread. For spatial clusters with large elevation angle spreads, however, the random pairing method would fail...... and the other two methods should be considered....

  1. Notes on the quantum theory of angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Feenberg, Eugene

    1999-01-01

    This classic, concise text has served a generation of physicists as an exceptionally useful guide to the mysteries of angular momenta and Clebsch-Gordon Coefficients. Derived from notes originally prepared to assist graduate students in reading research papers on atomic, molecular, and nuclear structure, the text first reviews the basic elements of quantum theory. It then examines the development of the fundamental commutation relations for angular momentum components and vector operators, and the ways in which matrix elements and eigenvalues of the angular momentum operators are worked out f

  2. Uncertainty assessment of 3D instantaneous velocity model from stack velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele Maesano, Francesco; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    3D modelling is a powerful tool that is experiencing increasing applications in data analysis and dissemination. At the same time the need of quantitative uncertainty evaluation is strongly requested in many aspects of the geological sciences and by the stakeholders. In many cases the starting point for 3D model building is the interpretation of seismic profiles that provide indirect information about the geology of the subsurface in the domain of time. The most problematic step in the 3D modelling construction is the conversion of the horizons and faults interpreted in time domain to the depth domain. In this step the dominant variable that could lead to significantly different results is the velocity. The knowledge of the subsurface velocities is related mainly to punctual data (sonic logs) that are often sparsely distributed in the areas covered by the seismic interpretation. The extrapolation of velocity information to wide extended horizons is thus a critical step to obtain a 3D model in depth that can be used for predictive purpose. In the EU-funded GeoMol Project, the availability of a dense network of seismic lines (confidentially provided by ENI S.p.A.) in the Central Po Plain, is paired with the presence of 136 well logs, but few of them have sonic logs and in some portion of the area the wells are very widely spaced. The depth conversion of the 3D model in time domain has been performed testing different strategies for the use and the interpolation of velocity data. The final model has been obtained using a 4 layer cake 3D instantaneous velocity model that considers both the initial velocity (v0) in every reference horizon and the gradient of velocity variation with depth (k). Using this method it is possible to consider the geological constraint given by the geometries of the horizons and the geo-statistical approach to the interpolation of velocities and gradient. Here we present an experiment based on the use of set of pseudo-wells obtained from the

  3. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Processing of Instantaneous Angular Speed Signal for Detection of a Diesel Engine Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Charchalis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of diesel engine performance under its operating is critical for the prediction of malfunction development and subsequently functional failure detection. Analysis of instantaneous angular speed (IAS of the crankshaft is considered as one of the nonintrusive and effective methods of the detection of combustion quality deterioration. In this paper results of experimental verification of fuel system's malfunction detecting, using optical encoder for IAS recording are presented. The implemented method relies on the comparison of measurement results, recorded under healthy and faulty conditions of the engine. Elaborated dynamic model of angular speed variations enables us to build templates of engine behavior. Recorded during experiment, values of cylinder pressure were taken for the approximation of pressure basic waveform. The main task of data processing is smoothing the raw angular speed signal. The noise is due to sensor mount vibrations, signal emitter machining, engine body vibrations, and crankshaft torsional vibrations. Smoothing of the measurement data was carried out by the implementation of the Savitzky-Golay filter. Measured signal after smoothing was compared with the model of IAS run.

  5. Anomalous cross-field velocities in a CIV laboratory experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.

    1988-10-01

    The axial and radial ion velocities and the electron radial velocity are determined in coaxial plasma gun operated under critical velocity conditions. The particle celocities are determined from probe measurement together with He I 3889 AA absolute intensity measurements and the consideration of the total momentum balance of the current sheet. The ions are found move axially and the electrons radially much faster than predicted by the E/B drift in the macroscopic fields. These results agree with what can be expected from the instability processes, which has earlier been proposed to operate in these experiments. It is therefore a direct experimental demonstration that instability processes have to be invoked not only for the electron heating, but also to explain the macroscopic velocities and currents. (author)

  6. A critical flow model for the Cathena thermalhydraulic code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.K.; Hanna, B.N.

    1990-01-01

    The calculation of critical flow rate, e.g., of choked flow through a break, is required for simulating a loss of coolant transient in a reactor or reactor-like experimental facility. A model was developed to calculate the flow rate through the break for given geometrical parameters near the break and fluid parameters upstream of the break for ordinary water, as well as heavy water, with or without non- condensible gases. This model has been incorporated in the CATHENA, one-dimensional, two-fluid thermalhydraulic code. In the CATHENA code a standard staggered-mesh, finite-difference representation is used to solve the thermalhydraulic equations. This model compares the fluid mixture velocity, calculated using the CATHENA momentum equations, with a critical velocity. When the mixture velocity is smaller than the critical velocity, the flow is assumed to be subcritical, and the model remains passive. When the fluid mixture velocity is higher than the critical velocity, the model sets the fluid mixture velocity equal to the critical velocity. In this paper the critical velocity at a link (momentum cell) is first estimated separately for single-phase liquid, two- phase, or single-phase gas flow condition at the upstream node (mass/energy cell). In all three regimes non-condensible gas can be present in the flow. For single-phase liquid flow, the critical velocity is estimated using a Bernoulli- type of equation, the pressure at the link is estimated by the pressure undershoot method

  7. Critical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  8. Angular-dependent I-V characteristics in borocarbide superconductor YNi2B2C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, R M; Chen, Q Y; Chu, W K

    2006-01-01

    We present angular-dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements in borocarbide YNi 2 B 2 C single crystals near the vortex-glass irreversible line. External magnetic fields are applied along the angle θ with respect to the c-axis. The nonlinear I-V curves reveal scaling behaviour near the transition. Using the scaling analysis, the relevant critical exponents and vortex transition temperatures are determined for all orientations. The data agrees well with the vortex-glass (VG) model. No evidence was found that supports the existence of a Bose-glass (BG) type of transition

  9. Velocity Spread Reduction for Axis-encircling Electron Beam Generated by Single Magnetic Cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, S. G.; Baik, C. W.; Kim, D. H.; Park, G. S.; Sato, N.; Yokoo, K.

    2001-10-01

    Physical characteristics of an annular Pierce-type electron gun are investigated analytically. An annular electron gun is used in conjunction with a non-adiabatic magnetic reversal and an adiabatic compression to produce an axis-encircling electron beam. Velocity spread close to zero is realized with an initial canonical angular momentum spread at the cathode when the beam trajectory does not coincide with the magnetic flux line. Both the analytical calculation and the EGUN code simulation confirm this phenomenon.

  10. Radial profiles of velocity and pressure for condensation-induced hurricanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarieva, A.M.; Gorshkov, V.G.

    2011-01-01

    The Bernoulli integral in the form of an algebraic equation is obtained for the hurricane air flow as the sum of the kinetic energy of wind and the condensational potential energy. With an account for the eye rotation energy and the decrease of angular momentum towards the hurricane center it is shown that the theoretical profiles of pressure and velocity agree well with observations for intense hurricanes. The previous order of magnitude estimates obtained in pole approximation are confirmed.

  11. Radial profiles of velocity and pressure for condensation-induced hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarieva, A. M.; Gorshkov, V. G.

    2011-02-01

    The Bernoulli integral in the form of an algebraic equation is obtained for the hurricane air flow as the sum of the kinetic energy of wind and the condensational potential energy. With an account for the eye rotation energy and the decrease of angular momentum towards the hurricane center it is shown that the theoretical profiles of pressure and velocity agree well with observations for intense hurricanes. The previous order of magnitude estimates obtained in pole approximation are confirmed.

