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Sample records for cricopharyngeal sphincter achalasia

  1. Canine cricopharyngeal achalasia: case report

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    C Malm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A 7-month-old miniature poodle female dog was referred with dysphagia. After clinical, radiographic, and endoscopic examination, it was diagnosed a probable case of cricopharyngeal achalasia. The patient underwent surgical treatment and presented normal swallowing and no regurgitation after 24 hours post-surgery. Positive recovery and progressive body weight gain until 180 days after surgery was observed

  2. Cricopharyngeal achalasia in connection with autoimmune disorders in a pre-adolescent patient: a case report

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    Urška Vučina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cricopharyngeal achalasia is an uncommon cause of dysphagia, especially in children. Congenital form is known in neonates and infants. In older children this disease has been reported in very rare cases and mostly in connection with neurological and muscular diseases. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with a four-year history of dysphagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, radiological contrast swallow study and esophageal manometric study confrmed the diagnosis of cricopharyngeal achalasia. Te patient was successfully treated with dilatation of the upper esophageal sphincter. An initial attempt of dilatation appears to be a safe and effective option in the management of cricopharyngeal achalasia in children, and may prevent or at least postpone the need for myotomy. Following the diagnosis of cricopharyngeal achalasia, several autoimmune conditions were diagnosed. Our case report revealed that cricopharyngeal achalasia may occur in association with some other autoimmune conditions, and that autoimmunity may also play a role in cricopharyngeal achalasia itself

  3. An anatomical and clinical review of cricopharyngeal achalasia in the dog

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    R.C. Elliott

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cricopharyngeal achalasia is a rare cause of dysphagia in the dog. However it must be differentiated from other causes of dysphagia as it is treatable with surgery. It is a disruption of the cricopharyngeal phase of the oropharyngeal phase of deglutition. There appears to be an incoordination in the swallowing process between the relaxation of the rostral, middle pharyngeal muscles and the caudal pharyngeal muscles. It is seen as a primary condition in young animals presenting soon after weaning onto solid food. The dogs appear clinically healthy unless there is secondary aspiration pneumonia or emaciation. These dogs may present as respiratory emergencies and require intensive support and treatment prior to corrective surgery. The diagnosis is made on videofluoroscopy. The condition carries a good prognosis for cure with surgical myectomy of the cricopharyngeal muscle and the thyropharyngeal muscle, which make up the upper oesophageal sphincter. Temporary relief prior to surgery can be achieved by injection of the cricopharyngeal muscle with botulism toxin. Surgical treatment for dysphagia secondary to an underlying neurological, neuromuscular or pharyngeal weakness carries a guarded prognosis and will make aspiration pneumonia worse.

  4. Achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or painful swallowing Your symptoms continue, even with treatment for achalasia Prevention Many of the causes of achalasia cannot be prevented. However, treatment may help to prevent complications. Alternative Names ... achalasia; Swallowing problems - achalasia; Lower esophageal sphincter; LES; Myotomy ...

  5. Combined endoscopic approaches to the cardiac sphincter achalasia treatment

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    V. N. Klimenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess combined endoscopic approaches to the cardiac sphincter achalasia treatment. Results. There are preliminary results of treatment and methods of carrying out of combined endoscopic pneumocardiodilatation and injections of botulotoxin type A ‘Disport’ at achalasia cardia are described in the article. Aethio-pathogenetic aspects in the development of achalasia cardia, action of botulotoxin type A and balloon pneumocardiodilatation of the esophagus, were described. And modern roentgen-endoscopic classification of achalasia cardia was given. Prognostic estimation scale of possibility to implement further combined endoscopic or surgical treatment is defined and is being in subsequent working out. Conclusion. Described clinical cases most brightly demonstrate variety of clinical achalasia cardia manifestations and also determine of the earlier display of surgical treatment.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes reduced in lower esophageal sphincter of patients with achalasia.

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    Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Zheng, Z; Wang, T; Zhao, C; Zhou, G; Jin, H; Wang, B

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of achalasia remains largely unknown. Considerable evidence reveals that the lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction is due to the lack of inhibitory neurotransmitter, secondary to esophageal neuronal inflammation or loss. Recent studies suggest hydrogen sulfide may act as an inhibitory transmitter in gastrointestinal tract, but study about hydrogen sulfide in human esophagus still lack. The aim of the study was to investigate if hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes could be detected in human esophagus and if the synthesis of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide could be affected in achalasia patients. Tissue samples in cardia, lower esophageal sphincter, 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from achalasia patients undergoing peroral endoscopic myotomy. Control tissues in lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from esophageal carcinoma patients. Expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients and control were detected by immunohistochemical staining. In addition, expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were compared among different parts of esophagus in achalasia patients. Compared with control, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients was significantly reduced (χ 2 = 11.429, P = 0.010). The expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were lower in lower esophageal sphincter than that in 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter, respectively (all P achalasia, which implicates the involvement of the two hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes in the pathophysiology of achalasia. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  7. Long-term outcome of internal sphincter myectomy in patients with internal anal sphincter achalasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doodnath, Reshma

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Internal anal sphincter achalasia (IASA) is a condition with presentation similar to Hirschsprung\\'s disease (HD), but with the presence of ganglion cells on rectal suction biopsy (RSB). The diagnosis is made on anorectal manometry (ARM) by the absence of the rectosphincteric reflex on rectal balloon inflation. Internal sphincter myectomy (ISM) is the treatment of choice for patients with IASA. Recently, botulinum toxin has been used to treat IASA patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term bowel function in patients with IASA following ISM. METHODS: The medical records of 24 patients with IASA managed by ISM during 1993-2005 were examined. There were 18 boys and 6 girls, aged 2-12 years. All patients presented with intractable constipation with or without soiling. The diagnosis was made by the demonstration of the absence of the rectosphincteric reflex on ARM. HD was excluded by the presence of ganglion cells and normal acetylcholinesterase activity in RSB. Patients were followed 4-14 years later. RESULTS: Fifteen (62.5%) patients at the time of follow-up had regular bowel motions without the use of laxatives. Six (25%) patients had regular bowel motions, but remained on small doses of laxatives. Two (8.3%) patients who suffered from constipation and soiling required twice weekly enemas to remain clean. One (4.2%) patient required resection of dilated rectosigmoid colon 3 years after myectomy, remains on laxatives, but has normal bowel control. No patients had faecal incontinence following ISM. CONCLUSION: This long-term follow-up study shows that the vast majority of IASA patients have normal bowel control following ISM.

  8. Radiographic and manometric correlation in achalasia with apparent lower esophageal sphincter relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Richter, J.E.; Chen, Y.M.; Wu, W.C.; Gelfand, D.W.; Castell, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors compared the clinical, radiographic, and manometric findings in ten patients with atypical achalasia showing complete but short-duration lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation with findings in 39 patients with classic achalasia. Patients with atypical achalasia were younger, had dysphagia and weight loss of shorter duration, and had less esophageal dilation than patients with classic achalesia. LES pressure and esophagogastric junction caliber, however, were similar in the two groups. The majority of patients in both groups responded well to pneumatic dilation. They conclude that achalasia with apparent LES relaxation may represent an early form of this motor disorder and that the radiographic findings remain characteristic except for less dilation of the esophagus

  9. Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) metrics on high-resolution manometry (HRM) differentiate achalasia subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, P; Patel, A; Sayuk, G S; Gyawali, C P

    2017-12-01

    The upper esophageal sphincter (UES) reflexively responds to bolus presence within the esophageal lumen, therefore UES metrics can vary in achalasia. Within consecutive patients undergoing esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM), 302 patients (58.2±1.0 year, 57% F) with esophageal outflow obstruction were identified, and compared to 16 asymptomatic controls (27.7±0.7 year, 56% F). Esophageal outflow obstruction was segregated into achalasia subtypes 1, 2, and 3, and esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (EGJOO with intact peristalsis) using Chicago Classification v3.0. UES and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) metrics were compared between esophageal outflow obstruction and normal controls using univariate and multivariate analysis. Linear regression excluded multicollinearity of pressure metrics that demonstrated significant differences across individual subtype comparisons. LES integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) had utility in differentiating achalasia from controls (P<.0001), but no utility in segregating between subtypes (P=.27). In comparison to controls, patients collectively demonstrated univariate differences in UES mean basal pressure, relaxation time to nadir, recovery time, and residual pressure (UES-RP) (P≤.049). UES-RP was highest in type 2 achalasia (P<.0001 compared to other subtypes and controls). In multivariate analysis, only UES-RP retained significance in comparison between each of the subgroups (P≤.02 for each comparison). Intrabolus pressure was highest in type 3 achalasia; this demonstrated significant differences across some but not all subtype comparisons. Nadir UES-RP can differentiate achalasia subtypes within the esophageal outflow obstruction spectrum, with highest values in type 2 achalasia. This metric likely represents a surrogate marker for esophageal pressurization. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Residual lower esophageal sphincter pressure as a prognostic factor in the pneumatic balloon treatment of achalasia.

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    Park, Jung Ho; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Hyuk; Park, Hyojin; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyung Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Kyoung Sup

    2015-01-01

    Pneumatic balloon dilatation (PD) is a mainstay in achalasia treatment. The aim of this study was to identify predictive factors for successful treatment. We retrospectively reviewed 76 patients with a diagnosis of achalasia who underwent PD from June 2010 to May 2013. Clinical symptoms were assessed using Eckardt score and manometry data were analyzed using resting and relaxation pressure (4sIRP) of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and the distal contractile integral (DCI), which was calculated for 10 s from the start of deglutition between the upper margin of the LES and lower margin of upper esophageal contraction. Patients with achalasia were classified into three groups based on the Chicago classification. Among 76 patients, 52 patients received PD, and the treatment was unsuccessful in 9 patients (6 in class I and 3 in class III). When comparing prognostic factors between successful and unsuccessful treatment groups, the mean value for 4sIRP in the unsuccessful treatment group was significantly lower than that in the successful treatment group (P treatment of achalasia (odds ratio, 1.092; 95% confidence interval, 1.001-1.191) even after adjustment for a series of confounding factors. Lower 4sIRP may be a prognostic indicator for poor treatment outcome after PD. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Achalasia in Pregnancy: Botulinum Toxin A Injection of Lower Esophageal Sphincter

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    Nicole Hooft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Achalasia, a rare esophageal motility disorder that may cause malnutrition during pregnancy, can result in fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Many medical treatment regimens are contraindicated or not tolerated during pregnancy, and surgery is generally avoided due to potential risks to the fetus. Case Report. Severe, medically refractory achalasia in a 23-year-old pregnant woman that caused malnutrition was successfully managed by administering a botulinum toxin A injection to the lower esophageal sphincter. The injection was performed at approximately 14 weeks’ gestation and the patient reported clinically significant relief from dysphagia. She gained weight and ultimately delivered a healthy baby girl at term, but her symptoms returned a few months postpartum. She underwent a second treatment of botulinum toxin A injection, but it offered only one month of relief. Roughly eight months after delivery, the patient underwent a laparoscopic extended Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication. The patient resumed a normal diet one week postoperatively, and her baby has had no complications. Conclusion. This is only the second reported case of botulinum toxin A injection being used to treat achalasia in pregnancy. This treatment proved to be a safe temporary alternative without the risks of surgery and anesthesia during pregnancy.

  12. Upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities: frequent finding on high-resolution esophageal manometry and associated with poorer treatment response in achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Yamile H; Ciarleglio, Maria M; Clarke, John O; Nandwani, Monica; Stein, Ellen; Roland, Bani C

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) on high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) have been observed in both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals and are often interpreted as incidental findings of unclear clinical significance. Our primary aims were: (1) to assess the frequency of UES abnormalities in consecutive patients referred for HREM studies; and (2) to characterize the demographics, clinical symptoms, and manometric profiles associated with UES abnormalities as compared with those with normal UES function. We performed a retrospective study of 200 consecutive patients referred for HREM. Patients were divided into those with normal and abnormal UES function, including impaired relaxation (residual pressure >12 mm Hg), hypertensive (>104 mm Hg), and hypotensive (achalasia were significantly more likely to have UES abnormalities as compared with normal UES function (57.2% vs. 42.9%, P=0.04), with the most frequent abnormality being a hypertensive UES (50%). In addition, patients with impaired lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction or achalasia) were more likely to have an UES abnormality present as compared with those with normal LES relaxation (53.1% vs. 28.6%, P=0.01). When we assessed for treatment response among patients with achalasia, we found that subjects with evidence of UES dysfunction had significantly worse treatment outcomes as compared with those without UES abnormalities present (20% improved vs. 100%, P=0.015). This remained true even after adjusting for type of treatment received (surgical myotomy, per-oral endoscopic mytotomy, botulinum toxin injection, pneumatic dilatation, medical therapy, P=0.67) and achalasia subtype (P=1.00). UES abnormalities are a frequent finding on HREM studies, especially in patients with impaired LES relaxation, including both achalasia and esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Interestingly, the most common UES abnormality associated

  13. The efficacy of balloon dilation in achalasia is the result of stretching of the lower esophageal sphincter, not muscular disruption.

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    Borhan-Manesh, F; Kaviani, M J; Taghavi, A R

    2016-04-01

    Pneumatic dilation (PD) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in achalasia is a major palliative treatment. It is generally believed, although never substantiated, that therapeutic efficacy of ballooning in achalasia is the result of the disruption and tearing of the muscular layers of the LES. To clarify this issue, we investigated the frequency of muscular disruption at the LES, 24 hours after PD, by employing the endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), in a group of 43 consented patients with achalasia. Between July 2009 and March2012, 51 consecutive adult patients with tentative diagnosis of achalasia, some with recurrence of symptoms after an earlier treatment with balloon dilation, were evaluated and underwent PD, using Rigiflex balloon without major adverse effect. Out of the 51 evaluated, 43 eligible and consenting patients who underwent EUS, 24 hours after PD, using Olympus GF-UE 160 echoendoscope and an Aloka Prosound probe at 7.5 MHZ, are the subjects of this study. The EUS in 43 eligible patients revealed an intact LES in 36 (83.7%), small area of muscular disruption in 5 (11.6%) and small hematoma in 2 patients (4.6%). Our data convincingly demonstrate that the clinical effectiveness of balloon dilation in achalasia is not the result of muscular disruption, but of circumferential stretching of the LES. Our findings on the mechanism of action of PD in achalasia could result in modifying the current method of dilation for a safer procedure, by slowing the rate of inflation and allowing the sphincter to slowly stretch itself to the distending balloon. © 2015 The Authors. Diseases of the Esophagus published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  14. High-Resolution Manometry Evaluation of the Pharynx and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Motility in Patients with Achalasia.

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    Menezes, Mariano A; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2015-10-01

    The motility of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) is still poorly understood. It is also unclear if the motility of this area may be compromised in patients with achalasia. This study aims to evaluate the motility of the pharynx, UES, and proximal esophagus in patients with esophageal achalasia. Sixty patients with achalasia underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) (52 % females, mean age 54 years). Esophageal dilatation was classified according to the radiologic diameter in Type I (10 cm): 24 %. HRM classified 43 % of the patients as Chicago Type I and 57 % as Type II. Manometric parameters were compared to normal values obtained from a previous study in volunteers. The motility of the velopharynx showed short, premature, and hypertonic contraction. The epiglottis also showed hypertonic contraction. The UES had increased residual pressure. Chicago classification Type II patients had higher UES residual pressure (p = 0.03). The degree of esophageal dilatation did not correlate with manometric parameters. Achalasia may affect the motility of the pharyngo-upper esophageal area. The changes observed may represent functional alterations to prevent aspiration, especially in patients with Chicago classification Type II achalasia.

  15. Comparison of posterior internal anal sphincter myectomy and intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injection for treatment of internal anal sphincter achalasia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmacher, Florian; Puri, Prem

    2012-08-01

    Internal anal sphincter (IAS) achalasia is a clinical condition with presentation similar to Hirschsprung's disease, but with the presence of ganglion cells on rectal suction biopsy (RSB). The diagnosis is made by anorectal manometry (ARM), which demonstrates the absence of the rectosphincteric reflex on rectal balloon inflation. The recommended treatment of choice is posterior IAS myectomy. Recently, intrasphincteric botulinum toxin (Botox) injection has been effectively used for treatment of IAS achalasia. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of posterior IAS myectomy with intrasphincteric Botox injection for treatment of IAS achalasia. A systematic literature search for relevant articles was conducted using the following databases: MEDLINE( ® ), EMBASE(®), ISI Web of Science(SM) and the Cochrane Library. A meta-analysis was performed with the studies where IAS achalasia was diagnosed based on the results of ARM and RSB. Odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals were calculated. Sixteen prospective and retrospective studies, published from 1973 to 2009, were identified. A total of 395 patients with IAS achalasia were included in this meta-analysis. Fifty-eight percent of patients underwent IAS myectomy and 42 % Botox injection. Regular bowel movements were significantly more frequent after IAS myectomy (OR 0.53, [95 % CI 0.29-0.99]; p = 0.04). There was no significant difference in continued use of laxatives or rectal enemas (OR 0.92, [95 % CI 0.34-2.53], p = 0.89) and in overall complication rates between both procedures (OR 0.68, [95 % CI 0.38-1.21]; p = 0.19). Looking at specific complications, the rate of transient faecal incontinence was significantly higher after Botox injection (OR 0.07, [95 % CI 0.01-0.54]; p IAS myectomy (OR 0.56, [95 % CI 0.32-0.97]; p = 0.04 and OR 0.25, [95 % CI 0.15-0.41]; p IAS achalasia, posterior IAS myectomy appears to be a more effective treatment option compared to intrasphincteric

  16. Balloon dilation of the esophago-gastric junction affects lower and upper esophageal sphincter function in achalasia.

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    Wauters, L; Van Oudenhove, L; Selleslagh, M; Vanuytsel, T; Boeckxstaens, G; Tack, J; Omari, T; Rommel, N

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic dilation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in achalasia has an unappreciated effect on upper esophageal sphincter (UES) function. We studied UES pressure patterns at baseline and alterations in UES parameters resulting from therapy. High-resolution manometry (HRM) tracings from 50 achalasia patients, seen at a tertiary center between January 2009 and July 2011, were reviewed. Manometric parameters studied were (i) LES: resting pressure (restP), 4-second integrated relaxation pressure (IRP4); (ii) UES: resting pressure (restP), minimal relaxation pressure (MRP), peak pressure (PP), relaxation interval (RI), intrabolus pressure (IBP), and deglutitive sphincter resistance (DSR). Mixed models analyses with LES and UES parameters as dependent variables and treatment stage as within-subject independent variable of interest were used. Correlations between treatment-induced changes in LES, UES, and esophageal body (EB) parameters were performed. Pre- and posttreatment HRM tracings were available from 50 patients (mean age 52.7 ± 18.6 years, 29 men). Upper esophageal sphincter parameters MRP (17.9 ± 1.2 vs 15.2 ± 0.9 mmHg; p = 0.02) and IBP (31.5 ± 1.5 vs 27.4 ± 1.2 mmHg; p = 0.009) were significantly reduced after initial balloon dilation and this effect was significant in type II achalasia (p = 0.002 and p = 0.0006). Peak pressure, RI, and DSR were not. The therapeutic effect on LES IRP4 correlated significantly with the change in UES MRP, statistically mediated by the change in EB deglutitive pressure (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0002). We present the first HRM study demonstrating that pneumatic dilation of the LES affects intraesophageal and UES pressures in patients with achalasia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clinical study of columnar balloon dilatation therapy for severe dysphagia caused by upper esophageal sphincter achalasia after stroke

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    Wei-bo SHAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the mechanism and effect of columnar balloon dilatation therapy on treating patients with severe dysphagia caused by upper esophageal sphincter (UES achalasia after stroke. Methods Sixty -four patients with severe dysphagia caused by UES achalasia after stroke were diagnosed through Video Fluoroscopic Swallowing Study (VFSS and esophageal dynamics testing. The patients were randomly divided into control group (N = 32 and treatment group (N = 32. Patients in control group were treated with routine drug treatment and routine rehabilitation training, while patients in treatment group were treated with columnar balloon dilatation therapy on the basis of routine treatment. The treatment end point was either the patient resuming an oral diet or after 4-weeks treatment. All cases were evaluated by swallowing function of VFSS, high resolution manometry (HRM and scores of the severity of dysphagia before treatment and at treatment end point. Results Compared with before treatment, UES resting pressure (P = 0.000 and residual pressure (P = 0.000 were significantly decreased, peak pressure was significantly increased (P = 0.000, duration of relaxation was prolonged (P = 0.000, and scores of the severity of dysphagia were significantly increased (P = 0.000, 0.000 in both groups after treatment. Compared with control group, UES resting pressure (P = 0.001 and residual pressure (P = 0.000 were significantly decreased, peak pressure was significantly increased (P = 0.002, duration of relaxation was prolonged (P = 0.000, and scores of the severity of dysphagia were significantly increased (P = 0.000 in treatment group after treatment. Until the treatment end point or after 4-week treatment, the total effective rate in treatment group was significantly higher than that in control group [93.75% (30/32 vs. 81.25% (26/32; χ2 = 4.010, P = 0.000]. Conclusions Columnar balloon dilatation therapy is effective for reducing the tension of upper

  18. Achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2007-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare motor disorder of the oesophagus, characterised by the absence of peristalsis and impaired swallow-induced relaxation. These motor abnormalities result in stasis of ingested food in the oesophagus, leading to clinical symptoms, such as dysphagia, regurgitation of food,

  19. Achalasia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfino, John E; Gawron, Andrew J

    2015-05-12

    Achalasia significantly affects patients' quality of life and can be difficult to diagnose and treat. To review the diagnosis and management of achalasia, with a focus on phenotypic classification pertinent to therapeutic outcomes. Literature review and MEDLINE search of articles from January 2004 to February 2015. A total of 93 articles were included in the final literature review addressing facets of achalasia epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. Nine randomized controlled trials focusing on endoscopic or surgical therapy for achalasia were included (734 total patients). A diagnosis of achalasia should be considered when patients present with dysphagia, chest pain, and refractory reflux symptoms after an endoscopy does not reveal a mechanical obstruction or an inflammatory cause of esophageal symptoms. Manometry should be performed if achalasia is suspected. Randomized controlled trials support treatments focused on disrupting the lower esophageal sphincter with pneumatic dilation (70%-90% effective) or laparoscopic myotomy (88%-95% effective). Patients with achalasia have a variable prognosis after endoscopic or surgical myotomy based on subtypes, with type II (absent peristalsis with abnormal pan-esophageal high-pressure patterns) having a very favorable outcome (96%) and type I (absent peristalsis without abnormal pressure) having an intermediate prognosis (81%) that is inversely associated with the degree of esophageal dilatation. In contrast, type III (absent peristalsis with distal esophageal spastic contractions) is a spastic variant with less favorable outcomes (66%) after treatment of the lower esophageal sphincter. Achalasia should be considered when dysphagia is present and not explained by an obstruction or inflammatory process. Responses to treatment vary based on which achalasia subtype is present.

  20. Management of achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, An J.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by the absence of peristalsis and defective relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Patients present at all ages with dysphagia and regurgitation as main symptoms. The diagnosis is suggested by barium swallow and endoscopy

  1. Pnematic Dilation in Achalasia

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    Maximilian Bittinger

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic dilation is the most common first-line therapy for the treatment of achalasia. The aim of dilation is a controlled disruption of circular muscle fibres of the lower esophageal sphincter to reduce the functional obstruction. Several types of dilators and different dilation techniques are used, but the achieved results are similar. The mean success rate is about 80% in the short term, but some patients need redilation in the further course (particularly young patients. Best long term results are obtained if the lower esophageal sphincter pressure can be reduced below 10 mmHg. Major complications are rare after pneumatic dilation; the most serious complication is esophageal perforation, which occurs at a mean rate of about 2.5%. Considering the pros and cons of other effective forms of treatment of achalasia (esophagomyotomy and intrasphincteric injection of botulinum toxin, pneumatic dilation is still the treatment of choice in the majority of patients with achalasia.

  2. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triadafilopoulos, G.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Gullo, R.; Patti, M. G.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Kahrilas, P. J.; Duranceau, A.; Jamieson, G.; Zaninotto, G.

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed

  3. Achalasia: virus-induced euthanasia of neurons?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2008-01-01

    Achalasia, a motor disorder of the esophagus, is characterized by myenteric plexitis leading to neuronal loss. Cytotoxic T cells, isolated from the lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients, respond to human herpes virus-1 (HSV-1) with gamma-IFN (and to a lesser extent IL-2) production and

  4. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

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    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  5. Achalasia: Dilation, Injection or Surgery?

    OpenAIRE

    Peracchia, Alberto; Bonavina, Luigi

    2000-01-01

    Achalasia results from irreversible alterations of the esophageal myenteric plexus. The target of treatment in this setting is to reduce lower esophageal sphincter resistance to passage of the bolus. Definitive treatment of the disease requires pneumatic dilation or Heller myotomy. Although no controlled studies comparing modern endoscopic and surgical techniques are available, laparoscopic surgery is emerging as the initial intervention of choice.

  6. Barrett’s Oesophagus in an Achalasia Patient: Immunological Analysis and Comparison with a Group of Achalasia Patients

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    Samuel Torres-Landa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to characterize the presence of diverse CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets and regulatory cells in peripheral blood and lower oesophageal sphincter (LES from a young patient with BE/achalasia without treatment versus achalasia group. In order to characterize the circulating cells in this patient, a cytometric analysis was performed. LES tissue was evaluated by double-immunostaining procedure. Five healthy blood donors, 5 type achalasia patients, and 5 oesophagus tissue samples (gastrooesophageal junction from transplant donors were included as control groups. A conspicuous systemic inflammation was determined in BE/achalasia patient and achalasia versus healthy volunteer group. Nonetheless, a predominance of Th22, Th2, IFN-α-producing T cells, Tregs, Bregs, and pDCregs was observed in BE/achalasia patient versus achalasia group. A low percentage of Th1 subset in BE/achalasia versus achalasia group was determined. A noticeable increase in tissue of Th22, Th17, Th2, Tregs, Bregs, and pDCregs was observed in BE/achalasia versus achalasia group. Th1 subset was lower in the BE/achalasia patient versus achalasia group. This study suggests that inflammation is a possible factor in the pathogenesis of BE/achalasia. Further research needs to be performed to understand the specific cause of the correlation between BE and achalasia.

  7. Management of achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Dughera

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Luca Dughera1, Michele Chiaverina1, Luca Cacciotella1, Fabio Cisarò21Internal Medicine, Motility and Endoscopy Unit, 2Gastroenterology and Hepatology Unit, Department of Medicine, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Torino, ItalyAbstract: Several theories on the etiology and pathophysiology of achalasia have been reported but, to date, it is widely accepted that loss of peristalsis and absence of swallow-induced relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter are the main functional abnormalities. Treatment of achalasia often aims to alleviate the symptoms of achalasia and not to correct the underlying disorder. Medical therapy has poor efficacy, so patients who are good surgical candidates should be offered either laparoscopic myotomy or pneumatic balloon dilatation. Their own preference should be included in the decision-making process, and treatment should meet the local expertise with these procedures. Laparoscopic surgical esophagomyotomy is a safe and effective modality. It can be considered as initial management or as secondary treatment if the patient does not respond to less invasive modalities. Pneumatic dilatation has proven to be a safe, effective, and durable modality of treatment when performed by experienced individuals, and appears to be the most cost-effective alternative. For patients with multiple comorbidities and for elderly patients, who are not good surgical candidates, endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin should be considered a safe and effective procedure. However, its positive effect diminishes over time, and the need for multiple repeated sessions must be taken into consideration. In the management of patients with achalasia, nutritional aspects play an important role. When lifestyle changes are insufficient, it is necessary to proceed to percutaneous gastrostomy under radiological guidance. In the future, intraluminal myotomy or endoscopic mucosectomy will possibly be an option. Further studies are needed to investigate

  8. Heartburn in patients with achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, S J; Souza, R F; Rosenberg, S J; Ruben, R A; Goyal, R K

    1995-01-01

    Heartburn, the main symptom of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD), might be expected to occur infrequently in achalasia, a disorder characterised by a hypertensive lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) that fails to relax. Nevertheless, it is often described by patients with achalasia. The medical records of 32 patients with untreated achalasia who complained of heartburn, and of 35 similar patients who denied the symptom, were reviewed to explore the implications of heartburn in this condition. Data on endoscopic and manometric findings, and on the onset and duration of oesophageal symptoms were collected. Three patterns of heartburn were observed: (1) in 8 patients (25%) the onset of heartburn followed the onset of dysphagia, (2) in 15 patients (47%) heartburn preceded the onset of dysphagia and persisted as dysphagia progressed, and (3) in 9 patients (28%), heartburn preceded the onset of dysphagia and stopped as dysphagia progressed. The mean (SD) basal LOS pressure in the patients with heartburn (38 (16) mm Hg) was significantly lower than that in patients without the symptom (52 (26) mm Hg); the lowest LOS pressure (29 (11) mm Hg) was observed in the subset of patients whose heartburn preceded the onset of dysphagia and then stopped. It is concluded that patients who have achalasia with heartburn have lower basal LOS pressures than patients who have achalasia without this symptom. In some patients with achalasia, the appearance of dysphagia is heralded by the disappearance of longstanding heartburn. For these patients, it is speculated that achalasia develops in the setting of underlying GORD. PMID:7590421

  9. Ayurvedic management of achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Rastogi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is an esophageal motor disorder characterized by sustained lower esophageal sphincter contraction and reduced esophageal peristalsis. This pathology eventually results in symptoms like dysphagia, regurgitation and occasional chest pain related to food intake. This is an uncommon disorder of unexplained etiology; however viral, autoimmune and neurodegenerative causes are often afflicted to its manifestation. As per the current state of knowledge, achalasia is considered to be a chronic incurable condition. The treatment options offered here primarily aim at reducing the tone of lower esophageal sphincter by pharmacologic, endoscopic or surgical means. We are presenting here a case of achalasia with two years of symptomatic history of food regurgitation, dysphagia and heart burn without any noticeable response from allopathic medicines. The patient was subsequently kept under ayurvedic therapy considering the symptoms caused by vata impairment and hence requiring vatanulomana and reduction in esophageal muscle tone as the primary management. The patient was kept under suggested Ayurvedic therapy and followed-up for 3 months. A symptom-free follow-up in this case was noticed after completion of 1 month of Ayurvedic therapy.

  10. Idiopathic (primary achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaezi Michael F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Idiopathic achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder characterized by esophageal aperistalsis and abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES relaxation in response to deglutition. It is a rare disease with an annual incidence of approximately 1/100,000 and a prevalence rate of 1/10,000. The disease can occur at any age, with a similar rate in men and women, but is usually diagnosed between 25 and 60 years. It is characterized predominantly by dysphagia to solids and liquids, bland regurgitation, and chest pain. Weight loss (usually between 5 to 10 kg is present in most but not in all patients. Heartburn occurs in 27%–42% of achalasia patients. Etiology is unknown. Some familial cases have been reported, but the rarity of familial occurrence does not support the hypothesis that genetic inheritance is a significant etiologic factor. Association of achalasia with viral infections and auto-antibodies against myenteric plexus has been reported, but the causal relationship remains unclear. The diagnosis is based on history of the disease, radiography (barium esophagogram, and esophageal motility testing (esophageal manometry. Endoscopic examination is important to rule out malignancy as the cause of achalasia. Treatment is strictly palliative. Current medical and surgical therapeutic options (pneumatic dilation, surgical myotomy, and pharmacologic agents aimed at reducing the LES pressure and facilitating esophageal emptying by gravity and hydrostatic pressure of retained food and liquids. Although it cannot be permanently cured, excellent palliation is available in over 90% of patients.

  11. Idiopathic (primary) achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Farnoosh; Vaezi, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder characterized by esophageal aperistalsis and abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation in response to deglutition. It is a rare disease with an annual incidence of approximately 1/100,000 and a prevalence rate of 1/10,000. The disease can occur at any age, with a similar rate in men and women, but is usually diagnosed between 25 and 60 years. It is characterized predominantly by dysphagia to solids and liquids, bland regurgitation, and chest pain. Weight loss (usually between 5 to 10 kg) is present in most but not in all patients. Heartburn occurs in 27%–42% of achalasia patients. Etiology is unknown. Some familial cases have been reported, but the rarity of familial occurrence does not support the hypothesis that genetic inheritance is a significant etiologic factor. Association of achalasia with viral infections and auto-antibodies against myenteric plexus has been reported, but the causal relationship remains unclear. The diagnosis is based on history of the disease, radiography (barium esophagogram), and esophageal motility testing (esophageal manometry). Endoscopic examination is important to rule out malignancy as the cause of achalasia. Treatment is strictly palliative. Current medical and surgical therapeutic options (pneumatic dilation, surgical myotomy, and pharmacologic agents) aimed at reducing the LES pressure and facilitating esophageal emptying by gravity and hydrostatic pressure of retained food and liquids. Although it cannot be permanently cured, excellent palliation is available in over 90% of patients. PMID:17894899

  12. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavina, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is the most commonly diagnosed primary esophageal motor disorder and the second most common functional esophageal disorder. Current therapy of achalasia is directed toward elimination of the outflow resistance caused by failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax completely upon swallowing. The advent of minimally invasive surgery has nearly replaced endoscopic pneumatic dilation as the first-line therapeutic approach. In this editorial, the rationale and the evide...

  13. Barrett’s Oesophagus in an Achalasia Patient: Immunological Analysis and Comparison with a Group of Achalasia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Torres-Landa; Janette Furuzawa-Carballeda; Enrique Coss-Adame; Miguel A. Valdovinos; Edgar Alejandro-Medrano; Bárbara Ramos-Ávalos; Braulio Martínez-Benítez; Gonzalo Torres-Villalobos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the presence of diverse CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets and regulatory cells in peripheral blood and lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) from a young patient with BE/achalasia without treatment versus achalasia group. In order to characterize the circulating cells in this patient, a cytometric analysis was performed. LES tissue was evaluated by double-immunostaining procedure. Five healthy blood donors, 5 type achalasia patients, and 5 oesophagus tissue sampl...

  14. Progress in intervention procedure of achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xinmei; Cheng Yingsheng

    2008-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder, with the main symptom of dysphagia; and caused by the tonus increase and abnormal relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter(LES). The etiology remains unclear, the objective of the current treatment approaches for achalasia containing the reduction of the LES tone and obstruction to relieve the patients' symptoms; including pharmacologic treatment, botulinum toxin treatment, surgical myotomy, pneumatic dilatation and cardia stent dilatation. The temporary cardia stent dilatation possesses some better advantages and effects; and ought to be the first choice of minimal invasive interventional management for achalasia. (authors)

  15. Persistent post-stroke dysphagia treated with cricopharyngeal myotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthi S Nair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke dysphagia is a common problem after stroke. About 8-13% patients have persistent dysphagia and are unable to return to pre-stroke diet even after 6 months of stroke. Use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG may be required in these patients, which may be psychologically unacceptable and impair the quality of life. In those with cricopharyngeal dysfunction leading on to refractory post-stroke dysphagia, cricopharyngeal myotomy and injection of botulinum toxin are the treatment options. We present a case of vertebrobasilar stroke who had persistent dysphagia due to cricopharyngeal dysfunction with good recovery of swallowing function following cricopharyngeal myotomy 1.5 years after the stroke.

  16. Injection of Botulinum Toxin a to Upper Esophageal Sphincter for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Two Patients with Inclusion Body Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis WC Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis (IBM is a progressive degenerative skeletal muscle disease leading to weakening and atrophy of both proximal and distal muscles. Dysphagia is reported in up to 86% of IBM patients. Surgical cricopharyngeal myotomy may be effective for cricopharyngeal dysphagia and there is one published report that botulinum toxin A, injected into the cricopharyngeus muscle using a hypopharyngoscope under general anesthesia, relieved IBM-associated dysphagia. This report presents the first documentation of botulinum toxin A injection into the upper esophageal sphincter using a flexible esophagogastroduodenoscope under conscious sedation, to reduce upper esophageal sphincter pressure and successfully alleviate oropharyngeal dysphagia in two IBM patients.

  17. Achalasia: Dilation, Injection or Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Peracchia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia results from irreversible alterations of the esophageal myenteric plexus. The target of treatment in this setting is to reduce lower esophageal sphincter resistance to passage of the bolus. Definitive treatment of the disease requires pneumatic dilation or Heller myotomy. Although no controlled studies comparing modern endoscopic and surgical techniques are available, laparoscopic surgery is emerging as the initial intervention of choice.

  18. Morphofunctional analysis of experimental model of esophageal achalasia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirov, A G; Raginov, I S; Burmistrov, M V; Chelyshev, Y A; Khasanov, R Sh; Moroshek, A A; Grigoriev, P N; Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedyarov, M A

    2010-10-01

    We carried out a detailed analysis of rat model of esophageal achalasia previously developed by us. Manifest morphological and functional disorders were observed in experimental achalasia: hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium, reduced number of nerve fibers, excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue in the esophageal wall, high contractile activity of the lower esophageal sphincter, and reduced motility of the longitudinal muscle layer. Changes in rat esophagus observed in experimental achalasia largely correlate with those in esophageal achalasia in humans. Hence, our experimental model can be used for the development of new methods of disease treatment.

  19. Management of achalasia: surgery or pneumatic dilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, Joel E.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2011-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder of unknown cause, characterised by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Patients present at all ages, primarily with dysphagia for solids/liquids and bland regurgitation. The diagnosis is suggested by

  20. Infantile achalasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starinsky, R.; Pajewsky, M.; Berlovitz, I.; Versano, D.; Mares, A.J.

    1984-02-01

    Achalasia in infancy is rare. A male infant who started to have symptoms at the age of 4 months, and who was operated on at the age of 17 months is described. Post operatively the symptoms subsided and normal growth and development were regained. Achalasia should be included in the differential diagnosis of children with regurgitation, vomiting and failure to thrive.

  1. Achalasia: from diagnosis to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Michael F; Felix, Valter N; Penagini, Roberto; Mauro, Aurelio; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux; Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Martínek, Jan; Rieder, Erwin

    2016-10-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder associated with abnormalities in peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation. The etiology of the disease remains elusive. It is often misdiagnosed initially as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Patients with achalasia often complain of dysphagia to solids and liquids but may focus on regurgitation as the primary symptom, leading to the early misdiagnosis. Chest pain, weight loss, and occasional vomiting may be additional symptoms encountered in those with achalasia. The disease may be suspected on the basis of clinical presentation, but diagnosis depends on classic findings using high-resolution manometry, showing either failed or simultaneous contractions with associated normal or high LES pressures with no or incomplete relaxation with swallows. There are no cures for achalasia, and, in most patients, treatments have to be repeated over time. Definitive treatment options in achalasia include pneumatic dilation, surgical myotomy, and the new technique of per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Botulinum toxin (Botox) or other medical therapies are often reserved for those who cannot have definitive therapies owing to comorbid conditions. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Treatments for achalasia in 2017: how to choose among them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2017-07-01

    To review recent advances in achalasia diagnostics and therapeutics. The cardinal feature of achalasia, impaired lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation, can occur in association with varied patterns of esophageal contractility. The Chicago Classification distinguishes among these as follows: without contractility (type I), with panesophageal pressurization (type II), with premature (spastic) distal esophageal contractions (type III), or even with preserved peristalsis [esophagogastric junction (EGJ) outlet obstruction]. Physiological testing also reveals achalasia-like syndromes that also benefit from achalasia therapies. Coincident with this has been the development of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), an endoscopic technique for performing an esophageal myotomy. Hence, the option now exists to either selectively ablate the LES (pneumatic dilation, laparoscopic Heller myotomy, or POEM) or to ablate the sphincter and create a myotomy along some or the entire adjacent smooth muscle esophagus (POEM). Each achalasia syndrome has unique treatment considerations; type II achalasia responds well to all therapies, whereas type III responds best to POEM. Emerging data support the concept that optimal management of achalasia is phenotype-specific, guided by high-resolution manometry, and, in some instance, functional luminal imaging probe studies. This opinion article reviews the varied characteristic and treatment considerations of achalasia syndromes as currently understood.

  3. Oesophageal achalasia: an argument for primary surgical management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, D S

    2009-04-01

    Achalasia is a primary oesophageal motility disorder resulting from damage to the ganglion cells of the myenteric plexus. Impaired relaxation of the lower oesophageal sphincter and aperistalsis causes its cardinal symptoms of dysphagia, chest pain and reflux-type symptoms. Management is somewhat controversial, with options including systemic and local pharmacotherapy, dilatation and oesophagomyotomy. We review the presentation, investigation and management of oesophageal achalasia and make an argument for primary surgical management.

  4. Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy versus Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy: Evidence-Based Approach to the Treatment of Esophageal Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-04-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a rare disorder characterized by a failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax during swallowing, combined with aperistalsis of the esophageal body. Treatment is not curative, but aims to eliminate the outflow resistance caused by the nonrelaxing lower esophageal sphincter. Current evidence suggests that both laparoscopic Heller myotomy and per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) are very effective in the relief of symptoms in patients with achalasia. Specifically, for type III achalasia, POEM may achieve higher success rates. However, POEM is associated to a very high incidence of pathologic reflux, with the risk of exchanging one disease-achalasia-with another-gastroesophageal reflux.

  5. Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy for Achalasia Technical Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Allaix, Marco E; Patti, Marco G

    2018-04-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder defined by the lack of esophageal peristalsis, and by a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax in response to swallowing. Patients' symptoms include dysphagia, regurgitation, aspiration, heartburn, and chest pain. Achalasia is a chronic condition without cure, and treatment options are aimed at providing symptomatic relief, improving esophageal emptying, and preventing the development of megaesophagus. Presently, a laparoscopic Heller myotomy with a partial fundoplication is considered the best treatment modality. A properly executed operation is key for the success of a laparoscopic Heller myotomy.

  6. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Boeckxstaens, G E; Gullo, R; Patti, M G; Pandolfino, J E; Kahrilas, P J; Duranceau, A; Jamieson, G; Zaninotto, G

    2012-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed in a symposium that took place in Kagoshima, Japan, in September 2010 under the auspices of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  7. Endoscopic approach to achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Michaela; Eckardt, Alexander J; Wehrmann, Till

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder. The etiology is still unknown and therefore all treatment options are strictly palliative with the intention to weaken the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Current established endoscopic therapeutic options include pneumatic dilation (PD) or botulinum toxin injection. Both treatment approaches have an excellent symptomatic short term effect, and lead to a reduction of LES pressure. However, the long term success of botulinum toxin (BT) injection is poor with symptom recurrence in more than 50% of the patients after 12 mo and in nearly 100% of the patients after 24 mo, which commonly requires repeat injections. In contrast, after a single PD 40%-60% of the patients remain asymptomatic for ≥ 10 years. Repeated on demand PD might become necessary and long term remission can be achieved with this approach in up to 90% of these patients. The main positive predictors for a symptomatic response to PD are an age > 40 years, a LES-pressure reduction to 40 years, was nearly equivalent to surgery. A new promising technique might be peroral endoscopic myotomy, although long term results are needed and practicability as well as safety issues must be considered. Treatment with a temporary self expanding stent has been reported with favorable outcomes, but the data are all from one study group and must be confirmed by others before definite recommendations can be made. In addition to its use as a therapeutic tool, endoscopy also plays an important role in the diagnosis and surveillance of patients with achalasia. PMID:23951393

  8. Achalasia: Treatment Options Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willemijntje A Hoogerwerf

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of all current forms of treatment of achalasia is to enable the patient to eat without disabling symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation, coughing or choking. Historically, this has been accomplished by mechanical disruption of the lower esophageal sphincter fibres, either by means of pneumatic dilation (PD or by open surgical myotomy. The addition of laparoscopic myotomy and botulinum toxin (BTX injection to the therapeutic armamentarium has triggered a recent series of reviews to determine the optimal therapeutic approach. Both PD and BTX have excellent short term (less than three months efficacy in the majority of patients. New data have been published that suggest that PD and BTX (with repeat injections can potentially obtain long term efficacy. PD is still considered the first-line treatment by most physicians; its main disadvantage is risk of perforation. BTX injection is evolving as an excellent, safe option for patients who are considered high risk for more invasive procedures. Laparoscopic myotomy with combined antireflux surgery is an increasingly attractive option in younger patients with achalasia, but long term follow-up studies are required to establish its efficacy and the potential for reflux-related sequelae.

  9. Achalasia with massive oesophageal dilation causing tracheomalacia and asthma symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gomez-Larrauri

    Full Text Available Achalasia is an uncommon oesophageal motor disorder characterized by failure of relaxation of the lower oesophageal sphincter and muscle hypertrophy, resulting in a loss of peristalsis and a dilated oesophagus. Gastrointestinal symptoms are invariably present in all cases of achalasia observed in adults. We report a case of a 34 year-old female patient with long standing history of asthma-like symptoms, labelled as uncontrolled and steroid resistant asthma with no gastrointestinal manifestations. Thoracic CT scan revealed a massive oesophagus due to achalasia, which caused severe tracheomalacia as a result of tracheal compression. Her symptoms regressed completely after a laparoscopic Heller myotomy surgery intervention.

  10. Update on therapeutic interventions for the management of achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasingam, Nishmi; Perczuk, Adam; Talbot, Michael; Kaffes, Arthur; Saxena, Payal

    2016-08-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder. It is the absence of peristalsis in the esophageal body and inability of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax, which characterizes this rare condition. Its features typically include dysphagia, regurgitation, chest pain, and weight loss. The ultimate goal in treating achalasia is to relieve the patient's symptoms, improve esophageal emptying, and prevent further dilatation of the esophagus. Current treatment modalities targeted at achalasia include pharmacological therapy, endoscopic therapy, and surgery. This review focuses on the current therapeutic options and explores the role of peroral endoscopic myotomy in the management armamentarium. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for the Treatment of Achalasia: An Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus, characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES. Treatment of achalasia is currently aimed at decreasing the resting pressure in the LES. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM is an emerging novel endoscopic procedure for the treatment of achalasia with initial data suggesting an acceptable safety profile, excellent short-term symptom resolution, low incidence of postprocedural gastroesophageal reflux (GER, and improvement in manometric outcomes. Further prospective randomized trials are required to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of this promising technique compared to other treatment modalities for achalasia. In this review we outline the technical aspects of POEM, summarize the available data on safety and outcomes, and suggest future directions for further advancement of this minimally invasive approach for the treatment of achalasia.

  12. Achalasia: A Review of Etiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Hedayanti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia was a condition marked by peristaltic movement absent in lower esophageal sphincter and segment that hypertonic result in imperfect relaxation during food ingestion. Achalasia incidence did not differ between men and women, account for 1 in 100.000 people every year with prevalence of 10 in 100.000 people, unrelated specifically with ethnic, and has its highest incidence on 30-60 age group. Based on its etiology, it was divided into primary and secondary Achalasia, while based on its motility, it was into hypermotil, hypomotil, and amotil Achalasia. Until present, several therapeutic modalities were available to treat Achalasia, among them was pharmacology therapy, botulinum toxin injection via endoscopy, pneumatic dilatation, Heller myotomy surgery, and Per Oral Endoscopy Myotomy (POEM.

  13. Balloon Dilatation of Esophageal Strictures/Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Sabharwal, Tarun; Adam, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motor disorder characterized by increased lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, diminished-to-absent peristalsis in the distal portion of the esophagus composed of smooth muscle, and lack of a coordinated LES relaxation in response to swallowing. These abnormalities are recognized radiographically by aperistalsis, esophageal dilatation, and decreased opening of the LES, with a characteristic “bird-beak” appearance. The principal symptom of this disorder is dysp...

  14. Achalasia: A review of Western and Iranian experiences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javad Mikaeli; Farhad Islami; Reza Malekzadeh

    2009-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary motor disorder of the esophagus, in which esophageal emptying is impaired.Diagnosis of achalasia is based on clinical findings. The diagnosis is confirmed by radiographic, endoscopic,and manometric evaluations. Several treatments for achalasia have been introduced. We searched the PubMed Database for original articles and metaanalyses about achalasia to summarize the current knowledge regarding this disease, with particular focus on different procedures that are used for treatment of achalasia. We also report the Iranian experience of treatment of this disease, since it could be considered as a model for mediumresource countries. Myotomy,particularly laparoscopic myotomy with fundoplication,is the most effective treatment for achalasia.Compared to other treatments, however, the initial cost of myotomy is usually higher and the recovery period is longer. When performing myotomy is not indicated or not possible, graded pneumatic dilation with slow rate of balloon inflation seems to be an effective and safe initial alternative. Injection of botulinum toxin into the lower esophageal sphincter before pneumatic dilation may increase remission rates. However, this needs to be confirmed in further studies. Due to lack of adequate information regarding the role of expandable stents in the treatment of achalasia, insertion of stents does not currently seem to be a recommended treatment. In summary, laparoscopic myotomy can be considered as the procedure of choice for treatment of achalasia. Graded pneumatic dilation is an effective alternative when the performance of myotomy is not possible for any reason.

  15. Achalasia as a complication of bulimia nervosa: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Oesophageal achalasia is a medical condition characterised by oesophageal aperistalsis, an increased resting pressure with partial or incomplete relaxation of the lower oesophageal sphincter. Bulimia nervosa (BN) is an eating disorder manifested by binge eating attacks followed by recurrent inappropriate ...

  16. Togetherness of Achalasia, Paraesophageal Diverticulum and Dextrocardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Demirci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is a disorder of motor function of the esophagus. Its treatment is the quite gratifying. Depending on increasing lower esophageal sphincter pressure, esophageal diverticula can occur in patients with achalasia. We report achalasia, paraesophageal diverticulum and also offer a patient with dextrocardia. 23 year old male patient was admitted to our outpatient clinic with following complaints; chest pain, palpitations and difficulty swallowing. The bird%u2019s beak appearance was observed to in the distal esophagus in contrast barium graphy. The diverticulum was viewed in the distal part of esophagus. Paraesophageal diverticulum situated in food scraps was viewed at 38 cm from the incisors on the endoscopy. It was diagnosed with achalasia and paraesophageal diverticulum to patient as a result of this examination. Cardiology consultation was requested for complaints of chest pain and palpitation. Dextrocardia was viewed in the transesophageal echocardiography. It was applied balloon dilation therapy to patient. The heart is usually structurally normal in the case of dextrocardia. This type of anomaly is not life-shortening effect on. They may be associated with other congenital malformations. Achalasia and paraesophageal diverticulum may be associated with dextrocardia. If congenital anomalies was detected, other possible structural diseases remind.

  17. The muscular expression of RAS in patients with achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselbrant, A; Kostic, S; Lönroth, H

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) elicits smooth muscle contractions via activation of AngII type 1 receptor (AT1R) in the intestinal wall and in sphincter regions in several species. Achalasia is a rare swallowing disorder and is characterized by a loss of the wave-like contraction that forces food through the oesophagus and a failure of the lower oesophageal sphincter to relax during swallowing. The present study was undertaken to elucidate expression and distribution of a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the muscular layer of distal normal human oesophagus as well as in patients with achalasia using western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). AT1R, together with enzyme renin and cathepsin D expression were decreased in patients with achalasia. In contrast, the mast cells chymase, cathepsin G, neprilysin and the receptor for angiotensin 1-7 peptides, the MAS receptor, were increased in patients with achalasia. The results showed the existence of a local RAS in human oesophageal muscular layer. The enzymes responsible for AngII production are different and there has been a shift in receptor physiology from AT1R to MAS receptor in patients with achalasia. These changes in the RAS might play a significant role in the physiological motor control for patients with achalasia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. The Pathogenesis and Management of Achalasia: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Fehmi; Vaezi, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder that is commonly misdiagnosed initially as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Patients with achalasia often complain of dysphagia with solids and liquids but may focus on regurgitation as the primary symptom, leading to initial misdiagnosis. Diagnostic tests for achalasia include esophageal motility testing, esophagogastroduodenoscopy and barium swallow. These tests play a complimentary role in establishing the diagnosis of suspected achalasia. High-resolution manometry has now identified three subtypes of achalasia, with therapeutic implications. Pneumatic dilation and surgical myotomy are the only definitive treatment options for patients with achalasia who can undergo surgery. Botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter should be reserved for those who cannot undergo definitive therapy. Close follow-up is paramount because many patients will have a recurrence of symptoms and require repeat treatment. PMID:26087861

  19. Causes and treatments of achalasia, and primary disorders of the esophageal body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Valter Nilton; DeVault, Kenneth; Penagini, Roberto; Elvevi, Alessandra; Swanstrom, Lee; Wassenaar, Eelco; Crespin, Oscar M; Pellegrini, Carlos A; Wong, Roy

    2013-10-01

    The following on achalasia and disorders of the esophageal body includes commentaries on controversies regarding whether patients with complete lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation can be considered to exhibit early achalasia; the roles of different mucle components of the LES in achalasia; sensory neural pathways impaired in achalasia; indications for peroral endoscopic myotomy and advantages of the technique over laparoscopic and thorascopic myotomy; factors contributing to the success of surgical therapy for achalasia; modifications to the classification of esophageal body primary motility disorders in the advent of high-resolution manometry (HRM); analysis of the LES in differentiating between achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm (DES); and appropriate treatment for DES, nutcracker esophagus (NE), and hypertensive LES (HTLES). © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. The Pathogenesis and Management of Achalasia: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Fehmi; Vaezi, Michael F

    2015-07-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder that is commonly misdiagnosed initially as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Patients with achalasia often complain of dysphagia with solids and liquids but may focus on regurgitation as the primary symptom, leading to initial misdiagnosis. Diagnostic tests for achalasia include esophageal motility testing, esophagogastroduodenoscopy and barium swallow. These tests play a complimentary role in establishing the diagnosis of suspected achalasia. High-resolution manometry has now identified three subtypes of achalasia, with therapeutic implications. Pneumatic dilation and surgical myotomy are the only definitive treatment options for patients with achalasia who can undergo surgery. Botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter should be reserved for those who cannot undergo definitive therapy. Close follow-up is paramount because many patients will have a recurrence of symptoms and require repeat treatment.

  1. Esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia esophagus: simultaneous or peristaltic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Patel, Nirali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-05-01

    Absence of peristalsis and impaired relaxation of lower esophageal sphincter are the hallmarks of achalasia esophagus. Based on the pressurization patterns, achalasia has been subdivided into three subtypes. The goal of our study was to evaluate the esophageal contraction pattern and bolus clearance in type 3 achalasia esophagus. High-resolution manometry (HRM) recordings of all patients diagnosed with achalasia esophagus in our center between the years 2011 and 2013 were reviewed. Recordings of 36 patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for the characteristics of swallow-induced "simultaneous esophageal contraction." The HRM impedance recordings of 14 additional patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for bolus clearance from the impedance recording. Finally, the HRM impedance along with intraluminal ultrasound imaging was conducted in six patients to further characterize the simultaneous esophageal contractions. Among 187 achalasia patients, 30 were type 1, 121 type 2, and 36 type 3. A total of 434 swallows evaluated in type 3 achalasia patients revealed that 95% of the swallow-induced contractions met criteria for simultaneous esophageal contraction, based on the onset of contraction. Interestingly, the peak and termination of the majority of simultaneous esophageal contractions were sequential. The HRM impedance revealed that 94% of the "simultaneous contractions" were associated with complete bolus clearance. Ultrasound image analysis revealed that baseline muscle thickness of patients in type 3 achalasia is larger than normal but the pattern of axial shortening is similar to that in normal subjects. The majority of esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia are not true simultaneous contractions because the peak and termination of contraction are sequential and they are associated with complete bolus clearance.

  2. [Laparoscopic Heller myotomy for esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Luis; Butte, Jean Michel; Pimentel, Fernando; Escalona, Alex; Pérez, Gustavo; Crovari, Fernando; Guzmán, Sergio; Llanos, Osvaldo

    2007-04-01

    Achalasia is characterized by an incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. The best treatment is surgical and the laparoscopic approach may have good results. To assess the results of laparoscopic Heller myotomy among patients with achalasia. Prospective study of patients subjected to a laparoscopic Heller myotomy between 1995 and 2004. Clinical features, early and late operative results were assessed. Twenty seven patients aged 12 to 74 years (12 females) were operated. All had disphagia lasting for a mean of 32 months. Mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure ranged from 18 to 85 mmHg. Eight patients received other treatments prior to surgery but symptoms persisted or reappeared. The preoperative clinical score was 7. No patient died and no procedure had to be converted to open surgery. In a follow up of 21 to 131 months, all patients are satisfied with the surgical results and the postoperative clinical score is 1. Only one patient with a mega esophagus maintained a clinical score of six. In this series of patients, laparoscopic Heller myotomy was an effective and safe treatment for esophageal achalasia.

  3. Treatment of achalasia in the era of high-resolution manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresan, Francesco; Ioannou, Alexandros; Azzaroli, Francesco; Bazzoli, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary motility disorder characterized by impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and absence of esophageal peristalsis leading to impaired bolus transit, manifested with symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation, retrosternal pain, and weight loss. The standard diagnostic tool is esophageal manometry which demonstrates incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and impaired esophageal peristalsis. Recently, a new advanced technique, high-resolution manometry (HRM) with the addition of pressure topography plotting, using multiple sensors to capture the manometric data as a spatial continuum, allows a detailed pressure recording of the esophageal motility. This technique, currently the gold standard for the diagnosis of achalasia, has led to a subclassification of three manometric types that seem to have different responsiveness to treatment. Because its pathogenesis is as yet unknown, achalasia treatment options are not curative. Type II achalasia patients respond better to treatment compared to those with types I and III. Low-risk patients with type I or II achalasia have good outcome with both graded pneumatic dilatations and laparoscopic Heller myotomy, while type III achalasia patients respond better to laparoscopic Heller myotomy. Although, type III achalasia patients responds less in comparison to types I and II to laparoscopic Heller myotomy. Peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising new technique but long-term follow-up studies for its safety and efficacy must be performed. This article reviews the current therapeutic options, highlighting the impact of HRM to predict the outcome and the new insights for the treatment of achalasia. PMID:26130022

  4. 2011 update on esophageal achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Keng-Liang; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chi-Sin

    2012-01-01

    There have been some breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal achalasia in the past few years. First, the introduction of high-resolution manometry with pressure topography plotting as a new diagnostic tool has made it possible to classify achalasia into three subtypes. The most favorable outcome is predicted for patients receiving treatment for type II achalasia (achalasia with compression). Patients with typeI(classic achalasia) and type III achalasia (spastic achalasia) e...

  5. Esophageal Resection for End-Stage Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiolfi, Alberto; Asti, Emanuele; Bonitta, Gianluca; Siboni, Stefano; Bonavina, Luigi

    2018-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation loss and of peristalsis in the esophageal body. Endoscopic balloon dilation and laparoscopic surgical myotomy have been established as initial treatment modalities. Indications and outcomes of esophagectomy in the management of end-stage achalasia are less defined. A literature search was conducted to identify all reports on esophagectomy for end-stage achalasia between 1987 and 2017. MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were consulted matching the terms "achalasia," "end-stage achalasia," "esophagectomy," and "esophageal resection." Seventeen articles met the inclusion criteria and 1422 patients were included in this narrative review. Most of the patients had previous multiple endoscopic and/or surgical treatments. Esophagectomy was performed through a transthoracic (74%) or a transhiatal (26%) approach. A thoracoscopic approach was used in a minority of patients and seemed to be safe and effective. In 95 per cent of patients, the stomach was used as an esophageal substitute. The mean postoperative morbidity rate was 27.1 per cent and the mortality rate 2.1 per cent. Symptom resolution was reported in 75 to 100 per cent of patients over a mean follow-up of 43 months. Only five series including 195 patients assessed the long-term follow-up (>5 years) after reconstruction with gastric or colon conduits, and the results seem similar. Esophagectomy for end-stage achalasia is safe and effective in tertiary referral centers. A thoracoscopic approach is a feasible and safe alternative to thoracotomy and may replace the transhiatal route in the future.

  6. Clinical management of achalasia: current state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krill JT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Joseph T Krill, Rishi D Naik, Michael F Vaezi Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Center for Swallowing and Esophageal Disorders, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Achalasia is a primary disorder of esophageal motility. It classically presents with dysphagia to both solids and liquids but may be accompanied by regurgitation and chest pain. The gold standard for the diagnosis of achalasia is esophageal motility testing with manometry, which often reveals aperistalsis of the esophageal body and incomplete lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. The diagnosis is aided by complimentary tests, such as esophagogastroduodenoscopy and contrast radiography. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy is indicated to rule out mimickers of the disease known as “pseudoachalasia” (eg, malignancy. Endoscopic appearance of a dilated esophagus with retained food or saliva and a puckered lower esophageal sphincter should raise suspicion for achalasia. Additionally, barium esophagography may reveal a dilated esophagus with a distal tapering giving it a “bird’s beak” appearance. Multiple therapeutic modalities aid in the management of achalasia, the decision of which depends on operative risk factors. Conventional treatments include medical therapy, botulinum toxin injection, pneumatic dilation, and Heller myotomy. The last two are defined as the most definitive treatment options. New emerging therapies include peroral endoscopic myotomy, placement of self-expanding metallic stents, and endoscopic sclerotherapy. Keywords: achalasia, pseudoachalasia, pneumatic dilation, Heller myotomy, botulinum toxin injection, peroral endoscopic myotomy

  7. First Identified Case in Literature: Association of Achalasia and Celiac Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Bucak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease has been shown to cause problems related to gastrointestinal system motility such as reduction of the esophageal sphincter pressure and prolongation of gastric emptying time. Achalasia disease is a motor disorder that is charac¬terized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and by incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Association of achalasia and celiac diseases has not been reported yet. Our patient with growth and developmental retardation had vomiting effects which lasted for 3 years. Celiac disease was diagnosed serologically and histopathologically in our patient; we determined achalasia disease with esophagoscopic examination, upper gastrointestinal system contrast study, and esophageal manometer. Esophageal balloon dilatation was applied. This case is presented because of the interesting association between celiac disease and achalasia disease.

