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Sample records for creek ranch fy

  1. Pine Creek Ranch, FY 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Mark E.

    2001-11-01

    Pine Creek Ranch was purchased in 1999 by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs using Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation funds. The 25,000 acre property will be managed in perpetuity for the benefit of fish and wildlife habitat. Major issues include: (1) Restoring quality spawning and rearing habitat for stealhead. Streams are incised and fish passage barriers exist from culverts and possibly beaver dams. In addition to stealhead habitat, the Tribes are interested in overall riparian recovery in the John Day River system for wildlife habitat, watershed values and other values such as recreation. (2) Future grazing for specific management purposes. Past grazing practices undoubtedly contributed to current unacceptable conditions. The main stem of Pine Creek has already been enrolled in the CREP program administered by the USDA, Natural Resource Conservation Service in part because of the cost-share for vegetation restoration in a buffer portion of old fields and in part because of rental fees that will help the Tribes to pay the property taxes. Grazing is not allowed in the riparian buffer for the term of the contract. (3) Noxious weeds are a major concern. (4) Encroachment by western juniper throughout the watershed is a potential concern for the hydrology of the creek. Mark Berry, Habitat Manager, for the Pine Creek Ranch requested the Team to address the following objectives: (1) Introduce some of the field staff and others to Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) assessments and concepts. (2) Do a PFC assessment on approximately 10 miles of Pine Creek. (3) Offer management recommendations. (4) Provide guidelines for monitoring.

  2. Pine Creek Ranch; Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Mark E.

    2003-02-01

    This report gives information about the following four objectives: OBJECTIVE 1--Gather scientific baseline information for monitoring purposes and to assist in the development of management plans for Pine Creek Ranch; OBJECTIVE 2--Complete and implement management plans; OBJECTIVE 3--Protect, manage and enhance the assets and resources of Pine Creek Ranch; and OBJECTIVE 4--Deliverables.

  3. Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

    2005-10-31

    The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all

  4. Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

    2006-01-01

    The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all

  5. Assessment of rangeland ecosystem conditions, Salt Creek watershed and Dugout Ranch, southeastern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.A.; Miller, M.E.; Belote, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, dry rangelands are being valued for multiple services beyond their traditional value as a forage production system. Additional ecosystem services include the potential to store carbon in the soil and plant biomass. In addition, dust emissions from rangelands might be considered an ecosystem detriment, the opposite of an ecosystem service. Dust emitted may have far-reaching impacts, for example, reduction of local air quality, as well as altering regional water supplies through effects on snowpack. Using an extensive rangeland monitoring dataset in the greater Canyonlands region (Utah, USA), we developed a method to estimate indices of the provisioning of three ecosystem services (forage production, dust retention, C storage) and one ecosystem property (nativeness), taking into account both ecosystem type and alternative states within that ecosystem type. We also integrated these four indices into a multifunctionality index. Comparing the currently ungrazed Canyonlands National Park watersheds to the adjacent Dugout Ranch pastures, we found clearly higher multifunctionality was attained in the Park, and that this was primarily driven by greater C-storage and better dust retention. It is unlikely to maximize all benefits and minimize all detriments at the same time. Some goods and services may have synergistic interactions; for example, managing for carbon storage will increase plant and biocrust cover likely lowering dust emission. Likewise, some may have antagonistic interactions. For instance, if carbon is consumed as biomass for livestock production, then carbon storage may be reduced. Ultimately our goal should be to quantify the monetary consequences of specific land use practices for multiple ecosystem services and determine the best land use and adaptive management practices for attaining multiple ecosystem services, minimizing economic detriments, and maximizing economic benefits from multi-commodity rangelands. Our technique is the first step

  6. Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical

  7. Campbell Creek Research Homes: FY2013 Annual Performance Report OCT.1, 2012 SEP. 30, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Lyne, Christopher T [ORNL; Odukomaiya, Wale O [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    packages. There are more than 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will be used to evaluate the impact of energy-efficiency upgrades on the envelope, mechanical equipment, and demand-response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short-term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the October 2012 through September 2013 (FY 2013) timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

  8. FY-1975 narrative report [including July-December, 1975]: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1975 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  9. Mercury Remediation Technology Development for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - FY 2016 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Johnbull O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, John G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Mehlhorn, Tonia L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Lowe, Kenneth Alan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Morris, Jesse G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Mayes, Melanie [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Johs, Alexander [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Mathews, Teresa J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); McManamay, Ryan A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); DeRolph, Christopher R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Poteat, Monica D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Olsen, Todd A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Eller, Virginia A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Gonez Rodriguez, Leroy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)

    2017-07-01

    Mercury remediation is a high priority for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM), especially at and near the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) where historical mercury use has resulted in contaminated buildings, soils, and downstream surface waters. To address mercury contamination of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC), the DOE has adopted a phased, adaptive management approach to remediation, which includes mercury treatment actions at Y-12 in the short-term and research and technology development (TD) to evaluate longer-term solutions in the downstream environment (US Department of Energy 2014).

  10. Mercury Remediation Technology Development for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - FY 2015 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Mathews, Teresa J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Mayes, Melanie [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Johs, Alexander [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Poteat, Monica D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Mehlhorn, Tonia [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Lester, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Morris, Jesse [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Lowe, Kenneth [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Dickson, Johnbull O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eller, Virginia [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeRolph, Christopher R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    2016-04-01

    Mercury remediation is a high priority for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM) because of large historical losses of mercury within buildings and to soils and surface waters at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Because of the extent of mercury losses and the complexities of mercury transport and fate in the downstream environment, the success of conventional options for mercury remediation in lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) is uncertain. A phased, adaptive management approach to remediation of surface water includes mercury treatment actions at Y-12 in the short-term and research and technology development (TD) to evaluate longer-term solutions in the downstream environment (US Department of Energy 2014b).

  11. FY94 site characterization and multilevel well installation at a west Bear Creek Valley research site on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moline, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Schreiber, M.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1996-03-01

    The goals of this project are to collect data that will assist in determining what constitutes a representative groundwater sample in fractured shale typical of much of the geology underlying the ORR waste disposal sites, and to determine how monitoring-well construction and sampling methods impact the representativeness of the sample. This report details the FY94 field activities at a research site in west Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). These activities funded by the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office through the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrologic and Geologic Studies (ORRHAGS) task, focus on developing appropriate sampling protocols for the type of fractured media that underlies many of the ORR waste disposal sites. Currently accepted protocols were developed for porous media and are likely to result in nonrepresentative samples in fractured systems.

  12. Ranching sustainability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce Larsen; William Tietje; Karl Striby

    2015-01-01

    California oak woodland creates a landscape of renowned beauty, providing the public with essential natural resource services and economic values through ranching. Ranchers however, come under intense pressure and scrutiny from the public to demonstrate stewardship of the land they manage. The solution often chosen to address these concerns is, simply, more regulations...

  13. Starr Ranch Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr Ranch Renewable Energy success story is the summary of a renewable energy study by U.S. EPA Region 6. This publication summarizes the analyses to determine appropriate renewable energy options in Starr Ranch.

  14. Late Cretaceous volcanism in south-central New Mexico: Conglomerates of the McRae and Love Ranch Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman-Fahey, J.L.; McMillan, N.J.; Mack, G.H.; Seager, W.R. (New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Evidence to support Late Cretaceous volcanism in south central New Mexico is restricted to a small area of 75-Ma-old andesitic rocks at Copper Flats near Hillsboro, and volcanic clasts in the McRae (Late Cretaceous/Paleocene ) and Love Ranch (Paleocene/Eocene). Formations located in the Jornada del Muerto basin east and northeast of the Caballo Mountains. Major and trace element data and petrographic analysis of 5 samples from Copper Flats lavas and 40 samples of volcanic clasts from the McRae and Love Ranch conglomerates will be used to reconstruct the Cretaceous volcanic field. The McRae Formation consists of two members: the lower Jose Creek and the upper Hall Lake. The lowermost Love Ranch Formation is unconformable in all places on the Hall Lake Member. Stratigraphic variations in clast composition from volcanic rocks in the lower Love Ranch Formation to Paleozoic and Precambrian clasts in the upper Love Ranch Formation reflect the progressive unroofing of the Laramide Rio Grande Uplift. Volcanic clasts in the McRae and Love Ranch Formations were derived from the west and south of the depositional basin, but the source area for McRae clasts is less well constrained. Stratigraphic, chemical, and petrographic data will be used to reconstruct the volcanic complex and more clearly define magma genesis and metasomatism associated with Laramide deformation.

  15. Acorns - Spears and Didion Ranches [ds322

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These data are the characteristics and acorn counts from 2005 of individual live oak trees found in 0.05-ha circular habitat plots at Spears and Didion Ranches,...

  16. 78 FR 70259 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of Tribal Relations, USDA. ACTION: Notice... American Farming and Ranching (CNAFR) a public advisory committee of the Office of Tribal Relations (OTR... farming and ranching opportunities created through the farm loan program through enhanced extension and...

  17. 78 FR 49444 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of Tribal Relations... Council for Native American Farming and Ranching (CNAFR) a public advisory committee of the Office of... maximizing the number of new farming and ranching opportunities created through the farm loan program through...

  18. 78 FR 23206 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of Tribal Relations, USDA. ACTION: Notice... American Farming and Ranching (CNAFR) a public advisory committee of the Office of Tribal Relations (OTR... farming and ranching opportunities created through the farm loan program through enhanced extension and...

  19. 77 FR 43571 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of Tribal Relations... Council for Native American Farming and Ranching (CNAFR) a public advisory committee of the Office of... ranchers; (3) to examine methods of maximizing the number of new farming and ranching opportunities created...

  20. 77 FR 71396 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of Tribal Relations Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY... forthcoming meeting of The Council for Native American Farming and Ranching (CNAFR) a public advisory... ranchers; (3) to examine methods of maximizing the number of new farming and ranching opportunities created...

  1. Ranch business planning and resource monitoring for rangeland sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristie A. Maczko; John A. Tanaka; Michael Smith; Cindy Garretson-Weibel; Stanley F. Hamilton; John E. Mitchell; Gene Fults; Charles Stanley; Dick Loper; Larry D. Bryant; J. K. (Rooter) Brite

    2012-01-01

    Aligning a rancher's business plan goals with the capability of the ranch's rangeland resources improves the viability and sustainability of family ranches. Strategically monitoring the condition of soil, water, vegetation, wildlife, livestock production, and economics helps inform business plan goals. Business planning and resource monitoring help keep...

  2. Livestock versus Wildlife Ranching in Kenyan Rangelands: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Livestock versus Wildlife Ranching in Kenyan Rangelands: A Case Study of Laikipia District Ranches. ... The results reveal a web of interactive factors involving land tenur, livestock development, disease control, marketing and environmental conservation that need to be considered if the newly emerging mixed -livestock ...

  3. Okanogan Focus Watershed Salmon Creek : Annual Report 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyman, Hilary

    1999-11-01

    During FY 1999 the Colville Tribes and the Okanogan Irrigation District (OID) agreed to study the feasibility of restoring and enhancing anadromous fish populations in Salmon Creek while maintaining the ability of the district to continue full water service delivery to it members.

  4. Feasibility Study for Paragon - Bisti Solar Ranch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benally, Thomas [Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO), Window Rock, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO) and Navajo Nation (NN) plan to develop renewable energy (RE) projects on the Paragon-Bisti Ranch (PBR) lands, set aside under the Navajo Hopi Land Settlement Act (NHLSA) for the benefit of Relocatees. This feasibility study (FS), which was funded under a grant from DOE’s Tribal Energy Program (TEP), was prepared in order to explore the development of the 22,000-acre PBR in northwestern New Mexico for solar energy facilities. Topics covered include: • Site Selection • Analysis of RE, and a Preliminary Design • Transmission, Interconnection Concerns and Export Markets • Financial and Economic Analysis • Environmental Study • Socioeconomic and Cultural Factors • Next Steps.

  5. Herp Coverboard Sampling - Spears and Didion Ranches [ds324

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These data are detections of reptiles in 2006 under 2 ft x 2 ft dimension plywood coverboards at four of the 15 sample points at Spears and Didion Ranches, Placer...

  6. 76 FR 76120 - Establishment of the Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... Establishment of the Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, USDA... establishment of the Council for Native American Farming and Ranching (Council). The purpose of the Council is... farming and ranching opportunities created through the farm loan program through enhanced extension and...

  7. 76 FR 28888 - Revocation of Class E Airspace; Gruver Cluck Ranch Airport, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revocation of Class E Airspace; Gruver Cluck Ranch Airport... removes Class E airspace at Gruver, Cluck Ranch Airport, TX. The airport has been abandoned, thereby eliminating the need for controlled airspace in the Gruver, Cluck Ranch Airport, TX, area. The FAA is taking...

  8. 77 FR 14011 - Rainbow Ranch Wind, LLC, Rainbow West Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for Enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Rainbow Ranch Wind, LLC, Rainbow West Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for... Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), 16 USA 8242-3(h), Rainbow Ranch Wind, LLC (Rainbow Ranch) and Rainbow West Wind, LLC (Rainbow West) (collectively, Petitioners) filed a petition requesting the Federal Energy...

  9. Productivity of Indigenous and Exotic Cattle on Kenya Ranches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of productivity and adaptability of indigenous (Boran and Small East African Zebu) and the exotic (Sahiwal and Ayrshire) cattle on Kenyan ranches located in semi-arid areas of the Rift Valley Provinces was done. Data sets of the cattle breeds over the 1979-1993 period on Deloraine, Elkarama, Ilkerin, ...

  10. (Phacochoerus Africanus) from the Nazinga Game Ranch of Burkina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was conducted to assess the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in warthogs from the Nazinga Game Ranch of Burkina Faso. The study revealed that Eight different nematodes and one estode species were present in the gastrointestinal tracks of the animals. In the stomach, Simondsia paradoxa was found at ...

  11. Geospatial modelling of the Obudu cattle ranch Cross River state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geospatial modelling of the Obudu cattle ranch Cross River state, Nigeria. EJ Aniah, DD Eni, MA Abua, MA Amama. Abstract. No Abstract. Lwati: A Journal of Contemporary Research Vol. 4 () 2007: pp.309-328. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  12. Calculating stocking rates for game ranches: substitution ratios for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reports on a study conducted to quantify the overlap in ungulate resource-use on a game ranch, and to demonstrate how these indices of overlap can be incorporated into substitution ratios for calculating stocking rates. Illustrates with tables. Keywords:Aepyceros melampus; Animal units; Blue wildebeest; Burchell's zebra; ...

  13. Avian response to pine restoration at Peck Ranch Conservation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Clawson; Carrie Steen; Kim Houf; Terry Thompson

    2007-01-01

    Midco Pine Flats is a 2,223-acre region of Peck Ranch Conservation Area (CA) that is classified as a pine-oak plains land type association. Extensive logging in the early 1900s removed most overstory shortleaf pine allowing oak to become the primary overstory component. In 2000, Missouri Department of Conservation staff initiated a pineoak woodland restoration project...

  14. Cultural Resource Survey Report. Hildebrand Ranch Area: Proposed Chatfield Arboretum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    the Colorado Archaeological So- ciety has done extensive survey and excavation on and near the Ken Caryl ranch. Such sites as Falcon’s Nest (5JF211...Coloradoans. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. Baker,James H. 1927 History of Colorado. Linderman Co., Inc., Denver. Burney, Michael, Thomas

  15. 77 FR 75152 - Farm, Ranch, and Rural Communities Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, EPA gives notice... Administrator on a range of environmental issues and policies that are of importance to agriculture and rural... programs that affect and engage agriculture and rural communities. DATES: The Farm, Ranch, and Rural...

  16. Book Review: Game Ranch Management (Sixth Edition) | Peel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Title: Game Ranch Management (Sixth Edition). Book Authors: J du P Bothma & J.G. du Toit (Eds.) 2016, Van Schaik Publishers, PO Box 12681, Hatfield 0028, Pretoria, South Africa 1012 pages, hardcover, eBook and ePub. ISBN: 9780627033469, 9780627033476 (eBook), 9780627034909 (ePub). Price R949.00 ...

  17. Herpetofauna at the Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger C. Cogan

    2013-01-01

    A rich diversity of amphibian and reptile species occurs at the Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch, an 8000-acre sanctuary for native biota and research facility in the semi-arid grasslands of southeastern Arizona, created in 1969 and managed by the National Audubon Society since 1980. Nine species of amphibians and 42 species of reptiles have been identified by staff...

  18. 77 FR 68116 - Water Wheel Ranch; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Water Wheel Ranch; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and... filed: December 12, 2011, and supplemented on October 8, 2012. d. Applicant: Water Wheel Ranch. e. Name of Project: Water Wheel Ranch Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The Water Wheel Ranch Hydroelectric...

  19. Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, Mark A.

    2013-04-25

    The purpose of the Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project was to drill, test, and confirm the present economic viability of the undeveloped geothermal reservoir in the 870 acre Caldwell Ranch area of the Northwest Geysers that included the CCPA No.1 steam field. All of the drilling, logging, and sampling challenges were met. Three abandoned wells, Prati 5, Prati 14 and Prati 38 were re-opened and recompleted to nominal depths of 10,000 feet in 2010. Two of the wells required sidetracking. The flow tests indicated Prati 5 Sidetrack 1 (P-5 St1), Prati 14 (P-14) and Prati 38 Sidetrack 2 (P-38 St2) were collectively capable of initially producing an equivalent of 12 megawatts (MWe) of steam using a conversion rate of 19,000 pounds of steam/hour

  20. The Zambian Wildlife Ranching Industry: Scale, Associated Benefits, and Limitations Affecting Its Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Peter A.; Barnes, Jonathan; Nyirenda, Vincent; Pumfrett, Belinda; Tambling, Craig J.; Taylor, W. Andrew; Rolfes, Michael t’Sas

    2013-01-01

    The number and area of wildlife ranches in Zambia increased from 30 and 1,420 km2 in 1997 to 177 and ∼6,000 km2 by 2012. Wild ungulate populations on wildlife ranches increased from 21,000 individuals in 1997 to ∼91,000 in 2012, while those in state protected areas declined steeply. Wildlife ranching and crocodile farming have a turnover of ∼USD15.7 million per annum, compared to USD16 million from the public game management areas which encompass an area 29 times larger. The wildlife ranching industry employs 1,200 people (excluding jobs created in support industries), with a further ∼1,000 individuals employed through crocodile farming. Wildlife ranches generate significant quantities of meat (295,000 kg/annum), of which 30,000 kg of meat accrues to local communities and 36,000 kg to staff. Projected economic returns from wildlife ranching ventures are high, with an estimated 20-year economic rate of return of 28%, indicating a strong case for government support for the sector. There is enormous scope for wildlife ranching in Zambia due to the availability of land, high diversity of wildlife and low potential for commercial livestock production. However, the Zambian wildlife ranching industry is small and following completion of field work for this study, there was evidence of a significant proportion of ranchers dropping out. The industry is performing poorly, due to inter alia: rampant commercial bushmeat poaching; failure of government to allocate outright ownership of wildlife to landowners; bureaucratic hurdles; perceived historical lack of support from the Zambia Wildlife Authority and government; a lack of a clear policy on wildlife ranching; and a ban on hunting on unfenced lands including game ranches. For the wildlife ranching industry to develop, these limitations need to be addressed decisively. These findings are likely to apply to other savanna countries with large areas of marginal land potentially suited to wildlife ranching. PMID:24367493

  1. Richness of mammals on the San Bernardino Ranch in the municipality of Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mario Erandi Bonillas-Monge; Carlos Manuel Valdez-Coronel

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the San Bernardino Ranch has performed, as economical activities, livestock and farming, which has contributed to the deterioration of regional ecosystems. The ranch is ecologically important due to the diverse types of habitats of conservation interest such as the semi-desert grassland, the riparian vegetation, and a large ciénega, in which restoration...

  2. Vegetation map and plant checklist of Ol Ari Nyiro ranch and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ol Ari Nyiro is a 360 km2 ranch of the Laikipia Plateau, in a semi-arid part of Kenya. The vegetation of the ranch and nearby Mukutan Gorge was mapped, and a preliminary check-list of fungi and vascular plants compiled. The vegetation was classified in 16 different types. A total of 708 species and subspecies were ...

  3. Factors affecting the distribution of wild ungulates on a ranch in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting the distribution of wild ungulates on a ranch in Kenya: Preliminary report. L.H. Blankenship, C.R. Field. Abstract. This paper gives a preliminary report on the factors affecting the distribution of wild ungulates on a ranch in Kenya. The study covers only one phase of an overall project on the compatabfiity of ...

  4. Traditional ranching heritage and cultural continuity in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol Raish; Alice M. McSweeney

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted among ranchers on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests in the Southwestern United States, examines the role of ranching in maintaining traditional heritage and cultural continuity. The mainly Hispanic ranching families of northern New Mexico first came into the region in 1598 with Spanish colonization. Many of the villages received community...

  5. A Critique of the Green Economy: Approach in the Wildlife Ranching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The wildlife ranching1 sector has grown phenomenally, but discourses that involve the green economy have emerged in discussions of the wildlife ranching sector in South Africa. Drawing on data obtained through interviews with key informants, observations and documentary evidence, this paper uses the Afrocentric ...

  6. San Mateo Creek Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The San Mateo Creek Basin comprises approximately 321 square miles within the Rio San Jose drainage basin in McKinley and Cibola counties, New Mexico. This basin is located within the Grants Mining District (GMD).

  7. Cache Creek mercury investigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Cache Creek watershed is located in the California Coastal range approximately 100 miles north of San Francisco in Lake, Colusa and Yolo Counties. Wildlife...