  12. Radial profiles of velocity and pressure for condensation-induced hurricanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarieva, A.M., E-mail: ammakarieva@gmail.co [Theoretical Physics Division, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gorshkov, V.G. [Theoretical Physics Division, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-14

    The Bernoulli integral in the form of an algebraic equation is obtained for the hurricane air flow as the sum of the kinetic energy of wind and the condensational potential energy. With an account for the eye rotation energy and the decrease of angular momentum towards the hurricane center it is shown that the theoretical profiles of pressure and velocity agree well with observations for intense hurricanes. The previous order of magnitude estimates obtained in pole approximation are confirmed.

  13. Velocity and Motion Control of a Self-Balancing Vehicle Based on a Cascade Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Velazquez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents balancing, velocity and motion control of a self-balancing vehicle. A cascade controller is implemented for both balancing control and angular velocity control. This controller is tested in simulations using a proposed mathematical model of the system. Motion control is achieved based on the kinematics of the robot. Control hardware is designed and integrated to implement the proposed controllers. Pitch is kept under 1° from the equilibrium position with no external disturbances. The linear cascade control is able to handle slight changes in the system dynamics, such as in the centre of mass and the slope on an inclined surface.

  14. Comparison between length and velocity gauges in quantum simulations of high-order harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    , and acceleration forms, and two gauges, the length and velocity gauges. The relationships among the harmonic phases obtained from the Fourier transform of the three forms are discussed in detail. Although quantum mechanics is gauge invariant and the length and velocity gauges should give identical results, the two...... gauges present different computation efficiencies, which reflects the different behavior in terms of characteristics of the physical couplings acting in the two gauges. In order to obtain convergence, more angular momentum states are required in the length gauge, while more grid points are required...

  15. A kinetic theory for nonanalog Monte Carlo algorithms: Exponential transform with angular biasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, T.; Larsen, E.W.

    1998-01-01

    A new Boltzmann Monte Carlo (BMC) equation is proposed to describe the transport of Monte Carlo particles governed by a set of nonanalog rules for the transition of space, velocity, and weight. The BMC equation is a kinetic equation that includes weight as an extra independent variable. The solution of the BMC equation is the pointwise distribution of velocity and weight throughout the physical system. The BMC equation is derived for the simulation of a transmitted current, utilizing the exponential transform with angular biasing. The weight moments of the solution of the BMC equation are used to predict the score moments of the transmission current. (Also, it is shown that an adjoint BMC equation can be used for this purpose.) Integrating the solution of the forward BMC equation over space, velocity, and weight, the mean number of flights per history is obtained. This is used to determine theoretically the figure of merit for any choice of biasing parameters. Also, a maximum safe value of the exponential transform parameter is proposed, which ensure the finite variance of variance estimate (sample variance) for any penetration distance. Finally, numerical results that validate the new theory are provided

  16. Nonlinear dynamic model for skidding behavior of angular contact ball bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qinkai; Chu, Fulei

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic model is proposed to predict the skidding behavior of angular contact ball bearings under combined load condition. The centrifugal and gyroscopic effects induced by ball rotation and revolution, Hertz contact between the ball and inner/outer races, discontinuous contact between the ball and cage and elastohydrodynamic lubrication are considered in the model. Through comparisons with the tested results of the reference, the dynamic model is verified. Based upon these, variations of ball slipping speed with time and space are discussed for the bearing under combined load condition. It is shown that radial load leads to the fluctuations in the slipping velocity of the ball contacting with inner/outer races, especially for the ball in load-decreasing regions. Adding the radial load would significantly increase the amplitude and range of slipping velocity, indicating that the skidding becomes more serious. As the ball still withstands contact load in the load-decreasing region, large slipping velocity would increase the temperature of both bearing and lubricant oil, intensify the wear and then might shorten the bearing service life. Therefore, the radial load should be considered carefully in the design and monitoring of rotating machinery.

  17. The angular momentum dependence of complex fragment emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobtka, L.G.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Large fragment (A > 4) production at high angular momentum is studied via the reaction, 200 MeV 45 Sc + 65 Cu. Comparisons of the fragment yields from this reaction (high angular momentum) to those from 93 Nb + Be (low angular momentum) are used to verify the strong angular momentum dependence of large fragment production predicted by equilibrium models. Details of the coincident γ-ray distributions not only confirm a rigidly rotating intermediate but also indicate that the widths of the primary L-wave distributions decrease with increasing symmetry in the decay channel. These data are used to test the asymmetry and L-wave dependence of emission barriers calculated from a rotating, finite range corrected, liquid drop model. 21 refs., 10 figs

  18. Manifest rotation symmetric expressions for angular momentum eigenfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eeg, J.O.; Wroldsen, J.

    1983-01-01

    Manifest rotation symmetric expressions for eigenfunctions for spin s, orbital angular momentum l and total angular momentum j = l+s, .... , /l-s/ in terms of (2j+1) x (2s+1) multipole transition matrices (MTM) is given. These matrices, which are irreducible tensor matrices, have an algebra together with ordinary spin matrices for spin s and spin j. Explicit expressions for MTM's and their algebra are given for angular momenta <-3. By means of some examples it is shown that within this formalism angular integrations in central field problems will be simplified considerably. Thus the formalism turns out to be very useful for instance for calculations within the MIT-bag and also within spin-spin interactions in atomic physics. (Auth.)

  19. The INCAS Project: An Innovative Contact-Less Angular Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislanzoni, L.; Di Cintio, A.; Solimando, M.; Parzianello, G.

    2013-09-01

    Angular Positions sensors are widely used in all spacecrafts, including re-entry vehicles and launchers, where mechanisms and pointing-scanning devices are required. The main applications are on mechanisms for TeleMeasure (TM) related to the release and deployment of devices, or on rotary mechanisms such as Solar Array Drive Mechanism (SADM) and Antenna Pointing Mechanism (APM). Longer lifetime (up to 7- 10 years) is becoming a new driver for the coming missions and contact technology sensors often incur in limitations due to the wear of the contacting parts [1].A Self-Compensating Absolute Angular Encoder was developed and tested in the frame of an ESA's ARTES 5.2 project, named INCAS (INnovative Contact-less Angular Sensor). More in particular, the INCAS sensor addresses a market need for contactless angular sensors aimed at replacing the more conventional rotary potentiometers, while featuring the same level of accuracy performances and extending the expected lifetime.

  20. Electronic orbital angular momentum and magnetism of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Ji, E-mail: ji.luo@upr.edu

    2014-10-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of graphene electrons in a perpendicular magnetic field is calculated and corresponding magnetic moment is used to investigate the magnetism of perfect graphene. Variation in magnetization demonstrates its decrease with carrier-doping, plateaus in a large field, and de Haas–van Alphen oscillation. Regulation of graphene's magnetism by a parallel electric field is presented. The OAM originates from atomic-scale electronic motion in graphene lattice, and vector hopping interaction between carbon atomic orbitals is the building element. A comparison between OAM of graphene electrons, OAM of Dirac fermions, and total angular momentum of the latter demonstrates their different roles in graphene's magnetism. Applicability and relation to experiments of the results are discussed. - Highlights: • Orbital angular momentum of graphene electrons is calculated. • Orbital magnetic moment of graphene electrons is obtained. • Variation in magnetization of graphene is calculated. • Roles of different kinds of angular momentum are investigated.