  8. Endoscopic approaches to treatment of achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Iqbal, Shahzad; Grendell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy for achalasia is directed at disrupting or weakening the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The two most commonly utilized endoscopic interventions are large balloon pneumatic dilation (PD) and botulinum toxin injection (BTI). These interventions have been extensively scrutinized and compared with each other as well as with surgical disruption (myotomy) of the LES. PD is generally more effective in improving dysphagia in achalasia than BTI, with the latter reserved for infirm older people, and PD may approach treatment results attained with myotomy. However, PD may need to be repeated. Small balloon dilation and endoscopic stent placement for achalasia have only been used in select centers. Per oral endoscopic myotomy is a newer endoscopic modality that will likely change the treatment paradigm for achalasia. It arose from the field of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery and represents a scarless endoscopic approach to Heller myotomy. This is a technique that requires extensive training and preparation and thus there should be rigorous accreditation and monitoring of outcomes to ensure safety and efficacy. PMID:23503707

  9. Update on the endoscopic treatments for achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Dushant S; Wang, Andrew Y

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is the most common primary motility disorder of the esophagus and presents as dysphagia to solids and liquids. It is characterized by impaired deglutitive relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. High-resolution manometry allows for definitive diagnosis and classification of achalasia, with type II being the most responsive to therapy. Since no cure for achalasia exists, early diagnosis and treatment of the disease is critical to prevent end-stage disease. The central tenant of diagnosis is to first rule out mechanical obstruction due to stricture or malignancy, which is often accomplished by endoscopic and fluoroscopic examination. Therapeutic options include pneumatic dilation (PD), surgical myotomy, and endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin injection. Heller myotomy and PD are more efficacious than pharmacologic therapies and should be considered first-line treatment options. Per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a minimally-invasive endoscopic therapy that might be as effective as surgical myotomy when performed by a trained and experienced endoscopist, although long-term data are lacking. Overall, therapy should be individualized to each patient’s clinical situation and based upon his or her risk tolerance, operative candidacy, and life expectancy. In instances of therapeutic failure or symptom recurrence re-treatment is possible and can include PD or POEM of the wall opposite the site of prior myotomy. Patients undergoing therapy for achalasia require counseling, as the goal of therapy is to improve swallowing and prevent late manifestations of the disease rather than to restore normal swallowing, which is unfortunately impossible. PMID:27818585

  10. Genetic variation in the lymphotoxin-α (LTA)/tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) locus as a risk factor for idiopathic achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Mira M.; Lambrechts, Diether; Becker, Jessica; Cleynen, Isabelle; Tack, Jan; Vigo, Ana G.; Ruiz de León, Antonio; Urcelay, Elena; Pérez de la Serna, Julio; Rohof, Wout; Annese, Vito; Latiano, Anna; Palmieri, Orazio; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mueller, Michaela; Lang, Hauke; Fumagalli, Uberto; Laghi, Luigi; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Cuomo, Rosario; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Nöthen, Markus M.; Vermeire, Séverine; Knapp, Michael; Gockel, Ines; Schumacher, Johannes; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic achalasia is a rare motor disorder of the oesophagus characterised by neuronal loss at the lower oesophageal sphincter. Achalasia is generally accepted as a multifactorial disorder with various genetic and environmental factors being risk-associated. Since genetic factors predisposing to

  11. Esophageal achalasia: current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-05-27

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unknown origin, characterized by lack of peristalsis and by incomplete or absent relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing. The goal of treatment is to eliminate the functional obstruction at the level of the gastroesophageal junction Areas covered: This comprehensive review will evaluate the current literature, illustrating the diagnostic evaluation and providing an evidence-based treatment algorithm for this disease Expert commentary: Today we have three very effective therapeutic modalities to treat patients with achalasia - pneumatic dilatation, per-oral endoscopic myotomy and laparoscopic Heller myotomy with fundoplication. Treatment should be tailored to the individual patient, in centers where a multidisciplinary approach is available. Esophageal resection should be considered as a last resort for patients who have failed prior therapeutic attempts.

  12. A case report of achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarumpaet, F.; Dairi, L.

    2018-03-01

    Achalasia is characterized by esophageal nonperistaltic contraction and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. The most common symptom are dysphagia, regurgitation, and heartburn. A 48 years old male was admitted into HAM General Hospital Medan with achief complaint of dysphagia since adulthood. The patient had to drink a lot of water to help swallow solid or soft food. Complaint worsened in the last three months followed by odynophagia, nausea, and vomiting undigested, retained food. The patient also complained about heartburn and was previously diagnosed with a variant of angina pectoris but his symptoms didn’t improve with medication. The patient had a history of weight loss but no anorexia, no prior history of corrosive ingestion. The patient was an active smoker. Physical examination revealed no abnormality. Oesophagogram showed dilated distal esophagus with rat tail appearance. Gastroscopy revealed dilatation on the lower third of the esophagus. Computed Tomography revealed dilatation of distal esophagus. Based on the results of the exams, we concluded the diagnosis as achalasia. The patient was treated with calcium channel blocker and proton pump inhibitor. The patient showed clinical improvement after treated and was discharged. The patient was planned for once a month follow up in the outpatient clinic.

  13. Endoscopic myotomy of the cricopharyngeal muscle with CO2 laser surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takes, R.P.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Marres, H.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cricopharyngeal dysfunction may lead to severe dysphagia and aspiration. Several treatment modalities are available, such as external myotomy of the muscle, dilatation, and local infiltration with botulinum toxin. Recently, endoscopic transmucosal myotomies using a CO2 laser have been

  14. Achalasia 5 years following Roux-en-y gastric bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehyar Hefazi Torghabeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oesophageal achalasia is a rare, but serious condition in which the motility of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES is inhibited. This disorder of idiopathic aetiology complicates the peristaltic function and relaxation of the LES that may cause symptoms such as dysphagia, epigastric pain, and regurgitation of an obstructed food. The following case describes achalasia in a patient 5 years following a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB. The patient underwent a laparoscopic Heller myotomy without a fundoplication. Although achalasia seems to be a rare occurrence in obese patients, this is the third case documented in a patient who previously had an RYGB. The role of performing a fundoplication in these patients remains to be elucidated.

  15. Esophageal Achalasia: Pathophysiology, Clinical Presentation, and Diagnostic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Neto, Rafael M L; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2018-04-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax in response to swallowing. These abnormalities lead to impaired emptying of food from the esophagus into the stomach with resulting food stasis. Most patients experience severe dysphagia, and regurgitation can lead to aspiration and respiratory problems. Consequently, the quality of life of patients affected by achalasia is severely impacted. A thorough evaluation with upper endoscopy, barium swallow, and esophageal manometry is mandatory to establish the diagnosis and plan the optimal treatment. In selected patients, an ambulatory pH monitoring is recommended to distinguish between gastroesophageal reflux disease and achalasia.

  16. Achalasia in the elderly patient: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana B. Schechter

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder secondary to the degeneration of ganglion cells of the inhibitory intramural myenteric plexus. It affects both sexes similarly and has two peaks of incidence, one in the 3rd to 4th decades of life and the other after 60 years of age. The effect of age on esophageal motility of patients with achalasia is not well known. Studies have shown that healthy older people, when compared to the young, have: a a lower number of ganglion cells in the intramural myenteric plexus; b a reduced normal relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter; and c a reduced esophageal peristalsis. Thus, as both age and achalasia can produce comparable degenerative changes in the intramural myenteric plexus, it is possible that advanced age could be an important factor in enhancing the clinical and manometric abnormalities commonly found in patients with achalasia. OBJECTIVES: To compare the clinical, radiological and manometric findings in young as compared to elderly (>60 years old achalasia patients. METHODS: A retrospective study of a group of patients with untreated achalasia separated into young and elderly patients. Demographic, clinical, serology for Chagas' disease, radiological and manometric data were compared between these groups. The level of significance was P<0.05. RESULTS: The study included 105 patients, 52 young (25 M/27 F, mean age 40 years old and 53 elderly (21 M/32 F, mean age 70 years old. The elderly group had a higher prevalence of Chagas' disease (P = 0.004 and a lower pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter [26.4 mm Hg vs 31.9 mm Hg] P = 0.001, a difference that persisted when analyzed only elderly and young patients with idiopathic achalasia. Younger patients had a higher prevalence of heartburn (P = 0.001 and chest pain (P = 0.012 than the elderly. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients with achalasia had a lower esophageal sphincter pressure than the young, even when we excluded patients with

  17. Achalasia Carcinoma Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Makmun, Dadang

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of carcinoma of the esophagus in a 58 years old woman with achalasia, who has been diagnosed since 30 years ago, which initiated by surgical treatment (myotomy) and the symptoms recurred since 3 years ago. According to the progress of the disease, Malignancy was strongly suspected due to prolonged stasis and mucosal irritation caused by achalasia (achalasia carcinoma sequence). Because of these contributing factors for the development of serious complications such as Malignan...

  18. Clinical management of achalasia: current state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, Joseph T; Naik, Rishi D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary disorder of esophageal motility. It classically presents with dysphagia to both solids and liquids but may be accompanied by regurgitation and chest pain. The gold standard for the diagnosis of achalasia is esophageal motility testing with manometry, which often reveals aperistalsis of the esophageal body and incomplete lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. The diagnosis is aided by complimentary tests, such as esophagogastroduodenoscopy and contrast radiography. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy is indicated to rule out mimickers of the disease known as “pseudoachalasia” (eg, malignancy). Endoscopic appearance of a dilated esophagus with retained food or saliva and a puckered lower esophageal sphincter should raise suspicion for achalasia. Additionally, barium esophagography may reveal a dilated esophagus with a distal tapering giving it a “bird’s beak” appearance. Multiple therapeutic modalities aid in the management of achalasia, the decision of which depends on operative risk factors. Conventional treatments include medical therapy, botulinum toxin injection, pneumatic dilation, and Heller myotomy. The last two are defined as the most definitive treatment options. New emerging therapies include peroral endoscopic myotomy, placement of self-expanding metallic stents, and endoscopic sclerotherapy. PMID:27110134

  19. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Parkman, Henry P

    2016-09-13

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification. Potential treatments include drugs, endoscopic botulinum toxin injection, balloon dilation, traditional surgery (usually laparoscopic Heller myotomy; LHM), and a novel, less invasive, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy termed peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first human POEM was performed in 2008, with the first publication appearing in 2010 and evidence now rapidly accumulating showing POEM to be comparable to traditional surgery in terms of clinical success and radiologic and manometric post-therapy outcomes. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of achalasia with particular emphasis on the recent developments of HRM and POEM, which arguably represent the most important advances in the field since the advent of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in the 1990s. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Esophageal achalasia in adolescence - two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Vaz Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Achalasia is a rare disorder, particularly in pediatrics, characterized by esophageal aperistalsis and inadequate relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Its etiology remains unclear. Cases: We describe two adolescents with dysphagia for solids and liquids, vomiting, weight loss and nocturnal cough for a few months. Initially it was considered to be an eating disorder, and the diagnosis of achalasia was reached later by esophageal manometry in one case and by intraoperative biopsy in another. The patients were submitted to Heller myotomy with an antireflux procedure, laparoscopically in one case, and by laparotomy in another, both with a favorable outcome. Discussion/Conclusions: We emphasize the rarity and diagnostic challenge of these cases. The nonspecific symptoms often lead to the diagnosis of an eating disorder, delaying the correct treatment. If symptoms persist achalasia must be considered and the esophageal manometry is the diagnostic test of choice. The gold standard in treatment is surgical, and we highlight the effectiveness of the techniques applied.

  1. Severe Recurrent Achalasia Cardia Responding to Treatment of Severe Autoimmune Acquired Haemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Al-Jafar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired haemophilia A and severe acquired achalasia are both very rare conditions with unknown aetiology. Haemophilia A is a haemorrhagic disease induced by deficiency or malfunction of coagulation factor VIII. Congenital haemophilia is an inherited disease transmitted by the mother through X-linked inheritance and primarily affects males. However, acquired haemophilia A is a serious, sudden-onset, autoimmune disease that affects either sex. In addition, achalasia is a disease of the oesophagus caused by abnormal function of the nerves and muscles. It causes swallowing difficulties due to the inability of the lower oesophageal sphincter to relax during swallowing, leading to dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain. In this report, we describe the case of a patient with severe, newly diagnosed, acquired haemophilia A with long-standing, recurrent achalasia; the achalasia had recurred 3 times despite complete and proper surgical fixation. Acquired haemophilia A is treated with immunosuppressive therapy. High-dose steroid therapy was administered for 7 months, during which the patient responded well; moreover, the achalasia did not recur for more than 2 years. The response of the achalasia to immunosuppressive therapy suggests that achalasia may be an autoimmune disorder and that there may be an association between both diseases. The findings of the present case suggest that achalasia may favourably respond to steroid therapy as a first-line treatment prior to surgery.

  2. Achalasia as a complication of bulimia nervosa: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem O. Kutuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oesophageal achalasia is a medical condition characterised by oesophageal aperistalsis, an increased resting pressure with partial or incomplete relaxation of the lower oesophageal sphincter. Bulimia nervosa (BN is an eating disorder manifested by binge eating attacks followed by recurrent inappropriate compensatory behaviours, such as self-induced vomiting and excessive exercise. Dysphagia, regurgitation, vomiting, retrosternal pain, heartburn, weight loss, avoidance of eating, consumption of large amount of liquids and aberrant eating behaviours are symptoms of both achalasia and BN. Owing to these common signs and symptoms, oesophageal achalasia can be misdiagnosed as an eating disorder. In addition, oesophageal achalasia can occur as a complication of BN. It is often difficult to distinguish organic and psychological vomiting or comorbidity because of overlapping of the symptoms. Case report: We report the case of a patient who developed oesophageal achalasia following severe, repetitive vomiting as a complication of BN. Conclusion: We want to raise awareness regarding the development of a medical illness in the presence of a psychiatric disorder. Importantly, physicians should have a fundamental knowledge of these two diseases regarding their clinical patterns to differentially diagnose one or both disorders as quickly as possible.

  3. Finding the Right Treatment for Achalasia Treatment: Risks, Efficacy, Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonen, An; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2016-12-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder of the esophagus that is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and a failure of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to relax upon swallowing. The defective relaxation leads to symptoms of dysphagia for solids and liquids, regurgitation, aspiration, chest pain, and weight loss. Achalasia is believed to result from a selective loss of enteric inhibitory neurons, most likely due to an autoimmune phenomenon in genetic susceptible individuals. As there is no curative treatment for achalasia, treatment is confined to disruption of the LES to improve bolus passage. The two most commonly used treatment modalities available are the endoscopic pneumodilation (PD) and the surgical laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM). A recent European randomized controlled trial showed that both treatment modalities have comparable success rates after a follow-up of at least 5 years. In view of these data, both treatments can be used as an initial therapy in achalasia and the choice should be based on the expertise available. Recently, a new endoscopic technique, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), has been introduced with excellent short-term success rates. However, longer follow-up and data from randomized controlled trials are needed before accepting this technique as a new treatment option for achalasia in clinical practice.

  4. Esophageal motility after peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Li, Meng; Lu, Bin; Meng, Lina; Fan, Yihong; Bao, Haibiao

    2016-05-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been introduced as a novel endoscopic treatment for achalasia. The aim of this work is to assess the changes in esophageal motility caused by POEM in patients with achalasia. Forty-one patients with achalasia underwent POEM from September 2012 to November 2014. Esophageal motility of all patients was evaluated preoperatively and 1 month after POEM utilizing high-resolution manometry, which was performed with ten water swallows, ten steamed bread swallows, and multiple rapid swallows (MRS). In single swallows, including liquid swallows and bread swallows, all the parameters of lower esophagus sphincter resting pressure (LESP), 4-s integrated relaxation pressure (4sIRP), and intra-bolus pressure (IBP) were decreased between pre- and post-POEM patients (all p 0.05), but increased in subtype I (subtype I: p > 0.05). In liquid swallows, the Eckardt score of subtype II patients decreased with DCI, and distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude after POEM was significantly lower compared with those showing increased values of those two parameters (p achalasia patients. POEM reduces LES pressure in achalasia, and partly restores esophageal motility. POEM displayed varying effect on esophageal motility in patients with different patterns of swallowing. In addition, the changes in parameters associated with esophageal peristalsis correlated with decreases in Eckardt score.

  5. Esophageal achalasia in children — clinical case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivantsiv-Griga I.S.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Esophageal achalasia is a primary disorder of the motor function characterized by the increased pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter, impairment of its reflex relaxation and inhibited peristalsis of the esophagus which, in turn, leads to functional obstruction of the distal section of the esophagus. Goal. Improvement of early diagnosis and treatment outcomes of esophageal achalasia in children. Materials and methods. Clinical observation, laboratory and instrumental examination of a 10 year old child with esophageal achalasia. Results. The results of clinical data and laboratory and instrumental examination methods were analized and the diagnosis of esophageal achalasia in a 10 year old male was confirmed. Conclusions. The described clinical case provided an opportunity for a thorough analysis of the clinical aspects of diagnosis and treatment of the given pathology. Esophageal achalasia is a rare pathology in children and has an atypical clinical manifestation; therefore, primary care physicians should study this disorder in detail and make a great effort to diagnose it in a timely manner.

  6. Clinical remission following endoscopic placement of retrievable, fully covered metal stents in patients with esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y; Dai, Y-M; Wan, X-J

    2014-01-01

    Metal stents may represent an alternative therapy in the treatment of achalasia. We therefore evaluated the effectiveness of retrievable, fully covered metal stents in patients with achalasia. Fifty-nine patients with achalasia were treated with retrievable, fully covered metal stents. Symptoms using a global symptom score (0-10), lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure, LES relaxation, and simultaneous contraction of the esophagus were analyzed before and 1 week and 1 month after intervention. Complications and treatment outcomes were followed up at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postoperatively. Stent placement was successful, and clinical symptoms resolved (P treatment in patients with achalasia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  7. The early efficacy of Heller myotomy in the treatment of Iranian patients with achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Saeed; Forotan, Mojgan; Nikzamir, Abdolrahim; Zomorody, Saeedeh; Jahani-Sherafat, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of Heller myotomy for the treatment of achalasia in a referral center in Tehran, and investigate the clinical characteristics, manometric results and treatment responses among three achalasia subtypes in Iranian patients. Esophageal achalasia is an unusual swallowing disorder, characterized by high pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) on swallowing, failure relaxation of the LES and the absence of peristalsis in esophageal. In this cross sectional study, clinical symptom and esophageal manometry before and 2 months after treating with Heller myotomy in 20 patients with achalasia who were referred to Taleghani Hospital, Tehran, in 2013 were evaluated. Patients' demographic, clinical features and response to treatment were analyzed using SPSS software (version 20, Chicago, IL, USA). All the diagnostic criteria measured after the treatment were significantly different (PHeller myotomy is highly effective in relieving dysphasia in patients with achalasia. Also, type II achalasia is the most common subtype of achalasia with a better response to Heller myotomy compared to the other types.

  8. Functional restoration of the esophagus after peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Cheal Wung; Youn, Young Hoon; Chung, Hyunsoo; Lee, Yong Chan; Park, Hyojin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a new efficacious treatment option for achalasia. We propose to define “esophageal remodeling” as the functional restoration of the esophagus that involves decreased lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, recovery of esophageal body peristalsis, and reduction of luminal diameter. The aim of this study was to investigate “esophageal remodeling” after POEM for achalasia. Materials and methods We analyzed data from a prospectively collected database of POEM subjects, which included preoperative and 2-month postoperative Eckardt symptom scores, and results from esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM) and barium esophagogram (BE). We recruited 23 patients (13 male; mean age: 53.9 years) whose preoperative and postoperative HRM and BE results were available, from among 30 patients with achalasia who underwent POEM at two institutions between July 2013 and December 2015. Results All patients achieved clinical treatment success (Eckardt score≤3). Partial recovery of esophageal body peristalsis was noted in 1/5 patients with type I (20%), 6/11 with type II (54.5%), and 7/7 with type III (100%) achalasia after POEM. Pan-esophageal pressurization disappeared after POEM in 10/11 type II achalasia patients. The average diameter of the esophageal body after POEM was significantly decreased in all types of achalasia. Conclusion POEM provided excellent clinical symptomatic relief and esophageal remodeling in terms of restoration of peristalsis and reduction in diameter of the esophageal body, especially in patients with type III achalasia. PMID:28542509

  9. Functional restoration of the esophagus after peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Cheal Wung; Youn, Young Hoon; Chung, Hyunsoo; Lee, Yong Chan; Park, Hyojin

    2017-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a new efficacious treatment option for achalasia. We propose to define "esophageal remodeling" as the functional restoration of the esophagus that involves decreased lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, recovery of esophageal body peristalsis, and reduction of luminal diameter. The aim of this study was to investigate "esophageal remodeling" after POEM for achalasia. We analyzed data from a prospectively collected database of POEM subjects, which included preoperative and 2-month postoperative Eckardt symptom scores, and results from esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM) and barium esophagogram (BE). We recruited 23 patients (13 male; mean age: 53.9 years) whose preoperative and postoperative HRM and BE results were available, from among 30 patients with achalasia who underwent POEM at two institutions between July 2013 and December 2015. All patients achieved clinical treatment success (Eckardt score≤3). Partial recovery of esophageal body peristalsis was noted in 1/5 patients with type I (20%), 6/11 with type II (54.5%), and 7/7 with type III (100%) achalasia after POEM. Pan-esophageal pressurization disappeared after POEM in 10/11 type II achalasia patients. The average diameter of the esophageal body after POEM was significantly decreased in all types of achalasia. POEM provided excellent clinical symptomatic relief and esophageal remodeling in terms of restoration of peristalsis and reduction in diameter of the esophageal body, especially in patients with type III achalasia.

  10. Focal achalasia – case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUTUIAN, RADU

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary smooth muscle motility disorder specified by aperistalsis of the tubular esophagus in combination with a poorly relaxing and occasionally hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (LES). These changes occur secondary to the destruction of the neural network coordinating esophageal peristalsis and LES relaxation (plexus myentericus). There are limited data on segmental involvement of the esophagus in adults. We report on the case of a 54-year-old man who presented initially with complete aperistalsis limited to the distal esophagus. After a primary good response to BoTox-infiltration of the distal esophagus the patient relapsed two years later. The manometric recordings documented now a progression of the disease with a poorly relaxing hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and complete aperistalsis of the tubular esophagus (type III achalasia according to the Chicago 3.0 classification system). This paper also reviews diagnostic findings (including high resolution manometry, CT scan, barium esophagram, upper endoscopy and upper endoscopic ultrasound data) in patients with achalasia and summarizes the therapeutic options (including pneumatic balloon dilatation, botulinum toxin injection, surgical or endoscopic myotomy). PMID:29440962

  11. High-resolution manometry findings in patients with achalasia and massive dilated megaesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, M A; Andolfi, C; Herbella, F A M; Patti, M G

    2017-05-01

    Achalasia may present in a non-advanced or an advanced (end stage) stage based on the degree of esophageal dilatation. Manometric parameters and esophageal caliber may be prognostic for the outcome of treatment. The correlation between manometry and disease stage has not been yet fully studied. This study aims to describe high-resolution manometry findings in patients with achalasia and massive dilated megaesophagus. Eighteen patients (mean age 61 years, 55% females) with achalasia and massive dilated megaesophagus, as defined by a maximum esophageal dilatation >10 cm at the barium esophagram, were studied. Achalasia was considered secondary to Chagas' disease in 14 (78%) of the patients and idiopathic in the remaining. All patients underwent high-resolution manometry. Upper esophageal sphincter was hypotonic and had impaired relaxation in the majority of patients. Aperistalsis was seen in all patients with an equal distribution of Chicago type I and type II. No type III was noticed. Lower esophageal sphincter did not have a characteristic manometric pattern. In 50% of the cases, the manometry catheter was not able to reach the stomach. Our results did not show a manometric pattern in patients with achalasia and massive dilated esophagus. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Pathogenesis of achalasia cardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Singh, Renu

    2012-06-28

    Achalasia cardia is one of the common causes of motor dysphagia. Though the disease was first described more than 300 years ago, exact pathogenesis of this condition still remains enigmatic. Pathophysiologically, achalasia cardia is caused by loss of inhibitory ganglion in the myenteric plexus of the esophagus. In the initial stage, degeneration of inhibitory nerves in the esophagus results in unopposed action of excitatory neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, resulting in high amplitude non-peristaltic contractions (vigorous achalasia); progressive loss of cholinergic neurons over time results in dilation and low amplitude simultaneous contractions in the esophageal body (classic achalasia). Since the initial description, several studies have attempted to explore initiating agents that may cause the disease, such as viral infection, other environmental factors, autoimmunity, and genetic factors. Though Chagas disease, which mimics achalasia, is caused by an infective agent, available evidence suggests that infection may not be an independent cause of primary achalasia. A genetic basis for achalasia is supported by reports showing occurrence of disease in monozygotic twins, siblings and other first-degree relatives and occurrence in association with other genetic diseases such as Down's syndrome and Parkinson's disease. Polymorphisms in genes encoding for nitric oxide synthase, receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide, interleukin 23 and the ALADIN gene have been reported. However, studies on larger numbers of patients and controls from different ethnic groups are needed before definite conclusions can be obtained. Currently, the disease is believed to be multi-factorial, with autoimmune mechanisms triggered by infection in a genetically predisposed individual leading to degeneration of inhibitory ganglia in the wall of the esophagus.

  13. Pathogenesis of achalasia cardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Singh, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Achalasia cardia is one of the common causes of motor dysphagia. Though the disease was first described more than 300 years ago, exact pathogenesis of this condition still remains enigmatic. Pathophysiologically, achalasia cardia is caused by loss of inhibitory ganglion in the myenteric plexus of the esophagus. In the initial stage, degeneration of inhibitory nerves in the esophagus results in unopposed action of excitatory neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, resulting in high amplitude non-peristaltic contractions (vigorous achalasia); progressive loss of cholinergic neurons over time results in dilation and low amplitude simultaneous contractions in the esophageal body (classic achalasia). Since the initial description, several studies have attempted to explore initiating agents that may cause the disease, such as viral infection, other environmental factors, autoimmunity, and genetic factors. Though Chagas disease, which mimics achalasia, is caused by an infective agent, available evidence suggests that infection may not be an independent cause of primary achalasia. A genetic basis for achalasia is supported by reports showing occurrence of disease in monozygotic twins, siblings and other first-degree relatives and occurrence in association with other genetic diseases such as Down’s syndrome and Parkinson’s disease. Polymorphisms in genes encoding for nitric oxide synthase, receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide, interleukin 23 and the ALADIN gene have been reported. However, studies on larger numbers of patients and controls from different ethnic groups are needed before definite conclusions can be obtained. Currently, the disease is believed to be multi-factorial, with autoimmune mechanisms triggered by infection in a genetically predisposed individual leading to degeneration of inhibitory ganglia in the wall of the esophagus. PMID:22791940

  14. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia: An American perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Iqbal, Shahzad; Grendell, James H; Stavropoulos, Stavros N

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is an uncommon esophageal motility disorder characterized by the selective loss of enteric neurons leading to absence of peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a novel modality for the treatment of achalasia performed by gastroenterologists and surgeons. It represents a natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy. POEM has the minimal invasiveness of an endoscopic procedure that can duplicate results of the surgical Heller myotomy. POEM is conceptually similar to a surgical myotomy without the inherent external incisions and post-operative care associated with surgery. Initial high success and low complications rates promise a great future for this technique. In fact, POEM has been successfully performed on patients with end-stage achalasia as an initial treatment reserving esophagectomy for those without good response. The volume of POEMs performed worldwide has grown exponentially. In fact, surgeons who have performed Heller myotomy have embraced POEM as the preferred intervention for achalasia. However, the niche of POEM remains to be defined and long term results are awaited. We describe our experience with POEM having performed the first POEM outside of Japan in 2009, the evolution of our technique, and give our perspective on its future. PMID:24044040

  15. Esophageal Stasis on a Timed Barium Esophagogram Predicts Recurrent Symptoms in Patients With Long-Standing Achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O.; Lei, A.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In achalasia, early recognition of the need for retreatment is of crucial importance to reduce morbidity and long-term complications such as esophageal decompensation. In clinical practice, symptoms and parameters of esophageal function including lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure

  16. Oesophageal food impaction in achalasia treated with Coca-Cola and nifedipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumi, Andriani; Panos, Marios Zenon

    2010-01-01

    Achalasia is characterised by the loss of peristaltic movement in the distal oesophagus and failure of the lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation, which results in impaired oesophageal emptying. We report a case of a 92-year-old frail woman with a history of achalasia, who presented with acute oesophageal obstruction due to impaction of a large amount of food material. She was treated successfully with nifedipine, in combination with Coca-Cola (original product, not sugar free), so avoiding the risks associated with repeated endoscopic intubation and piecemeal removal of the oesophageal content.

  17. The Spectrum of Achalasia: Lessons From Studies of Pathophysiology and High-Resolution Manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter J.; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution manometry and recently described analysis algorithms, summarized in the Chicago Classification, have increased the recognition of achalasia. It has become apparent that the cardinal feature of achalasia, impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, can occur in several disease phenotypes: without peristalsis, with premature (spastic) distal esophageal contractions, with panesophageal pressurization, or with peristalsis. Any of these phenotypes could indicate achalasia; however, without a disease-specific biomarker, no manometric pattern is absolutely specific. Laboratory studies indicate that achalasia is an autoimmune disease in which esophageal myenteric neurons are attacked in a cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune response against an uncertain antigen. This autoimmune response could be related to infection of genetically predisposed subjects with herpes simplex virus 1, although there is substantial heterogeneity among patients. At one end of the spectrum is complete aganglionosis in patients with end-stage or fulminant disease. At the opposite extreme is type III (spastic) achalasia, which has no demonstrated neuronal loss but only impaired inhibitory postganglionic neuron function; it is often associated with accentuated contractility and could be mediated by cytokine-induced alterations in gene expression. Distinct from these extremes is progressive plexopathy, which likely arises from achalasia with preserved peristalsis and then develops into type II achalasia and then type I achalasia. Variations in its extent and rate of progression are likely related to the intensity of the cytotoxic T-cell assault on the myenteric plexus. Moving forward, we need to integrate the knowledge we have gained into treatment paradigms that are specific for individual phenotypes of achalasia and away from the one-size-fits-all approach. PMID:23973923

  18. Endoscope-guided pneumatic dilation for treatment of esophageal achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Wu, Keng-Liang; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Tai, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chi-Sin

    2010-01-01

    Pneumatic dilation (PD) is considered to be the first line nonsurgical therapy for achalasia. The principle of the procedure is to weaken the lower esophageal sphincter by tearing its muscle fibers by generating radial force. The endoscope-guided procedure is done without fluoroscopic control. Clinicians usually use a low-compliance balloon such as Rigiflex dilator to perform endoscope-guided PD for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. It has the advantage of determining mucosal injury during the dilation process, so that a repeat endoscopy is not needed to assess the mucosal tearing. Previous studies have shown that endoscope-guided PD is an efficient and safe nonsurgical therapy with results that compare well with other treatment modalities. Although the results may be promising, long-term follow-up is required in the near future. PMID:20101764

  19. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

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    Bashar S. Amr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor for association of these two rare disorders.

  20. Leiomyoma of the distal oesophagus mimicking achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idenburg, F. J.; Akkermans, L. M.; Smout, A. J.; Kooijman, C. D.; Obertop, H.

    1991-01-01

    An unusual case of a patient with symptoms suggestive of oesophageal achalasia is described. Most oesophageal tumour growths causing secondary achalasia are associated with malignant tumours. This patient had a large oesophageal leiomyoma closely mimicking achalasia. Treatment consisted of

  1. Swallowing disorders in muscular diseases: functional assessment and indications of cricopharyngeal myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Guily, J L; Périé, S; Willig, T N; Chaussade, S; Eymard, B; Angelard, B

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-four patients with an identified muscular disease were referred to our department for assessment and treatment of swallowing difficulties. Their ages ranged from 16 to 91 years (mean 59). The diagnoses were oculopharyngeal dystrophy in 17 patients, Steinert myotonic dystrophy in 6, mitochondrial myopathies in 4, polymyositis in 3, and other types in 4 patients. The main consequences of the dysphagia were weight loss (12 patients), pulmonary infections (15 patients), modified food consistency (18 patients) and non-oral feeding (3 patients). Several techniques were used to assess the different stages of deglutition: physical examination during swallowing, videofluoroscopy, pharyngoesophageal manometry, videofibroscopy of the pharynx during swallowing. Major pathological features found in the pharynx were decreased pharynx peristaltis and impaired UES relaxation. Cricopharyngeal myotomy was performed in 11 myopathic patients (median follow-up 24.9 months), while it was unnecessary, refused or contraindicated in the other patients. The procedure was successful in 8 patients whose dysphagia was dramatically improved, and failed in 3 patients. Pharyngeal perstaltis was severely impaired only in the 3 failures and was partly preserved in the improved cases. We conclude that pharyngeal function is the major prognostic factor. Cricopharyngeal myotomy is an effective treatment in those cases where cricopharyngeal dysfunction is a predominant problem or where pharyngeal peristaltis is partly impaired, since the procedure removes one obstacle. It is contraindicated when pharynx propulsion is severely impaired.

  2. 2011 update on esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Keng-Liang; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chi-Sin

    2012-04-14

    There have been some breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal achalasia in the past few years. First, the introduction of high-resolution manometry with pressure topography plotting as a new diagnostic tool has made it possible to classify achalasia into three subtypes. The most favorable outcome is predicted for patients receiving treatment for type II achalasia (achalasia with compression). Patients with type I(classic achalasia) and type III achalasia (spastic achalasia) experience a less favorable outcome. Second, the first multicenter randomized controlled trial published by the European Achalasia Trial group reported 2-year follow-up results indicating that laparoscopic Heller myotomy was not superior to endoscopic pneumatic dilation (PD). Although the follow-up period was not long enough to reach a convincing conclusion, it merits the continued use of PD as a generally available technique in gastroenterology. Third, the novel endoscopic technique peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising option for treating achalasia, but it requires increased experience and cautious evaluation. Despite all this good news, the bottom line is a real breakthrough from the basic studies to identify the actual cause of achalasia that may impede treatment success is still anticipated.

  3. Longitudinal muscle dysfunction in achalasia esophagus and its relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Hong, Su Jin; Bhargava, Valmik

    2013-04-01

    Muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Goal of this review is to summarize the role of longitudinal muscle in physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging that measure circular and longitudinal muscle contraction respectively reveal that during peristalsis 2 layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the other hand, during transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), longitudinal muscle contracts independently of circular muscle. Recent studies provide novel insights, i.e., longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus induces LES relaxation and possibly descending relaxation of the esophagus. In achalasia esophagus and other motility disorders there is discoordination between the 2 muscle layers. Longitudinal muscle contraction patterns are different in the recently described three types of achalasia identified by high-resolution manometry. Robust contraction of the longitudinal muscle in type II achalasia causes pan-esophageal pressurization and is the mechanism of whatever little esophageal emptying that take place in the absence of peristalsis and impaired LES relaxation. It may be that preserved longitudinal muscle contraction is also the reason for superior outcome to medical/surgical therapy in type II achalasia esophagus. Prolonged contractions of longitudinal muscles of the esophagus is a possible mechanism of heartburn and "angina like" pain seen in esophageal motility disorders and possibly achalasia esophagus. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are on the horizon. Neuro-pharmacologic control of circular and longitudinal muscles is different, which provides an important opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus.

  4. Achalasia following reflux disease: coincidence, consequence, or accommodation? An experience-based literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vereczkei A

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available András Vereczkei, Laura Bognár, András Papp, Örs Péter Horváth Department of Surgery, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary Abstract: Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by the defective peristaltic activity of the esophageal body and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter due to the degeneration of the inhibitory neurons in the myenteric plexus of the esophageal wall. The histopathological and pathophysiological changes in achalasia have been well described. However, the exact etiological factors leading to the disease still remain unclear. Currently, achalasia is believed to be a multifactorial disease, involving both extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Based on our experience and the review of literature, we believe that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD might be one of the triggering factors leading to the development of achalasia. However, it is also stated that the two diseases can simultaneously appear independently from each other. Considering the large number and routine treatment of patients with GERD and achalasia, the rare combination of the two may even remain unnoticed; thus, the analysis of larger patient groups with this entity is not feasible. In this context, we report four cases where long-standing reflux symptoms preceded the development of achalasia. A literature review of the available data is also given. We hypothesize that achalasia following the chronic acid exposure of the esophagus is not accidental but either a consequence of a chronic inflammation or a protective reaction of the organism in order to prevent aspiration and lessen reflux-related symptoms. This hypothesis awaits further clinical confirmation. Keywords: achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus, Nissen fundoplication

  5. Per-oral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM): A safe and effective treatment for achalasia in geriatric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Mondragón, Oscar Víctor; Solórzano-Pineda, Omar Michel; Blancas-Valencia, Juan Manuel; González-Martínez, Marina Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary motor disorder of the esophagus characterized by impair relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and absent of esophageal peristalsis. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy is an alternative treatment to surgical Heller myotomy in patients over 65 years old. The aim of this paper was to describe the results of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) or the treatment of achalasia in geriatric patients. We included patients over 65 years old with POEM, from retrospective cohort review, in which POEM was performed with a standardized technique in our department. 12 patients were included, the procedure was successful in 98% of patients, minor adverse events occurred without mortality. POEM is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of achalasia, the results of the study are similar to those reported in The literature.

  6. Recurrent achalasia after Heller-Toupet procedure: Laparoscopic extended redo heller myotomy and floppy Dor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golash Vishwanath

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrences of symptoms after the surgery for achalasia cardia are not uncommon. There are several causes of recurrences but the early recurrences are speculated to be secondary to incomplete myotomy and late recurrence due to fibrosis after the myotomy or megaesophagus. These recurrences can be managed by regular dilation failing which a redo surgery is indicated. Laparoscopic approach is now standard because of the obvious benefits for patients and surgeons. Extent of myotomy and addition of fundoplication are debatable issue in the management of achalasia cardia but evidence suggests that some kind of fundoplication would be necessary after the complete division of lower esophageal sphincter. We present our experience in a case of recurrent achalasia, secondary to incomplete myotomy managed laparoscopically by extended myotomy and a floppy anterior fundoplication. Patient is asymptomatic six months after the surgery and radiologically there is free passage of barium in the stomach.

  7. Childhood achalasia: A comprehensive review of disease, diagnosis and therapeutic management

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, Ashanti L; Petrosyan, Mikael; Kane, Timothy D

    2014-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by failure of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and is rare in children. The most common symptoms are vomiting, dysphagia, regurgitation, and weight loss. Definitive diagnosis is made with barium swallow study and esophageal manometry. In adults, endoscopic biopsy is recommended to exclude malignancy however; it is not as often indicated in children. Medical management often fails resulting in recurrent symptoms and the ulti...

  8. [Effects of peroral endoscopic myotomy on esophageal dynamics in patients with esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yun-shi; Li, Liang; Zhou, Ping-hong; Xu, Mei-dong; Ren, Zhong; Zhu, Bo-qun; Yao, Li-qing

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the effects of peroral endoscopic myotomy(POEM) on esophageal dynamics in patients with esophageal achalasia. From September 2011 to November 2011, 20 cases with esophageal achalasia received POEM at the Endoscopic Center in the Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University. Pre-operation esophageal dynamics of all the patients were evaluated by high resolution manometry(HRM) system and 3 days after operation the test was repeated. Lower esophagus sphincter resting pressure(LESP), 4-second integrated relaxation pressure(4sIRP), lower esophagus sphincter relax rate(LESRR), lower esophagus sphincter length(LESL), and esophageal manometry were analyzed. After POEM, LESP decreased from(29.1±17.0) mm Hg to(14.6±4.9) mm Hg, and decrease rate was 49.8%(P0.05). Esophageal peristaltic contraction was absent in all the 20 patients preoperatively. After POEM, changes in the esophageal contraction were seen in 7 patients, and peristalsis was noticed but was below normal level. There were no significant changes in peristalsis in the remaining 13 patients. POEM can significantly reduce LESP and 4sIRP in patients with achalasia, but can not affect the contraction of the esophagus.

  9. The evaluation of functional results before and after laparoscopic Heller myotomy for achalasia: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooshani, Abdollah; Frootan, Mojgan; Abdi, Saeed; Jahani-Sherafat, Somayeh; Kamani, Freshteh

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the functional results before and after laparoscopic Heller myotomy for Iranian patients with achalasia. Achalasia is a severe neuromuscular disorder of the esophagus, characterized by the loss of peristalsis and an inability of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to reach optimal relaxation. In this cross sectional study, patients who underwent Heller myotomy for achalasia via laparoscopy in Taleghani Hospital Tehran, Iran were evaluated. Symptoms including pressure of residual, integrated relaxation sphincter (IRP), pressure of free drinking, pressure of LES, dysphasia score and peristalsis movement was measured and recorded by manometry before and after (2 months) treating with Heller myotomy. In this study, 23 patients with achalasia (12 females and 11 males) with a mean age of 30±3.5 years (minimum 20, maximum 44 years) who met the inclusion criteria of the study were examined. Results of this study showed that, all the diagnostic criteria that were measured before the treatment was significantly different from after the treatment (PHeller myotomy surgery can be as a treatment of choice for achalasia. Free Drinking pressure can be a suitable criteria after treatment for evaluation and prediction of the reducing the dysphasia score after the surgery.

  10. Outcomes promote reoperative Heller myotomy for symptoms of achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakita, S; Villadolid, D; Kalipersad, C; Thometz, D; Rosemurgy, A

    2007-10-01

    Heller myotomy is accepted as first-line therapy for achalasia, yet for a small number of patients, symptoms persist or recur after myotomy. This study was undertaken to report our results with reoperative laparoscopic Heller myotomy for recurrent symptoms of achalasia. We have undertaken laparoscopic Heller myotomy in 275 patients and reoperative myotomy in 12 patients for recurrent dysphagia, of which three had their initial myotomy undertaken by us. For each, studies prior to reoperative Heller myotomy documented a nonrelaxing lower esophageal sphincter without stricture. Patients scored symptoms before and after reoperative myotomy. Before reoperative myotomy, 75% underwent dilation and 42% underwent Botox injection. Ten of twelve reoperative myotomies were undertaken and completed laparoscopically. Median follow-up is 24.1 months (29.0 months + 25.89). Symptom frequency and severity scores improved significantly after reoperative myotomy. Frequency of vomiting and frequency and severity of heartburn were improved after reoperative myotomy, but not to a significant extent. However, they were not particularly notable prior to surgery, compared to obstructive symptoms, such as dysphagia. Excellent or good outcomes were reported in 73%, and notably, 91% stated that they would have the operation again after having been through the process firsthand and knowing their outcomes. Patient outcomes promote the application of reoperative Heller myotomy for recurrent or persistent symptoms of achalasia following Heller myotomy.

  11. Laparoscopic treatment for esophageal achalasia: experience at a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusa, A; Romano, G; Bonventre, S; Salamone, G; Cocorullo, G; Gulotta, G

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is a not frequent esophageal disorder characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Its cause is unknown. The aim of treatment is to improve the symptoms. We report the results of the treatment of this condition achieved in one center. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with esophageal achalasia. In the period 2010-2012 we observed 64 patients, of whom 19 were referred for medical treatment. Three of the remaining patients underwent botulinum toxin injection, 17 underwent multiple endoscopic dilation procedures and 25 underwent laparoscopic surgery. There were no complications in the group undergoing endoscopic therapy, but symptom remission was only temporary. Patients undergoing surgery showed a significant improvement in symptoms and no recurrence throughout the follow-up period, that is still ongoing (3 years). There were no major complications in any case and no morbidity or mortality. Surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia with laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication gives the best and longest-lasting results in suitably selected patients. The extension of the myotomy and reduction in LES pressure are the most important parameters to achieve a good result.

  12. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  13. [Focus on Achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumot, Marie-Anne; Barret, Maximilien; Leblanc, Sarah; Leconte, Mahaut; Dousset, Bertrand; Oudjit, Ammar; Prat, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2018-01-01

    The pathophysiology of achalasia is largely unknown, and involves the destruction of ganglion cell in the esophageal myenteric plexus. High-resolution esophageal manometry is the key investigation. Endoscopic pneumodilatation and laparoscopic Heller myotomy have comparable short-term success rates, around 90%. The main complication after pneumodilatation is esophageal perforation, occurring in about 1% of cases. Peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising treatment modality, however with frequent post-procedural gastroesophageal reflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Achalasia: Outcome in children.

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    Meyer, Anell; Catto-Smith, Anthony; Crameri, Joe; Simpson, Di; Alex, George; Hardikar, Winita; Cameron, Donald; Oliver, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Oesophageal achalasia is well-recognized but relatively rare in children, occasionally appearing as the "triple A" syndrome (with adrenal insufficiency and alacrima). Treatment modalities, as in adult practice, are not curative, often needing further interventions and spurring the search for better management. The outcome for syndromic variants is unknown. We sought to define the efficacy of treatments for children with achalasia with and without triple A syndrome. We conducted a retrospective analysis of presentation and outcomes for 42 children with achalasia presenting over three decades to a major pediatric referral center. Long term impact of the diagnosis was assessed by questionnaire. We identified 42 children including six with triple A syndrome. The median overall age at diagnosis was 10.8 years and median follow-up 1593 days. Initial Heller myotomy in 17 required further interventions in 11 (65%), while initial treatment with botulinum toxin (n = 20) was ultimately followed by myotomy in 17 (85%). Ten out of 35 patients who underwent myotomy required a repeat myotomy (29%). Patients with triple A syndrome developed symptoms earlier, but had delayed diagnosis, were more underweight at diagnosis and at last follow up. Questionnaire results suggested a significant long term deleterious impact on the quality of life of children and their families. Many children with achalasia relapse after initial treatment, undergoing multiple, different procedures, despite which symptoms persist and impact on quality of life. Symptoms develop earlier in patients with triple A syndrome, but the diagnosis is delayed and this has substantial nutritional impact. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Mediastinal Tumors Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Pleural Diseases Mesothelioma Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Overview The esophagus (ĕ-sof´ah-gus) is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from your mouth to your stomach. If the ...

  16. Surgical treatment analysis of idiopathic esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, José Luis Braga de; Said, Marcelo Manzano; Pereira, Douglas Rizzanti; Amaral, Paula Casals do; Lima, Juliana Carolina Alves; Leandro-Merhi, Vânia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic esophageal achalasia is an inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing, with consequent dysphagia. To demonstrate the results of surgical therapy in these patients, evaluating the occurred local and systemic complications. Were studied retrospectively 32 patients, 22 of whom presented non-advanced stage of the disease (Stage I/II) and 10 with advanced disease (Stage III/IV). All of them had the clinical conditions to be submitted to surgery. The diagnoses were done by clinical, endoscopic, cardiological, radiological and esophageal manometry analysis. Pre-surgical evaluation was done with a questionnaire based on the most predisposing factors in the development of the disease and the surgical indication was based on the stage of the disease. The patients with non-advanced stages were submitted to cardiomyotomy with fundoplication, wherein in the post-surgical early assessment, only one (4,4%) presented pulmonary infection, but had a good outcome. In patients with advanced disease, seven were submitted to esophageal mucosectomy preserving the muscular layer, wherein one patient (14,2%) presented dehiscence of gastric cervical esophagus anastomosis as well as pulmonary infection; all of these complications were resolved with proper specific treatment; the other three patients with advanced stage were submitted to transmediastinal esophagectomy; two of them presented hydropneumothorax with good evolution, and one of them also presented fistula of the cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but with spontaneous healing after conservative treatment and nutritional support. The two patients with fistula of the cervical anastomosis progressed to stenosis, with good results after endoscopic dilations. In the medium and long term assessment done in 23 patients, all of them reported improvement in life quality, with return to swallowing. The

  17. Current status of achalasia management: a review on diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuason, Joshua; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2017-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is characterized by loss of peristalsis and failure of relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), particularly during swallowing. This review focuses on the diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders as defined by the Chicago Classification ver 3.0, and presents management options with regard to per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) as the treatment of choice. A concise review of literature was performed for articles related to the management of achalasia, and this was contrasted with our institution's current practice. Achalasia is still incompletely understood, and management is focused on establishing a proper diagnosis, and relieving the obstructive symptoms. Achalasia should be considered when dysphagia is present, and not otherwise caused by an obstruction or inflammation, and when criteria is met as per the Chicago Classification ver 3.0. Lowering LES tone and disruption of LES can be accomplished by various methods, most notably pneumatic balloon dilatation and surgical myotomy. POEM has been gaining momentum as a first line therapy for achalasia symptoms, and can be considered an important tool for motility disorders of the esophagus.

  18. The preoperative manometric pattern predicts the outcome of surgical treatment for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Renato; Costantini, Mario; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Morbin, Tiziana; Rizzetto, Christian; Zanatta, Lisa; Ceolin, Martina; Finotti, Elena; Nicoletti, Loredana; Da Dalt, Gianfranco; Cavallin, Francesco; Ancona, Ermanno

    2010-11-01

    A new manometric classification of esophageal achalasia has recently been proposed that also suggests a correlation with the final outcome of treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate this hypothesis in a large group of achalasia patients undergoing laparoscopic Heller-Dor myotomy. We evaluated 246 consecutive achalasia patients who underwent surgery as their first treatment from 2001 to 2009. Patients with sigmoid-shaped esophagus were excluded. Symptoms were scored and barium swallow X-ray, endoscopy, and esophageal manometry were performed before and again at 6 months after surgery. Patients were divided into three groups: (I) no distal esophageal pressurization (contraction wave amplitude 30 mmHg); and (III) rapidly propagating pressurization attributable to spastic contractions. Treatment failure was defined as a postoperative symptom score greater than the 10th percentile of the preoperative score (i.e., >7). Type III achalasia coincided with a longer overall lower esophageal sphincter (LES) length, a lower symptom score, and a smaller esophageal diameter. Treatment failure rates differed significantly in the three groups: I = 14.6% (14/96), II = 4.7% (6/127), and III = 30.4% (7/23; p = 0.0007). At univariate analysis, the manometric pattern, a low LES resting pressure, and a high chest pain score were the only factors predicting treatment failure. At multivariate analysis, the manometric pattern and a LES resting pressure achalasia subtypes: patients with panesophageal pressurization have the best outcome after laparoscopic Heller-Dor myotomy.

  19. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin injection therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Shimoda, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Iwakiri, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    Botulinum toxin injection is an accepted treatment modality for esophageal achalasia in western countries. This pilot study aimed to clarify the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia in Japanese patients. We enrolled 10 patients diagnosed with esophageal achalasia between 2008 and 2014. A total of 100 U botulinum toxin A was divided into eight aliquots and injected around the esophagogastric junction. We compared the lower esophageal sphincter pressure before and 1 week after treatment. Scores of subjective symptoms for esophageal achalasia were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) before and after 1 week of follow-up of treatment. Barium passage was improved in barium esophagography and passage of contrast agent was also improved. Mean Eckardt score was reduced from 5.5 to 1.6 after treatment (ptreatment (p = 0.002). One week after treatment, mean VAS score was reduced from 10 to 3.9 (pachalasia was safe and effective with few complications. Therefore, botulinum toxin could be used as minimally invasive therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan.

  20. Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Esophageal Achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercantini, Paolo; Amodio, Pietro M.; Stipa, Francesco; Corigliano, Nicola; Ziparo, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A minimally invasive approach is considered the treatment of choice for esophageal achalasia. We report the evolution of our experience from thoracoscopic Heller myotomy (THM) to laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM). Our objective is to define the efficacy and safety of these 2 approaches. Methods: Between March 1993 and December 2001, 36 patients underwent minimally invasive surgery for achalasia. Sixteen patients underwent THM without an antireflux procedure, and 20 patients underwent LHM with partial anterior fundoplication (n=13) or closure of the angle of His (n=7). Results: Mean operative time and mean hospital stay were significantly shorter for LHM compared with that of THM (148.3±38.7 vs 222±46.1 min, respectively; P=0.0001) and (2.06±0.65 days vs 5.06±0.85 days, respectively; P=0.0001). Six of 16 patients (37.5%) in the THM group experienced persistent or recurrent dysphagia compared with 1 of 20 patients (5%) in the LHM group (P=0.01). Heartburn developed in 5 patients (31.2%) after THM and in 1 patient (5%) after LHM (P=0.06). Regurgitation developed in 4 patients (25%) after THM and in 2 patients (10%) after LHM (P=0.2). Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) basal pressure decreased significantly from 30.1±5.07 to 15.3±2.1 after THM and from 31.8±6.2 to 10.4±1.7 after LHM (P=0.0001). Mean esophageal diameter was significantly reduced after LHM compared with that after THM (from 53.9±5.9 mm to 27.2±3.3 mm vs 50.8±7.6 mm to 37.2±6.9 mm respectively; P=0.0001). Conclusion: In our experience, LHM is associated with better short-term results and is superior to THM in relieving dysphagia. LHM with partial anterior fundoplication should be considered the treatment of choice for achalasia. PMID:14558709

  1. Surgery for achalasia: 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiino, Y; Filipi, C J; Awad, Z T; Tomonaga, T; Marsh, R E

    1999-01-01

    Technical controversies abound regarding the surgical treatment of achalasia. To determine the value of a concomitant antireflux procedure, the best antireflux procedure, the correct length for gastric myotomy, the optimal surgical approach (thoracic or abdominal), and the equivalency of minimally invasive surgery, a literature review was carried out. The review is based on 23 articles on open transabdominal or transthoracic myotomy, 14 articles on laparoscopic myotomy, and four articles on thoracoscopic myotomy. Postoperative results of traditional open thoracic or transabdominal myotomy as determined by symptomatology were better with fundoplication than without fundoplication. The incidence of postoperative reflux as proved by pH monitoring was high in patients who had an open transabdominal myotomy without fundoplication. The type of antireflux procedure used and the length of gastric myotomy had little effect on results. The results of transthoracic Heller myotomy do not require a concomitant fundoplication. Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic myotomy had excellent results at short-term follow-up. A fundoplication must be added if the myotomy is performed transabdominally. A randomized prospective study is required to determine the best fundoplication and the extent of gastric myotomy. Although minimally invasive surgery for achalasia has excellent initial results, longer follow-up in a larger population of patients is needed.

  2. Appearance of a double bubble in achalasia cardia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Achalasia cardia is characterized by failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax in response to swallowing and by an absence of peristalsis in the esophageal body. Absence of a gastric air bubble is a well known radiological finding. Pneumatic balloon dilatation results in reappearance of the gastric bubble. Case presentation We report the case of a 43-year-old Indian man with achalasia cardia whose chest X-ray at the time of presentation showed an air bubble in the gastric region causing a diagnostic quandary. Successful dilatation of the lower esophageal sphincter resulted in the appearance of another air bubble in the gastric region. Proper analysis showed that the first bubble was actually a colonic air bubble of the splenic flexure and the appearance of the second bubble was the anticipated gastric air bubble. Conclusion In patients presenting with achalasia cardia, a colonic air bubble may be seen in the gastric region causing diagnostic difficulty. In these patients, a gastric air bubble may appear after pneumatic dilatation. At the end of the procedure, there will be two air bubbles ("double bubble": a colonic and a gastric air bubble. To our knowledge, this finding has not been reported in the literature thus far.

  3. Incidence, clinical features and para-clinical findings of achalasia in Algeria: Experience of 25 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebaibia, Amar; Boudjella, Mohammed Amine; Boutarene, Djamel; Benmediouni, Farouk; Brahimi, Hakim; Oumnia, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence of achalasia in Algeria and to determine its clinical and para-clinical profile. To evaluate the impact of continuing medical education (CME) on the incidence of this disease. METHODS From 1990 to 2014, 1256 patients with achalasia were enrolled in this prospective study. A campaign of CME on diagnosis involving different regions of the country was conducted between 1999 and 2003. Annual incidence and prevalence were calculated by relating the number of diagnosed cases to 105 inhabitants. Each patient completed a standardized questionnaire, and underwent upper endoscopy, barium swallow and esophageal manometry. We systematically looked for Allgrove syndrome and familial achalasia. RESULTS The mean annual incidence raised from 0.04 (95%CI: 0.028-0.052) during the 1990s to 0.27/105 inhabitants/year (95%CI: 0.215-0.321) during the 2000s. The incidence of the disease was two and half times higher in the north and the center compared to the south of the country. One-hundred-and-twenty-nine (10%) were children and 97 (7.7%) had Allgrove syndrome. Familial achalasia was noted in 18 different families. Patients had dysphagia (99%), regurgitation (83%), chest pain (51%), heartburn 24.5% and weight loss (70%). The lower esophageal sphincter was hypertensive in 53% and hypotensive in 0.6%. CONCLUSION The mean incidence of achalasia in Algeria is at least 0.27/105 inhabitants. A good impact on the incidence of CME was noted. A gradient of incidence between different regions of the country was found. This variability is probably related to genetic and environmental factors. The discovery of an infantile achalasia must lead to looking for Allgrove syndrome and similar cases in the family. PMID:27784974

  4. Esophageal achalasia compressing left atrium diagnosed by echocardiography using a liquid containing carbon dioxide in a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Man Je; Song, Bong Gun; Lee, Hyoun Soo; Kim, Ki Hoon; Ok, Hea Sung; Kim, Byeong Ki; Park, Yong Hwan; Kang, Gu Hyun; Chun, Woo Jung; Oh, Ju Hyeon

    2012-01-01

    Extrinsic compression of the left atrium by the esophagus, the stomach, or both is an uncommon but important cause of hemodynamic compromise. Achalasia is a motility disorder characterized by impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and dilatation of the distal two thirds of the esophagus. Echocardiographic imaging after oral ingestion of liquid containing carbon dioxide allowed for differentiation between a compressive vascular structure and the esophagus. We report a rare case of esophageal achalasia compressing the left atrium diagnosed by echocardiography using a liquid containing carbon dioxide in a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Peroral endoscopic myotomy: An emerging minimally invasive procedure for achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneswaran, Yalini; Ujiki, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an emerging minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of achalasia. Due to the improvements in endoscopic technology and techniques, this procedure allows for submucosal tunneling to safely endoscopically create a myotomy across the hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter. In the hands of skilled operators and experienced centers, the most common complications of this procedure are related to insufflation and accumulation of gas in the chest and abdominal cavities with relatively low risks of devastating complications such as perforation or delayed bleeding. Several centers worldwide have demonstrated the feasibility of this procedure in not only early achalasia but also other indications such as redo myotomy, sigmoid esophagus and spastic esophagus. Short-term outcomes have showed great clinical efficacy comparable to laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM). Concerns related to postoperative gastroesophageal reflux remain, however several groups have demonstrated comparable clinical and objective measures of reflux to LHM. Although long-term outcomes are necessary to better understand durability of the procedure, POEM appears to be a promising new procedure. PMID:26468336

  6. Management of primary achalasia: The role of endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján-Sanchis, Marisol; Suárez-Callol, Patricia; Monzó-Gallego, Ana; Bort-Pérez, Inmaculada; Plana-Campos, Lydia; Ferrer-Barceló, Luis; Sanchis-Artero, Laura; Llinares-Lloret, María; Tuset-Ruiz, Juan Antonio; Sempere-Garcia-Argüelles, Javier; Canelles-Gamir, Pilar; Medina-Chuliá, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is an oesophageal motor disorder which leads to the functional obstruction of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) and is currently incurable. The main objective of all existing therapies is to achieve a reduction in the obstruction of the distal oesophagus in order to improve oesophageal transit, relieve the symptomatology, and prevent long-term complications. The most common treatments used are pneumatic dilation (PD) and laparoscopic Heller myotomy, which involves partial fundoplication with comparable short-term success rates. The most economic non-surgical therapy is PD, with botulinum toxin injections reserved for patients with a higher surgical risk for whom the former treatment option is unsuitable. A new technology is peroral endoscopic myotomy, postulated as a possible non-invasive alternative to surgical myotomy. Other endoluminal treatments subject to research more recently include injecting ethanolamine into the LES and using a temporary self-expanding metallic stent. At present, there is not enough evidence permitting a routine recommendation of any of these three novel methods. Patients must undergo follow-up after treatment to guarantee that their symptoms are under control and to prevent complications. Most experts are in favour of some form of endoscopic follow-up, however no established guidelines exist in this respect. The prognosis for patients with achalasia is good, although a recurrence after treatment using any method requires new treatment. PMID:26078828

  7. Laparoscopic cardiomyotomy in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, N; Feussner, H; Stein, H; Siewert, J R

    2000-01-01

    Tu evaluate the usefulness of the laparoscopic approach as the standard procedure in the surgical treatment of achalasia. Among different competing options of the treatment of esophageal achalasia, extramucosal myotomy of the lower esophageal sphincter--usually combined with anterior fundoplasty--is the most effective but also the most invasive approach. Minimally invasive performance of this operation reduces invasivity and should make the operative treatment a more attractive alternative to other procedures, such as pneumatic dilatation or botox injection. From 1991 till 1997, 27 patients underwent laparoscopic Heller Dor operation (16 males, 11 females, mean age 37 years). Diagnosis was established in all of them by an esophagogram and esophageal manometry. The main symptom was dysphagia in all of the patients. No mortality was observed in this series. There were no conversions to laparotomy. The single intraoperative complication was one case of iatrogenic mucosal laceration. Post operative complications were found in one case of wound infection, and two cases of pneumomedistinum. After a mean follow-up of 33 months (3-77), all patients are without dysphagia and without pathological gastroesophageal reflux. The mean value of residual LES pressure could be reduced from 21 +/- 6.4 mmHg to 7.44 +/- 2.7 mmHg. Laparoscopic cardiomyotomy is at lesat as safe, in terms of morbidity and mortality, as open surgery and similarily effective in alleviating dysphagia. Short hospitalisation and convalascent periods have provided an attractive alternative to repeated dilations for many patients.

  8. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies.

  9. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  10. Value of X-ray cinematography of deglutition to establish the indication for myotomy of the pharyngo-esophageal sphincter

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    Augustiny, N.; Schmid, H.; Bruehlmann, W.F.

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients were examined one to four years after cricopharyngeal myotomy that had been carried out because of dysfunction of the pharyngo-esophageal sphincter. Twelve patients were examined radiologically. Eleven of the 14 patients were clinically improved or cured. In two patients who were not improved, the underlying condition was a polymyositis. The other patients suffered from an idiopathic dysfunction. Because of the small numbers involved, no detailed statistical analysis was carried out. Nevertheless, our results indicate that: Cricopharyngeus myotomy produces marked improvement or cure in patients with idiopathic dysfunction. Weak propulsive peristalsis of the pharyngeal constrictors is a prognostic factor indicating a poor clinical result of surgery. There is little chance of clinical improvement in patients with polymyositis.

  11. [The importance of x-ray cinematography of deglutition for indicating the need for myotomy of the pharyngoesophageal sphincter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustiny, N; Schmid, H; Brühlmann, W F

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients were examined one to four years after cricopharyngeal myotomy that had been carried out because of dysfunction of the pharyngo-esophageal sphincter. Twelve patients were examined radiologically. Eleven of the 14 patients were clinically improved or cured. In two patients who were not improved, the underlying condition was a polymyositis. The other patients suffered from an idiopathic dysfunction. Because of the small numbers involved, no detailed statistical analysis was carried out. Nevertheless, our results indicate that: Cricopharyngeus myotomy produces marked improvement or cure in patients with idiopathic dysfunction. Weak propulsive peristalsis of the pharyngeal constrictors is a prognostic factor indicating a poor clinical result of surgery. There is little chance of clinical improvement in patients with polymyositis.

  12. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Rösch, T.; Fockens, P.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of achalasia is complicated by symptom recurrence and a significant risk for severe complications. Endoscopic myotomy was developed in the search for a highly efficacious treatment with lower risks. Since its introduction in 2010, several centers have adopted the technique and published

  13. Clinical management of pediatric achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lennep, Marinde; van Wijk, Michiel P.; Omari, Taher I.; Benninga, Marc A.; Singendonk, Maartje M. J.

    2018-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder. Much of the literature is based on the adult population. In adults, guidance of therapeutic approach by manometric findings has led to improvement in patient outcome. Promising results have been achieved with novel therapies such as PerOral

  14. Non-surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annese, Vito; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is an infrequent motility disorder characterized by a progressive stasis and dilation of the oesophagus; with subsequent risk of aspiration, weight loss, and malnutrition. Although the treatment of achalasia has been traditionally based on a surgical approach, especially with the introduction of laparoscopic techniques, there is still some space for a medical approach. The present article reviews the non-surgical therapeutic options for achalasia. PMID:17007039

  15. Non-surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Annese, Vito; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is an infrequent motility disorder characterized by a progressive stasis and dilation of the oesophagus; with subsequent risk of aspiration, weight loss, and malnutrition. Although the treatment of achalasia has been traditionally based on a surgical approach, especially with the introduction of laparoscopic techniques, there is still some space for a medical approach. The present article reviews the non-surgical therapeutic options for achalasia.