  8. Big Creek Pit Tags

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The BCPITTAGS database is used to store data from an Oncorhynchus mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) population dynamics study in Big Creek, a coastal stream along the...

  9. Vegetation - Pine Creek WA and Fitzhugh Creek WA [ds484

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This fine-scale vegetation classification and map of the Pine Creek and Fitzhugh Creek Wildlife Areas, Modoc County, California was created following FGDC and...

  10. The Zambian wildlife ranching industry: scale, associated benefits, and limitations affecting its development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Lindsey

    Full Text Available The number and area of wildlife ranches in Zambia increased from 30 and 1,420 km(2 in 1997 to 177 and ∼6,000 km(2 by 2012. Wild ungulate populations on wildlife ranches increased from 21,000 individuals in 1997 to ∼91,000 in 2012, while those in state protected areas declined steeply. Wildlife ranching and crocodile farming have a turnover of ∼USD15.7 million per annum, compared to USD16 million from the public game management areas which encompass an area 29 times larger. The wildlife ranching industry employs 1,200 people (excluding jobs created in support industries, with a further ∼1,000 individuals employed through crocodile farming. Wildlife ranches generate significant quantities of meat (295,000 kg/annum, of which 30,000 kg of meat accrues to local communities and 36,000 kg to staff. Projected economic returns from wildlife ranching ventures are high, with an estimated 20-year economic rate of return of 28%, indicating a strong case for government support for the sector. There is enormous scope for wildlife ranching in Zambia due to the availability of land, high diversity of wildlife and low potential for commercial livestock production. However, the Zambian wildlife ranching industry is small and following completion of field work for this study, there was evidence of a significant proportion of ranchers dropping out. The industry is performing poorly, due to inter alia: rampant commercial bushmeat poaching; failure of government to allocate outright ownership of wildlife to landowners; bureaucratic hurdles; perceived historical lack of support from the Zambia Wildlife Authority and government; a lack of a clear policy on wildlife ranching; and a ban on hunting on unfenced lands including game ranches. For the wildlife ranching industry to develop, these limitations need to be addressed decisively. These findings are likely to apply to other savanna countries with large areas of marginal land potentially suited to wildlife

  11. Determinants of elephant distribution at Nazinga Game Ranch, Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Jonathan A.; Klaver, Robert W.; Wicks, Zeno W.

    2007-01-01

    We used seasonal ground total counts and remote sensing and GIS technology to relate elephant (Loxodonta africana africana) distribution at Nazinga Game Ranch to environmental and anthropogenic factors. Variables used in analyses were normalized difference vegetation index, elevation, stream density, density of poaching and human illegal activities, distance to dams, distance to rivers, distance to roads, and distance to poaching risk. Contrary to our expectation, road traffic did not disturb elephants. Strong negative relationships were documented between elephant abundance and stream density, distance to dams, and poaching density. Density of poaching and other human illegal activities explained 81%, vegetation greenness 6%, and stream density 3% of the variation in elephant density. Elephant distribution represented a survival strategy affected by poaching, food quality and abundance, and water availability. 

  12. Watershed Restoration on Black Drake Ranch: Humility vs. hubris in applying incomplete scientific information to real world applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkley, G. B.; Mattenberger, S.

    2009-12-01

    Black Drake Ranch comprises ~1000 acres of Klamath Basin high desert in S. Central OR, containing 2.5m reaches each of the North Fork Sprague River (NFSR) and its major tributary, Five Mile Creek, a meandering meadow spring creek anchoring 26m of upstream habitat for several species of concern, including native redband trout. Decades of unenlightened management had resulted in substantial watershed degradation: channelization and diking by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (hubris), massive stream bank head cuts and erosion by cattle hooves, complete blockade of fish passage by two irrigation diversion dams, loss of eggs and fry in irrigation runoff, upland juniper overgrowth from fire suppression, and extensive infestation of noxious weeds. After in depth analysis by the Working Landscapes Alliance, Klamath Watershed Partnership, Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, and adjacent landowners, the landowner, a retired cellular biologist, collaborated with an United States Fish & Wildlife Service hydrologist to formulate a comprehensive Long Term Strategic Plan (LTSP) to restore a functioning ecosystem compatible with an economically viable cattle/hay ranching operation. The LTSP is based upon current best practices (CPBs) recommended by experts in relevant, but relatively young scientific fields, with the recognition that these CPBs are constantly evolving as new information becomes available, particularly relevant to this particular site. Consequently, the LTSP remains flexible, and is repeatedly revised as new information is culled from the literature, but mostly from on-site experience and errors. This LTSP entails: 1. Rotational cattle grazing and riparian fencing to allow the re-establishment of bank-stabilizing native plant populations; 2. At diversion dams, installation of fish screens and 3. re-establishment of fish passage using paleochannels revealed by aerial contour mapping; 4. Selective stream bank head cut repair to retain and thereby reduce irrigation

  13. Mtwapa Creek, Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: trophic ecology, fish, Mtwapa, Kenya. Abstract—~The trophic status of common fish species in Mtwapa creek on the Kenyan coast was studied. Both the qualitative and quantitative spectra ... Selar crumenophthalmus fed mainly on fish scales. Polychaetes were an important diet for Gerres oyena and Leiognalhus.

  14. Preliminary project proposal : White Ranch Units, Alamosa/Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Proposal for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Colorado Division of Wildlife to purchase the White Ranch property in Saguache County as partial fulfillment...

  15. 2006 Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) Lidar: Rutland Ranch District

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a survey of select areas within Rutland Ranch. This data falls in Manatee County. These data were produced for...

  16. Stakeholder Theory and Rangeland Management: The Importance of Ranch Income Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, S.; Roche, L. M.; Elias, E.

    2016-12-01

    The California drought beginning in 2012 has been driven by reduced precipitation and record high temperatures. Hydrologic drought in the Southwest United States is projected to become the new climatology of the region. While ranchers are considered naturally adaptive, often adeptly altering management based upon conditions, the projected increased aridity may challenge rangeland management. Certain rancher characteristics are likely to impact how well ranchers adapt. Based on Stakeholder Theory (ST), we hypothesize that the extent to which ranchers are dependent on their ranches as a source of income would serve as a predictor of several key variables related to ranching adaptation and success. Data were obtained from 507 ranchers throughout the State of California via the Rangeland Decision-Making Survey implemented by University of California, Davis in 2010, just prior to the unprecedented California drought. Consistent with the ST urgency facet, results of linear regression analyses indicate the more dependent ranchers are on their ranches for their income, the more aware they are of USDA ranching initiatives (β = 0.19, p < .001) and state ranching initiatives (β = 0.10, p < .05). In addition, more dependent ranchers are more likely to use multiple and diverse sources of information about ranching (β = 0.18, p < .001), are more likely to realize the severity and extent of the most recent drought's impacts (β = 0.18, p < .001), and were more likely to have a drought management plan in place during the most recent drought (β = 0.18, p < .001). These findings are important in relation to both outreach/extension efforts and rangeland research. Outreach/extension efforts should take into account that people less dependent on their ranches are less aware of resources, as well as, less prepared to adapt to drought. Researchers should control for the extent to which ranchers are dependent on their ranches for income in order to ensure more accurate findings.

  17. Disability Compensation and Patient Expenditures: FY2000 to FY2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report contains FY2000 through FY2013 data on disability compensation expenditures and recipients and on VA healthcare system patients and patient expenditures.

  18. FY 10 Multifamily Initial Endorsements

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — In FY 2010, HUD's Multifamily's 18 Hubs initially endorsed 1011 loans totaling $11.3 billion and providing 170,672 units/ beds. FY 10's $11.3 billion is the highest...

  19. Cattaraugus Creek Study, New York, Final Feasibility Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    tributaries of the creek include Clear Creek at Arcade, Elton Creek, Buttermilk Creek, Spring Brook, Spooner Creek, South Branch Cattaraugus Creek, and Clear...Indian Reservation. The main tributaries of the creek include Clear Creek at Arcade, Elton Creek, Buttermilk Creek, Spring Brook, Spooner Creek, South...Page 1 Basin Map 2 2 Major Community Centers and Areas of Unique Consideration 9 3 Prime Farmland Map 14 4 Soil Productivity for Agricultural Use 15

  20. FY 1994 Annual Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This is the third Office of Inspector General (OIG)Annual Work Plan. Its purpose is to summarize work completed in Fiscal Year (FY) 1993, identify ongoing projects from previous fiscal years which the OIG intends to continue into FY 1994, and announce planned projects which the OIG intends to begin in FY 19994.

  1. Legislative Branch: FY2014 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    Authorizations Since 1999, by Matthew E. Glassman . Legislative Branch: FY2014 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 10 The FY2012 level of...Congresses, by Matthew E. Glassman . Legislative Branch: FY2014 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 11 Members’ Representational...vehicles; communications equipment; security equipment and its installation; dignitary protection; intelligence analysis; hazardous material response

  2. Farming and ranching related injuries in Southern Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Jackson; McRoberts, Drew; O'Byrne, Brian; Morgan, Bill; Krall, Kevin; Surjan, Christian; Mayberry, John

    2017-05-01

    Agriculture is an inherently dangerous industry. We sought injury data for use with the Idaho Time Sensitive Emergency (TSE) system to formulate goals and track improvements. Registries in southern Idaho were queried for ICD-9-CM diagnoses related to agriculture in 2014. Injuries known or likely to have occurred on properties intended for farming, ranching, animal care, or milk production, and relating to those activities were included. Among 72 patients, injuries were related to horses (31%), machinery (17%), ATVs (17%), and hay bales/haystacks (13%). Average age was 45 (3-82), 82% male, and mean ISS of 13 (1-50). Transportation utilized air (31%) and ground (69%) methods, with an average of 35 min (9-132). There was 1 inhospital death and 4 on-scene fatalities. We established baseline transport and injury data for the Idaho TSE system. These results can help our TSE system track improvements intended to increase quality of care. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. 75 FR 27332 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC; Eagle Creek Land...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources... Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, and Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC.... For the transferee: Mr. Paul Ho, Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, and...

  4. Agua Caliente Wind/Solar Project at Whitewater Ranch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooks, Todd [Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, Palm Springs, CA (United States); Stewart, Royce [Red Mountain Energy Partners, Sante Fe, NM (United States)

    2014-12-16

    Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy (DOE) to study the feasibility of a wind and/or solar renewable energy project at the Whitewater Ranch (WWR) property of ACBCI. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was engaged to conduct the study. The ACBCI tribal lands in the Coachella Valley have very rich renewable energy resources. The tribe has undertaken several studies to more fully understand the options available to them if they were to move forward with one or more renewable energy projects. With respect to the resources, the WWR property clearly has excellent wind and solar resources. The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has continued to upgrade and refine their library of resource maps. The newer, more precise maps quantify the resources as among the best in the world. The wind and solar technology available for deployment is also being improved. Both are reducing their costs to the point of being at or below the costs of fossil fuels. Technologies for energy storage and microgrids are also improving quickly and present additional ways to increase the wind and/or solar energy retained for later use with the network management flexibility to provide power to the appropriate locations when needed. As a result, renewable resources continue to gain more market share. The transitioning to renewables as the major resources for power will take some time as the conversion is complex and can have negative impacts if not managed well. While the economics for wind and solar systems continue to improve, the robustness of the WWR site was validated by the repeated queries of developers to place wind and/or solar there. The robust resources and improving technologies portends toward WWR land as a renewable energy site. The business case, however, is not so clear, especially when the potential investment portfolio for ACBCI has several very beneficial and profitable alternatives.

  5. The South African wildlife ranching sector: A Social Accounting Matrix Leontief multiplier analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippus C. Cloete

    2014-10-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of this article is to put into context the relative economic contribution of the wildlife ranching sector, as opposed to other land-use options in South Africa. Motivation for the study: Growth in the wildlife ranching sector at the cost of other traditional farming practices resulted in disagreements amongst various role players about the impact thereof on the national economy. The controversy can most probably be explained by different beliefs, coupled with the lack of a proper understanding and quantification of the wildlife ranching sector’s contribution toward the economy. Research methodology: The study employed a Social Accounting Matrix-based Leontief multiplier analysis for South Africa. Main findings: Results from the multiplier analysis revealed that developments within the wildlife ranching sector are likely to make a relatively more superior contribution towards the economy, especially when compared to similar land-use options such as extensive livestock production. Practical/managerial implications: It has been acknowledged by both academia and private sector that a major need exists for more research on the South African wildlife ranching industry, specifically looking at issues such as the industries, economic and social contributions, potentials and constraints. The research, therefore, contributes toward the depth of economic information and research regarding the South African wildlife sector. Contribution/value added: The research provides valuable information in dealing with the ‘popular belief’, especially amongst some of South Africa’s decision makers, namely, that growth in the wildlife ranching sector is not or does not have the ability to contribute significantly toward economic and socioeconomic factors.

  6. The South African wildlife ranching sector: A Social Accounting Matrix Leontief multiplier analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippus C. Cloete

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: There is startlingly little economic research on the South African wildlife sector which contributes toward disputes regarding the economic contribution of the sector.Research purpose: The purpose of this article is to put into context the relative economic contribution of the wildlife ranching sector, as opposed to other land-use options in South Africa.Motivation for the study: Growth in the wildlife ranching sector at the cost of other traditional farming practices resulted in disagreements amongst various role players about the impact thereof on the national economy. The controversy can most probably be explained by different beliefs, coupled with the lack of a proper understanding and quantification of the wildlife ranching sector’s contribution toward the economy.Research methodology: The study employed a Social Accounting Matrix-based Leontief multiplier analysis for South Africa.Main findings: Results from the multiplier analysis revealed that developments within the wildlife ranching sector are likely to make a relatively more superior contribution towards the economy, especially when compared to similar land-use options such as extensive livestock production.Practical/managerial implications: It has been acknowledged by both academia and private sector that a major need exists for more research on the South African wildlife ranching industry, specifically looking at issues such as the industries, economic and social contributions, potentials and constraints. The research, therefore, contributes toward the depth of economic information and research regarding the South African wildlife sector.Contribution/value added: The research provides valuable information in dealing with the ‘popular belief’, especially amongst some of South Africa’s decision makers, namely, that growth in the wildlife ranching sector is not or does not have the ability to contribute significantly toward economic and socioeconomic factors.

  7. Kiowa Creek Switching Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a new Kiowa Creek Switching Station near Orchard in Morgan County, Colorado. Kiowa Creek Switching Station would consist of a fenced area of approximately 300 by 300 feet and contain various electrical equipment typical for a switching station. As part of this new construction, approximately one mile of an existing 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line will be removed and replaced with a double circuit overhead line. The project will also include a short (one-third mile) realignment of an existing line to permit connection with the new switching station. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 40 CFR Parts 1500--1508, the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required for the proposed project. This determination is based on the information contained in this environmental assessment (EA) prepared by Western. The EA identifies and evaluates the environmental and socioeconomic effects of the proposed action, and concludes that the advance impacts on the human environment resulting from the proposed project would not be significant. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Ship Creek bioassessment investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.; Murphy, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB) personnel to conduct a series of collections of macroinvertebrates and sediments from Ship Creek to (1) establish baseline data on these populations for reference in evaluating possible impacts from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities at two operable units, (2) compare current population indices with those found by previous investigations in Ship Creek, and (3) determine baseline levels of concentrations of any contaminants in the sediments associated with the macroinvertebrates. A specific suite of indices established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was requested for the macroinvertebrate analyses; these follow the Rapid Bioassessment Protocol developed by Plafkin et al. (1989) and will be described. Sediment sample analyses included a Microtox bioassay and chemical analysis for contaminants of concern. These analyses included, volatile organic compounds, total gasoline and diesel hydrocarbons (EPA method 8015, CA modified), total organic carbon, and an inductive-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) metals scan. Appendix A reports on the sediment analyses. The Work Plan is attached as Appendix B.

  9. 77 FR 42714 - Eagle Creek Hydropower, LLC, Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Water Resources, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene... Land Resources, LLC; and Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC. e. Name of Project: Rio Hydroelectric... President-- Operations, Eagle Creek Hydropower, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Land...

  10. Agent Orange Exposure and Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance: An Operation Ranch Hand Veteran Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgren, Ola; Shim, Youn K; Michalek, Joel; Costello, Rene; Burton, Debra; Ketchum, Norma; Calvo, Katherine R; Caporaso, Neil; Raveche, Elizabeth; Middleton, Dan; Marti, Gerald; Vogt, Robert F

    2015-11-01

    Multiple myeloma has been classified as exhibiting "limited or suggestive evidence" of an association with exposure to herbicides in Vietnam War veterans. Occupational studies have shown that other pesticides (ie, insecticides, herbicides, fungicides) are associated with excess risk of multiple myeloma and its precursor state, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS); however, to our knowledge, no studies have uncovered such an association in Vietnam War veterans. To examine the relationship between MGUS and exposure to Agent Orange, including its contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), in Vietnam War veterans. This was a prospective cohort study conducted in 2013 to 2014, testing for MGUS in serum specimens collected and stored in 2002 by the Air Force Health Study (AFHS). The relevant exposure data collected by the AFHS was also used. We tested all specimens in 2013 without knowledge of the exposure status. The AFHS included former US Air Force personnel who participated in Operation Ranch Hand (Ranch Hand veterans) and other US Air Force personnel who had similar duties in Southeast Asia during the same time period (1962 to 1971) but were not involved in herbicide spray missions (comparison veterans). Agent Orange was used by the US Air Force personnel who conducted aerial spray missions of herbicides (Operation Ranch Hand) in Vietnam from 1962 to 1971. We included 479 Ranch Hand veterans and 479 comparison veterans who participated in the 2002 follow-up examination of AFHS. Agent Orange and TCDD. Serum TCDD levels were measured in 1987, 1992, 1997, and 2002. Risk of MGUS measured by prevalence, odds ratios (ORs), and 95% CIs. The 479 Ranch Hand veterans and 479 comparison veterans had similar demographic and lifestyle characteristics and medical histories. The crude prevalence of overall MGUS was 7.1% (34 of 479) in Ranch Hand veterans and 3.1% (15 of 479) in comparison veterans. This translated into a 2.4-fold increased risk

  11. Improved recapture rate of vaccinated sea-ranched Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, K.; Larsen, J.L.; Therkildsen, Birgit

    2001-01-01

    Vaccination of sea-ranched Atlantic salmon was conducted in order to investigate if immunoprophylactic measures could improve their survival. Fish were either vaccinated by bath or injection. A total of 66 000 fish were reared in fresh water at a hatchery on the island of Bornholm and at the pres......Vaccination of sea-ranched Atlantic salmon was conducted in order to investigate if immunoprophylactic measures could improve their survival. Fish were either vaccinated by bath or injection. A total of 66 000 fish were reared in fresh water at a hatchery on the island of Bornholm...

  12. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2001 Through FY 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey A. Appel et al.

    2004-02-05

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the accelerator and experiment operations for the period FY 2001 through FY 2003. The plan is to have an annual TM to gather such information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the startup of Run II at the Tevatron Collider and the beginning of the MiniBooNE neutrino experiment. While the focus is on the FY 2003 efforts, this document includes summaries of the earlier years where available for completeness.

  13. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan - FY96-FY98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP) presents the recommended TFA technical program. The recommendation covers a 3-year funding outlook (FY96-FY98), with an emphasis on FY96 and FY97. In addition to defining the recommended program, this document also describes the processes used to develop the program, the implementation strategy for the program, the references used to write this report, data on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank site baselines, details on baseline assumptions and the technical elements, and a glossary.

  14. Coyote Creek Trash Reduction Project: Clean Creeks, Healthy Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Coyote Creek Trash Reduction Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  15. Bridge Creek IMW database - Bridge Creek Restoration and Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The incised and degraded habitat of Bridge Creek is thought to be limiting a population of ESA-listed steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss). A logical restoration approach...

  16. High School Students' Compositions of Ranch Designs: Implications for Academic and Personal Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagorinsky, Peter; Pettis, Victoria; Reed, Patty

    2004-01-01

    This research analyzed the composing processes of two high school students designing horse ranch plans for a course in equine management and production. The investigation focused on understanding the problems driving the design process, the tools through which the students inscribed and encoded meaning in their compositions, and the integration,…

  17. Animal Science Basic Core Curriculum. Kansas Postsecondary Farm and Ranch Management Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    Thirty-six units of instruction are included in this core curriculum in animal science for postsecondary farm and ranch management programs. Units of instruction are divided into seven instructional areas: (1) Livestock Types, (2) Livestock Programs, (3) Nutrition, (4) Animal Health, (5) Animal Breeding, (6) Animal Improvement, and (7) Livestock…

  18. Habitat characteristic of two selected locations for sea cucumber ranching purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartati, Retno; Trianto, Agus; Widianingsih

    2017-02-01

    Sea cucumbers face heavily overfished because of their high prices and very strong market demand. One effort suggested to overcome this problem is sea ranching. The objectives of present works were to determine biological, physical, and chemical characteristics of prospective location for sea ranching of sea cucumber Holothuria atra. Two location at Jepara Waters (Teluk Awur and Bandengan WateRs of Jepara Regency) were selected. The determination of chemical (salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen of water, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite and ammonium of water and sediment, organic matters of sediment), physical (transparancy, sedimen grains size, water current direction and its velocity), biologycal characteristic (coverage of seagrass and its macroalgae associated, phytoplankton as well as chlorophyl-a and phaeopytin of water and sediment) ware determined. The result of present work showed that some characteristic were matched with requirement as sea ranching location of sea cucumber because the density of sea cucumber in the sea is a function of habitat features. For sediment feeding holothurians of the family Aspidochirotida, the biologycal characteristic act as very important considerations by providing sea cucumber food. High cholophyl-a and phaeopytin in sediment also represent a prosperous habitat for sea cucumber ranching.