  1. Efficient evaluation of angular power spectra and bispectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assassi, Valentin; Simonović, Marko; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2017-11-01

    Angular statistics of cosmological observables are hard to compute. The main difficulty is due to the presence of highly-oscillatory Bessel functions which need to be integrated over. In this paper, we provide a simple and fast method to compute the angular power spectrum and bispectrum of any observable. The method is based on using an FFTlog algorithm to decompose the momentum-space statistics onto a basis of power-law functions. For each power law, the integrals over Bessel functions have a simple analytical solution. This allows us to efficiently evaluate these integrals, independently of the value of the multipole l. In particular, this method significantly speeds up the evaluation of the angular bispectrum compared to existing methods. To illustrate our algorithm, we compute the galaxy, lensing and CMB temperature angular power spectrum and bispectrum.

  2. Phase-space distributions and orbital angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquini B.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the concept of Wigner distributions to describe the phase-space distributions of quarks in the nucleon, emphasizing the information encoded in these functions about the quark orbital angular momentum.

  3. Helicons in uniform fields. II. Poynting vector and angular momenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2018-03-01

    The orbital and spin angular momenta of helicon modes have been determined quantitatively from laboratory experiments. The current density is obtained unambiguously from three dimensional magnetic field measurements. The only approximation made is to obtain the electric field from Hall Ohm's law which is usually the case for low frequency whistler modes. This allows the evaluation of the Poynting vector from which the angular momentum is obtained. Comparing two helicon modes (m = 0 and m = 1), one can separate the contribution of angular momentum of a rotating and non-rotating wave field. The orbital angular momentum is important to assess the wave-particle interaction by the transverse Doppler shift of rotating waves which has not been considered so far.

  4. Genetic characterization of angular leaf spot resistance in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr Tryphone

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... Angular leaf spot disease (ALS) caused by Pseudocercospora griseola is one ... Author(s) agree that this article remains permanently open access under the terms ... that results in shrivelled seeds of reduced size and quality.

  5. prevalence of angular leaf spot disease and sources of resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-02-17

    Feb 17, 2017 ... Angular leaf spot (Pseudocercospora griseola Crous U, Brown) is one of the ..... Incidence of six foliar bean diseases in two agro ecological zones of eastern Democratic Republic of .... use of poor quality farmer-saved seed.

  6. Angular Momentum Transport in Quasi-Keplerian Accretion Disks ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Keplerian accretion disk yield results that are inconsistent with the generally accepted model. If correct, the ideas proposed by Hayashi &. Matsuda would radically alter our understanding of the nature of the angular momentum transport in the disk, ...

  7. The mass and angular momentum of reconstructed metric perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Meent, Maarten

    2017-06-01

    We prove a key result regarding the mass and angular momentum content of linear vacuum perturbations of the Kerr metric obtained through the formalism developed by Chrzarnowski, Cohen, and Kegeles (CCK). More precisely, we prove that the Abbott-Deser mass and angular momentum integrals of any such perturbation vanish when that perturbation was obtained from a regular Fourier mode of the Hertz potential. As a corollary we obtain a generalization of previous results on the completion of the ‘no string’ radiation gauge metric perturbation generated by a point particle. We find that for any bound orbit around a Kerr black hole, the mass and angular momentum perturbations completing the CCK metric are simply the energy and angular momentum of the particle ‘outside’ the orbit and vanish ‘inside’ the orbit.

  8. Design and Implementation of a Digital Angular Rate Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Peng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of detecting the attitude of a rotating carrier, the paper presents a novel, digital angular rate sensor. The sensor consists of micro-sensing elements (gyroscope and accelerometer, signal processing circuit and micro-processor (DSP2812. The sensor has the feature of detecting three angular rates of a rotating carrier at the same time. The key techniques of the sensor, including sensing construction, sensing principles, and signal processing circuit design are presented. The test results show that the sensor can sense rolling, pitch and yaw angular rate at the same time and the measurement error of yaw (or pitch angular rate and rolling rate of the rotating carrier is less than 0.5%.

  9. Large-uncertainty intelligent states for angular momentum and angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goette, Joerg B; Zambrini, Roberta; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Barnett, Stephen M

    2005-01-01

    The equality in the uncertainty principle for linear momentum and position is obtained for states which also minimize the uncertainty product. However, in the uncertainty relation for angular momentum and angular position both sides of the inequality are state dependent and therefore the intelligent states, which satisfy the equality, do not necessarily give a minimum for the uncertainty product. In this paper, we highlight the difference between intelligent states and minimum uncertainty states by investigating a class of intelligent states which obey the equality in the angular uncertainty relation while having an arbitrarily large uncertainty product. To develop an understanding for the uncertainties of angle and angular momentum for the large-uncertainty intelligent states we compare exact solutions with analytical approximations in two limiting cases

  10. Biomechanics of increased spin velocity of flying discs during forehand throws by skilled and unskilled throwers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasakawa, Kei; Umegaki, Koji; Sakurai, Shinji

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to assess the relationship between throwing distance and kinematic release parameters of the flying disc in unskilled throwers, and to assess the relationship between kinetic variables acting on flying discs and the change in spin velocity during long forehand throws by skilled and unskilled throwers. Ten skilled and eleven unskilled throwers performed throws at maximum effort. Reflective marker positions on the disc and body were recorded with a 3D motion capture system during the throws to derive kinematic variables of a disc and kinetic variables acting on the disc. The analysis interval was from maximum external shoulder rotation to disc release. Significant correlations were observed between the throwing distance and spin velocity in skilled (r = 0.722, P < 0.05) and unskilled throwers (r = 0.794, P < 0.01), between the change in spin velocity and the angular impulse of moments of force, in unskilled throwers (r = 0.703, P < 0.05), and between the change in spin velocity and the angular impulse of torque among skilled throwers (r = 0.680, P < 0.01). Therefore, a strategy for increasing spin velocity in unskilled throwers could be used to generate a larger torque, similar to that observed in skilled throwers.

  11. A Very Fast and Angular Momentum Conserving Tree Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcello, Dominic C.

    2017-01-01

    There are many methods used to compute the classical gravitational field in astrophysical simulation codes. With the exception of the typically impractical method of direct computation, none ensure conservation of angular momentum to machine precision. Under uniform time-stepping, the Cartesian fast multipole method of Dehnen (also known as the very fast tree code) conserves linear momentum to machine precision. We show that it is possible to modify this method in a way that conserves both angular and linear momenta.

  12. Existence of black holes due to concentration of angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuri, Marcus A. [Department of Mathematics, Stony Brook University,Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2015-06-29

    We present a general sufficient condition for the formation of black holes due to concentration of angular momentum. This is expressed in the form of a universal inequality, relating the size and angular momentum of bodies, and is proven in the context of axisymmetric initial data sets for the Einstein equations which satisfy an appropriate energy condition. A brief comparison is also made with more traditional black hole existence criteria based on concentration of mass.

  13. Gamma-gamma angular correlation measurement in the 100 Ru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenchian, G.

    1990-01-01

    An angular correlation automatic spectrometer with two Ge(Li) detectors has been developed. The spectrometer moves automatically, controlled by a microcomputer. The gamma-gamma directional angular correlations of coincidence transitions have been measured in 100 Ru nuclide, following the β + and electron capture of 100 Rh. The 100 Rh source has been produced with 100 Ru(p,n) 100 Rh reaction, using the proton beam of the Cyclotron Accelerator insiding in 100 Ru isotope. (author)

  14. A Very Fast and Angular Momentum Conserving Tree Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcello, Dominic C., E-mail: dmarce504@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Computation and Technology Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    There are many methods used to compute the classical gravitational field in astrophysical simulation codes. With the exception of the typically impractical method of direct computation, none ensure conservation of angular momentum to machine precision. Under uniform time-stepping, the Cartesian fast multipole method of Dehnen (also known as the very fast tree code) conserves linear momentum to machine precision. We show that it is possible to modify this method in a way that conserves both angular and linear momenta.