  16. Minimally invasive myotomy for the treatment of esophageal achalasia: evolution of the surgical procedure and the therapeutic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresadola, Vittorio; Feo, Carlo V

    2012-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease of the esophagus, characterized by the absence of peristalsis in the esophageal body and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter, which may be hypertensive. The cause of this disease is unknown; therefore, the aim of the therapy is to improve esophageal emptying by eliminating the outflow resistance caused by the lower esophageal sphincter. This goal can be accomplished either by pneumatic dilatation or surgical myotomy, which are the only long-term effective therapies for achalasia. Historically, pneumatic dilatation was preferred over surgical myotomy because of the morbidity associated with a thoracotomy or a laparotomy. However, with the development of minimally invasive techniques, the surgical approach has gained widespread acceptance among patients and gastroenterologists and, consequently, the role of surgery has changed. The aim of this study was to review the changes occurred in the surgical treatment of achalasia over the last 2 decades; specifically, the development of minimally invasive techniques with the evolution from a thoracoscopic approach without an antireflux procedure to a laparoscopic myotomy with a partial fundoplication, the changes in the length of the myotomy, and the modification of the therapeutic algorithm.

  17. An Overview of Achalasia and Its Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dhyanesh A.; Lappas, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    Achalasia is one of the most studied esophageal motility disorders. However, the pathophysiology and reasons that patients develop achalasia are still unclear. Patients often present with dysphagia to solids and liquids, regurgitation, and varying degrees of weight loss. There is significant latency prior to diagnosis, which can have nutritional implications. The diagnosis is suspected based on clinical history and confirmed by esophageal high-resolution manometry testing. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy is necessary to rule out potential malignancy that can mimic achalasia. Recent data presented in abstract form suggest that patients with type II achalasia may be most likely, and patients with type III achalasia may be least likely, to report weight loss compared to patients with type I achalasia. Although achalasia cannot be permanently cured, palliation of symptoms is possible in over 90% of patients with the treatment modalities currently available (pneumatic dilation, Heller myotomy, or peroral endoscopic myotomy). This article reviews the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management options in patients with achalasia, as well as potential insights into histopathologic differences and nutritional implications of the subtypes of achalasia. PMID:28867969

  18. Efficacy of pneumodilation in achalasia after failed Heller myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, C M G; Ponds, F A M; Schijven, M P; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2016-11-01

    Heller myotomy is an effective treatment for the majority of achalasia patients. However, a small proportion of patients suffer from persistent or recurrent symptoms after surgery and they are usually subsequently treated with pneumodilation (PD). Data on the efficacy of PD as secondary treatment for achalasia are scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the efficacy of PD as treatment for achalasia patients suffering from persistent or recurrent symptoms after Heller myotomy. Patients with recurrent or persistent symptoms (Eckardt score >3) after Heller myotomy were selected. Patients were treated with PD, using a graded distension protocol with balloon sizes ranging from 30 to 40 mm. After each dilation symptoms were assessed to evaluate whether a subsequent dilation with a larger balloon size was required. Patients with recurrent or persistent symptoms (Eckardt score >3) after treatment with a 40-mm balloon were identified as failures. Twenty-four patients were included in total; 15 patients with achalasia type I, seven with achalasia type II and two with achalasia type III. Median relapse time was 2.5 years after Heller myotomy (IQR: 9 years and 3 months). Three patients were not suitable for PD; one patient was morbidly obese and not fit for any form of sedation and two had a siphon-shaped esophagus leaving 21 patients to treat. Eight patients were successfully treated with a single 30-mm balloon dilation (median follow-up time: 6.5 years; IQR: 7.5 years). Four patients required dilations with 30- and 35-mm balloons (median follow-up time: 11 years; IQR: 3 years). Nine patients failed on the 35-mm balloon dilation and underwent a subsequent dilation with a 40-mm balloon, and all failed on this balloon as well. Thus, PD was successful in 12 of the 21 treatable patients, resulting in a success rate of 57% for treatable patients or 50% for all patients. Baseline Eckardt scores were also higher in those that failed (median: 8; IQR: 2) than those that

  19. Effect of peroral esophageal myotomy for achalasia treatment: A Chinese study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng; Hu, Yue; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Shuo; Cai, Li-Jun

    2015-05-14

    To assess the safety and feasibility of peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM) in patients with achalasia. From January 2012 to March 2014, 50 patients (28 men, 22 women; mean age: 42.8 years, range: 14-70 years) underwent POEM. Pre- and postoperative symptoms were quantified using the Eckardt scoring system. Barium swallow and esophagogastroscopy were performed before and after POEM, respectively. Esophageal motility was evaluated in all patients, both preoperatively and one month after POEM treatment, using a high-resolution manometry system. Manometry data, Eckardt scores, lower esophageal sphincter pressure and barium swallow results were used to evaluate the effect of the procedure. POEM was successfully completed for all patients. The mean procedure time was 55.4 ± 17.3 min and the mean total length of myotomy of the circular esophagus was 10.5 ± 2.6 cm. No specific complications occurred, with the exception of two patients that developed asymptomatic pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema. Clinical improvement in symptoms was achieved in all patients. Approximately 77.5% of patients experienced weight gain 6 mo after POEM, with an average of 4.78 kg (range: 2-15 kg). The lower esophageal sphincter resting pressure, four second integrated relaxation pressure and Eckardt scores were all significantly reduced after POEM (Ps achalasia symptoms, improve gastroesophageal junction relaxation and restore esophageal body motility function, but not normal esophageal peristalsis.

  20. Laparoscopic extended cardiomyotomy in children: an effective procedure for the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun; Tannuri, Uenis; Velhote, Manoel Carlos Prieto; Romão, Rodrigo Luiz Pinto

    2010-07-01

    Achalasia of the esophagus is characterized by aperistalsis and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing. The objective of the present study is to present the experience of a modified Heller myotomy via a laparoscopic approach for the treatment of children who had this condition. A retrospective review of medical records of all patients who underwent this procedure from 2000 to 2009 was performed. The procedure consisted of an extended esophagomyotomy beginning on the lower part of the lower esophageal sphincter and continuing 5 to 6 cm above on the lower third of the esophagus, and then extended 3 to 4 cm below to the stomach, associated with an anterior 180-degree hemi-fundoplication according to Dor's technique. Fifteen patients were included in the study. There were 8 female and 7 male patients. Mean operating time was 190 minutes with no intraoperative complications and 1 conversion to open surgery because of difficulty in dissecting an inflamed distal esophagus. In a mean follow-up period of 32.3 months, 2 patients had recurrence of mild dysphagia that disappeared spontaneously, and 1 required a single botulinum toxin injection with complete resolution of symptoms. We conclude that the laparoscopic extended Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication is a safe and effective method for the treatment for achalasia in the pediatric population even in advanced cases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. New insights into the pathophysiology of achalasia and implications for future treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Valdovinos, Miguel Ángel; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Martín Del Campo, Luis A; Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo

    2016-09-21

    Idiopathic achalasia is an archetype esophageal motor disorder, causing significant impairment of eating ability and reducing quality of life. The pathophysiological underpinnings of this condition are loss of esophageal peristalsis and insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The clinical manifestations include dysphagia for both solids and liquids, regurgitation of esophageal contents, retrosternal chest pain, cough, aspiration, weight loss and heartburn. Even though idiopathic achalasia was first described more than 300 years ago, researchers are only now beginning to unravel its complex etiology and molecular pathology. The most recent findings indicate an autoimmune component, as suggested by the presence of circulating anti-myenteric plexus autoantibodies, and a genetic predisposition, as suggested by observed correlations with other well-defined genetic syndromes such as Allgrove syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 B syndrome. Viral agents (herpes, varicella zoster) have also been proposed as causative and promoting factors. Unfortunately, the therapeutic approaches available today do not resolve the causes of the disease, and only target the consequential changes to the involved tissues, such as destruction of the LES, rather than restoring or modifying the underlying pathology. New therapies should aim to stop the disease at early stages, thereby preventing the consequential changes from developing and inhibiting permanent damage. This review focuses on the known characteristics of idiopathic achalasia that will help promote understanding its pathogenesis and improve therapeutic management to positively impact the patient's quality of life.

  2. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia: clinical impact of 28 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Isomoto, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the efficacy of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia. Twenty-eight esophageal achalasia patients who underwent POEM in our institution between August 2010 and October 2012 were enrolled. Under general anesthesia with tracheal intubation, initial incision was made on the anterior wall of the esophagus after submucosal injection. Submucosal tunnel was created and extended below the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) onto the gastric cardia. Subsequently, myotomy was done using triangle tip knife. After confirmation of smooth passage of scope through the esophagogastric junction, the entry was closed. Esophagogram and manometry study was done before and after the procedure. Also, subjective symptom score and Eckardt score were assessed before and 3 months after POEM. POEM was successfully done in all cases without any severe complications such as perforation and mediastinitis.Mean procedure time was 99.1 min (range 61-160) and mean myotomy length was 14.4 cm (range 10-18). Significant improvement was achieved in both esophagogram and endoscopic findings. Mean LES pressure was 71.2 mmHg (35.8-119.0) and 21.0 mmHg (6.7-41.0) before and after the procedure (P treatment of choice for esophageal achalasia. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  3. Long-term outcome of peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia in patients with previous Heller myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Helle Ø; Kirkegård, Jakob; Kjær, Daniel Willy; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Kunda, Rastislav; Bjerregaard, Niels Christian

    2017-06-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an emerging procedure in the treatment of esophageal achalasia, a primary motility disorder. However, the long-term outcome of POEM in patients, who have previously undergone a Heller myotomy, is unknown. Using a local database, we identified patients with esophageal achalasia, who underwent POEM. We compared patients with a previous Heller myotomy to those, who had received none or only non-surgical therapy prior to the POEM procedure. We conducted follow-up examinations at 3, 12, and 24 months following the procedure. We included 66 consecutive patients undergoing POEM for achalasia, of which 14 (21.2 %) had undergone a prior Heller myotomy. In both groups, the preoperative Eckardt score was 7. Postoperatively, the non-Heller group experienced a more pronounced symptom relief at both 3-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up compared with the Heller group, and there was a tendency for the effect of POEM to reduce over time. We suggest that there is a correlation between preoperative measurements of gastroesophageal sphincter pressures and the chance of a successful POEM. POEM has a place in the treatment of esophageal achalasia in patients with a prior Heller myotomy and persistent symptoms as it is a safe procedure with acceptable long-term results.

  4. Esophageal striated muscle contractions in patients with Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.O. Dantas

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease causes degeneration and reduction of the number of intrinsic neurons of the esophageal myenteric plexus, with consequent absent or partial lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and loss of peristalsis in the esophageal body. The impairment of esophageal motility is seen mainly in the distal smooth muscle region. There is no study about esophageal striated muscle contractions in the disease. In 81 patients with heartburn (44 with esophagitis taken as controls, 51 patients with Chagas' disease (21 with esophageal dilatation and 18 patients with idiopathic achalasia (11 with esophageal dilatation we studied the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of esophageal proximal contractions. Using the manometric method and a continuous perfusion system we measured the esophageal striated muscle contractions 2 to 3 cm below the upper esophageal sphincter after swallows of a 5-ml bolus of water. There was no significant difference in striated muscle contractions between patients with heartburn and esophagitis and patients with heartburn without esophagitis. There was also no significant difference between patients with heartburn younger or older than 50 years or between men and women or in esophageal striated muscle contractions between patients with heartburn and Chagas' disease. The esophageal proximal amplitude of contractions was lower in patients with idiopathic achalasia than in patients with heartburn. In patients with Chagas' disease there was no significant difference between patients with esophageal dilatation and patients with normal esophageal diameter. Esophageal striated muscle contractions in patients with Chagas' disease have the same amplitude and duration as seen in patients with heartburn. Patients with idiopathic achalasia have a lower amplitude of contraction than patients with heartburn.

  5. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G.

    2017-01-01

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esoph...

  6. Treatment of the patient with achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, Wout O.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review In recent years, several studies on the treatment and follow-up of achalasia have been published. This review aims at highlighting interesting publications from the recent years. Recent findings Treatment of achalasia aims at relieving functional obstruction at the level of the

  7. Internal anal sphincter: Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalit; Emmanuel, Anton

    2017-08-01

    To summarise current knowledge of Internal anal sphincter. The internal anal sphincter (IAS) is the involuntary ring of smooth muscle in the anal canal and is the major contributor to the resting pressure in the anus. Structural injury or functional weakness of the muscle results in passive incontinence of faeces and flatus. With advent of new assessment and treatment modalities IAS has become an important topic for surgeons. This review was undertaken to summarise our current knowledge of internal anal sphincter and highlight the areas that need further research. The PubMed database was used to identify relevant studies relating to internal anal sphincter. The available evidence has been summarised and advantages and limitations highlighted for the different diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Our understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of IAS has increased greatly in the last three decades. Additionally, there has been a rise in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques specifically targeting the IAS. Although these are promising, future research is required before these can be incorporated into the management algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Defining sphincter of oddi dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi (SO) dysmotility may give rise to pain. The golden standard for the demonstration of SO dysfunction is endoscopic manometry. A number of abnormalities are observed in patients with postcholecystectomy pain and in patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis. Criteria for defi...

  9. Isosorbide dinitrate and nifedipine treatment of achalasia: a clinical, manometric and radionuclide evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfond, M.; Rozen, P.; Gilat, T.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of sublingual isosorbide dinitrate (5 mg) and nifedipine (20 mg) were compared in 15 patients with achalasia. The parameters examined included the manometric measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure, the radionuclide assessment of esophageal emptying and the clinical response. The mean basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure fell significantly after both drugs (p less than 0.01), with a maximum fall of 63.5% 10 min after receiving isosorbide dinitrate, but by only 46.7% 30 min after nifedipine. The esophageal radionuclide test meal retention was significantly less (p less than 0.01) only after receiving isosorbide dinitrate. The drug improved initial esophageal emptying by its effect on the lower esophageal sphincter and by relieving the test meal hold-up noted to occur at the junction of the upper and midesophagus. Eight patients cleared their test meal within 10 min after isosorbide dinitrate administration while only two did so after nifedipine. Subjectively, 13 patients had their dysphagia relieved by isosorbide dinitrate and 8 by nifedipine. However, this relief was not confirmed in 4 patients by the radionuclide study and they, as well as the other 3 patients who did not respond to therapy, were referred to pneumatic dilatation. Side effects were more prominent after nitrates. Three of the patients are currently receiving nifedipine and 5 patients received isosorbide dinitrate therapy for 8-14 mo. The radionuclide test meal is currently the best way of objectively evaluating drug therapy in patients with achalasia. Isosorbide dinitrate is more effective than nifedipine in relieving their symptoms

  10. Isosorbide dinitrate and nifedipine treatment of achalasia: a clinical, manometric and radionuclide evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelfond, M.; Rozen, P.; Gilat, T.

    1982-11-01

    The effects of sublingual isosorbide dinitrate (5 mg) and nifedipine (20 mg) were compared in 15 patients with achalasia. The parameters examined included the manometric measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure, the radionuclide assessment of esophageal emptying and the clinical response. The mean basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure fell significantly after both drugs (p less than 0.01), with a maximum fall of 63.5% 10 min after receiving isosorbide dinitrate, but by only 46.7% 30 min after nifedipine. The esophageal radionuclide test meal retention was significantly less (p less than 0.01) only after receiving isosorbide dinitrate. The drug improved initial esophageal emptying by its effect on the lower esophageal sphincter and by relieving the test meal hold-up noted to occur at the junction of the upper and midesophagus. Eight patients cleared their test meal within 10 min after isosorbide dinitrate administration while only two did so after nifedipine. Subjectively, 13 patients had their dysphagia relieved by isosorbide dinitrate and 8 by nifedipine. However, this relief was not confirmed in 4 patients by the radionuclide study and they, as well as the other 3 patients who did not respond to therapy, were referred to pneumatic dilatation. Side effects were more prominent after nitrates. Three of the patients are currently receiving nifedipine and 5 patients received isosorbide dinitrate therapy for 8-14 mo. The radionuclide test meal is currently the best way of objectively evaluating drug therapy in patients with achalasia. Isosorbide dinitrate is more effective than nifedipine in relieving their symptoms.

  11. Treatment choices and outcomes of patients with manometrically diagnosed achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, J C; Finley, C; Hanna, W C; Miller, L; Ferri, L; Urbach, D R; Darling, G E

    2016-07-01

    This prospective population-based study was designed to evaluate treatment choices in patients with new manometrically diagnosed achalasia and their outcomes. Patients referred to the esophageal function laboratory were enrolled after a new manometric diagnosis of achalasia. Patients completed an initial achalasia symptom score validated questionnaire on their symptom severity, duration, treatment pre-diagnosis and Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form (SF-36) survey. Treatment decisions were made by the referring physician and the patient. Follow-up questionnaires were completed every 3 months for 1 year. Patients who chose not to undergo treatment at 1-year follow-up completed another questionnaire after 5 years. Between January 2004 and January 2005, 83 of 124 eligible patients were enrolled. Heller myotomy was performed on 31 patients, three patients received botulinum toxin injections, and 25 patients received 29 pneumatic balloon dilatations. Twenty-four patients chose to receive no treatment. Following treatment, patients treated with surgery, dilatation and botulinum toxin had an average improvement in achalasia symptom score of 23 +/- 12.2, 17 +/- 10.9, and 9 +/- 14, respectively. Patients receiving no treatment had worsening symptoms with a symptom score change of -3.5 +/- 11.4. Surgery and dilatation resulted in significant improvement (P treatment. In univariate logistic regression, symptom severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00 to 1.08), sphincter tone (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.09), difficulty swallowing liquids (OR 3.21, 95% 1.15 to 8.99), waking from sleep (OR 2.75, 95% 1.00 to 7.61), and weight loss (OR 5.99, 95% CI 1.93 to 18.58) were all significant in predicting that patients would select treatment. In the multivariate analysis, older age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.09) and weight loss (OR 3.91, 95% CI 1.02 to 15.2) were statistically significant for undergoing treatment. At 5 years, five (21%) of those who

  12. Peroral endoscopic myotomy can improve esophageal motility in patients with achalasia from a large sample self-control research (66 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangzhe Yao

    Full Text Available Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM as a new approach to achalasia attracts broad attention. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the results with esophageal motility after POEM through the first large sample clinical research.We have a self-control research with all patients (205 in total who underwent POEM from 2010 to 2014 at our Digestive Endoscopic Center, 66 patients of which underwent high resolution manometry (HRM before and after POEM in our motility laboratory. Follow-ups last for 5.6 months on average. Outcome variables analyzed included upper esophageal sphincter pressure (UESP, upper esophageal sphincter residual pressure (UESRP, lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP, lower esophageal sphincter residual pressure (LESRP and esophageal body peristalsis. We have a statistical analysis to illustrate how POEM impacts on the change of esophageal motility.The symptoms related to dysphagia were relieved in 95% of patients in recent term after POEM. While HRM showed a statistically significant reduction of URSRP, LESP and LESRP (P0.05 did not occur for these two groups on LESP and LESRP reduction.POEM clearly relieved the symptoms related to dysphagia by lowering the pressure of upper esophageal sphincter (UES and lower esophageal sphincter (LES,and other endoscopic treatment before POEM did not affect the improvement of LES pressure. These results are concluded from our short-term follow-up study, while the long-term efficacy remains to be further illustrated.Chinese Clinical Trial Register ChiCTR-TRC-12002204.

  13. The Treatment of Achalasia in Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesp, Julie A; Farrell, Timothy M

    2018-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that obesity is frequently associated with esophageal motility disorders. Morbid obesity and achalasia may coexist in the same patient. The management of the morbidly obese patient with achalasia is complex and the most effective treatment remains controversial. The aim of this study is to review the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of achalasia in morbidly obese patients. PubMed search from January 1990 to July 2017, including the following terms: achalasia, morbid obesity, bariatric, and treatment. Achalasia in the setting of morbid obesity may be successfully treated by endoscopic or surgical methods. Surgeons may choose to add a bariatric procedure, with various strategies present in the literature. A review of the present literature suggests that the preferred approach to achalasia in the morbidly obese patient is to address both disease processes simultaneously with a laparoscopic Heller myotomy and a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is cited by most experts as the bariatric procedure of choice, given its antireflux benefits. A well-powered study, comparing the various approaches to the treatment of achalasia in the setting of morbid obesity, is required to establish a consensus.

  14. Primary versus secondary achalasia: New signs on barium esophagogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Debi, Uma; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate new signs on barium swallow that can differentiate primary from secondary achalasia. Materials and Methods: Records of 30 patients with primary achalasia and 17 patients with secondary achalasia were reviewed. Clinical, endoscopic, and manometric data was recorded. Barium esophagograms were evaluated for peristalsis and morphology of distal esophageal segment (length, symmetry, nodularity, shouldering, filling defects, and “tram-track sign”). Results: Mean age at presentation was 39 years in primary achalasia and 49 years in secondary achalasia. The mean duration of symptoms was 3.5 years in primary achalasia and 3 months in secondary achalasia. False-negative endoscopic results were noted in the first instance in five patients. In the secondary achalasia group, five patients had distal esophageal segment morphology indistinguishable from that of primary achalasia. None of the patients with primary achalasia and 35% patients with secondary achalasia had a length of the distal segment approaching combined height of two vertebral bodies. None of the patients with secondary achalasia and 34% patients with primary achalasia had maximum caliber of esophagus approaching combined height of two vertebral bodies. Tertiary contractions were noted in 90% patients with primary achalasia and 24% patients with secondary achalasia. Tram-track sign was found in 55% patients with primary achalasia. Filling defects in the distal esophageal segment were noted in 94% patients with secondary achalasia. Conclusion: Length of distal esophageal segment, tertiary contractions, tram-track sign, and filling defects in distal esophageal segment are useful esophagographic features distinguishing primary from secondary achalasia. PMID:26288525

  15. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2017-06-30

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus, absent contractility) and minor disorders of peristalsis (ineffective esophageal motility, fragmented peristalsis). The aim of this study was to review the current diagnosis and management of esophageal motility disorders other than achalasia.

  16. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy is not superior to pneumatic dilation in the management of primary achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji-Wei; Li, Yin; Xing, Wen-Qun; Lv, Hong-Wei; Wang, Hao-Ran

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder, of unknown cause, which results in increased lower esophageal sphincter tone and symptoms of difficulty swallowing. Current major therapeutic options include laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) and pneumatic dilation (PD). We undertake a systematic review comparing the efficacy and safety of these 2 treatments in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Methods: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for randomized controlled trial investigating LHM versus PD in the treatment of primary achalasia. The primary outcome was symptom remission rates. The Mantel–Haenszel method with fixed-effect or random-effects model was used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Five studies involving 498 participants were included. The cumulative remission rate was significantly higher with LHM at 3 months and 1 year (short-term), with a risk ratio of 1.16 (95% CI 1.01–1.35, P = 0.04) and 1.14 (95% CI 1.02–1.27, P = 0.02), respectively. There were no significant differences between LHM and PD in 2-year and 5-year remission rate (long-term), with a risk ratio of 1.05 (95% CI 0.91–1.22, P = 0.49) and 1.17 (95% CI 0.84–1.64, P = 0.34), respectively. Rates of major mucosal tears requiring subsequent intervention with LHM were significantly lower than those of esophageal perforation with PD requiring postprocedural medical or surgical therapy, with a risk ratio of 0.25 (95% CI 0.08–0.81, P = 0.02). Postprocedural rates of gastroesophageal reflux, lower esophageal sphincter pressures, and quality of life scores did not differ in trials with sufficient data. Conclusions: There were no significant differences between LHM and PD in 2-year and 5-year remission rate. This study indicates that either treatment can be proposed as initial treatment for achalasia. PMID:28207499

  17. Early discharge after external anal sphincter repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe an accelerated-stay program for repair of the external anal sphincter. METHODS: Twenty consecutive patients undergoing overlapping repair of the external anal sphincter were included in the study. Effect parameters were length of hospitalization....... CONCLUSION: We have described a safe accelerated-stay program (24 to 48 hours) for overlapping repair of external anal sphincter....

  18. Achalasia following gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, H L; Mayberry, J F; Atkinson, M

    1986-01-01

    Five patients initially presenting with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux, proven by radiology or pH monitoring, subsequently developed achalasia, confirmed by radiology and manometry, after an interval of 2-10 years. During this period dysphagia, present as a mild and intermittent symptom accompanying the initial reflux in 3 of the 5, became severe and resulted in oesophageal stasis of food in all. Three of the 5 had a demonstrable hiatal hernia. In none was reflux a troublesome symptom after Rider-Moeller dilatation or cardiomyotomy undertaken for the achalasia. Gastro-oesophageal reflux does not protect against the subsequent development of achalasia. It is suggested that the autonomic damage eventually leading to achalasia may in its initial phases cause gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. PMID:3950898

  19. Syndrome of achalasia, ACTH insensitivity and alacrima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosino, M.M.; Genieser, N.B.; Becker, M.H.; Bangaru, B.S.; Sklar, C.

    1986-05-01

    An unusual multisystem disorder characterized by the triad of selective ACTH insensitivity, achalasia and alacrima has recently been described. The following case fulfills the criteria for this syndrome which has not been previously reported in the radiographic literature.

  20. Morbid Obesity with Achalasia: A Surgical Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Monika E.; Sedrak, Micheal; Wagner, Oliver J.; Jacobsen, Garth; Talamini, Mark; Horgan, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Achalasia is a relatively rare medical condition that is classically not associated with obesity. The surgical treatment of a simultaneous occurrence of these two diseases requires careful consideration, and only a few reports can be found in the literature combining a Heller myotomy with gastric bypass, duodenal switch, or gastric banding. We report the case of a 69-year-old female patient with early achalasia and obesity who underwent simultaneous laparoscopic gastric sleeve resection and r...

  1. Novel mechanism for impaired nitrergic relaxation in achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2006-01-01

    New insights into the pathogenesis of achalasia indicate that incubation with serum from patients with achalasia leads to altered neurochemical coding of the myenteric plexus and impairs the nitrergic response to nerve stimulation

  2. Surgical Treatment for Achalasia of the Esophagus: Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo Torres-Villalobos; Luis Alfonso Martin-del-Campo

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder that leads to dysphagia, chest pain, and weight loss. Its diagnosis is clinically suspected and is confirmed with esophageal manometry. Although pneumatic dilation has a role in the treatment of patients with achalasia, laparoscopic Heller myotomy is considered by many experts as the best treatment modality for most patients with newly diagnosed achalasia. This review will focus on the surgical treatment of achalasia, with special emphasis on lapar...

  3. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for the treatment of esophageal achalasia: systematic review and pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K; Abbassi-Ghadi, N; Markar, S; Kumar, S; Jethwa, P; Zaninotto, G

    2016-10-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a novel approach to performing esophageal myotomy for the treatment of achalasia. This review aims to assess subjective and objective metrics of achalasia treatment efficacy, perioperative adverse events and the incidence of postoperative gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients treated with POEM. Secondary aims include a pooled analysis comparison of the clinical outcomes and procedural safety of POEM versus laparoscopic Heller's myotomy (LHM). A systematic review of the literature, up to and including January 15, 2015, was conducted for studies reporting POEM outcomes. Studies comparing POEM to LHM were also included for the purpose of pooled analysis. Outcomes from 1122 POEM patients, from 22 studies, are reported in this systematic review. Minor operative adverse events included capno/pneumo-peritoneum (30.6%), capno/pneumo-thorax (11.0%) and subcutaneous emphysema (31.6%). Major operative adverse events included mediastinal leak (0.3%), postoperative bleeding (1.1%) and a single mortality (0.09%). There was an improvement in lower esophageal sphincter pressure and timed barium esophagram column height of 66% and 80% post-POEM, respectively. Symptom improvement was demonstrated with a pre- and post-POEM Eckardt score ± standard deviation of 6.8 ± 1.0 and 1.2 ± 0.6, respectively. Pre- and post-POEM endoscopy showed esophagitis in 0% and 19% of patients, respectively. The median (interquartile range) points scored for study quality was 15 (14-16) out of total of 32. Pooled analysis of three comparative studies between LHM and POEM showed similar results for adverse events, perforation rate, operative time and a nonsignificant trend toward a reduced length of hospital stay in the POEM group. In conclusion, POEM is a safe and effective treatment for achalasia, showing significant improvements in objective metrics and achalasia-related symptoms. Randomized comparative studies of LHM and POEM are required to determine the

  4. Efficacy of peroral endoscopic myotomy vs other achalasia treatments in improving esophageal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaka, Madhusudhan R; Hayat, Umar; Thota, Prashanthi N; Jegadeesan, Ramprasad; Ray, Monica; Gabbard, Scott L; Wadhwa, Neha; Lopez, Rocio; Baker, Mark E; Murthy, Sudish; Raja, Siva

    2016-05-28

    To assess and compare the esophageal function after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) vs other conventional treatments in achalasia. Chart review of all achalasia patients who underwent POEM, laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) or pneumatic dilation (PD) at our institution between January 2012 and March 2015 was performed. Patient demographics, type of achalasia, prior treatments, pre- and post-treatment timed barium swallow (TBE) and high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) findings were compared between the three treatment groups. Patients who had both pre- and 2 mo post-treatment TBE or HREM were included in the final analysis. TBE parameters compared were barium column height, width and volume of barium remaining at 1 and 5 min. HREM parameters compared were basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressures and LES-integrated relaxation pressures (IRP). Data are presented as mean ± SD, median [25(th), 75(th) percentiles] or frequency (percent). Analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test, Pearsons χ(2) test and Fishers Exact tests were used for analysis. A total of 200 achalasia patients were included of which 36 underwent POEM, 22 underwent PD and 142 underwent LHM. POEM patients were older (55.4 ± 16.8 years vs 46.5 ± 15.7 years, P = 0.013) and had higher BMI than LHM (29.1 ± 5.9 kg/m(2) vs 26 ± 5.1 kg/m(2), P = 0.012). More number of patients in POEM and PD groups had undergone prior treatments compared to LHM group (72.2% vs 68.2% vs 44.3% respectively, P = 0.003). At 2 mo post-treatment, all TBE parameters including barium column height, width and volume remaining at 1 and 5 min improved significantly in all three treatment groups (P = 0.01 to P 0.05). POEM, PD and LHM were all effective in improving esophageal function in achalasia at short-term. There was no difference in efficacy between the three treatments.

  5. A segregation analysis of familial achalasia in Iranian population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malekzadeh, Reza; Amini, Marzyeh; Mikaeli, Javad; Fazlollahi, Narges; Alizadeh, Behrozziad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Achalasia is a rare primary immune-mediated motor disorder of esophagus with an annual incidence of -1 in 100,000 affecting mostly adult of 25 to 60 years old. The inheritance pattern of Achalasia is not studied very well due to lack of sizable studies. Within a large cohort of Achalasia,

  6. “Pinstripe Pattern” in an Achalasia Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Imagawa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic image of achalasia usually shows dilated esophageal cavity with retained liquids and foods. Recently, “pinstripe pattern” (PSP in the case of achalasia patient was reported as an endoscopic image of the indicator for early detection of achalasia. The typical endoscopic image of PSP can be recognized in this case.

  7. Comparison of outcomes of laparoscopic Heller myotomy versus per-oral endoscopic myotomy for management of achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Steven G; Burdick, J S; Ogola, Gerald O; Ontiveros, Estrellita

    2017-10-01

    Achalasia is a rare disorder that has several treatment options. The gold standard of treatment is a surgical myotomy called a laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM). More recently, an endoscopic myotomy has become an option as well, called per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). An achalasia registry was queried for patients undergoing either LHM or POEM at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. Patient demographics, preoperative and postoperative data points, and Eckardt scores were collected. The patients were further stratified into their follow-up intervals, immediate postoperative and long-term follow-up, to assess surgical success. A subset analysis was done for success of treatment for patients who had redo surgery versus those undergoing the procedure for the first time. There were 12 patients in the POEM group and 11 patients in the LHM group. Both groups demonstrated mean lower esophageal sphincter pressures with failure to relax. Procedure length and hospital length of stay were similar between the two groups. There were three adverse events in each group, but none altered the patient's postoperative clinical course. Eckardt scores, used to assess success of the surgery, were 82% for POEM patients and 66% for LHM patients after 6 months. The outcomes for POEM and LHM in our early experience are similar to those reported in the literature for high-volume centers managing achalasia.

  8. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia: outcomes of the first over 100 patients with short-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwaku, Hironari; Inoue, Haruhiro; Yamashita, Kanefumi; Ohmiya, Toshihiro; Beppu, Richiko; Nakashima, Ryo; Takeno, Shinsuke; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Nimura, Satoshi; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-11-01

    POEM is a recently developed achalasia treatment method, which combines the efficacy of surgical myotomy with the benefits of endoscopic procedures. Very few studies have focussed on the efficacy and usefulness of POEM in over 100 cases. The first 100 adult patients treated according to standard POEM technique in a single center and followed up for 3 months were identified and included in this study (men 42; women 58; mean age 48.2 ± 18.8; range 9-91 years) The pre- and postoperative assessments included Eckardt scores, manometry, endoscopy, and monitoring pH. Mean operative time was 150.8 ± 49.3 min (75-370 min). Adverse events over Grade IIIb by the Clavien-Dindo classification were not encountered. The mean preoperative and postoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressures were 43.6 ± 26.2 and 20.9 ± 12.7 mmHg, respectively, indicating a statistically significant decrease after POEM (P achalasia, and previous treatment method. The percent of monitoring time with a pH treatment. Our results confirm the efficacy of POEM in a large patient series and support POEM as one of the first-line achalasia therapies in the near future.

  9. Functional and morphological changes in the pharynx in achalasia and in diffuse esophageal spasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannig, C.; Wuttge-Hannig, A.; Amon, K.; Feussner, H.

    1989-08-01

    Since the pharynx and the esophagus are a functional unit, functional radiodiagnosis has to be directed at pharyngo-esophageal interaction. Among our collective of 73 patients suffering from achalasia or diffuse esophageal spasm, we were able to recognize a substantially increased incidence of morphological or functional pharyngeal disorders by means of cineradiography. The functional alterations in particular were often not revealed by conventional fluoroscopy. High-speed cineradiography, with its high temporal and spatial resolution, turned out to be a valuable tool in analysis of the origin of pharyngeal dysphagia. Manometry correlated very well with the radiologic findings in tubular esophagus, but proved unreliable in the detection of alterations of the upper esophageal sphincter region, because of problems inherent in the method. Furthermore, membranous stenosis (webs), lateral or dorsal diverticula, and asymmetry of the pharynx were observed strikingly often. (orig.).

  10. Esophageal achalasia in the Veneto region: epidemiology and treatment. Epidemiology and treatment of achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Nicola; Portale, Giuseppe; Gallo, Costantino; Rocchietto, Stefano; Caruso, Valentina; Costantini, Mario; Salvador, Renato; Ruol, Alberto; Zaninotto, Giovanni

    2011-03-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder, incurable but amenable to palliative treatments to relieve dysphagia. Given the rarity of the disease, there is a paucity of data from population-based studies on incidence and outcome of the two treatments most commonly used in clinical practice, i.e., endoscopic pneumatic dilation (PD) and surgical myotomy (SM). A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted on the Veneto region, in north-eastern Italy. All patients with achalasia as their primary diagnosis between 2001 and 2005 were identified and their demographics and treatment details obtained. The overall incidence of achalasia was 1.59 cases/100,000/year. Achalasia patients were mainly seen at University Hospitals. Fifty-five percent of the patients received treatment, 23.3% SM and 31.8% PD. The cumulative risk of any subsequent intervention for achalasia was 20% in treated patients (29.7% in patients treated primarily with PD and 4% in patients treated with SM first). The epidemiology of achalasia in the Veneto Region is in line with the situation reported elsewhere and did not change between 2001 and 2005. Achalasia patients are mostly seen at University Hospitals. We observed a greater risk of subsequent intervention for patients previously treated with PD compared with SM.

  11. Surgical Treatment for Achalasia of the Esophagus: Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Martin-del-Campo, Luis Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder that leads to dysphagia, chest pain, and weight loss. Its diagnosis is clinically suspected and is confirmed with esophageal manometry. Although pneumatic dilation has a role in the treatment of patients with achalasia, laparoscopic Heller myotomy is considered by many experts as the best treatment modality for most patients with newly diagnosed achalasia. This review will focus on the surgical treatment of achalasia, with special emphasis on laparoscopic Heller myotomy. We will also present a brief discussion of the evaluation of patients with persistent or recurrent symptoms after surgical treatment for achalasia and emerging technologies such as LESS, robot-assisted myotomy, and POEM. PMID:24348542

  12. Surgical Treatment for Achalasia of the Esophagus: Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Torres-Villalobos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder that leads to dysphagia, chest pain, and weight loss. Its diagnosis is clinically suspected and is confirmed with esophageal manometry. Although pneumatic dilation has a role in the treatment of patients with achalasia, laparoscopic Heller myotomy is considered by many experts as the best treatment modality for most patients with newly diagnosed achalasia. This review will focus on the surgical treatment of achalasia, with special emphasis on laparoscopic Heller myotomy. We will also present a brief discussion of the evaluation of patients with persistent or recurrent symptoms after surgical treatment for achalasia and emerging technologies such as LESS, robot-assisted myotomy, and POEM.

  13. [Surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia--20 years experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaramov, N; Sokolov, M; Angelov, K; Toshev, S; Petrov, B

    2009-01-01

    Achalasia comes from a Greek word that means "failure to relax." Cardiospasm and achalasia refer to the same condition. This report addresses esophageal achalasia--its history, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options. We report our experience in treating this disorder surgically using modified Heller myotomy combined or not with partial gastric fundoplication. 47 patients with achalasia surgically operated in 20-years period are reported by authors. These features make it reasonable to reasses the relative indications for surgery and nonsurgical therapy in achalasia of the esophagus.

  14. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor for primary esophageal achalasia: outcomes in 173 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Riccardo; Fumagalli Romario, Uberto; Ceolin, Martina; Massaron, Simonetta; Peracchia, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic Heller myotomy combined with anterior (Dor) fundoplication is the most widely-used surgical procedure for treating esophageal achalasia in Europe From November 1992 through May 2010 we performed laparoscopic Heller-Dor on 173 patients Conversion to laparotomy was required in three cases (1.7%) at the beginning of the experience (for mucosal) perforation which was the most frequent intraoperative complication, managed laparoscopically with the increasing experience. Five (2.9%) cases had minor postoperative complications. Clinical results were satisfactory in 99.4% of cases. One patient (0.6%) had severe persistent dysphagia. Mean esophageal diameter decreased from 50 mm ± 12 (range 20- 90) to 25 mm ± 7 (range 15-80). Lower esophageal sphincter pressure decreased from 32 mmHg (median, range 10- 93) pre-operatively to 11 mmHg (median, range 5-21) at one year follow up and residual pressure from 12 mmHg (median, range 3-30) to 4 mmHg (median, range 1-8). Impedance and pH monitoring showed normal levels in 39/47 (83%) patients who agreed to testing. The good outcomes of this experience, in part due to careful adherence to technical aspects of the operation, confirm that the laparoscopic Heller-Dor is the gold standard surgical treatment for esophageal achalasia.

  15. Repeated Surgical or Endoscopic Myotomy for Recurrent Dysphagia in Patients After Previous Myotomy for Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Uberto; Rosati, Riccardo; De Pascale, Stefano; Porta, Matteo; Carlani, Elisa; Pestalozza, Alessandra; Repici, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Surgical myotomy of the lower esophageal sphincter has a 5-year success rate of approximately 91 %. Peroral endoscopic myotomy can provide similar results for controlling dysphagia. Some patients experience either persistent or recurrent dysphagia after myotomy. We present here a retrospective analysis of our experience with redo myotomy for recurrent dysphagia in patients with achalasia. From March 1996 to February 2015, 234 myotomies for primary or recurrent achalasia were performed in our center. Fifteen patients (6.4 %) had had a previous myotomy and were undergoing surgical redo myotomy (n = 9) or endoscopic redo myotomy (n = 6) for recurrent symptoms. Patients presented at a median of 10.4 months after previous myotomy. Median preoperative Eckardt score was 6. Among the nine patients undergoing surgical myotomy, three esophageal perforations occurred intraoperatively (all repaired immediately). Surgery lasted 111 and 62 min on average (median) in the surgical and peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) groups, respectively. No postoperative complications occurred in either group. Median postoperative stay was 3 and 2.5 days in the surgical and POEM groups, respectively. In the surgical group, Eckardt score was dysphagia. Preliminary results using POEM indicate that the technique can be safely used in patients who have undergone previous surgical myotomy.

  16. Predictors of short term treatment outcome in patients with achalasia following endoscopic or surgical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Cristian; Bancila, Ion; Tutuian, Radu; Iacob, Razvan; Tomulescu, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Pneumatic balloon dilation and surgical myotomy are the most effective treatments for achalasia. While there is controversy which method is best, the aim of the current study was to identify predictors of symptom recurrence after endoscopic or surgical therapy. Patients undergoing pneumatic balloon dilatation (30mm) or laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication were included in the study. Analyzed parameters include total symptom score (sum of 0-5 point intensity for dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain), width and height of esophageal column at 2 and 5 minutes after oral barium ingestion, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) length, resting (LESP) and residual pressure (LESRP) before and 3 months after intervention. Patients with symptoms score surgical group were symptom-free 3 months after intervention. Therapies improved LESP (24.4±8.2mmHg pre- vs. 15.4±10.3mmHg post-therapy; p=0.003) and mean LESRP (7.9±4.3mmHg pre- vs. 5.3±6.7mmHg post-therapy; p=0.03). Univariate linear regression analysis identified barium contrast column width >5cm at 2 minutes (p=0.04), LES length 10mmHg (p=0.02) as predictors for persistent symptoms. While >85% of achalasia patients responded well to 30mm pneumatic balloon dilation, patients with elevated LES pressure, short LES and wide esophagus should be considered as primary surgical candidates.

  17. Temporary self-expanding cardia stents for the treatment of achalasia: an experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yueqi; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua; Zhao Jungong; Li Feng; Chen Niwei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the performance, efficiency and optimal removal time of a newly designed temporary retrievable cardia covered stent (TRC-CS) for the treatment of achalasia in a dog model. Methods: Eighty-four achalasia-like dog models were randomly divided into seven groups of 12, a control group (CG; no stent insertion), a standard stent control group (NSCG, standard esophageal stent) and five treatment groups (TG, TRC-CS). Stents were retrieved at 4 days after insertion in the NSCG and at 4 days (4 d-TG), 2 weeks (2 w-TG), 1 month (1 m-TG), 3 months (3 m-TG), and 6 months (6 m-TG) in the TGs. lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and a timed barium esophagram were assessed before stent insertion, after stent retrieval, and at 1-week, 1-, 3- and 6-month follow-up. Three dogs in NSCG and 4 d-TG were sacrificed for histological examination at each follow-up to investigate the inflammatory reaction after stent insertion. Results: Stent insertion/removal and the follow-up procedures were well tolerated. At 6-month follow-up, the 2 w-TG and 1 m-TG demonstrated an acceptable stent migration (n=2 in both TGs versus n=4 in NSCG, n=4 in 3 m-TG, and =6 in 6 m-TG), improved LESP compared to after BAC injection (P<0.05), and improved timed barium height (p=0.0144 and 0.0409). Mouse-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and α-smooth muscle actin staining revealed no inflammatory reaction difference between the NSCG and 4d-TG at each follow-up. Conclusion: The TRC-CS was effective in the treatment of achalasia in a dog model. LESP measurements, timed barium esophagram studies suggest an optimal stent retrieval time of between 2 w∼1 m. (authors)

  18. Thoracoscopic versus laparoscopic modified Heller Myotomy for achalasia: efficacy and safety in 87 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, K C; Finley, R J; Clifton, J C; Graham, A J; Storseth, C; Inculet, R

    1999-08-01

    The ideal treatment for achalasia permanently eliminates the dysfunctional lower esophageal sphincter, relieving dysphagia and regurgitation; prevents gastroesophageal reflux; and has an acceptable morbidity rate. Controversy exists concerning whether the thoracoscopic Heller Myotomy (THM) or laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) technique is the best approach to a modified Heller myotomy for achalasia. We performed a retrospective comparison of the patient characteristics, operative results, postoperative symptoms, and the learning curves for the procedures of 24 patients undergoing THM and 63 patients undergoing LHM between 1991 and 1998. Preoperative patient variables in each group revealed similar distributions for age, gender, and prevalence of previous pneumatic dilation. Mean operating room (OR) times were 4.3 hours (range 2.9 to 5.6 hours) for THM and 3.0 hours (range 1.5 to 6.5 hours) for LHM (p = 0.01). Three esophageal perforations occurred in the THM group and two in the LHM group. Conversion to an open procedure took place in five THM operations (21%) and one LHM operation (2%) (p = 0.005). There were no postoperative esophageal leaks. Mean postoperative length of stay (LOS) for THM was 6.1 days (range 1 to 17 days) and for LHM was 4.0 days (range 1 to 12 days) (p = 0.03). Learning-curve analysis of the first 24 LHM patients compared with the most recent 24 revealed greater OR time in the first 24 mean 3.6 hours, (range 2.0 to 6.5 hours) versus mean 2.3 hours, (range 1.5 to 3.7 hours; p = 0.01), and greater LOS mean 5.5 days, (range 3 to 12 days) versus mean 3.1 days, (range 1 to 8 days; p open procedure, and shorter LOS compared with THM. LHM was superior to THM in relieving dysphagia and preventing heartburn. LHM may be the preferred surgical treatment of achalasia in some patients.

  19. Laparoscopic esophageal myotomy versus pneumatic dilation in the treatment of idiopathic achalasia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baniya R

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ramkaji Baniya, Sunil Upadhaya, Jahangir Khan, Suresh Kumar Subedi, Tabrez Shaik Mohammed, Balvant K Ganatra, Ghassan Bachuwa Department of Internal Medicine, Hurley Medical Center, Michigan State University, Flint, MI, USA Background: Achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unknown etiology associated with abnormalities in peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. The disease is incurable; however, definitive treatment procedures like pneumatic dilation (PD/balloon dilation and laparoscopic esophageal myotomy (LEM are performed to relieve dysphagia and related symptoms. Currently, there is paucity of data comparing the outcomes of these procedures. The aim of this meta-analysis is to compare the short- and long-term success rates of PD and LEM. Methods: A thorough systematic search of PubMed, Scopus, clinicaltrials.gov, and Cochrane library was conducted for randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing the outcomes of PD versus LEM in the treatment of achalasia. The Mantel-Haenszel method and random effect model were used to analyze the data. RCTs with outcome data at 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year intervals were analyzed. Results: A total of 437,378 and 254 patients at 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year intervals were analyzed for outcome data. At 3 months and 1 year, PD was not as effective as LEM (odds ratio [OR]: 0.50; confidence interval [CI] 0.31–0.82; P = 0.009 and OR: 0.47; CI 0.22–0.99; P = 0.21 but at 5 years, one procedure was non-inferior to the other (OR: 0.62; 0.33–1.19; P = 0.34. Conclusion: PD was as effective as LEM in relieving symptoms of achalasia in the long-term. Keywords: achalasia, balloon dilation, pneumatic dilation, laparoscopic myotomy, Heller’s myotomy

  20. Heller Myotomy Versus Heller Myotomy With Dor Fundoplication for Achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, William O.; Torquati, Alfonso; Holzman, Michael D.; Khaitan, Leena; Byrne, Daniel; Lutfi, Rami; Sharp, Kenneth W.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the impact of the addition of Dor fundoplication on the incidence of postoperative gastroesophageal reflux (GER) after Heller myotomy. Summary Background Data: Based only on case series, many surgeons believe that an antireflux procedure should be added to the Heller myotomy. However, no prospective randomized data support this approach. Patients and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, institutional review board-approved clinical trial, patients with achalasia were assigned to undergo Heller myotomy or Heller myotomy plus Dor fundoplication. Patients were studied via 24-hour pH study and manometry at 6 months postoperatively. Pathologic GER was defined as distal esophageal time acid exposure time greater than 4.2% per 24-hour period. The outcome variables were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. Results: Forty-three patients were enrolled. There were no differences in the baseline characteristics between study groups. Pathologic GER occurred in 10 of 21 patients (47.6%) after Heller and in 2 of 22 patients (9.1%) after Heller plus Dor (P = 0.005). Heller plus Dor was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of GER (relative risk 0.11; 95% confidence interval 0.02–0.59; P = 0.01). Median distal esophageal acid exposure time was lower in the Heller plus Dor (0.4%; range, 0–16.7) compared with the Heller group (4.9%; range, 0.1–43.6; P = 0.001). No significant difference in surgical outcome between the 2 techniques with respect to postoperative lower-esophageal sphincter pressure or postoperative dysphagia score was observed. Conclusions: Heller Myotomy plus Dor Fundoplication was superior to Heller myotomy alone in regard to the incidence of postoperative GER. PMID:15319712

  1. Achalasia and chronic opiate use: innocent bystanders or associated conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, K; Murray, J A; Geno, D M; Katzka, D A

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution manometry identifies three subtypes of achalasia. However, type 3 differs from classic achalasia. Although opiates affect esophageal motility, opiate use and achalasia have not been studied. Patients with a new diagnosis of achalasia at Mayo Clinic Rochester between June 1, 2012 and January 3, 2014 were identified. Clinical records were reviewed to assess symptoms, opiate use, and therapy. Fifty-six patients with achalasia were identified, 14 (25%) were on opiates. Opiate prescription was unrelated to achalasia in all cases, with chronic back and joint pain constituting the majority. Of patients on opiates, five (36%) had type 3 achalasia compared with four (10%) not on opiates (P = 0.02). No patients on opiates had type 1 achalasia. Clinical presentation did not differ with opiates, although those on opiates were more likely to report chest pain (39 vs. 14%, P = 0.05) and less likely to have esophageal dilation (62 vs. 82%, P = 0.13), none with greater than 5-cm diameter. Contractile vigor was greater with opiate use, with distal contractile integral of 7149 versus 2615.5 mmHg/cm/second (P = 0.08). Treatment response was inferior on opiates, with persistent symptoms in 22% compared with 3% without opiates (P = 0.06). Opiate use is common in type 3 achalasia, with the majority of patients on opiates. No patients on opiates were diagnosed with type 1 achalasia. Manometric findings of type 3 achalasia mimic those induced by opiates, suggesting a physiologic mechanism for opiate induced type 3 achalasia. Treatment outcome is inferior with opiates, with opiate cessation perhaps preferable. Further studies assessing opiate use and achalasia are needed. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  2. Anal Sphincter Augmentation Using Biological Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Nasra N; Narang, Sunil K; Köckerling, Ferdinand; Daniels, Ian R; Smart, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the use of biological materials in the augmentation of the anal sphincter either as part of an overlapping sphincter repair (OSR) or anal bulking procedure. A systematic search of PubMed was conducted using the search terms "anal bulking agents," "anal sphincter repair," or "overlapping sphincter repair." Five studies using biological material as part of an overlapping sphincter repair (OSR) or as an anal bulking agent were identified. 122 patients underwent anal bulking with a biological material. Anorectal physiology was conducted in 27 patients and demonstrated deterioration in maximum resting pressure, and no significant change in maximum squeeze increment. Quality of life scores (QoLs) demonstrated improvements at 6 weeks and 6 months, but this had deteriorated at 12 months of follow up. Biological material was used in 23 patients to carry out an anal encirclement procedure. Improvements in QoLs were observed in patients undergoing OSR as well as anal encirclement using biological material. Incontinence episodes decreased to an average of one per week from 8 to 10 preoperatively. Sphincter encirclement with biological material has demonstrated improvements in continence and QoLs in the short term compared to traditional repair alone. Long-term studies are necessary to determine if this effect is sustained. As an anal bulking agent the benefits are short-term.

  3. Treatment of achalasia: the short-term response to botulinum toxin injection seems to be independent of any kind of pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meining A

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that intrasphincteric injection of botulinum toxin (BTX may represent an alternative therapy to balloon dilatation in achalasia. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections in achalasia patients, as assessed using lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (LOSP and symptom scores, and to compare the response in patients with different types of pretreatment (no previous treatment, balloon dilatation, myotomy, BTX injection. Methods Forty patients who presented with symptomatic achalasia were treated with BTX injection (48 injections in 40 patients. Some of the patients had received prior treatment (seven with myotomy, seven with dilatation and eight with BTX. The symptoms were assessed using a global symptom score (0–10, which was evaluated before treatment, 1 week afterwards, and 1 month afterwards. Manometry was also carried out before and after treatment. Three different selections of patients were studied: all patients; untreated patients; and patients with prior BTX, dilatation, or myotomy. Results After BTX injection, there was a significant reduction in LOSP (before, 38.2 ± 11.3 mmHg; 1 week after, 20.5 ± 6.9 mmHg; 1 month after, 17.8 ± 6.8 mmHg; P Conclusions BTX injection offers an alternative treatment for achalasia which is safe and can be performed in an outpatient setting. The initial response to BTX, in terms of symptom scores and LOSP, appears to be independent of any prior treatment. A number of patients do not adequately respond to balloon dilatation or myotomy, which are the first-line treatment modalities in achalasia patients. BTX injection can be performed in these patients, and symptomatic benefit can be expected in the same percentages as with BTX injection in untreated patients.

  4. Pneumodilation versus laparoscopic Heller's myotomy for achalasia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Slattery, E

    2011-08-04

    Boeckxstaens et al. (May 12 issue)1 compare single laparoscopic myotomy with a series of pneumodilation procedures for patients with achalasia. They found no significant difference in outcomes between the two groups, although perforation occurred in 4% of patients in the pneumodilation group and often required emergency treatment. No significant clinical adverse outcomes occurred in the surgical group.\\r\

  5. Roentgenodiagnosis of cardiospasm, achalasia and cardium chalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksumov, D.N.; Oster, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    The technique of roentgenodiagnosis of stomach and esophagus in cases of cardiospasm, achalasia of the esophageal-stomach segment is presented. The above technique permits to obtain the maximum of useful information and to determine the prognosis, working capacity and to solve the problem on the most advisable treatment method

  6. esophageal carcinoma complicating achalasia, 25 years post

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mine

    Some degree of stasis usually persists despite adequate treatment and relief of symptoms. Complications or recurrent symptoms include dysphagia, esophageal reflux, stricture and carcinoma. 5. This case report suggests that long term surveillance of the patient with achalasia is essential even after successful treatment.

  7. 2D DIGE Does Not Reveal all: A Scotopic Report Suggests Differential Expression of a Single "Calponin Family Member" Protein for Tetany of Sphincters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Using 2D differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS), a recent report by Rattan and Ali (2015) compared proteome expression between tonically contracted sphincteric smooth muscles of the internal anal sphincter (IAS), in comparison to the adjacent rectum [rectal smooth muscles (RSM)] that contracts in a phasic fashion. The study showed the differential expression of a single 23 kDa protein SM22, which was 1.87 fold, overexpressed in RSM in comparison to IAS. Earlier studies have shown differences in expression of different proteins like Rho-associated protein kinase II, myosin light chain kinase, myosin phosphatase, and protein kinase C between IAS and RSM. The currently employed methods, despite its high-throughput potential, failed to identify these well-characterized differences between phasic and tonic muscles. This calls into question the fidelity and validatory potential of the otherwise powerful technology of 2D DIGE/MS. These discrepancies, when redressed in future studies, will evolve this recent report as an important baseline study of "sphincter proteome." Proteomics techniques are currently underutilized in examining pathophysiology of hypertensive/hypotensive disorders involving gastrointestinal sphincters, including achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), spastic pylorus, seen during diabetes or chronic chemotherapy, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and recto-anal incontinence. Global proteome mapping may provide instant snapshot of the complete repertoire of differential proteins, thus expediting to identify the molecular pathology of gastrointestinal motility disorders currently labeled "idiopathic" and facilitating practice of precision medicine.

  8. ANAL SPHINCTER INJURIES (OASIS AT DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Jakopič

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anal incontinence severely impairs quality of life. It affects 4 to 19 % of women and is statistically related to number of vaginal deliveries. It is grossly underreported and most patients that do seek help are referred to gastroenterologists or colorectal surgeons. Incidence of recognized sphincter injuries at time of delivery is 1 to 2 %. However studies with anal ultrasound showed incidence of anal sphincter injuries at 28 to 41 %. Depending on the degree of injury symptoms range from partial to complete inability to control passing of winds, liquid or solid stools. About three thirds of patients are asymp- tomatic in puerperium, however half of them are at risk of developing anal incontinence in later life. Hypoestrogenisem, additional perineal trauma during consequent deliveries and sphincter atrophy can unmask anal sphincter damage years later. Timely recognition and treatment are vital for good long term results and quality of life, if possible immediately after delivery. Good knowledge of perineal anatomy, recognition of risk factors, intense search and appropriate treatment and follow-up are essential to management of anal sphincter injuries. All secondary sphincter repair is less effective. Content: Updated overview of current opinion and guidelines on anal sphincter injuries are pre- sented. Anal sphincter is composed of external anal sphincter (EAS and internal anal sphincter (IAS. Striated EAS is divided into three parts – subcutaneous, superficial, deep, and con- nected to puborectalis muscle posteriorly. Smooth-muscled IAS is a continuation of a cir- cular smooth-muscle layer of rectum. In between there is a thin longitudinal muscle layer. IAS constitutes 70 % of resting tone and is under constant contraction. EAS contributes to 30 % of resting tone and almost all pressure during active contraction. EAS injury leads to insufficient contraction after rectal sampling and filling which causes urgency – patient can

  9. Hypertrophy of the muscularis propria of the lower esophageal sphincter and the body of the esophagus in patients with primary motility disorders of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Kassab, Ghassan; Puckett, James L; Liu, Jianmin

    2003-08-01

    Patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) and nutcracker esophagus/high amplitude esophageal contraction (HAEC) have a thicker esophageal muscularis propria than do healthy subjects. The goals of this study were to determine the esophageal muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA), a measure of muscle mass, in patients with achalasia of the esophagus; and to compare it with that in patients with DES, patients with HAEC, and normal subjects. Using a high-frequency ultrasound probe catheter, concurrent manometry and ultrasound images of the esophagus were recorded in four subject groups: normal volunteers, patients with HAEC, patients with DES, and patients with achalasia of the esophagus. Recordings were obtained from the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and multiple sites in the esophagus 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 cm above the LES. The LES and esophageal muscle thickness as well as esophageal MCSA were greater in all three patient groups than in the normal subject group. Muscle thickness and MCSA were observed to be greatest in patients with achalasia, which were greater than in patients with DES, which were greater than in those with HAEC, which in turn were greater than in normal subjects. We propose that an increase in the MCSA is an important feature of patients with primary motility disorders of the esophagus. The degree of increase in muscle mass may be an important determinant of the type and the severity of esophageal motor dysfunction.

  10. Evaluation of the anorectal sphincter using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Ehiichi

    1994-01-01

    Until now the evaluation of how to function on the sphincter muscle complex on the imaging study has been done by defecography. The purpose of this paper is to show the normal and abnormal functions of sphincter muscle complex at rest and squeeze using MRI. The subjects were 15 volunteers with informed consent and 13 post operative patients with a history anorectal anomalies. MR images were obtained with a 1.5 T unit. Sagittal and axial planes were evaluated both at rest and squeeze. Squeeze was simulated by insufflating a rectal balloon or enema on the volunteers. Only light stimulation was stressed on the post operative patients by means of balloon insufflation with 50 ml air. Under balloon stimulation, 71% of normal sphincter muscle complexes contracted only transverse dimention. The rest was as is. None revealed significant distension. All patients with continence demonstrated the same transverse contraction. Patients with incontinence showed no significant contraction. Under enema stimulation for normal subjects, sphincter muscle complex distended on both dimensions. Gluteal muscle contracted 50% of volunteers under enema stimulation. All post operative patients with continence demonstrated gluteal muscles contractions. Normal sphincter muscle complex contracts only in transverse dimension under balloon stimulation, which is caused by the muscle. Under enema stimulation, it distends on both dimensions. Gluteal muscle contract only under enema stimulation. In post operative patients, MRI shows different functions of anal sphincter muscle complex between continent and incontinent groups. It may explain causes of incontinence. The gluteal muscle and puborectal muscle seem to have one of the essentials for continence. (author)

  11. Change in cross-sectional area of esophageal muscle does not correlate with the outcome of achalasia after pneumatic balloon dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Dong Hyun; Choi, Yong Sung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Eun Ran; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Jong Chul; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2010-03-01

    Patients with achalasia have a thicker muscularis propria compared to normal patients. Because pneumatic balloon dilatation (PD) is an effective treatment for achalasia, the changes in the esophageal muscles after PD may predict treatment outcomes, if muscular change is of primary importance. In the present study, we aimed to observe the changes in esophageal muscle thickness following PD and assessed whether symptom relapse can be predicted on the basis of the esophageal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), as measured by high-frequency intraluminal ultrasound (HFIUS). Fifteen patients treated by PD were studied and followed up for a median of 3.6 years. An HFIUS was done before PD and 6 months after PD. The esophageal muscle CSA measured at the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), and 3 and 6 cm above the LES, was used to see whether any association was present between symptom recurrence and the esophageal muscle CSA. A single PD resulted in a 2-year remission rate of 66%. A significance variance in change (-65%-248%) was noticed in the muscle CSA after PD. The predilation muscle CSA, post-dilation muscle CSA, and change in the muscle CSA after PD was not associated with symptom recurrence. Our findings suggest that measuring the muscle CSA does not help to predict treatment outcome. Muscular changes in achalasia might be just reactive changes.

  12. Extreme Achalasia Presenting as Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Goldsmith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Achalasia may lead to cachexia if not diagnosed in an early stage. Surgery in cachectic patients is hazardous and complications may result in a protracted recovery or even death. Different treatment options have been described. In this paper, we report a stepwise surgical laparoscopic approach which appears to be safe and effective. Methods. Over a one-year period, a patient with a body mass index (BMI below 17 being treated for anorexia nervosa was referred with dysphagia. Because of the extreme cachexia, a laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy (LFJ was fashioned to enable long-term home enteral feeding. The patient underwent a laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM when the BMI was normal. Results. The patient recovered well following this stepwise approach. Conclusion. Patients with advanced achalasia usually present with extreme weight loss. In this small group of patients, a period of home enteral nutrition (HEN via a laparoscopically placed feeding jejunostomy allows weight gain prior to safe definitive surgery.

  13. Fiber types in the striated urethral and anal sphincters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Reske-Nielsen, E

    1983-01-01

    Seven normal human striated urethral and anal sphincters obtained by autopsy were examined using histochemical techniques. In both the urethral sphincter and the subcutaneous (s.c.) and superficial part of the anal sphincter a characteristic pattern with two populations of muscle fibers, abundant...