  19. Horses: An Introduction to Horses: Racing, Ranching, and Riding for Blind and Physically Handicapped Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cylke, Frank Kurt, Ed.

    This annotated bibliography of materials focuses on horses, racing, ranching, and riding. Two articles are presented in full. They are: "Diary of a Blind Horseman: Confidence Springs from a Horse Named Sun" (Richard Vice and Steve Stone) and "Young Rider: Her Horses Show the Way" (Helen Mason). Each article tells the true story…

  20. Shortleaf pine natural community restoration on Peck Ranch Conservation Area in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Tuttle; Kim J. Houf

    2007-01-01

    Oak decline has become a significantly increasing problem on Peck Ranch Conservation Area over the last several years. Most of the oak decline problems exist on past shortleaf pine sites. To address this issue, the area managers wrote a natural community restoration plan for 2,233 acres located on the Current-Eleven Point Oak-Pine Woodland Dissected Plain land type...

  1. Bird list of San Bernardino Ranch in Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinda Cardenas-Garcia; Monica C. Olguin-Villa

    2013-01-01

    Interest and investigation of birds has been increasing over the last decades due to the loss of their habitats, and declination and fragmentation of their populations. San Bernardino Ranch is located in the desert grassland region of northeastern Sonora, México. Over the last decade, restoration efforts have tried to address the effects of long deteriorating economic...

  2. 76 FR 77890 - Swan Ranch Railroad, L.L.C.-Operation Exemption-Swan Industrial Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Swan Ranch Railroad, L.L.C.--Operation Exemption--Swan Industrial Park Swan... located within the Swan Industrial Park, in Cheyenne, Wyo. The track over which SRR will operate is...

  3. New insights on Southern Coyote Creek Fault and Superstition Hills Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zandt, A. J.; Mellors, R. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Burgess, M. K.; O'Hare, M.

    2007-12-01

    Recent field work has confirmed an extension of the southern Coyote Creek (CCF) branch of the San Jacinto fault in the western Salton trough. The fault marks the western edge of an area of subsidence caused by groundwater extraction, and field measurements suggest that recent strike-slip motion has occurred on this fault as well. We attempt to determine whether this fault connects at depth with the Superstition Hills fault (SHF) to the southeast by modeling observed surface deformation between the two faults measured by InSAR. Stacked ERS (descending) InSAR data from 1992 to 2000 is initially modeled using a finite fault in an elastic half-space. Observed deformation along the SHF and Elmore Ranch fault is modeled assuming shallow (< 5 km) creep. We test various models to explain surface deformation between the two faults.

  4. Tidal Creek Sentinel Habitat Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ecological Research, Assessment and Prediction's Tidal Creeks: Sentinel Habitat Database was developed to support the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  5. FY09-FY10 NITRD Budget Cross Cut

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President — This data set represents a cross cut of 13 Federal agencies R&D budget in the area of networking and information technology for FY09 and FY10 brokendown by...

  6. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1987-06-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

  7. FY11 Force Structure Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    FY11 N/A N/A 6 - MARIETTA RegAF Military Reserve AGR Guard AGR Civilians Reserve Drill Guard Drill -2 0 0 +1 0 0 FY10 FY11 N/A N/A I n t e g r i t...A I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Legend: AD Air Force Base Reserve Base Guard Base Other 85 FY11 Ohio Fact Sheet...5 C-5A I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Legend: AD Air Force Base Reserve Base Guard Base Other 86 FY11 Ohio Fact

  8. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  9. CTUIR Grande Ronde River Basin Watershed Restoration Program McCoy Creek/McIntyre Creek Road Crossing, 1996-1998 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Allen B.

    1999-07-01

    This Annual Report provides a detailed overview of watershed restoration accomplishments achieved by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and project partners in the Upper Grande Ronde River Basin under contract with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) during the period July 1, 1997 through June 30, 1998. The Contract Agreement entitled McCoy Meadows Watershed Restoration Project (Project No.96-83-01) includes habitat restoration planning, design, and implementation in two project areas--the McCoy Meadows Ranch located in the Meadow, McCoy, and McIntyre Creek subbasins on private land and the Mainstem Grande Ronde River Habitat Enhancement Project located on private and National Forest System lands near Bird Tract Springs along the Grande Ronde River. During the contract period, the CTUIR and partners (Mark and Lorna Tipperman, landowners), Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) initiated phase 1 construction of the McCoy Meadows Restoration Project. Phase 1 involved reintroduction of a segment of McCoy Creek from its existing channelized configuration into a historic meander channel. Project efforts included bioengineering and tree/shrub planting and protection, transporting salvaged cottonwood tree boles and limbs from offsite source to the project area for utilization by resident beaver populations for forage and dam construction materials, relocation of existing BPA/ODFW riparian corridor fencing to outer edges of meadow floodplain, establishment of pre-project photo points, and coordination of other monitoring and evaluation efforts being led by other project partners including groundwater monitoring wells, channel cross sections, water quality monitoring stations, juvenile population sampling index sites, redd surveys, and habitat surveys. Project activities also included

  10. Improving water quality for human and livestock consumption on cattle ranches in Lincoln and Socorro Counties New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dwyer, Brian P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rigali, Mark J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stewart, Thomas Austin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the assistance provided to Shafer Ranches, Inc., Hightower Ranch, and Western Environmental by Sandia National Laboratories under a Leveraged New Mexico Small Business Assistance grant. The work was conducted between April to November, 2014. Therefore, Sandia National Laboratories has been asked to investigate and develop a water treatment system that would result in reduced cost associated with infrastructure, maintenance, elimination of importing water, and improved cattle health.

  11. Final environmental statement related to the United Nuclear Corporation, Morton Ranch, Wyoming Uranium Mill (Converse County, Wyoming)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    Impacts from Morton Ranch Uranium Mill will result in: alterations of up to 270 acres occupied by the mill facilities; increase in the existing background radiation levels; socioeconomic effects on Glenrock and Douglas, Wyoming. Solid waste material (tailings solids) from the mill will be deposited onsite in exhausted surface mine pits. Any license issued for the Morton Ranch mill will be subject to conditions for the protection of the environment.

  12. Bioassessment of Black Creek, Holmes County, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Physical, chemical and biological components at four stations on Black Creek and one station on Harland Creek (reference site), Holmes County, Mississippi were...

  13. NREL Photovoltaic Program FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This report reviews the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R&D) activities under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) Program from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993 (fiscal year [FY] 1993). The NREL PV Program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991 - FY 1995. The FY 1993 budget authority (BA) for carrying out the NREL PV Program was $40.1 million in operating funds and $0.9 million in capital equipment funds. An additional $4.8 million in capital equipment funds were made available for the new Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF) that will house the in-house PV laboratories beginning in FY 1994. Subcontract activities represent a major part of the NREL PV Program, with more than $23.7 million (nearly 59%) of the FY 1993 operating funds going to 70 subcontractors. In FY 1993, DOE assigned certain other PV subcontracting efforts to the DOE Golden Field Office (DOE/GO), and assigned responsibility for their technical support to the NREL PV Program. An example is the PV:BONUS (Building Opportunities in the U.S. for Photovoltaics) Project. These DOE/GO efforts are also reported in this document.

  14. Photovoltaics program plan, FY 1991--FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This program plan describes the goals and philosophy of DOE National Photovoltaics Program and its major research and development activities for fiscal years (FY) 1991 through 1995. The plan represents a consensus among researchers and manufacturers, as well as current and potential users of photovoltaics (PV). It defines the activites that we believe are necessary to continue the rapid progress toward acceptance of photovoltaics as a serious candidate for cost-competitive electric power generation by the utility, transportation, buildings, and industrial sectors. A succesful National Photovoltaics Program will help achieve many of our national priorities. The mission of the National Photovoltaics Program is to help US industry to develop photovoltaic technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States, making PV a significant part of our national energy mix. To fully achieve this, we must continue to work toward the long-term goals established in our previous program plan: reducing the price of delivered electricity to 5 to 6 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), increasing lifetimes to 30 years, and increasing module efficiencies to 15% for flat-plate and 25% for concentrator technologies. If progress continues at its current pace, we expect that the PV industry will have installed at least 1000 megawatts (MW) of capacity in the United States and 500 MW internationally by the year 2000.

  15. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

    1995-04-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

  16. Wildlife Impact Assessment: Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects, Idaho. Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1986-05-01

    This report presents an analysis of impacts on wildlife and their habitats as a result of construction and operation of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects in Idaho. The objectives were to: (1) determine the probable impacts of development and operation of the Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects to wildlife and their habitats; (2) determine the wildlife and habitat impacts directly attributable to hydroelectric development and operation; (3) briefly identify the current major concerns for wildlife in the vicinities of the hydroelectric projects; and (4) provide for consultation and coordination with interested agencies, tribes, and other entities expressing interest in the project.

  17. 33 CFR 117.331 - Snake Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Snake Creek. 117.331 Section 117.331 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.331 Snake Creek. The draw of the Snake Creek...

  18. Ranching modernization in tropical Brazil: foreign investment and environment in Mato Grosso, 1900-1950.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Accompanying the expansion of modern beef production in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries were technologies and methods that proponents assumed were applicable to all ecosystems. successes in Europe, the United States, and Argentina convinced ranchers, investors, and animal scientists that these could be applied in the tropical Americas with ease. This assumption contributed to a wave of foreign ranching investment in semi-tropical Mato Grosso, Brazil, beginning in the early twentieth century. However, such a view failed to consider the specific characteristics of such environments and led to difficulties for several ventures and a re-evaluation of the relationship between ecosystems and the type of ranching appropriate to them. Ultimately, local Brazilian practice and experimentation proved more successful in tropical and semi-tropical Brazil, forcing foreign ranching concerns to adapt their techniques. Following the logic of earlier decades, more recently cattle-raising practices developed in Mato Grosso and similar regions have been applied in the tropical Amazon, resulting in widespread ecological devastation. The uneven experiences of foreign entrepreneurs in Mato Grosso offer valuable lessons for understanding the application of modernization technologies to diverse ecosystems; such knowledge can lead to a more sustainable approach to meat production.

  19. 77 FR 13592 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Land...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting... Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, and Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC (transferees) filed an...

  20. FY 2008 Public Libraries Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Dig into FY 2008 data on public library systems (referred to as administrative entities in the Public Libraries Survey) and main libraries, branches, and bookmobiles...

  1. FY12 CPD Formula Allocation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 budget for the Department of Housing and Urban Development has been enacted. This spreadsheet provide full-year allocations for the Office...

  2. FY 2009 Public Libraries Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Dig into FY 2009 data on public library systems (referred to as administrative entities in the Public Libraries Survey) and main libraries, branches, and bookmobiles...

  3. FY 2011 Public Libraries Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Dig into FY 2011 data on public library systems (referred to as administrative entities in the Public Libraries Survey) and main libraries, branches, and bookmobiles...

  4. FY 2010 Public Libraries Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Dig into FY 2010 data on public library systems (referred to as administrative entities in the Public Libraries Survey) and main libraries, branches, and bookmobiles...

  5. Backwaters of Makupa Creek, Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acid 8 mL was used for elution to strip the metals from the resin. Certified samples SLEW—Z and. NASS-5, from the National Research Council of. Canada were ..... sediment Fe enrichment factors (EF) at the Makupa creek backwaters, indicating its remobilization. Humic and fluvic acid mobilization did not have a significant ...

  6. Administrative Discretionary Grants (FY 1996-2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Review the administrative records for discretionary grant recipients who were awarded funds by IMLS from FY 1996 to FY 2014. Data include information on the...

  7. LSTA Allotments (FY 2003-2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Review Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) allotments by state from FY 2003 to FY 2016. The Grants to States program is the largest source of federal funding...

  8. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-01-01

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  9. FY 2002 Top 200 Users Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    conducted in FY 2000, FY 2001 and FY 2002. The Customer Satisfaction Survey was a random sample of all users not included in the Top 200 Survey...contains a report on overall customer satisfaction. This is derived from the Annual Survey Composite Data Report and reflects data from both the Top 200 Users Survey and the Customer Satisfaction Survey.

  10. Operating plan FY 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    This document is the first edition of Argonne`s new Operating Plan. The Operating Plan complements the strategic planning in the Laboratory`s Institutional Plan by focusing on activities that are being pursued in the immediate fiscal year, FY 1998. It reflects planning that has been done to date, and it will serve in the future as a resource and a benchmark for understanding the Laboratory`s performance. The heart of the Institutional Plan is the set of major research initiatives that the Laboratory is proposing to implement in future years. In contrast, this Operating Plan focuses on Argonne`s ongoing R&D programs, along with cost-saving measures and other improvements being implemented in Laboratory support operations.

  11. FY17 Strategic Themes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, Robert W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    I am pleased to present this summary of the FY17 Division 1000 Science and Technology Strategic Plan. As this plan represents a continuation of the work we started last year, the four strategic themes (Mission Engagement, Bold Outcomes, Collaborative Environment, and Safety Imperative) remain the same, along with many of the goals. You will see most of the changes in the actions listed for each goal: We completed some actions, modified others, and added a few new ones. As I’ve stated previously, this is not a strategy to be pursued in tension with the Laboratory strategic plan. The Division 1000 strategic plan is intended to chart our course as we strive to contribute our very best in service of the greater Laboratory strategy. I welcome your feedback and look forward to our dialogue about these strategic themes. Please join me as we move forward to implement the plan in the coming months.

  12. PINE CREEK ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, George W.; Denton, David K.

    1984-01-01

    Examination of the Pine Creek Roadless Area, Oregon indicates that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of energy or metallic mineral resources in the area. No mines or mineral prospects were identified during the investigation. Although nearby parts of Harney Basin are characterized by higher than normal heat flow, indicating that the region as a whole may have some as yet undefined potential for the occurrence of the geothermal energy resources, no potential for this resource was identified in the roadless area.

  13. Haights Creek RPM Pipe Failures

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation

    1994-01-01

    In 1989, Haights Creek Irrigation Company replaced 730 linear feet of 24- and 27-inch-diameter RPM (reinforced plastic mortar) pipe because of several failures. Bureau of Reclamation personnel examined the pipe before and after exhumation, the surrounding soil conditions, and measured diametral deflections. Major longitudinal cracks in the pipe invert appear to be the result of hard spots in the pipe foundation. Some of these hard spots were caused from mounding, or using a mound of soil u...

  14. Trout Creek Mountain project, Oregon

    OpenAIRE

    Hatfield, Doc; Hatfield, Connie

    1995-01-01

    The Trout Creek Mountain experience is an example of how the land and the people can win by building bridges of understanding and common interest between concerned constituencies. Love of the land, its natural resources, and realization of a need for changing grazing practices to reverse the degradation of riparian areas were the common interests that caused environmentalists, ranchers, the BLM, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to work togethe...

  15. Annual Progress Report FY-82. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    and Hypothyroid Rats . (FY-81) P I vi J DEOARIENT OF MEDICINE continued PAGE Endocrinology-Metabolism Service continued 1326-81 Nibbling Versus...Reserve in 50 Infertile Men. (FY-77 PI) 1379 Effect of Post-Weaning Undernutrition on 51 Reproductive Hormones in Rats . (FY-77 PI) 1380 Effect of Thyroid...Status on the Hormonally- 52 Induced Cyclic AMP Responses of the Kidney. (FY-77 P]D 1381 Estradiol (E2) Receptors in Rat Thyroid 54 Glands. (FY-77 F

  16. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K.A. (ed.)

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaics Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The SERI subcontracted PV research and development represents most of the subcontracted R D that is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program. This report covers fiscal year (FY) 1990: October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. During FY 1990, the SERI PV program started to implement a new DOE subcontract initiative, entitled the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project.'' Excluding (PVMaT) because it was in a start-up phase, in FY 1990 there were 54 subcontracts with a total annualized funding of approximately $11.9 million. Approximately two-thirds of those subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of over $3.3 million. Cost sharing by industry added another $4.3 million to that $11.9 million of SERI PV subcontracted R D. The six technical sections of this report cover the previously ongoing areas of the subcontracted program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, and the University Participation Program. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs discuss approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1990, and future research directions. Another section introduces the PVMaT project and reports the progress since its inception in FY 1990. Highlights of technology transfer activities are also reported.

  17. Traveltime characteristics of Gore Creek and Black Gore Creek, upper Colorado River basin, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdak, Jason J.; Spahr, Norman E.; Szmajter, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    In the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, major highways are often constructed in stream valleys. In the event of a vehicular accident involving hazardous materials, the close proximity of highways to the streams increases the risk of contamination entering the streams. Recent population growth has contributed to increased traffic volume along Colorado highways and has resulted in increased movement of hazardous materials, particularly along Interstate 70. Gore Creek and its major tributary, Black Gore Creek, are vulnerable to such contamination from vehicular accidents along Interstate 70. Gore Creek, major tributary of the Eagle River, drains approximately 102 square miles, some of which has recently undergone significant urban development. The headwaters of Gore Creek originate in the Gore Range in the eastern part of the Gore Creek watershed. Gore Creek flows west to the Eagle River. Beginning at the watershed boundary on Vail Pass, southeast of Vail Ski Resort, Interstate 70 parallels Black Gore Creek and then closely follows Gore Creek the entire length of the watershed. Interstate 70 crosses Gore Creek and tributaries 20 times in the watershed. In the event of a vehicular accident involving a contaminant spill into Gore Creek or Black Gore Creek, a stepwise procedure has been developed for water-resource managers to estimate traveltimes of the leading edge and peak concentration of a conservative contaminant. An example calculating estimated traveltimes for a hypothetical contaminant release in Black Gore Creek is provided. Traveltime measurements were made during May and September along Black Gore Creek and Gore Creek from just downstream from the Black Lakes to the confluence with the Eagle River to account for seasonal variability in stream discharge. Fluorometric dye injection of rhodamine WT and downstream dye detection by fluorometry were used to measure traveltime characteristics of Gore Creek and Black Gore Creek. During the May traveltime measurements

  18. FY16 Strategic Themes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, Robert W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    I am pleased to present this summary of the Division 1000 Science and Technology Strategic Plan. This plan was created with considerable participation from all levels of management in Division 1000, and is intended to chart our course as we strive to contribute our very best in service of the greater Laboratory strategy. The plan is characterized by four strategic themes: Mission Engagement, Bold Outcomes, Collaborative Environment, and the Safety Imperative. Each theme is accompanied by a brief vision statement, several goals, and planned actions to support those goals throughout FY16. I want to be clear that this is not a strategy to be pursued in tension with the Laboratory strategic plan. Rather, it is intended to describe “how” we intend to show up for the “what” described in Sandia’s Strategic Plan. I welcome your feedback and look forward to our dialogue about these strategic themes. Please join me as we move forward to implement the plan in the coming year.

  19. Cattle ranching intensification in Brazil can reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by sparing land from deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Avery S.; Mosnier, Aline; Havlík, Petr; Valin, Hugo; Herrero, Mario; Schmid, Erwin; O’Hare, Michael; Obersteiner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether policies to encourage cattle ranching intensification in Brazil can abate global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by sparing land from deforestation. We use an economic model of global land use to investigate, from 2010 to 2030, the global agricultural outcomes, land use changes, and GHG abatement resulting from two potential Brazilian policies: a tax on cattle from conventional pasture and a subsidy for cattle from semi-intensive pasture. We find that under either policy, Brazil could achieve considerable sparing of forests and abatement of GHGs, in line with its national policy targets. The land spared, particularly under the tax, is far less than proportional to the productivity increased. However, the tax, despite prompting less adoption of semi-intensive ranching, delivers slightly more forest sparing and GHG abatement than the subsidy. This difference is explained by increased deforestation associated with increased beef consumption under the subsidy and reduced deforestation associated with reduced beef consumption under the tax. Complementary policies to directly limit deforestation could help limit these effects. GHG abatement from either the tax or subsidy appears inexpensive but, over time, the tax would become cheaper than the subsidy. A revenue-neutral combination of the policies could be an element of a sustainable development strategy for Brazil and other emerging economies seeking to balance agricultural development and forest protection. PMID:24778243

  20. A fuzzy logic-based tool to assess beef cattle ranching sustainability in complex environmental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sandra A; de Lima, Helano Póvoas; Massruhá, Silvia M F S; de Abreu, Urbano G P; Tomás, Walfrido M; Salis, Suzana M; Cardoso, Evaldo L; de Oliveira, Márcia Divina; Soares, Márcia Toffani S; Dos Santos, Antônio; de Oliveira, Luiz Orcírio F; Calheiros, Débora F; Crispim, Sandra M A; Soriano, Balbina M A; Amâncio, Christiane O G; Nunes, Alessandro Pacheco; Pellegrin, Luiz Alberto

    2017-08-01

    One of the most relevant issues in discussion worldwide nowadays is the concept of sustainability. However, sustainability assessment is a difficult task due to the complexity of factors involved in the natural world added to the human interference. In order to assess the sustainability of beef ranching in complex and uncertain tropical environment systems this paper describes a decision support system based on fuzzy rule-approach, the Sustainable Pantanal Ranch (SPR). This tool was built by a set of measurements and indicators integrated by fuzzy logic to evaluate the attributes of the three dimensions of sustainability. Indicators and decision rules, as well as scenario evaluations, were obtained from workshops involving multi-disciplinary team of experts. A Fuzzy Rule-Based System (FRBS) was developed to each attribute, dimension and general index. The essential parts of the FRBS are the knowledge database, rules and the inference engine. The FuzzyGen and WebFuzzy tools were developed to support the FRBS and both showed efficiency and low cost for digital applications. The results of each attribute, dimension and index were presented as radar graphs, showing the individual value (0-10) of each indicator. In the validation process using the WebFuzzy, different combinations of indicators were made for each attribute index to show the corresponding output, and which confirm the feasibility and usability of the tool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Amphibians and reptiles of C. E. Miller Ranch and the Sierra Vieja, Chihuahuan Desert, Texas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew R. Davis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the occurrence of 50 species of amphibians and reptiles recently collected on C. E. Miller Ranch and the Sierra Vieja in the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas, USA and describe their perceived distribution and abundance across various habitat associations of the region. Our recent surveys follow intense, historic sampling of amphibians and reptiles from this region in 1948. Of the 50 species detected in recent surveys, six were not collected in 1948 and an additional three species documented in 1948 have yet to be detected in a 14-year period of recent surveys. Combining data from both historic and recent surveys, a total of 53 species of amphibians and reptiles are known from the ranch (11 amphibians, 42 reptiles. Land stewardship and conservation practices have likely contributed to the persistence of the majority of these species through time. Additionally, we discuss the status of amphibians and reptiles not collected during recent surveys and comment on potential species that have not yet been detected.