  15. Analytical scheme calculations of angular momentum coupling and recoupling coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveikis, A.; Kuznecovas, A.

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the Scheme programming language opportunities to analytically calculate the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, Wigner 6j and 9j symbols, and general recoupling coefficients that are used in the quantum theory of angular momentum. The considered coefficients are calculated by a direct evaluation of the sum formulas. The calculation results for large values of quantum angular momenta were compared with analogous calculations with FORTRAN and Java programming languages.

  16. Analytical scheme calculations of angular momentum coupling and recoupling coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deveikis, A.; Kuznecovas, A.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the Scheme programming language opportunities to analytically calculate the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, Wigner 6j and 9j symbols, and general recoupling coefficients that are used in the quantum theory of angular momentum. The considered coefficients are calculated by a direct evaluation of the sum formulas. The calculation results for large values of quantum angular momenta were compared with analogous calculations with FORTRAN and Java programming languages

  17. Orbital and angular motion construction for low thrust interplanetary flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelnikov, R. V.; Mashtakov, Y. V.; Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Tkachev, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    Low thrust interplanetary flight is considered. Firstly, the fuel-optimal control is found. Then the angular motion is synthesized. This motion provides the thruster tracking of the required by optimal control direction. And, finally, reaction wheel control law for tracking this angular motion is proposed and implemented. The numerical example is given and total operation time for thrusters is found. Disturbances from solar pressure, thrust eccentricity, inaccuracy of reaction wheels installation and errors of inertia tensor are taken into account.

  18. Spatial Angular Compounding for Elastography without the Incompressibility Assumption

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Min; Varghese, Tomy

    2005-01-01

    Spatial-angular compounding is a new technique that enables the reduction of noise artifacts in ultrasound elastography. Previous results using spatial angular compounding, however, were based on the use of the tissue incompressibility assumption. Compounded elastograms were obtained from a spatially-weighted average of local strain estimated from radiofrequency echo signals acquired at different insonification angles. In this paper, we present a new method for reducing the noise artifacts in...

  19. Diffraction by a plane angular sector, a new derivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thokild B.

    1990-01-01

    An alternative derivation is given for the exact solution to the scattering problem in which a Hertz dipole illuminates a perfectly conducting plane angular sector. Specifically, the Ohm-Rayleigh method is used rather than that of Satterwhite (1969)......An alternative derivation is given for the exact solution to the scattering problem in which a Hertz dipole illuminates a perfectly conducting plane angular sector. Specifically, the Ohm-Rayleigh method is used rather than that of Satterwhite (1969)...

  20. Shape coexistence in 72Kr at finite angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almehed, Daniel; Walet, Niels R.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate shape coexistence in a rotating nucleus. We concentrate on the case of 72 Kr which exhibits an interesting interplay between prolate and oblate shaped states as a function of angular momentum. The calculation uses the local harmonic version of the method of self-consistent adiabatic large-amplitude collective motion. We analyse how the collective behaviour of the system changes with angular momentum and we focus on the role of non-axial shapes

  1. Spin and intrinsic angular momentum; application to the electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paillere, P.

    1993-05-01

    Within the framework of the field theory governed by a Lagrangian, function of the tensor quantities and their covariant first derivatives, and starting with the third order intrinsic angular momentum tensor obtained from a variational principle, the intrinsic angular momentum vector of the electromagnetic field in vacuum is determined. This expression leads to spin matrices for the electromagnetic field, with unity as eigenvalue, thus allowing to bridge the gap between continuous physics and quantum physics. 6 refs

  2. Effects of angular misalignment on optical klystron undulator radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, G., E-mail: gmishra_dauniv@yahoo.co.in; Prakash, Bramh; Gehlot, Mona

    2015-11-21

    In this paper ,we analyze the important effects of optical klystron undulator radiation with an angular offset of the relativistic electron beam in the second undulator section. An anlytical expression for the undulator radiation is obtained through a transparent and simple procedure.It is shown that the effects of the angular offset is more severe for longer undulator lengths and with higher dispersive field strengths.Both these effects are less pronounced for undulators with large K values.

  3. Zero velocity interval detection based on a continuous hidden Markov model in micro inertial pedestrian navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Ding, Wei; Yan, Huifang; Duan, Shunli

    2018-06-01

    Shoe-mounted pedestrian navigation systems based on micro inertial sensors rely on zero velocity updates to correct their positioning errors in time, which effectively makes determining the zero velocity interval play a key role during normal walking. However, as walking gaits are complicated, and vary from person to person, it is difficult to detect walking gaits with a fixed threshold method. This paper proposes a pedestrian gait classification method based on a hidden Markov model. Pedestrian gait data are collected with a micro inertial measurement unit installed at the instep. On the basis of analyzing the characteristics of the pedestrian walk, a single direction angular rate gyro output is used to classify gait features. The angular rate data are modeled into a univariate Gaussian mixture model with three components, and a four-state left–right continuous hidden Markov model (CHMM) is designed to classify the normal walking gait. The model parameters are trained and optimized using the Baum–Welch algorithm and then the sliding window Viterbi algorithm is used to decode the gait. Walking data are collected through eight subjects walking along the same route at three different speeds; the leave-one-subject-out cross validation method is conducted to test the model. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can accurately detect different walking gaits of zero velocity interval. The location experiment shows that the precision of CHMM-based pedestrian navigation improved by 40% when compared to the angular rate threshold method.

  4. Angular momentum of circularly polarized light in dielectric media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2005-07-01

    A circularly polarized plane-wave is known to have no angular momentum when examined through Maxwell’s equations. This, however, contradicts the experimentally observed facts, where finite segments of plane waves are known to be capable of imparting angular momentum to birefringent platelets. Using a superposition of four plane-waves propagating at slightly different angles to a common direction, we derive an expression for the angular momentum density of a single plane-wave in the limit when the propagation directions of the four beams come into alignment. We proceed to use this four-beam technique to analyze the conservation of angular momentum when a plane-wave enters a dielectric slab from the free space. The angular momentum of the beam is shown to decrease upon entering the dielectric medium, by virtue of the fact that the incident beam exerts a torque on the slab surface at the point of entry. When the beam leaves the slab, it imparts an equal but opposite torque to the exit facet, thus recovering its initial angular momentum upon re-emerging into the free-space. Along the way, we derive an expression for the outward-directed force of a normally incident, finite-diameter beam on a dielectric surface; the possible relationship between this force and the experimentally observed bulging of a liquid surface under intense illumination is explored.

  5. Investigation of angular and axial smoothing of PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daube-Witherspoon, M.E.; Carson, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Radial filtering of emission and transmission data is routinely performed in PET during reconstruction in order to reduce image noise. Angular smoothing is not typically done, due to the introduction of a non-uniform resolution loss; axial filtering is also not usually performed on data acquired in 2D mode. The goal of this paper was to assess the effects of angular and axial smoothing on noise and resolution. Angular and axial smoothing was incorporated into the reconstruction process on the Scanditronix PC2048-15B brain PET scanner. In-plane spatial resolution and noise reduction were measured for different amounts of radial and angular smoothing. For radial positions away from the center of the scanner, noise reduction and degraded tangential resolution with no loss of radial resolution were seen. Near the center, no resolution loss was observed, but there was also no reduction in noise for angular filters up to a 7 degrees FWHM. These results can be understood by considering the combined effects of smoothing projections across rows (angles) and then summing (backprojecting). Thus, angular smoothing is not optimal due to its anisotropic noise reduction and resolution degradation properties. However, uniform noise reduction comparable to that seen with radial filtering can be achieved with axial smoothing of transmission data. The axial results suggest that combined radial and axial transmission smoothing could lead to improved noise characteristics with more isotropic resolution degradation

  6. A systematic construction of microstate geometries with low angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bena, Iosif; Heidmann, Pierre; Ramírez, Pedro F.