  14. Esophageal achalasia : results of balloon dilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Won Woo; Kang, Sung Gwon; Yoon, Kwon Ha; Kim, Nam Hyeon; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Sung, Kyu Bo; Song, Ho Young [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 21 balloon dilation procedures were performed in 14 patients with achalasia. A balloon with a diameter of 20 mm was used for the initial attempt.If the patient tolerated this well, the procedure was repeated with a 10-20 mm balloon, placed alongside at the same session. If, however the patient complained of severe chest pain and/or a postprocedural esophagogram showed an improvement,the additional balloon was not used. For patients whose results were unsatisfactory, the dilation procedure was repeated at sessions three to seven days apart. Succesful dilation was achieved in 13 of 14 patients(92.9%), who needed a total of 20 sessions of balloon dilation, ranging from one to three sessions per patient(mean, 1.54 sessions). Esophageal rupture occured in one of 14 patients(7.1%) ; of the 13 patients who underwent a successful dilation procedure, 12(92.3%) were free of recurrent symptoms during the follow-up period of 1-56(mean, 18.5) months. The remaning patient(7.7%) had a recurrence seven months after dilation. Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation seems to be safe and effective in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  15. Esophageal achalasia : results of balloon dilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Won Woo; Kang, Sung Gwon; Yoon, Kwon Ha; Kim, Nam Hyeon; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Sung, Kyu Bo; Song, Ho Young

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 21 balloon dilation procedures were performed in 14 patients with achalasia. A balloon with a diameter of 20 mm was used for the initial attempt.If the patient tolerated this well, the procedure was repeated with a 10-20 mm balloon, placed alongside at the same session. If, however the patient complained of severe chest pain and/or a postprocedural esophagogram showed an improvement,the additional balloon was not used. For patients whose results were unsatisfactory, the dilation procedure was repeated at sessions three to seven days apart. Succesful dilation was achieved in 13 of 14 patients(92.9%), who needed a total of 20 sessions of balloon dilation, ranging from one to three sessions per patient(mean, 1.54 sessions). Esophageal rupture occured in one of 14 patients(7.1%) ; of the 13 patients who underwent a successful dilation procedure, 12(92.3%) were free of recurrent symptoms during the follow-up period of 1-56(mean, 18.5) months. The remaning patient(7.7%) had a recurrence seven months after dilation. Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation seems to be safe and effective in the treatment of esophageal achalasia

  16. Pneumatic Dilation versus Laparoscopic Heller's Myotomy for Idiopathic Achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Annese, Vito; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Chaussade, Stanislas; Costantini, Mario; Cuttitta, Antonello; Elizalde, J. Ignasi; Fumagalli, Uberto; Gaudric, Marianne; Rohof, Wout O.; Smout, André J.; Tack, Jan; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Busch, Olivier R.; Lei, A.; Bartelsman, J.; Hirsch, D.; Klinkenberg-Knol, E. C.; Cuesta, M. A.; Simmermacher, R. K. J.; Kuipers, E. J.; Bonjer, H. J.; Masclee, A. A. M.; Ringers, J.; Lerut, A.; Metman, E. H.; Huten, N.; Letessier, E.; Dousset, B.; Pera, M.; Perez de la Serna, J.; Malesci, Alberto; Andriulli, A.; Scaramuzzi, G.; de Santo, E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Many experts consider laparoscopic Heller's myotomy (LHM) to be superior to pneumatic dilation for the treatment of achalasia, and LHM is increasingly considered to be the treatment of choice for this disorder. Methods We randomly assigned patients with newly diagnosed achalasia to

  17. New Endoscopic Indicator of Esophageal Achalasia: “Pinstripe Pattern”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Isomoto, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yasutoshi; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Aims Endoscopic diagnosis of esophageal achalasia lacking typical endoscopic features can be extremely difficult. The aim of this study was to identify simple and reliable early indicator of esophageal achalasia. Patients and Methods This single-center retrospective study included 56 cases of esophageal achalasia without previous treatment. As a control, 60 non-achalasia subjects including reflux esophagitis and superficial esophageal cancer were also included in this study. Endoscopic findings were evaluated according to Descriptive Rules for Achalasia of the Esophagus as follows: (1) esophageal dilatation, (2) abnormal retention of liquid and/or food, (3) whitish change of the mucosal surface, (4) functional stenosis of the esophago-gastric junction, and (5) abnormal contraction. Additionally, the presence of the longitudinal superficial wrinkles of esophageal mucosa, “pinstripe pattern (PSP)” was evaluated endoscopically. Then, inter-observer diagnostic agreement was assessed for each finding. Results The prevalence rates of the above-mentioned findings (1–5) were 41.1%, 41.1%, 16.1%, 94.6%, and 43.9%, respectively. PSP was observed in 60.7% of achalasia, while none of the control showed positivity for PSP. PSP was observed in 26 (62.5%) of 35 cases with shorter history achalasia were 83.8%, 64.7%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusion “Pinstripe pattern” could be a reliable indicator for early discrimination of primary esophageal achalasia. PMID:25664812

  18. New endoscopic indicator of esophageal achalasia: "pinstripe pattern".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Isomoto, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yasutoshi; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic diagnosis of esophageal achalasia lacking typical endoscopic features can be extremely difficult. The aim of this study was to identify simple and reliable early indicator of esophageal achalasia. This single-center retrospective study included 56 cases of esophageal achalasia without previous treatment. As a control, 60 non-achalasia subjects including reflux esophagitis and superficial esophageal cancer were also included in this study. Endoscopic findings were evaluated according to Descriptive Rules for Achalasia of the Esophagus as follows: (1) esophageal dilatation, (2) abnormal retention of liquid and/or food, (3) whitish change of the mucosal surface, (4) functional stenosis of the esophago-gastric junction, and (5) abnormal contraction. Additionally, the presence of the longitudinal superficial wrinkles of esophageal mucosa, "pinstripe pattern (PSP)" was evaluated endoscopically. Then, inter-observer diagnostic agreement was assessed for each finding. The prevalence rates of the above-mentioned findings (1-5) were 41.1%, 41.1%, 16.1%, 94.6%, and 43.9%, respectively. PSP was observed in 60.7% of achalasia, while none of the control showed positivity for PSP. PSP was observed in 26 (62.5%) of 35 cases with shorter history achalasia were 83.8%, 64.7%, and 100%, respectively. "Pinstripe pattern" could be a reliable indicator for early discrimination of primary esophageal achalasia.

  19. Incidence and costs of achalasia in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeij, F. B.; Ponds, F. A.; Smout, A. J.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Recent reports show increasing incidence of achalasia in some populations. The aim of this study was to estimate incidence, prevalence, and healthcare costs of achalasia in a large cohort in The Netherlands. Data were obtained from the largest Dutch healthcare insurance company (±4.4 million

  20. Laparoscopic treatment of achalasia at a low frequency center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Gonzalez, D.; Ruso, L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze the results of surgical treatment of achalasia by video laparoscopic approach. The laparoscopic treatment of achalasia esophageal provides excellent functional results in the short and long term. In Uruguay, for demographic reasons and low prevalence of the disease, the number of patients operated annually is low

  1. Erroneous diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessing, Boudewijn F.; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2011-01-01

    Most experienced gastroenterologists have seen one or several cases of achalasia patients who have been erroneously diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or even underwent antireflux surgery. We aim to describe the current knowledge about the diagnostic features of achalasia and

  2. Gastric myoelectrical and antroduodenal motor activity in patients with achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M. A.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary motor disorder of the oesophagus, in which the myenteric plexus is involved. However, abnormalities in other parts of the digestive tract have also been described in achalasia. Whether gastric myoelectrical and duodenal motor activity in these patients is also affected is

  3. Validation of a disease-specific quality-of-life questionnaire in a large sample of Dutch achalasia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankhuisen, R.; Heijkoop, R.; van Herwaarden, M. A.; de Vries, D. R.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Baron, A.; Samsom, M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: The aim of this study was to validate a translated version of an achalasia-specific quality-of-life questionnaire (achalasia-DSQoL) by examining its psychometric properties in a Dutch cohort of achalasia patients. The achalasia-DSQoL was administered to 171 treated achalasia patients

  4. Incontinence after primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter tears is related to relative length of reconstructed external sphincter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norderval, S; Røssaak, K.; Markskog, A

    2012-01-01

    To determine if anatomic primary repair with end-to-end reconstruction of the external anal sphincter (EAS) in its full length combined with separate repair of coexisting internal anal sphincter (IAS) tear, when present, results in less incontinence and better anal sphincter integrity compared...

  5. Esophageal Sphincter Device for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganz, Robert A.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Horgan, Santiago; Bemelman, Willem A.; Dunst, Christy M.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Lipham, John C.; Luketich, James D.; Melvin, W. Scott; Oelschlager, Brant K.; Schlack-Haerer, Steven C.; Smith, C. Daniel; Smith, Christopher C.; Dunn, Dan; Taiganides, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors often seek alternative therapy. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter. METHODS We prospectively assessed 100 patients

  6. Bladder-sphincter dysfunction in myelomeningocele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, J. D.; Dik, P.; de Jong, T. P.

    2001-01-01

    Pediatric urodynamics taught us that detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia creates a bladder outlet obstruction in about 50% of any population of children with myelomeningocele. This functional obstruction causes renal damage due to obstructive uropathy, exactly the same way as a congenital anatomical

  7. The prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booy, J D; Takata, J; Tomlinson, G; Urbach, D R

    2012-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease of the esophagus that has an unknown etiology. Genetic, infectious, and autoimmune mechanisms have each been proposed. Autoimmune diseases often occur in association with one another, either within a single individual or in a family. There have been separate case reports of patients with both achalasia and one or more autoimmune diseases, but no study has yet determined the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in the achalasia population. This paper aims to compare the prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with esophageal achalasia to the general population. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 193 achalasia patients who received treatment at Toronto's University Health Network between January 2000 and May 2010 to identify other autoimmune diseases and a number of control conditions. We determined the general population prevalence of autoimmune diseases from published epidemiological studies. The achalasia sample was, on average, 10-15 years older and had slightly more men than the control populations. Compared to the general population, patients with achalasia were 5.4 times more likely to have type I diabetes mellitus (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-19), 8.5 times as likely to have hypothyroidism (95% CI 5.0-14), 37 times as likely to have Sjögren's syndrome (95% CI 1.9-205), 43 times as likely to have systemic lupus erythematosus (95% CI 12-154), and 259 times as likely to have uveitis (95% CI 13-1438). Overall, patients with achalasia were 3.6 times more likely to suffer from any autoimmune condition (95% CI 2.5-5.3). Our findings are consistent with the impression that achalasia's etiology has an autoimmune component. Further research is needed to more conclusively define achalasia as an autoimmune disease. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  8. Biomimetic artificial sphincter muscles: status and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Vanessa; Fattorini, Elisa; Karapetkova, Maria; Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Weiss, Florian; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is the involuntary loss of bowel content and affects more than 12% of the adult population, including 45% of retirement home residents. Severe fecal incontinence is often treated by implanting an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, have long-term reoperation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. These statistics show that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter and that the development of an adaptive, biologically inspired implant is required. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are being developed as artificial muscles for a biomimetic sphincter, due to their suitable response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. However, at present the operation voltage of DEAs is too high for artificial muscles implanted in the human body. To reduce the operating voltage to tens of volts, we are using microfabrication to reduce the thickness of the elastomer layer to the nanometer level. Two microfabrication methods are being investigated: molecular beam deposition and electrospray deposition. This communication covers the current status and a perspective on the way forward, including the long-term prospects of constructing a smart sphincter from low-voltage sensors and actuators based on nanometer-thin dielectric elastomer films. As DEA can also provide sensory feedback, a biomimetic sphincter can be designed in accordance with the geometrical and mechanical parameters of its natural counterpart. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence du ring daily activities.

  9. Effectiveness of peroral endoscopic myotomy in the treatment of achalasia: a pilot trial in Chinese Han population with a minimum of one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ting Sheng; Guo, Hui Min; Yang, Tian; Peng, Chun Yan; Zou, Xiao Ping; Shi, Rui Hua

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the outcomes of Chinese Han patients who underwent peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for achalasia. Patients undergoing POEM for achalasia at the Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School were prospectively enrolled in this study, with a follow-up duration of at least one year. Their outcomes were evaluated by analyzing esophageal manometry, timed barium esophagogram and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), which were performed before surgery, 5 days after surgery and at the last follow-up. Patients' symptom relief was considered the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, esophageal emptying, patients' quality of life (QoL) and procedure-related complications. Eighty-seven patients were included in the study. Eckardt score after POEM was remarkably lower than the preoperative score (0.4 ± 0.7 vs 7.1 ± 2.1, P = 0.001). The preoperative LES pressure was 32.4 ± 15.3 mmHg, which was decreased to 3.8 ± 3.9 mmHg immediately after surgery. The height of the barium column at 1 min after barium swallow was significantly reduced after treatment (11.7 ± 1.2 cm vs 3.2 ± 1.6 cm, P achalasia, which can relieve the symptoms of achalasia by improving esophageal emptying and lowering LES pressure. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Treatment of achalasia: comparison of temporary stent insertion with pneumatic dilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yueqi; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua; Zhao Jungong; Li Feng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze and compare the clinical efficacy of temporary stent insertion with pneumatic dilation at the same diameter for the treatment of achalasia based on a long-term follow-up observation. Methods: A total of 101 treated achalasia patients were divided into pneumatic dilation group (group A, n=38) and temporary stent insertion group (group B, n=63). The diameter of the balloon and stent used for the procedure was 30 mm. The total symptom scores (TSSs) and esophageal manometry was used to assess the symptoms and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure improvement. Barium-swallow-esophageal study was employed to objectively evaluate the esophageal emptying function. Barium-swallow-esophageal study was employed to objectively evaluate the esophageal emptying function. TSSs and LES pressure improvement were assessed, recorded and compared during the regular interval follow-up. Results: Forty-nine pneumatic dilations and 65 stent insertions were successfully performed in all patients under fluoroscopic guidance. Complications included pain, reflux and bleeding, which occurred in 9 (23.6%), 8 (21.1%) and 3(8.0%) patients in group A, respectively, while in 27 (42.9%), 8 (12.7%) and 10 (15.9%) patients in group B, respectively. The stent was retained approximately 4-7 days and all stents were retrieved via endoscope. TSSs, esophageal manometry and postoperative barium esophagram showed significant improvement compared to those obtained before treatment (P<0.0001). At the end of follow-up, TSSs and LES pressure in group B were 4.00±1.00 and (43.67±12.66) mmHg, respectively, which were 10.20±0.45 (P=0.0096) and (58.60±8.65) mmHg (P=0.1687), respectively, in group A. The Kaplan-Meier curve revealed that group B obtained a better symptom remission than group A did (Log-rank test; P=0.0212). Conclusion: Long-term follow-up results indicate that for the treatment of achalasia retrievable stent placement is more effective than same diameter

  11. Laparoscopic graduated cardiomyotomy with anterior fundoplication as treatment for achalasia: experience of 48 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Etchegaray-Dondé

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aims: At the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Clinic of the Hospital General de Mexico, achalasia treatment has been standarized through strictly graduated cardiomyotomy. This procedure guarantees a complete myotomy for the satisfactory resolution of dysphagia, a characteristic symptom of achalasia. To ensure the inclusion of the entire lower esophageal sphincter, an 8 cm Penrose drain is placed at the surgical site 6 cm above the gastroesophageal junction and 2 cm in a caudal direction, for accurate laparoscopic measuring. The aim of our study was to evaluate the results of this technique. Materials and methods: A descriptive, retrospective, longitudinal, and observational study was conducted on a cohort of patients diagnosed with achalasia at the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Clinic of the Hospital General de México “Dr. Eduardo Liceaga”. Results: The study included 48 patients, 40 of whom had no prior surgical treatment and 8 that presented with recurrence. Forty-seven patients (97.9% underwent a laparoscopic procedure and conversion to open surgery was required in 2 of them (4.25% conversion rate. Postoperative progression was satisfactory in all cases, with mean oral diet commencement at 52 h and mean hospital stay of 5.7 days. No recurrence was registered during the mean follow-up period of 35.75 months and there were no deaths. Conclusions: Laparoscopic graduated (strictly measured cardiomyotomy with anterior fundoplication is a reproducible, efficacious, and safe option for the surgical treatment of achalasia. Resumen: Introducción y objetivos: En la Clínica de Tracto Digestivo Superior del Hospital General de México, el tratamiento de la acalasia se ha estandarizado mediante la realización de una cardiomiotomía estrictamente graduada que permite garantizar una miotomía completa para resolver de forma satisfactoria la disfagia característica de esta enfermedad. Un penrose de 8 cm, se coloca sobre el lecho

  12. Achalasia-Specific Quality of Life After Pneumatic Dilation or Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy With Partial Fundoplication: A Multicenter, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrystoja, Caitlin C; Darling, Gail E; Diamant, Nicholas E; Kortan, Paul P; Tomlinson, George A; Deitel, Wayne; Laporte, Audrey; Takata, Julie; Urbach, David R

    2016-11-01

    Achalasia is a chronic, progressive, and incurable esophageal motility disease. There is clinical uncertainty about which treatment should be recommended as first-line therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of pneumatic dilation compared with laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication in improving achalasia-specific quality of life. This was a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial at five academic hospitals in Canada. Fifty previously untreated adults with a clinical diagnosis of primary achalasia, confirmed by manometric testing, were enrolled between November 2005 and March 2010, and followed for 5 years after treatment. Randomization was stratified by site, in random blocks of size four and with balanced allocation. Patients were treated with pneumatic dilation or laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication. The primary outcome was the difference between the treatments in the mean improvement of the achalasia severity questionnaire (ASQ) score at 1 year from baseline. Prespecified secondary outcomes included general and gastrointestinal quality of life, symptoms, esophageal physiology measures (lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and pressure, esophageal emptying, abnormal esophageal acid exposure), complications, and incidence of retreatment. Functional and imaging studies were performed blinded and all outcome assessors were blinded. There were no significant differences between treatments in the improvement of ASQ score at 1 year from baseline (27.5 points in the Heller myotomy arm vs. 20.2 points in the pneumatic dilation arm; difference 7.3 points, 95% confidence interval -4.7 to 19.3; P=0.23). There were no differences between treatments in improvement of symptoms, general and gastrointestinal quality of life, or measures of esophageal physiology. Improvements in ASQ score diminished over time for both interventions. At 5 years, there were no differences between treatments in improvement of ASQ score

  13. Laparoscopic esophagomyotomy for achalasia in children: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, T Kumar; Naik, Nimesh D; Fahy, Aodhnait S; Arghami, Arman; Farley, David R; Ishitani, Michael B; Moir, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia in children is rare but ultimately requires endoscopic or surgical treatment. Historically, Heller esophagomyotomy has been recommended as the treatment of choice. The refinement of minimally invasive techniques has shifted the trend of treatment toward laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) in adults and children with achalasia. A review of the available literature on LHM performed in patients 5 years) outcomes is needed. Due to the infrequency of achalasia in children, these characteristics are unlikely to be defined without collaboration between multiple pediatric surgery centers. The introduction of peroral endoscopic myotomy and single-incision techniques, continue the trend of innovative approaches that may eventually become the standard of care. PMID:26839646

  14. The management of esophageal achalasia: from diagnosis to surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolsky, Adrian; Fisichella, P Marco

    2014-03-01

    The goal of this review is to illustrate our approach to patients with achalasia in terms of preoperative evaluation and surgical technique. Indications, patient selection and management are herein discussed. Specifically, we illustrate the pathogenetic theories and diagnostic algorithm with current up-to-date techniques to diagnose achalasia and its manometric variants. Finally, we focus on the therapeutic approaches available today: medical and surgical. A special emphasis is given on the surgical treatment of achalasia and we provide the reader with a detailed description of our pre and postoperative management.

  15. Radionuclide esophageal transit: an evaluation of therapy in achalasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, M.K.; Brady, C.E.; Weiland, F.L.

    1983-09-01

    We measured quantitative esophageal transit, expressed as percentage of esophageal retention, before and after pneumatic dilatation in two patients with achalasia. In the sitting position they ingested a 500 ml liquid meal containing 500 muCi technetium Tc 99m sulfur colloid. Radioactivity counts of the entire esophagus were plotted at five-minute intervals for 30 minutes. In five normal control subjects the esophagus essentially cleared in less than one minute. Both patients with achalasia had definite retention 30 minutes before dilatation and had quantitative improvement after dilatation. Radionuclide scintigraphic esophageal transit probably correlates better than other parameters with the physiologic degree of obstruction in achalasia.

  16. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangö, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, J; Rosthøj, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Jangö H, Langhoff-Roos J, Rosthøj S, Sakse A. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures: a population-based cohort study. BJOG 2012;00:000-000 DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03486.x. Objective  To determine the incidence and risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter...... were used to determine risk factors of recurrent ASR. Main outcome measures  The incidence of recurrent ASR and odds ratios for possible risk factors of recurrent ASR: age, body mass index, grade of ASR, birthweight, head circumference, gestational age, presentation, induction of labour, oxytocin...... augmentation, epidural, episiotomy, vacuum extraction, forceps, shoulder dystocia, delivery interval and year of second delivery. Results  Out of 159 446 women, 7336 (4.6%) experienced an ASR at first delivery, and 521 (7.1%) had a recurrent ASR (OR 5.91). The risk factors of recurrent ASR in the multivariate...

  17. A newly-designed temporary cardia stent for the treatment of achalasia:an experimental study in canine models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Xiaochun; Cheng Yingsheng; Zhu Yueqi; Li Feng; Wang Weiguo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of a newly-designed temporary covered cardia stent for the treatment of achalasia in canine models and to investigate the histopathological changes at different points of follow-up time after the stent was removed. Methods: The canine achalasia model was created by injecting benzyl-dimethyl-tetradecyl ammonium chloride (BAC) circumferentially into the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) of the dogs. Twenty-four dogs with achalasia were randomly and equally divided into two groups with 12 dogs in each group: control group (using routine esophageal stents) and study group (using newly-designed temporary covered cardia stents). Under fluoroscopic guidance stents were implanted in the esophagus and were taken away from the esophagus 4 days after stent insertion in experimental dogs of both groups. LES pressures and timed barium esophagography (TBE) were performed in all dogs before and immediately after the stenting procedure, as well as at one week, 3 and 6 months after the stent was removed. Every three dogs were sacrificed each time at one week, 3 and 6 months after the stent was removed. The esophageal cardia was excised and sent for pathological examination. Results: All animals well tolerated the stent insertion / removal and the follow-up procedures. No severe complications such as esophageal perforation occurred. Comparison between two groups showed that stent migration occurrence was much lower in study group (n = 1) than that in control group (n = 5). The reduction of LES pressures in study group was more significant in comparison with control group (at 6-month follow-up, P = 0.027). The difference in barium column product (height x width) between 0-min and 5-min TBE was statistically significant in study group (at 3-month follow-up, P = 0.009). Integrated analysis of multi-comparison for LES pressures among subgroups of each group revealed that the dogs in study group exhibited better outcomes than the dogs in

  18. Clinical role of a modified seton technique for the treatment of trans-sphincteric and supra-sphincteric anal fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Yukihiko; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Saito, Tohru

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a modified seton technique that resects the external fistula tract while preserving the anal sphincter muscle. This study assessed the technique when used for the management of complex anal fistulas. Between January 2006 and December 2007, 239 patients (208 males and 31 females, median age: 41 years) underwent surgery for complex anal fistulas using the technique. Of the 239 patients, 198 patients had trans-sphincteric fistula and 41 patients had supra-sphincteric fistula. The durations of the surgeries were 17 min (47, 13) [median (range, interquartile range)] for trans-sphincteric fistulas and 38 (44, 16) for supra-sphincteric fistulas. The durations of the surgeries were significantly (P trans-sphincteric fistula. The hospital stays were 4 (13, 2) days and 5 (14, 3) days, respectively, for trans- and supra-sphincteric fistulas. The durations of seton placement until the spontaneous dropping of the seton were 42 (121, 48) and 141 (171, 55) days respectively. The recurrence rate was 0 % in patients with trans-sphincteric fistulas and 4.9 % (2 of 41) in patients with supra-sphincteric fistulas (P < 0.01). Serious incontinence was not observed. The technique provided favorable results for the treatment of complex anal fistulas and could be safely applied while preserving the sphincter function and conserving fecal continence.

  19. Giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp misdiagnosed as achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoş, I; Istrate, A; Codreşi, M; Bolca, C

    2012-01-01

    A 59 years old woman was admitted in our unit accusing longtime dysphagia and regurgitation. On admission, the patient was wearing a 3 month old definitive feeding gastrostomy tube. The contrast swallow, endoscopy and esophageal manometry established the diagnostic--achalasia. We removed the gastrostomy tube and we performed an open Heller myotomy. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged one week later with affirmatively unimpaired deglutition. One month later, the patient was admitted via emergency with a giant fibrous tumor arising from her mouth after an episode of strong coughing and vomiting. The repeated endoscopy showed a giant esophageal polyp that was missed by the previous investigations, originating from pharingoesophageal junction. The esophageal polyp was resected by cervical approach with good postoperative outcome. The polyp's particular extreme dimensions (27 cm) prevented the acute asphyxia by blockage at the laryngeal level, possibly provoked by smaller tumors. As postoperative one month barium swallow showed a normal esophageal aspect, a final question remains--was achalasia real or an erroneous diagnosis was established the second time too?

  20. [The artificial sphincter: therapy for faecal incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, U

    2012-08-01

    Faecal incontinence (FI) challenges a patient's professional, social and sexual life. Often the patient becomes depressive and socially isolated. If able to break open for therapy the patient should receive as first line a conservative treatment (like dietary measures, pelvic re-education, biofeedback, bulking agents, irrigation). When is the time to implant an artificial anal sphincter? If conservative therapy fails as well as surgical options (like a sphincteroplasty - if indicated a reconstruction of the pelvic floor if insufficient, or a sacral nerve stimulation) an ultimo surgical procedure should be offered to appropriate and compliant patients: an artificial anal sphincter. Worldwide, there are two established devices on the market: the artificial bowel sphincter® (ABS) from A. M. S. (Minnetonka, MN, USA) and the soft anal band® from A. M. I. (Feldkirch, Austria). How to implant the artificial anal sphincter? Both devices consist of a silicon cuff which can be filled with fluid. Under absolute aseptic conditions this cuff is placed in the lithotomy position by perianal incisions around the anal canal below the pelvic floor. A silicon tube connects the anal cuff with a reservoir (containing fluid) which is placed either behind the pubis bone in front of the bladder (ABS) or below the costal arch (anal band). With a pump placed in the scrotum/labia (ABS) or by pressing the balloon (anal band) in both types operated by the patient the fluid is shifted forth and back between the anal cuff and the reservoir closing or opening the anal canal. Both systems are placed completely subcutaneously. Both devices improve significantly the anal continence. Both systems have a high rate of reoperations. However, the causes for the redos are different. The ABS is associated with high infection and anal penetration rates of the cuff leading to an explantation rate to up to 60 % of the implants. This kind of complication seems to be much lower with the anal band. The major

  1. Surgery or Peroral Esophageal Myotomy for Achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Luigi; Pallabazzer, Giovanni; Solito, Biagio; Santi, Stefano; Pigazzi, Alessio; De Luca, Raffaele; Biondo, Francesco Giuseppe; Spaziani, Alessandro; Longaroni, Maurizio; Di Martino, Natale; Boccardi, Virginia; Patriti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To date very few studies with small sample size have compared peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM) with the current surgical standard of care, laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM), in terms of efficacy and safety, and no recommendations have been proposed. To investigate the efficacy and safety of POEM compared with LHM, for the treatment of achalasia. The databases of Pubmed, Medline, Cochrane, and Ovid were systematically searched between January 1, 2005 and January 31, 2015, with the medical subject headings (MeSH) and keywords “achalasia,” “POEM,” “per oral endoscopic myotomy,” and “peroral endoscopic myotomy,” “laparoscopic Heller myotomy” (LHM), “Heller myotomy.” All types of study designs including adult patients with diagnosis of achalasia were selected. Studies that did not report the comparison between endoscopic and surgical treatment, experimental studies in animal models, single case reports, technical reports, reviews, abstracts, and editorials were excluded. The total number of included patients was 486 (196 in POEM group and 290 in LHM group). There were no differences between POEM and LHM in reduction in Eckardt score (MD = −0.659, 95% CI: −1.70 to 0.38, P = 0.217), operative time (MD = −0.354, 95% CI: −1.12 to 0.41, P = 0.36), postoperative pain scores (MD = −1.86, 95% CI: −5.17 to 1.44, P = 0.268), analgesic requirements (MD = −0.74, 95% CI: −2.65 to 1.16, P = 0.445), and complications (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.5–2.44, P = 0.796). Length of hospital stay was significantly lower for POEM (MD = −0.629, 95% CI: −1.256 to −0.002, P = 0.049). There was a trend toward significant reduction in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux rate in favors of LHM compared to POEM group (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.11–2.95, P = 0.017). All included studied were not randomized. Furthermore all selected studies did not report the results of follow-up longer than 1 year and

  2. Achalasia as a complication of bulimia nervosa: A case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-02-07

    Feb 7, 2017 ... İzzet Baysal University, Turkey ... Toros F, Kaytanli U. Achalasia ... She stated that her father had deserted them for someone ... distinguish organic and psychological vomiting or comorbidity because of overlapping of the.

  3. New endoscopic indicator of esophageal achalasia: "pinstripe pattern".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Minami

    Full Text Available Endoscopic diagnosis of esophageal achalasia lacking typical endoscopic features can be extremely difficult. The aim of this study was to identify simple and reliable early indicator of esophageal achalasia.This single-center retrospective study included 56 cases of esophageal achalasia without previous treatment. As a control, 60 non-achalasia subjects including reflux esophagitis and superficial esophageal cancer were also included in this study. Endoscopic findings were evaluated according to Descriptive Rules for Achalasia of the Esophagus as follows: (1 esophageal dilatation, (2 abnormal retention of liquid and/or food, (3 whitish change of the mucosal surface, (4 functional stenosis of the esophago-gastric junction, and (5 abnormal contraction. Additionally, the presence of the longitudinal superficial wrinkles of esophageal mucosa, "pinstripe pattern (PSP" was evaluated endoscopically. Then, inter-observer diagnostic agreement was assessed for each finding.The prevalence rates of the above-mentioned findings (1-5 were 41.1%, 41.1%, 16.1%, 94.6%, and 43.9%, respectively. PSP was observed in 60.7% of achalasia, while none of the control showed positivity for PSP. PSP was observed in 26 (62.5% of 35 cases with shorter history < 10 years, which usually lacks typical findings such as severe esophageal dilation and tortuosity. Inter-observer agreement level was substantial for food/liquid remnant (k = 0.6861 and PSP (k = 0.6098, and was fair for abnormal contraction and white change. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for achalasia were 83.8%, 64.7%, and 100%, respectively."Pinstripe pattern" could be a reliable indicator for early discrimination of primary esophageal achalasia.

  4. Data analyses and perspectives on laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se-Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    In general, the treatment methods for esophageal achalasia are largely classified into four groups, including drug therapy using nitrite or a calcium channel blocker, botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic therapy such as endoscopic balloon dilation, and surgery. Various studies have suggested that the most effective treatment of esophageal achalasia is surgical therapy. The basic concept of this surgical therapy has not changed since Heller proposed esophageal myotomy for the purpose of resol...

  5. The Pathogenesis and Management of Achalasia: Current Status and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Ates, Fehmi; Vaezi, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder that is commonly misdiagnosed initially as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Patients with achalasia often complain of dysphagia with solids and liquids but may focus on regurgitation as the primary symptom, leading to initial misdiagnosis. Diagnostic tests for achalasia include esophageal motility testing, esophagogastroduodenoscopy and barium swallow. These tests play a complimentary role in establishing the diagnosis of suspected achalasia. High-...

  6. Ling classification describes endoscopic progressive process of achalasia and successful peroral endoscopy myotomy prevents endoscopic progression of achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Gang; Linghu, En-Qiang; Chai, Ning-Li; Li, Hui-Kai

    2017-05-14

    To verify the hypothesis that the Ling classification describes the endoscopic progressive process of achalasia and determine the ability of successful peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) to prevent endoscopic progression of achalasia. We retrospectively reviewed the endoscopic findings, symptom duration, and manometric data in patients with achalasia. A total of 359 patients (197 women, 162 men) with a mean age of 42.1 years (range, 12-75 years) were evaluated. Symptom duration ranged from 2 to 360 mo, with a median of 36 mo. Patients were classified with Ling type I ( n = 119), IIa ( n = 106), IIb ( n = 60), IIc ( n = 60), or III ( n = 14), according to the Ling classification. Of the 359 patients, 349 underwent POEM, among whom 21 had an endoscopic follow-up for more than 2 years. Pre-treatment and post-treatment Ling classifications of these 21 patients were compared. Symptom duration increased significantly with increasing Ling classification (from I to III) ( P achalasia and may be able to serve as an endoscopic assessment criterion for achalasia. Successful POEM (Eckardt score ≤ 3) seems to have the ability to prevent endoscopic evolvement of achalasia. However, studies with larger populations are warranted to confirm our findings.

  7. Early discharge after external anal sphincter repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    and complications within 30 days after the operation. Surgery was performed during the period of March 1993 to May 1997. The accelerated-stay program included preoperative information, no premedication, a surgical procedure without colostomy, single-dose prophylactic antibiotics, paracetamol for analgesia, free...... surgery and 5 patients stayed for 48 hours after the operation. There was no 30-day morbidity, and no patient received a colostomy in conjunction with the sphincter repair. Fourteen of 19 patients available for follow-up reported a significantly improved functional result compared with preoperative state...

  8. Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy and Dor Fundoplication for Esophageal Achalasia: Technique and Perioperative Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Ciro; Fisichella, P Marco

    2016-11-01

    Surgical correction of achalasia using laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication is argued to be the gold standard treatment for patients with achalasia. The goal of this technical report is to illustrate our preferred approach to patients with achalasia and to provide the reader with a detailed description of our operative technique, its rationale, and our pre and postoperative management.

  9. Sphincter Saving Surgery in Low Rectal Carcinoma in a Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgery is the principal modality of treatment of rectal carcinoma in order to achieve cure. Sphincter saving surgery improves the quality of life of patients with low rectal carcinoma. Aim: To report a case of sphincter saving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer with hand sown colorectal anastomosis

  10. The Danish anal sphincter rupture questionnaire: Validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Ottesen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To revise, validate and test for reliability an anal sphincter rupture questionnaire in relation to construct, content and face validity. Setting and background. Since 1996 women with anal sphincter rupture (ASR) at one of the public university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark have bee...

  11. Anal sphincter complex: endoanal MR imaging of normal anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, S. M.; Stoker, J.; Laméris, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the normal anatomy of the anal sphincter complex on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Ten healthy volunteers (four men, six women; age range, 21-26 years) underwent MR imaging with an endoanal coil. The lower part of the anal canal contained the internal sphincter, the longitudinal muscle

  12. Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy for Non-Dilated Esophageal Achalasia in Children with Intraoperative Stepped Dilation Under Image Guidance: Attempting Complete Myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Go; Miyake, Hiromu; Koyama, Mariko; Morita, Keiichi; Kaneshiro, Masakatsu; Nouso, Hiroshi; Yamoto, Masaya; Fukumoto, Koji; Urushihara, Naoto

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a modified surgical approach to laparoscopic myotomy for achalasia using stepped dilation with a Rigiflex balloon and contrast medium under image guidance. A 10-year-old boy with persistent dysphagia and vomiting had ingested only liquids for 3 months, losing >10 kg in body weight. Barium swallow and esophageal manometry diagnosed esophageal achalasia with mild esophageal dilatation. After failed pneumatic dilatation, laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication was performed. Prior to surgery, a Rigiflex balloon dilator was placed within the esophagus near the diaphragmatic hiatus. A four-port technique was used, and mobilization of the esophagus was limited to the anterior aspect. A 5-cm Heller myotomy was performed, extending another 2 cm onto the anterior gastric wall. During myotomy, the Rigiflex balloon was serially dilated from 30 to 50 mL, and filled with contrast medium under fluoroscopic image guidance in order to maintain appropriate tension on the esophagus to facilitate myotomy, and to confirm adequate myotomy with sufficient release of lower esophageal sphincter by resecting residual circular muscle fibers. Residual circular muscle fibers can be simultaneously visualized under both fluoroscopic image guidance and direct observation through the laparoscope, and they were cut precisely until the residual notch fully disappeared. Dor fundoplication was completed. The operative time was 180 minutes, and oral intake was started after esophagography on postoperative day 1. As of the 12-month follow-up, the patient has not shown any symptoms, and his postoperative course appeared satisfactory.

  13. Temporary endoscopic metallic stent for idiopathic esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Franco; Gaia, Silvia; Rolle, Emanuela; Recchia, Serafino

    2014-02-01

    Idiopathic achalasia is a motor disorder of the esophagus of unknown etiology caused by loss of motor neurons determining an altered motility. It may determine severe symptoms such as progressive dysphagia, regurgitations, and pulmonary aspirations. Many therapeutic options may be offered to patients with achalasia, from surgery to endoscopic treatments such as pneumatic dilation, botulinum injection, peroral endoscopic myotomy, or endoscopic stenting. Recently, temporary placement of a stent was proposed by Cheng as therapy for achalasia disorders, whereas no Western authors have dealt with it up to date. The present study reports our preliminary experience in 7 patients with achalasia treated with a temporary stent. Partially covered self-expanding metallic stents (Micro-Tech, Nanjin, China) 80 mm long and 30 mm wide were placed under fluoroscopic control and removed after 6 days. Clinical follow-up was scheduled to check endoscopic success, symptoms release, and complications. The placement and the removal of the stents were obtained in all patients without complications. Mean clinical follow-up was 19 months. Five out of 7 patients referred total symptoms release and 2 experienced significant improvement of dysphagia. The procedure was not time consuming and was safe; no mild or severe complications were registered. In conclusion, our results may suggest a possible safe and effective endoscopic alternative treatment in patients with achalasia; however, further larger studies are necessary to confirm these promising, but very preliminary, data.

  14. Outcomes of esophagectomy for esophageal achalasia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molena, Daniela; Mungo, Benedetto; Stem, Miloslawa; Feinberg, Richard L; Lidor, Anne O

    2014-02-01

    While the outcomes after Heller myotomy have been extensively reported, little is known about patients with esophageal achalasia who are treated with esophagectomy. This was a retrospective analysis using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample over an 11-year period (2000-2010). Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of achalasia who underwent esophagectomy (group 1) were compared to patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy (group 2) during the same time period. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, postoperative complications, and total hospital charges. A propensity-matched analysis was conducted comparing the same outcomes between group 1 and well-matched controls in group 2. Nine hundred sixty-three patients with achalasia and 18,003 patients with esophageal cancer underwent esophagectomy. The propensity matched analysis showed a trend toward a higher mortality in group 2 (7.8 vs. 2.9 %, p = 0.08). Postoperative length of stay and complications were similar in both groups. Total hospital charges were higher for the achalasia group ($115,087 vs. $99, 654.2, p = 0.006). This is the largest study to date examining outcomes after esophagectomy in patients with achalasia. Based on our findings, esophagectomy can be considered a safe option, and surgeons should not be hindered by a perceived notion of prohibitive operative risk in this patient population.

  15. Mucosal perforation during laparoscopic surgery for achalasia: impact of preoperative pneumatic balloon dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souma, Yoshihito; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Taniguchi, Eiji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Hamada, Tetsuhiro; Yasuda, Jun; Yumiba, Takeyoshi; Ohashi, Shuichi; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-03-01

    Controversy remains whether preoperative pneumatic balloon dilation (PBD) influences the surgical outcome of laparoscopic esophagocardiomyotomy in patients with esophageal achalasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether preoperative PBD represents a risk factor for surgical complications and affects the symptomatic and/or functional outcomes of laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication (LHD). A retrospective chart review was conducted on a prospectively compiled surgical database of 103 consecutive patients with esophageal achalasia who underwent LHD from November 1994 to September 2014. The following data were compared between the patients with preoperative PBD (PBD group; n = 26) and without PBD (non-PBD group; n = 77): (1) patients' demographics: age, gender, body mass index, duration of symptoms, maximum transverse diameter of esophagus; (2) operative findings: operating time, blood loss, intraoperative complications; (3) postoperative course: complications, clinical symptoms, postoperative treatment; and (4) esophageal functional tests: preoperative and postoperative manometric data and postoperative profile of 24-h esophageal pH monitoring. (1) No significant differences were observed in the patients' demographics. (2) Operative findings were similar between the two groups; however, the incidence of mucosal perforation was significantly higher in the PBD group (n = 8; 30.7 %) compared to the non-PBD group (n = 6; 7.7 %) (p = 0.005). (3) Postoperative complications were not encountered in either group. The differences were not significant for postoperative clinical symptoms, the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease, or necessity of postoperative treatments. (4) Lower esophageal sphincter pressure was effectively reduced in both groups, and no differences were observed in manometric data or 24-h pH monitoring profiles between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that preoperative PBD and the

  16. Optimization of the artificial urinary sphincter: modelling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti, Florian; Leippold, Thomas; John, Hubert; Blunschi, Nadine; Mueller, Bert

    2006-01-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter should be long enough to prevent strangulation effects of the urethral tissue and short enough to avoid the improper dissection of the surrounding tissue. To optimize the sphincter length, the empirical three-parameter urethra compression model is proposed based on the mechanical properties of the urethra: wall pressure, tissue response rim force and sphincter periphery length. In vitro studies using explanted animal or human urethras and different artificial sphincters demonstrate its applicability. The pressure of the sphincter to close the urethra is shown to be a linear function of the bladder pressure. The force to close the urethra depends on the sphincter length linearly. Human urethras display the same dependences as the urethras of pig, dog, sheep and calf. Quantitatively, however, sow urethras resemble best the human ones. For the human urethras, the mean wall pressure corresponds to (-12.6 ± 0.9) cmH 2 O and (-8.7 ± 1.1) cmH 2 O, the rim length to (3.0 ± 0.3) mm and (5.1 ± 0.3) mm and the rim force to (60 ± 20) mN and (100 ± 20) mN for urethra opening and closing, respectively. Assuming an intravesical pressure of 40 cmH 2 O, and an external pressure on the urethra of 60 cmH 2 O, the model leads to the optimized sphincter length of (17.3 ± 3.8) mm

  17. Anal sphincter responses after perianal electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ejnar; Klemar, B; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    By perianal electrical stimulation and EMG recording from the external anal sphincter three responses were found with latencies of 2-8, 13-18 and 30-60 ms, respectively. The two first responses were recorded in most cases. They were characterised by constant latency and uniform pattern, were...... not fatigued by repeated stimulation, were most dependent on placement of stimulating and recording electrodes, and always had a higher threshold than the third response. The third response was constantly present in normal subjects. It had the longest EMG response and the latency decreased with increasing...... stimulation to a minimum of 30-60 ms. This response represented the clinical observable spinal reflex, "the classical anal reflex". The latencies of the two first responses were so short that they probably do not represent spinal reflexes. This was further supported by the effect of epidural anaesthesia which...

  18. Laparoscopic treatment of achalasia -first case in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferid Latić

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder. Commonly used treatments are botulinum toxin injections, endoscopic balloon dilation and surgical myotomy with or withoutfundoplication. We are hereby presenting the first case of laproscopic myotomy with fundoplication performed in Croatia. A 32-year old female was admitted to the hospital due to the symptoms of dysphagia, regurgitation, chest pain and weight loss. Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography with contrast and flexible endoscopy confirmed the clinical diagnosis of achalasia. She was treated by the Heller laparoscopic procedure and Dor anterior fundoplication. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged on the fifth postoperative day. This case shows thatlaparoscopic treatment of achalasia is a feasibile and safe procedure which can be performed even in a small country hospital, but it requires great technical care and experience of the surgeon.

  19. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations. PMID:26717928

  20. Pneumatic dilatation in achalasia cardia results and follow-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supe A

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic dilatation is one of the more recent methods in the management of achalasia cardia. Fifty dilatations were done in 42 patients with achalasia cardia over 5 years. There was a significant decrease in the maximum diameter of the oesophagus and a significant increase in diameter in the narrowed lower oesophageal segment in all the patients. Of the patients studied, 95.23% were relieved of their symptoms after only one to two sessions. There were no immediate complications. Out of the 38 patients on long term follow up, 8 (21.05% had recurrence of symptoms. On repeat dilatations, 4 (50% of them had good response. Late complication like reflux oesophagitis was observed in only 1 patient over a median follow up period of 22 months. It was thus concluded that pneumatic dilatation is a safe, simple and effective procedure in managing patients with achalasia cardia.

  1. Manometric and clinical analysis of patients with Achalasia in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montazeri Q

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Seventy-one patients with achalasia were studied. They were 2-29 years old. Dysphagia to solid food was the main presenting symptom (100 percent. Reliable and persistent manometric findings were absence of normal contraction waves in association with the presence of low amplitudes simultaneous waves in all cases. In vigorous achalasia, weight loss (P=0.001, dysphagia (P=0.012 and LES pressures (P=0.01 were significantly different in comparison to classic achalasia. Manometry was done in 18 patients who were treated with pneumatic dilation. LES pressure (P=0.003 and esophageal basal pressures were significantly dropped one month after pneumatic dilation (P=0.01. Normal contraction wave did not appeare in any of treated cases.

  2. [Anal sphincter injury caused by falling off a trampoline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    A girl of preschool age fell off a trampoline in a sitting position onto an iron bar sticking up from the ground. In addition to a laceration of the terminal portion of the rectum, she was found to have a severe sphincter injury. The sphincters were repaired by a surgeon the next morning. After one month from the surgery the anal canal pressure was found to be symmetrical with good contractile force of the sphincters. No abnormalities were found in a contrast study or in rectoscopy. The protective stoma was closed after three months from the injury and fecal continence was normal after one and a half years.

  3. Coexistent Hirschsprung's disease and esophageal achalasia in male siblings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, J L

    2012-02-03

    Achalasia of the esophagus developed in two male siblings soon after birth, and they were successfully treated by surgery. Persistent signs resulted in the later diagnosis of Hirschsprung\\'s disease. One required subtotal colectomy and ileoanal anastomosis, and the other is managing well on conservative treatment. Genetic analysis of the genes encoding the RET protooncogene, endothelin-3, and the endothelin-3 receptor did not show any defect. Familial achalasia of the esophagus in combination with Hirschsprung\\'s disease has never been reported.

  4. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  5. Pneumatic Dilation of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter Can Now Be Successfully Performed Without Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Bustamante, Marco; Moraveji, Sharareh; McCallum, Richard W

    2016-11-01

    Patients with dysphagia may be diagnosed with impaired lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and treated with pneumatic dilation (PD), stretching and tearing LES muscle fibers. Esophageal perforation has been reported to be as high as 10%. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the perforation rate of PD when used for impaired relaxation of the LES using current techniques. A chart review was conducted to identify patients referred for esophageal manometry by high-resolution manometry and later received PD from January 2013 to April 2016. The diagnoses of achalasia, gastroesophageal junction outlet obstruction or hypertensive LES with accompanying impaired LES relaxation were based on the Chicago Classification III. Demographic data, clinical findings, treatment approaches and outcomes were explored. A total of 187 patients were referred for dysphagia and had esophageal manometry during this time frame. In all, 62 patients (34 female), mean age of 52 years, met the criteria for incomplete relaxation of the LES and underwent a total of 88 PD procedures. All initial PD procedures used the 30-mm diameter balloon, 18 subsequently required a 35-mm balloon and 8 went on to 40-mm balloon size. No perforations or other complications were documented by esophagogastroduodenoscopy, gastrografin testing immediately postdilation or by subsequent clinical outcome. PD by an experienced gastroenterologist using general anesthesia, fluoroscopic guidance, Rigiflex balloon equipment and a specific repetitive technique can be successfully performed without perforation. Hence, the already known therapeutic efficacy of PD can now be combined with the knowledge that there is essentially no accompanying perforation rate. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Esophageal cancer screening in achalasia: is there a consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, K; Geno, D M; Katzka, D A

    2015-04-01

    Achalasia is an important but relatively uncommon disorder. While highly effective therapeutic options exist, esophageal cancer remains a long-term potential complication. The risk of esophageal cancer in achalasia remains unclear, with current guidelines recommending against routine endoscopic screening. However, given limited data and conflicting opinion, it is unknown whether consensus regarding screening practices in achalasia among experts exists. A 10-question survey to assess screening practices in achalasia was created and distributed to 28 experts in the area of achalasia. Experts were identified based on publications and meeting presentations in the field. Survey responses were received from 17 of 28 (61%) experts. Wide geographic distribution was seen among respondents, with eight (47%) from Europe or Australia, seven (41%) from the United States, and two (12%) from Asia. Screening for esophageal cancer was inconsistent, with nine (53%) experts endorsing the practice and eight (47%) not. Screening practices did not differ among geographic regions. No consensus regarding the risk for esophageal cancer in achalasia was seen, with three experts reporting no increased risk compared with the general population, eight experts a lifetime risk of 0.1-0.5%, three experts a 0.5-1% risk, two experts a 1-2% risk, and one expert a 3-5% risk. However, these differences in perception of risk did not influence screening practices. Upper endoscopy was utilized among all experts who endorsed screening. However, practices still varied with screening commencing at or within 1 year of diagnosis in two practices compared with 5 and 10 years in three respective practices each. Surveillance intervals also varied, performed every 2 years in four practices, every 3 years in four practices, and every 5 years in one practice. Practice variation in the management of achalasia itself was also seen, with initial treatment with Heller myotomy endorsed by eight experts, pneumatic

  7. Radiology of the AS 800 artificial urinary sphincter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.; Shetty, M.K.; Flood, H.D.; Grainger, R.

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen adult male patients who had an AS 800 artificial urinary sphincter inserted are reviewed. Five have had malfunction, and in four the causes were diagnosed radiologically. These included: fistula formation, leakage of hydraulic fluid, air in the system, and inadequate deflation of the cuff. Since the sphincter is filled with contrast medium, it is ideally suited to radiological assessment. (author). 5 refs.; 6 figs

  8. Robot-assisted Heller's myotomy for achalasia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altokhais, Tariq; Mandora, Hala; Al-Qahtani, Ayed; Al-Bassam, Abdulrahman

    2016-12-01

    Achalasia is rare in children. Surgical options include open, laparoscopic and robotic approaches. However, Heller's myotomy remains the treatment of choice. This report describes our experience with robot-assisted Heller's myotomy in children and presents a review of the literature. Included in this study are children who underwent robot-assisted Heller's myotomy for esophageal achalasia via the Da Vinci surgical system between 2004 and 2015 at King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The medical records of these patients were reviewed for demographic data, presenting symptoms, diagnostic modalities, operative procedures, complications, outcomes and follow-ups. Six patients were identified. The age of the patients at surgery ranged between 2 and 12 years (mean 7.1 years). The most common presenting symptoms were dysphagia, vomiting and nocturnal cough. Contrast swallow and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy established a diagnosis of esophageal achalasia in all of the patients. Four patients underwent esophageal dilatation 2-5 times before the definitive procedure. All patients underwent successful robot-assisted Heller's myotomy with concomitant partial posterior fundoplication. The postoperative course was uneventful. Five patients had a complete resolution of the symptoms and one patient improved. The follow-up assessments have been consistent and have ranged from 0.5 to 11 years (mean 4.4 years). Robotic-assisted Heller's myotomy for esophageal achalasia in children is safe and effective and is a suitable alternative to open and laparoscopic approaches.

  9. Data analyses and perspectives on laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se-Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    In general, the treatment methods for esophageal achalasia are largely classified into four groups, including drug therapy using nitrite or a calcium channel blocker, botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic therapy such as endoscopic balloon dilation, and surgery. Various studies have suggested that the most effective treatment of esophageal achalasia is surgical therapy. The basic concept of this surgical therapy has not changed since Heller proposed esophageal myotomy for the purpose of resolution of lower esophageal obstruction for the first time in 1913, but the most common approach has changed from open-chest surgery to laparoscopic surgery. Currently, the laparoscopic surgery has been the procedure of choice for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. During the process of the transition from open-chest surgery to laparotomy, to thoracoscopic surgery, and to laparoscopic surgery, the necessity of combining antireflux surgery has been recognized. There is some debate as to which type of antireflux surgery should be selected. The Toupet fundoplication may be the most effective in prevention of postoperative antireflux, but many medical institutions have selected the Dor fundoplication which covers the mucosal surface exposed by myotomy. Recently, a new endoscopic approach, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), has received attention. Future studies should examine the long-term outcomes and whether POEM becomes the gold standard for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:26478674

  10. Efficacy of pneumodilation in achalasia after failed Heller myotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saleh, C. M. G.; Ponds, F. A. M.; Schijven, M. P.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Heller myotomy is an effective treatment for the majority of achalasia patients. However, a small proportion of patients suffer from persistent or recurrent symptoms after surgery and they are usually subsequently treated with pneumodilation (PD). Data on the efficacy of PD as secondary treatment

  11. Coexistent Hirschsprung's disease and esophageal achalasia in male siblings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, JL; Mulcahy, TM; O'Riordain, DS; Buys, CHCM; Hofstra, RMW; McCarthy, T; Kirwan, WO

    1997-01-01

    Achalasia of the esophagus developed in two male siblings soon after birth, and they were successfully treated by surgery. Persistent signs resulted in the later diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease. One required subtotal colectomy and ileoanal anastomosis, and the other is managing well on

  12. Hospitalization for esophageal achalasia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molena, Daniela; Mungo, Benedetto; Stem, Miloslawa; Lidor, Anne O

    2015-09-25

    To assess the outcome of different treatments in patients admitted for esophageal achalasia in the United States. This is a retrospective analysis using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample over an 8-year period (2003-2010). Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of achalasia were divided into 3 groups based on their treatment: (1) Group 1: patients who underwent Heller myotomy during their hospital stay; (2) Group 2: patients who underwent esophagectomy; and (3) Group 3: patients not undergoing surgical treatment. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included length of stay (LOS), discharge destination and total hospital charges. Among 27141 patients admitted with achalasia, nearly half (48.5%) underwent Heller myotomy, 2.5% underwent esophagectomy and 49.0% had endoscopic or other treatment. Patients in group 1 were younger, healthier, and had the lowest mortality when compared with the other two groups. Group 2 had the highest LOS and hospital charges among all groups. Group 3 had the highest mortality (1.2%, P achalasia carries exceedingly low mortality in the modern era; however, in complicated patients, even less invasive treatments are burdened by significant mortality and morbidity.

  13. Outcomes of treatment for achalasia depend on manometric subtype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, Wout O.; Salvador, Renato; Annese, Vito; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Chaussade, Stanislas; Costantini, Mario; Elizalde, J. Ignasi; Gaudric, Marianne; Smout, Andre J.; Tack, Jan; Busch, Olivier R.; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with achalasia are treated with either pneumatic dilation (PD) or laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM), which have comparable rates of success. We evaluated whether manometric subtype was associated with response to treatment in a large population of patients treated with either PD or LHM (the

  14. Current status in the treatment options for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Chiu, Chien-Hua; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lee, Jyong-Hong; Lu, Hung-I; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Wu, Keng-Liang

    2013-09-07

    Recent advances in the treatment of achalasia include the use of high-resolution manometry to predict the outcome of patients and the introduction of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first multicenter randomized, controlled, 2-year follow-up study conducted by the European Achalasia Trial group indicated that laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) was not superior to pneumatic dilations (PD). Publications on the long-term success of laparoscopic surgery continue to emerge. In addition, laparoscopic single-site surgery is applicable to advanced laparoscopic operations such as LHM and anterior fundoplication. The optimal treatment option is an ongoing matter of debate. In this review, we provide an update of the current progress in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Unless new conclusive data prove otherwise, LHM is considered the most durable treatment for achalasia at the expense of increased reflux-associated complications. However, PD is the first choice for non-surgical treatment and is more cost-effective. Repeated PD according to an "on-demand" strategy based on symptom recurrence can achieve long-term remission. Decision making should be based on clinical evidence that identifies a subcategory of patients who would benefit from specific treatment options. POEM has shown promise but its long-term efficacy and safety need to be assessed further.

  15. Gender effect on clinical features of achalasia: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdavinia Mahboobeh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achalasia is a well-characterized esophageal motor disorder but the rarity of the disease limits performing large studies on its demographic and clinical features. Methods Prospectively, 213 achalasia patients (110 men and 103 women were enrolled in the study. The diagnosis established by clinical, radiographic, and endoscopic as well as manometry criteria. All patients underwent a pre-designed clinical evaluation before and within 6 months after the treatment. Results Solid dysphagia was the most common clinical symptom in men and women. Chest pain was the only symptom which was significantly different between two groups and was more complained by women than men (70.9% vs. 54.5% P value= 0.03. Although the occurrence of chest pain significantly reduced after treatment in both groups (P Conclusion It seems that chest pain is the distinct symptom of achalasia which is affected by sex as well as age and does not relate to the duration of illness, LESP and the type of treatment achalasia patients receive.

  16. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Roberto Oliveira; Santos, Carla Manfredi; Cassiani, Rachel Aguiar; Alves, Leda Maria Tavares; Nascimento, Weslania Viviane

    2016-01-01

    - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a) inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b) swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c) volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  17. Data analyses and perspectives on laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se-Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-10-14

    In general, the treatment methods for esophageal achalasia are largely classified into four groups, including drug therapy using nitrite or a calcium channel blocker, botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic therapy such as endoscopic balloon dilation, and surgery. Various studies have suggested that the most effective treatment of esophageal achalasia is surgical therapy. The basic concept of this surgical therapy has not changed since Heller proposed esophageal myotomy for the purpose of resolution of lower esophageal obstruction for the first time in 1913, but the most common approach has changed from open-chest surgery to laparoscopic surgery. Currently, the laparoscopic surgery has been the procedure of choice for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. During the process of the transition from open-chest surgery to laparotomy, to thoracoscopic surgery, and to laparoscopic surgery, the necessity of combining antireflux surgery has been recognized. There is some debate as to which type of antireflux surgery should be selected. The Toupet fundoplication may be the most effective in prevention of postoperative antireflux, but many medical institutions have selected the Dor fundoplication which covers the mucosal surface exposed by myotomy. Recently, a new endoscopic approach, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), has received attention. Future studies should examine the long-term outcomes and whether POEM becomes the gold standard for the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  18. Multidisciplinary Approach to Esophageal Achalasia: A Single Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Andolfi, Ciro; Kavitt, Robert T; Konda, Vani J A; Patti, Marco G

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of achalasia is palliative. Pneumatic dilatation (PD) or laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) just eliminates the outflow obstruction allowing easier emptying of the esophagus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of a multidisciplinary approach to esophageal achalasia. A consecutive series of patients with achalasia treated by a multidisciplinary esophageal team consisting of radiologists, gastroenterologists, and surgeons in a quaternary care center between May 2008 and April 2015 were analyzed. A total of 147 patients with achalasia underwent LHM and partial fundoplication. Sixty-two patients (42%) had been treated preoperatively with PD and/or botulinum toxin (BT). The preoperative Eckardt score (ES) was 6.4 ± 2. At a median follow-up of 22 months, 128 patients (87%) did well and required no further treatment (ES 0.1). The remaining 19 patients (13%) had recurrence of symptoms and required further treatment: 12 were treated with PD and improved (ES 0.7); 4 were treated with PD and BT and improved (ES 1.3); 3 failed PD. These 3 patients had been treated with multiple sessions of PD and BT before the myotomy. Overall, 144 patients (98%) did well with laparoscopic (87%) or laparoscopic and endoscopic treatment (11%). The results of this study show that (a) LHM is an effective treatment modality, (b) PD improved symptoms in the majority of patients with recurrent dysphagia after myotomy and (c) multiple preoperative endoscopic treatments seem to affect outcomes of LHM. Patients with achalasia should be treated in a quaternary care center by a multidisciplinary team.

  19. Achalasia-an unnecessary long way to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebisch, S; Hadzijusufovic, E; Mehdorn, M; Müller, M; Scheuermann, U; Lyros, O; Schulz, H G; Jansen-Winkeln, B; Lang, H; Gockel, I

    2017-05-01

    Although achalasia presents with typical symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation, weight loss, and atypical chest pain, the time until first diagnosis often takes years and is frustrating for patients and nevertheless associated with high costs for the healthcare system. A total of 563 patients were interviewed with confirmed diagnosis of achalasia regarding their symptoms leading to diagnosis along with past clinical examinations and treatments. Included were patients who had undergone their medical investigations in Germany. Overall, 527 study subjects were included (male 46%, female 54%, mean age at time of interview 51 ± 14.8 years). Dysphagia was present in 86.7%, regurgitation in 82.9%, atypical chest pain in 79%, and weight loss in 58% of patients before diagnosis. On average, it took 25 months (Interquartile Range (IQR) 9-65) until confirmation of correct diagnosis of achalasia. Though, diagnosis was confirmed significantly quicker (35 months IQR 9-89 vs. 20 months IQR 8-53; p surgical myotomy. Endoscopic dilatation was realized significantly faster compared to esophageal myotomy (1 month IQR 0-4 vs. 3 months IQR 1-11; p achalasia was significantly faster in the past 15 years, it still takes almost 2 years until the correct diagnosis of achalasia is confirmed. Alarming is the fact that although esophageal manometry is known as the gold standard to differentiate primary motility disorders, only three out of four patients had undergone this diagnostic pathway during their diagnostic work-up. Better education of medical professionals and broader utilization of highly sensitive diagnostic tools, such as high-resolution manometry, are strictly necessary in order to correctly diagnose affected patients and to offer therapy faster. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Sphincter of Oddi stenosis: diagnosis using hepatobiliary scintigraphy and endoscopic manometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.G.L.; Gregg, J.A.; Koroshetz, A.M.; Hill, T.C.; Clouse, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the role of radionuclide imaging in diagnosing sphincter of Oddi stenosis, 21 patients with symptoms suggesting this disorder underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, cholescintigraphy, and, when possible, endoscopic manometry. Those patients with abnormal hepatobiliary scintigraphy results had a mean basal sphincter pressure of 38.5 mm Hg. Sphincter pressures could not be measured in six patients with sphincters too tight to cannulate. Ten patients who underwent hepatobiliary scanning both before and after sphincter surgery had normal scan results of the repeat study. Hepatobiliary imaging appears useful for diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi stenosis in selected patients in whom manometry cannot be performed and for objective assessment of response to therapy

  1. Robotic heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication for achalasia in a woman with morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedirli, Abdulkadir; Dogan, Ibrahim; Kozan, Ramazan

    2012-12-01

    Achalasia is a relatively rare condition with a prevalence estimated at less than 0.001 %. Laparoscopic or robotic Heller myotomy is an effective surgical treatment for achalasia. We present the first published case of a morbidly obese achalasia patient treated with robotic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication. The operative time was 175 min, with an estimated blood loss of 110 ml. The patient had a normal bowel transit on postoperative day 2, and he was discharged on postoperative day 4 on a liquid diet. A follow-up at 2 months showed significant resolved symptoms of achalasia.