  2. Cattle ranching intensification in Brazil can reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by sparing land from deforestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Avery S; Mosnier, Aline; Havlík, Petr; Valin, Hugo; Herrero, Mario; Schmid, Erwin; O'Hare, Michael; Obersteiner, Michael

    2014-05-20

    This study examines whether policies to encourage cattle ranching intensification in Brazil can abate global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by sparing land from deforestation. We use an economic model of global land use to investigate, from 2010 to 2030, the global agricultural outcomes, land use changes, and GHG abatement resulting from two potential Brazilian policies: a tax on cattle from conventional pasture and a subsidy for cattle from semi-intensive pasture. We find that under either policy, Brazil could achieve considerable sparing of forests and abatement of GHGs, in line with its national policy targets. The land spared, particularly under the tax, is far less than proportional to the productivity increased. However, the tax, despite prompting less adoption of semi-intensive ranching, delivers slightly more forest sparing and GHG abatement than the subsidy. This difference is explained by increased deforestation associated with increased beef consumption under the subsidy and reduced deforestation associated with reduced beef consumption under the tax. Complementary policies to directly limit deforestation could help limit these effects. GHG abatement from either the tax or subsidy appears inexpensive but, over time, the tax would become cheaper than the subsidy. A revenue-neutral combination of the policies could be an element of a sustainable development strategy for Brazil and other emerging economies seeking to balance agricultural development and forest protection.

  3. Disease constraints for utilization of the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) on game ranches in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron M; Munag'andu, Hetron M; Siamudaala, Victor M; Nambota, Andrew; Bwalya, John M; Munyeme, Musso; Mweene, Aaron S; Takada, Ayato; Kida, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    Eco-tourism depending on wildlife is becoming increasingly profitable and landowners are beginning to favor game farming and ecotourism. In these areas, large-scale translocation of wildlife involves a diversity of species and large populations. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is one of the major tourist attractions in Zambia. It accounts for 8.7% and 12.4% of the total animal species hunted in the Game Management Areas and the total hunting revenue earned in Zambia, respectively. It is ecologically an important animal species essential for the purpose of habitat control and facilitating the provision of suitable grazing pastures. However, the rearing of the African buffalo on game ranches has been hampered by its carrier state of the Southern Africa Terroritory (SAT) serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus (FMD). The African buffalo is also known to be a carrier of Theileria parva lawrencei, the causative agent of corridor disease (CD) that continues to have devastating effects on the livestock industry in Zambia. In addition, the importation of buffaloes from countries with populations endemic to bovine tuberculosis is highly restricted. Veterinary regulations in Zambia, strongly advocate against the translocation of buffaloes from protected areas to private ranches for disease control purposes thereby mounting a considerable constraint on the economic and ecological viability of the industry. It is hoped that this review will motivate the relevant government authorities in exploiting ways in which this animal species play a central role in eco-tourism.

  4. Archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gard, H.A.; Poet, R.M.

    1992-09-01

    In response to a request for a cultural resources review from Westinghouse Hanford Company for the Action Plan for Characterization of McGee Ranch Soil, Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, located in the northwest portion of the Hanford Site. Staff members covered 8.4 km{sup 2} and recorded 42 cultural resources; 22 sites, and 20 isolated artifacts. Only 2 sites and 3 isolates were attributed to a prehistoric Native American occupation. The historic sites date from the turn of the century to the 1940s and are representative of the settlement patterns that occurred throughout the Columbia Basin. In addition to an archaeological pedestrian survey of the project area, we conducted literature and records searches and examined available aerial photographs. Records kept at HCRL were reviewed to determine if any archaeological survey had been conducted previously within the project area. Although no survey had been conducted, portions of the area adjacent to project boundaries were surveyed in 1988 and 1990. During those surveys, historic and prehistoric cultural resources were observed, increasing the possibility that similar land usage had taken place within the current project boundaries. Literature searches established a general historical sequence for this area. Aerial photographs alerted researchers to homesteads and linear features, such as roads and irrigation ditches, that might not be apparent from ground level.

  5. Archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gard, H.A.; Poet, R.M.

    1992-09-01

    In response to a request for a cultural resources review from Westinghouse Hanford Company for the Action Plan for Characterization of McGee Ranch Soil, Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, located in the northwest portion of the Hanford Site. Staff members covered 8.4 km{sup 2} and recorded 42 cultural resources; 22 sites, and 20 isolated artifacts. Only 2 sites and 3 isolates were attributed to a prehistoric Native American occupation. The historic sites date from the turn of the century to the 1940s and are representative of the settlement patterns that occurred throughout the Columbia Basin. In addition to an archaeological pedestrian survey of the project area, we conducted literature and records searches and examined available aerial photographs. Records kept at HCRL were reviewed to determine if any archaeological survey had been conducted previously within the project area. Although no survey had been conducted, portions of the area adjacent to project boundaries were surveyed in 1988 and 1990. During those surveys, historic and prehistoric cultural resources were observed, increasing the possibility that similar land usage had taken place within the current project boundaries. Literature searches established a general historical sequence for this area. Aerial photographs alerted researchers to homesteads and linear features, such as roads and irrigation ditches, that might not be apparent from ground level.

  6. National Cemetery Administration Summary of Veteran and Non-Veteran Interments: FY2000 to FY2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Total Veteran and Non-Veteran Interments at National Cemetery, and shown by Interment Type of Casket or Cremain, FY2000 to FY2012. Non-Veteran includes dependents,...

  7. SANDY CREEK ROADLESS AREA, MISSISSIPPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Boyd R.; Bitar, Richard F.

    1984-01-01

    The Sandy Creek Roadless Area includes about 3. 7 sq mi in the southeastern part of Adams County, Mississippi. On the basis of a mineral survey, the area offers little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources but has a probable resource potential for oil and natural gas. It is possible that wells drilled deep enough to penetrate the older reservoirs will encounter significant quantities of oil and natural gas in the roadless area. The deposits of gravel, sand, and clay present in the area could be utilized in the construction industry, but similar deposits elsewhere are much closer to available markets.

  8. 33 CFR 117.571 - Spa Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Spa Creek. 117.571 Section 117.571 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.571 Spa Creek. The S181 bridge, mile 4.0, at...

  9. 33 CFR 117.929 - Durham Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Durham Creek. 117.929 Section 117.929 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.929 Durham Creek. The removable span of the...

  10. 33 CFR 117.917 - Battery Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Battery Creek. 117.917 Section 117.917 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.917 Battery Creek. The draw of...

  11. 33 CFR 117.401 - Trail Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trail Creek. 117.401 Section 117.401 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Indiana § 117.401 Trail Creek. (a) The draw of the Franklin...

  12. 33 CFR 117.543 - Bear Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bear Creek. 117.543 Section 117.543 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.543 Bear Creek. (a) The draws of the Baltimore...

  13. Currents and siltation at Dharamtar creek, Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.; Kolhatkar, V.M.; Fernandes, A.A.

    Hydrographic data collected in Dharamtar Creek during 1976-77 have been analysed. This showed that the waters in the Creek are well mixed and the salinity varied with the tide. The tidal currents are found to be generally strong. The distribution...

  14. LDRD FY 2014 Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anita Gianotto; Dena Tomchak

    2013-08-01

    As required by DOE Order 413.2B the FY 2014 Program Plan is written to communicate ares of investment and approximate amounts being requested for the upcoming fiscal year. The program plan also includes brief highlights of current or previous LDRD projects that have an opportunity to impact our Nation's current and future energy challenges.

  15. The FY2011 Federal Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    costs of federal health care programs and baby boomer retirements present further challenges to fiscal stability. Operating these programs in their...costs and baby boomer retirements. Budget Fiscal Year 2011 The Obama Administration released its FY2011 budget on February 1, 2010. Congress began its...11 Healthcare Legislation .................................................................................................. 12

  16. Developing ecological site and state-and-transition models for grazed riparian pastures at Tejon Ranch, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix P. Ratcliff; James Bartolome; Michele Hammond; Sheri Spiegal; Michael White

    2015-01-01

    Ecological site descriptions and associated state-and-transition models are useful tools for understanding the variable effects of management and environment on range resources. Models for woody riparian sites have yet to be fully developed. At Tejon Ranch, in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California, we are using ecological site theory to investigate the role of...

  17. 77 FR 48138 - Topaz Solar Farms LLC; High Plains Ranch II, LLC; Bethel Wind Energy LLC; Rippey Wind Energy LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ...-000; EG12-68-000; EG12-69-000] Topaz Solar Farms LLC; High Plains Ranch II, LLC; Bethel Wind Energy LLC; Rippey Wind Energy LLC; Pacific Wind, LLC; Colorado Highlands Wind, LLC; Shooting Star Wind... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal...

  18. Exposure-effect relations between aircraft and road traffic noise exposure at school and reading comprehension: the RANCH project.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, Charlotte; Martin, Rocio; Kempen, Elise van; Alfred, Tamuno; Head, Jenny; Davies, Hugh W; Haines, Mary M; Lopez Barrio, Isabel; Matheson, Mark; Stansfeld, Stephen A

    2006-01-01

    Transport noise is an increasingly prominent feature of the urban environment, making noise pollution an important environmental public health issue. This paper reports on the 2001-2003 RANCH project, the first cross-national epidemiologic study known to examine exposure-effect relations between

  19. Final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement. Cullinan Ranch Specific Plan. Chapter 13. Comments and Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    DIICTORS ADVISORY COMMITTEE lrosdenl Contra Costa County San Mateo County Howard Allen Irwin Luckman EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Lennie Roberts* Elizabeth Kilham...Street TJ, Kent. J. San Francisco, CA 94104 A. Starker Leopold Irwin Luckman Martin Meyerson RE: Draft EIR/EIS for Cullinan Ranch, Vallejo, CA Robert

  20. Geomorphic data collected within and adjacent to Nebraska Public Power District's Cottonwood Ranch Property, Platte River, Nebraska, Water Year 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Paul; Parker, Randolph; Nelson, Johnathan; Burman, R.; Heckman, Aashley

    2003-01-01

    River-channel topographic surveys were conducted and bed-material samples were collected along transects across the Platte River during water year 2001 (October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001). A total of 57 transect lines or cross sections were established within three study reaches located along the middle channel of the Platte River in a 2,650-acre parcel of land owned by the Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD), hereinafter referred to as the Cottonwood Ranch Property. Five additional cross sections were established downstream of the Cottonwood Ranch Property across the entire width of the Platte River as a component of a proposed future general monitoring program. A development and enhancement plan is proposed by NPPD on the Cottonwood Ranch Property to satisfy their Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing guidelines. The goal of the plan is to improve habitat along this reach for endangered species. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) designed a monitoring and research program to study and detect what effects, if any, these channel management actions have on channel morphology and sediment transport within and adjacent to the Cottonwood Ranch Property. This report presents the data-collection methods and summarizes the geomorphic data collected in support of the monitoring program for water year 2001.

  1. 93 years of stand density and land-use legacy research at the Coulter Ranch Study Site (P-53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Margaret M. Moore

    2008-01-01

    In 1913, the Fort Valley Experimental Forest initiated an unprecedented case-study experiment to determine the effects of harvesting methods on tree regeneration and growth on a ponderosa pine-Gambel oak forest at Coulter Ranch in northern Arizona. The harvesting methods examined were seed-tree, group selection, and light selection. In addition, the effects of...

  2. 93 Years of stand density and land-use legacy research at the Coulter Ranch Study Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Margaret M. Moore

    2008-01-01

    In 1913, the Fort Valley Experimental Forest initiated an unprecedented case-study experiment to determine the effects of harvesting methods on tree regeneration and growth on a ponderosa pine-Gambel oak forest at Coulter Ranch in northern Arizona. The harvesting methods examined were seed-tree, group selection, and light selection. In addition, the effects of...

  3. Hydrology of the Johnson Creek Basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karl K.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Creek basin is an important resource in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. Johnson Creek forms a wildlife and recreational corridor through densely populated areas of the cities of Milwaukie, Portland, and Gresham, and rural and agricultural areas of Multnomah and Clackamas Counties. The basin has changed as a result of agricultural and urban development, stream channelization, and construction of roads, drains, and other features characteristic of human occupation. Flooding of Johnson Creek is a concern for the public and for water management officials. The interaction of the groundwater and surface-water systems in the Johnson Creek basin also is important. The occurrence of flooding from high groundwater discharge and from a rising water table prompted this study. As the Portland metropolitan area continues to grow, human-induced effects on streams in the Johnson Creek basin will continue. This report provides information on the groundwater and surface-water systems over a range of hydrologic conditions, as well as the interaction these of systems, and will aid in management of water resources in the area. High and low flows of Crystal Springs Creek, a tributary to Johnson Creek, were explained by streamflow and groundwater levels collected for this study, and results from previous studies. High flows of Crystal Springs Creek began in summer 1996, and did not diminish until 2000. Low streamflow of Crystal Springs Creek occurred in 2005. Flow of Crystal Springs Creek related to water-level fluctuations in a nearby well, enabling prediction of streamflow based on groundwater level. Holgate Lake is an ephemeral lake in Southeast Portland that has inundated residential areas several times since the 1940s. The water-surface elevation of the lake closely tracked the elevation of the water table in a nearby well, indicating that the occurrence of the lake is an expression of the water table. Antecedent conditions of the groundwater level and autumn

  4. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  5. Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    FY2014 below FY2012 enacted levels within the S&T account is for the Climate Protection Program activity within the Clean Air and Climate program...area. The $8.3 million requested for the Climate Protection Program for FY2014 is $8.0 million (nearly 50%) less than the FY2012 appropriation of $16.3...Climate 124.4 n/a 126.0 - Climate Protection Program 16.3 n/a 8.3 - Federal Vehicle & Fuel Standards & Certification 91.9 n/a 100.4 Enforcement 15.3 n/a

  6. 77 FR 10960 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Snake Creek, Islamorada, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Snake Creek, Islamorada, FL AGENCY... of Snake Creek Bridge, mile 0.5, across Snake Creek, in Islamorada, Florida. The regulation is set... Sheriff's Office has requested a temporary modification to the operating schedule of Snake Creek Bridge in...

  7. Redbank and Fancher Creeks, California: General Design Memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    Creek, flows under the Enterprise Canal to Marion and Alluvial Avenues, where it has to be pumped into Dry Creek. i- Dog Creek. - Dog Creek runoff...Engineering Research Center, (1977); Shore Protection Manual - 1977 Edition; 8. Donovan , N.C. and Bornstein, A.E., 1978, Uncertainties in Seismic Risk

  8. Urban-architectural permanencies of farms and ranches in the northeast of Puebla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Leecet González Solís

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present article is studied the urbanization process that ocurred in the northeast of Puebla city during the first half of the twentieth century, resulting in a superposition of structures, which can be read thorugh the urban-architectural permanencies of farms and ranches, immersed in the actual urban fabric. The main objective is to analyze the process of incorporation of rural land into the urban fabric in the northeast of Puebla, as an antecedent to study the actual state of the urban-architectural permanencies of haciendas and ranchos, to finally bring viable alternatives for incorporation of these remains, to the current needs of society to ensure its permanence as a legacy.

  9. Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal cell. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  10. Research on Environmental Adjustment of Cloud Ranch Based on BP Neural Network PID Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinzhi; Xiang, Wei; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Jianbo; Huang, Lianzhen; Tu, Qinggang; Zhao, Heming

    2018-01-01

    In order to make the intelligent ranch management mode replace the traditional artificial one gradually, this paper proposes a pasture environment control system based on cloud server, and puts forward the PID control algorithm based on BP neural network to control temperature and humidity better in the pasture environment. First, to model the temperature and humidity (controlled object) of the pasture, we can get the transfer function. Then the traditional PID control algorithm and the PID one based on BP neural network are applied to the transfer function. The obtained step tracking curves can be seen that the PID controller based on BP neural network has obvious superiority in adjusting time and error, etc. This algorithm, calculating reasonable control parameters of the temperature and humidity to control environment, can be better used in the cloud service platform.

  11. Aventura ranch field: A classic stratigraphic trap - James Lime, Van Zandt County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A.; Palmer, J.T. (Palmer Petroleum, Inc., Shreveport, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Aventura Ranch field, found September 10, 1990, is the most recent significant James Lime discovery in the East Texas basin. Current estimates indicate recoverable reserves of 20 bcf of gas and 1.5 million bbl of condensate. The field represents a classic stratigraphic trap, formed by a facies change from downdip porous and permeable grainstones, terminating updip into carbonate mudstones, wackestones, and unrelated grainstones. The James Lime formation consists of poorly sorted, low-porosity lime wackestone/mudstones, and well-sorted reservoir lime grainstones. The reservoir consists of two facies: (1) skeletal grainstones, and (2) oolitic grainstones. The skeletal grainstones are interpreted as deposits adjacent to the James Lime reef core. The oolitic grainstones were deposited as high-energy shoals or bars in shallow, agitated water, possible paralleling the skeletal grainstones adjacent of the reef. Both interparticle and intraparticle porosity are present in the grainstone facies. Microporosity also is evident and is responsible for suppressing most of the induction log resistivity throughout the field. Resistivity as low as 1.5 ohms is found to be hydrocarbon productive. Subsequent to the development of the Fairway field, a large James Lime stratigraphic trap had been sought for many years, resulting in only the minor discovery of North Athens field. Several dry holes had been drilled amazingly close to the currently productive area. Perseverance and persistence finally paid off with the discovery of Aventura Ranch field. Currently, the field is producing 6 million ft[sup 3] of gas and 425 bbl of condensate a day.

  12. Unique activity spectrum of colicin FY: all 110 characterized Yersinia enterocolitica isolates were colicin FY susceptible.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Bosák

    Full Text Available Colicin FY is a plasmid encoded toxin that recognizes a yersinia-specific outer membrane protein (YiuR as a receptor molecule. We have previously shown that the activity spectrum of colicin FY comprises strains of the genus Yersinia. In this study, we analyzed the activity of colicin FY against 110 Yersinia enterocolitica isolates differing in geographical origin and source. All isolates were characterized through analysis of 16S rRNA genes, serotyping, biotyping, restriction profiling of genomic DNA, detection of virulence markers and susceptibility to antibiotics. This confirmed the broad variability of the collection, in which all 110 Y. enterocolitica isolates, representing 77 various strains, were inhibited by colicin FY. Although isolates showed variable levels of susceptibility to colicin FY, it was not associated with any strain characteristic. The universal susceptibility of Y. enterocolitica strains to colicin FY together with the absence of activity towards strains outside the Yersinia genus suggests potential therapeutic applications for colicin FY.

  13. Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Dudley W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

  14. 78 FR 5798 - Grouse Creek Wind Park, LLC, Grouse Creek Wind Park II, LLC; Notice of Petition for Enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Grouse Creek Wind Park, LLC, Grouse Creek Wind Park II, LLC; Notice of... Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), Grouse Creek Wind Park, LLC and Grouse Creek Wind Park II...

  15. CREEK Project's Internal Creek Habitat Survey for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: January 1998.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  16. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) -- formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  17. Annual Historical Review FY88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    ERP ) funds was increased from $130.081 million in FY87, (99.98 percent obligated) to $155.0 million, which included Rocky Mountain Arsenal. The U.S...Lanka, Taiwan, and Thailand in the Asia and Pacific regions, and Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador , El Salvador...efficiency review GOSC General Officer Steering Committee ERF European Redistribution Facility GPLR Government Purpose License Rights ERP Environmental

  18. CAES Annual Report FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortny Rolston

    2011-10-01

    The Center for Advanced Energy Studies was created to lead research programs important to the nation, attract students and faculty to the Idaho universities and act as a catalyst for technology-based economic development. CAES is striving to meet those goals by continuing to develop its infrastructure and equipment capabilities, expand its research portfolio and bolster Idaho's energy workforce. This Annual Report details the progress CAES made in FY 2011 toward fulfilling its research, education and economic development missions.

  19. Ethanol annual report FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Texeira, R.H.; Goodman, B.J. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the research progress and accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Ethanol from Biomass Program, field managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute, during FY 1990. The report includes an overview of the entire program and summaries of individual research projects. These projects are grouped into the following subject areas: technoeconomic analysis; pretreatment; cellulose conversion; xylose fermentation; and lignin conversion. Individual papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Solid sample locations for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban runoff...

  1. Proctor Creek Boone Boulevard Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the Proctor Creek watershed and community, green infrastructure, the Boone Boulevard Green Street Project Conceptual Design, and the added value and application of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to the project.