    2017-10-01

    We outline a systematic procedure to obtain horizonless microstate geometries that have the same charges as three-charge five-dimensional black holes with a macroscopically-large horizon area and an arbitrarily-small angular momentum. There are two routes through which such solutions can be constructed: using multi-center Gibbons-Hawking (GH) spaces or using superstratum technology. So far the only solutions corre-sponding to microstate geometries for black holes with no angular momentum have been obtained via superstrata [1], and multi-center Gibbons-Hawking spaces have been believed to give rise only to microstate geometries of BMPV black holes with a large angular mo-mentum [2]. We perform a thorough search throughout the parameter space of smooth horizonless solutions with four GH centers and find that these have an angular momentum that is generally larger than 80% of the cosmic censorship bound. However, we find that solutions with three GH centers and one supertube (which are smooth in six-dimensional supergravity) can have an arbitrarily-low angular momentum. Our construction thus gives a recipe to build large classes of microstate geometries for zero-angular-momentum black holes without resorting to superstratum technology.

  7. Effect of nutritional intake towards Angular cheilitis of orphanage children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiani Rakhmayanthie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Angular cheilitis is one of the oral manifestations of iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiency. This manifestation frequently seen in people at first and second decade. The purpose of this study was to obtain the prevalence of angular cheilitis and its classifications related to the nutritional intake level in 6-18 years old children. Methods: This research was a descriptive study with 53 children between 6-18 years old from Muhammadiyah Orphanage Bandung as the samples. The oral cavity was examined clinically and their food consumption in a week was noted in Food Recall 24 hours and Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ in order to measure their nutritional intake level. Results: There are 23 children with angular cheilitis. 13% has iron and folate deficiencies, and 87% has iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies. Angular cheilitis types that has been found are Type I (39%, Type II (48% and Type III (13%. Conclusion: The prevalence of angular cheilitis in 6-18 years old children in Muhammadiyah Orphanage Bandung was moderately high, most of them were having iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies. Type II angular cheilitis was the most frequently seen.

  8. Velocity distribution in snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.; Ito, Y.

    1997-12-01

    In order to investigate the detailed structure of snow avalanches, we have made snow flow experiments at the Miyanomori ski jump in Sapporo and systematic observations in the Shiai-dani, Kurobe Canyon. In the winter of 1995-1996, a new device to measure static pressures was used to estimate velocities in the snow cloud that develops above the flowing layer of avalanches. Measurements during a large avalanche in the Shiai-dani which damaged and destroyed some instruments indicate velocities increased rapidly to more than 50 m/s soon after the front. Velocities decreased gradually in the following 10 s. Velocities of the lower flowing layer were also calculated by differencing measurement of impact pressure. Both recordings in the snow cloud and in the flowing layer changed with a similar trend and suggest a close interaction between the two layers. In addition, the velocity showed a periodic change. Power spectrum analysis of the impact pressure and the static pressure depression showed a strong peak at a frequency between 4 and 6 Hz, which might imply the existence of either ordered structure or a series of surges in the flow.

  9. Velocity Estimate Following Air Data System Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McLaren, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    .... A velocity estimator (VEST) algorithm was developed to combine the inertial and wind velocities to provide an estimate of the aircraft's current true velocity to be used for command path gain scheduling and for display in the cockpit...

  10. [NEII] Line Velocity Structure of Ultracompact HII Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Kataza, Hirokazu; Yamashita, Takuya; Miyata, Takashi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Onaka, Takashi; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    Newly formed massive stars are embedded in their natal molecular clouds and are observed as ultracompact HII regions. They emit strong ionic lines such as [NeII] 12.8 micron. Since Ne is ionized by UV photons of E>21.6eV which is higher than the ionization energy of hydrogen atoms the line probes the ionized gas near the ionizing stars. This enables to probe gas motion in the vicinity of recently-formed massive stars. High angular and spectral resolution observations of the [NeII] line will thus provide siginificant information on structures (e.g. disks and outflows) generated through massive star formation. We made [NeII] spectroscopy of ultracompact HII regions using the Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (COMICS) on the 8.2m Subaru Telescope in July 2002. Spatial and spectral resolutions were 0.5"" and 10000 respectively. Among the targets G45.12+0.13 shows the largest spatial variation in velocity. The brightest area of G45.12+0.13 has the largest line width in the object. The total velocity deviation amounts to 50km/s (peak to peak value) in the observed area. We report the velocity structure of [NeII] emission of G45.12+0.13 and discuss the gas motion near the ionizing star.

  11. Critical currents in columnar vanadium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkasova, V.G.; Kolin'ko, A.E.; Slatin, A.E.; Fogel, N.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The angular dependence of the critical current I/sub c/ is studied in columnar vanadium films. In measurements in constant magnetic fields an anomalous maximum I/sub c/ is found on the I/sub c/(theta) curves at arbitrary values of the external magnetic field and temperature, when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the plane of the specimen. The angular dependence of I/sub c/ measured in constant reduced magnetic fields h = H/H/sub c/2(T,theta) shows no singularities in the vicinity of the angle at which the I/sub c/ peak is found in the case H = const, i.e., the critical current is isotropic. This implies that a change in the relative orientation of the vortices and column boundaries produces no change in critical current. The experimental data obtained permit the conclusion that the anisotropy of I/sub c/ observed in a constant magnetic field H is merely a consequence of the anisotropy of the critical magnetic field H/sub c/: the critical current ''tracking'' the magnitude and angular dependence of H/sub c/

  12. Measurement of anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation on a large angular scale at 33 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstein, M.V.

    1978-11-01

    Results of a measurement of anisotropy in the 3 0 K cosmic background radiation on a large-angular-scale are presented. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (0.89 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20-km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern celestial hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of +- 46m 0 K/√Hz. The measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the motion of the earth relative to the sources of the radiation; the anisotropy is well fit by a cosine distribution of amplitude 3.61 +- 0.54 millireverse arrowreverse arrow-degrees Kelvin (m 0 K), one part in 800 of 3 0 K, implying a velocity of 361 +- 54 km/sec toward the direction 11.23 +- 0.46 hours right ascension, and 19.0 +- 7.5 0 declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypothesis of dipole (cos theta) and quadrupole (cos 2 theta) angular distributions places a 1 m 0 K limit on the amplitude of most components of quadruple anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 m 0 K limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 0 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 0 . This thesis describes the equipment development through three engineering flights and the data acquisition in eleven additional flights. The astrophysical results are then presented from the statistical analysis of the reduced data

  13. How Critical Is Critical Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent educational discourse is full of references to the value of critical thinking as a 21st-century skill. In music education, critical thinking has been discussed in relation to problem solving and music listening, and some researchers suggest that training in critical thinking can improve students' responses to music. But what exactly is…