  2. Achalasia and Respiratory Symptoms: Effect of Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Ciro; Kavitt, Robert T; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2016-09-01

    Dysphagia and regurgitation are considered typical symptoms of achalasia. However, there is mounting evidence that some achalasia patients may also experience respiratory symptoms such as cough, wheezing, and hoarseness. The aims of this study were to determine: (1) what percentage of achalasia patients experience respiratory symptoms and (2) the effect of a laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication on the typical and respiratory symptoms of achalasia. Between May 2008 and December 2015, 165 patients with achalasia were referred for treatment to the Center for Esophageal Diseases of the University of Chicago. Patients had preoperatively a barium swallow, endoscopy, and esophageal manometry. All patients underwent a Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication. Based on the presence of respiratory symptoms, patients were divided into two groups: group A, 98 patients (59%) without respiratory symptoms and group B, 67 patients (41%) with respiratory symptoms. The preoperative Eckardt score was similar in the two groups (6.5 ± 2.1 versus 6.4 ± 2.0). The mean esophageal diameter was 27.7 ± 10.8 mm in group A and 42.6 ± 20.1 mm in group B (P myotomy that extended for 5 cm on the esophagus and 2.5 cm onto the gastric wall. At a median postoperative follow-up of 17 months, the Eckardt score improved significantly and similarly in the two groups (0.3 ± 0.8 versus 0.3 ± 1.0). Respiratory symptoms improved or resolved in 62 patients (92.5%). The results of this study showed that: (1) respiratory symptoms were present in 41% of patients; (2) patients with respiratory symptoms had a more dilated esophagus; and (3) surgical treatment resolved or improved respiratory symptoms in 92.5% of patients. This study underlines the importance of investigating the presence of respiratory symptoms along with the more common symptoms of achalasia and of early treatment before lung damage occurs.

  3. Intra- and interrater reliability of the Chicago Classification of achalasia subtypes in pediatric high-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singendonk, M. M. J.; Rosen, R.; Oors, J.; Rommel, N.; van Wijk, M. P.; Benninga, M. A.; Nurko, S.; Omari, T. I.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundSubtyping achalasia by high-resolution manometry (HRM) is clinically relevant as response to therapy and prognosis have shown to vary accordingly. The aim of this study was to assess inter- and intrarater reliability of diagnosing achalasia and achalasia subtyping in children using the

  4. Sphincter-saving procedure for radiation-injuried rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshihiro; Koyama, Yasuo; Hojo, Keiichi

    1982-01-01

    Up to this time the sigmoid colostomy has been widely accepted and conventional treatment for radiation-injured rectum, but patients without residual malignancy strongly desire to live without colostomy. We have tried to remove the involved rectal segments by sphincter-saving procedures. Four patients underwent these procedures, pull-through procedure in three and low anterior resection in one. Among sphincter-saving procedures, pull-through procedure was most adequate. Provided the following five conditions are fulfilled, pull-through procedure should be considered for severe radiation-injured rectum. (1) No recurrence of initial malignancy in the pelvis. (2) More than 2 cm intact rectal segment above dentate line may be preserved. (3) No radiation-injured segment in upper sigmoid. (4) No severe radiation damage in small intestine. (5) Patients under 70 year-old, with normal tonus of anal sphincter. (author)

  5. Influence of hiatal hernia on lower esophageal sphincter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, G B; Bombeck, C T; Nyhus, L M

    1981-01-01

    Sliding hiatal hernia has long term been implicated as a cause of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) incompetence and gastroesophageal reflux. The physics of LES function in hiatal hernia were investigated in in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro models of sliding hernias were constructed from excised canine gastroesophageal specimens. A "sphincter" was simulated with a rubber band around the gastroesophageal junction. It was found that placement of a ligature "hernia ring" on the stomach increased the opening pressure of the model sphincter. Addition of a tissue "hernia sac" sutured to the esophagus above the sphincter further increased the opening pressure, the protective effect being related to the pressure transmitted from the stomach to the hernia sac. There was no fluid leakage from the hernia sac between the hernia ring and the stomach. In anesthetized dogs (in vivo model) gastric and esophageal pressures were measured during gastric infusion while the LES gas way to reflux. A ligature tied loosely around the stomach to simulate a "hernia ring" and a sliding hernia without a hernia sac increased both the opening and the closing pressures of the LES by 36 +/- 18% and 35 +/- 20% (mean +/- SD), respectively. The opening pressure was increased by a decrease in gastric wall tension at the gastroesophageal junction, which was caused by the decreased radius of the herniated portion of the stomach. Pressure transmitted from the stomach to the hernia sac added to the LES pressure, and thereby further increased the opening pressure of the sphincter. The results explain how gastroesophageal reflux may be prevented in patients with hiatal hernia. It was recognized that the hernia sac may protect the sphincter, provided that it inserts into the esophagus above the LES. PMID:7469555

  6. Mode of delivery after obstetric anal sphincter injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Roopali; Bhide, Alka; Digesu, Alex; Khullar, Vik; Fernando, Ruwan

    2015-11-01

    To assess the effect of vaginal delivery and caesarean section on faecal symptoms and structure and function of anal sphincter in women who sustained obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in their previous pregnancy and were advised about the mode of delivery based on faecal incontinence symptoms, anal manometry and endoanal ultrasound. It is a descriptive study on a cohort of women who had OASIS from 2006 to 2013. They were assessed after OASIS and during subsequent pregnancy with a questionnaire, endoanal ultrasound and anal manometry. Vaginal delivery was recommended to asymptomatic women with normal investigations. Elective caesarean section was recommended to women with faecal symptoms, anal sphincter defects of more than 30° or low resting or incremental anal pressures. All women were reassessed after subsequent delivery. Fifty women who had pregnancies after OASIS, were seen after OASIS, during subsequent pregnancy and after the second delivery. 15 women had faecal symptoms after OASIS. The external, internal and combined anal sphincter defects were seen in 13, 11 and 9 women respectively. Low resting and incremental pressure were seen in 15 and 11 women respectively. Caesarean section was done in 22 women and 28 women delivered vaginally. Worsening of faecal symptoms and reduction in anal pressures were not observed in planned vaginal delivery or elective caesarean section groups. Faecal symptoms were worse with reduced anal pressures in three women from the planned caesarean section group. One of the women had a vaginal delivery and two women had emergency caesarean section at 7cm and 10cm dilatation. There were no new sphincter defects or recurrent OASIS in any of the women in the study group. Decision about the mode of delivery of pregnancy after OASIS based on symptoms, anal manometry and endoanal ultrasound helps in preserving the anal sphincter function and avoiding unnecessary caesarean sections. Further follow-up of these patients is essential

  7. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescarus, Radu; Shlomovitz, Eran; Swanstrom, Lee L

    2014-01-01

    Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a new minimally invasive endoscopic treatment for achalasia. Since the first modern human cases were published in 2008, around 2,000 cases have been performed worldwide. This technique requires advanced endoscopic skills and a learning curve of at least 20 cases. POEM is highly successful with over 90 % improvement in dysphagia while offering patients the advantage of a low impact endoscopic access. The main long-term complication is gastroesophageal reflux (GER) with an estimated incidence of 35 %, similar to the incidence of GER post-laparoscopic Heller with fundoplication. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift in the treatment of achalasia, more long-term data are clearly needed to further define its role in the treatment algorithm of this rare disease.

  8. Thoracoscopic esophagomyotomy for achalasia: maximum gain, minimal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, J W

    1997-10-01

    Achalasia can be effectively treated by either hydrostatic balloon dilatation or transthoracic modified Heller myotomy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether thoracoscopic methods could be used to achieve surgical results equal to the transthoracic approach with less pain. Twenty-one patients (10 men, 11 women; median age 42 years) had the diagnosis of achalasia confirmed by manometry, radiography, and endoscopy. All had dysphagia; five had weight loss. Median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1 to 360 months). Eleven patients had undergone previous unsuccessful hydrostatic dilatation. Mean esophageal diameter was 5.5 +/- 2.2 cm. All patients underwent attempted modified Heller myotomy through a left thoracoscopic approach. Three patients required conversion to thoracotomy. The myotomy was extended Heller myotomy reproduces the superior results of open esophagomyotomy with a reduced hospitalization and reduced incisional pain and disability.

  9. Sudden endotracheal tube block in a patient of Achalasia Cardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal tube block due to various mechanical causes such as mucous, blood clot, denture, and ampoules have been reported. A patient of achalasia cardia with chronic passive aspiration pneumonitis developed mucoid mass in the respiratory passage which dislodged during the surgical procedure. The episode occurred almost an hour after induction of anesthesia and the dislodged mucoid mass blocked the lumen of endotracheal tube, leading to hypoxia and impending cardiac arrest. However, the patient was salvaged by replacing the tube.

  10. An experience of laparoscopic modified heller cardiomyotomy for achalasia cardia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, A.; Majeed, F. A.; Imtiaz, T.; Hussain, M.; Saeed, Y.; Imran, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The study was carried out to ascertain the outcome of laparoscopic modified Heller's myotomy for achalasia cardia and to determine the morbidity associated with it. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Rawalpindi over a period of 4 years, from Jan 2010 to Aug 2014. Material and Methods: This study was carried out on patients undergoing surgical repair of laparoscopic Heller myotomy for cardiac achalasia at Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi over a period of four years (2010-2014). Patients undergoing laparoscopic-modified Heller myotomy at a thoracic referral and surgical training center. Eighteen cases of achalasia cardia based on clinical, barium and endoscopic findings were included in the sample using non probability purposive sampling technique. Pseudo achalasia, sigmoid esophagus were excluded.Laparoscopic modified Heller myotomy was done in all patients. Data were analyzed with the help of SPSS 20.0. Results: Age ranged between 14 years to 40 years with mean age of 28 years. The most frequent symptom was dysphagia (95 percent), followed by regurgitation of ingested food (60 percent), weight loss (40 percent) and chest pain (20 percent). Mean operating time was forty minutes. There was no perioperative mortality. We applied Dor patch in 4 patients. Three patients had mucosal tear on large myotomy, diagnosed per operatively and repaired. There was no conversion to open procedure. There was marked improvement in symptoms especially dysphagia and there was no post operative reflux. Conclusion: Modified Heller myotomy by laparoscopic approach is a safe and effective procedure with acceptable results. It is easy to perform and improves the symptoms of the suffering individual. (author)

  11. The current state of per oral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shane P.

    2017-01-01

    Achalasia is an acquired neuromuscular disorder that has been treated using a variety of modalities throughout medical history. Recently, the technique of per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was introduced to treat the disease using a truly minimally invasive, natural orifice technique that is rapidly being adopted across the world. This review outlines the development of POEM, the technique itself, and gives a comparison to other procedures, specifically laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM). PMID:29078682

  12. Training in peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM for esophageal achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheriadis N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas Eleftheriadis, Haruhiro Inoue, Haruo Ikeda, Manabu Onimaru, Akira Yoshida, Toshihisa Hosoya, Roberta Maselli, Shin-ei KudoDigestive Disease Center, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, JapanAbstract: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM has been developed in the context of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES as a minimally invasive endoscopic treatment for symptomatic esophageal achalasia, which is a chronic progressive benign disease with severe morbidity and difficult management. Since September 2008, POEM has been successfully performed in more than 200 consecutive patients with symptomatic achalasia at the Digestive Disease Center of Showa University, Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Japan, with excellent short- and long-term results and absence of serious complications. International experience of POEM within clinical studies is also promising. According to these results, POEM is considered as a safe procedure that can be applied to all achalasia patients. However, the low incidence of achalasia (0.3%–1% per 100,000 population, in combination with the potential serious complications related to the technically demanding POEM procedure, has made training difficult. There is therefore an urgent need for an animal model for training to decrease the learning curve. Further, there are other ethical and training issues to address. The pig is the most appropriate animal model for training in POEM due to its anatomy being similar to that of humans. The porcine esophagus has the advantage of easy mobilization due to absence of tight junctions to surrounding organs. A non-survival porcine model would be a simple, inexpensive, and reproducible animal model for training in POEM, without the need for concern about complications. A possible training process might first involve observation of POEM performed by specialists, then training on non-survival and survival porcine models, followed by training in

  13. Training in peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadis, Nicholas; Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Onimaru, Manabu; Yoshida, Akira; Hosoya, Toshihisa; Maselli, Roberta; Kudo, Shin-ei

    2012-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been developed in the context of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) as a minimally invasive endoscopic treatment for symptomatic esophageal achalasia, which is a chronic progressive benign disease with severe morbidity and difficult management. Since September 2008, POEM has been successfully performed in more than 200 consecutive patients with symptomatic achalasia at the Digestive Disease Center of Showa University, Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Japan, with excellent short- and long-term results and absence of serious complications. International experience of POEM within clinical studies is also promising. According to these results, POEM is considered as a safe procedure that can be applied to all achalasia patients. However, the low incidence of achalasia (0.3%–1% per 100,000 population), in combination with the potential serious complications related to the technically demanding POEM procedure, has made training difficult. There is therefore an urgent need for an animal model for training to decrease the learning curve. Further, there are other ethical and training issues to address. The pig is the most appropriate animal model for training in POEM due to its anatomy being similar to that of humans. The porcine esophagus has the advantage of easy mobilization due to absence of tight junctions to surrounding organs. A non-survival porcine model would be a simple, inexpensive, and reproducible animal model for training in POEM, without the need for concern about complications. A possible training process might first involve observation of POEM performed by specialists, then training on non-survival and survival porcine models, followed by training in humans under specialist guidance and finally, performance of POEM in humans. PMID:22888256

  14. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira DANTAS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. Objective - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. Methods - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. Results - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. Conclusion - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  15. [New concepts on the physiopathology, diagnosis, and treatment of achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Sánchez, R; Valdovinos-Díaz, M A

    1998-01-01

    To review the most relevant publications on the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of esophageal achalasia, and the clinical experience achieved at our institution in order to propose a practical strategy to facilitate the management of these patients. Manual and MEDLINE search of key articles published between January 1986 and July 1997 in addition to publications of our institute of thirty years. All kinds of publications with substantial clinical experience, new information or research protocols. Achalasia is an uncommon disorder of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus. Main symptoms are dysphagia, regurgitations and chest pain. The diagnosis is established by manometric criteria. Esophagogram, endoscopy and radionuclide esophageal emptying test help to differentiate other conditions and evaluate the response to treatment. Pharmacotherapy may provide relief to patients with mild symptoms and is useful for patients with high risk of complications. Dilations and myotomy are safe, effective and long lasting procedures. Botulinum toxin may be effective in selected cases. Predictive factors of response have been described for each therapy. A systematic approach to the management of patients with achalasia is necessary. Introduction of new therapies as botulinum toxin and minimal invasion surgery are changing the therapeutic decisions in this field. Drugs and BoTox are considered the first line of treatment for high risk patients and dilation and surgery for patients with no risk.

  16. "Stray" achalasia: From gastroenterologist to pulmonologist and back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović Dušanka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Achalasia is a rare esophageal disorder which, due to frequent presence of both respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms, can initially be referred either to pulmonologist or gastroenterologist. Case Outline. A 50-year-old patient was initially referred to gastroenterologist with the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, occasional hiccups, weight loss, chest pain, dysphonia, and dry cough. After chest X-ray, the patient was referred to pulmonologist with differential diagnosis for pulmonary infiltration and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Pulmonologist interpreted chest X-ray as showing paratracheal mediastinal enlargement with air-fluid levels, thus suspecting achalasia. Computed tomography scan of the thorax with per os contrast showed extremely dilated esophagus with food stasis. The patient was then referred to thoracic surgeon, who ordered additional diagnostics (esophageal passage with contrast, esophagomanometry, esophagogastroduodenoscopy, and finally performed Heller myotomy. Postoperatively there were no complications, and the patient was symptom free during the follow-up. Conclusion. Although achalasia can also result in respiratory symptoms, fastidious anamnesis and accurate radiological interpretation are essential for the correct diagnosis.

  17. Therapeutic evaluation of retrievable esophageal covered stent in treating achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuwei; Zhang Fuqiang; Yuan Liang; Li Yunhui; Luo Bin; Yu Li; Sun Dingqiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effect of retrievable esophageal covered metal internal stent in treating patients with achalasia. Methods: Under DSA guidance, peroral 'Z-type' double horn covered metal internal stent implantation was performed in 16 patients with achalasia. Esophagography was carried out about 28 days after the procedure and the stent was retrieved. Results: Of 16 cases, the stent fell off into the stomach two weeks after the operation in one. And the stent was successfully replaced after it was taken out. The placed stent was successfully retrieved in all cases 28 days after the treatment. No serious complications occurred. All the patients were followed up for 3 months to 3 years. During the follow-up period restenosis of the esophagus developed in two cases (at one and 1.5 years respectively), and the restenosis degree was relived after balloon dilation. Clinically, no esophageal symptoms, such as dysphagia, occurred in all patients. Conclusion: As a simple and safe technique, the retrievable esophageal covered metal internal stent implantation is very effective with fewer complications for the treatment of achalasia. Moreover, the technique carries lower restenosis occurrence. (authors)

  18. Retrospective analysis of paediatric achalasia in India: Single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Developing countries at tertiary referral centre. The aim of this study was to share our experience of paediatric achalasia in Indian scenario. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of children <16 years, operated for achalasia at our centre, from December 1998 to December 2011. Results: Total 40 patients (mean age 39 ± 4.29 months, including 1 patient of megaesophagus were operated over 13 years of period; 17 patients (associated congenital H-type tracheoesophageal fistula in one patient, non- responders/ lost follow-up for minimum of 3 years in 16 patients were excluded from the study. The response rate of parents in follow-up was 60.0%. Mean symptoms duration was 27.88 ± 2 months. Most common symptoms were regurgitation and failure to thrive (78.2%. Mean symptom scoring in follow-up after 3 year was 1 ± 0.7 compared to 5 ± 0.51 at the time of admission (P < 0.012. One infant expired (mediastenitis, one developed adhesive intestinal obstruction and one needed posterior re-myotomy (for megaesophagus. There were no treatment failures in mean follow-up of 40.2 ± 5.07 months. Conclusions: Cardiomyotomy with partial fundoplication is the best modality of treatment for paediatric achalasia cardia, even from parents′ perspective.

  19. Intra and post-operative complications of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Luigi; Peri, Andrea; Tinozzi, Francesco Paolo; Zonta, Sandro; di Stefano, Michele; Meloni, Federica; Pietrabissa, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate and discuss all the potential complications affecting morbidity of patients treated with surgery for primary achalasia. A review of the available English literature published to date has been conducted. All articles reporting surgical experience in achalasia were examined and then were selected only those specifically inherent to the topic at issue. Mucosal perforation is the main intra-operative complication while persistence or recurrence of the disease and gastro-esophageal reflux are those mostly affecting patients afterwards, even at long-term follow-up. A few other less common morbidities, as well as the technical considerations useful to minimize and manage each complication mentioned, are reported. Minimally invasive surgery for achalasia consent to treat patients with a low rate of perioperative complications that can be managed with conservative approach in the majority of cases. Risk of esophageal cancer exists in these patients and remains although surgical therapy. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy along with partial fundoplication is a safe and effective procedure that should be considered as the treatment of choice at first evaluation of achalasic patients rather than endoscopic techniques. Robotic technology may add further contribution in diminishing perioperative complications.

  20. Achalasia of the Cardia in a 21 Year old Pregnant Lady: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Achalasia of the cardia is a motor disorder of the lower oesophagus of unknown aetiology. It is characterized by persistent dysphagia in 82 – 100% of patients. We describe a rare case of dysphagia due to Achalasia cardia in a pregnant lady in her third trimester. Tanzania Medical Journal Vol. 23 (2) 2008: pp. 31-32.

  1. Difference of achalasia subtypes based on clinical symptoms, radiographic findings, and stasis scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meillier

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Achalasia subtypes had similar clinical symptoms, except for increased vomiting severity in subtype i. The maximum esophageal diameter in subtype ii was significantly greater than in subtype iii. Esophageal stasis scores were similar. Thus, high-resolution esophageal manometry remains essential in assessing achalasia subtypes.

  2. The Impact of Heller Myotomy on Integrated Relaxation Pressure in Esophageal Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Renato; Savarino, Edoardo; Pesenti, Elisa; Spadotto, Lorenzo; Capovilla, Giovanni; Cavallin, Francesco; Galeazzi, Francesca; Nicoletti, Loredana; Merigliano, Stefano; Costantini, Mario

    2016-01-01

    A new high-resolution manometry (HRM) parameter, the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), has been proposed for the assessment of esophageal-gastric junction (EGJ) relaxation. Our aim was to assess the effect of Heller myotomy on IRP in achalasia patients. We prospectively collected data on achalasia patients who underwent HRM between 2009-2014. Barium swallow was used to assess esophageal diameter and shape. Manometric diagnoses were performed by using the Chicago Classification v3. All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of achalasia were treated surgically with Heller Myotomy One hundred thirty-nine consecutive achalasia patients (M:F = 72:67) represented the study population. All the patients had 100% simultaneous waves but 11 had an IRP achalasia, and how it changes after surgical treatment. An increased preoperative IRP correlated directly with a more severe dysphagia. The IRP was restored to normal by Heller myotomy.

  3. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia in a case of Allgrove syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Jun; Hikichi, Takuto; Inoue, Haruhiro; Watanabe, Ko; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Takagi, Tadayuki; Suzuki, Rei; Sugimoto, Mitsuru; Konno, Naoki; Waragai, Yuichi; Asama, Hiroyuki; Takasumi, Mika; Sato, Yuki; Irie, Hiroki; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2018-01-30

    Allgrove syndrome, also known as Triple A syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by three signs: esophageal achalasia, adrenocorticotropic hormone refractoriness, and alacrima. A 31-year-old male presented to our hospital for treatment of difficulty swallowing caused by esophageal achalasia. Because he had complicating alacrima, a neurologic disease, and a family history of consanguineous marriage, a genetic neurologic disease was suspected. Then, a mutation in the achalasia-addisonianism-alacrima syndrome gene was identified. With the diagnosis of Allgrove syndrome, a per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was performed for esophageal achalasia. After the POEM, the symptoms and the esophageal pressure findings ameliorated quickly, with no recurrence noted throughout a follow-up of more than 1 year. Here, we report the first case of POEM performed for esophageal achalasia in Allgrove syndrome.

  4. Achalasia: pneumatic Dilation. Experience in a reference hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, Martin; Farfan, Yezid; Molano, Juan; Rey, Mario; Martinez, Julian; Marulanda, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Chalasia has an incidence of 1:100.000. The therapy for achalasia, focus on reducing the pressure gradient across the LES, which can be achieved by forceful pneumatic dilation of the gastroesophageal junction, surgical myotomy or by pharmacological agents, injected endoscopically or taken orally. Pneumatic balloon dilation is regarded as the first-Line treatment, with an initial success rate of 85% to 90%. The objective of this study is to show our experience with pneumatic balloon dilation in the patients with diagnosis of achalasia from the hospital La Samaritana during a period from February 2002 to February 2005. Patients diagnosed with achalasia from the department of gastroenterology and endoscopy of the Hospital La Samaritana during period of February 2002 to February 2005 was included. Procedures were made in fluoroscopy room. The patients received intravenous sedation and analgesia. We used a Regiflex balloon, 3.5 cm diameter. Balloons were inflated with saline water and water-soluble contrast during one minute. We diagnosed 19 patients with achalasia during period from February 2002 to February 2005, 14 were females and 5 males (26%); we made pneumatic dilation in 11 patients (60%), 9 were females (82%) with mean age 38.9 years (ranged from 16 to 13 years). Three patients (21%) underwent once pneumatic dilation and the rest (8 patients) underwent twice (73%). We don't report any perforation. So far we have followed the patients ambulatory during period from 6 months to 2 years. We find recurrence one year after of the pneumatic dilation in a female patient 22 years old (9%). The pneumatic dilation as cost-effective therapy, with a good initial success, but in the longer the follow-up lower the success rate and low morbidity (4). We suggest making only two pneumatic dilations. Today, there isn't consensus on the optimal endoscopic dilation technique and we believe that the sedation must be included in this procedure. In the future, we need more comparative

  5. Rectocele and anal sphincter defect – surgical anatomy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carefully directed translabial ultrasound scan of the rectum and anal sphincters. The ultrasound examination was performed by a radi- ologist with specific understanding of the pathology. Conventional two-dimensional ultrasound imaging was performed using a 4 - 8. MHz curved array probe. The patient was in the left ...

  6. Anal incontinence in women with recurrent obstetric anal sphincter rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgeskov, Reneé; Nickelsen, Carsten Nahne Amtoft; Secher, Niels Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Abstract Objectives: To determine the risk of recurrent anal sphincter rupture (ASR), and compare the risk of anal incontinence (AI) after recurrent ASR, with that seen in women with previous ASR who deliver by caesarean section or vaginally without sustaining a recurrent ASR. METHODS...

  7. Anal sphincter electromyography in patients with Anorectal Dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinchet Soler, Rafael; Hidalgo Marrero, Yanet; Espichicoque Megret, Arianne; Manzano Suarez, Jianeya; Perez Gonzales, Ruth Maite

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the electromyography value of anal sphincter in patients with anorectal dysfunctions. Anorectal dysfunctions are frequent reason of pediatric consultation in children, especially with anal incontinence. A study of series of cases in patient with anorectal dysfunctions was carried out from January 2002 to January of 2006. 65 patients were studied. Anorectal malformations (ARM) represented the predominant affection with 38 patients (58.5%), prevailing the male sex in 25 patients (65.8%). Encopresis and intestinal agagliosis dicrease was observed. Sphincter was found before surgical treatment through electromyography in patients with anorectal malformations and colostomy; in those with definitive operation and open colostomy, it avoided the operation in a patient that did not have muscular activity of the external sphincter. In children already operated and with closed colostomy several electromyography changes were observed in correspondence with different incontinence grades. In encopresis cases the study was useful to rule out sphincter functional alterations. Electromyography was pathological in all the operated patients of intestinal aganglionosis. This procedure was very useful for anal incontinence study that helped to determine and establish the prognosis. (author)

  8. Paradoxical sphincter contraction is rarely indicative of anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voderholzer, W A; Neuhaus, D A; Klauser, A G; Tzavella, K; Müller-Lissner, S A; Schindlbeck, N E

    1997-08-01

    Anismus is thought to be a cause of chronic constipation by producing outlet obstruction. The underlying mechanism is paradoxical contraction of the anal sphincter or puborectalis muscle. However, paradoxical sphincter contraction (PSC) also occurs in healthy controls, so anismus may be diagnosed too often because it may be based on a non-specific finding related to untoward conditions during the anorectal examination. To investigate the pathophysiological importance of PSC found at anorectal manometry in constipated patients and in patients with stool incontinence. Digital rectal examination and anorectal manometry were performed in 102 chronically constipated patients, 102 patients with stool incontinence, and in 18 controls without anorectal disease. In 120 of the 222 subjects defaecography was also performed. Paradoxical sphincter contraction was defined as a sustained increase in sphincter pressure during straining. Anismus was assumed when PSC was present on anorectal manometry and digital rectal examination and the anorectal angle did not widen on defaecography. Manometric PSC occurred about twice as often in constipated patients as in incontinent patients (41.2% versus 25.5%, p anismus is rare.

  9. Effect of clebopride on lower esophageal sphincter pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, V; da Silva, A L; Castro, L de P

    1981-01-01

    In 12 individuals without gastrointestinal symptoms, the IV administration of metoclopramide and of clebopride produced both a significant increase on the lower esophageal sphincter pressure. The increase induced by clebopride was significantly higher than that induced by metoclopramide. The tolerability of clebopride was satisfactory with just mild drowsiness being noted in most cases.

  10. Is glutamate involved in transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate is an important excitatory amino acid and plays a major role in brain stem neurotransmission. Although the effect of glutamate on esophaoreal motility is well studied, its role in the triggering of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) remains to be determined.

  11. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  12. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for the treatment of achalasia in a patient with esophageal varices. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Naning; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoyin; Yao, Liping; Xie, Huahong; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-06-01

    Achalasia is very uncommon, and rarely does achalasia co-exist with esophageal varices. We present a 62-year-old woman who was diagnosed with both achalasia and esophageal varices in December 2014 and had a past history of hematemesis. The patient's achalasia symptoms' Eckardt score was 9, and her hepatic function was Child-Pugh grade A6. After comprehensive assessment of the patient's health and discussion of the pros and cons of various therapies for achalasia, the patient underwent a peroral endoscopic myotomy. She was symptom-free after the operation and had no recurrence of achalasia symptoms at 20-month follow-up. No adverse events were reported. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia with esophageal varices has not been previously reported in the English literature.

  13. The identification of specialized pacemaking cells in the anal sphincters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Ahmed; El Sibai, Olfat; Ahmed, Ismail

    2006-07-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are claimed to generate the electrical activity in the colon and stomach. As the external (EAS) and internal (IAS) anal sphincters exhibit resting electrical activity, we hypothesized the presence of ICC in these sphincters. This hypothesis was investigated in the current study. Specimens from the EAS and IAS were taken from normal areas of the anorectum which had been surgically excised by abdominoperineal operation for rectal cancer of 28 patients (16 men, 12 women, mean age 42.2+/-4.8 years). The specimens were subjected to c-kit immunohistochemistry. Controls for the specificity of the antisera consisted of tissue incubation with normal rabbit serum substituted for the primary antiserum. Fusiform, c-kit positive, ICC-like cells were detected in the anal sphincters; they had dendritic processes. They were clearly distinguishable from the non-branching, c-kit negative smooth and striated muscle cells of the anal sphincters. The specimens contained also c-kit positive mast cells, but they had a rounded body with no dendritic processes. Immunoreactivity was absent in negative controls in which the primary antibody was omitted. We have identified, for the first time, cells in EAS and IAS with morphological and immunological phenotypes similar to ICCs of the gut. These cells appear to be responsible for initiating the slow waves recorded from the anal sphincters and for controlling their activity. A deficiency or absence of these cells may affect the anal motile activity. Studies are needed to explore the role of these cells in anal motility disorders.

  14. Laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia: Multiport vs single-incision approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shuichi; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyata, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2016-02-01

    SILS can potentially improve aesthetic outcomes without adversely affecting treatment outcomes, but these outcomes are uncertain in laparoscopic Heller-Dor surgery. We determined if the degree of patient satisfaction with aesthetic outcomes progressed with the equivalent treatment outcomes after the introduction of a single-incision approach to laparoscopic Heller-Dor surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 20 consecutive esophageal achalasia patients (multiport approach, n = 10; single-incision approach, n = 10) and assessed the treatment outcomes and patient satisfaction with the aesthetic outcomes. In the single-incision approach, thin supportive devices were routinely used to gain exposure to the esophageal hiatus. No statistically significant differences in the operating time (210.2 ± 28.8 vs 223.5 ± 46.3 min; P = 0.4503) or blood loss (14.0 ± 31.7 vs 16.0 ± 17.8 mL; P = 0.8637) were detected between the multiport and single-incision approaches. We experienced no intraoperative complications. Mild dysphagia, which resolved spontaneously, was noted postoperatively in one patient treated with the multiport approach. The reduction rate of the maximum lower esophageal sphincter pressure was 25.1 ± 34.4% for the multiport approach and 21.8 ± 19.2% for the single-incision approach (P = 0.8266). Patient satisfaction with aesthetic outcomes was greater for the single-incision approach than for the multiport approach. When single-incision laparoscopic Heller-Dor surgery was performed adequately and combined with the use of thin supportive devices, patient satisfaction with the aesthetic outcomes was higher and treatment outcomes were equivalent to those of the multiport approach. © 2015 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. MicroRNA-130a is highly expressed in the esophageal mucosa of achalasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hiroyuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Yoshida, Akira; Ikeda, Haruo; Minami, Hitomi; Kanda, Tsutomu; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Takeshima, Fuminao; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2017-08-01

    Esophageal achalasia is considered as a risk factor of esophageal cancer. The etiologies of esophageal achalasia remain unknown. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has recently been established as a minimally invasive method with high curability. The aims of the present study were to identify the microRNAs (miRs) specific to esophageal achalasia, to determine their potential target genes and to assess their alteration following POEM. RNA was extracted from biopsy samples from middle esophageal mucosa and analyzed using a microarray. Differentially expressed miRs in achalasia patients compared with control samples were identified and analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Correlations between specific miR expression levels and the patients' clinical background were also investigated. In addition, alterations of selected miR expression levels before and after POEM were analyzed. The results of RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated that the miR-130a expression levels were significantly higher in patients with achalasia (Pachalasia. However, no significant change in miR-130a expression was observed between before and after POEM. In conclusion, miR-130a is highly expressed in the esophageal mucosa of patients with achalasia and may be a biomarker of esophageal achalasia.

  16. The Functional Lumen Imaging Probe Detects Esophageal Contractility not Observed with Manometry in Patients with Achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Dustin A.; Lin, Zhiyue; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Sternbach, Joel; Donnan, Erica N.; Friesen, Laurel; Listernick, Zoe; Mogni, Benjamin; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) could improve characterization of achalasia subtypes by detecting non-occlusive esophageal contractions not observed with standard manometry. We aimed to evaluate for esophageal contractions during volumetric distention in patients with achalasia using FLIP topography. Methods Fifty one treatment-naïve patients with achalasia, defined and sub-classified by high-resolution esophageal pressure topography, and 10 asymptomatic individuals (controls) were evaluated with the FLIP during endoscopy. During stepwise distension, simultaneous intra-bag pressures and 16 channels of cross-sectional areas were measured; data were exported to software that generated FLIP topography plots. Esophageal contractility was identified by noting periods of reduced luminal diameter. Esophageal contractions were further characterized by propagation direction, repetitiveness, and based on whether they were occluding or non-occluding. Results Esophageal contractility was detected in all 10 controls: 8/10 had repetitive, antegrade, contractions and 9/10 had occluding contractions. Contractility was detected in 27% (4/15) of patients with type I achalasia and 65% (18/26, including 9 with occluding contractions) of patients with type II achalasia. Contractility was detected in all 10 patients with type III achalasia; 8 of these patients had a pattern of contractility not observed in controls (repetitive, retrograde contractions). Conclusions Esophageal contractility not observed with manometry can be detected in patients with achalasia using FLIP topography. The presence and patterns of contractility detected with FLIP topography may represent variations in pathophysiology, such as mechanisms of pan-esophageal pressurization in patients with type II achalasia. These findings could have implications for additional sub-classification to supplement prediction of the achalasia disease course. PMID:26278501

  17. Clinical Diagnosis of Achalasia: How Reliable is the Barium X-Ray?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I El-Takli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Manometry is considered to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of achalasia. However, many physicians believe that contrast radiography, classically showing esophageal dilation with bird-beak narrowing of the gastroesophageal junction, is also accurate in either diagnosing or excluding the disorder. The aim of the current study was to determine the accuracy of barium x-ray in the diagnosis of achalasia. The radiological diagnosis of all patients manometrically diagnosed with achalasia (using conventional criteria between January 1994 and June 1998 were reviewed. A total of 51 cases of achalasia were identified. Thirteen patients were excluded because they either did not have contrast radiography before a manometric diagnosis or had their x-rays performed more than six months previously. Of the remaining 38 patients, achalasia was stated as a diagnostic possibility in the radiologists report in only 22 (58% of those patients. Achalasia was not considered in the remaining 16 patients: two were reported as normal, four as having stenosis/narrowing in distal esophagus, two as having presbyesophagus, one as having mild gastroesophageal reflux and seven as having nonspecific dysmotility. To determine the reason for the diagnostic failure of the barium x-ray, an expert gastrointestinal radiologist reviewed 12 of the nondiagnostic x-rays in a blinded fashion, interspersed with 10 randomly selected esophageal-contrast radiographs from control subjects to avoid bias. Of these initially nondiagnostic x-rays in achalasia patients, typical radiological features of achalasia were deemed to be present in 50%. The present study indicates that contrast radiography lacks sensitivity in the diagnosis of achalasia. This is not only due to radiologist oversight but also because of the absence of the characteristic radiological features in many cases. This reinforces the important role of esophageal manometry in patients with persistent nonstructural dysphagia.

  18. Improvement of respiratory symptoms following Heller myotomy for achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Saurabh; Petersen, Rebecca; Tatum, Roger; Sinan, Huseyin; Aaronson, Daniel; Mier, Fernando; Martin, Ana V; Pellegrini, Carlos A; Oelschlager, Brant K

    2011-02-01

    Although patients with achalasia complain mainly of dysphagia, we have observed that they also have a high rate of respiratory problems. We hypothesized that the latter may be due to poor esophageal clearance leading to aspiration. This study examines the effect of Heller myotomy on these symptoms. We studied the course of 111 patients with achalasia who underwent Heller myotomy between 1994 and 2008 and who agreed to participate in this study. All patients completed a questionnaire postoperatively assessing the preoperative and postoperative prevalence and severity of symptoms using visual analog scales. Patients were divided into two groups: one that included all those with respiratory symptoms (dyspnea, hoarseness, cough, wheezing, sore throat, and/or a history of asthma or pneumonia) prior to myotomy and one that included those without those symptoms. All patients presented with dysphagia as their primary complaint, and 63 (57%) reported respiratory symptoms or disease prior to surgery. There were no significant differences in preoperative characteristics between those with and without respiratory manifestations. After a median follow-up of 71 months (range 9-186 months), 55 (87%) patients reported durable improvement of dysphagia. The frequency and severity of all respiratory symptoms decreased significantly. Twenty-four of the 29 patients (82%) who reported a history of pneumonia prior to surgery did not experience recurrent episodes after Heller myotomy. A Heller myotomy is effective in improving esophageal emptying in patients with achalasia. This results in sustained improvement of dysphagia and associated respiratory symptoms/diseases. This suggests that respiratory symptoms/diseases in these patients are likely caused by esophageal retention of food and secretions, and then aspiration.

  19. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy for achalasia: results after 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowgill, Sarah M; Villadolid, Desiree; Boyle, Robert; Al-Saadi, Sam; Ross, Sharona; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2009-12-01

    Laparoscopic Heller myotomy was first undertaken in the early 1990s, and appreciable numbers of patients with 10-year follow-up periods are now available. This study was undertaken to determine long-term outcomes after laparoscopic Heller myotomy used to treat achalasia. Of 337 patients who have undergone laparoscopic Heller myotomy since 1992, 47 who underwent myotomy more than 10 years ago have been followed through a prospectively maintained registry. Among many symptoms, patients scored dysphagia, chest pain, vomiting, regurgitation, choking, and heartburn before and after myotomy using a Likert scale with choices ranging from 0 (never/not bothersome) to 10 (always/very bothersome). Symptom scores before and after myotomy were compared using a Wilcoxon matched-pairs test. Data are reported as median (mean ± standard deviation). The median length of the hospital stay was 2 days (mean, 3 ± 8.6 days; range, 1-60 days). Notable complications were infrequent after myotomy. There were no perioperative deaths. One patient required a redo myotomy after 5 years due to recurrence of symptoms. At this writing, 33 patients (70%) are still alive. The causes of death after discharge were unrelated to myotomy. The frequency and severity scores for dysphagia, chest pain, vomiting, regurgitation, choking, and heartburn all decreased significantly after laparoscopic Heller myotomy (p Heller myotomy can be undertaken with few complications. This procedure significantly decreases the frequency and severity of achalasia symptoms without promoting heartburn. The symptoms of achalasia are durably ameliorated by laparoscopic Heller myotomy during long-term follow-up evaluation, thereby promoting application of this procedure.

  20. Pediatric achalasia. Single-center study of interventional treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Grabowski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Esophageal achalasia is a rare entity in children. However, young age is a factor of failure of conservative treatment, emphasizing the role of surgery. In our institution laparoscopic Heller’s cardiomyotomy is the chosen procedure for surgical treatment. Aim: To assess the outcome of surgery for achalasia treatment in children operated on in a single institution. Material and methods: A retrospective analysis of consecutive patient records from the years 1997 to 2014 was performed. There were 11 patients. Their mean age was 13 years, ranging from 6 to 17. Duration of symptoms was 2 to 36 months, mean 16. All 11 patients were operated on with a laparoscopic approach. Pneumatic dilatation was used both pre- and postoperatively but in no case was sufficient on its own. Collected data included patient demographics, preoperative symptoms and their duration, diagnostic findings and therapeutic means. Surgical procedures, complications and long-term follow-up were analyzed. The follow-up lasted from 1 to 10 years and finished when the patient reached 18 years of age. Results: Twelve laparoscopic cardiomyotomies were performed with concomitant fundoplications, 10 Toupet and 2 Dor and one redo procedure. There were no deaths. Two perforations were repaired promptly. The success rate was 82%, though with subsequent dilatations. One failure was due to serious progression of the disease. Conclusions : In our opinion, laparoscopic Heller’s myotomy is the procedure of choice for treating achalasia in children. Endoscopic balloon dilatation may be used as a complementary treatment, especially as a primary redo procedure.

  1. Analysis of the learning curve for peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia: Single-center, two-operator experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Houning; Zhao, Ningning; Zheng, Zhongqing; Wang, Tao; Yang, Fang; Jiang, Xihui; Lin, Lin; Sun, Chao; Wang, Bangmao

    2017-05-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has emerged as an advanced technique for the treatment of achalasia, and defining the learning curve is mandatory. From August 2011 to June 2014, two operators in our institution (A&B) carried out POEM on 35 and 33 consecutive patients, respectively. Moving average and cumulative sum (CUSUM) methods were used to analyze the POEM learning curve for corrected operative time (cOT), referring to duration of per centimeter myotomy. Additionally, perioperative outcomes were compared among distinct learning curve phases. Using the moving average method, cOT reached a plateau at the 29th case and at the 24th case for operators A and B, respectively. CUSUM analysis identified three phases: initial learning period (Phase 1), efficiency period (Phase 2) and mastery period (Phase 3). The relatively smooth state in the CUSUM graph occurred at the 26th case and at the 24th case for operators A and B, respectively. Mean cOT of distinct phases for operator A were 8.32, 5.20 and 3.97 min, whereas they were 5.99, 3.06 and 3.75 min for operator B, respectively. Eckardt score and lower esophageal sphincter pressure significantly decreased during the 1-year follow-up period. Data were comparable regarding patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes. This single-center study demonstrated that expert endoscopists with experience in esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection reached a plateau in learning of POEM after approximately 25 cases. © 2016 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  2. Achalasia diagnosed by 99mTc pertechnetate scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikosch, P.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Kresnik, E.; Lind, P.

    1997-01-01

    A 73-year-old patient presented a 99m Tc scintiscan with a focal tracer accumulation left and caudal of the thyroid gland. Further investigations with sonography, CT, esophagoscopy and barium swallow provided the diagnosis of achalasia as the reason for focal 99m Tc retention caudal of the thyroid gland. Explanation for 99m Tc accumulation within the esophagus may be the nonspecific accumulation of 99m Tc not only in the thyroid gland but also in the salivary glands. Excretion of the tracer follows with the saliva. Structural and motor disorders of the esophagus can thus lead to focal tracer retention within the esophagus simulating thyroid tissue. (orig.) [de

  3. Intra- and interrater reliability of the Chicago Classification of achalasia subtypes in pediatric high-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singendonk, M M J; Rosen, R; Oors, J; Rommel, N; van Wijk, M P; Benninga, M A; Nurko, S; Omari, T I

    2017-11-01

    Subtyping achalasia by high-resolution manometry (HRM) is clinically relevant as response to therapy and prognosis have shown to vary accordingly. The aim of this study was to assess inter- and intrarater reliability of diagnosing achalasia and achalasia subtyping in children using the Chicago Classification (CC) V3.0. Six observers analyzed 40 pediatric HRM recordings (22 achalasia and 18 non-achalasia) twice by using dedicated analysis software (ManoView 3.0, Given Imaging, Los Angeles, CA, USA). Integrated relaxation pressure (IRP4s), distal contractile integral (DCI), intrabolus pressurization pattern (IBP), and distal latency (DL) were extracted and analyzed hierarchically. Cohen's κ (2 raters) and Fleiss' κ (>2 raters) and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used for categorical and ordinal data, respectively. Based on the results of dedicated analysis software only, intra- and interrater reliability was excellent and moderate (κ=0.89 and κ=0.52, respectively) for differentiating achalasia from non-achalasia. For subtyping achalasia, reliability decreased to substantial and fair (κ=0.72 and κ=0.28, respectively). When observers were allowed to change the software-driven diagnosis according to their own interpretation of the manometric patterns, intra- and interrater reliability increased for diagnosing achalasia (κ=0.98 and κ=0.92, respectively) and for subtyping achalasia (κ=0.79 and κ=0.58, respectively). Intra- and interrater agreement for diagnosing achalasia when using HRM and the CC was very good to excellent when results of automated analysis software were interpreted by experienced observers. More variability was seen when relying solely on the software-driven diagnosis and for subtyping achalasia. Therefore, diagnosing and subtyping achalasia should be performed in pediatric motility centers with significant expertise. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Esophageal achalasia: a risk factor for carcinoma. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustumi, F; Bernardo, W M; da Rocha, J R M; Szachnowicz, S; Seguro, F C; Bianchi, E T; Sallum, R A A; Cecconello, I

    2017-10-01

    Achalasia of the cardia is associated with an increased risk of esophageal carcinoma. The real burden of achalasia at the malignancy genesis is still a controversial issue. Therefore, there are no generally accepted recommendations on follow-up evaluation for achalasia patients. This study aims to estimate the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in achalasia patients. We searched for association between carcinoma and esophageal achalasia in databases up to January 2017 to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 1,046 studies were identified from search strategy, of which 40 were selected for meta-analysis. A cumulative number of 11,978 esophageal achalasia patients were evaluated. The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma was 312.4 (StDev 429.16) cases per 100,000 patient-years at risk. The incidence of adenocarcinoma was 21.23 (StDev 31.6) cases per 100,000 patient-years at risk. The prevalence for esophageal carcinoma was 28 carcinoma cases in 1,000 esophageal achalasia patients (CI 95% 2, 39). The prevalence for squamous cell carcinoma was 26 cases in 1,000 achalasia patients (CI 95% 18, 39) and for adenocarcinoma was 4 cases in 1,000 achalasia patients (CI 95% 3, 6).The absolute risk increase for squamous cell carcinoma was 308.1 and for adenocarcinoma was 18.03 cases per 100,000 patients per year. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first meta-analysis estimating the burden of achalasia as an esophageal cancer risk factor. The high increased risk rate for cancer in achalasia patients points to a strict endoscopic surveillance for these patients. Also, the increased risk for developing adenocarcinoma in achalasia patients suggests fundoplication after myotomy, to avoid esophageal reflux and Barret esophagus, a known risk factor for adenocarcinoma. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please

  5. Radionuclide esophageal emptying study before and after pneumatic dilatation in achalasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujiie, Hiroaki; Hongo, Michio; Lin, Yih-Fong; Satake, Kenzo; Asaki, Shigeru; Goto, Yoshio; Okuyama, Shinichi

    1987-11-01

    The therapeutic effect of pneumatic dilatation was evaluated quantitatively by radionuclide transit study in 11 achalasia patients. Before pneumatic dilatation, marked retention with more than 80 % of isotope in the esophagus at 15 minutes after ingestion was noted in all patients. Marked improvement in emptying was shown after pneumatic dilatation. Pneumatic dilatation is a safe and effective therapeutic aid for achalasia treatment, and radionuclide transit study is not only noninvasive and physiologic but also its procedure is easily performed. We conclude that radionuclide transit study is a good method to evaluate the result of the treatment quantitatively in achalasia patients.

  6. Sonographic assessment of the anal sphincter after obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI) using transperineal ultrasound (TPUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Vered H; Valsky, Dan V; Yagel, Simcha

    2018-03-24

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI) is the most common cause of anal incontinence and ano-rectal symptoms in women 1 . Reported rates of anal incontinence following primary repair of OASI range between 15-61%, with a mean of 39% 2, 3 . Other possible complications of OASI include perineal pain, dyspareunia, and less commonly, abscess formation, wound breakdown, and rectovaginal fistulae. Symptom onset may occur immediately, several years postpartum, or only late in life when aging of tissues adds to the delivery insult. Having sustained an OASI may impact significantly on women's physical and emotional health. Missed OASI, inadequate repair or lack of follow up are potential sources of litigation 4 . The reported incidence of OASI may be as high as 4-6.6% 4 , averaging 2.9% in the UK 3 . The incidence is higher in primiparae (6.1%) than in multiparae (1.7%) 3 . Recent years are seeing an increased awareness and structured training programs, which appear to have resulted in an increase in the detection rate of OASI 3 . The following risk factors have been identified with varying risk rates reported 3 : Asian ethnicity (OR 2.27, 95% CI 2.14-2.41), nulliparity (relative risk [RR] 6.97, 95% CI 5.40-8.99), birth weight greater than 4 kg (OR 2.27, 95% CI 2.18-2.36), shoulder dystocia (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.72-2.08), occipito-posterior position (RR 2.44, 95% CI 2.07-2.89), prolonged second stage of labor (up to RR 2.02, 95% CI 1.62-2.51 after four hours duration). Instrumental deliveries and episiotomy use have been extensively studied resulting in the following evidence: Vacuum delivery without episiotomy (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.74-2.05); vacuum delivery with episiotomy is protective (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.51-0.63); forceps delivery without episiotomy carries the highest potential risk (OR 6.53, 95% CI 5.57-7.64); and forceps delivery with episiotomy (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.49). Other potential risk factors have been suggested with varying evidence such as advanced maternal age at

  7. The Danish anal sphincter rupture questionnaire: Validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Ottesen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To revise, validate and test for reliability an anal sphincter rupture questionnaire in relation to construct, content and face validity. Setting and background. Since 1996 women with anal sphincter rupture (ASR) at one of the public university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark have been...... main questions but one. Two questions needed further explanation. Seven women made minor errors. Conclusion. The validated Danish questionnaire has a good construct, content and face validity. It is a well accepted, reliable, simple and clinically relevant screening tool. It reveals physical problems...... offered pelvic floor muscle examination and instruction by a specialist physiotherapist. In relation to that, a non-validated questionnaire about anal and urinary incontinence was to be answered six months after childbirth. Method. The original questionnaire was revised and a pilot test was performed...

  8. Velopharyngeal sphincter pathophysiologic aspects in the in cleft palat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are common congenital abnormalities with typical functional disorders on speech, deglutition and middle ear function. Objective: This article reviews functional labiopalatine disorders through a pathophysiological view. Method: We performed a literature search on line, as well as books and periodicals related to velopharyngeal sphincter. Our sources were LILACS, MEDLINE and SciELO databases, and we applied to the research Keywords of interest on the velopharyngeal pathophysiology, for articles published between 1965 and 2007. Conclusion: Velopharyngeal sphincter plays a central role in speech, swallowing and middle ear physiology in patients with labiopalatine cleft. At the end of our bibliographic review, pursuant to the velopharyngeal physiology in individuals with this disorder in the functional speech, deglutition and otologic function, we observed that although there is a great number of published data discussing this issue, further studies are necessary to completely understand the pathophysiology, due to the fact they have been exploited superficially.

  9. Long-term effect of sphincteric fatigue during bladder neurostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J S; Hassouna, M; Sawan, M; Duval, F; Elhilali, M M

    1995-01-01

    Commercially available stimulators lack several features, including multiple channel capability and flexible stimulation parameters. These factors limit clinical application. A new computerized electrical stimulator system was developed by our team and evaluated for its efficacy in bladder evacuation in an animal model after spinal cord transection. The system can generate a wide range of stimulation characteristics and has the feature of being a programmable multichannel pacemaker. It has enabled us to induce a reversible fatigue to the external sphincter that results in proper bladder emptying on stimulation. Using this new bladder pacemaker, 8 dogs were studied. We applied the concept of fatiguing of the external sphincter via the pudendal nerve to avoid rhizotomy. We determined the optimal stimulation parameters that can reliably empty the dog's bladder for the duration of the experiment, which lasted for 8 months. The new computerized electrical stimulation system achieved the objective of reducing bladder outlet resistance without the need for sacral rhizotomy.

  10. Boston's balloon dilatation for treatment of cardiac achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Jianguo; Song Jinwen; Yang Yan; Liu Xiaohong; Fu Zhiming; Zhang Yaqin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To review and summarize effectiveness and method of the Boston's balloon dilation in cardiac achalasia. Methods: The intensified guide wire was inserted into stomach through mouth cavity under TV control. The Boston's balloon was inserted to the cardiac stricture through the guide wire and dilatated with 15% contrast medium with to a maximum diameter for five minutes and then the balloon was dilatated again for 3-5 minutes, all together for 3-4 times. The severe stricture must be pre-dilatated with 20-25 mm diameter balloon. Results: The balloon insertion was technically successful in all 26 patients. The once success of balloon dilation was achieved in 24 patients and twice in other 2. Follow-up time was from 2 weeks to 31 months (mean 10.6 months). Recurrent stenosis had not occurred in all patients. Remission rate of dysphagia was 100%. Esophageal reflux occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The Boston's balloon dilatation is simple and effective for treatment of cardiac achalasia. The method sometimes may replace surgical procedure

  11. Manometric Changes to the Lower Esophageal Sphincter After Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation in Patients With Chronic Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Heather F; Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Wilshire, Candice; Aye, Ralph W

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the manometric changes, function, and impact of magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Implantation of a MSA around the gastroesophageal junction has been shown to be a safe and effective therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease, but its effect on the LES has not been elucidated. Retrospective case control study (n = 121) evaluating manometric changes after MSA. Inclusion criteria consisted of a confirmed diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease by an abnormal esophageal pH study (body mass index <35 kg/m, hiatal hernia <3 cm, and absence of endoscopic Barrett disease). Manometric changes, pH testing, and proton pump inhibitor use were assessed preoperatively and 6 and 12 months after MSA. MSA was associated with an overall increase in the median LES resting pressure (18 pre-MSA vs 23 mm Hg post-MSA; P = 0.0003), residual pressure (4 vs 9 mm Hg; P < 0.0001), and distal esophageal contraction amplitude (80 vs 90 mm Hg; P = 0.02). The percent peristalsis remained unaltered (94% vs 87%; P = 0.71).Overall, patients with a manometrically defective LES were restored 67% of the time to a normal sphincter with MSA. Those with a structurally defective or severely defective LES improved to a normal LES in 77% and 56% of patients, respectively. Only 18% of patients with a normal preoperative manometric LES deteriorated to a lower category. MSA results in significant manometric improvement of the LES without apparent deleterious effects on the esophageal body. A manometrically defective LES can be restored to normal sphincter, whereas a normal LES remains stable.

  12. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia: long term follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Cheol Yong; Park, Hyun Mee; Kim, So Eun; Lee, Shin Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Chang Joon [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of balloon catheter dilatation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Seven patients(three males and four females) with esopha-geal achalasia were treated with balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheters of variable sizes were used depending on patient's conditions. The patients were followed up over a period of 12-39 months. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia was successful in all patients without esophageal perforation. All patients were relieved from dysphagia. Recurrence was not found in 5 patients on long term follow-up study, but was seen in 2 patients after 18 and 21 months, respectively. Balloon catheter dilatation was a safe and effective method in the treatment of esophageal achalasia with low recurrence rate of 29% on follow-up study.

  13. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia: long term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Cheol Yong; Park, Hyun Mee; Kim, So Eun; Lee, Shin Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Chang Joon

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of balloon catheter dilatation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Seven patients(three males and four females) with esopha-geal achalasia were treated with balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheters of variable sizes were used depending on patient's conditions. The patients were followed up over a period of 12-39 months. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia was successful in all patients without esophageal perforation. All patients were relieved from dysphagia. Recurrence was not found in 5 patients on long term follow-up study, but was seen in 2 patients after 18 and 21 months, respectively. Balloon catheter dilatation was a safe and effective method in the treatment of esophageal achalasia with low recurrence rate of 29% on follow-up study

  14. Recurrent respiratory distress and cardiopulmonary arrest caused by megaoesophagus secondary to achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Tapiwa Mabvuure

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Oesophagectomy should be considered for patients with end-stage achalasia and mega-oesophagus causing respiratory compromise to avoid potential fatal complications such as tracheal compression and subsequent respiratory arrest.

  15. Predictors for outcome of failure of balloon dilatation in patients with achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Alderliesten (Joyce); J.M. Conchillo; I. Leeuwenburgh (Ivonne); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pneumatic balloon dilatation (PD) is a regular treatment modality for achalasia. The reported success rates of PD vary. Recurrent symptoms often require repeated PD or surgery. Objective: To identify predicting factors for symptom recurrence requiring repeated treatment.

  16. Esophagogastric junction distensibility measurements during hydraulic dilation therapy in achalasia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappelle, W.F.; Bogte, A.; Siersema, P.D.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility is predictive of long-term clinical success after achalasia treatment. A new commercially available hydraulic dilation balloon is capable of measuring EGJ opening diameters whilst simultaneously dilating the EGJ.

  17. Novel association of achalasia with hereditary sensory and motor neuropathy with sensorineural deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, A K; Lubel, J S; Kohn, G P

    2016-08-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder. Unlike diffuse esophageal spasm, it has not previously been described in association with hereditary sensory and motor neuropathy (HSMN). An 18-year-old-male with HSMN with sensorineural deafness presented with a 2-day history of dysphagia to solids and liquids. Achalasia was diagnosed after extensive investigations, and his symptoms resolved with endoscopic and definitive surgical management. His monozygotic twin brother had also been diagnosed with HSMN and suffered from chronic dysphagia, which was also subsequently diagnosed with achalasia. This is the first case to illustrate an association between HSMN with sensorineural deafness and achalasia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  18. Socio-economic status and lifestyle factors are associated with achalasia risk: A population-based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Helen G; Gray, Ronan T; Lau, Kar W; McCaughey, Conall; Coyle, Peter V; Murray, Liam J; Johnston, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between various lifestyle factors and achalasia risk. METHODS: A population-based case-control study was conducted in Northern Ireland, including n = 151 achalasia cases and n = 117 age- and sex-matched controls. Lifestyle factors were assessed via a face-to-face structured interview. The association between achalasia and lifestyle factors was assessed by unconditional logistic regression, to produce odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: Individuals who had low-class occupations were at the highest risk of achalasia (OR = 1.88, 95%CI: 1.02-3.45), inferring that high-class occupation holders have a reduced risk of achalasia. A history of foreign travel, a lifestyle factor linked to upper socio-economic class, was also associated with a reduced risk of achalasia (OR = 0.59, 95%CI: 0.35-0.99). Smoking and alcohol consumption carried significantly reduced risks of achalasia, even after adjustment for socio-economic status. The presence of pets in the house was associated with a two-fold increased risk of achalasia (OR = 2.00, 95%CI: 1.17-3.42). No childhood household factors were associated with achalasia risk. CONCLUSION: Achalasia is a disease of inequality, and individuals from low socio-economic backgrounds are at highest risk. This does not appear to be due to corresponding alcohol and smoking behaviours. An observed positive association between pet ownership and achalasia risk suggests an interaction between endotoxin and viral infection exposure in achalasia aetiology. PMID:27099443

  19. Activated Eosinophils are Present in Esophageal Muscle in Patients with Achalasia of the Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hong; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Li-li

    2018-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to undertake a histological evaluation of the presence of eosinophils in esophageal muscle in patients with achalasia before treatment with peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), with clinical follow-up at one year. Material/Methods Before treatment, esophageal biopsies including mucosa and esophageal muscle were obtained from 28 patients with achalasia. Nine patients who had undergone esophagectomy for esophageal carcinoma were included in the control group. The Eckardt Score was used to evaluate the clinical symptoms of achalasia. Histology of routinely processed tissue sections was used to perform eosinophil cell counts (0 to +++), and immunohistochemistry was used to detect expression of eosinophil major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), and S100 protein in cases of achalasia (n=28) and controls (n=9). The findings in patients with achalasia were compared before and one year following POEM. Results Esophageal tissue from patients with achalasia showed eosinophils infiltrating into the muscularis externa in 85.7% (24/28), into the muscularis propria in 28.6% (8/28), and in 89% (25/28) there were few remaining myenteric ganglion cells, before POEM. The extent of inflammation was similar in all regions of the esophagus and between subtypes of achalasia. At one year following POEM, the Eckardt Scores between the former eosinophil (0) group and the eosinophil (+++) group were significantly different (Z=3.50, P=0.030). Conclusions Achalasia of the esophagus was associated with infiltration of the esophageal muscle by activated eosinophils and a decrease in the density of ganglion cells in the myenteric esophageal plexus. PMID:29672471

  20. Clinical, Endoscopic, and Radiologic Features of Three Subtypes of Achalasia, Classified Using High-Resolution Manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed Q.; AlQaraawi, Abdullah; Al-Sohaibani, Fahad; Al-Kahtani, Khalid; Al-Ashgar, Hamad I.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: High-resolution manometry (HRM) has improved the accuracy of manometry in detecting achalasia and determining its subtypes. However, the correlation of achalasia subtypes with clinical, endoscopic, and radiologic findings has not been assessed. We aimed to evaluate and compare the clinical, endoscopic, and fluoroscopy findings associated with three subtypes of achalasia using HRM. Patients and Methods: The retrospective clinical data, HRM, endoscopy, and radiologic findings were obtained from the medical records of untreated achalasia patients. Results: From 2011 to 2013, 374 patients underwent HRM. Fifty-two patients (14%) were diagnosed with achalasia, but only 32 (8.5%) of these patients had not received treatment and were therefore included in this study. The endoscopy results were normal in 28% of the patients, and a barium swallow was inconclusive in 31% of the achalasia patients. Ten patients (31%) were classified as having type I achalasia, 17 (53%) were classified as type II, and 5 (16%) were classified as type III. Among the three subtypes, type I patients were on average the youngest and had the longest history of dysphagia, mildest chest pain, most significant weight loss, and most dilated esophagus with residual food. Chest pain was most common in type III patients, and frequently had normal fluoroscopic and endoscopic results. Conclusion: The clinical, radiologic, and endoscopic findings were not significantly different between patients with type I and type II untreated achalasia. Type III patients had the most severe symptoms and were the most difficult to diagnose based on varied clinical, radiologic, and endoscopic findings. PMID:26021774

  1. The Effect of Race in Patients with Achalasia Diagnosed With High-Resolution Esophageal Manometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedid, Victor; Rosenblatt, Elizabeth; Gandhi, Kunjal Komal; Dhalla, Sameer; Nandwani, Monica C; Stein, Ellen M; Clarke, John O

    2018-02-01

    The advent of the Chicago Classification for esophageal motility disorders allowed for clinically reproducible subgrouping of patients with achalasia based on manometric phenotype. However, there are limited data with regards to racial variation using high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM). The aim of our study was to evaluate the racial differences in patients with achalasia diagnosed with HREM using the Chicago Classification. We evaluated the clinical presentation, treatment decisions and outcomes between blacks and non-blacks with achalasia to identify potential racial disparities. We performed a retrospective review of consecutive patients referred for HREM at a single tertiary referral center from June 2008 through October 2012. All patients diagnosed with achalasia on HREM according to the Chicago Classification were included. Demographic, clinical and manometric data were abstracted. All studies interpreted before the Chicago Classification was in widespread use were reanalyzed. Race was defined as black or non-black. Patients who had missing data were excluded. Proportions were compared using chi-squared analysis and means were compared using the Student's t-test. A total of 1,268 patients underwent HREM during the study period, and 105 (8.3%) were manometrically diagnosed with achalasia (53% female, mean age: 53.8 ± 17.0 years) and also met the aforementioned inclusion and exclusion criteria. A higher percentage of women presented with achalasia in blacks as compared to whites or other races (P treatment decisions and treatment outcomes among blacks and non-blacks. Our study highlights possible racial differences between blacks and non-blacks, including a higher proportion of black women diagnosed with achalasia and most blacks presenting with dysphagia. There is possibly a meaningful interaction of race and sex in the development of achalasia that might represent genetic differences in its pathophysiology. Further prospective studies are required

  2. High prevalence of heartburn and low acid sensitivity in patients with idiopathic achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Julio; Ortiz, Vicente; Maroto, Nuria; Ponce, Marta; Bustamante, Marco; Garrigues, Vicente

    2011-03-01

    Heartburn is frequently reported by patients with achalasia before treatment. However, the esophageal sensitivity to acid as a possible mediator of this symptom has not been previously evaluated. To evaluate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and the esophageal sensitivity to acid perfusion in patients with untreated achalasia. Forty patients with achalasia were prospectively evaluated. Forty-three patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease comprised the control group (ten of them with Barrett's esophagus). Symptoms were evaluated by a structured clinical questionnaire. Objective assessment was performed by ambulatory 24-h esophageal pH monitoring and endoscopy. Esophageal sensitivity to acid was evaluated by esophageal perfusion of ClH 0.1 N. Fifteen (37%) of the 40 patients with achalasia presented heartburn, but only four of them had esophagitis and/or abnormal esophageal pH recording. Eight patients had abnormal pH recording. Three patients had esophagitis. The esophagus was sensitive to acid in seven (17%) patients with achalasia, three of them with heartburn and one with abnormal pH recording. In the control group, 40 of 43 (93%) presented heartburn. Acid perfusion was positive in 32 (74%). Sensitivity to acid was lower in patients with achalasia than in those with gastroesophageal reflux disease with or without Barrett's esophagus. The prevalence of heartburn in patients with achalasia is high, although its association with objective indicators of gastroesophageal reflux disease is weak. Patients with achalasia have lower esophageal sensitivity to acid than patients with GERD, suggesting that heartburn is does not arise from this condition.