  2. Exit and Paradise Creek Fluvial Features, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset presents a delineation of the maximum extent of fluvial occupation detectable from vegetation patterns at Exit and Paradise Creeks in Kenai Fjords...

  3. Mercury in Thana creek, Bombay harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Desai, B.N.

    weight) with marked increased from harbour to the creek region suggests substantial mercury input in the head region. Chemical extraction by hydrogen peroxide indicated that more than 70% of mercury was leachable and probably organically bound...

  4. Habitat--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  5. Folds--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is...

  6. Bathymetry--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Scott Creek, California. The raster data file is included in...

  7. Rattlesnake Creek Management Program 12-year review

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rattlesnake Creek Partnership (Partnership) was formed over 18 years ago to cooperatively develop and implement solutions to water resource problems within the...

  8. Faults--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is...

  9. Bioassessment of Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Physical, chemical and biological components at five stations on Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi were evaluated using Rapid Bioassessment Protocols (RBP)...

  10. Contours--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is...

  11. Featured Partner: Saddle Creek Logistics Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EPA fact sheet spotlights Saddle Creek Logistics as a SmartWay partner committed to sustainability in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution caused by freight transportation, partly by growing its compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles for

  12. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, C.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Holmes, S.; Louis, W.; Meyer, A.; Moore, Craig D.; Raja, R.; Ramberg, E.; Roser, R.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2004. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2004 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE neutrino experiment, and SY 120 activities.

  13. A NEW GENUS AND SPECIES OF SPHENODONTIAN FROM THE GHOST RANCH COELOPHYSIS QUARRY (UPPER TRIASSIC: APACHEAN), ROCK POINT FORMATION, NEW MEXICO, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HECKERT, ANDREW B; LUCAS, SPENCER G; RINEHART, LARRY F; HUNT, ADRIAN P

    2008-01-01

    .... The holotype was recovered during preparation of block C‐8‐82 from the famous Coelophysis (Whitaker) quarry at Ghost Ranch, New Mexico, and is the most complete small vertebrate recovered from the quarry...

  14. FY 1996 Congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The FY 1996 budget presentation is organized by the Department`s major business lines. An accompanying chart displays the request for new budget authority. The report compares the budget request for FY 1996 with the appropriated FY 1995 funding levels displayed on a comparable basis. The FY 1996 budget represents the first year of a five year plan in which the Department will reduce its spending by $15.8 billion in budget authority and by $14.1 billion in outlays. FY 1996 is a transition year as the Department embarks on its multiyear effort to do more with less. The Budget Highlights are presented by business line; however, the fifth business line, Economic Productivity, which is described in the Policy Overview section, cuts across multiple organizational missions, funding levels and activities and is therefore included in the discussion of the other four business lines.

  15. FY 1995 cost savings report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews-Smith, K.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-21

    Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 challenged us to dramatically reduce costs at Hanford. We began the year with an 8 percent reduction in our Environmental Management budget but at the same time were tasked with accomplishing additional workscope. This resulted in a Productivity Challenge whereby we took on more work at the beginning of the year than we had funding to complete. During the year, the Productivity Challenge actually grew to 23 percent because of recissions, Congressional budget reductions, and DOE Headquarters actions. We successfully met our FY 1995 Productivity Challenge through an aggressive cost reduction program that identified and eliminated unnecessary workscope and found ways to be more efficient. We reduced the size of the workforce, cut overhead expenses, eliminated paperwork, cancelled construction of new facilities, and reengineered our processes. We are proving we can get the job done better and for less money at Hanford. DOE`s drive to do it ``better, faster, cheaper`` has led us to look for more and larger partnerships with the private sector. The biggest will be privatization of Hanford`s Tank Waste Remediation System, which will turn liquid tank waste into glass logs for eventual disposal. We will also save millions of dollars and avoid the cost of replacing aging steam plants by contracting Hanford`s energy needs to a private company. Other privatization successes include the Hanford Mail Service, a spinoff of advanced technical training, low level mixed waste thermal treatment, and transfer of the Hanford Museums of Science and history to a private non-profit organization. Despite the rough roads and uncertainty we faced in FY 1995, less than 3 percent of our work fell behind schedule, while the work that was performed was completed with an 8.6 percent cost under-run. We not only met the FY 1995 productivity challenge, we also met our FY 1995-1998 savings commitments and accelerated some critical cleanup milestones. The challenges continue

  16. A comparison of some methods used to estimate the grazing capacity of a game ranch in Northern Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Schmidt

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The grazing capacity of a game ranch in Northern Province was estimated in a number of different ways using rainfall and herbaceous composition and phytomass data. The results indicate that the grazing capacity under the present environmental conditions should be approximately 50 of the recommended agricultural grazer stocking rate. This is in agreement with recent literature, indicating that the methods used should be suitable for determining a first approximation of grazing capacity in the mixed bushveld of Northern Province.

  17. Conforth Ranch Wildlife Mitigation Feasibility Study, McNary, Oregon : Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Larry; Wright, Patrick; Giger, Richard

    1991-03-01

    The 2,860-acre Conforth Ranch near Umatilla, Oregon is being considered for acquisition and management to partially mitigate wildlife losses associated with McNary Hydroelectric Project. The Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) estimated that management for wildlife would result in habitat unit gains of 519 for meadowlark, 420 for quail, 431 for mallard, 466 for Canada goose, 405 for mink, 49 for downy woodpecker, 172 for yellow warbler, and 34 for spotted sandpiper. This amounts to a total combined gain of 2,495 habitat units -- a 110 percent increase over the existing values for these species combined of 2,274 habitat units. Current water delivery costs, estimated at $50,000 per year, are expected to increase to $125,000 per year. A survey of local interest indicated a majority of respondents favored the concept with a minority opposed. No contaminants that would preclude the Fish and Wildlife Service from agreeing to accept the property were identified. 21 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Sustainable Cattle Ranching in Practice: Moving from Theory to Planning in Colombia's Livestock Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Amy M.; Zuluaga, Andrés Felipe; Chará, Julián; Etter, Andrés; Searchinger, Timothy

    2017-08-01

    A growing population with increasing consumption of milk and dairy require more agricultural output in the coming years, which potentially competes with forests and other natural habitats. This issue is particularly salient in the tropics, where deforestation has traditionally generated cattle pastures and other commodity crops such as corn and soy. The purpose of this article is to review the concepts and discussion associated with reconciling food production and conservation, and in particular with regards to cattle production, including the concepts of land-sparing and land-sharing. We then present these concepts in the specific context of Colombia, where there are efforts to increase both cattle production and protect tropical forests, in order to discuss the potential for landscape planning for sustainable cattle production. We outline a national planning approach, which includes disaggregating the diverse cattle sector and production types, identifying biophysical, and economic opportunities and barriers for sustainable intensification in cattle ranching, and analyzing areas suitable for habitat restoration and conservation, in order to plan for both land-sparing and land-sharing strategies. This approach can be used in other contexts across the world where there is a need to incorporate cattle production into national goals for carbon sequestration and habitat restoration and conservation.

  19. High-resolution seismic-reflection data from offshore northern California — Bolinas to Sea Ranch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Chin, John L.; Allwardt, Parker; Beeson, Jeffrey; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2016-12-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution seismic-reflection data in September 2009, on survey S-8-09-NC, offshore of northern California between Bolinas and Sea Ranch.The survey area spans about 125 km of California’s coast and extends around Point Reyes. Data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. Cumulatively, ~1,150 km of seismic-reflection data were acquired using a SIG 2mille minisparker. Subbottom acoustic depth of penetration spanned tens to several hundred meters and varied by location and underlying sediments and rock types.This report includes maps and a navigation file of the surveyed transects, utilizing Google Earth™ software, as well as digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y and JPEG formats. The images of bedrock, sediment deposits, and tectonic structure provide geologic information that is essential to hazard assessment, regional sediment management, and coastal and marine spatial planning at Federal, State and local levels. This information is also valuable for future research on the geomorphic, sedimentary, tectonic, and climatic record of central California.

  20. The impact of tick control on the productivity of indigenous cattle under ranch conditions in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okello-Onen, J; Tukahirwa, E M; Perry, B D; Rowlands, G J; Nagda, S N; Musisi, G; Bode, E; Heinonen, R; Mwayi, W; Opuda-Asibo, J

    2003-06-01

    The impact of tick control on the productivity of indigenous cattle was investigated in three herds of East African shorthorn Zebu and Zebu x Ankole (Nganda) breeds, maintained under three tick management systems practised under ranch conditions: twice-a-week dipping, once-a-month dipping, and no tick control. The milk production and the growth rates of pre-weaned and post-weaned calves were monitored once a month over a period of 34 months. Milk offtake was 23% higher during the heavy rainy seasons than in the long dry seasons. Twice-a-week dipping increased the milk offtake by 21% in the second year of study and prolonged the duration of lactation in cows. Similarly, twice-a-week dipping increased the pre-weaning growth rate by 39% in the second year of study, but had no significant effect on the post-weaning growth rate. Generally, the growth rate of calves were greatest during the heavy rainy seasons and least during the long dry seasons. These results provide a basis for assessing the losses under different tick management systems in the various production systems.

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1984-FY 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-11-01

    In this plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to be committed to scientific and technological research that is based on technical excellence and innovation and that provides a foundation for and a stimulus to broader and more sustained economic growth. DOE is being asked to assist in establishing a new program for Laboratory cooperation with industry, beginning with an initial focus on materials science. The current Institutional Plan thus projects growth in the materials science area as well as in other basic physical science areas and suggests a new initiative designed to extend the various technology transfer activities and to make them more effective by using ORNL as the trial Laboratory for some of these different approaches. This Institutional Plan projects a stable future for ORNL, with only modest amounts of growth in selected areas of research for the FY 1984-FY 1989 planning cycle. Summaries of the overall picture of the proposed budget and personnel levels for the current planning cycle are included. Scientific programs, laboratory resource development, and private sector interactions are discussed.

  2. FIDDLER CREEK POLYMER AUGMENTATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle A. Johnson, Jr.

    2001-10-31

    The Fiddler Creek field is in Weston County, Wyoming, and was discovered in 1948. Secondary waterflooding recovery was started in 1955 and terminated in the mid-1980s with a fieldwide recovery of approximately 40%. The West Fiddler Creek Unit, the focus of this project, had a lower recovery and therefore has the most remaining oil. Before the project this unit was producing approximately 85 bbl of oil per day from 20 pumping wells and 17 swab wells. The recovery process planned for this project involved adapting two independent processes, the injection of polymer as a channel blocker or as a deep-penetrating permeability modifier, and the stabilization of clays and reduction of the residual oil saturation in the near-wellbore area around the injection wells. Clay stabilization was not conducted because long-term fresh water injection had not severely reduced the injectivity. It was determined that future polymer injection would not be affected by the clay. For the project, two adjoining project patterns were selected on the basis of prior reservoir studies and current well availability and production. The primary injection well of Pattern 1 was treated with a small batch of MARCIT gel to create channel blocking. The long-term test was designed for three phases: (1) 77 days of injection of a 300-mg/l cationic polyacrylamide, (2) 15 days of injection of a 300-mg/l anionic polymer to ensure injectivity of the polymer, and (3) 369 days of injection of the 300-mg/l anionic polymer and a 30:1 mix of the crosslinker. Phases 1 and 2 were conducted as planned. Phase 3 was started in late March 1999 and terminated in May 2001. In this phase, a crosslinker was added with the anionic polymer. Total injection for Phase 3 was 709,064 bbl. To maintain the desired injection rate, the injection pressure was slowly increased from 1,400 psig to 2,100 psig. Early in the application of the polymer, it appeared that the sweep improvement program was having a positive effect on Pattern 1

  3. A Peek into 'Alamogordo Creek'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3 On its 825th Martian day (May 20, 2006), NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity stopped for the weekend to place its instrument arm onto the soil target pictured here, dubbed 'Alamogordo Creek.' Two views from the panoramic camera, acquired at about noon local solar time, are at the top. Below them is a close-up view from the microscopic imager. At upper left, a false-color view emphasizes differences among materials in rocks and soil. It combines images taken through the panoramic camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 432-nanometer filters. At upper right is an approximately true-color rendering made with the panoramic camera's 600-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 480-nanometer filters. The microscopic-imager frame covers the area outlined by the white boxes in the panoramic-camera views, a rectangle 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. As Opportunity traverses to the south, it is analyzing soil and rocks along the way for differences from those seen earlier. At this site, the soil contains abundant small spherical fragments, thought to be hematite-rich concretions, plus finer-grained basaltic sand. Most of the spherical fragments seen in the microscopic image are smaller than those first seen at the rover's landing site in 'Eagle Crater,' some five kilometers (3.1 miles) to the north. However, a few larger spherical fragments and other rock fragments can also be seen in the panoramic-camera images.

  4. Exit and Paradise Creek Drainage Area Boundaries, Alaska, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains drainage area boundaries for Exit Creek and Paradise Creek in Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska. A drainage area boundary identifies the land...

  5. Geology of the Quartz Creek Pegmatite District, Gunnison County Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staatz, Mortimer H.; Trites, A.F.

    1952-01-01

    The Quartz Creek pegmatite district includes an area about 29 square miles in the vicinity of Quartz Creek in Gunnison County,. Colo. This area contains 1,803 pegmatites that are intruded into pre-Cambrian rocks.

  6. Elevation - LiDAR Survey Minnehaha Creek, MN Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — LiDAR Bare-Earth Grid - Minnehaha Creek Watershed District. The Minnehaha Creek watershed is located primarily in Hennepin County, Minnesota. The watershed covers...

  7. Preliminary Biotic Survey of Cane Creek, Calhoun County, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A biotic survey of Cane Creek (Calhoun County, AL) was completed in the Fall (1992) and Winter (1993) at six sites within Cane Creek to determine the effects of...

  8. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge contaminant survey results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — As part of a baseline contaminant survey of all National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Missouri, fish were collected at the Squaw Creek NWR from Davis and Squaw creeks...

  9. Steel Creek fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.; Kissick, L.A.

    1988-03-01

    Fish samples were collected from Steel Creek during 1986 and 1987 following the impoundment of the headwaters of the stream to form L-Lake, a cooling reservoir for L-Reactor which began operating late in 1985. Electrofishing and ichthyoplankton sample stations were located throughout the creek. Fykenetting sample stations were located in the creek mouth and just above the Steel Creek swamp. Larval fish and fish eggs were collected with 0.5 m plankton nets. Multivariate analysis of the electrofishing data suggested that the fish assemblages in Steel Creek exhibited structural differences associated with proximity to L-Lake, and habitat gradients of current velocity, depth, and canopy cover. The Steel Creek corridor, a lotic reach beginning at the base of the L-Lake embankment was dominated by stream species and bluegill. The delta/swamp, formed where Steel Creek enters the Savannah River floodplain, was dominated by fishes characteristic of slow flowing waters and heavily vegetated habitats. The large channel draining the swamp supported many of the species found in the swamp plus riverine and anadromous forms.

  10. SPECIAL MINING MANAGEMENT ZONE - CLEAR CREEK, IDAHO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Karen; Esparza, Leon E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of mineral-resource surveys, a substantiated resource potential for sediment-hosted cobalt-copper-gold-silver deposits has been identified in the Elkhorn and upper Garden Creek areas of the Special Mining Management Zone - Clear Creek, Idaho. Areas of favorable host rock, but with less strong evidence of mineralization, were classified as having probable resource potential for the same kind of deposit. A probable resource potential for porphyry-type copper-molybdenum deposits is assigned to areas along Clear Creek and upper Squaw Gulch based on the presence of extensive stockwork fracturing and alteration of the nonporphyritic granite, introduced disseminated magnetite, and the close proximity of known Tertiary plutons. The nature of the geologic terrain makes the occurrence of organic fuels on geothermal resources extremely unlikely.

  11. Streamflow conditions along Soldier Creek, Northeast Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2017-11-14

    The availability of adequate water to meet the present (2017) and future needs of humans, fish, and wildlife is a fundamental issue for the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation in northeast Kansas. Because Soldier Creek flows through the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Reservation, it is an important tribal resource. An understanding of historical Soldier Creek streamflow conditions is required for the effective management of tribal water resources, including drought contingency planning. Historical data for six selected U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages along Soldier Creek were used in an assessment of streamflow characteristics and trends by Juracek (2017). Streamflow data for the period of record at each streamgage were used to compute annual mean streamflow, annual mean base flow, mean monthly flow, annual peak flow, and annual minimum flow. Results of the assessment are summarized in this fact sheet.

  12. The Boulder Creek Batholith, Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Dolores J.

    1980-01-01

    The Boulder Creek batholith is the best known of several large Precambrian batholiths of similar rock composition that crop out across central Colorado. The rocks in the batholith belong to the calc-alkaline series and range in composition from granodiorite through quartz diorite (tonalite) to gneissic aplite. Two rock types dominate': the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, the major rock unit, and a more leucocratic and slightly younger unit herein named Twin Spruce Quartz Monzonite. Besides mafic inclusions, which occur mainly in hornblende-bearing phases of the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, there are cogenetic older and younger lenses, dikes, and small plutons of hornblende diorite, hornblendite, gabbro, and pyroxenite. Pyroxenite is not found in the batholith. The Boulder Creek Granodiorite in the batholith represents essentially two contemporaneous magmas, a northern body occurring in the Gold Hill and Boulder quadrangles and a larger southern body exposed in the Blackhawk and the greater parts of the Tungsten and Eldorado Springs quadrangles. The two bodies are chemically and mineralogically distinct. The northern body is richer in CaO and poorer in K2O, is more mafic, and has a larger percentage of plagioclase than the southern body. A crude sequence of rock types occurs from west to east in the batholith accompanied by a change in plagioclase composition from calcic plagioclase on the west to sodic on the east. Ore minerals tend to decrease, and the ratio potassium feldspar:plagioclase increases inward from the western contact of the batholith, indicating that the Boulder Creek batholith is similar to granodiorite batholiths the world over. Emplacement of the Boulder Creek batholith was contemporaneous with plastic deformation and high-grade regional metamorphism that folded the country rock and the batholith contact along west-northwest and north-northwest axes. Also, smaller satellitic granodiorite bodies tend to conform to the trends of foliation and fold axes in

  13. Suzhou Creek Rehabilitation Project ECOLOGICAL STUDY 1998 Biological monitoring program

    OpenAIRE

    Lien, L.; Haowen, Yin

    1998-01-01

    Suzhou Creek, flowing through the central parts of Shanghai, is heavy polluted by sewage, metals and organic micro pollutants. Due to the pollution, lower parts of the creek have virtually no life of fish or macro-invertebrates, and the other biological communities are totally disturbed. Even at upstream sections the flora and fauna suffer from pollution. During the last decade the contamination has been slightly reduced in the creek. A biological monitoring program was designed for the creek...

  14. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2016-01-25

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  15. CREEK Project's Phytoplankton Pigment Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The CREEK Project began in January of 1996 and was designed to help determine the role of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in tidal creeks of the North Inlet Estuary,...

  16. SBA Disaster Loan Data FY2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — SBA Disaster Loan Data for FY 2012 provides verified loss and approved loan amount totals for both home and business disaster loans, segmented by city, county, zip...

  17. SBA Disaster Loan Data FY2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — SBA Disaster Loan Data for FY 2011 provides verified loss and approved loan amount totals for both home and business disaster loans, segmented by city, county, zip...

  18. Multifamily Hubs' Initial Endorsements FY12

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Describes the program, geographic & lender distribution of multifamily loans initially endorsed for FHA insurance or risk sharing in FY 12. A loan is initially...

  19. Flora and Fauna of Abiala Creek, Niger Delta, Nigeria | OLALEYE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abiala creek is a typical aquatic weed infested creek in the Niger Delta Area of Nigeria. Examination of the aquatic vegetation revealed seven weed species dominated by Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solm - Laub. The presence of these aquatic weeds negatively affected the plankton species diversity in the creek.

  20. Bedload and nearbed detritus transport in a tidal saltmarsh creek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemminga, M.A.; Cattrijsse, A.; Wielemaker, A.

    1996-01-01

    Bedload and nearbed transport of coarse (>1 mm) detritus particles were investigated in a tidal creek of a salt marsh in the Westerschelde estuary (south-west Netherlands). Using a fyke net positioned on the creek bottom, hourly transport through the creek was measured during 14 flood-ebb cycles in

  1. Microsatellite analyses of Alameda Creek Rainbow/Steelhead trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Fountain, Monique C.

    1999-01-01

    Microsatellite genetic diversity found in Alameda Creek rainbow trout support a close genetic relationship with coastal trout found in Lagunitas Creek, Marin County, California. No significant genotypic or allelic frequencies associations could be drawn among Alameda Creek trout and fish collected from the four primary rainbow trout hatchery strains in use in California, Whitney, Mount Shasta, Coleman, and Hot Creek strains, indeed, genetic distance analyses (δμ2) supported genetic separation among Alameda Creek trout and hatchery trout with greater than 50% bootstrap values in 1000 replicate neighbor-joining trees. Fish collected for this study from Palo Seco and Sheppard Creeks shared allelic frequencies with both the fish in Alameda Creek and those found in Scott Creek in Santa Cruz County. Fish collected in Horseshoe Creek or San Lorenzo Creek (Alameda County) did not share this unique genetic relationship between Alameda Creek fish and putative wild coastal trout. These two streams had allelic frequencies similar to some hatchery trout strains and to wild trout captured in the Central Valley. These data suggest that there are two possible steelhead ESUs using the tributaries of San Francisco Bay (one coastal and one Central Valley) or that hatchery trout supplementation has impacted some, but not all streams with a subsequent loss of locally adapted genetic characteristics. These data support the implementation of conservation management of rainbow trout in the Alameda Creek drainage as part of the central California coastal steelhead ESU.