  14. Cosmic string induced peculiar velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Dalen, A.; Schramm, D.N.

    1987-02-01

    We calculate analytically the probability distribution for peculiar velocities on scales from 10h -1 to 60h -1 Mpc with cosmic string loops as the dominant source of primordial gravitational perturbations. We consider a range of parameters βGμ appropriate for both hot (HDM) and cold (CDM) dark matter scenarios. An Ω = 1 CDM Universe is assumed with the loops randomly placed on a smooth background. It is shown how the effects can be estimated of loops breaking up and being born with a spectrum of sizes. It is found that to obtain large scale streaming velocities of at least 400 km/s it is necessary that either a large value for βGμ or the effect of loop fissioning and production details be considerable. Specifically, for optimal CDM string parameters Gμ = 10 -6 , β = 9, h = .5, and scales of 60h -1 Mpc, the parent size spectrum must be 36 times larger than the evolved daughter spectrum to achieve peculiar velocities of at least 400 km/s with a probability of 63%. With this scenario the microwave background dipole will be less than 800 km/s with only a 10% probability. The string induced velocity spectrum is relatively flat out to scales of about 2t/sub eq//a/sub eq/ and then drops off rather quickly. The flatness is a signature of string models of galaxy formation. With HDM a larger value of βGμ is necessary for galaxy formation since accretion on small scales starts later. Hence, with HDM, the peculiar velocity spectrum will be larger on large scales and the flat region will extend to larger scales. If large scale peculiar velocities greater than 400 km/s are real then it is concluded that strings plus CDM have difficulties. The advantages of strings plus HDM in this regard will be explored in greater detail in a later paper. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  16. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  17. The multiplicity of massive stars: A high angular resolution survey with the HST fine guidance sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldoretta, E. J.; Gies, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.-C.; Norris, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an all-sky survey made with the Fine Guidance Sensor on the Hubble Space Telescope to search for angularly resolved binary systems among massive stars. The sample of 224 stars is comprised mainly of Galactic O- and B-type stars and luminous blue variables, plus a few luminous stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The FGS TRANS mode observations are sensitive to the detection of companions with an angular separation between 0.″01 and 1.″0 and brighter than △m=5. The FGS observations resolved 52 binary and 6 triple star systems and detected partially resolved binaries in 7 additional targets (43 of these are new detections). These numbers yield a companion detection frequency of 29% for the FGS survey. We also gathered literature results on the numbers of close spectroscopic binaries and wider astrometric binaries among the sample, and we present estimates of the frequency of multiple systems and the companion frequency for subsets of stars residing in clusters and associations, field stars, and runaway stars. These results confirm the high multiplicity fraction, especially among massive stars in clusters and associations. We show that the period distribution is approximately flat in increments of logP. We identify a number of systems of potential interest for long-term orbital determinations, and we note the importance of some of these companions for the interpretation of the radial velocities and light curves of close binaries that have third companions.

  18. THE MEGAMASER COSMOLOGY PROJECT. V. AN ANGULAR-DIAMETER DISTANCE TO NGC 6264 AT 140 Mpc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, C. Y.; Braatz, J. A.; Lo, K. Y.; Condon, J. J.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Reid, M. J.; Henkel, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present the direct measurement of the Hubble constant, yielding the direct measurement of the angular-diameter distance to NGC 6264 using the H 2 O megamaser technique. Our measurement is based on sensitive observations of the circumnuclear megamaser disk from four observations with the Very Long Baseline Array, the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), and the Effelsberg telescope. We also monitored the maser spectral profile for 2.3 years using the GBT to measure accelerations of maser lines by tracking their line-of-sight velocities as they change with time. The measured accelerations suggest that the systemic maser spots have a significantly wider radial distribution than in the archetypal megamaser in NGC 4258. We model the maser emission as arising from a circumnuclear disk with orbits dominated by the central black hole. The best fit of the data gives a Hubble constant of H 0 = 68 ± 9 km s –1 Mpc –1 , which corresponds to an angular-diameter distance of 144 ± 19 Mpc. In addition, the fit also gives a mass of the central black hole of (3.09 ± 0.42) × 10 7 M ☉ . The result demonstrates the feasibility of measuring distances to galaxies located well into the Hubble flow by using circumnuclear megamaser disks.

  19. Angular distributions of 250 GeV/c positive particles axially channeled in germanium crystal. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, C.R.; Gibson, W.M.; Kim, I.J.; Williams, G.O.; Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Chrisman, B.L.; Toohig, T.E.; Guzik, Z.; Nigmanov, T.S.; Tsyganov, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    Channeling phenomena are observed for charged particles of momentum up to 250 GeV/c in a germanium crystal. The angular distributions of the channeled particles are compared with theoretical predictions based on a diffusion model. The results indicate additional mechanisms leading to dechanneling of the particles although channeling effects are observed for particles incident at up to several times the critical angle, in contrast with the results from low energy channeling. (orig.)

  20. Critical Jostling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pippin Barr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Games can serve a critical function in many different ways, from serious games about real world subjects to self-reflexive commentaries on the nature of games themselves. In this essay we discuss critical possibilities stemming from the area of critical design, and more specifically Carl DiSalvo’s adversarial design and its concept of reconfiguring the remainder. To illustrate such an approach, we present the design and outcomes of two games, Jostle Bastard and Jostle Parent. We show how the games specifically engage with two previous games, Hotline Miami and Octodad: Dadliest Catch, reconfiguring elements of those games to create interactive critical experiences and extensions of the source material. Through the presentation of specific design concerns and decisions, we provide a grounded illustration of a particular critical function of videogames and hope to highlight this form as another valuable approach in the larger area of videogame criticism.

  1. Initial angular momentum and flow in high energy nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Rainer J.; Chen, Guangyao; Somanathan, Sidharth

    2018-03-01

    We study the transfer of angular momentum in high energy nuclear collisions from the colliding nuclei to the region around midrapidity, using the classical approximation of the color glass condensate (CGC) picture. We find that the angular momentum shortly after the collision (up to times ˜1 /Qs , where Qs is the saturation scale) is carried by the "β -type" flow of the initial classical gluon field, introduced by some of us earlier. βi˜μ1∇iμ2-μ2∇iμ1 (i =1 ,2 ) describes the rapidity-odd transverse energy flow and emerges from Gauss's law for gluon fields. Here μ1 and μ2 are the averaged color charge fluctuation densities in the two nuclei, respectively. Interestingly, strong coupling calculations using anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) techniques also find an energy flow term featuring this particular combination of nuclear densities. In classical CGC the order of magnitude of the initial angular momentum per rapidity in the reaction plane, at a time 1 /Qs , is |d L2/d η |≈ RAQs-3ɛ¯0/2 at midrapidity, where RA is the nuclear radius, and ɛ¯0 is the average initial energy density. This result emerges as a cancellation between a vortex of energy flow in the reaction plane aligned with the total angular momentum, and energy shear flow opposed to it. We discuss in detail the process of matching classical Yang-Mills results to fluid dynamics. We will argue that dissipative corrections should not be discarded to ensure that macroscopic conservation laws, e.g., for angular momentum, hold. Viscous fluid dynamics tends to dissipate the shear flow contribution that carries angular momentum in boost-invariant fluid systems. This leads to small residual angular momentum around midrapidity at late times for collisions at high energies.

  2. Isotropic gates and large gamma detector arrays versus angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, V.E.; Duchene, G.