  3. Severe recurrent achalasia cardia responding to treatment of severe autoimmune acquired haemophilia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Jafar, H; Laffan, M; Al-Sabah, S; Elmorsi, M; Habeeb, M; Alnajar, F

    2012-01-01

    Acquired haemophilia A and severe acquired achalasia are both very rare conditions with unknown aetiology. Haemophilia A is a haemorrhagic disease induced by deficiency or malfunction of coagulation factor VIII. Congenital haemophilia is an inherited disease transmitted by the mother through X-linked inheritance and primarily affects males. However, acquired haemophilia A is a serious, sudden-onset, autoimmune disease that affects either sex. In addition, achalasia is a disease of the oesopha...

  4. Thoracoscopic Surgery in a Patient with Multiple Esophageal Carcinomas after Surgery for Esophageal Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Yuki; Tsukada, Tomoya; Aoki, Tatsuya; Haba, Yusuke; Hirano, Katsuhisa; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Kaji, Masahide; Shimizu, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    We present a case in which we used a thoracoscopic approach for resection of multiple esophageal carcinomas diagnosed 33 years after surgery for esophageal achalasia. A 68-year-old Japanese man had been diagnosed with esophageal achalasia and underwent surgical treatment 33 years earlier. He was examined at our hospital for annual routine checkup in which upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a “0-IIb+IIa” lesion in the middle esophagus. Iodine staining revealed multiple irregularly shaped ...

  5. Heller myotomy for achalasia. From the open to the laparoscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaix, Marco E; Patti, Marco G

    2015-07-01

    The last three decades have witnessed a progressive evolution in the surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia, with a shift from open to a minimally invasive Heller myotomy. The laparoscopic approach is currently the standard of care with better short-term outcomes and similar long-term functional results when compared to open surgery. More recently, the laparoscopic single-site approach and the use of the robot have been proposed to further improve the surgical outcome in achalasia patients.

  6. Retention Esophagitis as a Significant Clinical Predictor of Progression to Esophageal Cancer in Achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haewon Kim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims Chronic liquid and/or food stasis caused by retention esophagitis (RE in achalasia is a notable endoscopic finding because of the presence of a thickened or whitish esophageal mucosa and histologically altered squamous hyperplasia. We aimed to identify the clinical features of RE associated with achalasia and to clarify the clinical definition of RE in achalasia as a precancerous lesion identified by analyzing biomarker expressions. Methods From 2006 to 2015, we retrospectively reviewed 37 patients with achalasia without previous treatment. Among them, 21 patients had diagnostic findings of RE (RE+ and 16 patients had no diagnostic findings of RE (RE–. Immunohistochemical staining of p53, p16, and Ki-67 was performed on the endoscopic biopsy tissues from the patients with achalasia and 10 control patients with non-obstructive dysphagia. Results The symptom duration and transit delay were significantly longer in the RE+ group than in the RE– group. We found particularly high p53 positivity rates in the RE+ group (p<0.001. The rate of p16 expression was also significantly higher in the RE+ group than in the other two groups (p=0.003. Conclusions A high p53 expression rate was more frequently found in the RE+ group than in the other two groups. RE could be a meaningful clinical feature of achalasia for predicting esophageal carcinogenesis.

  7. Autism and esophageal achalasia in childhood: a possible correlation? Report on three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betalli, P; Carretto, E; Cananzi, M; Zanatta, L; Salvador, R; Galeazzi, F; Guariso, G; Gamba, P; Costantini, M

    2013-04-01

    Chronic gastrointestinal symptoms are commonly reported in autistic patients. Dysphagia is often present, and it is generally related to behavioral eating disorders. The association between autism and esophageal achalasia has not been described in literature yet. We report our experience with three cases of autistic children we recently treated for esophageal achalasia. In the first case (a 14-year-old male), achalasia was diagnosed with barium swallow and esophageal manometry and was successfully treated with three pneumatic endoscopic dilatations (follow-up: 3 years). In the second case (a 12-year-old female), achalasia was diagnosed with barium swallow and esophageal manometry and was treated with Heller myotomy after two unsuccessful pneumatic endoscopic attempts (follow-up: 3 months). In the last case, a 15-year-old male underwent barium swallow and endoscopy that confirmed achalasia. He was treated with Heller myotomy, and he is asymptomatic at a 6-month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association between autism and esophageal achalasia. Because of the rarity of both diseases, their association in the same patient is unlikely to be casual even if speculation on their common etiology is impossible at present. This finding needs further confirmation, but it is sufficient, in our opinion, to indicate proper evaluation with barium swallow and/or manometry in any autistic children with eating difficulty. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  8. Relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic characteristics in patients with fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Deutekom, Marije; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; Engel, Alexander F.; Janssen, Lucas W. M.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.; Dobben, Annette C.; Baeten, Cor G. M. I.; de Priester, Jacobus A.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: External anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging has been associated with poor outcome of anal sphincter repair. We studied the relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy on endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic

  9. Endosonographic appearance of the anal sphincters in patients following colostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudol-Szopinska, I.; Jakubowski, W.; Szczepkowski, M.; Panorska, A.

    2002-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to visualize, by anal ultrasound (AUS), the suspected defects of the anal sphincters in the patients after colostomy and to analyze possible factors that could have led to such defects. Patients and methods. AUS, using a 7.0 MHz endorectal probe, was performed in a group of 25 patients with colostomy. The internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS) and puborectalis muscle (PR) were visualized and the defects within them were qualified and quantified. For statistical analysis, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. Results. The IAS was thin in all but three patients (22 patients; 88 %) with the mean thickness of 1.62 mm. A circular reduction of the thickness along the entire length of the IAS was seen in 20 patients (90.9 %). The echogenicity of the IAS was increased in 15 patients (60 %), and in 10 of them (66.6%), this defect embraced the whole length and circumference of the IAS. The margins of the IAS were not well-defined in 10 patients (40%). A significant correlation was found between the length of the patient's life with the stoma and the IAS echogenicity defect (p-value = 0.0001). No significant correlation was found between the dynamic examination, the IAS thickness and the IAS borders definition. Conclusion. The reduced thickness, increased echogenicity and borders definition defect of the IAS are seen in the patients after colostomy. The only significant correlation was confirmed between the length of the patient's life with the stoma and the IAS echogenicity defect. (author)

  10. The impact of anal sphincter injury on perceived body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, David; Khan, Rabia; Naidoo, Kristina; Kearney, Rohna; Myers, Jenny; Reid, Fiona

    2017-05-01

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury is common but the effect on body image is unreported. The aim of this study was to explore patient perceived changes in body image and other psychological aspects in women attending a perineal follow-up clinic. This retrospective study analysed women's responses to a self-reported questionnaire. Consecutive women with anal sphincter injury who attended a United Kingdom Maternity Hospital perineal follow-up clinic between January 1999 and January 2012 were identified and the records obtained and reviewed. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine variables influencing self-reported change in body image. Questionnaires and operation notes were analysed from 422 women who attended at a median of four months after delivery. 222 (53%) reported a change in body image with 80 (19%) reporting lower self-esteem and 75 (18%) a change in their personality due to the change in body image. 248 (59%) perceived an anatomical change due to the delivery. Factors associated with increased likelihood of reporting a change in body image were reporting a perceived change in anatomy due to the delivery, adjusted OR 6.11 (3.56-10.49), anal incontinence, OR 1.97 (1.16-3.36), and delivery by forceps, OR 2.59 (1.23-5.43). This is the first study to quantify body image changes in women after anal sphincter injury sustained in childbirth. These were found to be very common, affecting up to 50% of women. The study has several limitations but it does highlight the significant psychosocial problems of negative self-esteem and personality changes associated with a perceived change in body image that has not previously been reported. It also outlines the further research questions that need to be addressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Narcolepsy-cataplexy and loss of sphincter control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vgontzas, A. N.; Sollenberger, S. E.; Kales, A.; Bixler, E. O.; Vela-Bueno, A.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the case of a 34-year-old man who presented intermittent faecal incontinence as a manifestation of cataplexy. The patient's sleep history was positive for the full narcoleptic tetrad (sleep attacks, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations) while extensive neuropsychiatric work up was negative for any neurologic or psychiatric illness. Repeat polysomnograms (including a polysomnogram with a full seizure montage) were positive for pathologic sleepiness, but there was no evidence of a seizure disorder. The course of the patient's symptomatology and the favourable response of his symptoms to stimulants and imipramine support the theory that his intermittent loss of sphincter control is part of his narcolepsy-cataplexy. PMID:8796217

  12. OPPORTUNITIES OF LAPAROSCOPY IN THE TREATMENT OF ESOPHAGEAL ACHALASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Allakhverdyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes opportunities and results of laparoscopic oesophagocardiomiotomy and laparoscopic transhiatal oesophagus removal without hand assistance in esophageal achalasia (cardiospasm. In total, such operations were performed in 196 and 31 of cases (of 423 patients, respectively. There were minimal numbers of relapses (below 2.3% after laparoscopic oesophagocardiomiotomy done by the proposed technique. All cases of reflux esophagitis were diagnosed after esophagocardiomiotomy with Dor fundoplication.After cardiodilatation, disease relapses were registered in 57% of patients. The advantages of a laparoscopic access for oesophagectomy are shown and technical particular of this intervention are analyzed based on a case history. The principles of Fast track surgery in this patient category are discussed that allow for reduction of the length of hospital stay by 40%.

  13. Esophageal Achalasia: An Uncommon Complication during Pregnancy Treated Conservatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Spiliopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old Caucasian woman, gravida 3 para 2, was admitted at 29 weeks of gestation because of vomiting, dysphagia for solids and liquids, and loss of weight. An enlargement of the anterior left neck region was noted on the palpation of the thyroid gland. An MRI of the neck showed a marked esophageal dilatation with the presence of food remnants along its length and the displacement of the trachea to the right. The findings of the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and manometry were suggestive of esophageal achalasia. Conservative management with total parenteral nutrition (TPN through a peripheral line proved to be successful. A healthy male baby was born by a cesarean section at 37 weeks. The patient underwent laparoscopic esophageal myotomy and fundoplication seven days postpartum.

  14. Laparoscopic myotomy: technique and efficacy in treating achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A; Pellegrini, C A

    2001-04-01

    Esophageal Heller myotomy and a partial antireflux procedure for achalasia are the ideal procedures to benefit from the advances in minimally invasive surgery. The magnified view of the operative field provided by the laparoscope allows precise division of the esophageal muscle fibers with excellent results. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy results in reduced postoperative pain, less morbidity, shorter hospitalization, better resolution of dysphagia, and less postoperative heartburn when compared with the open abdominal and even the thoracoscopic approach. A longer myotomy especially at the distal end, and a loose, well-formed partial fundoplication are the keys to a successful outcome. Superior long-term results after surgical myotomy when compared with nonsurgical interventions argue strongly in favor of surgery in any patient who is fit enough to undergo general anesthesia.

  15. Laparoscopic myotomy in achalasia cardia treatment: Experience after 36 operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelović Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Laparoscopic Heller­Dor operation, a standard method in the treatment of achalasia, has been performed at the Center for Esophageal Surgery of the First Surgical Clinic since April 2006. Objective. The aim of this study was to present this surgical procedure and initial experiences after 36 consecutive laparoscopic Heller­Dor operations. Methods. This partly retrospective, partly prospective study presented our results after laparoscopic Heller­Dor operation (presentation of the treatment method. We performed a standard anterior esophagocardioymiotomy, without releasing the posterior aspect of the cardia, and anterior partial fundoplication. The type and severity of symptoms and their duration were evaluated based on questionnaires fulfilled by patients. The diagnosis was made based on radiological, endoscopic and manometric findings. Laparoscopic surgery as the method of treatment was evaluated based on the duration of surgery, intra­ and postoperative complications, time interval until the initiation of oral feeding, length of hospital stay, need for additional therapeutic measures after the operation and effect of surgery on the severity of symptoms. Results. Preopereratively, dysphagia was the predominant symptom in all patients, while regurgitation was much lower (44%. The average duration of operation was 127 minutes. Postoperative hospitalization lasted on the average 5.7 days. From 36 treated patients, 34 (94.4% considered that the effect of treatment was good or excellent. Postoperative dysphagia was present in two patients (5.6% and was successfully solved by balloon dilatation. Conclusion. Laparoscopic Heller­Dor operation is an effective and safe surgical procedure in resolving symptoms of achalasia and today presents the method of the first choice in the treatment of this disease.

  16. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the anal sphincter using a dedicated endoanal receiver coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSouza, N.M.; Williams, A.D.; Gilderdale, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    The use of a surface coil in MR imaging improves signal-to-noise ratio of adjacent tissues of interest. We therefore devised an endoanal receiver coil for imaging the anal sphincter. The probe is solid and re-usable: it comprises a saddle geometry receiver with integral tuning, matching and decoupling. It is placed in the anal canal and immobilised externally. Both in vitro and in vivo normal anatomy is identified. The mucosa is high signal intensity, the submucosa low signal intensity, the internal sphincter uniformly high signal intensity and the external sphincter low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. In females, the transverse perineal muscle bridges the inferior part of the external sphincter anteriorly. In perianal sepsis, collections and the site of the endoanal opening are identified. In early-onset fecal incontinence following obstetric trauma/surgery, focal sphincter defects are demonstrated; in late-onset fecal incontinence external sphincter atrophy is seen. In fecally incontinent patients with scleroderma, forward deviation of the anterior sphincter musculature with descent of rectal air and feces into the anal canal is noted. The extent of sphincter invasion is assessed in low rectal tumours. In children with congenital anorectal anomalies, abnormalities of the muscle components are defined using smaller-diameter coils. Such information is invaluable in the assessment and surgical planning of patients with a variety of anorectal pathologies. (orig.)

  17. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the anal sphincter using a dedicated endoanal receiver coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSouza, N.M.; Williams, A.D.; Gilderdale, D.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Imperial College School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-04-01

    The use of a surface coil in MR imaging improves signal-to-noise ratio of adjacent tissues of interest. We therefore devised an endoanal receiver coil for imaging the anal sphincter. The probe is solid and re-usable: it comprises a saddle geometry receiver with integral tuning, matching and decoupling. It is placed in the anal canal and immobilised externally. Both in vitro and in vivo normal anatomy is identified. The mucosa is high signal intensity, the submucosa low signal intensity, the internal sphincter uniformly high signal intensity and the external sphincter low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. In females, the transverse perineal muscle bridges the inferior part of the external sphincter anteriorly. In perianal sepsis, collections and the site of the endoanal opening are identified. In early-onset fecal incontinence following obstetric trauma/surgery, focal sphincter defects are demonstrated; in late-onset fecal incontinence external sphincter atrophy is seen. In fecally incontinent patients with scleroderma, forward deviation of the anterior sphincter musculature with descent of rectal air and feces into the anal canal is noted. The extent of sphincter invasion is assessed in low rectal tumours. In children with congenital anorectal anomalies, abnormalities of the muscle components are defined using smaller-diameter coils. Such information is invaluable in the assessment and surgical planning of patients with a variety of anorectal pathologies. (orig.) With 15 figs., 26 refs.

  18. [Design of an artificial sphincter system with bio-feedback function based on MSP430].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-kan; Yan, De-tian

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we advance a new treating method for rectectomy postoperative anus incontinence, which is called "artificial sphincter system with biofeedback-function". The system simulates the function of human's sphincter and has entered into a stage of simulation experiments on animals.

  19. Effects of lesogaberan on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter function in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Beaumont, Hanneke; Mertens, Veerle; Denison, Hans; Ruth, Magnus; Adler, John; Silberg, Debra G.; Sifrim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are a major mechanism behind reflux. This study assessed the effects of lesogaberan (AZD3355), a novel gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor agonist, on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function when used as

  20. Distribution and effect of galanin on gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi motility in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harling, H; Messell, T; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the occurrence and topographical distribution of galanin-like immunoreactivity (GAL-LI) in the porcine gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi and to investigate the pharmacologic effect of GAL on gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi motility. By radioimmunoassay the c...

  1. Comparison of angiotensin II (Ang II) effects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and lower esophageal sphincter smooth muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Satish; Fan, Ya-Ping; Puri, Rajinder N

    2002-03-22

    Studies were performed to compare the actions of Ang II in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) vs. lower esophageal sphincter (LES) smooth muscles in vitro, in opossum and rabbit. Studies also were carried out in isolated smooth muscle cells. In opossum, Ang II produced no discernible effects in the IAS, but did produce a concentration-dependent contraction in the LES. Conversely, in the rabbit, while Ang II caused a modest response in the LES, it caused a significant contraction in the IAS. The contractile responses of Ang II in the opossum LES were mostly resistant to different neurohumoral antagonists but were antagonized by AT1 antagonist losartan. AT2 antagonist PD 123,319, rather than inhibiting, prolonged the contractile action of Ang II. The contractile actions of Ang II in the opossum LES were not modified by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin 1 x 10(-6) M) but were partially attenuated by the PKC inhibitor H-7 (1 x 10(-6) M), Ca2+ channel blocker nicardipine (1 x 10(-5) M), Rho kinase inhibitor HA-1077 (1 x 10(-7) M) or p(44/42) MAP kinase inhibitor PD 98059 (5 x 10(-5) M). The combination of HA-1077 and H-7 did not cause an additive attenuation of Ang II responses. Western blot analyses revealed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors. We conclude that Ang lI-induced contraction of sphincteric smooth muscle occurs primarily by the activation of AT1 receptors at the smooth muscle cells and involves multiple pathways, influx of Ca2+, and PKC, Rho kinase and p(44/42) MAP kinase.

  2. Endoscopic Therapy for Achalasia Before Heller Myotomy Results in Worse Outcomes Than Heller Myotomy Alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C Daniel; Stival, Alessandro; Howell, D Lee; Swafford, Vickie

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Heller myotomy has been shown to be an effective primary treatment of achalasia. However, many physicians treating patients with achalasia continue to offer endoscopic therapies before recommending operative myotomy. Herein we report outcomes in 209 patients undergoing Heller myotomy with the majority (74%) undergoing myotomy as secondary treatment of achalasia. Methods: Data on all patients undergoing operative management of achalasia are collected prospectively. Over a 9-year period (1994–2003), 209 patients underwent Heller myotomy for achalasia. Of these, 154 had undergone either Botox injection and/or pneumatic dilation preoperatively. Preoperative, operative, and long-term outcome data were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with multiple χ2 and Mann-Whitney U analyses, as well as ANOVA. Results: Among the 209 patients undergoing Heller myotomy for achalasia, 154 received endoscopic therapy before being referred for surgery (100 dilation only, 33 Botox only, 21 both). The groups were matched for preoperative demographics and symptom scores for dysphagia, regurgitation, and chest pain. Intraoperative complications were more common in the endoscopically treated group with GI perforations being the most common complication (9.7% versus 3.6%). Postoperative complications, primarily severe dysphagia, and pulmonary complications were more common after endoscopic treatment (10.4% versus 5.4%). Failure of myotomy as defined by persistent or recurrent severe symptoms, or need for additionally therapy including redo myotomy or esophagectomy was higher in the endoscopically treated group (19.5% versus 10.1%). Conclusion: Use of preoperative endoscopic therapy remains common and has resulted in more intraoperative complications, primarily perforation, more postoperative complications, and a higher rate of failure than when no preoperative therapy was used. Endoscopic therapy for achalasia should not be used unless patients are not candidates for

  3. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia in children: analysis of 13 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Xu, Chun-Di; Zaouche, Abdehaman; Cai, Wei

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a rare disease and there have been very few reports about it, especially in children. We reviewed our experience in dealing with esophageal achalasia in 13 children. Thirteen children (6 boys and 7 girls), who had been diagnosed with achalasia over a 12-year period between May 1993 and October 2005, were analysed with regard to clinical manifestations, esophageal manometry, endoscopic findings, and treatment. Their age ranged from 3 years to 14 years and 5 months (average 10.3 years) at the time of diagnosis. In the 13 children, 3 had a family history of esophageal achalasia, 2 of them were sisters. All the 3 children suffered from achalasia/alacrimia/ACTH deficiency. Dysphagia was the most common symptom in the affected children. Vomiting/regurgitation, retrosternal pain, retarded growth, and respiratory symptoms were also observed in some patients. Heller's esophagocardiomyotomy was performed in 9 (69.23%) children, among whom 3 had an antireflux operation at the same time. In the remaining 4 children, 3 received a pneumatic dilatation and 1 received regular administration of nifedipine. Twelve patients were followed up: 8 patients by surgery were cured and have been in perfect condition until now, 3 patients recovered fairly, and 1 patient showed improvement. Esophageal manometry combined with X-ray examination proves to be an effective diagnostic method for achalasia. It is also effective in evaluating the result of treatment. Heller's esophagocardiomyotomy is a treatment of choice for children with achalasia because of its safety and long-term effective results after surgery.

  4. Incidence of Achalasia in South Australia Based on Esophageal Manometry Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Jaime A; Hamer, Peter W; Heddle, Richard; Holloway, Richard H; Myers, Jennifer C; Thompson, Sarah K

    2017-03-01

    Achalasia is a disorder of esophageal motility with a reported incidence of 0.5 to 1.6 per 100,000 persons per year in Europe, Asia, Canada, and America. However, estimates of incidence values have been derived predominantly from retrospective searches of databases of hospital discharge codes and personal communications with gastroenterologists, and are likely to be incorrect. We performed a cohort study based on esophageal manometry findings to determine the incidence of achalasia in South Australia. We collected data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics on the South Australian population. Cases of achalasia diagnosed by esophageal manometry were identified from the 3 adult manometry laboratory databases in South Australia. Endoscopy reports and case notes were reviewed for correlations with diagnoses. The annual incidence of achalasia in the South Australian population was calculated for the decade 2004 to 2013. Findings were standardized to those of the European Standard Population based on age. The annual incidence of achalasia in South Australia ranged from 2.3 to 2.8 per 100,000 persons. The mean age at diagnosis was 62.1 ± 18.1 years. The incidence of achalasia increased with age (Spearman rho, 0.95; P achalasia in South Australia to be 2.3 to 2.8 per 100,000 persons and to increase with age. South Australia's relative geographic isolation and the population's access to manometry allowed for more accurate identification of cases than hospital code analyses, with a low probability of missed cases. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Successful Implantation of Bioengineered, Intrinsically Innervated, Human Internal Anal Sphincter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shreya; Gilmont, Robert R.; Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Somara, Sita; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Bitar, Khalil N.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims To restore fecal continence, the weakened pressure of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) must be increased. We bioengineered intrinsically innervated human IAS, to emulate sphincteric physiology, in vitro. Methods We co-cultured human IAS circular smooth muscle with immortomouse fetal enteric neurons. We investigated the ability of bioengineered innervated human IAS, implanted in RAG1−/− mice, to undergo neovascularization and preserve the physiology of the constituent myogenic and neuronal components. Results The implanted IAS was neovascularized in vivo; numerous blood vessels were observed with no signs of inflammation or infection. Real-time force acquisition from implanted and pre-implant IAS showed distinct characteristics of IAS physiology. Features included the development of spontaneous myogenic basal tone; relaxation of 100% of basal tone in response to inhibitory neurotransmitter vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and direct electrical field stimulation of the intrinsic innervation; inhibition of nitrergic and VIPergic EFS-induced relaxation (by antagonizing nitric oxide synthesis or receptor interaction); contraction in response to cholinergic stimulation with acetylcholine; and intact electromechanical coupling (evidenced by direct response to potassium chloride). Implanted, intrinsically innervated bioengineered human IAS tissue preserved the integrity and physiology of myogenic and neuronal components. Conclusion Intrinsically innervated human IAS bioengineered tissue can be successfully implanted in mice. This approach might be used to treat patients with fecal incontinence. PMID:21463628

  6. Hospital variation in sphincter preservation for elderly rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgion, Christopher M; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2014-09-01

    The primary goal of an operation for rectal cancer is to cure cancer and, where possible, preserve continence. A wide range of sphincter preservation rates have been reported. This study evaluated hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE), and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of elderly rectal cancer patients. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked data, we identified 4959 patients older than 65 y with stage I-III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000-2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly patients with rectal cancer. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which combined explained 31% of procedure variation. Receipt of LE is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A comparison of symptom severity and bolus retention with Chicago classification esophageal pressure topography metrics in patients with achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicodem, Fredec; de Ruigh, Annemijn; Xiao, Yinglian; Rajeswaran, Shankar; Teitelbaum, Ezra N.; Hungness, Eric S.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We compared findings from timed barium esophagrams (TBEs) and esophageal pressure topography studies among achalasia subtypes and in relation to symptom severity. We analyzed data from 50 patients with achalasia (31 men; age, 20-79 y) who underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM), had TBE after a

  8. Gender differences in both the pathology and surgical outcome of patients with esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se-Ryung; Akimoto, Shusuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a relatively rare disease that occurs usually in middle-aged patients. The laparoscopic Heller-Dor (LHD) procedure is the gold-standard surgical treatment for esophageal achalasia. There are many studies on the pathology and surgical outcome of esophageal achalasia from various perspectives, but there are no studies on gender differences in both the pathology and surgical outcome. This study aimed to evaluate gender differences in the surgical outcome with the LHD procedure and in the pathology of esophageal achalasia patients. The study included 474 LHD-treated patients who were postoperatively followed up for 6 months or more. The patients were divided into 2 groups by gender, to compare the preoperative pathology, surgical outcome, symptom scores before and after LHD, symptom score improvement frequency, and patient satisfaction with the surgery. The study population consisted of 248 male and 226 female, having a mean age of 45.1 years. There were no gender differences in the preoperative pathology, but a significantly lower BMI (p achalasia were characterized by low BMI, less esophageal dilation, and increased frequency and severity of chest pain. LHD improved the chest pain in the female patients, whereas the surgical outcome and satisfaction with the surgery were excellent regardless of gender.

  9. Progression of diffuse esophageal spasm to achalasia: incidence and predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, L H S; Herbella, F A M; Rodriguez, T N; Trivino, T; Farah, J F M

    2013-07-01

    The progression of certain primary esophageal motor disorders to achalasia has been documented; however, the true incidence of this decay is still elusive. This study aims to evaluate: (i) the incidence of the progression of diffuse esophageal spasm to achalasia, and (ii) predictive factors to this progression. Thirty-five patients (mean age 53 years, 80% females) with a manometric picture of diffuse esophageal spasm were followed for at least 1 year. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease confirmed by pH monitoring or systemic diseases that may affect esophageal motility were excluded. Esophageal manometry was repeated in all patients. Five (14%) of the patients progressed to achalasia at a mean follow-up of 2.1 (range 1-4) years. Demographic characteristics were not predictive of transition to achalasia, while dysphagia (P= 0.005) as the main symptom and the wave amplitude of simultaneous waves less than 50 mmHg (P= 0.003) were statistically significant. In conclusion, the transition of diffuse esophageal spasm to achalasia is not frequent at a 2-year follow-up. Dysphagia and simultaneous waves with low amplitude are predictive factors for this degeneration. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  10. Quantitative Measures of Swallowing Deficits in Patients With Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerston, Julia K; Heller, Amanda C; Houtz, Daniel R; Kendall, Katherine A

    2016-05-01

    Dysphagia and associated aspiration pneumonia are commonly reported sequelae of Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies of swallowing in patients with PD have described prolonged pharyngeal transit time, delayed onset of pharyngeal transit, cricopharyngeal (CP) achalasia, reduced pharyngeal constriction, and slowed hyolaryngeal elevation. These studies were completed using inconsistent evaluation methodology, reliance on qualitative analysis, and a lack of a large control group, resulting in concerns regarding diagnostic precision. The purpose of this study was to investigate swallowing function in patients with PD using a norm-referenced, quantitative approach. This retrospective study includes 34 patients with a diagnosis of PD referred to a multidisciplinary voice and swallowing clinic. Modified barium swallow studies were performed using quantitative measures of pharyngeal transit time, hyoid displacement, CP sphincter opening, area of the pharynx at maximal constriction, and timing of laryngeal vestibule closure relative to bolus arrival at the CP sphincter. Reduced pharyngeal constriction was found in 30.4%, and a delay in airway closure relative to arrival of the bolus at the CP sphincter was the most common abnormality, present in 62% of patients. Previously reported findings of prolonged pharyngeal transit, poor hyoid elevation, and CP achalasia were not identified as prominent features. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Thoracoscopic Surgery in a Patient with Multiple Esophageal Carcinomas after Surgery for Esophageal Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yuki; Tsukada, Tomoya; Aoki, Tatsuya; Haba, Yusuke; Hirano, Katsuhisa; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Kaji, Masahide; Shimizu, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    We present a case in which we used a thoracoscopic approach for resection of multiple esophageal carcinomas diagnosed 33 years after surgery for esophageal achalasia. A 68-year-old Japanese man had been diagnosed with esophageal achalasia and underwent surgical treatment 33 years earlier. He was examined at our hospital for annual routine checkup in which upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a "0-IIb+IIa" lesion in the middle esophagus. Iodine staining revealed multiple irregularly shaped iodine-unstained areas, the diagnosis of which was esophageal carcinoma. Thoracoscopic subtotal esophagectomy was performed. Esophageal carcinoma may occur many years after surgery for esophageal achalasia, even if the passage symptoms have improved. So, long-term periodic follow-up is necessary for detection of carcinoma at an earlier stage.

  12. Thoracoscopic Surgery in a Patient with Multiple Esophageal Carcinomas after Surgery for Esophageal Achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Yamasaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case in which we used a thoracoscopic approach for resection of multiple esophageal carcinomas diagnosed 33 years after surgery for esophageal achalasia. A 68-year-old Japanese man had been diagnosed with esophageal achalasia and underwent surgical treatment 33 years earlier. He was examined at our hospital for annual routine checkup in which upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a “0-IIb+IIa” lesion in the middle esophagus. Iodine staining revealed multiple irregularly shaped iodine-unstained areas, the diagnosis of which was esophageal carcinoma. Thoracoscopic subtotal esophagectomy was performed. Esophageal carcinoma may occur many years after surgery for esophageal achalasia, even if the passage symptoms have improved. So, long-term periodic follow-up is necessary for detection of carcinoma at an earlier stage.

  13. Outcome of Achalasia Cardia Managed with Transabdominal Hellers Cardiomyotomy and Anterior Dor Patch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyne, A.; Majeed, F. A.; Khan, M. I.; Rahim, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate relief of dysphagia and apprearance of reflux symptoms in patients of achalasia cardia treated with Trans abdominal cardiomyotomy and anterior Dor patch. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of study: Combined Military Hospital Quetta and Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi from Jan 2006 to Jan 2012. Methodology: Twenty three cases were diagnosed to have achalasia cardia on barium swallow, upper GI endoscopy and CT scan chest in selective cases. They were treated with transabdominal modified Hellers cardiomyotomy and anterior Dor patch as an antireflux procedure. Relief of dysphagia and occurrence of reflux symptoms were evaluated clinically. Results: All (100%) operated patients had symptomatic relief of dysphagia over follow up of six months. No patient had post op reflux symptoms. Conclusion: Transabdominal Hellers cardiomyotomy with anterior Dor patch is a safe and effective surgical option for achalasia cardia. (author)

  14. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Brisinda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Worldwide Experience with Erosion of the Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicuben, Evan T; Bell, Reginald C W; Jobe, Blair A; Buckley, F P; Daniel Smith, C; Graybeal, Casey J; Lipham, John C

    2018-04-17

    The magnetic sphincter augmentation device continues to become a more common antireflux surgical option with low complication rates. Erosion into the esophagus is an important complication to recognize and is reported to occur at very low incidences (0.1-0.15%). Characterization of this complication remains limited. We aim to describe the worldwide experience with erosion of the magnetic sphincter augmentation device including presentation, techniques for removal, and possible risk factors. We reviewed data obtained from the device manufacturer Torax Medical, Inc., as well as the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. The study period was from February 2007 through July 2017 and included all devices placed worldwide. In total, 9453 devices were placed and there were 29 reported cases of erosions. The median time to presentation of an erosion was 26 months with most occurring between 1 and 4 years after placement. The risk of erosion was 0.3% at 4 years after device implantation. Most patients experienced new-onset dysphagia prompting evaluation. Devices were successfully removed in all patients most commonly via an endoscopic removal of the eroded portion followed by a delayed laparoscopic removal of the remaining beads. At a median follow-up of 58 days post-removal, there were no complications and 24 patients have returned to baseline. Four patients reported ongoing mild dysphagia. Erosion of the LINX device is an important but rare complication to recognize that has been safely managed via minimally invasive approaches without long-term consequences.

  16. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jundt K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12% to after childbirth (21 and 28% in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women.

  17. Successful implantation of physiologically functional bioengineered mouse internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shreya; Miyasaka, Eiichi A; Hashish, Mohamed; Somara, Sita; Gilmont, Robert R; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Bitar, Khalil N

    2010-08-01

    We have previously developed bioengineered three-dimensional internal anal sphincter (IAS) rings from circular smooth muscle cells isolated from rabbit and human IAS. We provide proof of concept that bioengineered mouse IAS rings are neovascularized upon implantation into mice of the same strain and maintain concentric smooth muscle alignment, phenotype, and IAS functionality. Rings were bioengineered by using smooth muscle cells from the IAS of C57BL/6J mice. Bioengineered mouse IAS rings were implanted subcutaneously on the dorsum of C57BL/6J mice along with a microosmotic pump delivering fibroblast growth factor-2. The mice remained healthy during the period of implantation, showing no external signs of rejection. Mice were killed 28 days postsurgery and implanted IAS rings were harvested. IAS rings showed muscle attachment, neovascularization, healthy color, and no external signs of infection or inflammation. Assessment of force generation on harvested IAS rings showed the following: 1) spontaneous basal tone was generated in the absence of external stimulation; 2) basal tone was relaxed by vasoactive intestinal peptide, nitric oxide donor, and nifedipine; 3) acetylcholine and phorbol dibutyrate elicited rapid-rising, dose-dependent, sustained contractions repeatedly over 30 min without signs of muscle fatigue; and 4) magnitudes of potassium chloride-induced contractions were 100% of peak maximal agonist-induced contractions. Our preliminary results confirm the proof of concept that bioengineered rings are neovascularized upon implantation. Harvested rings maintain smooth muscle alignment and phenotype. Our physiological studies confirm that implanted rings maintain 1) overall IAS physiology and develop basal tone, 2) integrity of membrane ionic characteristics, and 3) integrity of membrane associated intracellular signaling transduction pathways for contraction and relaxation by responding to cholinergic, nitrergic, and VIP-ergic stimulation. IAS smooth muscle

  18. Sphincter preservation with preoperative radiation therapy and coloanal anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minsky, Bruce D; Cohen, Alfred M; Enker, Warren E; Paty, Philip

    1995-02-01

    Purpose: To determine if preoperative radiation therapy allows sphincter preservation in the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with the diagnosis of invasive, resectable, primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum limited to the pelvis were enrolled on a Phase I/II trial of preoperative radiation therapy plus low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. By preoperative assessment, all patients had invasive tumors (2: T2, 28: T3) involving the distal half of the rectum and required an abdominoperineal resection. The median tumor size was 4 cm (range: 1.5-6 cm) and the median distance from the anal verge was 4 cm (range: 3-7 cm). The whole pelvis received 46.8 Gy followed by a 3.60 Gy boost to the primary tumor bed. The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 6-82 months). Results: Of the 29 patients who underwent resection, 3 (10%) had a complete pathologic response and 24 (83%) were able to successfully undergo a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. The incidence of local failure was crude: 17% and 4-year actuarial: 23%. The 4-year actuarial survival was 75%. One patient developed a partial disruption of the anastomosis and two developed rectal stenosis. Analysis of sphincter function using a previously published scale was performed at the time of last follow-up in 22 of the 24 patients who underwent a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. Function was good or excellent in 77%. The median number of bowel movements/day was two (range: 1-6). Conclusions: This technique may be an alternative to an abdominoperineal resection in selected patients. Continued follow-up is needed to determine if this approach ultimately has similar local control and survival rates as an abdominoperineal resection.

  19. Sphincter preservation with preoperative radiation therapy and coloanal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Enker, Warren E.; Paty, Philip

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if preoperative radiation therapy allows sphincter preservation in the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with the diagnosis of invasive, resectable, primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum limited to the pelvis were enrolled on a Phase I/II trial of preoperative radiation therapy plus low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. By preoperative assessment, all patients had invasive tumors (2: T2, 28: T3) involving the distal half of the rectum and required an abdominoperineal resection. The median tumor size was 4 cm (range: 1.5-6 cm) and the median distance from the anal verge was 4 cm (range: 3-7 cm). The whole pelvis received 46.8 Gy followed by a 3.60 Gy boost to the primary tumor bed. The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 6-82 months). Results: Of the 29 patients who underwent resection, 3 (10%) had a complete pathologic response and 24 (83%) were able to successfully undergo a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. The incidence of local failure was crude: 17% and 4-year actuarial: 23%. The 4-year actuarial survival was 75%. One patient developed a partial disruption of the anastomosis and two developed rectal stenosis. Analysis of sphincter function using a previously published scale was performed at the time of last follow-up in 22 of the 24 patients who underwent a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. Function was good or excellent in 77%. The median number of bowel movements/day was two (range: 1-6). Conclusions: This technique may be an alternative to an abdominoperineal resection in selected patients. Continued follow-up is needed to determine if this approach ultimately has similar local control and survival rates as an abdominoperineal resection

  20. Postpartum two- and three-dimensional ultrasound evaluation of anal sphincter complex in women with obstetric anal sphincter injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, C; Martínez-Franco, E; Wozniak, M M; Cassado, J; Santoro, G A; Elías, N; López, M; Palacio, M; Wieczorek, A P; Espuña-Pons, M

    2017-04-01

    To compare the sensitivity and specificity of two- (2D) and three- (3D) dimensional transperineal ultrasound (TPUS) and 3D endovaginal ultrasound (EVUS) with the gold standard 3D endoanal ultrasound (EAUS) in detecting residual defects after primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS). External (EAS) and internal (IAS) anal sphincters were evaluated by the four ultrasound modalities in women with repaired OASIS. 2D-TPUS was evaluated in real-time, whereas 3D-TPUS, 3D-EVUS and 3D-EAUS volumes were evaluated offline by six blinded readers. The presence/absence of any tear in EAS or IAS was recorded and defects were scored according to the Starck system. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated, using 3D-EAUS as reference standard. Inter- and intraobserver analyses were performed for all 3D imaging modalities. Association between patients' symptoms (Wexner score) and ultrasound findings (Starck score) was calculated. Images from 55 patients were analyzed. Compared with findings on 3D-EAUS, the agreement for EAS evaluation was poor for 3D-EVUS (κ = 0.01), fair for 2D-TPUS (κ = 0.30) and good for 3D-TPUS (κ = 0.73). The agreement for IAS evaluation was moderate for both 3D-EVUS (κ = 0.41) and 2D-TPUS (κ = 0.52) and good for 3D-TPUS (κ = 0.66). Good intraobserver (3D-EAUS, κ = 0.73; 3D-TPUS, κ = 0.78) and interobserver (3D-EAUS, κ = 0.68; 3D-TPUS, κ = 0.60) agreement was reported. Significant association between Starck and Wexner scores was found only for 3D-EAUS (Spearman's rho = 0.277, P = 0.04). 2D-TPUS and 3D-EVUS are not accurate modalities for the assessment of anal sphincters after repair of OASIS. 3D-TPUS shows good agreement with the gold standard 3D-EAUS and a high sensitivity in detecting residual defects. It, thus, has potential as a screening tool after primary repair of OASIS. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG

  1. Brittleness of diabetes due to achalasia cardia managed successfully by multiple innovative strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimal Upreti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia cardia is an infrequent disorder of esophageal dysmotility that has failure of the lower end of the esophagus to relax with swallowing as hallmark abnormality. Diabetes mellitus, on the other hand, can afflict the motor activity of gastrointestinal tract by causing autonomic neuropathy. Combination of these diseases can be very distressing to a patient. We present a 45-year-old lady co-affected with both these disorders who presented with severe hypoglycemia and was managed successfully using the multiple strategies to treat achalasia and diabetes.

  2. Esophageal scintigraphy to quantitate esophageal transit of the achalasia patients after heller's myotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junfeng; Wang Qizhang; Li Wenqi

    1995-01-01

    To quantitate esophageal transit of the achalasia patients after Heller's myotomy using scintigraphic technique. After a bolus ingestion of 10 ml orange juice containing 185 MBq 99m Tc-DTPA, radioactivity was measured on the esophagus for 5 minutes by SPECT, and esophageal clearance rate was calculated. Forty-two patients and 10 normal controls were included. Esophageal transit was increased significantly after Heller's operation, but it was still lower than normal value. Heller's myotomy can significantly improve esophageal transit in the patients with achalasia, although it does not reach normal level

  3. The evolution of the treatment of esophageal achalasia: a look at the last two decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaix, Marco E; Herbella, Fernando A; Patti, Marco G

    2012-09-01

    Thanks to the development of minimally invasive surgery, the last 20 years have witnessed a revolution in the treatment of benign esophageal disorders, particularly for esophageal achalasia. This has brought a shift in the treatment algorithm of this disease, as today a laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication is considered the primary form of treatment in most Centers in North America. This article reviews the evolution of the treatment of esophageal achalasia during the last two decades, with particular stress on the key technical elements of this operation.

  4. Revisional Surgery after Heller Myotomy for Treatment of Achalasia: A Comparative Analysis Focusing on Operative Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gouda, Biswanath P.; Nelson, Thomas; Bhoyrul, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    Surgical myotomy is the gold standard in therapy for achalasia, but treatment failures occur and require revisional surgery. A MEDLINE search of peer-reviewed articles published in English from 1970 to December 2008 was performed using the following terms: esophageal achalasia, Heller myotomy, and revisional surgery. Thirty-three articles satisfied our inclusion criteria. A total of 12,727 patients, with mean age of 43.3 years (males 46% and females 50%), underwent Heller myotomy (open 94.8% ...

  5. Treatments for pediatric achalasia: Heller myotomy or pneumatic dilatation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, C; Michaud, L; Mougenot, J-F; Lamblin, M-D; Philippe-Chomette, P; Cargill, G; Bonnevalle, M; Boige, N; Bellaïche, M; Viala, J; Hugot, J-P; Gottrand, F; Cezard, J-P

    2010-03-01

    The treatment of achalasia consists of reducing distal esophageal obstruction by either Heller myotomy surgery or endoscopic pneumatic dilatation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the short- and middle-term results of these procedures in children. For technical reasons, children under six years old (n=8) were treated by surgery only, whereas patients over six years old (n=14) were treated by either Heller myotomy or pneumatic dilatation. Of the children aged under six years, 75% were symptom-free at six months and 83% at 24 months of follow-up. Of the patients aged over six years, complete remission was achieved by Heller myotomy in 44.5% vs. 55.5% by pneumatic dilatation after six months, and in 40% vs. 65%, respectively, after 24 months. Both pneumatic dilatation and Heller myotomy showed significant rates of failure. These results suggest that pneumatic dilatation may be considered a primary treatment in children over six years old. Also, where necessary, Heller myotomy and pneumatic dilatation may be used as complementary treatments.

  6. Esophageal achalasia: retrospective analysis of treatment during 2000–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Štupnik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Esophageal achalasia (EA is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unclear aetiology. Standard treatments of EA are: pneumatic balloon dilation (PBD of the lower esophageal sphyncter (LES and surgical cleaving of the muscle by Heller myotomy. Although the treatment effectively cures dysphagia, the symptoms recur in about a half of the patients. Our point of interest was long-term effectiveness of EA treatment at our department. METHODSWe made a retrospective analysis of EA patients treated at our department of thoracic surgery during the 2000–2010 period.RESULTSIn 11 years we performed 187 PBD and 22 laparoscopic myotomies (LM in 148 patients. Three years after the procedure 65 % of patients after PBD and 90 % of patients after LM showed no signs of disease. The risk of recurrence was 3.56-times greater (p = 0.03 after PBD (in comparison to LM, whereas patients older than 50 years bear 0.51-times lower risk (p = 0.02. The most significant complicatios were esophageal perforation in 3 patients (1.6 % after PBD and gastroesophageal reflux in 3 patients (15 % after LM.CONCLUSIONSPBD is a fast, simple, inexpensive and very efficient method of EA treatment, which can be safely performed in almost every patient. LM is far more expensive and a more complicated method that is more suitable for younger patients, in whom PBD is less effective.

  7. Treatment of esophageal achalasia in children: Today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldaro, Tamara; Familiari, Pietro; Romeo, Erminia Francesca; Gigante, Giovanni; Marchese, Michele; Contini, Anna Chiara Iolanda; Federici di Abriola, Giovanni; Cucchiara, Salvatore; De Angelis, Paola; Torroni, Filippo; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia (EA) is a rare esophageal motility disorder in children. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) represents the treatment of choice in young patients. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is becoming an alternative to LHM. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness, safety, and outcomes of POEM vs LHM in treatment of children with EA. Data of pediatric patients with EA, who underwent LHM and POEM from February 2009 to December 2013 in two centers, were collected. Eighteen patients (9 male, mean age: 11.6 years; range: 2-17 years) were included. Nine patients (6 male, mean age: 10.7 years; range: 2-16 years) underwent LHM, and the other 9 (3 males, mean age: 12.2 years; range: 6-17 years) underwent POEM procedure. Mean operation time was shorter in POEM group compared with LHM group (62/149 minutes). Myotomy was longer in POEM group than in LHM group (11/7 cm). One major complication occurred after LHM (esophageal perforation). No clinical and manometric differences were observed between LHM and POEM in follow-up. The incidence of iatrogenic gastroesophageal reflux disease was low (1 patient in both groups). Results of a midterm follow-up show that LHM and POEM are safe and effective treatments also in children. Besides, POEM is a mini-invasive technique with an inferior execution timing compared to LHM. A skilled endoscopic team is mandatory to perform this procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Functional Lumen Imaging Probe Detects Esophageal Contractility Not Observed With Manometry in Patients With Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Dustin A; Lin, Zhiyue; Kahrilas, Peter J; Sternbach, Joel; Donnan, Erica N; Friesen, Laurel; Listernick, Zoe; Mogni, Benjamin; Pandolfino, John E

    2015-12-01

    The functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) could improve the characterization of achalasia subtypes by detecting nonocclusive esophageal contractions not observed with standard manometry. We aimed to evaluate esophageal contractions during volumetric distention in patients with achalasia using FLIP topography. Fifty-one treatment-naive patients with achalasia, defined and subclassified by high-resolution esophageal pressure topography, and 10 asymptomatic individuals (controls) were evaluated with the FLIP during endoscopy. During stepwise distension, simultaneous intrabag pressures and 16 channels of cross-sectional areas were measured; data were exported to software that generated FLIP topography plots. Esophageal contractility was identified by noting periods of reduced luminal diameter. Esophageal contractions were characterized further by propagation direction, repetitiveness, and based on whether they were occluding or nonoccluding. Esophageal contractility was detected in all 10 controls: 8 of 10 had repetitive antegrade contractions and 9 of 10 had occluding contractions. Contractility was detected in 27% (4 of 15) of patients with type I achalasia and in 65% (18 of 26, including 9 with occluding contractions) of patients with type II achalasia. Contractility was detected in all 10 patients with type III achalasia; 8 of these patients had a pattern of contractility that was not observed in controls (repetitive retrograde contractions). Esophageal contractility not observed with manometry can be detected in patients with achalasia using FLIP topography. The presence and patterns of contractility detected with FLIP topography may represent variations in pathophysiology, such as mechanisms of panesophageal pressurization in patients with type II achalasia. These findings could have implications for additional subclassification to supplement prediction of the achalasia disease course. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  9. Overdiagnosis and rising rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS): time for reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioutis, D; Thakar, R; Sultan, A H

    2017-11-01

    To determine the accuracy of clinical diagnosis of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) using three-dimensional (3D) endoanal ultrasound (EA-US) and to compare symptoms and anal manometry measurements between women with anal sphincters adequately repaired and those with persistent anal sphincter defects. The EA-US images of women with clinically diagnosed and repaired OASIS, defined as third- or fourth-degree perineal tear, who attended the perineal clinic at Croydon University Hospital over a 10-year period (2003-2013) were reanalyzed by a single expert blind to symptoms and the results of clinical examination. St Mark's Incontinence Scores (SMIS) and anal manometry measurements were obtained and compared between women with an intact anal sphincter and those with an anal sphincter scar and between those with an intact anal sphincter and those with a defect. Anal manometry measurements were compared between women with an external anal sphincter (EAS) defect and those with an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. The images of 908 women were reanalyzed. No evidence of OASIS was found in 64 (7.0%) women, an EAS scar alone was detected in 520 (57.3%) and an anal sphincter defect in 324 (35.7%). Of the 324 women with a defect, 112 had an EAS defect, 90 had an IAS defect and 122 had a combined IAS and EAS defect. SMIS results were significantly higher in women with an anal sphincter defect compared with those with no evidence of OASIS (P = 0.018), but there was no significant difference in scores between women with an intact sphincter and those with an EAS scar only. Women with a defect had a significantly lower maximum resting pressure (median (range), 44 (8-106) vs 55 (29-86) mmHg; P 40) vs 25 (10-40) mm; P = 0.003). Seven percent of women with a clinical diagnosis of OASIS were wrongly diagnosed. We believe that this rate may differ from that of other units but training methods and competency assessment tools for the diagnosis and repair of OASIS need

  10. Hereditary vacuolar internal anal sphincter myopathy causing proctalgia fugax and constipation: a new case contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Portilla, Fernando; Borrero, Juan José; Rafel, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Hereditary anal sphincter myopathy is rare. We present a family with one affected member with proctalgia fugax, constipation and internal anal sphincter hypertrophy. Ultrastructural findings show vacuolization of smooth muscle cells without the characteristic polyglucosan inclusion. Further relief of symptoms was obtained using an oral calcium antagonist. Based on clinical presentation, endosonography and morphological findings, we consider our case is a histological variant of the vacuolar myopathy originally described.

  11. Distribution and Effect of Galanin on Gallbladder and Sphincter of Oddi Motility in the Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Harling

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the occurrence and topographical distribution of galanin-like immunoreactivity (GAL-LI in the porcine gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi and to investigate the pharmacologic effect of GAL on gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi motility. By radioimmunoassay the concentration of GAL-LI in the gallbladder was 2.75 ± 0.23, 9.73 ± 1.33 in the common bile duct and 5.10 ± 0.37 in the sphincter of Oddi (pmol/g ± SE. By immunohistochemistry GAL-LI was found exclusively in ganglionic cells and in nerve fibers among the smooth muscle bundles. Gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi pressures were recorded before and during 5-minute local intraarterial infusion of 4, 8, 19, 39, 78 and 194 ng GAL-Kg-1-min-1 in 12 anaesthetized pigs. GAL in doses ≥ 39 ng.kg-1.min-1 significantly reduced sphincter of Oddi phasic wave frequency (4.8 ± 0.4 vs. 2.1 ± 0.5; p = 0.004 and sphincter of Oddi motility index (70.2 ± 6.02 vs. 27.7 ± 8.3; p = 0.002 but did not affect gallbladder pressure. We conclude that the distribution of GAL-LI in the sphincter of Oddi and the effect that a pharmacologic dose of GAL has on sphincter of Oddi motor activity, suggests that GAL may be involved in the physiologic control of bile flow in the pig.

  12. Effect of peroral endoscopic myotomy on esophagogastric junction physiology in patients with achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, Tessa; Rohof, Wout O.; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Eberl, Susanne; Rösch, Thomas; Fockens, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic dilation and laparoscopic Heller myotomy improve parameters of esophageal function such as lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, esophageal emptying, and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility. To evaluate the effect of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) on esophagogastric

  13. Efficacy of Treatment for Patients With Achalasia Depends on the Distensibility of the Esophagogastric Junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, Wout O.; Hirsch, David P.; Kessing, Boudewijn F.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Many patients with persistent dysphagia and regurgitation after therapy have low or no lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. Distensibility of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) largely determines esophageal emptying. We investigated whether assessment of the distensibility

  14. NMR imaging of the anal levator and sphincter muscles in anorectal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hideyo; Maie, Masahiko; Ohnuma, Naomi; Etoh, Takao; Iwai, Jun

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the anal levater and sphincter muscles was obtained on 4 normal volunteers and 11 patients with postoperative anorectal malformations (including 8 supra-levator type and 3 low type). Balloon catheter were inserted into the rectum and marked it as the center of a anal canal. Four normal subjects revealed the levater and sphincter muscles were thick and well developed in all sections (Sagittal, Transevse, Coronal). In most of the supra-levator type of anorectal malformations, thin levator and sphincter muscles were observed by Sagittal and Coronal scans. Transeverse scan revealed that the neorectum was not effectively pull-throughed into the puborectal muscle in one patient. Coronal scan showed the dameged external sphincter muscle. In three low types of anorectal malformations, the levator and the sphincter muscles were all well developed, but in one patient the external sphincter muscle existed at the posterior part of the anal canal. These observations were usefull in managing the postoperative care of anorectal malformations. (author)

  15. Significance of the thickness of the anal sphincters with age and its relevance in faecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachrysostomou, M; Pye, S D; Wild, S R; Smith, A N

    1994-08-01

    Ultrasonographic studies in healthy volunteers showed that the external anal sphincter (EAS) and internal anal sphincter (IAS) thicknesses were inversely related at rest. The functional importance of the two sphincters in continence control was demonstrated in the relationship between the sum of the thicknesses of the two sphincters and the anal canal resting pressure. The aims of the present study were to assess the morphometric appearance of the anal sphincters by endosonography in faecally incontinent patients and to contrast this with that of older healthy subjects. Twenty-eight female patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence (FI) were studied. An older group of 7 healthy women, aged 41-75 years, and a young group of 11 nulliparous healthy women, aged 20-23 years, served as control groups. Anal endosonography was performed with a radial rotating endoprobe, with the subject in the left lateral position. Conventional anal manometry was performed in all subjects. The EAS in the FI group was thicker than the EAS in the old (p IAS thickness in the FI group did not differ from that in the older group. In both these groups the IAS was thicker than in the young women (p IAS in the FI group does not seem to compensate for function and results in a failure of the sphincter mechanism to maintain continence, whereas in healthy elderly subjects the increased IAS thickness appears to be compensatory and important for continence control.

  16. Frequency of operative trauma to anal sphincters: evaluation with endoanal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatiadis, Apostolos; Konstantinou, Evangelos; Theodosopoulou, Eleni; Mamoura, Konstantinia

    2002-01-01

    Sphincter trauma after anorectal surgery is usually asymptomatic. Frequency of trauma cannot be established with the clinical examination only. The frequency of operative sphincter defects and their correlation with disorders of continence was evaluated with the endoanal ultrasound. This study includes 123 subjects who had undergone anorectal surgery in the past and were examined with endoanal ultrasound for various indications such as continence disorders, recurrent fistula, idiopathic perineal pain, or simple postoperative follow-up. No subjects had isolated external anal sphincter defects. Nineteen of 123 patients (15%) had minor or major continence disorders, 55 patients (45%) had no sphincter defects, 42 (34%) had only internal anal sphincter (IAS) defects, and 26 (21%) had simultaneously external and internal anal sphincter (EAS) defects. The incidence of IAS and EAS trauma after Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy was 1/18 (5.5%) and 0/18 respectively; after fistula repair, 24/42 (57%) and 12/42 (29%); and after anal dilatation, 13/17 (76%) and 4/17 (24%). Sixteen of 26 patients (62%) with EAS trauma and 51/68 patients (75%) with IAS trauma did not report any disorders of continence. In patients with two or more operations, the frequency of IAS trauma was 74%, 30% for EAS trauma, and 26% for continence disorders.

  17. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, A.-M., E-mail: annemarie.roos@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mayday University Hospital, Croydon (United Kingdom); Abdool, Z. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sultan, A.H.; Thakar, R. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mayday University Hospital, Croydon (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Aim: To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B and K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. Results: On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Conclusion: Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect.

  18. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A.-M.; Abdool, Z.; Sultan, A.H.; Thakar, R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B and K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. Results: On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Conclusion: Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect.

  19. Sphincter saving anorectoplasty (SSARP for the reconstruction of Anorectal malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paudel Bishnu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes a new technique of sphincter saving anorectoplasty (SSARP for the repair of anorectal malformations (ARM. Methods Twenty six males with high ARM were treated with SSARP. Preoperative localization of the center of the muscle complex is facilitated using real time sonography and computed tomography. A soft guide wire is inserted under image control which serves as the route for final pull through of bowel. The operative technique consists of a subcoccygeal approach to dissect the blind rectal pouch. The separation of the rectum from the fistulous communication followed by pull through of the bowel is performed through the same incision. The skin or the levators in the midline posteriorly are not divided. Postoperative anorectal function as assessed by clinical Wingspread scoring was judged as excellent, good, fair and poor. Older patients were examined for sensations of touch, pain, heat and cold in the circumanal skin and the perineum. Electromyography (EMG was done to assess preoperative and postoperative integrity of external anal sphincter (EAS. Results The patients were separated in 2 groups. The first group, Group I (n = 10, were newborns in whom SSARP was performed as a primary procedure. The second group, Group II (n = 16, were children who underwent an initial colostomy followed by delayed SSARP. There were no operative complications. The follow up ranged from 4 months to 18 months. Group I patients have symmetric anal contraction to stimulation and strong squeeze on digital rectal examination with an average number of bowel movements per day was 3–5. In group II the rate of excellent and good scores was 81% (13/16. All patients have an appropriate size anus and regular bowel actions. There has been no rectal prolapse, or anal stricture. EAS activity and perineal proprioception were preserved postoperatively. Follow up computed tomogram showed central placement the pull through bowel in between

  20. Pediatric Achalasia in the Netherlands : Incidence, Clinical Course, and Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marije; van Lennep, Marinde; Vrijlandt, Remy; Benninga, Marc; Oors, Jac; Houwen, RHJ; Kokke, Freddy; van der Zee, David; Escher, Johanne; van den Neucker, Anita; de Meij, Tim; Bodewes, Frank; Schweizer, Joachim; Damen, Gerard; Busch, Olivier; van Wijk, Michiel

    OBJECTIVE: To assess incidence and clinical course of Dutch patients with achalasia diagnosed before 18 years of age as well as their current symptoms and quality of life (QoL). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective medical chart review and a cross-sectional study assessing current clinical status using the

  1. Health-related quality of life after laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication for achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asti, Emanuele; Sironi, Andrea; Lovece, Andrea; Bonavina, Giulia; Fanelli, Melania; Bonitta, Gianluca; Bonavina, Luigi

    2017-04-01

    In addition to symptom scores, a person's perception of health and quality of life assessment is an important indicator of quality of treatment and can provide an efficient index to compare different therapeutic modalities in chronic disease states. Only a few studies have investigated quality of life comprehensively in patients with achalasia, and therefore the controversy regarding the best treatment algorithm continues. The primary study outcome was pre- and postoperative quality of life in patients with achalasia undergoing laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication. The study is a retrospective, observational cohort. The hospital registry and the updated research database were reviewed to identify all patients who were treated for achalasia between 2010 and 2015. Patients were eligible for the study if they had a minimum 1-year follow-up and had pre-and postoperative Eckardt, Short Form-36, and Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease Health-Related Quality of Life scores. Patients with previous operative and/or endoscopic treatments for achalasia were excluded. One-hundred and eighteen patients were identified. The median follow-up was 40 months (interquartile range 27). The proportion of patients with Eckardt stage II-III decreased from 94.9-13% (P Heller myotomy combined with Dor fundoplication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of recurrent symptoms after per-oral endoscopic myotomy in achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeij, Froukje B.; Ponds, Fraukje A.; Werner, Yuki; Sternbach, Joel M.; Fockens, Paul; Bastiaansen, Barbara A.; Smout, André J. P. M.; Pandolfino, John E.; Rösch, Thomas; Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2018-01-01

    Background and Aims: Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been rapidly gaining ground as a treatment for achalasia. Although POEM is a safe and effective treatment, a subset of patients has persistent or recurrent symptoms after POEM. This study aimed to examine the efficacy of different

  3. Economic evaluation of the randomized European Achalasia trial comparing pneumodilation with Laparoscopic Heller myotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, A.; Busch, O.; Costantini, M.; Finotti, E.; Tack, J.; Salvador, R.; Boeckxstaens, G.; Zaninotto, G.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundA recent multicenter randomized trial in achalasia patients has shown that pneumatic dilation resulted in equivalent relief of symptoms compared to laparoscopic Heller myotomy. Additionally, the cost of each treatment should be also taken in consideration. Therefore, the aim of the present

  4. Pediatric Achalasia in the Netherlands: Incidence, Clinical Course, and Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marije; van Lennep, Marinde; Vrijlandt, Remy; Benninga, Marc; Oors, Jac; Houwen, Roderick; Kokke, Freddy; van der Zee, David; Escher, Johanne; van den Neucker, Anita; de Meij, Tim; Bodewes, Frank; Schweizer, Joachim; Damen, Gerard; Busch, Olivier; van Wijk, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    To assess incidence and clinical course of Dutch patients with achalasia diagnosed before 18 years of age as well as their current symptoms and quality of life (QoL). Retrospective medical chart review and a cross-sectional study assessing current clinical status using the Eckardt score and reflux

  5. Esophageal stasis in achalasia patients without symptoms after treatment does not predict symptom recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeij, F. B.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundAfter achalasia treatment, a subset of patients has poor esophageal emptying without having symptoms. There is no consensus on whether to pre-emptively treat these patients. We hypothesized that, if left untreated, these patients will experience earlier symptom recurrence than patients

  6. Pediatric Achalasia in the Netherlands : Incidence, Clinical Course, and Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marije; van Lennep, Marinde; Vrijlandt, Remy; Benninga, Marc; Oors, Jac; Houwen, Roderick; Kokke, Freddy; van der Zee, David; Escher, Johanne; van den Neucker, Anita; de Meij, Tim; Bodewes, Frank; Schweizer, Joachim; Damen, Gerard; Busch, Olivier; van Wijk, Michiel

    Objective To assess incidence and clinical course of Dutch patients with achalasia diagnosed before 18 years of age as well as their current symptoms and quality of life (QoL). Study design Retrospective medical chart review and a cross-sectional study assessing current clinical status using the

  7. Management of achalasia in the UK, do we need new guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihene El Kafsi

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Diagnosis and management of achalasia within the UK is relatively standardised, although there remains limited access to HRM. Discussion at benign MDTs however is poor and follow-up differs widely. UK guidelines may help to make these more uniform.