  2. 77 FR 5201 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD... across Bear Creek, mile 3.4, between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. The proposed change will alter the... Avenue across Bear Creek, mile 3.4 between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. This change would require the...

  3. 77 FR 73967 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD... highway bridge at Wise Avenue across Bear Creek, mile 3.4, between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. The... Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 5201). The rulemaking concerned would...

  4. FY2012 CoC Competition Grants (New and Renewal)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the FY2012 renewal and new homeless assistance projects awarded by HUD for the FY2012 Continuum of Care (CoC) Program competition. Approximately...

  5. FY 2004 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — ...This Supplement to the Presidents Budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 summarizes the NITRD agencies coordinated research activities and FY 2004 plans, as required by...

  6. EST Table: FY036659 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY036659 rbmte13c09 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0047800(cysteamine dioxygenase activity)|GO:...f|XP_974899.1| PREDICTED: similar to 2-aminoethanethiol (cysteamine) dioxygenase [Tribolium castaneum] FY036659 bmte ...

  7. CREEK Project's Oyster Biomass Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before -...

  8. Water resources of the English River, Old Mans Creek, and Clear Creek basins in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwob, H.H.

    1964-01-01

    The surface and ground water resources of a 991 square mile area comprising the drainage basins of English River, Old Mans Creek and Clear Creek are presented. These basins lie to the west and southwest of Iowa City, Iowa, and all three streams are tributary to the Iowa River. The area is comprised of rolling uplands with relatively broad valleys and is devoted mainly to agriculture and livestock farming.

  9. How Fern Creek Is Beating Goliath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Margaret; Galatowitsch, Patrick; Hefferin, Keri; Highland, Shanita

    2013-01-01

    The "David" is Fern Creek Elementary, a small urban school in Orlando, Florida, that serves an overwhelmingly disadvantaged student population. The "Goliaths" are the mountains of problems that many inner-city students face--poverty, homelessness, mobility, instability, limited parent involvement, and violent neighborhood…

  10. Species status of Mill Creek Elliptio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.M. [Academy of Natural Sciences (United States); Mulvey, M. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses environmental effects of the Savannah River Plant on aqautic populations in Mill Creek and surrounding tributaries. Of particular concern was the status of Elliptio. Genetics and phenotypic characteristics have shown that the current classification system is not adequate for these populations. The appendices characterize genetic variability at different loci, electrophoretic data, allele frequencies, sympatric species, and anatomical characters.

  11. Geology of the Teakettle Creek watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert S. LaMotte

    1937-01-01

    The Teakettle Creek Experimental Watersheds lie for the most part on quartzites of probable Triassic age. However one of the triplicate drainages has a considerable acreage developed on weathered granodiorite. Topography is relatively uniform and lends itself to triplicate watershed studies. Locations for dams are suitable if certain engineering precautions...

  12. 77 FR 8818 - Publication of FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... PROTECTION Publication of FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Notice of public availability of FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory. SUMMARY: In accordance with... of the FY 2011 service contract inventory. This inventory provides information on service contract...

  13. FY 2005 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — The Supplement to the President`s FY 2005 Budget reports on the FY 2004 research and development R and D activities and FY 2005 plans of the multiagency Networking...

  14. Geosciences projects FY 1985 listing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    This report, which updates the previous working group publication issued in February 1982, contains independent sections: (A) Summary Outline of DOE Geoscience and Related Studies, and (B) Crosscut of DOE Geoscience and Geoscience Related Studies. The FY 1985 funding levels for geoscience and related activities in each of the 11 programs within DOE are presented. The 11 programs fall under six DOE organizations: Energy Research Conservation and Renewable Energy; Fossil Energy; Defense Programs; Environmental, Safety, and Health; and Civilian radioactive Waste. From time to time, there is particular need for special interprogrammatic coordination within certain topical areas. section B of the report is intended to fill this need for a topical categorization of the Department's geoscience and related activities. These topical areas in Solid Earth Geosciences, Atmospheric Geosciences, Ocean Geosciences, Space and Solar/Terrestrial Geosciences, and Hydrological Geosciences are presented in this report.

  15. NCPV FY 1998 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, R. D.; Hansen, A.

    1999-07-19

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) from October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998 (FY 1998). The NCPV is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE National Photovoltaics Program Plan for 1996-2000. The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to make PV a significant part of the domestic economy--as an industry and as an energy resource. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NCPV provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals.

  16. FY08 VPP Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossett, Sharon D.

    2008-01-01

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is a recognized third-party certification of worker safety and health program excellence, based on industry best practices that focus on management leadership and employee involvement, as well as other safety and health program elements. This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) VPP Program Evaluation is the FY-2008 report of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee regarding the status of VPP at PNNL. It is an update of the previous annual report dated January, 2007 and was completed in January 2008. An annual evaluation of the status of VPP is required of all sites that participate in the DOE-VPP. This report provides a detailed summary of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee’s evaluation of program performance and documents both strengths and improvement opportunities related to the various aspects of the VPP model.

  17. Significance of new potassium-argon ages from the Goldens Ranch and Moroni Formations, Sanpete-Sevier Valley area, central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkind, I.J.; Marvin, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Exposures of volcanic-sedimentary strata are widely distributed within central Utah. We believe that these volcanic and stratified sedimentary rocks, known by different formational names in different parts of this region, are, in fact, segments of one and the same suite of rocks that formed during the early and middle Tertiary. Potassium-argon ages indicate that both the Goldens Ranch and Moroni Formations formed during the late Eocene to middle Oligocene. The geochronology and stratigraphic relations are stong evidence that the Goldens Ranch and Moroni Formations are correlative, and that they are one and the same depositional unit. We recognize two sequences of repeated deformation: one that occurred prior to deposition and consolidation of the Goldens Ranch and Moroni Formations, and a second that occurred after these formations were emplaced, in essence, after early Oligocene time. In our view, multiple episodes of salt diapirism explain the structural complexity in central Utah. -from Authors

  18. FY 1996 annual work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-30

    In April 1994, the Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Plan was issued. This Plan presents the Department`s strategic outlook in response to a changing world. It discusses the Department`s unique capabilities; its mission, vision, and core values; and key customer and stakeholder considerations. The DOE Strategic Plan lists business strategies and critical success factors which are intended to aid the Department in accomplishing its mission and reaching its vision of itself in the future. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has an important role in carrying out the goals and objectives of the Secretary`s Strategic Plan. The ultimate goal of the OIG is to facilitate positive change by assisting its customers, responsible Government officials, in taking actions to improve programs and operations. The Inspector General annually issues his own Strategic Plan that contains program guidance for the next fiscal year. As part of its responsibility in carrying out the OIG mission, the Office of the Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services (Office of Audit Services) publishes an Annual Work Plan that sets forth audits that are planned for the next fiscal year. Selection of these audits is based on the overall budget of the Department, analyses of trends in Departmental operations, guidance contained in the agency`s strategic plans, statutory requirements, and the expressed needs and audit suggestions of Departmental program managers and OIG managers and staff. This work plan includes audits that are carried over from FY 1995 and audits scheduled to start during FY 1996. Audits included in the plan will be performed by OIG staff.

  19. Preliminary Assessment for CAU 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Pu and DU Site CAS No. TA-39-001-TAGR: Soil Contamination, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit 485, Corrective Action Site TA-39-001-TAGR, the Cactus Spring Ranch Soil Contamination Area, is located approximately six miles southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the eastern mouth of Sleeping Column Canyon in the Cactus Range on the Tonopah Test Range. This site was used in conjunction with animal studies involving the biological effects of radionuclides (specifically plutonium) associated with Operation Roofer Coaster. The location had been used as a ranch by private citizens prior to government control of the area. According to historical records, Operation Roofer Coaster activities involved assessing the inhalation uptake of plutonium in animals from the nonnuclear detonation of nuclear weapons. Operation Roofer Coaster consisted of four nonnuclear destruction tests of a nuclear device. The four tests all took place during May and June 1963 and consisted of Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1, 11, and 111. Eighty-four dogs, 84 burros, and 136 sheep were used for the Double Tracks test, and ten sheep and ten dogs were used for Clean Slate 11. These animals were housed at Cactus Spring Ranch. Before detonation, all animals were placed in cages and transported to the field. After the shot, they were taken to the decontamination area where some may have been sacrificed immediately. All animals, including those sacrificed, were returned to Cactus Spring Ranch at this point to have autopsies performed or to await being sacrificed at a later date. A description of the Cactus Spring Ranch activities found in project files indicates the ranch was used solely for the purpose of the Roofer Coaster tests and bioaccumulation studies and was never used for any other project. No decontamination or cleanup had been conducted at Cactus Spring Ranch prior to the start of the project. When the project was complete, the pits at Cactus Spring Ranch were filled with soil, and trailers where dogs were housed and animal autopsies had been performed were removed

  20. Genome sequencing identifies Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov., isolated from a ranch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Bakker, Henk C; Manuel, Clyde S; Fortes, Esther D; Wiedmann, Martin; Nightingale, Kendra K

    2013-09-01

    Twenty Listeria-like isolates were obtained from environmental samples collected on a cattle ranch in northern Colorado; all of these isolates were found to share an identical partial sigB sequence, suggesting close relatedness. The isolates were similar to members of the genus Listeria in that they were Gram-stain-positive, short rods, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive; the isolates were similar to Listeria fleischmannii because they were non-motile at 25 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequencing for representative isolates and whole genome sequencing for one isolate was performed. The genome of the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii (strain LU2006-1(T)) was also sequenced. The draft genomes were very similar in size and the average MUMmer nucleotide identity across 91% of the genomes was 95.16%. Genome sequence data were used to design primers for a six-gene multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme. Phylogenies based on (i) the near-complete 16S rRNA gene, (ii) 31 core genes and (iii) six housekeeping genes illustrated the close relationship of these Listeria-like isolates to Listeria fleischmannii LU2006-1(T). Sufficient genetic divergence of the Listeria-like isolates from the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii and differing phenotypic characteristics warrant these isolates to be classified as members of a distinct infraspecific taxon, for which the name Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TTU M1-001(T) ( =BAA-2414(T) =DSM 25391(T)). The isolates of Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. differ from the nominate subspecies by the inability to utilize melezitose, turanose and sucrose, and the ability to utilize inositol. The results also demonstrate the utility of whole genome sequencing to facilitate identification of novel taxa within a well-described genus. The genomes of both subspecies of Listeria fleischmannii contained putative enhancin genes; the Listeria fleischmannii subsp

  1. Conserving wildlife amongst the cotton fields. A third of a century of experience at the Nazinga Game Ranch, Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouché, Philippe; Lejeune, Philippe; Bailly, Vincent; Muyle, Margaux; Zinque, Marie-Hélène; Mercier, Alizé; Cornélis, Daniel; Lungren, Clark; Portier, Bruno; Marchal, Antoine; Renault, Florent; Yaméogo, Dieudonné; Kafando, Pierre; Sawadogo, Prosper; Vermeulen, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Established in the early 1970 as a participatory wildlife production area, the Nazinga Game Ranch turned into an island of conservation surrounded by cultivation. We asked ourselves how long-term ungulate trends are affected in a context of continuous human pressure. To find out, we compiled and analysed the data of yearly line-transect counts of mammals carried out since 1985. Results showed that large species such as the elephant (Loxodonta africana) and large antelopes increased or showed stable populations. In contrast, medium and small ungulates showed continuously decreasing trends. During the same period, rainfall, water availability from artificial water points and the crop encroaching outside Nazinga Game Ranch increased. After an initial significant reduction, illegal human signs increased. However, we showed that human signs were positively correlated with the abundance of large ungulates but negatively correlated with the abundance of medium and small ones. In conclusion, this study showed that some isolated mammal populations could be restored and maintained in the long term, in spite of being surrounded by highly cultivated areas.

  2. Comparison of hepatic and nephric total mercury concentrations between feral and ranch American mink (Neovison vison) from northwestern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Budis, Halina; Lanocha, Natalia; Podlasinska, Joanna; Jedrzejewska, Ewa; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I

    2012-05-01

    For many years the American mink (Neovison vison) has been used in North America (where it originates from) as a sensitive indirect bioindicator in assessing the degree of mercury (Hg) contamination in terrestrial ecosystems. The aim of this paper was the determination of total concentrations of Hg in the liver and kidneys of feral and ranch mink from the Warta Mouth National Park (WMNP) and from farms located in northwestern Poland, for comparison with similar data on American mink from North America. In road-killed feral mink from the WMNP, the mean concentrations were 11.8 and 14.1 mg/kg dry weight in the liver and kidney, respectively. Mean Hg concentrations in feral mink were from 240 to 90 times higher in these two respective tissues than in ranch mink. The feral mink from northwestern Poland had concentrations of hepatic and nephric Hg similar to the highest concentrations that have been recorded over the past several decades in wild American mink from certain areas of Canada and the USA.

  3. The Ash of Ohlson Ranch: A well-dated Stratigraphic Marker for Constraining Deformation Across the Northern San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R. J.; Vazquez, J. A.; Fleck, R. J.; DeLong, S.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A.; Wan, E.; Powell, C., II; Prentice, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The marine to non-marine transgressional - regressional Ohlson Ranch Formation of northern California was deposited mainly east of the San Andreas Fault and the Gualala structural block during Pliocene sea level high stands. The formation transitions eastward from marine to fluvial deposits and the marine strata are deposited on a mildly warped, pholad-bored erosional surface cut near Pliocene sea level (probably above storm wave-base), on rocks of the Coastal and Central belts of the Franciscan Complex. West of the San Andreas fault near Point Arena, a right-laterally displaced remnant of the wave-cut surface occurs at ca. 100m above modern sea level. East of the fault this surface varies in elevation from ca. 200-350m and a 12-15 cm thick light gray silicic tephra, the ash of Ohlson Ranch (AOR) locally occurs ~10m above the base of the marine section. The AOR consists of very fine-grained glass shards with conspicuous brown biotite in the upper 2 cm and rare co-magmatic clinopyroxene, hornblende and euhedral, weakly zoned zircons. The zircons are relatively uniform in size and little abraded, suggesting they are primary and not re-worked. The fine-grained nature of the AOR deposit suggests it is water lain and chemical analysis of the volcanic glass indicates that the eruptive source was in the southern Cascade Range. We analyzed both polished section mounts of zircon crystals and unpolished rims by ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) and LA-ICPMS in order to establish a precise U-Pb age for the AOR. Ages were adjusted for initial 230Th deficiency in the U-Pb chain using Th/U measured in zircon and host glass shards. Thirty-two zircon grains measured by LA-ICPMS at the University of Arizona LaserChron Center yield a mean U-Pb age of 4.58 ± 0.30 Ma (2σ , MSWD=0.53, n=23). SHRIMP analyses of zircon interiors exposed in polished epoxy-mounts yield a mean U-Pb age of 4.36 ± 0.11 Ma (2σ, MSWD 0.72, n=19). To further refine the likely eruption age of the AOR, the SHRIMP was

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1992--FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    In operation for fifty years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). ORNL is one of DOE's major multiprogram national laboratories. Activities at the Laboratory are focused on basic and applied research, on technology development, and on other technological challenges that are important to DOE and to the nation. The Laboratory also performs research and development (R D) for non-DOE sponsors when such activities complement DOE missions and address important national or international issues. The Laboratory is committed to the pursuit of excellence in all its activities, including the commitment to carry out its missions in compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. The principal elements of the Laboratory's missions in support of DOE include activities in each of the following areas: (1) Energy production and conservation technologies; (2) physical and life sciences; (3) scientific and technical user facilities; (4) environmental protection and waste management; (5) science technology transfer; and, (6) education. This institutional plan for ORNL activities is for the next five years: FY 1992--1997.

  5. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-02-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

  6. FY02 I/O Integration Blueprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupps, K; Gary, M; Fitzgerald, K; Quinn, T; Wiltzius, D; Minuzzo, K; Seager, M; McLarty, T

    2001-11-16

    This document describes I/O focused requirements, issues, options, plans, deliverables and budgets for Livermore Computing (LC) in FY02. Areas covered include I/O for archival storage, network, platform, visualization and the I/O Testbed. Implementation Plan (IP) milestones and tasks in each of these areas map to the efforts and plans described in this document. When developing FY02 I/O requirements, a survey of key LC customers was performed (see Appendix A and D) and DisCom2 requirements were gathered. The LC customer provided throughput and capacity estimates were quite conservative when compared to ASCI curve projections and were history-based rather than being based on hardware capabilities. Because substantial differences exist in the ASCI platform in FY02, required I/O throughput rates were raised appropriately (i.e., by over 200% platform-to-archive). Archive capacity requirements remain fairly stable in FY02 as aggressive FY01 plans and purchases will accommodate most of the volume of data received through FY02. 10 Gigabit Ethernet network infrastructure will begin to get deployed in early FY02. When full implementation becomes cost effective it will allow us to greatly increase bandwidth between computer facilities. In addition pre-production OC-48 Ultrafastlane encryptors will be installed in early FY02 at each of the Tri-Labs. Preliminary testing of these encryption units and production unit installation will also take place in FY02. Significant network tuning, routing and protocol efforts will be investigated during FY02. These include channel bonding, gigabit ethernet flow control and HPSS protocol enhancements. Changes to and investigation of archive mover platforms and tape technologies are planned in FY02. 1BM tape robotics and tape devices will be phased out. New Storage Area Network (SAN) and platform-based mover architectures will be prototyped and investigated as approaches capable of significantly reducing archive expenditures in support of

  7. Documentary Research of the Sugar Creek Basin,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    oif ii,ied atfter thle abli~ltiorn of siasett as an -. Chailotte. VICTORIA, 16010 Trhe Plano . c - -- pruinint-rit :Irea I-t oirey famnily J’civ-utc...lS RY (OtNIY pie of F’ederal tarmot inise - Ici afe, riot niiii’iaib/e .,IIKCI, Davidsoir College catnprr. I1849 Mount Glileadi vicinity. TOWN CR(EEK

  8. Channel stability of Turkey Creek, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, David L.; Soenksen, Philip J.

    1998-01-01

    Channelization on Turkey Creek and its receiving stream, the South Fork Big Nemaha River, has disturbed the equilibrium of Turkey Creek and has led to channel-stability problems, such as degradation and channel widening, which pose a threat to bridges and land adjacent to the stream. As part of a multiagency study, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed channel stability at two bridge sites on upper and middle portions of Turkey Creek by analyzing streambed-elevation data for gradation changes, comparing recent cross-section surveys and historic accounts, identifying bank-failure blocks, and analyzing tree-ring samples. These results were compared to gradation data and trend results for a U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station near the mouth of Turkey Creek from a previous study. Examination of data on streambed elevations reveals that degradation has occurred. The streambed elevation declined 0.5 m at the upper site from 1967-97. The streambed elevation declined by 3.2 m at the middle site from 1948-97 and exposed 2 m of the pilings of the Nebraska Highway 8 bridge. Channel widening could not be verified at the two sites from 1967-97, but a historic account indicates widening at the middle site to be two to three times that of the 1949 channel width. Small bank failures were evident at the upper site and a 4-m-wide bank failure occurred at the middle site in 1987 according to tree ring analyses. Examination of streambed-elevation data from a previous study at the lower site reveals a statistically significant aggrading trend from 1958-93. Further examination of these data suggests minor degradation occurred until 1975, followed by aggradation.

  9. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, Stephen J.; Buehler, M.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Grinstein, S.; Habig, A.; Holmes, S.; Hylen, J.; Kissel, W.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2008. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2008 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  10. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geelhoed, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hahn, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Harris, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Henderson, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); McFarland, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Moore, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pahlka, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Plunkett, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Soha, A. K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Van de Water, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2012. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2012 MINOS and MINERνA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  11. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P.; Bernardi, G.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Dixon, R.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Hahn, S.; Harris, D.; Henderson, S.

    2011-11-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2011. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2011 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MINOS and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  12. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M.N; Appel, J.A.; Brice, S.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, d.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Holmes, S.; Kissel, W.; Lee, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2009. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2009 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  13. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarapata, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geer, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geesaman, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Harris, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lang, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); McFarland, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Moore, C. D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Nagaitsev, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Plunkett, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Reimer, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schmidt, J. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Soha, A. K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Tayloe, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Thomas, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Torretta, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Van de Water, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2014. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2014 MINOS and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  14. NREL Partnership Survey - FY 2016 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts an annual partnership satisfaction survey in which we ask our clients to rate NREL in a number of areas. As a national laboratory, the principal areas we focus on include value, timeliness, quality, price, and capabilities. This fact sheet shows the results of a survey with 300 customers responding to 11 questions using ratings that vary from 'strongly agree' to 'strongly disagree.' In FY 16, 100% of the scores improved or were equal to FY 15 numbers.

  15. FY16-20 Strategic Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwell, Amber Suzanne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Welcome to our FY16–FY20 Strategic Plan, which both refects our continued dedication to the work we do and reinforces the importance of the integrated Laboratories’ strategic framework to our future. This document is the result of the leadership team’s journey over the past few years in response to the needs of our nation. In an external environment that continues to change, sometimes in unexpected ways, it is critical that our mission areas and our foundation become increasingly synergistic, forming a whole whose parts are interdependent.

  16. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarapata, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2015-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2015 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  17. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY POINT OF USE REVERSE OSMOSIS. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SUNSET RANCH DEVELOPMENT IN HOMEDALE, ID. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the point of use arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Sunset Ranch Development in Homedale, ID. The objectives of the project are to evaluate t...