    1997-01-01

    Angular information extracted from in-beam γ ray measurements are of great importance for γ ray multipolarity and nuclear spin assignments. In our days large Ge detector arrays became available allowing the measurements of extremely weak γ rays in almost 4π sr solid angle (e.g., EUROGAM detector array). Given the high detector efficiency it is common for the mean suppressed coincidence multiplicity to reach values as high as 4 to 6. Thus, it is possible to gate on particular γ rays in order to enhance the relative statistics of a definite reaction channel and/or a definite decaying path in the level scheme of the selected residual nucleus. As compared to angular correlations, the conditioned angular distribution spectra exhibit larger statistics because in the latter the gate-setting γ ray may be observed by all the detectors in the array, relaxing somehow the geometrical restrictions of the angular correlations. Since the in-beam γ ray emission is anisotropic one could inquire that gate setting as mentioned above, based on anisotropic γ ray which would perturb the angular distributions in the unfolded events. As our work proved, there is no reason to worry about this if the energy gate runs over the whole solid angle in an ideal 4π sr detector, i.e., if the gate is isotropic. In real quasi 4π sr detector arrays the corresponding quasi isotropic gate preserves the angular properties of the unfolded data, too. However extraction of precise angular distribution coefficient especially a 4 , requires the consideration of the deviation of the quasi isotropic gate relative to the (ideal) isotropic gate

  3. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Kathrin, E-mail: k.mueller@fz-juelich.de; Fedosov, Dmitry A., E-mail: d.fedosov@fz-juelich.de; Gompper, Gerhard, E-mail: g.gompper@fz-juelich.de

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  4. Critical Proximity

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This essay considers how written language frames visual objects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s response to Raymond Roussel’s obsessive description, the essay proposes a model of criticism where description might press up against its objects. This critical closeness is then mapped across the conceptual art practice and art criticism of Ian Burn. Burn attends to the differences between seeing and reading, and considers the conditions which frame how we look at images, including how w...

  5. Railgun armature velocity improvement, SBIR phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmond, Leo E.; Bauer, David P.

    1992-08-01

    Railgun hypervelocity performance has not been repeatably demonstrated at velocities over 6 km/s. A significant performance limiting phenomena is the formation of secondary current paths in parallel with the main projectile accelerating plasma. A confined plasma armature technique was developed to prevent secondary armature formation. Confinement prevents loss of ionized material from the plasma armature and thereby prevents formation of a low rail-to-rail conductance. We controlled pressure in the confined armature via controlled venting through ports in the rails. Railgun tests with the confined armature show that sealing at the rail-confinement vessel interface is critical and difficult to achieve. Our tests show that during low seal leakage operation secondaries are prevented. However, maintaining good seal for the entire launch is very difficult.

  6. Criticality Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsaed, A.

    2004-01-01

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  7. ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES FOR M DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, J. S.; Ramsey, L. W.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pavlenko, Y.; Barnes, J. R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Gallardo, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic rotation velocities (v sin i) for 56 M dwarf stars using high-resolution Hobby-Eberly Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph red spectroscopy. In addition, we have also determined photometric effective temperatures, masses, and metallicities ([Fe/H]) for some stars observed here and in the literature where we could acquire accurate parallax measurements and relevant photometry. We have increased the number of known v sin i values for mid M stars by around 80% and can confirm a weakly increasing rotation velocity with decreasing effective temperature. Our sample of v sin is peak at low velocities (∼3 km s -1 ). We find a change in the rotational velocity distribution between early M and late M stars, which is likely due to the changing field topology between partially and fully convective stars. There is also a possible further change in the rotational distribution toward the late M dwarfs where dust begins to play a role in the stellar atmospheres. We also link v sin i to age and show how it can be used to provide mid-M star age limits. When all literature velocities for M dwarfs are added to our sample, there are 198 with v sin i ≤ 10 km s -1 and 124 in the mid-to-late M star regime (M3.0-M9.5) where measuring precision optical radial velocities is difficult. In addition, we also search the spectra for any significant Hα emission or absorption. Forty three percent were found to exhibit such emission and could represent young, active objects with high levels of radial-velocity noise. We acquired two epochs of spectra for the star GJ1253 spread by almost one month and the Hα profile changed from showing no clear signs of emission, to exhibiting a clear emission peak. Four stars in our sample appear to be low-mass binaries (GJ1080, GJ3129, Gl802, and LHS3080), with both GJ3129 and Gl802 exhibiting double Hα emission features. The tables presented here will aid any future M star planet search target selection to extract stars with low v

  8. What velocities and eccentricities tell us about radial migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schönrich R.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This note attempts to interpret some of the recent findings about a downtrend in the mean azimuthal velocity of low [α/Fe] thin disc stars with increasing metallicity. The presence of such a trend was predicted in the model of [19], albeit with a slightly steeper slope. We show that in a simple picture a Galactic disc without mixing in angular momenta would display an exceedingly steep trend, while in the case of complete mixing of all stars the trend has to vanish. The difference between model and observational data can hence be interpreted as the consequence of the radial abundance gradient in the model being too high resulting in an underestimate of the migration strength. We shortly discuss the value of eccentricity distributions in constraining structure and history of the Galactic disc.

  9. Criticality calculation by the LTSN method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistela, Claudia H.F.; Vilhena, Marco T. de; Borges, Volnei

    1997-01-01

    This work evaluates criticality parameters (multiplication factor and critical thickness) by the LTS N method in unidimensional slabs homogeneous and heterogeneous considering one-group model and isotropic scattering. The idea of the LTS N method encompasses the following steps: application of the Laplace transform into a set of discrete ordinates equations, analytical solution of the algebraic linear system for the transformed angular fluxes and their reconstruction by the Heaviside expansion technique. The novel feature of the proposed method is based upon the criticality parameters determination by solving a transcendental equation. Numerical results are reported. 12 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Influence of mass-asymmetry and ground state spin on fission fragment angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.; Biswas, D.C.; Saxena, A.; Pant, L.M.; Nayak, B.K.; Vind, R.P.; Sahu, P.K.; Sinha, Shrabani; Choudhury, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    The strong influence of the target or/and projectile ground state spin on the anomalously large anisotropies of fission fragments produced in the heavy-ion induced fission of actinide targets were reported earlier. Interestingly, all those systems studied were having a mass asymmetry greater than the Businaro-Gallone critical asymmetry and hence the presence of pre-equilibrium fission was unambiguously ruled out. The observed anisotropies were successfully explained using the ECD-K-States model. It is of interest to know the influence of the target/projectile ground state spin on systems having an entrance channel mass asymmetry less than the critical value where pre-equilibrium fission cannot be ignored. With this motivation we performed measurements of fission fragment angular distributions of the 16 O+ 235 U (spin=7/2) system

  11. An Angular Leakage Correction for Modeling a Hemisphere, Using One-Dimensional Spherical Coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.; Eberle, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    A radially dependent, angular leakage correction was applied to a one-dimensional, multigroup neutron diffusion theory computer code to accurately model hemispherical geometry. This method allows the analyst to model hemispherical geometry, important in nuclear criticality safety analyses, with one-dimensional computer codes, which execute very quickly. Rapid turnaround times for scoping studies thus may be realized. This method uses an approach analogous to an axial leakage correction in a one-dimensional cylinder calculation. The two-dimensional Laplace operator was preserved in spherical geometry using a leakage correction proportional to 1/r 2 , which was folded into the one-dimensional spherical calculation on a mesh-by-mesh basis. Hemispherical geometry is of interest to criticality safety because of its similarity to piles of spilled fissile material and accumulations of fissile material in process containers. A hemisphere also provides a more realistic calculational model for spilled fissile material than does a sphere

  12. Modeling of the angular dependence of plasma etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Wei; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of the angular dependence of etching yield is essential to investigate the origins of sidewall roughness during plasma etching. In this article the angular dependence of polysilicon etching in Cl 2 plasma was modeled as a combination of individual angular-dependent etching yields for ion-initiated processes including physical sputtering, ion-induced etching, vacancy generation, and removal. The modeled etching yield exhibited a maximum at ∼60 degree sign off-normal ion angle at low flux ratio, indicative of physical sputtering. It transformed to the angular dependence of ion-induced etching with the increase in the neutral-to-ion flux ratio. Good agreement between the modeling and the experiments was achieved for various flux ratios and ion energies. The variation of etching yield in response to the ion angle was incorporated in the three-dimensional profile simulation and qualitative agreement was obtained. The surface composition was calculated and compared to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The modeling indicated a Cl areal density of 3x10 15 atoms/cm 2 on the surface that is close to the value determined by the XPS analysis. The response of Cl fraction to ion energy and flux ratio was modeled and correlated with the etching yields. The complete mixing-layer kinetics model with the angular dependence effect will be used for quantitative surface roughening analysis using a profile simulator in future work.