  8. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for the treatment of achalasia: an international prospective multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Renteln, Daniel; Fuchs, Karl-Hermann; Fockens, Paul; Bauerfeind, Peter; Vassiliou, Melina C.; Werner, Yuki B.; Fried, Gerald; Breithaupt, Wolfram; Heinrich, Henriette; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Kersten, Jan F.; Verlaan, Tessa; Trevisonno, Michael; Rösch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Pilot studies have indicated that peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) might be a safe and effective treatment for achalasia. We performed a prospective, international, multicenter study to determine the outcomes of 70 patients who underwent POEM at 5 centers in Europe and North America. Three months

  9. Achalasia with megaesophagus and tracheal compression in a young patient: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moritz Kaths

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This report emphasizes that physicians should be alert and consider airway obstruction and signs of dyspnea as severe and threatening symptoms in extensive cases of achalasia with megaesophagus. Early surgical treatment provides a therapeutic option to obviate the occurrence of acute respiratory distress and consecutive complications. In particular, difficulties in intubation prior to surgery must be considered.

  10. Long-term results of laparoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia in children: a multicentric survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Ciro; Riccipetitoni, Giovanna; Chiarenza, Salvatore Fabio; Roberti, Agnese; Vella, Claudio; Alicchio, Francesca; Fava, Giorgio; Escolino, Maria; De Pascale, Teresa; Settimi, Alessandro

    2013-11-01

    This report describes three Italian centers' experience in the treatment of children with esophageal achalasia. Between June 2000 and June 2012, 31 children (13 girls and 18 boys, with a median age of 8.4 years) affected by esophageal achalasia were treated in three different institutions with an esophagomyotomy according to Heller's procedure via laparoscopy associated with a Dor antireflux procedure. Between 2000 and 2005 (for 14 patients) we used mono- or bipolar coagulation to perform myotomy; after 2005 (for 17 patients) we used the new hemostatic devices to perform it. Median length of surgery was 120 minutes. Median hospital stay was 4 days. We recorded eight complications in our series: 3 patients (9.6%) had a mucosal perforation, and 5 children (16.1%) presented dysphagia after surgery. When comparing the data before and after 2005, it seems that the new hemostatic devices statistically shortened the length of surgery (Ptreatment of achalasia in the pediatric population. Intraoperative complications were achalasia have to be treated only at centers with a strong experience in the treatment of this pathology.

  11. Achalasia:what is the best treatment? | Ahmed | Annals of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A Medline, PubMed and Cochrane database search was conducted using ... Medical treatment with nitrates or calcium channel blockers has variable results in ... Conclusion: Laparoscopic myotomy should be the initial treatment for most ... Keywords: Achalasia, Heller's esophagomyotomy, pneumatic dilatation

  12. Pneumothorax complicating botulinum toxin injection in the body of a dilated oesophagus in achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is used for an increasing number of indications in the field of gastroenterology. We report a case in which injection of botulinum toxin in the dilated tubular oesophagus in a patient with achalasia was complicated by a pneumothorax necessitating suction drainage

  13. [Experience of the surgical management of the esophageal achalasia in a tertiary care hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Fregoso, Elpidio Manuel; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; Sánchez-Fernández, Patricio Rogelio; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder. The most common symptoms are: dysphagia, chest pain, reflux and weight loss. The esophageal manometry is the standard for diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of the surgical management in patients with achalasia in a tertiary care hospital. A case series consisting of achalasia patients, treated surgically between January and December of 2011. Clinical charts were reviewed to obtain data and registries of the type of surgical procedure, morbidity and mortality. Fourteen patients were identified, with an average age of 49.1 years. The most common symptoms were: dysphagia, vomiting, weight loss and pyrosis. Eight open approaches were performed and six by laparoscopy, with an average length of cardiomyotomy of 9.4 cm. Eleven patients received an antireflux procedure. The effectiveness of procedures performed was 85.7 %. Surgical management offered at this tertiary care hospital does not differ from that reported in other case series, giving effectiveness and safety for patients with achalasia.

  14. Impact of esophageal flexion level on the surgical outcome in patients with sigmoid esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se-Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2017-11-01

    Esophageal achalasia can be roughly divided into non-sigmoid and sigmoid types. Laparoscopic surgery has been reported to be less than optimally effective for sigmoid type. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the esophageal flexion level on the clinical condition and surgical outcomes of patients with sigmoid esophageal achalasia. The subjects were 36 patients with sigmoid esophageal achalasia who had been observed for >1 year after surgery. The subjects were divided into sigmoid type (Sg) and advanced sigmoid type (aSg) groups based on the flexion level of the lower esophagus to compare their clinical parameters and surgical outcomes. The Sg and aSg groups included 26 (72%) and 10 subjects, respectively. There were no marked differences in the clinical parameters or surgical outcomes between the two groups. However, the clearance rate calculated using the timed barium esophagogram was lower in the aSg group than in the Sg group. No differences were found in the postoperative symptom scores between the two groups, and both reported a high level of satisfaction. Although laparoscopic surgery for symptoms of sigmoid esophageal achalasia was highly successful regardless of the flexion level, the improvement in esophageal clearance was lower when the flexion level was higher.

  15. Achalasia symptom response after Heller myotomy segregated by high-resolution manometry subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amit; Patel, Ami; Mirza, Faiz A; Soudagar, Samad; Sayuk, Gregory S; Gyawali, C Prakash

    2016-02-01

    Achalasia is classified into three HRM subtypes that predict outcomes from diverse management strategies. We assessed if symptomatic response varied when a single management strategy-Heller myotomy (HM)-is employed. Treatment-naive subjects with achalasia referred for HM were followed in this observational cohort study. Chicago criteria designated achalasia subtypes (subtype I: no esophageal pressurization; subtype II: panesophageal pressurization in ≥20 % swallows; subtype III: premature contractions in ≥20 % swallows). Symptom questionnaires assessed symptom burden before and after HM on five-point Likert scales (0 = no symptoms, 4 = severe symptoms) and on 10-cm visual analog scales (global symptom severity, GSS); satisfaction with HM was recorded similarly. Data were analyzed to determine predictors of GSS change across subtypes. Sixty achalasia subjects (56.1 ± 2.4 years, 55 % female) fulfilled inclusion criteria, 15 % with subtype I, 58 % with subtype II, and 27 % with subtype III achalasia. Baseline symptoms included dysphagia (solids: 85 %, liquids: 73 %), regurgitation (84 %), and chest pain (35 %); mean GSS was 7.1 ± 0.3. Upon follow-up 2.1 ± 0.2 years after HM, GSS declined to 1.9 ± 0.4 (p < 0.001), with surgical satisfaction score of 8.7 ± 0.3 out of 10; these were similar across achalasia subtypes. On univariate analysis, female gender, Eckardt score, severity of transit symptoms, and maximal IRP predicted linear GSS improvement; female gender (p = 0.003) and dysphagia for liquids (p = 0.043) remained predictive on multivariate analysis. When a uniform surgical approach is utilized, symptomatic outcome and satisfaction with therapy are similar across achalasia subtypes. Female gender and severity of dysphagia for solids may predict better HM outcome.

  16. Peroral endoscopic myotomy versus pneumatic dilation for achalasia in patients aged ≥ 65 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehong Wang

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Both peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM and pneumatic dilation (PD has proved to be effective for treating achalasia in patients aged ≥ 65 years. However little is known about the comparison between POEM and PD. The aim of the study was to compare the safety and efficacy of POEM and PD for the treatment of achalasia in these patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients aged 65 years-old or more who received POEM or PD for the treatment of achalasia at our hospital from January 2010 to December 2015, they were divided into the POEM group and the PD group. Demographics and data about safety and efficacy were collected retrospectively and compared between the two groups. Results: A total of 31 patients were enrolled, and 21 of them received POEM, while the other 10 received PD. The treatment success (Eckardt score ≤ 3 rate of POEM and PD at 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after the treatment were comparable (p > 0.05. Treatment failure was noticed in 3 cases, 1 of them was in the POEM group and the other 2 in the PD group, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that sigmoid-type achalasia was a predictive factor of treatment failure. No severe complications were observed during operation and periodical follow-up. Conclusion: Short-term and intermediate efficacy of POEM and PD for treating achalasia in patients aged ≥ 65 years was comparable. A large scale, randomized study with long-term follow-up is necessary in order to make a definitive conclusion.

  17. [Surgical treatment of achalasia - endoscopic or laparoscopic? : Proposal for a tailored approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahden, B H A von; Filser, J; Al-Nasser, M; Germer, C-T

    2017-03-01

    Primary idiopathic achalasia is the most common form of the rare esophageal motility disorders. A curative therapy which restores the normal motility does not exist; however, the therapeutic principle of cardiomyotomy according to Ernst Heller leads to excellent symptom control in the majority of cases. The established standard approach is Heller myotomy through the laparoscopic route (LHM), combined with Dor anterior fundoplication for reflux prophylaxis/therapy. At least four meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated superiority of LHM over pneumatic dilation (PD); therefore, LHM should be used as first line therapy (without prior PD) in all operable patients. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a new alternative approach, which enables Heller myotomy to be performed though the endoscopic submucosal route. The POEM procedure has a low complication rate and also leads to good control of dysphagia but reflux rates can possibly be slightly higher (20-30%). Long-term results of POEM are still scarce and the results of the prospective randomized multicenter trial POEM vs. LHM are not yet available; however, POEM seems to be the preferred treatment option for certain indications. Within the framework of the tailored approach for achalasia management of POEM vs. LHM established in Würzburg, we recommend long-segment POEM for patients with type III achalasia (spasmodic) and other hypercontractile motility disorders and potentially type II achalasia (panesophageal compression) with chest pain as the lead symptom, whereas LHM can also be selected for type I. For sigmoid achalasia, especially with siphon-like transformation of the esophagogastric junction, simultaneous hiatal hernia and epiphrenic diverticula, LHM is still the preferred approach. The choice of the procedure for revisional surgery in case of recurrent dysphagia depends on the suspected mechanism (morphological vs. functional/neuromotor).

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi Detection in Colombian Patients with a Diagnosis of Esophageal Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesso-Gómez, Santiago; Pavia, Paula; Rodríguez-Mantilla, Iván Enrique; Lasso, Paola; Orozco, Luis A; Cuellar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción J; Mendoza de Molano, Belén; González, John M

    2018-03-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus that might be secondary to a chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Several studies have investigated esophageal achalasia in patients with Chagas disease (CD) in Latin America, but no related studies have been performed in Colombia. The goals of the present study were to determine the presence of anti- T. cruzi antibodies in patients with esophageal achalasia who visited a referral hospital in Bogotá, Colombia, and to detect the presence of the parasite and its discrete typing units (DTUs). This cross-sectional study was conducted in adult patients (18-65 years old) who were previously diagnosed with esophageal achalasia and from whom blood was drawn to assess antibodies against T. cruzi using four different serological tests. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected by conventional polymerase chain reaction (cPCR) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). In total, 38 patients, with an average age of 46.6 years (standard deviation of ±16.2) and comprising 16 men and 22 women, were enrolled. Five (13.15%) patients were found to be positive for anti- T. cruzi antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), and two patients who were negative according to IFA were reactive by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot (5.3%). Parasite DNA was detected in two of these seven patients by cPCR and in one of these by qPCR. The parasite DTU obtained was TcI. In summary, this study identified T. cruzi in Colombian patients with esophageal achalasia, indicating that digestive compromise could also be present in patients with chronic CD.

  19. Results after laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation for esophageal achalasia in 100 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation has been the procedure of choice for the treatment of achalasia. However, because the incidence of achalasia is low, reports on the outcome of surgical treatment for achalasia are limited. In this study, the therapeutic results after laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation for achalasia at a single university hospital were evaluated. Between August 1994 and July 2006, 100 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation. The therapeutic results after laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation were assessed based on complications, operation time, blood loss, postoperative hospital stay, and the standardized questionnaire for satisfaction by telephone or outpatient clinic interview. With respect to perioperative complications, lower esophageal mucosal perforation occurred in 14 patients, but all of them could be suture-obliterated laparoscopically. One patient was converted to laparotomy because of uncontrolled bleeding from the short gastric artery. The mean operative time was 169 minutes, and the mean perioperative blood loss was 22 mL. The median postoperative hospital stay was 7 days. Reflux esophagitis, which was seen in five patients, was treated successfully with a proton pump inhibitor. According to the standardized questionnaire for satisfaction, 77 patients rated their recovery as 'excellent', 17 as 'good', 4 as 'fair', and 2 as 'poor'; thus, the overall success rate was 94%. There were no significant differences in surgical outcomes by morphologic type and severity of esophageal dilatation; however, the success rate deteriorated significantly with progression of the morphologic type. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation is a safe and effective surgical treatment for achalasia.

  20. A single center 26-year experience with treatment of esophageal achalasia: is there an optimal method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Aimee C; Mills, Jessica; Marcon, Margaret A; Himidan, Sharifa; Kim, Peter C W

    2009-07-01

    Treatment modalities for achalasia are evolving and remain controversial. Herein, we report the relative efficacy and outcomes after dilatation or myotomy in children with achalasia. A retrospective analysis of all children treated for achalasia at a tertiary center from 1981 to 2007 was performed (n = 40). Demographics, presenting symptoms, perioperative parameters, and outcomes were analyzed using t tests and chi(2) statistics. Thirty patients were initially treated by esophageal dilatation (ED), whereas 10 were treated by laparoscopic or open Heller myotomy (HM). Both groups were similar with respect to age (10.6 vs 12.4 years; P = .19). There were 18 males and 12 females in the ED group, compared to 5 males and 5 females in the HM group (P = .72). Mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis, including dysphagia, vomiting, food sticking, chest pain, and weight loss, was 15.9 months for ED and 10.7 months for HM (P = .41). Mean time from diagnosis to initial intervention was 76 days in ED vs 86 days in HM (P = .78). Subsequent interventions by myotomy or both dilatation and myotomy were required in 9 (30%) of 30 patients in the ED group and 2 (20%) of 10 patients in the HM group (P = .70). A clear transition from open to laparoscopic approach occurred between 1995 and 2001. Mean operating times were comparable (186.3 vs 156.0 minutes; P = .48). Of 14 laparoscopic myotomies, 11 (79%) had fundoplication, and 2 (18%) of the 11 were converted to open procedure. Intraoperative mucosal perforation rates were similar between open and laparoscopic groups (17% vs 18%). At follow-up, 32% of ED patients vs 43% HM had complete symptom relief (mean follow-up duration, 75.2 months; SD, 196.5). Both dilatation and myotomy are effective immediate treatment of achalasia. A clear transition to and preference for laparoscopic approach has occurred in the treatment of achalasia in children.

  1. Muscle layer histopathology and manometry pattern of primary esophageal motility disorders including achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, N; Sato, H; Takahashi, K; Hasegawa, G; Mizuno, K; Hashimoto, S; Sato, Y; Terai, S

    2017-03-01

    Histopathology of muscularis externa in primary esophageal motility disorders has been characterized previously. We aimed to correlate the results of high-resolution manometry with those of histopathology. During peroral endoscopic myotomy, peroral esophageal muscle biopsy was performed in patients with primary esophageal motility disorders. Immunohistochemical staining for c-kit was performed to assess the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs). Hematoxylin Eosin and Azan-Mallory staining were used to detect muscle atrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, respectively. Slides from 30 patients with the following motility disorders were analyzed: achalasia (type I: 14, type II: 5, type III: 3), one diffuse esophageal spasm (DES), two outflow obstruction (OO), four jackhammer esophagus (JE), and one nutcracker esophagus (NE). ICCs were preserved in high numbers in type III achalasia (n=9.4±1.2 cells/high power field [HPF]), compared to types I (n=3.7±0.3 cells/HPF) and II (n=3.5±1.0 cells/HPF). Moreover, severe fibrosis was only observed in type I achalasia and not in other types of achalasia, OO, or DES. Four of five patients with JE and NE had severe inflammation with eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal muscle layer (73.8±50.3 eosinophils/HPF) with no epithelial eosinophils. One patient with JE showed a visceral myopathy pattern. Compared to types I and II, type III achalasia showed preserved ICCs, with variable data regarding DES and OO. In disorders considered as primary esophageal motility disorders, a disease category exists, which shows eosinophilic infiltration in the esophageal muscle layer with no eosinophils in the epithelium. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Sacral neuromodulation effects on periurethral sensation and urethral sphincter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Jonathan L; Kenton, Kimberly; Greer, W Jerod; Ramm, Olga; Szychowski, Jeff M; Wilson, Tracey; Richter, Holly E

    2013-06-01

    To characterize the effect of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) on urethral neuromuscular function. Following IRB approval, women with refractory overactive bladder (OAB) underwent standardized urethral testing prior to and after Stage 1 SNM implantation. Periurethral sensation was measured using current perception thresholds (CPT). Striated urethral sphincter activity was quantified using concentric needle electromyography (CNE) and Multi-Motor Unit Action Potential (MUP) analysis software. Nonparametric analyses were used to characterize pre/post changes with intervention. Baseline CPT and CNE findings were compared between SNM responders and non-responders. Twenty-seven women were enrolled in this pilot study with a mean age of 61 ± 13 years. Twenty of 26 women (76.9%) responded to SNM and went to Stage 2 permanent implantation. Four (14.8%) withdrew after Stage 1 implantation; three of the four withdrawals had not had therapeutic responses to SNM. CPT and CNE parameters did not significantly differ from baseline 2 weeks after SNM. Pre-SNM urethral sensation was not significantly different between responders and non-responders. However, responders had larger amplitude, longer duration and more turns and phases at baseline approaching significance, reflecting more successful urethral reinnervation, than non-responders. SNM does not alter urethral neuromuscular function 2 weeks post Stage 1 implantation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Rumination syndrome: when the lower oesophageal sphincter rises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourcerol, Guillaume; Dechelotte, Pierre; Ducrotte, Philippe; Leroi, Anne Marie

    2011-07-01

    Rumination syndrome is an uncommon condition characterised by the self-induced regurgitation from the stomach to the mouth of recently ingested meal that is chewed and reswallowed. Rumination is caused by a voluntary rise in intra-abdominal and intra-gastric pressure leading to the reflux of the gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the precise mechanisms preventing reflux at the gastro-oesophageal junction during the rise in intra-gastric pressure remains unknown. In 5 patients, rumination episodes were monitored using combined multiple intra-luminal impedance monitoring, high resolution manometry, and video-fluoroscopic recording. We showed that the gastro-oesophageal junction moved from the abdominal cavity into the thorax creating a "pseudo-hernia". This occurred at a range of 1.4 ± 0.3 s before the rise in intra-oesophageal pressure and the gastro-oesophageal reflux. This displacement of the gastro-oesophageal junction into thorax, rather than a lower oesophageal sphincter opening, explains the mechanism of voluntary regurgitations occurring during rumination syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and esophageal motor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joachim H; Küper, Markus A; Königsrainer, Alfred; Brücher, Björn L D M

    2010-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is caused by transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in healthy individuals and in most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Refluxate is normally propelled by pharyngeally induced swallowing events, but TLESRs may also be accompanied by retrograde esophageal motor responses (EMRs). These contractions have not previously been investigated and their effect on esophageal clearance is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of EMRs after TLESR in healthy individuals and GERD patients and to develop an animal model for further investigation of EMRs. The frequency of TLESRs and esophageal body contractions after TLESRs was assessed using ambulatory manometry in five healthy individuals and five GERD patients. An animal model was developed for reproducible provocation of TLESRs and subsequent EMRs. Patients with GERD have significantly more TLESRs than healthy individuals. However, post-TLESR EMRs were not more frequent in the GERD group. All post-TLESR EMRs presented as simultaneous contractions of the esophagus. The feline model allowed reproducible initiation of the esophageal motor response after TLESR, showing that EMRs can be induced by external mechanoreceptor stimulation simultaneously with LES relaxation. This experimental design imitates the conditions after fundoplication in humans. The study demonstrated that GERD patients have significantly more TLESRs in comparison with healthy individuals, but these were only incidental to EMRs. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of esophageal motility disorders. The animal model presented offers a feasible tool for investigating TLESR-induced esophageal motility.

  5. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavioli, Margherita; Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible

  6. Incidence of Esophageal Carcinomas After Surgery for Achalasia: Usefulness of Long-Term and Periodic Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Masaho; Narumiya, Kosuke; Kudo, Kenji; Yagawa, Yohsuke; Maeda, Shinsuke; Osugi, Harushi; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2016-11-14

    BACKGROUND Patients with esophageal achalasia are considered to be a high-risk group for esophageal carcinoma, and it has been reported that this cancer often arises at a long interval after surgery for achalasia. However, it is unclear whether esophageal carcinoma is frequent when achalasia has been treated successfully and the patient is without dysphagia. In this study, we reviewed patients with esophageal carcinoma who were detected by regular follow-up after surgical treatment of achalasia.   CASE REPORT Esophageal cancer was detected by periodic upper GI endoscopy in 6 patients. Most of them had early cancers that were treated by endoscopic resection. All 6 patients had undergone surgery for achalasia and the outcome had been rated as excellent or good. Annual follow-up endoscopy was done and the average duration of follow-up until cancer was seen after surgery was 14.3 years (range: 5 to 40 years). Five patients had early cancer. Four cases had multiple lesions.   CONCLUSIONS In conclusion, surgery for achalasia usually improves passage symptoms, but esophageal cancer still arises in some cases and the number of tumors occurring many years later is not negligible. Accordingly, long-term endoscopic follow-up is needed for detection of malignancy at an early stage.

  7. The impact of incontinence etiology on artificial urinary sphincter outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R. Miller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the impact of incontinence etiology on artificial urinary sphincter (AUS device outcomes. Materials and Methods: We identified 925 patients who underwent primary AUS placement from 1983 to 2011. The etiology of incontinence was categorized as radical prostatectomy alone, radical prostatectomy with radiation, benign prostate resection, and those with cryotherapy as a salvage prostate cancer treatment. Hazard regression and competing risk analyses were used to determine the association of the etiology of incontinence with device outcomes. Results: The distribution of the 4 etiologies of incontinence included: 598 patients (64.6% treated with prostatectomy alone, 206 (22.2% with prostatectomy and pelvic radiation therapy, 104 (11.2% with benign prostate resection, and 17 (1.8% with prior cryotherapy. With a median follow-up of 4.9 years (interquartile range, 1.2–8.8 years, there was significant difference in the cumulative incidence of device infection/urethral erosion events between the four etiologies (p=0.003. On multivariable analysis, prior cryotherapy (reference prostatectomy alone; hazard ratio [HR], 3.44; p=0.01, older age (HR, 1.07; p=0.0009 and history of a transient ischemic attack (HR, 2.57; p=0.04 were associated with an increased risk of device infection or erosion. Notably, pelvic radiation therapy with prostatectomy was not associated with an increased risk of device infection or erosion (reference prostatectomy alone, p=0.30. Conclusions: Compared to prostatectomy alone, prior treatment with salvage cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer was associated with an increased risk of AUS infection/erosion, whereas radiation (in addition to prostatectomy was not.

  8. Substance P stimulates the opossum sphincter of Oddi in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, J E; Cho, N; Zenilman, M E; Barteau, J A; Soper, N J; Becker, J M

    1990-09-01

    We have previously shown that substance P (SP) regulates sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility in vivo. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Our aim was to develop an in vitro model to measure spikeburst (SB) an contractile frequency (CMC) of the SO and to characterize further SP effects. In 16 opossums, SO rings were excised, mounted within a Kreb's tissue bath with bipolar electrodes and force transducers, allowed to equilibrate, and exposed to increasing SP concentrations with washout between each test solution. Spikeburst and CMC frequencies were recorded on a polygraph, quantitated, expressed as differences before and during SP, and statistically analyzed with Student's test. Although SP induced a significant concentration-dependent increase in phasic SB frequency and CMC, the amplitude of concentrations was not affected by SP. A close correlation was found between basal and SP-stimulated SB and CMC, suggesting myoelectric and mechanical coupling. Previous exposure of SO to SP antagonist [D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11]-SP significantly decreased the response to SP. Tetrodotoxin (TTX), did not affect the delta CMC response to SP. In conclusion an in vitro preparation was developed to study the effect of SP on the SO. Substance P increased SB and CMC of the SO in a concentration-dependent fashion, thus acting as a stimulatory peptide. Perfusion of SO rings with SP antagonist had no effect on basal CMC but significantly inhibited the action of SP in a competitive manner. The effect of SP was not altered by TTX. These data suggest that the action of SP on the SO is primarily myogenic.

  9. Hereditary internal anal sphincter myopathy causing proctalgia fugax and constipation. A newly identified condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, M A; Hoyle, C H; Burleigh, D E; Law, P J; Swash, M; Martin, J E; Nicholls, R J; Northover, J M

    1991-03-01

    A newly identified myopathy of the internal anal sphincter is described. In the affected family, at least one member from each of five generations had severe proctalgia fugax; onset was usually in the third to fifth decades of life. Three members of the family have been studied in detail. Each had severe pain intermittently during the day and hourly during the night. Constipation was an associated symptom, in particular difficulty with rectal evacuation. Clinically the internal anal sphincter was thickened and of decreased compliance. The maximum anal canal pressure was usually increased with marked ultraslow wave activity. Anal endosonography confirmed a grossly thickened internal anal sphincter. Two patients were treated by internal anal sphincter strip myectomy; one showed marked improvement and one was relieved of the constipation but had only slight improvement of the pain. The hypertrophied muscle in two of the patients showed unique myopathic changes, consisting of vacuolar changes with periodic acid-Schiff-positive polyglycosan bodies in the smooth muscle fibers and increased endomysial fibrosis. In vitro organ-bath studies showed insensitivity of the muscle to noradrenaline, isoprenaline, carbachol, dimethylpiperazinium, and electrical-field stimulation. Immunohistochemical studies for substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, neuropeptide Y, and vasoactive intestinal peptide showed staining in a similar distribution to that in control tissue. A specific autosomal-dominant inherited myopathy of the internal anal sphincter that causes anal pain and constipation has been identified and characterized.

  10. Multidisciplinary training in perineal care during labor and delivery for the reduction of anal sphincter injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jonathan; Gundry, Rowan; Young, Helen; Naguib, Adel

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the introduction of a multidisciplinary intrapartum perineal-care training program reduced the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in patients undergoing vaginal deliveries. A prospective observational cohort study enrolled women undergoing vaginal deliveries at a district general hospital maternity unit in the United Kingdom between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2014. All women experiencing obstetric anal sphincter injuries during the study period were identified and the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries before (2012-2013) a multidisciplinary training program was implemented was compared with the rate after (2013-2014) implementation using logistic regression analysis. The study enrolled 4920 patients. Following the implementation of the training program, the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries decreased from 4.8% to 3.1% of vaginal deliveries (odds ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.493-0.899; P = 0.008). The integration of intrapartum perineal-care training into mandatory annual staff training was associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical management of esophageal achalasia: Evolution of an institutional approach to minimally invasive repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Mikael; Khalafallah, Adham M; Guzzetta, Phillip C; Sandler, Anthony D; Darbari, Anil; Kane, Timothy D

    2016-10-01

    Surgical management of esophageal achalasia (EA) in children has transitioned over the past 2 decades to predominantly involve laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) or minimally invasive surgery (MIS). More recently, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been utilized to treat achalasia in children. Since the overall experience with surgical management of EA is contingent upon disease incidence and surgeon experience, the aim of this study is to report a single institutional contemporary experience for outcomes of surgical treatment of EA by LHM and POEM, with regards to other comparable series in children. An IRB approved retrospective review of all patients with EA who underwent treatment by a surgical approach at a tertiary US children's hospital from 2006 to 2015. Data including demographics, operative approach, Eckardt scores pre- and postoperatively, complications, outcomes, and follow-up were analyzed. A total of 33 patients underwent 35 operative procedures to treat achalasia. Of these operations; 25 patients underwent laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) with Dor fundoplication; 4 patients underwent LHM alone; 2 patients underwent LHM with Thal fundoplication; 2 patients underwent primary POEM; 2 patients who had had LHM with Dor fundoplication underwent redo LHM with takedown of Dor fundoplication. Intraoperative complications included 2 mucosal perforations (6%), 1 aspiration, 1 pneumothorax (1 POEM patient). Follow ranged from 8months to 7years (8-84months). There were no deaths and no conversions to open operations. Five patients required intervention after surgical treatment of achalasia for recurrent dysphagia including 3 who underwent between 1 and 3 pneumatic dilations; and 2 who had redo LHM with takedown of Dor fundoplication with all patients achieving complete resolution of symptoms. Esophageal achalasia in children occurs at a much lower incidence than in adults as documented by published series describing the surgical treatment in children. We

  12. Cultured smooth muscle cells of the human vesical sphincter are more sensitive to histamine than are detrusor smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Jochen; Oberbach, Andreas; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe

    2006-05-01

    To compare histamine receptor expression in cultured smooth muscle cells from the human detrusor and internal sphincter using receptor-specific agonists. Smooth muscle cells from the bladder dome and internal sphincter were cultured from 5 male patients undergoing cystectomy for bladder cancer therapy. Calcium transients in cells stimulated with carbachol, histamine, histamine receptor 1 (H1R)-specific heptanecarboxamide (HTMT), dimaprit (H2R), and R-(alpha)-methylhistamine (H3R) were measured by calcium imaging. Histamine receptor proteins were detected by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. H1R, H2R, and H3R expression was found in tissue and cultured cells. Carbachol stimulated equal numbers of detrusor and sphincter cells (60% and 51%, respectively). Histamine stimulated significantly more cells than carbachol in detrusor (100%) and sphincter (99.34%) cells. Calcium responses to carbachol in detrusor and sphincter cells were comparable and did not differ from those to histamine in detrusor cells. However, histamine and specific agonists stimulated more sphincter cells than did carbachol (P <0.001), and the calcium increase was greater in sphincter cells than in detrusor cells. Single cell analysis revealed comparable H2R responses in detrusor and sphincter cells, but H1R and H3R-mediated calcium reactions were significantly greater in sphincter cells. Histamine very effectively induces calcium release in smooth muscle cells. In sphincter cells, histamine is even more effective than carbachol regarding the number of reacting cells and the intracellular calcium increase. Some of the variability in the outcome of antihistaminic interstitial cystitis therapies might be caused by the ineffectiveness of the chosen antihistaminic or unintentional weakening of sphincteric function.

  13. Incontinence after primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter tears is related to relative length of reconstructed external sphincter: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norderval, S; Røssaak, K; Markskog, A; Vonen, B

    2012-08-01

    To determine if anatomic primary repair with end-to-end reconstruction of the external anal sphincter (EAS) in its full length combined with separate repair of coexisting internal anal sphincter (IAS) tear, when present, results in less incontinence and better anal sphincter integrity compared with conventional primary end-to-end repair in which the IAS is not actively reconstructed. Women who sustained third- or fourth-degree obstetric tears were included prospectively in the study following anatomic primary repair. Women treated with conventional primary repair prior to the study period comprised the control group. Three-dimensional endoanal ultrasonography (3D-EAUS) images were classified according to the EAUS defect score, and incontinence according to St Mark's score. Sixty-three women were included in the study group and 61 in the control group, with mean follow-up times of 11 and 21 months, respectively. Among women who had not delivered vaginally prior to the tear, St Mark's score ≥ 3 was reported by 9.6% (5/52) in the study group and 37.5% (15/40) in the control group at follow-up (P = 0.002). The corresponding numbers among women who had previously delivered vaginally were 36.4% (4/11) and 42.9% (9/21), respectively (non-significant). St Mark's score correlated with the EAUS defect score (P = 0.017). An EAS defect exceeding 50% of the sphincter length was significantly less common in the study group, and in a multivariable logistic regression model, mode of repair (anatomic vs conventional) was the only factor explaining the difference in EAS sphincter length between the two groups (P = 0.007). Improved continence status after anatomic primary repair was associated with a better longitudinal reconstruction of the EAS, while the integrity of the IAS did not differ between the groups. Women with a history of vaginal delivery prior to the sphincter tear had an inferior outcome regardless of mode of repair. Copyright © 2012 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley

  14. Disorders of the pelvic floor and anal sphincters; a gastroenterologist’s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn M.M. Quigley, MD FRCP FACP FACG FRCPI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration and coordination of the musculature of the pelvic floor and the anal sphincters is critical to two important physiological functions: defecation and continence. Consequently, disorders affecting the pelvic floor muscles, the anal sphincters, their innervation or their precise coordination will, depending on their nature, result either in obstructed defecation or fecal incontinence. Both of these disorders are much more common in females and the latter, in particular, is linked with parity. While the symptomatology, presentation and optimal mode of investigation of fecal incontinence are well standardized, considerable debate and controversy continues to surround the contributions of pelvic floor and anal sphincter dysfunction to chronic constipation and the optimal clinical approach to their investigation remains to be defined. In appropriately chosen cases surgical intervention may provide the best outcome for sufferers from incontinence; biofeedback approaches may be of value in both incontinence and obstructed defecation and surgery has little role to play in the latter.

  15. Teaching the pharyngeal flap and sphincter pharyngoplasty: The sticky note method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jake J; Jabbour, Noel

    2015-11-01

    To demonstrate a cost-effective, quick, and easily reproducible three-dimensional sticky note model to enhance the understanding and conceptualization of the geometry and steps of the pharyngeal flap and sphincter pharyngoplasty. The method involves making specified incisions and rearrangements of readily available components, including disposable clear plastic cups, yellow and pink sticky notes, and white paper. Once assembly is complete, further incisions and remodeling are performed to simulate a pharyngeal flap or sphincter pharyngoplasty. The cost of the materials to make one model was $0.94. Average construction time was less than 10 min. This three-dimensional model is an efficient, interactive, and simple visual aid to teach surgical trainees the geometry and steps of the pharyngeal flap and sphincter pharyngoplasty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Idiopathic detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in neurologically normal patients with voiding abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, T M; Djurhuus, J C; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    Symptomatology and clinical manifestations of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia are described in 23 patients without neurological disease. Their cardinal symptoms were recurrent cystitis, enuresis, frequent voiding, back pain during voiding and anal discomfort. The major objective finding was vesico......Symptomatology and clinical manifestations of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia are described in 23 patients without neurological disease. Their cardinal symptoms were recurrent cystitis, enuresis, frequent voiding, back pain during voiding and anal discomfort. The major objective finding...... was vesicoureteral reflux in 11 cases with kidney scarring in 10. Bladder trabeculation was found in 13 patients, bladder hyperreflexia in 8, and significant residual urine in 16 patients. The etiology of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in non-neurological patients is discussed. By means of exclusion it is most...

  17. Influence of preoperative (hyperthermic) radiochemotherapy on manometric anal sphincter function in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzmann, J.; Huenerbein, M.; Slisow, W.; Rau, B.; Gellermann, J.; Wust, P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) followed by curative surgery is a well-accepted therapeutic option in the treatment of advanced rectal cancer. Usually, the anal sphincter is located in the irradiation area of a preoperative RCT regime. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of preoperative RCT on anal sphincter function. Patients and methods: between 1994 and 2000, 102 patients with rectal cancer stage uT3/uT4 were analyzed. All patients underwent radiotherapy with 45 Gy (5 x 1.8 Gy) including two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (folinic acid) chemotherapy. 46 patients were treated additionally with up to five sessions of locoregional hyperthermia. The sphincter function was analyzed by perfusion manometry before preoperative therapy and 4 weeks after pretreatment had been finished. For statistics, the Wilcoxon signed rank test and mann-whitney U-test were used (SPSS 9.0 for Windows trademark). Results: the mean value of all 102 patients showed a significant reduction of the mean maximum resting pressure from 97 to 89 mmHg (p = 0.02). For the mean maximal squeeze pressure no significant difference could be shown (178 vs. 176 mmHg). For patients with distal (≤ 7.5 cm from anal verge) tumors the difference was highly significant (92 vs. 79 mmHg). Locoregional hyperthermia had no additional influence on sphincter function. Conclusion: preoperative RCT impairs sphincter function especially in patients with distal tumors. In addition, RCT could have a negative influence on the continence of patients who received sphincter-preserving surgery. (orig.) [de

  18. Smooth muscle enfoldment internal sphincter construction after intersphincteric resection for rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiying Jin

    Full Text Available To assess smooth muscle enfoldment and internal sphincter construction (SMESC for improvement of continence after intersphincteric resection (ISR for rectal cancer.Twenty-four Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into a conventional ISR group and experimental SMESC group, with 12 pigs in each group. The proximal sigmoid colon was anastomosed directly to the anus in the ISR group. In the SMESC group, internal sphincter construction was performed. At 12 weeks before and after surgery, rectal resting pressure and anal canal length were assessed. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to determine the thickness of the internal sphincter. After the animals were sacrificed, the rectum and anus were resected and pathological examinations were performed to evaluate the differences in sphincter thickness and muscle fibers.All 24 animals in the SMESC group and the ISR group survived the surgery. Twelve weeks post-surgery, the rectal resting pressure, length of the anal high-pressure zone and the postoperative internal sphincter thickness for the ISR group were significantly lower than for the SMESC group. There was a thickened area (about 2 cm above the anastomotic stoma among animals from the SMESC group; in addition, the smooth muscles were significantly enlarged and enfolded when compared to the ISR group.This animal model study shows that the SMESC procedure achieved acceptable reconstruction of the internal anal neo-sphincter (IAN/S, without increasing surgical risk. However, the findings in this experimental animal model must be confirmed by clinical trials to determine the safety and efficacy of this procedure in clinical practice.

  19. Smooth muscle enfoldment internal sphincter construction after intersphincteric resection for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heiying; Zhang, Bei; Yao, Hang; Du, Yonghong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Leng, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    To assess smooth muscle enfoldment and internal sphincter construction (SMESC) for improvement of continence after intersphincteric resection (ISR) for rectal cancer. Twenty-four Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into a conventional ISR group and experimental SMESC group, with 12 pigs in each group. The proximal sigmoid colon was anastomosed directly to the anus in the ISR group. In the SMESC group, internal sphincter construction was performed. At 12 weeks before and after surgery, rectal resting pressure and anal canal length were assessed. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to determine the thickness of the internal sphincter. After the animals were sacrificed, the rectum and anus were resected and pathological examinations were performed to evaluate the differences in sphincter thickness and muscle fibers. All 24 animals in the SMESC group and the ISR group survived the surgery. Twelve weeks post-surgery, the rectal resting pressure, length of the anal high-pressure zone and the postoperative internal sphincter thickness for the ISR group were significantly lower than for the SMESC group. There was a thickened area (about 2 cm) above the anastomotic stoma among animals from the SMESC group; in addition, the smooth muscles were significantly enlarged and enfolded when compared to the ISR group. This animal model study shows that the SMESC procedure achieved acceptable reconstruction of the internal anal neo-sphincter (IAN/S), without increasing surgical risk. However, the findings in this experimental animal model must be confirmed by clinical trials to determine the safety and efficacy of this procedure in clinical practice.

  20. Phasic or terminal detrusor overactivity in women: age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise A. Valentini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To search for relationships between phasic (P and terminal (T DO with age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior during involuntary detrusor contraction in woman. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Urodynamic studies (triple lumen catheter 7F, seated position of 164 successive women referred for LUTS with diagnosis of DO were reviewed. Patients were stratified in 4 sub-groups: pre- (18-44y, peri- (45-54 y, post-menopause (55-74 y and oldest old (≥ 75 y. The urethral sensor was positioned at the level of the maximum urethral closure pressure for sphincter behavior analysis. A variation of at least 5 cmH2O in pressure (detrusor or urethra was chosen to assert DO or sphincter response. Sphincter response was classified as relaxation (re before or during DO, or steady (st. RESULTS: Occurrence of P and TDO was similar: 77 P and 87 T. The PDO group was significantly younger (p = 0.0003. TDO was more frequent in patients with a history of neurological disease. The percentage of PDO remained almost constant in age groups, while that of TDO increased with age from 6.7% to 23.2% (p = 0.0013. Uninhibited contraction occurred at a smaller bladder volume in the P group: 149 ± 95 vs. 221 ± 113 mL (p < 0.0001. Steady sphincter predominated in the TDO subgroup: 45.9% vs. 32.1% and increased significantly in each DO sub-group of ³ 75y. CONCLUSION: Steady sphincter during both P and TDO, and occurrence of TDO appear as specific of aging. The last result could be related to structural changes in the detrusor muscle with aging.

  1. The diagnostic accuracy of endovaginal and transperineal ultrasound for detecting anal sphincter defects: The PREDICT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, A-M; Abdool, Z; Sultan, A H; Thakar, R

    2011-07-01

    To determine the accuracy and predictive value of transperineal (TPU) and endovaginal ultrasound (EVU) in the detection of anal sphincter defects in women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries and/or postpartum symptoms of faecal incontinence. One hundred and sixty-five women were recruited, four women were excluded as they were seen years after their last delivery. TPU and EVU, followed by endonanal ultrasound (EAU), were performed using the B&K Viking 2400 scanner. Sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values with 95% confidence intervals, for detecting anal sphincter defects were calculated for EVU and TPU, using EAU as the reference standard. On EAU a defect was found in 42 (26%) women: 39 (93%) had an external (EAS) and 23 (55%) an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. Analysable images of one level of the EAS combined with an analysable IAS were available in 140 (87%) women for EVU and in 131 (81%) for TPU. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of any defect was 48% (30-67%) and 85% (77-91%) for EVU and 64% (44-81%) and 85% (77-91%) for TPU, respectively. Although EAU using a rotating endoprobe is the validated reference standard in the identification of anal sphincter defects, it is not universally available. However while TPU and/or EVU with conventional ultrasound probes can be useful in identifying normality, for clinical purposes they are not sensitive enough to identify an underlying sphincter defect. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Redo Heller Myotomy for Achalasia in a Patient with Down Syndrome: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Stanley, Jessica; Vandendool, KellyAnn; Kiev, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Up to 77% of Down syndrome (DS) patients have associated structural or functional gastrointestinal abnormalities. Functional disturbances, such as processes affecting the enteric nervous system, can often affect the outcome of corrective surgical procedures. Recently, an association between DS and achalasia has been reported. In this report we present a 28-year-old male patient with a history of Down syndrome and achalasia, who presented with recurrent dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, and recurrent aspirations. The patient had previously undergone a laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication. Unfortunately, despite this surgery, he continued to require multiple esophageal dilations, and intraesophageal administration of Botox therapy. Additionally, there were numerous subsequent hospital admissions for recurrent aspiration pneumonia. Evaluation revealed an incomplete myotomy and a revision long Heller myotomy was successfully performed intraabdominally and he is now symptom and aspiration free.

  3. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy Versus Heller Myotomy for Achalasia: Pros and Cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefas, Cristian; Ababneh, Rami; Tanţău, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motor disorder that has multiple endoscopic and surgical methods of treatment. However, there is no consensus on optimal therapy in patients suffering from this disorder. This review discusses two therapies with similar but technically different concepts, peroral endoscopic myotomy and Heller surgical myotomy. After a brief introduction to the basic problems of achalasia, technical considerations, intra and postprocedural complications are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of the two procedures are discussed, based on the relevant articles in the literature. Heller surgical myotomy and peroral endoscopic myotomy appear to be similar in performance with similar results in terms of gastroesophageal reflux rates. However, with experience being gained in the field of endoscopic myotomy, this procedure seems more advantageous, with similar success rates to those of the established surgical technique, but offering shorter operating times, shorter hospitalizations and, ultimately, lower costs. Celsius.

  4. Twenty-year trends in the utilization of Heller myotomy for achalasia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisley, Kelly R; Preston, Jennifer F; Dolan, James P; Diggs, Brian S; Hunter, John G

    2017-08-01

    Trends in the utilization of Heller myotomy for achalasia in the U.S. over time have not been previously described. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, we analyzed patients undergoing Heller myotomy for achalasia over a 20-year period (1992-2011) to estimate rates of Heller myotomy, locations where the procedures were performed (rural, urban or teaching) and changes in technique (laparoscopic vs open) as well as outcomes of length of stay and in-hospital mortality. Over the last 20 years, the total number of Heller myotomies performed in the U.S. has increased (1576 cases in 1992 to 5046 cases in 2011, p = 0.001). These procedures are now being performed laparoscopically (0.9%-67.0%, p Heller myotomy at teaching institutions with decreased in-hospital mortality and shorter LOS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Artificial urethral sphincters: Value of plain film radiography in evaluation of prosthesis malfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.C.; Hansen, M.E.; Webster, G.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    Case records were reviewed to determine the diagnostic efficacy of plain radiographs in the evaluation of inflatable artificial urethral sphincters. Of 84 patients with prostheses, 21 (25%) developed complications. Fluid leaks were found in 16 patients who presented with recurrent incontinence; plain radiographs demonstrated an interval decrease in balloon reservoir diameter. Kinked tubing, which was evident on plain films, caused acute urinary retention in three patients. However, plain radiographs failed to detect evidence of prosthesis erosion into the urethra in either of two patients with this complication. Although urethroscopy is needed to detect urethral erosion, plain radiographs are inexpensive and reliable in the initial evaluation of artifical sphincter malfunction

  6. An assessment of the complications of the Brantley Scott artificial sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, P S; Galloway, N T; Lewis, D C; Stephenson, T P

    1987-08-01

    A Brantley Scott artificial sphincter has been inserted into 95 patients since 1981; more than half of the patients had lower urinary tract neuropathy and most of the others post-TUR incontinence. The main problem with the device has been cuff failure (12), which should be resolved by the new "dipped" cuffs. The major surgical complication has been erosion (10), usually associated with infection. Twenty-four patients had variable degrees of incontinence but the artificial sphincter remains the cornerstone of continence control when other methods have failed or are inappropriate.

  7. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM: a new endoscopic treatment for achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Miranda-García

    Full Text Available Background/aims: Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM is a new minimally invasive technique to treat achalasia. Methods: We performed a review of the literature of POEM with a special focus on technical details and the results obtained with this technique in patients with achalasia and other esophageal motility disorders. Results: Thousands of POEM procedures have been performed worldwide since its introduction in 2008. The procedure is based on the creation of a mucosal entry point in the proximal esophagus to reach the cardia through a submucosal tunnel and then perform a myotomy of the muscular layers of the cardia, esophagogastric junction and distal esophagus, as performed in a Heller myotomy. The clinical remission rate ranges from 82 to 100%. Although no randomized studies exist and available data are from single-center studies, no differences have been found between laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM and POEM in terms of perioperative outcomes, short-term outcomes (12 months and long-term outcomes (up to three years. Procedure time and length of hospital stay were lower for POEM. Post-POEM reflux is a concern, and controversial data have been reported compared to LHM. The technique is safe, with no reported deaths related to the procedure and an adverse event rate comparable to surgery. Potential complications include bleeding, perforation, aspiration and insufflation-related adverse events. Thus, this is a complex technique that needs specific training even in expert hands. The indication for this procedure is widening and other motor hypercontractil esophageal disorders have been treated by POEM with promising results. POEM can be performed in complicated situations such as in pediatric patients, sigmoid achalasia or after failure of previous treatments. Conclusions: POEM is an effective treatment for achalasia and is a promising tool for other motor esophageal disorders. It is a safe procedure but, due to its technical difficulty and

  8. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM): a new endoscopic treatment for achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda García, Pablo; Casals Seoane, Fernando; Gonzalez, Jean-Michel; Barthet, Marc; Santander Vaquero, Cecilio

    2017-10-01

    Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat achalasia. We performed a review of the literature of POEM with a special focus on technical details and the results obtained with this technique in patients with achalasia and other esophageal motility disorders. Thousands of POEM procedures have been performed worldwide since its introduction in 2008. The procedure is based on the creation of a mucosal entry point in the proximal esophagus to reach the cardia through a submucosal tunnel and then perform a myotomy of the muscular layers of the cardia, esophagogastric junction and distal esophagus, as performed in a Heller myotomy. The clinical remission rate ranges from 82 to 100%. Although no randomized studies exist and available data are from single-center studies, no differences have been found between laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) and POEM in terms of perioperative outcomes, short-term outcomes (12 months) and long-term outcomes (up to three years). Procedure time and length of hospital stay were lower for POEM. Post-POEM reflux is a concern, and controversial data have been reported compared to LHM. The technique is safe, with no reported deaths related to the procedure and an adverse event rate comparable to surgery. Potential complications include bleeding, perforation, aspiration and insufflation-related adverse events. Thus, this is a complex technique that needs specific training even in expert hands. The indication for this procedure is widening and other motor hypercontractil esophageal disorders have been treated by POEM with promising results. POEM can be performed in complicated situations such as in pediatric patients, sigmoid achalasia or after failure of previous treatments. POEM is an effective treatment for achalasia and is a promising tool for other motor esophageal disorders. It is a safe procedure but, due to its technical difficulty and possible associated complications, the procedure should be performed

  9. Economic evaluation of the randomized European Achalasia trial comparing pneumodilation with Laparoscopic Heller myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonen, A; Busch, O; Costantini, M; Finotti, E; Tack, J; Salvador, R; Boeckxstaens, G; Zaninotto, G

    2017-11-01

    A recent multicenter randomized trial in achalasia patients has shown that pneumatic dilation resulted in equivalent relief of symptoms compared to laparoscopic Heller myotomy. Additionally, the cost of each treatment should be also taken in consideration. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to perform an economic analysis of the European achalasia trial. Patients with newly diagnosed achalasia were enrolled from to 2003 to 2008 in 14 centers in five European countries and were randomly assigned to either pneumatic dilation (PD) or laparoscopic Heller (LHM). The economic analysis was performed in the three centers in three different countries where most patients were enrolled (Amsterdam [NL], Leuven, [B] and Padova [I]) and then applied to all patients included in the study. The total raw costs of the two treatments per patient include the initial costs, the costs of complications, and the costs of retreatments. Two hundred and one patients, 107 (57 males and 50 females, mean age 46 CI: 43-49 years) were randomized to LHM and 94 (59 males and 34 females, mean age 46 CI 43-50 years) to PD. The total cost of PD per patient was quite comparable in the three different centers; €3397 in Padova, €3259 in Amsterdam and €3792 in Leuven. For LHM, the total costs per patient were highest in Amsterdam: €4488 in Padova, €6720 in Amsterdam, and €5856 in Leuven. In conclusion, the strategy of treating achalasia starting with PD appears the most economic approach, independent of the health system. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Is Dor fundoplication optimum after laparoscopic Heller myotomy for achalasia? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming-Tian; He, Ya-Zhou; Deng, Xiang-Bing; Zhang, Yuan-Chuan; Yang, Ting-Han; Jin, Cheng-Wu; Hu, Bing; Wang, Zi-Qiang

    2013-11-21

    To compare the outcome of acid reflux prevention by Dor fundoplication after laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) for achalasia. Electronic database PubMed, Ovid (Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews, EmBase and Ovid MEDLINE) and Cochrane Library were searched between January 1995 and September 2012. Bibliographic citation management software (EndNote X3) was used for extracted literature management. Quality assessment of random controlled studies (RCTs) and non-RCTs was performed according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions 5.1.0 and a modification of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, respectively. The data were analyzed using Review Manager (Version 5.1), and sensitivity analysis was performed by sequentially omitting each study. Finally, 6 studies, including a total of 523 achalasia patients, compared Dor fundoplication with other types of fundoplication after LHM (Dor-other group), and 8 studies, including a total of 528 achalasia patients, compared Dor fundoplication with no fundoplication after LHM (Dor-no group). Dor fundoplication was associated with a significantly higher recurrence rate of clinical regurgitation and pathological acid reflux compared with the other fundoplication group (OR = 7.16, 95%CI: 1.25-40.93, P = 0.03, and OR = 3.79, 95%CI: 1.23-11.72, P = 0.02, respectively). In addition, there were no significant differences between Dor fundoplication and no fundoplication in all subjects. Other outcomes, including complications, dysphagia, postoperative physiologic testing, and operation-related data displayed no significant differences in the two comparison groups. Dor fundoplication is not the optimum procedure after LHM for achalasia. We suggest more attention should be paid on quality of life among different fundoplications.

  11. Comparison of Pneumatic Dilation with Pneumatic Dilation Plus Botulinum Toxin for Treatment of Achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Bakhshipour

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the therapeutic options for achalasia are pneumatic dilatation (PD, an appropriate long-term therapy, and botulinum toxin injection (BT that is a relatively short-term therapy. This study aimed to compare therapeutic effect of repetitive pneumatic dilation with a combined method (botulinum toxin injection and pneumatic dilation in a group of achalasia patients who are low responder to two initial pneumatic dilations. Thirty- four patients with documented primary achalasia that had low response to two times PD (<50% decrease in symptom score and barium height at 5 minute in timed esophagogram after 3month of late PD were randomized to receive pneumatic dilation (n=18 or botulinum toxin injection and pneumatic dilation by four weeks interval (n=16, PD and BT+PD groups respectively. Symptom scores were evaluated before and at 1, 6 and 12 months after treatment. Clinical remission was defined as a decrease in symptom score ≥ 50% of baseline. There were no significant differences between the two groups in gender, age and achalasia type. Remission rate of patients in BT-PD group in comparison with PD group were 87.5% vs. 67.1% (P = 0.7, 87.5% vs. 61.1% (P = 0.59 and 87.5% vs. 55.5% (P = 0.53 at 1, 6 and 12 months respectively .There were no major complications in either group. The mean symptom score decreased by 62.71% in the BT-PD group (P < 0.002 and 50.77% in the PD group (P < 0.01 at the end of the first year. Despite a better response rate in BT+PD group, a difference was not statistically significant. A difference may be meaningful if a large numbers of patients are included in the study.

  12. Correlation Between Timed Barium Esophagogram and Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy Results in Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Mi; Jeon, Han Ho; Park, Jae Jun; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin

    2015-08-01

    Timed barium esophagogram (TBE) and esophageal transit scintigraphy (ETS) have been adopted as useful ways to evaluate achalasia patients. TBE has merit as a simple, non-invasive, and convenient method. The study sought to compare the results of these two tests and verify their usefulness in evaluating treatment response. In addition, we assessed whether TBE could effectively replace ETS through correlation analysis. The medical records of 50 achalasia patients treated between September 2011 and June 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The height and width of the barium column at 1, 2, and 5 min were measured by TBE. Half-life (T 1/2, min) and R 30 (percentage of remaining radioactivity 30 s after radioisotope ingestion) were measured by ETS. Both tests were performed before and after treatment, and the tests were carried out 1 and 2 days after procedures. And we analyzed the correlation between the parameters from the two tests. The parameters of TBE and ETS were improved after treatment (p treatment, the height and width results at 5 min from TBE positively correlated with the T 1/2 parameter from ETS (correlation coefficients of 0.59 and 0.75, respectively). After treatment, the correlation coefficients between the 5-min height and width of the barium column by TBE and T 1/2 by ETS were 0.55 and 0.46, respectively. Both TBE and ETS are useful modalities in assessing esophageal emptying and response to achalasia treatment. TBE and ETS results have a statistically significant correlation both pre- and post-treatment. We suggest that TBE could effectively replace ETS for the assessment of achalasia.

  13. Radioisotopic monitoring of esophageal motility in patients with achalasia cardiae after surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dinh Ha; Szilvasi, J.

    1994-01-01

    Results of the radioisotope esophageal motility studies in patients after surgical treatment of achalasia are presented. 28 patients were studied. In both group of the patients (after Belsey-Mark and modified Nissen antireflux surgical techniques) slightly delayed esophageal transit time was found. Mean transit time of the esophagus proved to be a useful practical parameter. This simple, noninvasive, physiological radioisotope technique is recommended for follow-up studies of patients after gastroesophageal surgery. (N.T.). 10 refs., 2 figs

  14. Minimally Invasive Management of Achalasia Cardia: Results From a Single Center Study

    OpenAIRE

    Palanivelu, C.; Maheshkumar, G. S.; Jani, Kalpesh; Parthasarthi, R.; Sendhilkumar, K.; Rangarajan, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Since the performance of the first laparoscopic cardiomyotomy for achalasia cardia in 1991, the popularity of the minimally invasive approach for this troublesome disease has been growing. We present our experience of 226 patients who underwent laparoscopic cardiomyotomy and discuss the relevant issues. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out of 226 patients who have undergone laparoscopic cardiomyotomy since 1993. The preoperative workup, surgical technique, and postope...

  15. Videoscopic Heller myotomy for achalasia--results beyond short-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomston, M; Boyce, W; Mamel, J; Albrink, M; Murr, M; Durkin, A; Rosemurgy, A

    2000-08-01

    Heller myotomy has long been utilized for patients failing nonoperative management of achalasia. Videoscopy has been advocated to decrease the morbidity of Heller myotomy; however, few reports document outcome beyond 1 year after videoscopic Heller myotomy. To determine perioperative morbidity, relief of dysphagia, and the incidence of postoperative reflux symptoms following videoscopic Heller myotomy with follow-up to over 4 years. Patients with achalasia documented by barium esophogram and esophageal manometry underwent videoscopic Heller myotomy beginning in 1992. Intraoperative peroral endoscopy was utilized to guide the cephalad and caudad extent of myotomy. A barium esophogram was undertaken in the immediate postoperative period to evaluate for subclinical leak and assess esophageal emptying. Seventy-eight patients underwent videoscopic Heller myotomy. The mean age was 51 years +/- 19 (range 14 to 91). Most (62%) patients had undergone pneumatic dilation prior to surgical consultation and 54% had previous botox injections. All patients complained of dysphagia and 40% had symptoms of heartburn prior to myotomy. After myotomy, 91% of patients stated that their swallowing was improved with myotomy. Thirteen patients (18%) experience heartburn more than once per week after myotomy. The average length of stay was 2 +/- 2 days, with 72% of patients spending 2 days or fewer in the hospital. Six (7.7%) major complications occurred: five esophageal perforations and one enterotomy without long-term sequellae. Three procedures (3.8%) were converted to "open" procedures. No deaths occurred. We conclude that videoscopic Heller myotomy is safe and efficacious, with low morbidity and mortality. Videoscopic myotomy provides relief beyond the short term for dysphagia due to achalasia with minimal reflux symptoms. We advocate videoscopic Heller myotomy in the treatment of severe dysphagia due to achalasia not adequately palliated by or amenable to nonoperative management

  16. Imaging in the Evaluation of Endoscopic or Surgical Treatment for Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Palladino; Andrea Mardighian; Marilina D’Amora; Luca Roberto; Francesco Lassandro; Claudia Rossi; Gianluca Gatta; Mariano Scaglione; Guglielmi Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic (pneumatic dilation) versus surgical (Heller myotomy) treatment in patients affected by esophageal achalasia using barium X-ray examination of the digestive tract performed before and after the treatment. Materials and Methods. 19 patients (10 males and 9 females) were enrolled in this study; each patient underwent a barium X-ray examination to evaluate the esophageal diameter and the height of the barium column before a...

  17. Mechanical properties of the gastro-esophageal junction in health, achalasia, and scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, F; Fonollosa, V; Vilardell, M; Malagelada, J R

    2000-07-01

    Manometric assessment of the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) is deceptive in that ignores key dynamic properties of the junction, such as resistance to flow and compliance. Our aim was to investigate the mechanical properties of the GEJ comprising intraluminal pressure (measured by manometry), resistance to flow and compliance (measured by resistometry). We studied 8 healthy subjects, 11 patients with achalasia and 11 patients with scleroderma. We used a pneumatic resistometer, previously developed and validated in our laboratory. The resistometer consists of a flaccid polyurethane 5-cm cylinder connected to an electronically regulated nitrogen-injection system; the instrument records nitrogen flow through the cylinder while maintaining a constant pressure gradient between its proximal and distal ends. By placing the cylinder successively in the proximal stomach and along the GEJ we measured the GEJ-gastric resistance gradient (GEJ resistance minus gastric resistance) and were able to calculate the cumulative resistance (sum of resistance exerted at each pressure level), peak resistance (at any injection pressure), nil resistance point (injection pressure in mmHg at which GEJ resistance equals gastric resistance), and compliance slope (flow/pressure relationship). We found that GEJ resistance to flow (cumulative resistance, peak resistance, and nil resistance point) is significantly increased in achalasia and decreased in scleroderma (P < 0.05 versus health) while GEJ compliance is diminished in achalasia (P < 0.05 versus health) and normal in scleroderma. Achalasia is a disease characterized by increased GEJ resistance and rigidity. By contrast, although scleroderma is characterized by decreased GEJ resistance, GEJ compliance may be normal.

  18. Conservative management of esophageal perforations during pneumatic dilation for idiopathic esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Lerut, Toni; Coosemans, Willy; Vanbeckevoort, Dirk; Blondeau, Kathleen; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Tack, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal perforation is the most serious adverse event of pneumatic dilation (PD) for achalasia; it is usually managed by surgical repair. We investigated risk factors for esophageal perforation after PD and evaluated safety and long-term outcome of nonsurgical management strategies. We analyzed medical records of patients with achalasia who were treated with PD from 1992-2010 at the University Hospital Gasthuisberg in Leuven, Belgium; all patients with esophageal perforation were contacted to determine long-term outcomes. Achalasia outcomes were assessed by using the Vantrappen criteria. Of 830 PD procedures performed on 372 patients with manometry-confirmed achalasia (57 ± 1 years, 51% male), 16 were complicated by transmural esophageal perforation (4.3% of patients, 1.9% of dilations). Age >65 years was the only significant risk factor for complications (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-10.2). All patients were treated conservatively with broad-spectrum antibiotics and nothing by mouth. In 6 patients (38%) the clinical course was further complicated by a pleural effusion, which required a drain in 4 patients. One patient (6%) died of mediastinal hemorrhage within 12 hours after PD. Patients with complications were discharged after 19 ± 2.3 days, compared with 4 ± 0.2 days for those without complications (P 65 years is a significant risk factor for esophageal perforation after PD. Nonsurgical management of transmural esophageal tears is feasible, with favorable short-term and long-term outcomes, but is not devoid of complications. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Contemporary Management of Achalasia by Pediatric Surgeons: A Survey of the International Pediatric Endosurgical Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Joanna L; Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2016-07-01

    Achalasia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the esophagus. Surgical repair consists of esophagomyotomy, often in conjunction with an antireflux procedure. We sought to determine practice patterns in surgical treatment of pediatric achalasia. Data regarding preferences were collected as part of a comprehensive online-based survey sent to members of the International Pediatric Endosurgery Group (IPEG) completed by 191 surgeons of which 141 performed esophagomyotomies for achalasia. Procedures performed per surgeon were 1-2 (n = 21, 15%); 3-5 (n = 49, 34%); 6-10 (n = 39, 28%); 11-20 (n = 21, 15%); >20 (n = 11, 8%). Most approached the operation laparoscopically (n = 127, 90%). Workup before esophageal myotomy consisted of a diagnostic esophagram (n = 133, 94%) or manometry (n = 102, 73%). Only 60% of surgeons (n = 84) required an EGD. No preference observed in division location of the phrenoesophageal ligament for mobilization of the esophagus. There was a predominant preference for hook cautery (n = 82, 58%) over harmonic shears (n = 30, 21%), heated sealing device LigaSure™ (n = 18, 13%), and other devices (n = 11, 8%) for muscle division. Intraoperatively, 57% (n = 80) had endoscopy and 50% (n = 71) had postoperative esophagram before initiation of enteral feeding. For antireflux procedure, Thal/Dor approach was performed most frequently (n = 111, 79%) followed by the Toupet (n = 18, 13%) and Nissen (n = 4, 3%) and none (n = 7, 5%). Diet restrictions were provided in 76% (n = 107) of postoperative patients. Given the infrequency of achalasia in children, there are a range of treatment plans among pediatric surgeons. We have identified current practices as a first step in developing more standard treatment pathways.