  18. Tuberculosis in Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) and in a bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) on a game ranch in central province, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, U; Pandey, G S; Kriek, N P; Cauldwell, A E

    1998-09-01

    Mycobacteriosis was diagnosed for the first time outside a national park in free-ranging wild animals on a game ranch in Zambia. A Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) was found dead with tuberculous lesions on a ranch near Lusaka. Acid-fast bacilli were found in the affected organs. Mycobacteria were isolated from these tissues. A bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) was found dead on the same ranch with multiple superficial abscesses in the neck region, extensive granulomatous lesions in the lung, the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes and several nodular lesions in the spleen. Few acid-fast bacilli were found in the exudate from the abscesses and lesions in the affected organs. Histologically the lesions resembled those of tuberculosis, but mycobacteria could not be isolated. In addition, 1 Kafue lechwe among 37 wild ungulates of 13 species shot on the ranch showed typical tuberculous lesions in the lungs, but the diagnosis was not confirmed by bacterial isolation. The role of the Kafue lechwe as maintenance host for tuberculosis as well as in the possible spread of this disease to other wildlife are discussed.

  19. Isolation and identification of spoilage microorganisms using food-based media combined with rDNA sequencing: ranch dressing as a model food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Joy G; Jones, Joseph M; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2009-05-01

    Investigating microbial spoilage of food is hampered by the lack of suitable growth media and protocols to characterize the causative agents. Microbial spoilage of salad dressing is sporadic and relatively unpredictable, thus processors struggle to develop strategies to minimize or prevent spoilage of this product. The objectives of this study were to (i) induce and characterize spoilage events in ranch-style dressing as a model food, and (ii) isolate and identify the causative microorganisms using traditional and food-based media, coupled with rDNA sequence analysis. Ranch dressing (pH 4.4) was prepared and stored at 25 degrees C for 14 d and microbial populations were recovered on MRS agar and ranch dressing agar (RDA), a newly formulated food-based medium. When isolates suspected as the spoilage agents were inoculated into ranch dressing and held at 25 degrees C for 9-10 d, three unique spoilage events were characterized. Using rDNA sequence comparisons, spoilage organisms were identified as Lactobacillus brevis, Pediococcus acidilactici, and Torulaspora delbrueckii. P. acidilactici produced flat-sour spoilage, whereas Lb. brevis resulted in product acidification and moderate gas production. The RDA medium allowed for optimum recovery of the excessive gas-producing spoilage yeast, T. delbrueckii. The isolation and identification strategy utilized in this work should assist in the characterization of spoilage organisms in other food systems.

  20. Tuberculosis in Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis and in a bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus on a game ranch in Central Province, Zambia : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Zieger

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacteriosis was diagnosed for the first time outside a national park in free-ranging wild animals on a game ranch in Zambia. A Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis was found dead with tuberculous lesions on a ranch near Lusaka. Acid-fast bacilli were found in the affected organs. Mycobacteria were isolated from these tissues. A bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus was found dead on the same ranch with multiple superficial abscesses in the neck region, extensive granulomatous lesions in the lung, the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes and several nodular lesions in the spleen. Few acid-fast bacilli were found in the exudate from the abscesses and lesions in the affected organs. Histologically the lesions resembled those of tuberculosis, but mycobacteria could not be isolated. In addition, 1 Kafue lechwe among 37 wild ungulates of 13 species shot on the ranch showed typical tuberculous lesions in the lungs, but the diagnosis was not confirmed by bacterial isolation. The role of the Kafue lechwe as maintenance host for tuberculosis as well as in the possible spread of this disease to other wildlife are discussed.

  1. Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs. FY 2005 - FY 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2004-05-01

    This report describes a benefits analysis undertaken by EERE to better understand the extent to which the technologies and market improvements funded by its FY 2005 budget request will make energy more affordable, cleaner, and more reliable. It summarizes the results of the analysis, which focused on economic, environmental, and security benefits related to energy. The report identifies specific measures or indicators of estimated benefits for FY 2005.

  2. Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs. FY 2004 - FY 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2004-04-01

    This report describes a benefits analysis undertaken by EERE to better understand the extent to which the technologies and market improvements funded by its FY 2004 budget request will make energy more affordable, cleaner, and more reliable. It summarizes the results of the analysis, which focused on economic, environmental, and security benefits related to energy. The report identifies specific measures or indicators of estimated benefits for FY 2004.

  3. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1993 and plans for FY 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Eleanor C.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for F.Y. 1993 and research plans for F.Y. 1994. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5-year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  4. Microsatellite analyses of San Franciscuito Creek rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2000-01-01

    Microsatellite genetic diversity found in San Francisquito Creek rainbow trout support a close genetic relationship with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from another tributary of San Francisco Bay, Alameda Creek, and coastal trout found in Lagunitas Creek, Marin County, California. Fish collected for this study from San Francisquito Creek showed a closer genetic relationship to fish from the north-central California steelhead ESU than for any other listed group of O. mykiss. No significant genotypic or allelic frequency associations could be drawn between San Francisquito Creek trout and fish collected from the four primary rainbow trout hatchery strains in use in California, i.e. Whitney, Mount Shasta, Coleman, and Hot Creek hatchery fish. Indeed, genetic distance analyses (δµ2) supported separation between San Francisquito Creek trout and all hatchery trout with 68% bootstrap values in 1000 replicate neighbor-joining trees. Not surprisingly, California hatchery rainbow trout showed their closest evolutionary relationships with contemporary stocks derived from the Sacramento River. Wild collections of rainbow trout from the Sacramento-San Joaquin basin in the Central Valley were also clearly separable from San Francisquito Creek fish supporting separate, independent ESUs for two groups of O. mykiss (one coastal and one Central Valley) with potentially overlapping life histories in San Francisco Bay. These data support the implementation of management and conservation programs for rainbow trout in the San Francisquito Creek drainage as part of the central California coastal steelhead ESU.

  5. Alternative Electrochemical Salt Waste Forms, Summary of FY11-FY12 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mccloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lepry, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rodriguez, Carmen P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Windisch, Charles F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westman, Matthew P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rieck, Bennett T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lang, Jesse B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olszta, Matthew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-17

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, is currently investigating alternative waste forms for wastes generated from nuclear fuel processing. One such waste results from an electrochemical separations process, called the “Echem” process. The Echem process utilizes a molten KCl-LiCl salt to dissolve the fuel. This process results in a spent salt containing alkali, alkaline earth, lanthanide halides and small quantities of actinide halides, where the primary halide is chloride with a minor iodide fraction. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is concurrently investigating two candidate waste forms for the Echem spent-salt: high-halide minerals (i.e., sodalite and cancrinite) and tellurite (TeO2)-based glasses. Both of these candidates showed promise in fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY2010 with a simplified nonradioactive simulant of the Echem waste. Further testing was performed on these waste forms in FY2011 and FY2012 to assess the possibility of their use in a sustainable fuel cycle. This report summarizes the combined results from FY2011 and FY2012 efforts.

  6. HEMATOLOGICAL BLOOD PARAMETERS OF YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR CARPS (CYPRINIDAE REARED USING FISH RANCHING TECHNOLOGY IN THE SOUTHERN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Volichenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the hematological characteristics of blood young-of-the-year carps reared using fish ranching technology in the southern Ukraine and to establish certain correlations between the main fish technical features of the studied groups of the young-of-the-year fish. Methodology. The studies were based on field and experimental methods adopted for fisheries, biochemical and statistical studies. Findings. The paper contains the data on mean fish weight, hematological and biochemical parameters of serum of young-of-the-year carps reared using fish ranching technology. Based on a comparative analysis of the obtained data, we detected significant peculiarities and qualitative difference in the absence of foam cells and basophils, which distinguish carp from the group of herbivorous fish, established significant correlations between mean fish weight and hematologic indices of blood. Marked by fish-breeding relationships with signs like weight and some parameters of blood components in all studied fish: hemoglobin in the range from 0.7858 to 0.9943, number of erythrocytes from 0.7843 to 0.9942, lymphocytes from 0.7848 to 0.9949, сholеsterol from 0.7640 to 0.9616 and triglycerides of 0.7499 in silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and 0.9616 in common carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio. To show these relationships graphically, we used regression analysis and the obtained regression equations can give an accurate assessment of the quality of fish seeds through hematological blood parameters and mean weight. Originality. The analysis of hematological parameters of blood of young-of-the-year carps: common carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio, silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella reared using fish ranching technology in the south of Ukraine was performed for the first time. Practical value. The obtained data allow scientifically recommending them as a component of

  7. The PNNL Lab Homes Experimental Plan, FY12-FY15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Sarah H; Parker, Graham B; Baechler, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    The PNNL lab homes (http://labhomes.pnnl.gov/ ) are two manufactured homes recently installed immediately south of the 6th Street Warehouse on the PNNL Richland, WA campus that will serve as a project test bed for DOE, PNNL and its research partners who aim to achieve highly energy efficient and grid-responsive homes. The PNNL Lab Homes project is the first of its kind in the Pacific Northwest region. The Energy & Environment Directorate at PNNL, working with multiple sponsors, will use the identical 1,500 square-foot homes for experiments focused on reducing energy use and peak demand. Research and demonstration primarily will focus on retrofit technologies, and the homes will offer a unique, side-by-side ability to test and compare new ideas and approaches that are applicable to site-built as well as manufactured homes. The test plan has the following objectives: • To define a retrofit solution packages for moderate to cold climates that can be cost effectively deployed in the Pacific NW to save 50% of the energy needs of a typical home while enhancing the comfort and indoor air quality. The retrofit strategies would also lower the peak demands on the grid. • To leverage the unique opportunity in the lab homes to reach out to researchers, industry, and other interested parties in the building science community to collaborate on new smart and efficient solutions for residential retrofits. • To increase PNNL’s visibility in the area of buildings energy efficiency based on the communication strategy and presentation of the unique and impactful data generated in the lab homes. This document describes the proposed test plan for the lab homes to achieve these goals, through FY15. The subsequent sections will provide a brief description of each proposed experiment, summarize the timing of the experiment (including any experiments that may be run in parallel, and propose potential contributors and collaborators. For those experiments with funding information

  8. Feedstock Interface Fy2017 Q3 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Danny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Howe, Daniel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westover, Tyler [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klinger, HJordan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hernandez, Sergio [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-10

    This report summarized the results obtained in FY2017 Q3 of a collaborative effort between researchers at NREL, PNNL, and INL to develop rapid screening methods and models to predict the fact pyrolysis conversion performance of a range of biomass materials.

  9. Institutional research and development, FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Lawler, G.M.; Crawford, R.B.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.M.; Prono, J.K.; Strack, B.S. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to problems in various scientific fields, and long-term interdisciplinary research in support of defense and energy missions. This annual report describes research funded under this program for FY87. (DWL)

  10. SERI Biomass Program. FY 1983 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corder, R.E.; Hill, A.M.; Lindsey, H.; Lowenstein, M.Z.; McIntosh, R.P.

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the SERI Biomass Program during FY 1983. The SERI Biomass Program consists of three elements: Aquatic Species, Anaerobic Digestion, and Photo/Biological Hydrogen. Each element has been indexed separately. 2 references, 44 figures, 22 tables.

  11. Advanced Energy Projects: FY 1993, Research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    AEP has been supporting research on novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, new uses for scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction, etc. The summaries are grouped according to projects active in FY 1993, Phase I SBIR projects, and Phase II SBIR projects. Investigator and institutional indexes are included.

  12. FY 2012 Lightweight Materials Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-15

    The FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Lightweight Materials provides a detailed description of the activities and technical accomplishments which focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  13. Transmutation Fuels Campaign FY-09 Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lori Braase

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year 2009 (FY-08) accomplishments for the Transmutation Fuels Campaign (TFC). The emphasis is on the accomplishments and relevance of the work. Detailed description of the methods used to achieve the highlighted results and the associated support tasks are not included in this report.

  14. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    services to veterans who meet certain eligibility rules including hospital and medical care , disability compensation and pensions,3 education ,4...prosthetic and orthotic devices, including eyeglasses and hearing aids; home health services, hospice care , palliative care , and institutional respite care ...CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress Veterans Medical Care : FY2011 Appropriations Sidath Viranga

  15. A Creek to Bay Biological Assessment in Oakland, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, E.; Ramirez, N.; Lopez, A.; Avila, M.; Ramirez, J.; Arroyo, D.; Bracho, H.; Casanova, A.; Pierson, E.

    2011-12-01

    In 2007, the Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program (SWAMP) assessed the impact of trash on water quality in the Peralta Creek which is located in the Fruitvale district of Oakland, CA. This 2011 follow-up study will take further steps in evaluating the physical and biological impacts of pollution and human development on Peralta Creek and in the San Leandro Bay, where the Creek empties into the larger San Francisco Bay estuary. This study will utilize two forms of biological assessment in order to determine the level of water quality and ecosystem health of Peralta Creek and San Leandro Bay in Oakland, California. A Rapid Bioassesment Protocal (RBP) will be used as the method of biological assessment for Peralta Creek. RBP uses a biotic index of benthic macroinvertebrates to provide a measure of a water body's health. Larval trematodes found in two mud snails (Ilynassa obsoleta and Cerithidea californica) will be used to evaluate the health of the San Leandro Bay. Due to the complex life cycle of trematodes, the measure of trematode diversity and richness in host species serves as an indicator of estuarine health (Huspeni 2005). We have completed the assessment of one section of Peralta Creek, located at 2465 34th Avenue, Oakland, CA 94601. Abundance results indicate a moderately healthy creek because there were high levels of pollution tolerant benthic macroinvertebrates. The tolerant group of benthic macroinvertebrates includes such organisms as flatworms, leeches, and scuds. This is possibly due to this section of the creek being pumped up to the surface from culverts impacting the macroinvertebrate's life cycle. Another contributing factor to creek health is the amount of organic debris found in the creek, which inhibits the flow and oxygenation of the water, allowing for more pollution tolerant aquatic insects to persist. Further investigation is being conducted to fully assess the Peralta Creek watershed; from the preliminary results one can surmise that

  16. Vascular plants diversity of El Aribabi Conservation Ranch: A private natural protected area in northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Jesus Sanchez-Escalante; Denise Z. Avila-Jimenez; David A. Delgado-Zamora; Liliana Armenta-Cota; Thomas R. Van Devender; Ana Lilia. Reina-Guerrero

    2013-01-01

    In northeastern Sonora, isolated Sky Island mountain ranges with desertscrub, desert grassland, oak woodland, and pine-oak forest have high biodiversity. El Aribabi Conservation Ranch in the Sierra Azul (from 30°51’13”N, 110°41’9”W to 30°46’38”N, 110°32’3”W) was designated a Private Protected Natural Area by the Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas in March...

  17. The dynamical interactions of Amazon deforestation, intensification of cattle ranching and technology adoption: insights from a socio-ecological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hansen, Finn; Heitzig, Jobst; Donges, Jonathan F.; Cardoso, Manoel F.; Kurths, Jürgen; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2017-04-01

    Deforestation in the tropics - with vast consequences for the ecosystem and climate - is mainly driven by subsequent land use, which is not only determined by environmental and economic constraints but also influenced by the use of different production technologies. Inefficient production technologies can lead to excessive use of land, especially in areas where land is easily available and accessible. Here, the adoption of new technologies could help to use already converted land more intensively and ease pressures on ecologically valuable areas. In this study, we take the Brazilian Amazon as a prominent example region to explore the interplay of land-use decisions with environmental and economic dynamics in the process of land-use intensification and frontier expansion. Expansion of pasture land for cattle ranching to satisfy increasing domestic and international demands is one of the important drivers for deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Pasture run-down and following land abandonment further drive the expansion of deforestation frontiers into pristine forests. Therefore, intensification of livestock production, especially better pasture management, could potentially reduce deforestation. However, a number of reasons including the large spatial extent of the region make the process of comparing the effectiveness of different management techniques, technologies and policies in the region difficult. Therefore, the effectiveness and possible outcomes of policies to foster intensification are highly debated in the literature. Some authors deny that intensification policies are a viable option to spare forests as long as they are not a scarce resource [1] while others insist that intensification has an effect if only supported by the right policies [2]. In this presentation, we introduce a concise agent-based model to study conditions under which intensification can reduce deforestation and explore the trade-offs between intensified and extensive land uses

  18. 78 FR 58049 - Proposed Establishment of the Adelaida District, Creston District, El Pomar District, Paso Robles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... District, San Juan Creek, San Miguel District, Santa Margarita Ranch, and Templeton Gap District... Robles Willow Creek District, San Juan Creek, San Miguel District, Santa Margarita Ranch, and Templeton... Creek, San Miguel District, Santa Margarita Ranch, and Templeton Gap District viticultural areas within...

  19. ISCR FY2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R

    2006-02-02

    Large-scale scientific computation and all of the disciplines that support and help validate it have been placed at the focus of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) initiative of the Office of Science of the Department of Energy (DOE). The maturation of simulation as a fundamental tool of scientific and engineering research is underscored in the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) June 2005 finding that ''computational science has become critical to scientific leadership, economic competitiveness, and national security''. LLNL operates several of the world's most powerful computers--including today's single most powerful--and has undertaken some of the largest and most compute-intensive simulations ever performed, most notably the molecular dynamics simulation that sustained more than 100 Teraflop/s and won the 2005 Gordon Bell Prize. Ultrascale simulation has been identified as one of the highest priorities in DOE's facilities planning for the next two decades. However, computers at architectural extremes are notoriously difficult to use in an efficient manner. Furthermore, each successful terascale simulation only points out the need for much better ways of interacting with the resulting avalanche of data. Advances in scientific computing research have, therefore, never been more vital to the core missions of LLNL than at present. Computational science is evolving so rapidly along every one of its research fronts that to remain on the leading edge, LLNL must engage researchers at many academic centers of excellence. In FY 2005, the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) served as one of LLNL's main bridges to the academic community with a program of collaborative subcontracts, visiting faculty

  20. Assisting Vulnerable Communities: Canyon Ranch Institute's and Health Literacy Media's Health Literacy and Community-Based Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasant, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Canyon Ranch Institute and Health Literacy Media are a 501(c)3 non-profit public charity working to improve health based on the best evidence-based practices of health literacy and integrative health. As an organization, we offer a spectrum of health literacy work extending from plain language services to intensive community-based interventions. (See www.canyoranchinstitute.org & www.healthliteracy.media) In this chapter, we discuss the methodologies and outcomes of two of those community-based interventions - the Canyon Ranch Institute Life Enhancement Program and our Theater for Health program. Perhaps uniquely, an underpinning approach to both efforts is based on the increasing body of evidence of health literacy as a social determinant of health. Therefore, our research and evaluation of these programs captures not only changes in knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs but explicitly includes changes in informed behavior change and objective health outcomes as well. Our work makes it clear - that if you engage people in a health literate approach to informed behavior change (and respect their knowledge of their own lives and context) you can help people help themselves to better health. Further, from the perspective of health as a right and a resource for living, we find people who advance their health use this resource to continually better their own and their family's lives as well as the communities where they live. Hopefully, the examples provided in this chapter provide a sense of direction and motivation to others to fully explore the potential of health literacy to improve health and well-being, increase satisfaction with life, and produce health outcomes at a lower cost.

  1. Naturally occurring Influenza A virus subtype H1N2 infection in a Midwest United States mink (Mustela vison) ranch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Schwartz, Kent; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Jianqiang; Hildebrandt, Hugh

    2012-03-01

    Influenza A virus (FLUAV) causes acute respiratory disease in humans and a variety of animal species. The virus tends to remain within the species of origin; nonetheless, naturally occurring cross-species transmission of FLUAV has been periodically documented. Multiple cross-species transmissions of FLUAV have been reported from companion animals and captive wild animals, neither of which is historically considered as natural hosts of FLUAV. In the fall of 2010, mink (Mustela vison) inhabiting a 15,000-head mink farm in the Midwest United States experienced persistent severe respiratory distress and nose and/or mouth bleeding. Mink losses averaged approximately 10 animals per day. Six dead mink at 6 months of age were submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for diagnostic investigation. Gross and microscopic examinations revealed that all 6 mink had hemorrhagic bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Hemolytic Escherichia coli was isolated from lungs, probably accounting for hemorrhagic pneumonia. All animals tested negative for Canine distemper virus and Aleutian mink disease virus. Interestingly, FLUAV of H1N2 subtype, which contained the matrix gene of swine lineage, was detected in the lungs. Serological follow-up on mink that remained in the ranch until pelting also confirmed that the ranch had been exposed to FLUAV of H1 subtype (δ clade). The case study suggests that FLUAV should be included in the differential diagnosis when mink experience epidemics of respiratory disease. Since the source of FLUAV appeared to be uncooked turkey meat, feeding animals fully cooked ration should be considered as a preventive measure.

  2. NREL Energy Storage Projects: FY2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A.; Ban, C.; Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Ireland, J.; Keyser, M.; Kim, G. H.; Long, D.; Neubauer, J.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Smith, K.; Tenent, R.; Wood, E.; Han, T.; Hartridge, S.; Shaffer, C. E.

    2014-07-01

    In FY13, DOE funded NREL to make technical contributions to various R&D activities. This report summarizes NREL's R&D projects in FY13 in support of the USABC; Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design; ABR; and BATT program elements. The FY13 projects under NREL's Energy Storage R&D program are discussed in depth in this report.