  13. Verification of homogenization in fast critical assembly analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Go

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, homogenization procedures for fast critical assembly analyses are investigated. Errors caused by homogenizations are evaluated by the exact perturbation theory. In order to obtain reference solutions, three-dimensional plate-wise transport calculations are performed. It is found that the angular neutron flux along plate boundaries has a significant peak in the fission source energy range. To treat this angular dependence accurately, the double-Gaussian Chebyshev angular quadrature set with S 24 is applied. It is shown that the difference between the heterogeneous leakage theory and the homogeneous theory is negligible, and that transport cross sections homogenized with neutron flux significantly underestimate neutron leakage. The error in criticality caused by a homogenization is estimated at about 0.1%Δk/kk' in a small fast critical assembly. In addition, the neutron leakage is overestimated by both leakage theories when sodium plates in fuel lattices are voided. (author)

  14. Mixed optical Cherenkov–Bremsstrahlung radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone from relativistic heavy ions: Unusual dependence of the angular distribution width on the radiator thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhkova, E.I., E-mail: elenafiks@gmail.com; Pivovarov, Yu.L.

    2016-07-15

    The Cherenkov radiation (ChR) angular distribution is usually described by the Tamm–Frank (TF) theory, which assumes that relativistic charged particle moves uniformly and rectilinearly in the optically transparent radiator. According to the TF theory, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the ChR angular distribution inversely depends on the radiator thickness. In the case of relativistic heavy ions (RHI) a slowing-down in the radiator may sufficiently change the angular distribution of optical radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone, since there appears a mixed ChR–Bremsstrahlung radiation. As a result, there occurs a drastic transformation of the FWHM of optical radiation angular distribution in dependence on the radiator thickness: from inversely proportional (TF theory) to the linearly proportional one. In our paper we present the first analysis of this transformation taking account of the gradual velocity decrease of RHI penetrating through a radiator. - Highlights: • Stopping of relativistic heavy ions leads to appearance of a Cherenkov–Bremsstrahlung radiation near the Cherenkov cone. • Mixed Cherenkov–Bremsstrahlung optical radiation FWHM differs from the standard one determined by the Tamm–Frank theory. • The Cherenkov–Bremsstrahlung radiation angular distribution FWHM linearly depends on the radiator thickness.

  15. Critical Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2018-01-01

    Manipulation and mistakes in LCA studies are as old as the tool itself, and so is its critical review. Besides preventing misuse and unsupported claims, critical review may also help identifying mistakes and more justifiable assumptions as well as generally improve the quality of a study. It thus...... supports the robustness of an LCA and increases trust in its results and conclusions. The focus of this chapter is on understanding what a critical review is, how the international standards define it, what its main elements are, and what reviewer qualifications are required. It is not the objective...... of this chapter to learn how to conduct a critical review, neither from a reviewer nor from a practitioner perspective. The foundation of this chapter and the basis for any critical review of LCA studies are the International Standards ISO 14040:2006, ISO 14044:2006 and ISO TS 14071:2014....

  16. Production of 149Tb in deep inelastic transfer reactions: an approach to the angular momentum of fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivet, M.F.; Bimbot, R.; Gardes, D.; Fleury, A.; Hubert, F.; Llabador, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The excitation functions for deep inelastic reactions in which two to six charges are transferred from 40 Ar and 63 Cu ions to rare earth targets have been measured using activation techniques, the observed radionuclides being 150 Dy, 151 Dy and 149 gTb. From the comparison of the curves relative to 149 gTb and those relative to 150 Dy, 151 Dy, it was deduced that the low spin isomer 149 gTb was produced with significant probability for low incident energies. Using data from (heavy ions, xn) reactions, it was possible to attribute this production to the deexcitation of Tb fragments formed in deep inelastic transfers with angular momenta lower than 9n. This result is in good agreement with the angular momentum calculations performed under the hypothesis that the initial angular momentum window leading to deep inelastic reactions is situated between the critical angular momentum for fusion and that corresponding to grazing collisions. As far as Cu induced reactions are concerned, both hypothesis of rolling and sticking are consistent with the experimental data. For Ar induced reactions, the results indicate that the stage of sticking is not reached when the incident energy is lower than 200 MeV

  17. Nuclear level density variation with angular momentum induced shape transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Variation of Nuclear level density (NLD) with the excitation energy and angular momentum in particular has been a topic of interest in the recent past and there have been continuous efforts in this direction on the theoretical and experimental fronts but a conclusive trend in the variation of nuclear level density parameter with angular momentum has not been achieved so far. A comprehensive investigation of N=68 isotones around the compound nucleus 119 Sb from neutron rich 112 Ru (Z=44) to neutron deficient 127 Pr (Z= 59) nuclei is presented to understand the angular momentum induced variations in inverse level density parameter and the possible influence of deformation and structural transitions on the variations on NLd

  18. Orbital Angular Momentum Multiplexing over Visible Light Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Hardik Rameshchandra

    This thesis proposes and explores the possibility of using Orbital Angular Momentum multiplexing in Visible Light Communication system. Orbital Angular Momentum is mainly applied for laser and optical fiber transmissions, while Visible Light Communication is a technology using the light as a carrier for wireless communication. In this research, the study of the state of art and experiments showing some results on multiplexing based on Orbital Angular Momentum over Visible Light Communication system were done. After completion of the initial stage; research work and simulations were performed on spatial multiplexing over Li-Fi channel modeling. Simulation scenarios which allowed to evaluate the Signal-to-Noise Ratio, Received Power Distribution, Intensity and Illuminance were defined and developed.

  19. Angular Magnetoresistance of Nanowires with Alternating Cobalt and Nickel Segments

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan

    2017-06-22

    Magnetization reversal in segmented Co/Ni nanowires with varying number of segments was studied using angular Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on isolated nanowires. The MR measurements offer an insight into the pinning of domain walls within the nanowires. Angular MR measurements were performed on nanowires with two and multiple segments by varying the angle between the applied magnetic field and nanowire (−90° ≤θ≤90°). The angular MR measurements reveal that at lower values of θ the switching fields are nearly identical for the multisegmented and two-segmented nanowires, whereas at higher values of θ, a decrease in the switching field is observed in the case of two segmented nanowires. The two segmented nanowires generally exhibit a single domain wall pinning event, whereas an increased number of pinning events are characteristic of the multisegmented nanowires at higher values of θ. In-situ magnetic force microscopy substantiates reversal by domain wall nucleation and propagation in multisegmented nanowires.

  20. ANGULAR LIGHT-SCATTERING STUDIES ON ISOLATED MITOCHONDRIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotterer, Gerald S.; Thompson, Thomas E.; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1961-01-01

    Angular light-scattering studies have been carried out on suspensions of isolated rat liver mitochondria. The angular scatter pattern has a large forward component, typical of large particles. Changes in dissymmetry and in the intensity of light scattered at 90° have been correlated with changes in optical density during the course of mitochondrial swelling and contraction. Such changes can be measured at mitochondrial concentrations much below those required for optical density measurements. Changes in mitochondrial geometry caused by factors "leaking" from mitochondria, not detectable by optical density measurements, have been demonstrated by measuring changes in dissymmetry. Angular light-scattering measurements therefore offer the advantages of increased sensitivity and of added indices of changes in mitochondrial conformation. PMID:19866589