  20. Video manometry of the sphincter of Oddi: a new aid for interpreting manometric tracings and excluding manometric artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madácsy, L; Middelfart, H V; Matzen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    was to develop a new method sphincter of Oddi video manometry-based on simultaneous ESOM and real-time endoscopic image analysis, and to investigate the usefulness of video manometry for detecting manometric artefacts during ESOM. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seven consecutive patients who had undergone cholecystectomy...... and were referred with a suspicion of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction were investigated. Sphincter of Oddi pressure and endoscopic images (20 frames/s) were recorded simultaneously on a Synectics PC Polygraf computer system with a time-correlated basis, and then compared. RESULTS: On ESOM, 69 sphincter......, or retching, were also easily recognized using simultaneous ESOM and real-time endoscopic image analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Video manometry of the sphincter of Oddi is a promising new method for improving the analysis and documentation of ESOM tracings. It has several advantages over the conventional technique...

  1. Levels of muscle enzymes in the serum after esophageal pneumatic dilation in patients with achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimchi, N A; Ron, Y; Abramowich, D; Shirin, H; Scapa, E; Avni, Y

    2005-01-01

    The success rate of pneumatic dilation of the esophagus in patients with achalasia is variable. We aim to assess whether levels of muscle enzymes in the serum are useful for predicting the efficacy of this procedure. Consecutive adults with symptomatic achalasia treated with pneumatic dilation were included. Blood samples were taken immediately before the procedure and after 12, 24 and 32 h. Clinical efficacy of the pneumatic dilation was evaluated on the basis of a symptom score defined prior to, and 2 months after the procedure. Eleven patients underwent 13 pneumatic dilations. In nine patients this was the first dilation attempt. Ten dilations were clinically effective. The study was discontinued after enzyme levels did not show a trend of increase in any of our patients. Moreover, a statistically significant unexpected decrease in creatine phosphokinase values was found 12 h after the procedure, among the 10 successful dilations. We believe that levels of muscle enzymes in the serum cannot predict the efficacy of pneumatic dilation in patients with achalasia.

  2. A new experimental model to study preneoplastic lesions in achalasia of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vespúcio Marcelo Vinícius Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Develop an experimental model to study esophageal preneoplastic lesions induced by diethylnitrosamine in rats with achalasia. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control - C (n=8; rats with megaesophagus - B (n=8; rats treated with DEN - D (n=15 and rats with megaesophagus plus DEN - BD (n=15. Megaesophagus can be experimentally obtained in rats by topical application of benzalkonium choride. The morphology and PCNA labeling index of the epithelium were evaluated. RESULTS: The morphometric analysis showed an increase in epithelial thickness in the animals of group BD (2166?1012mm² when compared to the other groups (C = 878?278mm²; B = 1746?144mm² and D = 1691?697mm², mainly due to basal layer hyperplasia, besides an increase in the keratin of the superficial layer. The PCNA labeling index in the basal layer was significantly higher in the group BD (0,695?0,111 when compared to the other groups (C = 0,490?0,132; B = 0,512?0,215 and D = 0,477?0,198. CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirm in an experimental model the previous observation in humans of increased epithelial cell proliferation during the esophageal carcinogenic process in achalasia and may be useful to further studies on the mechanisms of the esophageal carcinogenesis and the the design of follow-up endoscopic studies for patients with achalasia.

  3. Endoscopic stent suture fixation for prevention of esophageal stent migration during prolonged dilatation for achalasia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, E; Asari, R; Paireder, M; Lenglinger, J; Schoppmann, S F

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare endoscopic stent suture fixation with endoscopic clip attachment or the use of partially covered stents (PCS) regarding their capability to prevent stent migration during prolonged dilatation in achalasia. Large-diameter self-expanding metal stents (30 mm × 80 mm) were placed across the gastroesophageal junction in 11 patients with achalasia. Stent removal was scheduled after 4 to 7 days. To prevent stent dislocation, endoscopic clip attachment, endoscopic stent suture fixation, or PCS were used. The Eckardt score was evaluated before and 6 months after prolonged dilatation. After endoscopic stent suture fixation, no (0/4) sutured stent migrated. When endoscopic clips were used, 80% (4/5) clipped stents migrated (p = 0.02). Of two PCS (n = 2), one migrated and one became embedded leading to difficult stent removal. Technical adverse events were not seen in endoscopic stent suture fixation but were significantly correlated with the use of clips or PCS (r = 0.828, p = 0.02). Overall, 72% of patients were in remission regarding their achalasia symptoms 6 months after prolonged dilatation. Endoscopic suture fixation of esophageal stents but not clip attachment appears to be the best method of preventing early migration of esophageal stents placed at difficult locations such as at the naive gastroesophageal junction. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Anesthetic management of peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Eriko; Murata, Hiroaki; Minami, Hitomi; Sumikawa, Koji

    2014-06-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a newly developed, less invasive treatment for esophageal achalasia that requires general anesthesia under positive pressure ventilation. In this retrospective case series, we describe the anesthetic management of 28 consecutive patients who underwent POEM for esophageal achalasia. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil under positive pressure ventilation through a tracheal tube. Retained contents in the esophagus were evacuated just before anesthesia induction to prevent regurgitation into the trachea. The POEM procedure was performed using an orally inserted flexible fiberscope. Elevation of end-tidal carbon dioxide after initiating esophageal carbon dioxide insufflation was observed in all patients and was treated by minute adjustments to the ventilation volume. Scopolamine butylbromide-induced tachycardia in one patient was treated with landiolol hydrochloride, which is a short-acting beta 1-selective blocker. Minor subcutaneous emphysema around the neck was observed in one patient. POEM was successfully completed, and tracheas were extubated immediately after the procedure in all patients. Our findings suggest that prevention of aspiration pneumonia during anesthesia induction, preparation for carbon dioxide insufflation-related complications, and treatment of scopolamine butylbromide-induced tachycardia play important roles in safe anesthesia management of POEM for esophageal achalasia.

  5. Esophageal stasis in achalasia patients without symptoms after treatment does not predict symptom recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeij, F B; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2017-08-01

    After achalasia treatment, a subset of patients has poor esophageal emptying without having symptoms. There is no consensus on whether to pre-emptively treat these patients. We hypothesized that, if left untreated, these patients will experience earlier symptom recurrence than patients without stasis. 99 treated achalasia patients who were in clinical remission (Eckardt ≤3) at 3 months after treatment were divided into two groups, based on presence or absence of esophageal stasis on a timed barium esophagogram performed after 3 months. Two years after initial treatment, patients with stasis after treatment still had a wider esophagus (3 cm; IQR: 2.2-3.8) and more stasis (3.5 cm; IQR: 1.9-5.6) than patients without stasis (1.8 cm wide and 0 cm stasis; both Ptreatment also had a higher degree of stasis and a more dilated esophagus, compared to patients without stasis, they did not have a higher chance of requiring retreatment. We conclude that stasis in symptom-free achalasia patients after treatment does not predict treatment failure within 2 years and can therefore not serve as a sole reason for retreatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception after peroral endoscopic myotomy in a patient with achalasia cardia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Samiullah; Su, Shuai; Jiang, Kui; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2018-01-01

    Retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception (RGEI) is a relatively rare gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which a portion of the stomach wall invaginates into the esophagus. More recently, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has emerged as an endoscopic alternative to surgical myotomy for achalasia, and, to the best of our knowledge, our case is the first RGEI after POEM to be reported. A 22-year-old male was presented with a history of vomiting, intractable retching and hematemesis for 3 days. He had a history of achalasia and underwent POEM 3 years ago caused by symptoms of severe dysphagia to solid and liquid. Initially, the patient was diagnosed with a blood-filled esophagus, and the mid esophagus was occluded with a ball-like mass, however, the final diagnosis of RGEI was made by thoracotomy. A therapeutic strategy of conservative treatment and left transthoracic surgery were applied. The surgery and post operative course were uneventful, and he remained asymptomatic 1 year after operation. POEM is a reliable and minimally invasive endoscopic method for esophageal achalasia. Early recognition and severity of RGEI are essential to decrease the unwanted complications. Upper GI series, esophagogastroduodenoscopy and computed tomography scan are helpful for diagnostic purposes of RGEI. Conservative treatment, endoscopic intervention, and surgery are the mainstay of treatments for RGEI. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term follow-up of two interventional procedures for achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua; Shang Kezhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observed the long-term follow-up of the two types of interventional procedure for achalasia. Methods: The study cohort was comprised of 140 patients of achalasia including 70 patients treated under fluoroscopy with pneumatic dilation (group A) and 70 with temporary partially covered metal stent dilation (group B). Results: One hundred and forty dilations were performed on the 70 patients of group A with complications of chest pain (n=35), reflux (n=18), and bleeding (n=8); 38 patients of relapsing dysphagia during a 12-month follow-up, and 50 patients out of 60 of recurrent dysphagia during a 36-month follow-up. Seventy partially covered expandable metal stents were temporarily placed in the 70 patients of group B and withdrawn after 3-7 days via gastroscopy with complications of chest pain (n=28), reflux (n=15), and bleeding (n=9); 7 patients out of 70 exhibited dysphagia relapse during a 12-month followup, and 9 out of 58 patients exhibited dysphagia relapse during a 36-month follow-up. All the stents were inserted and withdrawn successfully. The follow-up in groups A-B lasted for 12-96 months. Conclusion: Temporary partially covered metal stent dilation is one of the best methods of interventional procedure for achalasia in long-term follow-up. (authors)

  8. Heller Myotomy for Achalasia: Quality of Life Comparison of Laparoscopic and Open Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katilius, Marius

    2001-01-01

    Background: Achalasia is a relatively rare disorder with a variety of treatment options. Although laparoscopic Heller myotomy has become the surgical treatment of choice, little data exist on the overall quality of life of patients undergoing this technique versus standard open approaches. Methods: We prospectively evaluated all patients surgically treated for achalasia by a single surgeon. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy consisted of a long (≥ 6 cm) esophageal cardiomyotomy extending at least 2 cm onto the gastric cardia, with a concomitant Dor fundoplication. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively for symptoms and quality of life using the SF-36, a standardized, generic quality of life instrument. Results: A total of 23 patients were surgically treated: 15 patients had a planned laparoscopic procedure, with 3 conversions; 8 had planned open procedures. Dysphagia resolved in 20 of 21 patients, with 1 patient in the laparoscopic group requiring reoperation due to an inadequate gastric myotomy. Compared with preoperative scores, a statistically significant improvement occurred in the general health domain of the SF-36 (70 to 82, P = 0.04). Compared with that in patients undergoing open surgery, the laparoscopic group had better scores in the domains of physical functioning and bodily pain. Conclusions: Laparoscopic Heller myotomy has comparable success to open Heller myotomy, and causes less early detriment to quality of life. This should be the primary treatment in all fit surgical patients with achalasia. PMID:11548827

  9. Short-term surgical outcomes of reduced port surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Tsuboi, Kazuto; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Ishibashi, Yoshio; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-09-01

    To clarify the feasibility and utility of reduced port surgery (RPS) for achalasia. Between September 2005 and June 2013, 359 patients with esophageal achalasia, excluding cases of reoperation, underwent laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication (LHD) according to our clinical pathway. Three-hundred and twenty-seven patients underwent LHD with five incisions (conventional approach), while the other 32 patients underwent RPS, including eight via SILS. The clinical data were collected in a prospective fashion and retrospectively reviewed. We selected 24 patients matched for gender, age and morphologic type with patients in the RPS group from among the 327 patients (C group). The surgical outcomes were compared between the C and RPS groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the duration of symptoms, dysphagia score, chest pain score, shape of the distal esophagus and esophageal clearance. The operative time was significantly longer in the RPS group than in the C group (p achalasia are comparable to those obtained with the conventional method.

  10. Specific esophagogram to assess functional outcomes after Heller's myotomy and Dor's fundoplication for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukali, E; Gouvas, N; Tsiaoussis, J; Pechlivanides, G; Zervakis, N; Mantides, A; Xynos, E

    2011-09-01

    Esophageal emptying assessed at the 'timed barium' esophagogram correlates well with symptomatic outcomes after pneumatic dilation for esophageal achalasia, although 30% of patients with satisfactory outcome exhibit partial improvement in emptying. The aim of the study was to investigate any correlation of esophageal emptying to symptomatic response after laparoscopic Heller's myotomy and Dor's fundoplication. 'Bread and barium' (transit time of a barium opaque bread bolus) and 'timed barium' (height of esophageal barium column 5 minutes after ingestion of 200-250 mL of barium suspension) esophagogram was used to assess esophageal emptying in 73 patients with esophageal achalasia before 1 and 5 years (31 cases) after laparoscopic myotomy and anterior fundoplication. Symptoms assessment was based to a specific score. At 1-year follow-up, excellent and good symptomatic results were obtained in 95% of the cases. Esophageal maximum diameter, esophageal transit time, and esophageal barium column were significantly correlated to each other and to symptom score postoperatively (P achalasia. Complete symptomatic relief does not necessarily reflect complete esophageal emptying. Outcomes do not deteriorate by time. Because of wide availability, esophagogram can be applied in follow-up of postmyotomy patients in conjunction with symptomatic evaluation. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  11. The natural history of achalasia: Evidence of a continuum-"The evolutive pattern theory".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Renato; Voltarel, Guerrino; Savarino, Edoardo; Capovilla, Giovanni; Pesenti, Elisa; Perazzolo, Anna; Nicoletti, Loredana; Costantini, Andrea; Merigliano, Stefano; Costantini, Mario

    2018-04-01

    It is currently unclear if the three manometric patterns of esophageal achalasia represent distinct entities or part of a disease continuum. The study's aims were: a) to test the hypothesis that the three patterns represent different stages in the evolution of achalasia; b) to investigate whether manometric patterns change after Laparoscopic-Heller-Dor (LHD). We assessed the patients diagnosed with achalasia who underwent LHD as their first treatment from 1992 to 2016. Their symptoms were scored using a detailed questionnaire for dysphagia, food-regurgitation, and chest pain. Barium-swallow, endoscopy, and esophageal-manometry were performed before and 6 months after surgery. The study population consisted of 511 patients (M:F=283:228). Patients' demographic and clinical data showed that those with pattern III had a shorter history of symptoms, a higher incidence of chest pain, and a less dilated gullet (ptheory that the different manometric patterns represent different stages in the evolution of the disease-where pattern III is the earliest stage, pattern II an intermediate stage, and pattern I the final stage. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term results of the European achalasia trial: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing pneumatic dilation versus laparoscopic Heller myotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, An; Annese, Vito; Belmans, Ann; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Costantini, Mario; Dousset, Bertrand; Elizalde, J. I.; Fumagalli, Uberto; Gaudric, Marianne; Merla, Antonio; Smout, Andre J.; Tack, Jan; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Busch, Olivier R.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a chronic motility disorder of the oesophagus for which laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) and endoscopic pneumodilation (PD) are the most commonly used treatments. However, prospective data comparing their long-term efficacy is lacking. 201 newly diagnosed patients with achalasia were

  13. Serum from achalasia patients alters neurochemical coding in the myenteric plexus and nitric oxide mediated motor response in normal human fundus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    des Varannes, SB; Chevalier, J; Pimont, S; Le Neel, JC; Klotz, M; Schafer, KH; Galmiche, JP; Neunlist, M

    Background and aims: Achalasia is a disease of unknown aetiology. An immune mechanism has been suggested on the basis of previous morphological observations. The objective of this study was to test whether the serum of achalasia patients could reproduce the phenotype and functional changes that

  14. OCCULT ANAL SPHINCTER INJURIES (OASIS IN DEPARTMENT OF PERINATOLOGY IN LJUBLJANA – INCIDENCE AND RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Jakopič

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaginal delivery is the most important risk factors for development of faecal incontinence, which significantly affects quality of life. Foreign studies show OASIS occur at 20 to 40 % of vaginal deliveries. In Slovenia we recognize sphincter injuries at 1.7 % of deliveries, while true incidence of OASIS in our population remains unknown. Caesarean section prevents anal sphincter injuries. Known risk factors in foreign studies include prolonged second stage of labour, fetal weight > 3500 g, malpresentation, forceps delivery, maternal age more than 35 years at the time of first delivery, first delivery. Few women complain about defecatory problems in puerperium unless they are directly asked about them, so true incidence of such injuries is grossly underestimated. Previously compensated anal sphincter dysfunction can clinically manifest as late as in menopause. The most probable cause is atrophy of muscle and fibrous tissue of pelvic floor and anal sphincter due to lack of estrogen support in this period. With anal ultrasound we tried to determine the incidence of occult damage to anal sphincter in primiparas after vaginal delivery and the relation of injury to symptoms 6 weeks after delivery and identify possible risk factors in our population. We also tried to find out how many patients with anal sphincter injury become symptomatic immediately after deliv- ery. Methods: From January to June 2009 we examined 26 primiparas after vaginal delivery in the Ljubljana Maternity Hospital with anal ultrasound and compared various data about the delivery from our national delivery form. We excluded all patients with caesarean section, recognized anal sphincter injury at the time of the delivery or previous anorectal surgery, history of irritable bowel syndrome or pre-existing inflammatory bowel disease. All patients completed a bowel-function questionnaire, which included questions about faecal urgency and involuntary passing of gas, liquid or

  15. Association of High-Resolution Manometry Metrics with the Symptoms of Achalasia and the Symptomatic Outcomes of Peroral Esophageal Myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yurong; Xie, Chen; Wang, Meifeng; Jiang, Liuqin; Shi, Ruihua; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has improved the accuracy of manometry in detecting achalasia and has helped distinguish between clinically relevant subtypes. This study investigated whether HRM metrics correlate with the achalasia symptoms and symptomatic outcomes of peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM). Of the 30 patients who were enrolled, 25 were treated with POEM, 12 of who underwent HRM after 3 months. All the patients completed the Eckardt score questionnaires, and those who underwent POEM were followed up for about 6 months. Pearson correlation was used to assess the relationship between the HRM metrics and symptoms and outcomes. The integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) score positively correlated with the total Eckardt score, regurgitation score and weight loss score in all the patients, and with the weight loss score in type I achalasia. In 25 patients (10 patients, type I; 15 patients, type II) who underwent POEM, the total Eckardt scores and individual symptom scores significantly decreased after surgery. Changes in the Eckardt scores were similar between type I and type II. Further, the Eckardt scores and weight loss score changes were positively correlated with baseline IRP. Twelve patients (4 patients, type I; 8 patients, type II) underwent HRM again after POEM. IRP changed significantly after POEM, as did the DEP in type II. The IRP changes after POEM were positively correlated with the Eckardt score changes. IRP is correlated with the symptoms and outcomes of achalasia patients. Thus, HRM is effective for assessing the severity of achalasia and can predict the efficacy of POEM.

  16. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  17. Prolonged-Release Oxycodone/Naloxone Improves Anal Sphincter Relaxation Compared to Oxycodone Plus Macrogol 3350

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Brock, Christina; Grønlund, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    /naloxone or PR oxycodone plus macrogol 3350. Resting anal pressure, anal canal distensibility, and relaxation of the internal sphincter to rectal distension were evaluated before treatment (baseline) and on day 5. The Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptom (PAC-SYM) questionnaire, stool frequency, and stool...

  18. External anal sphincter atrophy on endoanal magnetic resonance imaging adversely affects continence after sphincteroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briel, J. W.; Stoker, J.; Rociu, E.; Laméris, J. S.; Hop, W. C.; Schouten, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    There is still considerable debate about the value of preoperative anorectal physiological parameters in predicting the clinical outcome after sphincteroplasty. Recently it has been reported that atrophy of the external anal sphincter can be clearly shown with endoanal magnetic resonance imaging

  19. Location of bladder and urethral sphincter motoneurons in the male guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R; Izhar, Z; Gerrits, PO; Miner, W; Holstege, G; Gerrits, Peter O.

    2004-01-01

    Although the guinea pig is used widely in experimental medical research, including in studies on micturition control, the spinal origin of preganglionic parasympathetic bladder and somatic external urethral sphincter motoneurons is not known. In the male, guinea pig using wheat germ

  20. Relation between flexor spasms, uninhibited detrusor contractions and anal sphincter activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, E; Petersen, T; Schrøder, H D

    1986-01-01

    The time relation between flexor spasms, detrusor contractions and anal sphincter activity was recorded in a consecutive series of 111 patients with hyperreflexic bladder and flexor spasms. In 76 of the patients flexor spasms were preceded by detrusor contractions. The opposite pattern, namely de...

  1. Artificial urinary sphincter erosion: the role of corticosteroids in an unusual presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Yap, Stanley A.; Stone, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroid use has proven beneficial for the management of many medical conditions. Unfortunately its anti-inflammatory properties also profoundly affect many aspects of wound healing. We present a case of an unusual presentation of an artificial urinary sphincter erosion in a patient treated with chronic high-dose steroids.

  2. Subtle lower esophageal sphincter relaxation abnormalities in patients with unexplained esophageal dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, T. V. K.; van Hoeij, F. B.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a relatively common symptom. We aimed to evaluate whether subtle, presently not acknowledged forms of dysfunction of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could explain dysphagia in a subset of patients with normal findings at high-resolution manometry (HRM) according to the

  3. Acid-secreting rectal duplication cyst with associated peptic ulcer eroding through the anal sphincters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R J; Charlton, F G; Jaffray, B

    2002-11-01

    A rectal duplication cyst with heterotopic gastric mucosa that resulted in a trans-sphincteric peptic ulcer on the opposite wall of the anus of a child is described. The management and outcome and a review of the literature is presented. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  4. Sphincter preservation in distal CT2N0 rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserberg, Nir; Kundel, Yulia; Purim, Ofer; Keidar, Andrei; Kashtan, Hanoch; Sadot, Eran; Fenig, Eyal; Brenner, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is usually not indicated for cT2N0 rectal cancer. Abdominoperineal resection is the standard treatment for distal rectal tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the actual sphincter-preservation rate in patients with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer given neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Data were retrospectively collected for all patients who were diagnosed with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center in 2000–2008 and received chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (5–7 weeks later). Thirty-three patients (22 male) of median age 65 years (range, 32–88) were identified. Tumor distance from the anal verge ranged from 0 to 5 cm. R0 resection with sphincter preservation was accomplished in 22 patients (66%), with a 22% pathological complete response rate. Median follow-up time was 62 months (range 7–120). There were no local failures. Crude disease-free and overall survival were 82% and 86%, respectively. Factors associated with sphincter preservation were tumor location (OR = 0.58, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.37-0.91) and pathological downstaging (OR = 7.8, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 1.35-45.85). Chemoradiotherapy was well tolerated. High rates of sphincter preservation can be achieved after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for distal cT2N0 rectal cancer, with tolerable toxicity, without compromising oncological outcome

  5. Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Low Rectal Cancers: Incidence and Risk Factors for Permanent Stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Joanna Chung Kiu; Foo, Dominic Chi Chung; Wei, Rockson; Law, Wai Lun

    2017-11-01

    Advances in surgical techniques and paradigm changes in rectal cancer treatment have led to a drastic decline in the abdominoperineal resection rate, and sphincter-preserving operation is possible in distal rectal cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term incidence of permanent stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for low rectal cancer and its corresponding risk factors. From 2000 to 2014, patients who underwent sphincter-preserving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer (within 5 cm from the anal verge) were included. The occurrence of permanent stoma over time and its risk factors were investigated by using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. This study included 194 patients who underwent ultra-low anterior resection for distal rectal cancer, and the median follow-up period was 77 months for the surviving patients. Forty-six (23.7%) patients required a permanent stoma eventfully. Anastomotic-related complications and disease progression were the main reasons for permanent stoma. Clinical anastomotic leakage (HR 5.72; 95% CI 2.31-14.12; p consideration when contemplating sphincter-preserving surgery.

  6. Endosonographic and manometric assessment of the anal sphincters after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudol-Szopinska, I.; Jakubowski, W.; Ciesielski, A.; Bielecki, K.; Baczuk, L.; Tarnowski, W.

    2003-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to compare endosonography and manometry of the anal sphincters in patients after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). Patients and methods. Ten patients aged between 23 and 50 years with IPAA performed for ulcerative colitis were examined with anal endosonography (AES) and manometry. Results. AES visualised abnormal image of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) in 9 patients (90%). Defects of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and puborectalis muscle (PR) were shown in 4 patients (40%). In 5 patients (50%) correlation between endosonographic and manometric assessment for the all analysed muscles: IAS, EAS and PR was found. In 4 cases (40%) both methods correlated with the evaluation of the EAS only and in 1 patient (10%) no correlation was found. Correlation between both methods for the IAS was found in half of the patients (50%) while in the evaluation of the EAS and PR dynamic activity, it was found in 9 cases (90%). Conclusions. Anal endosonography and manometry allow us to assess the morphology as well as the function of the anal sphincters in patients with IPAA. The methods mentioned above show high correlation in the assessment of the EAS function (9 cases; 90%) whereas in the case of IAS, manometry frequently (5 patients; 50%) does not confirm endosonografically detected defects. (author)

  7. Muscle-Derived Cells for Treatment of Iatrogenic Sphincter Damage and Urinary Incontinence in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gerullis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of injection of autologous muscle-derived cells into the urinary sphincter for treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence in men and to characterize the injected cells prior to transplantation. Methods. 222 male patients with stress urinary incontinence and sphincter damage after uroloical procedures were treated with transurethral injection of autologous muscle-derived cells. The transplanted cells were investigated after cultivation and prior to application by immunocytochemistry using different markers of myogenic differentiation. Feasibility and functionality assessment was achieved with a follow-up of at least 12 months. Results. Follow-up was at least 12 months. Of the 222 treated patients, 120 responded to therapy of whom 26 patients (12% were continent, and 94 patients (42% showed improvement. In 102 (46% patients, the therapy was ineffective. Clinical improvement was observed on average 4.7 months after transplantation and continued in all improved patients. The cells injected into the sphincter were at least ~50% of myogenic origin and representative for early stages of muscle cell differentiation. Conclusions. Transurethral injection of muscle-derived cells into the damaged urethral sphincter of male patients is a safe procedure. Transplanted cells represent different phases of myogenic differentiation.

  8. Le sphincter artificiel urinaire chez l'homme a propos de 23 cas The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Routine investigations included urine analysis, assessment of a possible concomitant inflammation or infection, urethroscopy and a urodynamic work-up. Pelvic floor training was done in all cases, while macroplastique was administered in 15 cases only. Finally, an artificial sphincter was placed in periurethral position in all ...

  9. Endoanal MRI of the anal sphincter complex: correlation with cross-sectional anatomy and histology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, S. M.; Stoker, J.; Zwamborn, A. W.; den Hollander, J. C.; Kuiper, J. W.; Entius, C. A.; Laméris, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate the in vivo endoanal MRI findings of the anal sphincter with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Fourteen patients with rectal tumours were examined with a rigid endoanal MR coil before undergoing abdominoperineal resection. In addition, 12 cadavers

  10. Endoanal MRI of the anal sphincter complex: correlation with cross-sectional anatomy and histology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Hussain (Shahid); J. Stoker (Jacob); A.W. Zwamborn; J.C. den Hollander (Jan); J.-W. Kuiper (Jan-Willem); C.A. Entius; J.S. Lameris

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to correlate the in vivo endoanal MRI findings of the anal sphincter with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Fourteen patients with rectal tumours were examined with a rigid endoanal MR coil before undergoing

  11. Objective definition and detection of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation revisited: is there room for improvement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holloway, R. H.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.; Penagini, R.; Sifrm, D. A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The advent of drugs that inhibit transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR) necessitates accurate identification and scoring. We assessed the intra-and inter-assessor variability of the existing objective criteria for TLESR, improving them where necessary. Methods Two 3-h

  12. Orthognathic Consequences of Sphincter Pharyngoplasty in Cleft Patients: A 2-Institutional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikane, Frances; Lai, Li Han; Hui, Brian K.; Martins, Deborah B.; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S.; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P.; Wilson, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding long-term sequelae of cleft treatment is paramount in the refinement of treatment algorithms to accomplish optimized immediate and long-term outcomes. In this study, we reviewed sphincter pharyngoplasties as a method of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) treatment in relationship to orthognathic surgery. Methods: Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients, 15 years of age and older, were reviewed for demographics, VPI surgery, revisions, and subsequent orthognathic surgery at 2 institutions. Chi-square test, Student’s t test, and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: In 214 patients reviewed (mean age, 19.5 years), 61.7% were male, 18.2% had isolated cleft palate, 61.2% had unilateral cleft lip and palate, and 20.6% had bilateral cleft lip and palate. A total of 33.6% were diagnosed with VPI and received a sphincter pharyngoplasty (mean age, 11.9 years). When subsequent orthognathic surgery was examined, sphincter pharyngoplasty was not associated with maxillary advancement (P = 0.59) but did correlate with an increase in mandibular surgery from 2.8% to 11.1% (P = 0.02). The indications for mandibular surgery in the pharyngoplasty population were related to congenital micrognathia. When cephalometric analyses were evaluated, sphincter pharyngoplasty resulted in a decreased sella-to-nasion-to-B point angle (mean, 79.0–76.3 degrees, P = 0.02) and a higher incidence of normal to class II maxillomandibular relationships as defined by A point-to-nasion-to-B point angles >0.5 (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Sphincter pharyngoplasty decreases anterior mandibular growth and the discrepancy between maxillomandibular skeletal relationships because of the frequent predisposition of cleft patients to maxillary hypoplasia. In patients with congenital mandibular micrognathia, a small increase in mandibular surgeries may occur. PMID:27200238

  13. Three-Dimensional Endoanal Ultrasound Features of the Anal Sphincter in Asian Primigravidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Dakshitha Praneeth; Senaratne, Supun; Senanayake, Hemantha; Samarasekera, Dharmabandu Nandadeva

    2018-04-17

    The normal parameters of 3-dimensional endoanal ultrasound (3DEAUS) of the anal sphincter have not been reported for primigravidae or pregnant women at present. 3DEAUS parameters in Asian primigravidae were assessed in this study. We analyzed 3DEAUS data of 101 consecutives Asian primigravidae, assessed in the early third trimester. The assessment was performed with a rigid ultrasonic probe (Olympus ® RU 12M-R1 probe and EU-ME1 ultrasound system (Olympus Corp., Shinjuku, Japan). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to detect the differences in pressure in different quadrants. The participants had a mean age of 24.7 (standard deviation [SD], 5.1) years. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all participants. The anal sphincter complex had 3 characteristic segments that were identifiable: upper, middle and lower. The puborectalis muscle was identified as a striated "V"-shaped sling, and its mean thickness was 7.44 (SD, 1.41) mm. The mean thickness of internal (IAS) and external (EAS) sphincters at the mid-sphincter level were 1.78 (SD, 0.59) and 5.49 (SD, 1.21) mm, respectively. The EAS measured 6.02 (SD, 1.07) mm at the lower sphincter level. The statistically significant differences seen in the in quadrants were: the IAS was thicker anteriorly (Z = -2.642; P = .008), the EAS at both midsphincter level (Z = -3.70; P IAS was thicker at the 9 o'clock position (Z = -2.081; P = .037). Good symmetry at all 3 levels was seen in the EAS (including the puborectalis muscle). Normal values of 3DEAUS for primigravidae have been identified and may serve as reference values for other laboratories. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  14. Morphologic changes of the anal sphincter musculature during and after temporary stool deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, M; Fein, M; Fuchs, K H; Bussen, D; Grun, C; Thiede, A

    2001-04-01

    Temporary stool deviation, using a stoma, is a well-known surgical principle to protect low colorectal or coloanal anastomoses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate any morphologic changes with regard to the anal sphincter muscles during and after temporary ileostomy. Forty-four patients with rectal carcinomas were studied prospectively. All patients underwent low anterior resection. Reconstruction was performed using either a coloanal pouch or a straight end-to-end anastomosis. A protective stoma was fashioned in all 44 patients (ileostomy n=41; colostomy n=3). Stoma closure was carried out after a median of 85 days (41-330 days). Using a standard protocol, anal-sphincter thickness [m. puborectalis, external anal sphincter (EAS) and internal anal (IAS) sphincter] was assessed by means of endoanal ultrasonography preoperatively, at the time of stoma closure, and every 3 months thereafter for 1 year. The diameter of the puborectal muscle decreased from a median preoperative value of 6.3 mm to 5.7 mm at the time of stoma closure (P=0.03). After 3 months, 6.2 mm was measured. This value remained stable for the complete follow-up period. Similar results were recorded for the EAS. The IAS thickness remained stable throughout the study period, measuring between 2.1 mm and 2.4 mm. Temporary stool deviation does lead to morphologic changes of the anal sphincter. While the smooth muscle remains unchanged, the striated counterpart undergoes atrophic transformation. However, after passage reconstruction, i.e., stoma closure, a rapid regeneration of the voluntary muscles is observed.

  15. Self-expandable metal stent placement in a child for treatment of achalasia after failed Heller myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugig, Roberto; Muñoz Jurado, Guillermo; Huang, Clifton; Oleas, Roberto; Robles-Medranda, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Background and study aims  Childhood achalasia treatment remains inconclusive. What is next after myotomy failure? Repeated pneumatic-dilation put patients at greater risk of perforation with possible symptom recurrence. We report on a 12-year-old patient with a 1-year history of achalasia whom underwent Heller myotomy with fundoplication and recurred with symptoms 1 week after surgery. Pneumatic dilatation was considered but not done because of the risk of esophageal perforation. The decision was made to place a fully covered self-expanding metallic stent (FC-SEMS) for 3 months, which resolved the stenosis as confirmed by esophagram. The patient has remained asymptomatic since the procedure was performed 2 years ago. FC-SEMS is an alternative for treatment of refractory achalasia in children who do not respond to conventional treatment.

  16. Impaired bolus clearance in combined high-resolution esophageal manometry and impedance measurement helps to differentiate between esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction and achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizer, Eugen; Seufferlein, Thomas; Hänle, Mark Martin

    2017-02-01

    Introduction and aims  High-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) has improved the diagnostic work-up of esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous evaluation of bolus clearance delivers useful information about the function of tubular esophagus. We assessed bolus clearance in a combined HRM-impedance examination for esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (EGJOO) in comparison to achalasia patients. The collected data were assessed in a retrospective analysis. Patients and methods  After gastroscopy excluded a mechanical esophageal or gastric obstruction, 142 consecutive patients underwent combined HRM-impedance examination. The assessment and interpretation of the manometry results were done according to the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders v3.0. After classifying the motility disorder, the evaluation of bolus clearance was done according to published studies. Results  All patients with achalasia (n = 24) showed a significantly impaired bolus clearance (achalasia cases. This might be helpful as an additional tool to differentiate between achalasia and EGJOO patients. Furthermore, the role of the combined impedance-HRM investigation for early diagnosis of achalasia in "pre-achalasia" condition or in evaluation of potential progress of EGJOO to achalasia should be evaluated in a prospective study. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure and increases frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Akash; Meshram, Megha; Gopan, Amrit; Ganjewar, Vaibhav; Kumar, Praveen; Bhatia, Shobna J

    2012-06-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (tLESR) and decreased basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure are postulated mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). There is conflicting evidence on the effect of carbonated drinks on lower esophageal sphincter function. This study was conducted to assess the effect of a carbonated beverage on tLESR and LES pressure. High resolution manometry tracings (16 channel water-perfused, Trace 1.2, Hebbard, Australia) were obtained in 18 healthy volunteers (6 men) for 30 min each at baseline, and after 200 mL of chilled potable water and 200 mL of chilled carbonated cola drink (Pepsi [Pepsico India Ltd]). The sequence of administration of the drinks was determined by random number method generated by a computer. The analysis of tracings was done using TRACE 1.2 software by a physician who was unaware of the sequence of administration of fluids. The mean (SD) age of the participant was 37.3 (12.9) years. The median (range) frequency of tLESr was higher after the carbonated beverage (10.5 [0-26]) as compared to baseline (0 [0-3], p = 0.005) as well as after water (1 [0-14], p = 0.010). The LES pressure decreased after ingestion of the carbonated beverage (18.5 [11-37] mmHg) compared to baseline (40.5 [25-66] mmHg, p = 0.0001) and after water (34 [15-67] mmHg, p = 0.003). Gastric pressure was not different in the three groups. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage increases tLESr and lowers LES pressure in healthy subjects.

  18. Characterization of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter, and gallbladder in patients with sphincter of Oddi spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Gerbail T; Krishnamurthy, Shakuntala; Watson, Randy D

    2004-01-01

    The major objectives of this project were to establish the pattern of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous administration of cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter of Oddi, and gallbladder, and to identify reliable parameters for the diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS). Eight women with clinically suspected sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS group), ten control subjects (control group), and ten patients who had recently received an opioid (opioid group) were selected for quantitative cholescintigraphy with cholecystokinin. Each patient was studied with 111-185 MBq (3-5 mCi) technetium-99m mebrofenin after 6-8 h of fasting. Hepatic phase images were obtained for 60 min, followed by gallbladder phase images for 30 min. During the gallbladder phase, 10 ng/kg octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK-8) was infused over 3 min through an infusion pump. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, basal hepatic bile flow into the gallbladder, gallbladder ejection fraction, and post-CCK-8 paradoxical filling (>30% of basal counts) were identified. Seven of the patients with SOS were treated with antispasmodics (calcium channel blockers), and one underwent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Mean (+/-SD) hepatic bile entry into the gallbladder (versus GI tract) was widely variable: it was lower in SOS patients (32%+/-31%) than in controls (61%+/-36%) and the opioid group (61%+/-25%), but the difference was not statistically significant. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, and pattern of bile flow through both intrahepatic and extrahepatic ducts were normal in all three groups. Gallbladder mean ejection fraction was 9%+/-4% in the opioid group; this was significantly lower (Pgallbladder refluxed into intrahepatic ducts; it reentered the gallbladder after cessation of CCK-8 infusion (paradoxical gallbladder filling) in all eight patients with SOS, but in none of the patients in the other two groups. Mean paradoxical filling was 204% (+/-193%) in the

  19. Outcome of Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) for Treating Achalasia Compared With Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy (LHM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lijun; Tian, Shuni; Du, Chao; Yuan, Ziying; Guo, Mingxiao; Lu, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an emerging endoscopic treatment for achalasia and the long-term efficacy of POEM remains to be evaluated. This study compared the outcomes of POEM with that of the standard laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) for achalasia. Achalasia patients treated by POEM or LHM were retrospectively analyzed, with a minimum postoperative follow-up of 3 years. Perioperative outcomes and long-term outcomes including treatment success (Eckardt score ≤3), occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (GerdQ score ≥9) and quality of life (36-item short form) were compared. Thirteen patients who underwent POEM were compared with 18 patients who received LHM. These patients were similar in age, sex, symptoms duration, Eckardt score, and previous therapy (all P>0.05). Mean myotomy lengths were similar (P=0.73). Operation time was shorter in the POEM group (P=0.001). One patient (7.7%) developed pneumothorax after POEM and 1 patient (5.6%) experienced postoperative infection after LHM (P=1.00). Treatment success was achieved in 83.3% (9/12) of POEM patients and 80.0% (12/15) of LHM patients (P=1.00). Both POEM and LHM significantly reduced Eckardt score (both P=0.00). GERD rate was similar (8.3% vs. 6.7%, P=1.00). There was no difference in all aspects of quality of life between the 2 groups. Long-term outcomes indicate that POEM is an effective treatment that is comparable with LHM. More data of randomized trials comparing POEM with LHM will enrich the existing evidence.

  20. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy for achalasia: changing trend toward "true" day-case procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sanjay; Super, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Laparoscopic Heller myotomy is the most effective therapy for achalasia. All case series have reported a minimum length of stay of more than 1 day. "True" day-case laparoscopic Heller myotomy has not been reported, so far. The aim of this study was to review our results with laparoscopic Heller myotomy with respect to the length of stay following the procedure. All patients undergoing laparoscopic Heller myotomy between August 2000 and July 2007 under the care of one surgeon were included in the study. This was performed by incising 6 cm of distal esophageal musculature, extending to 2 cm below the gastroesophageal junction. The myotomy was covered by an anterior fundoplication. All patients were reviewed in the clinic at a median of 6 weeks after surgery and, thereafter, if necessary. Over the 7-year period, 24 consecutive patients with achalasia were treated in this manner. There were 13 women and 11 men, with an age range of 12-73 years. Intraoperative complications included mucosal perforation in 2 patients (sutured immediately) with no postoperative complications or conversion to open surgery. There were no deaths. The average length of stay was 1.9 days (range, 0-4). The last 2 patients were discharged on the same day, and the 5 previous to this were discharged within 23 hours of surgery. There were no adverse outcomes related to early discharge, and there were no readmissions. All patients reported good to excellent results with a relief of dysphagia on follow-up. Three patients (12%) developed recurrent dysphagia after an initial improvement, requiring dilatation only several months later. Based on our own experience, we believe that laparoscopic Heller myotomy with anterior partial fundoplication is safe and achieves a good outcome in the treatment of achalasia. It is well tolerated and can be considered a true day-case procedure.

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treatment of Achalasia After Failed Heller Myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Inoue, Haruhiro; Ujiki, Michael B; Patel, Lava Y; Bapaye, Amol; Desai, Pankaj N; Dorwat, Shivangi; Nakamura, Jun; Hata, Yoshitaka; Balassone, Valerio; Onimaru, Manabu; Ponchon, Thierry; Pioche, Mathieu; Roman, Sabine; Rivory, Jérôme; Mion, François; Garros, Aurélien; Draganov, Peter V; Perbtani, Yaseen; Abbas, Ali; Pannu, Davinderbir; Yang, Dennis; Perretta, Silvana; Romanelli, John; Desilets, David; Hayee, Bu; Haji, Amyn; Hajiyeva, Gulara; Ismail, Amr; Chen, Yen-I; Bukhari, Majidah; Haito-Chavez, Yamile; Kumbhari, Vivek; Saxena, Payal; Talbot, Michael; Chiu, Philip Wai-Yan; Yip, Hon-Chi; Wong, Vivien Wai-Yin; Hernaez, Ruben; Maselli, Roberta; Repici, Alessandro; Khashab, Mouen A

    2017-10-01

    In patients with persistent symptoms after Heller myotomy (HM), treatment options include repeat HM, pneumatic dilation, or peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). We evaluated the efficacy and safety of POEM in patients with achalasia with prior HM vs without prior HM. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 180 patients with achalasia who underwent POEM at 13 tertiary centers worldwide, from December 2009 through September 2015. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those with prior HM (HM group, exposure; n = 90) and those without prior HM (non-HM group; n = 90). Clinical response was defined by a decrease in Eckardt scores to 3 or less. Adverse events were graded according to criteria set by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Technical success, clinical success, and rates of adverse events were compared between groups. Patients were followed up for a median of 8.5 months. POEM was technically successful in 98% of patients in the HM group and in 100% of patients in the non-HM group (P = .49). A significantly lower proportion of patients in the HM group had a clinical response to POEM (81%) than in the non-HM group (94%; P = .01). There were no significant differences in rates of adverse events between the groups (8% in the HM group vs 13% in the non-HM group; P = .23). Symptomatic reflux and reflux esophagitis after POEM were comparable between groups. POEM is safe and effective for patients with achalasia who were not treated successfully by prior HM. Although the rate of clinical success in patients with prior HM is lower than in those without prior HM, the safety profile of POEM is comparable between groups. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Per-Oral Endoscopic Myotomy Versus Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy for Achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Hongjuan; Chen, Xingdong; Liu, Lan; Wang, Hongbo; Liu, Bin; Guo, Jianqiang; Jia, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to assess the short-term outcomes of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) compared with laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) for achalasia through a meta-analysis of nonrandomized comparative studies. We searched PubMed, Embase, Medline, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar for studies that compared POEM and LHM for achalasia and were published between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2014. The Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies (MINORS) was used to evaluate the quality of the studies. Random- and fixed-effects meta-analytical models were used, and between-study heterogeneity was assessed. Four nonrandomized comparative studies that included 317 patients (125 in the POEM group and 192 in the LHM group) met our research criteria and were assessed. There were no differences between the POEM and LHM groups in terms of sex, preoperative Eckhart score, length of myotomy, operation time, length of hospital stay, and complications. The patients in the POEM group were older than those in the LHM group (MD =2.81, 95% CI 0.27–5.35; P = 0.03) with high between-study homogeneity (χ2 = 1.96, df = 2, I2 = 0%; P = 0.38). The patients in the POEM group had a lower Eckardt score after surgery compared with those in the LHM group (MD = −0.30, 95% CI −0.42 to −0.18; P < 0.001) with high between-study homogeneity (χ2 = 0.00, df = 1, I2 = 0%; P = 1.00). The efficacy and safety of POEM appear to be comparable to those of LHM. Multicenter and randomized trials with larger sample size are needed to further compare the efficacy and safety of POEM and LHM for the treatment of achalasia. PMID:26871816

  3. Laparoscopic heller myotomy for achalasia cardia-initial experience in a teaching institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaman, Lileswar; Iqbal, Javid; Kochhar, Rakesh; Sinha, Saroj

    2013-10-01

    Laparoscopic Heller cardiomyotomy and Dor fundoplication is the surgical procedure of choice for esophageal achalasia. The aim of our study was to investigate the clinical outcome and safety of laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure performed by using Hook electrocautery and as a teaching module for advanced laparoscopic surgery. Between January 2005 and December 2010, 25 consecutive patients with achalasia underwent laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation by a single surgeon. All the patients received upper gastrointestinal series (barium swallow), esophagogastroscopy, and esophageal manometry to exclude esophageal carcinoma and to confirm the diagnosis. All the patients were operated by laparoscopic modified Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication by using hook electrocautery. Among 25 operated patients, 14 were male and 11 were female with a median age of 43 years (range 18-72 years). The mean operative time was 93.3 min (range 50-50 min), the mean operative blood loss was 90 ml (range 40-200 ml), the median time to oral feeding was 2 days (2-4 days), and the median hospital stay was 4 days (4-7 days). There was no conversion to open surgery. Intraoperative mucosal perforation was encountered in three patients and was repaired in all of them by laparoscopic suture. All the patients had an uneventful recovery without postoperative complication and had excellent clinical response (96 %) during follow-up. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor operation using hook electrocautery is safe, inexpensive, and effective treatment for achalasia which is useful for teaching and training surgical residents in advanced laparoscopic surgery.

  4. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy can be used as primary therapy for esophageal achalasia regardless of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Renato; Costantini, Mario; Cavallin, Francesco; Zanatta, Lisa; Finotti, Elena; Longo, Cristina; Nicoletti, Loredana; Capovilla, Giovanni; Bardini, Romeo; Zaninotto, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic Heller-Dor surgery is the current treatment of choice for patients with esophageal achalasia, but elderly patients are generally referred for less invasive treatments (pneumatic dilations or botulinum toxin injections). To assess the effect of age on the surgical outcome of patients receiving laparoscopic Heller-Dor as primary treatment. Demographic and clinical findings were prospectively collected on patients undergoing laparoscopic Heller-Dor from 1992 to 2012. Patients were classified in three age brackets: group A (≤45 years), group B (45-70), and group C (≥70). Treatment was defined as a failure if the postoperative symptom score was >10th percentile of the preoperative score (i.e., >8). We consecutively performed the Heller-Dor in 571 achalasia patients, 305 (53.4 %) in group A, 226 (39.6 %) in group B, and 40 (7 %) in group C. The mortality was nil; the conversion and morbidity rates were both 1.1 %. Group C patients had higher preoperative symptom scores (p = 0.02), while the symptom duration was similar in all three groups. Mucosal tears occurred in 17 patients (3 %): 6 (2 %) in group A, 8 (3.5 %) in group B, and 3 (7.5 %) in group C (p = 0.09). The postoperative hospital stay was slightly longer for group C (p = 0.06). The treatment failure rate was quite similar: 31 failures in group A (10.1 %), 19 in group B (8.4 %), and 3 in group C (7.5 %; p = 0.80). These failures were seen more in manometric pattern III (22.2 %, p = 0.002). Laparoscopic Heller-Dor can be used as the first therapeutic approach to achalasia even in elderly patients with an acceptable surgical risk.

  5. Clinical outcome of pneumatic dilatation in patients with achalasia cardia: A single-center prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Hanmant Shejal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Pneumatic balloon dilation is one of the most commonly used and effective methods for treating patients with achalasia cardia. This study was performed to assess immediate and long-term response of pneumatic dilatation (PD in these patients. Materials and Methods: Forty-four achalasia cardia patients, who underwent PD in our center from January 2013 to December 2015, were prospectively studied. Data from these patients were analyzed for clinical improvement in symptoms after dilatation procedure over this period as per Eckardt score. Patients who required repeated procedure and factors influencing remission of symptoms were analyzed. Results: A total of 44 patients underwent PD, among which three lost to follow up. Of the 41 patients, 21 were male (51.22% and 20 were females (48.78%. Mean age was 38.68 (13–64 years. Median symptom duration before first dilatation was 18 months (2–240. Major symptoms at presentation were dysphagia (n = 41, 100%, regurgitation (n = 38 92.68%, chest pain (n = 31, 75.6%, and weight loss (n = 20, 48.78%. Mean follow-up period was 22.22 months (9–38. Forty (97.56% patients had immediate clinical improvement after 1 dilatation, of which 38 (92.68% patients did not require any further treatment. Mean Eckardt score was 6.82 (4–11 at the time of first dilatation which improved to 0.66 during follow-up. Two patients required second dilatation (one 5 months and other 18 months after the first procedure. Conclusion: PD is a safe and effective long-term therapy for achalasia cardia and has a good long-term clinical remission.

  6. Has the Introduction of Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy Altered the Treatment Paradigm of Achalasia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo E Ferri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surgical myotomy is well established as the most effective and durable treatment for achalasia, wide acceptance of this procedure as a first-line treatment has been hampered by perceived invasiveness and morbidity. Laparoscopic myotomy has significantly reduced surgical trauma and morbidity while maintaining effectiveness. The effect of laparoscopic myotomy on the treatment pattern for achalasia is not currently known. All patients undergoing surgical myotomy in Quebec from 1997 to 2002 were identified from the Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec billing database; previous endoscopic treatment was documented from 1990 to the time of surgery. Patients were divided into two groups (prelaparoscopy and postlaparoscopy defined by the approximate date when laparoscopic myotomy became generally available in Quebec. A questionnaire examining treatment preference for achalasia was sent to all Quebec gastroenterologists. The number of myotomies performed in Quebec remained stable (prelaparoscopy = 28.7/year; postlaparoscopy = 33/year, but were performed on an older population. The rate of preoperative endoscopic treatment did not differ from prelaparoscopy (29.2% to postlaparoscopy (23.3%. However, the time interval between the last endoscopy and myotomy diminished significantly. Questionnaire response rate was 41% (60 of 147. Although myotomy was recognized as the most effective treatment (54 of 60, only 22 of 60 gastroenterologists would refer a healthy patient for myotomy as initial treatment. Other choices included dilation (33 of 60, Botulinum toxin (two of 60 or calcium channel blockade (three of 60. Despite a decrease in time interval between endoscopic treatment and surgery, no decrease in the rate of existing endoscopic therapies occurred after laparoscopic myotomy became widely available. The benefits and minimal risks associated with laparoscopic myotomy need to be more effectively communicated by referring physicians.

  7. Achalasia of the cardia: experience with hydrostatic balloon dilatation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Sajwany, Mohammed Jaffer [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Royal Hospital, Muscat (Oman); Fataar, Shadley [Department of Radiology, Royal Hospital, Muscat (Oman)

    2002-06-01

    Background: Achalasia is a disorder of oesophageal motility and is rare in children. The mainstay of therapy has been surgery with its attendant complications and long postoperative stay. Treatment by hydrostatic balloon dilatation, a less morbid procedure, has not found much favour. Objective: To review the overall efficacy of balloon dilatation for the treatment of achalasia in children and to highlight the high incidence of non-syndromic familial cases in Oman. Materials and methods: This is a retrospective study of all patients (n=12) with achalasia treated with balloon dilatation at the Royal Hospital, Muscat, from 1991 to 1999. The diagnosis was established with a barium oesophagogram. Dilatation was performed under general anaesthesia. On follow-up, the weight and recurrence of symptoms were recorded. Investigations were done only if the patients were symptomatic on follow-up. Recurrence was treated with further dilatation. Results: Of the 12 patients, 10 had excellent alleviation of symptoms. Two patients developed recurrence of symptoms which responded favourably to further dilatation. The average length of postoperative stay in the hospital was 2 days. Of these 12 patients, there were 3 sets of siblings who did not have any other syndromic associations. This group also showed very good prognosis. The mean follow-up period was 3.5 years for all patients. Conclusions: The results of balloon dilatation were very satisfactory. We also recommend this procedure when there is recurrence of symptoms. It has lower morbidity than surgery and hospital stay is shorter. Furthermore, we have a high rate of non-syndromic familial cases, all with a favourable outcome. (orig.)

  8. Achalasia of the cardia: experience with hydrostatic balloon dilatation in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Sajwany, Mohammed Jaffer; Fataar, Shadley

    2002-01-01

    Background: Achalasia is a disorder of oesophageal motility and is rare in children. The mainstay of therapy has been surgery with its attendant complications and long postoperative stay. Treatment by hydrostatic balloon dilatation, a less morbid procedure, has not found much favour. Objective: To review the overall efficacy of balloon dilatation for the treatment of achalasia in children and to highlight the high incidence of non-syndromic familial cases in Oman. Materials and methods: This is a retrospective study of all patients (n=12) with achalasia treated with balloon dilatation at the Royal Hospital, Muscat, from 1991 to 1999. The diagnosis was established with a barium oesophagogram. Dilatation was performed under general anaesthesia. On follow-up, the weight and recurrence of symptoms were recorded. Investigations were done only if the patients were symptomatic on follow-up. Recurrence was treated with further dilatation. Results: Of the 12 patients, 10 had excellent alleviation of symptoms. Two patients developed recurrence of symptoms which responded favourably to further dilatation. The average length of postoperative stay in the hospital was 2 days. Of these 12 patients, there were 3 sets of siblings who did not have any other syndromic associations. This group also showed very good prognosis. The mean follow-up period was 3.5 years for all patients. Conclusions: The results of balloon dilatation were very satisfactory. We also recommend this procedure when there is recurrence of symptoms. It has lower morbidity than surgery and hospital stay is shorter. Furthermore, we have a high rate of non-syndromic familial cases, all with a favourable outcome. (orig.)

  9. Laparoendoscopic single-site Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication for achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Linda; Ross, Sharona; Dahal, Sujat; Morton, Connor; Okpaleke, Chinyere; Rosas, Melissa; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2011-06-01

    Laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery is beginning to include advanced laparoscopic operations such as Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication. However, the efficacy of LESS Heller myotomy has not been established. This study aimed to evaluate the authors' initial experience with LESS Heller myotomy for achalasia. Transumbilical LESS Heller myotomy with concomitant anterior fundoplication for achalasia was undertaken for 66 patients after October 2007. Outcomes including operative time, complications, and length of hospital stay were recorded and compared with those for an earlier contiguous group of 66 consecutive patients undergoing conventional multi-incision laparoscopic Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication. Symptoms before and after myotomy were scored by the patients using a Likert scale ranging from 0 (never/not severe) to 10 (always/very severe). Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test, the Wilcoxon matched-pairs test, and Fisher's exact test where appropriate. Patients undergoing LESS Heller myotomy were similar to those undergoing conventional laparoscopic Heller myotomy in gender, age, body mass index (BMI), blood loss, and length of hospital stay. However, the patients undergoing LESS Heller myotomies had operations of significantly longer duration (median, 117 vs. 93 min with the conventional laparoscopic approach) (pHeller myotomy, additional ports/incisions were required. No patients were converted to "open" operations, and no patients had procedure-specific complications. Symptom reduction was dramatic and satisfying after both LESS and conventional laparoscopic myotomy with fundoplication. The symptom reduction was similar with the two procedures. The LESS approach left no apparent umbilical scar. Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication effectively treats achalasia. The findings showed LESS Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication to be feasible, safe, and efficacious. Although the LESS approach increases operative

  10. Correlation between Timed Barium Esophagogram and the Eckardt Stage in Achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waraporn Boonsomjint, M.D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the correlation of timed barium esophagogram (TBE parameters and the Eckardt stage in patients with achalasia. Methods: This prospective study was done in 29 adult achalasia patients who underwent TBE and were assessed for clinical symptoms according to the Eckardt stage. The association between the Eckardt stage and TBE parameters including the height and the width of barium column, esophageal emptying between 1 and 5 minutes, which was calculated by comparing the area of barium column and esophageal emptying between 0 and 5 minutes, which was calculated from the relative changes in ingested volume to estimated volume of barium column on the 5-min image and this was calculated by using Kruskal-Wallis test. Comparison of mean emptied volume at 1 min. image and mean emptied volume between 1 and 5 minutes was done by using paired samples t-tests. Results: There was a significant difference in the amount of emptied volume at 1 min image (mean = 118.27, SD = 31.1 and emptied volume between 1 min and 5 min images (mean = 11.41, SD = 9.4; t(27 =15.375, p < 0.001. Statistically significant difference in esophageal emptying between 1 and 5 minutes across the Eckardt stages was found (H=8.115, 3 d.f., p=0.044. The difference was statistically significant between the Eckardt stage 2 and 3 (p=0.039. There were no statistically significant differences in other TBE parameters across the Eckardt stages. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference in TBE parameters across the Eckardt stages was found in the present study. However, TBE is a useful objective method to assess esophageal emptying in patients with achalasia. Interpretation of TBE should be standardized. Calculation of esophageal emptying should include the amount of barium emptied from the esophagus in the first minute.

  11. Internal anal sphincter myopathy causing proctalgia fugax and constipation: further clinical and radiological characterization in a patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, R J; Kamm, M A; Martin, J E

    1997-02-01

    We report a case of a distinctive familial internal anal sphincter myopathy with unique histological and radiological features. A 67-year-old woman presented with a 20-year history of proctalgia fugax and outlet obstruction; other family members were similarly affected. Computed tomograpy and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a grossly hypertrophied internal anal sphincter. Strip myectomy of the sphincter was carried out with improvement in evacuation but little relief of proctalgia. Further relief of symptoms was obtained using oral and transdermal nitrates and a calcium antagonist. Histological examination of the excised muscle revealed hypertrophy and an abnormal arrangement of fibres in whorls; many fibres contained vacuoles with inclusion bodies positive for periodic acid-Schiff. This description of a specific anal sphincter myopathy illustrates the potential importance of histopathological studies of smooth muscle in functional disorders of the gut.

  12. The role of GABA(A) receptors in the control of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations in the dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, H.; Jönsson-Rylander, A.-C.; Carlsson, K.; Pierrou, S.; Ahlefelt, M.; Brändén, L.; Jensen, J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Lehmann, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are triggered by activation of mechanosensitive gastric vagal afferents and are the major cause of gastroesophageal reflux and therefore an important target for therapeutic intervention in gastroesophageal reflux

  13. Radioisotope monitoring of gastric emptying in patients with achalasia cardiae after surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dinh Ha; Szilvasi, J.

    1994-01-01

    Gastric emptying rate was measured by a gamma camera method using 99m Tc-DTPA in liquid from in patients after surgical treatment of achalasia. Gastric emptying was significantly slower in both groups of the patients (after Belsey-Mark and after modified Nissen technique as well) based on the T 1/2 value of the gastric time activity curve. The lag period was longer in patients after modified Nissen operation. This simple, noninvasive, physiologic method gives quantitative information on the gastric emptying, and is this recommended for follow-up of patients after gastroesophageal surgery. (N.T.). 6 refs., 2 figs

  14. Dynamic, diagnostic, and pharmacological radionuclide studies of the esophagus in achalasia: correlation with manometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozen, P.; Gelfond, M.; Zaltzman, S.; Baron, J.; Gilat, T.

    1982-08-01

    The esophagus was evaluated in 15 patients with achalasia by continuous gamma camera imaging following ingestion of a semi-solid meal labeled with /sup 99//sup m/Tc. The images were displayed and recorded on a simple computerized data processing/display system. Subsequent cine' mode images of esophagela emptying demonstrated abnormalities of the body of the esophagus not reflected by the manometric examination. Computer-generated time-activity curves representing specific regions of interest were better than manometry in evaluating the results of myotomy, dilatation, and drug therapy. Isosorbide dinitrate significantly improved esophageal emptying.

  15. Dynamic, diagnostic, and pharmacological radionuclide studies of the esophagus in achalasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozen, P.; Gelfond, M.; Zaltzman, S.; Baron, J.; Gilat, T.

    1982-08-01

    The esophagus was evaluated in 15 patients with achalasia by continuous gamma camera imaging following ingestion of a semi-solid meal labeled with /sup 99m/Tc. The images were displayed and recorded on a simple computerized data processing/display system. Subsequent cine mode images of esophageal emptying demonstrated abnormalities of the body of the esophagus not reflected by the manometric examination. Computer-generated time-activity curves representing specific regions of interest were better than manometry in evaluating the results of myotomy, dilatation, and drug therapy. Isosorbide dinitrate significantly improved esophageal emptying.

  16. Radioisotope monitoring of gastro-esophageal reflux in patients with achalasia cardiae after surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dinh Ha; Szilvasi, J.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a radioisotope method of the gastro-esophageal reflux are presented in patients with achalasia cardiae after different types of surgical treatment. Both Belsey-Mark and modified Nissen techniques are effective in preventing spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux, however 2 patients after Nissen fundoplication demonstrated gastro-esophageal reflux provoked by abdominal compression. This simple, noninvasive and physiologic method is an appropriate diagnostic tool for evaluating the efficiency of different anti reflux surgical techniques and is recommended for follow-up studies of patients after gastro-esophageal surgical intervention. (N.T.). 8 refs., 1 fig

  17. Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Akca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was

  18. A comparative study of various electrodes in electromyography of the striated urethral and anal sphincter in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Kristensen, E S; Qvist, N

    1985-01-01

    The series comprised 41 children aged 6 to 14 years consecutively referred with recurrent urinary tract infection and/or enuresis. Carbon dioxide cystometry was carried out in the supine and the erect position and combined with simultaneous electromyography (EMG). The external urethral sphincter ....... Correlation between them was good, as was reproducibility. Perianal surface ECG electrodes are recommended for the evaluation of functional disturbances of the external sphincter. They are painless, easy to use, and are well tolerated by the patient....

  19. Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Contributes to Tone Generation in Porcine Lower Esophageal Sphincter Via Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger

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    Xiaopeng Bai

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Endogenous H2S regulates the LES myogenic tone by maintaining the basal [Ca2+]i via Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. H2S-generating enzymes may be a potential therapeutic target for esophageal motility disorders, such as achalasia.

  20. Electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter system*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Peng; Yang, Bang-hua; Shao, Yong; Yan, Guo-zheng; Liu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter. The coupling coils and human tissues, including the skin, fat, muscle, liver, and blood, were considered. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by a finite-length solenoid model. First, SAR and current density as a function of frequency (10–107 Hz) for an emission current of 1.5 A were calculated under different tissue thickness. Then relations between SAR, current density, and five types of tissues under each frequency were deduced. As a result, both the SAR and current density were below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The results show that the analysis of these data is very important for developing the artificial anal sphincter system. PMID:21121071