  3. Population Representation in the Military ServicesFY 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Cleared for Public Release Distribution unlimited Population Representation in the Military Services—FY 2014 Aline O. Quester...include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 1 Population Representation in the Military...Services—FY 2014 To view the FY 2014 Population Representation in the Military Services Summary document and all related tables, please visit https

  4. Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment FY 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Robert W.

    2000-03-10

    This document summarizes the Tanks Focus Area (TFA's) process of collecting, analyzing, and responding to high-level radioactive tank waste science and technology needs developed from across the DOE complex in FY 2000. The document also summarizes each science and technology need, and provides an initial prioritization of TFA's projected work scope for FY 2001 and FY 2002.

  5. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program: FY2011 Project Descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Whinnery, LeRoy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-02-03

    This document provides brief descriptions of research topics for consideration by the IDCA for potential funding in funding in FY 2011. The topics include the utilization of the results from the Proficiency Test developed during FY 2010 to start populating the small-scale safety and thermal testing (SSST) Testing Compendium and revising results from methods modifications. Other research topics were also developed for FY 2011 from issues that arose in the Proficiency Test.

  6. Twenty-Five Year Site Plan FY2013 - FY2037

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is the nation's premier national security science laboratory. Its mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the United States (U.S.) nuclear stockpile; reduce the threat of weapons of mass destruction, proliferation, and terrorism; and solve national problems in defense, energy, and the environment. The fiscal year (FY) 2013-2037 Twenty-Five Year Site Plan (TYSP) is a vital component for planning to meet the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) commitment to ensure the U.S. has a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear deterrent. The Laboratory also uses the TYSP as an integrated planning tool to guide development of an efficient and responsive infrastructure that effectively supports the Laboratory's missions and workforce. Emphasizing the Laboratory's core capabilities, this TYSP reflects the Laboratory's role as a prominent contributor to NNSA missions through its programs and campaigns. The Laboratory is aligned with Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) modernization activities outlined in the NNSA Strategic Plan (May 2011) which include: (1) ensuring laboratory plutonium space effectively supports pit manufacturing and enterprise-wide special nuclear materials consolidation; (2) constructing the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Nuclear Facility (CMRR-NF); (3) establishing shared user facilities to more cost effectively manage high-value, experimental, computational and production capabilities; and (4) modernizing enduring facilities while reducing the excess facility footprint. Th is TYSP is viewed by the Laboratory as a vital planning tool to develop an effi cient and responsive infrastructure. Long range facility and infrastructure development planning are critical to assure sustainment and modernization. Out-year re-investment is essential for sustaining existing facilities, and will be re-evaluated on an annual

  7. Copepod composition, abundance and diversity in Makupa Creek ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The taxonomic composition, abundance and spatio-temporal distribution of copepods were analysed from monthly zooplankton samples collected in Makupa creek and Mombasa Harbour (Makupa creek was until recently subjected to considerable dumping of domestic and industrial waste). At least 51 copepod species ...

  8. 33 CFR 117.1001 - Cat Point Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cat Point Creek. 117.1001 Section 117.1001 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1001 Cat Point Creek. The draw of the...

  9. Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1998 Habitat Conservation Projects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, Duane G.

    1999-12-01

    The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a few of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. 1998 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek.

  10. Total Hydrocarbon (THC) of the Lower Kolo Creek in Otuogidi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquatic wild life and habitats are affected by pollution through physical contact, absorption and inhalation. This study was carried out to investigate the THC values of lower Kolo creek in Otuogidi Bayelsa State – Nigeria for 12 months. THC of sediment and water covering wet and dry season obtained from the creek were ...

  11. 33 CFR 117.163 - Islais Creek (Channel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Islais Creek (Channel). 117.163 Section 117.163 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.163 Islais Creek (Channel). (a) The...

  12. Utilizing Creeks for Integrated Rural Coastal Development of Ilaje ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rural communities in the country are blessed with resources which need to be exploited to achieve rural development. This study examines the Utilization of Creeks for Integrated Coastal Development of Ilaje Area of Nigeria. The primary goal of the study is to carry out inventory on creek resources and how best it could be ...

  13. FY10 Defense Environmental Programs Annual Report to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    0 FORT BAKER / DC39799F973900 $010 $0 FORT BAYARD / DC39799F974000 $010 $0 FORT BUNKER HILL / DC39799F974100 $010 $0 FORT CHAPLIN / DC39799F974200...Progress Fort McClellan completed an interim removal action on 240 acres in the Charlie Area. Plan of Action Plan of action items for Fort McClellan...Ranges in FY11-FY12. MMRP 0 Complete the engineering evaluation and cost analysis for the Charlie Area in FY11-FY12. F-67 Army

  14. Information Resources Management Long Range Plan, FY 1995-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Table of Contents: Introduction; Agency 5-Year IRM Investment Projections; Major IRM Program Accomplishments for FY 1993; Information Collection Budget; Summary of Computer Security Plans; Appendix: Acronym List.

  15. W-519 Sagebrush Mitigation Project FY-2004 Final Review and Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2004-09-30

    This report summarizes activities conducted as mitigation for loss of sagebrush-steppe habitats due to Project W-519, the construction of the infrastructure for the Tank Waste Remediation System Vitrification Plant. The focus of this report is to provide a review and final status of mitigation actions performed through FY2004. Data collected since FY1999 have been included where appropriate. The Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project W-519 prescribed three general actions to be performed as mitigation for the disturbance of approximately 40 ha (100 acres) of mature sagebrush-steppe habitat. These actions included: (1) transplanting approximately 130,000 sagebrush seedlings on the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE); (2) rectification of the new transmission line corridor via seeding with native grasses and sagebrush; and (3) research on native plant species with a goal of increasing species diversity in future mitigation or restoration actions. Nearly 130,000 Wyoming big sagebrush seedlings where planted on ALE during FY2000 and FY2001. About 39,000 of those seedlings were burned during the 24-Command Fire of June 2000. The surviving and subsequent replanting has resulted in about 91,000 seedlings that were planted across four general areas on ALE. A 50% survival rate at any monitoring period was defined as the performance standard in the MAP for this project. Data collected in 2004 indicate that of the over 5000 monitored plants, 51.1% are still alive, and of those the majority are thriving and blooming. These results support the potential for natural recruitment and the ultimate goal of wildlife habitat replacement. Thus, the basic performance standard for sagebrush survival within the habitat compensation planting has been met. Monitoring activities conducted in 2004 indicate considerable variation in seedling survival depending on the type of plant material, site conditions, and to a lesser extent, treatments performed at the time of planting

  16. Ecological studies related to the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Site. Annual report, FY-1994 and FY-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory initiated ecological studies related to the construction of the DWPF on the SRS in FY-1979. Two areas have been used for biological surveys and long-term monitoring: the DWPF construction site (S-Area and Z-Area), and two control sites (Rainbow Bay and Tinker Creek). The Rainbow Bay study area and S-Area are located within 5 km of each other on the SRS, and both once contained Carolina bays which were very similar ecologically. One goal of the SREL`s faunal studies is to compare the natural variation in amphibian populations at the Rainbow Bay control site to the variation observed at the human-altered site (Sun Bay, formerly on the DWPF construction site). Pre-construction biological surveys included data on vegetation, birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles, fish and several invertebrate groups. No species on the Federal Endangered or Threatened lists were found on either site, but several plants and animals of threatened or special-concern status in South Carolina were present and the gopher frog (Rana areolata) currently is being considered for federal listing. Continuing studies are directed towards assessing construction impacts on the biota and towares modeling the effects of alteration of wetland hydroperiod on the biota. Primary emphasis is being paced on evaluation the effectiveness of mitigation measures undertaken by DOE.

  17. LDRD Annual Report FY2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P; De Yoreo, J; Jackson, K; van Bibber, K

    2007-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration in national security, energy security, environmental management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. The accomplishments described in this Annual Report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $92 million for FY2006 sponsored 188 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the

  18. LDRD FY2004 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kline, K. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-02-28

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and the National Nuclear Security Administration in national security, homeland security, energy security, environmental management, bioscience and healthcare technology, and breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. The LDRD Program was authorized by Congress in 1991 and is administered by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office. The accomplishments described in this Annual Report demonstrate how the LDRD portfolio is strongly aligned with these missions and contributes to the Laboratory’s success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $69.8 million for FY2004 sponsored 220 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific and technical quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of meritorious proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a challenging one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the Nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory’s multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the Nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle

  19. Institutional Plan FY 2003 - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd

    2003-01-27

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 2003-2007 Institutional Plan describes the strategic directions and key issues that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory management must address with the Department of Energy (DOE) in charting its future as a multiprogram national laboratory. The Plan provides an overview of the Laboratory's mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Plan facilitates the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to strengthen the Integrated Laboratory System. Preparation and review of the Institutional Plan is one element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, implemented through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the President's Management Agenda and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. The Plan complements the current performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California, and summarizes Best Management Practices for a potential future results-based contract as a basis for achieving DOE goals and the Laboratory's scientific and operations objectives. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the Plan is coordinated by the Planning and Strategic Development Office from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions and DOE comments on prior years' plans. The Laboratory Mission section identifies the specific strengths of Berkeley Lab that contribute to the mission in general and the Integrated Laboratory System in particular. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies the existing activities in support of DOE Office of Science and other sponsors; support for DOE goals; and the

  20. Water Quality of Peralta and Courtland Creek Oakland, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, A.; Zhen, K. L.; Ponce, X.; Johnson, A.; Varela, N.; Quintero, D.; Hernandez, G.; Oghogho, E.

    2014-12-01

    Authors: Allan Ahumada, Aminah Butler, Mellany Davis, Yarely Guzman, Micah Johnson, Xochitl Ponce, Kim Zhen Abstract: Beginning in the summer of 2012 and continuing to the present time our group has been assessing the water quality of Courtland Creek, which flows from Northeast to Southwest in East Oakland, California. During the summer of 2014 we began assessing the water quality at nearby Peralta Creek to compare the health of Courtland Creek with another one within the same watershed. In making our assessment we have analyzed samples collected from three different sites along both creeks for Nitrate, Phosphate, and Ammonia concentration levels. Additionally, we conducted benthic macroinvertebrate surveys at one site along each creek. Preliminary results indicate that nitrate levels in Courtland Creek waters are very high, which we believe is the result of human and animal waste entering into the creek. There were also unusually high levels of Phosphate and Ammonia detected in creek waters. Such high concentrations were noted in a past study and in an attempt to address this problem we initiated a native plant restoration project at one particular site located at the intersection of Courtland and Thompson avenues. This effort has resulted in a reduction in levels of Nitrate, Phosphate and Ammonia. The average levels of these compounds in waters collected near the restoration site were lower than those found in samples collected at other sites. However, they are still well above levels that are harmful to invertebrates and fish. Nitrate, Phosphate and Ammonia concentration levels in samples collected from Peralta Creek were significantly lower than those collected from Courtland Creek. For example, the maximum level of nitrate detected in Courtland Creek waters was 50 PPM while the maximum found in Peralta Creek waters was 15 PPM. We have concluded that the observed high levels of various compounds are the result of animal waste and human feces spilling directly

  1. 77 FR 5614 - Department of State FY11 Service Contract Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Department of State FY11 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice of the release of the Department of State FY11 Service Contract Inventory. SUMMARY: The Department of State has publically released its Service Contract Inventory for FY11 and its analysis of the FY10 inventory. They are...

  2. 78 FR 13743 - Department of State FY11 Service Contract Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... Department of State FY11 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice of the release of the Department of State FY11 Service Contract Inventory. SUMMARY: The Department of State has publically released its Service Contract Inventory for FY12 and its analysis of the FY11 inventory. They are...

  3. 76 FR 9399 - Department of State FY10 Service Contract Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... Department of State FY10 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice of the release of the Department of State FY10 Service Contract Inventory. SUMMARY: The Department of State has publically released its Service Contract Inventory for FY10. Section 743 of Division C of the FY 2010...

  4. Prevalence of Resistant Strains of Rhipicephalus microplus to Acaricides in Cattle Ranch in the Tropical Region of Tecpan of Galeana, Guerrero, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olivares-Pérez*, S. Rojas-Hernández, M.T. Valencia-Almazan, I. Gutiérrez-Segura and E.J. Míreles-Martínez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Tick and tick borne diseases cause many problems to the cattle industry worldwide. The prevalence of resistant strains of Rhipicephalus microplus to different acaricides on cattle farms in the tropical region of Tecpan of Galeana, Guerrero, Mexico, and risk factors related to prevalence of resistant strains of R. microplus. Sixty one ranches infested were sampled; in each ranch were collected 30-50 fully-engorged female R. microplus ticks, of 10 cattle randomly selected, and evaluated in their progeny resistance to acaricides, using the larval packet test. The prevalence of resistant strains was total pyrethroids and amitraz. In organophosphorus 31.1, 48.3 and 82.2% of strains were resistant to clorpyriphos, coumaphos and diazinon, respectively. Risk factors favored (P<0.05 the development of resistant strains of acaricides. We concluded that the resistance of R. microplus to acaricides used to control a problem, and risk factors (livestock management have accelerated the development of resistance.

  5. FY14 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, M. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jenei, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Perez, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-13

    In FY14, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 324 target shots in FY14, with 246 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 62 shots using just the EP laser system, and 16 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 31% of the total number of shots (62 OMEGA shots, 42 EP shots) shots supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 69% (200 OMEGA shots and 36 EP shots, including the 16 Joint shots) were dedicated to experiments for High- Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  6. NREL photovoltaic program FY 1997 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, R.D.; Hansen, A.; Smoller, S.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the NREL PV Program from October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997 (FY 1997). The NREL PV Program is part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE National Photovoltaics Program Plan for 1996--2000. The FY 1997 budget authority for carrying out the NREL PV Program was $39.3 million in operating funds and $0.4 million in capital equipment funds. Subcontract activities represent a major part of the NREL PV Program, with $21.8 million (55% of PV funds) going to some 84 subcontractors. Cost sharing by industry added almost $8.8 million to the subcontract R and D activities with industry.

  7. NATURAL BARRIERS TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2005-07-27

    This booklet contains project descriptions of work performed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Science and Technology and International's (OST&I) Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust during Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust is part of OST&I's Science and Technology Program which supports the OCRWM mission to manage and dispose of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. In general, the projects described will continue beyond FY 2004 assuming that the technical work remains relevant to the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and sufficient funding is made available to the Science and Technology Program.

  8. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beckwith, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  9. Photovoltaic Program Branch annual report, FY 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K A [ed.

    1990-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The branch is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year (FY) 1989, this included nearly 50 subcontracts, with a total annualized funding of approximately $13.1 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of nearly $4 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontracted program: Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, New Ideas, and University Participation. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1989, and future research directions. Each report will be cataloged individually.

  10. Annual Report: Photovoltaic Subcontract Program FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K. A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  11. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program. Annual report, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  12. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Convery, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geer, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geesaman, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harris, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lang, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); McFarland, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Messier, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moore, C. D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Newhart, D. [Fermilab; Reimer, P. E. [Argonne; Plunkett, R. [Fermilab; Rominsky, M. [Fermilab; Sanchez, M. [Iowa State U.; Schmidt, J. J. [Fermilab; Shanahan, P. [Fermilab; Tate, C. [Fermilab; Thomas, J. [University Coll. London; Donatella Torretta, Donatella Torretta [Fermilab; Matthew Wetstein, Matthew Wetstein [Iowa State University

    2016-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2016. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2016 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MicroBooNE experiment and the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment, LArIAT experiment and Meson Test Beam activities in the 120 GeV external switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was then edited for inclusion in this summary.

  13. Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-24

    perspective. The usual argument for this view is that the social returns (i.e., the benefits to society at large) exceed the private returns (i.e., the ...specify the funding distribution within RRA, except to limit the budget authority for Social , Behavioral and Economic Sciences to its FY2015 level. 63...for a new $20 million partnership with the Department of Health and Human Services for a program offering home visits to support maternal, child , and

  14. Maritime Domain Awareness FY08 assessment report

    OpenAIRE

    MacKinnon, Douglas J.; Schacher, Gordon E.; Hutchins, Susan G.; Freeman, Jared

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Navy has been given the responsibility to develop a comprehensive, worldwide Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) capability. PEO C4I has specified and assessed an initial set of systems, designated Spiral-1, to support MDS. Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy (DUSN) has appointed the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) to assess the overall capabilities and needs of MDA. This document reports the progress made in developing MDA capabilities during FY08. It summarizes information from PEO C4...

  15. The FY2014 Government Shutdown: Economic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Reaching the Debt Limit: Background and Potential Effects on Government Operations, coordinated by Mindy R. Levit . 3 Government spending’s contribution...Debt Limit: History and Recent Increases, by D. Andrew Austin and Mindy R. Levit . The FY2014 Government Shutdown: Economic Effects Congressional...the labor force through the furlough of non-excepted federal employees.17 Estimates of the number of federal employees furloughed vary widely, and

  16. Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Landsat provides sensing data for space policy and land use and climate change research. This account would be funded at $5.0 million in FY2012...and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2011, and the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies...February 14, 2011. For additional information on the USGCRP, see CRS Report RL33817, Climate Change: Federal Program Funding and Tax Incentives, by

  17. Report Card on FY 2010 Audits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    subsidies under the $35 million Mass Transportation Benefits ( MTB ) program in FY 2007. After conducting an in-depth examination of pertinent documentation...the auditors determined that 32,500 of 41,000 participants in the MTB program were probably ineligible to receive mass transit subsidies and were...should be a model for the kind of aggressive audit work that needs to be applied to high-dollar weapons and support contracts. The MTB program, by

  18. Defense: FY2013 Authorization and Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    Military Force against Iraq nor the FY2012 National Defense Authorization Act deny any constitutional right, including habeas corpus , to anyone...placed in military detention, and the ability of U.S. citizens and persons held at Guantanamo to challenge the legality of their detention via habeas ... corpus proceedings (Sections 1031, 1032). As introduced, the bill also contained a provision specifying that nothing in the AUMF should be construed

  19. Evaluative Testing of Sheep Ranching Site 5LA2316, 5LA2366, and 5LA2359 on the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site, Las Animas County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Evaluative Testing of Sheep Ranching Sites 5LA2316, 5LA2366, and 5LA2359 on the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site, Las Animas County, Colorado Fort...requirements, this project also provides a valuable contribution to our knowledge of the prehistory and resources of Las Animas County, Colorado...Maneuver Site, Las Animas County, Colorado 6. AUTHOR(S) Minette Church and Kimberly Henderson 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES

  20. Summary of NREL's FY13-FY15 Photovoltaic Subprogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-31

    In this report, you will find summaries of the completed FY13-FY15 Photovoltaic projects that were funded within NREL. The summaries describe the initial motivation for the project; significant achievements, including publications, intellectual property, and collaborations; and remaining challenges. Among the NREL projects, you will find research of almost every major PV technology - from the next generation of silicon PV to relatively new organic PVs - as well as projects advancing PV module durability and characterization. Each of these projects was designed to support SunShot's goals, putting the United States one step closer to widespread use of low-cost, clean electricity.

  1. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1992 and plans for FY 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Eleanor C.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for F.Y. 1992 and research plans for F.Y. 1993. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5-year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  2. FY16 Strategic Themes White Paper.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, Robert W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Science and Technology (S&T) Division 1000 Strategic Plan includes the Themes, Goals, and Actions for FY16. S&T will continue to support the Labs Strategic plan, Mission Areas and Program Management Units by focusing on four strategic themes that align with the targeted needs of the Labs. The themes presented in this plan are Mission Engagement, Bold Outcomes, Collaborative Environment, and the Safety Imperative. Collectively they emphasize diverse, collaborative teams and a self-reliant culture of safety that will deliver on our promise of exceptional service in the national interest like never before. Mission Engagement focuses on increasing collaboration at all levels but with emphasis at the strategic level with mission efforts across the labs. Bold Outcomes seeks to increase the ability to take thoughtful risks with the goal of achieving transformative breakthroughs more frequently. Collaborative environment strives for a self-aware, collaborative working environment that bridges the many cultures of Sandia. Finally, Safety Imperative aims to minimize the risk of serious injury and to continuously strengthen the safety culture. Each of these themes is accompanied by a brief vision statement, several goals, and planned actions to support those goals throughout FY16 and leading into FY17.

  3. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ali, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benstead, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eggert, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Erskine, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Panella, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hua, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moody, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubery, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sio, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swadling, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In FY16, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall, these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  4. NREL Photovoltaic Program FY 1996 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1997-08-01

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontract research and development (R&D) activities under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaics (PV) Program from October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996 (fiscal year [FY] 1996). The NREL PV Program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991 - FY 1995. The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to: "Work in partnership with U.S. industry to develop and deploy photovoltaic technology for generating economically competitive electric power, making photovoltaics an important contributor to the nation's and the world's energy use and environmental improvement. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. PV industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NREL PV Program provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals.

  5. Theoretical Division annual report, FY 1975. [LASL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, P.A.

    1976-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the activities in the Theoretical Division and a summary of research highlights during FY 1975. It is intended to inform a wide audience about the theoretical work of the LASL and, therefore, contains introductory material which places recent advances in a broader context. The report is organized into two special interest reports: reactor safety research and the Advanced Research Committee, and 11 reports from the T-Division group leaders on the work of their respective groups. Main interests and responsibilities are outlined including the relationship of the group's work to the work of other T-Division groups and other divisions at the Laboratory. The description of research highlights for FY 1975 explains in a fairly simple, straightforward manner the major recent advances and their significance. Each group report is followed by a publication list for FY 1975 (330 references) and a list of talks given outside the Laboratory (140 references). 29 figures. (auth)

  6. EST Table: FY030330 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY030330 bmte25i07 11/12/09 n.h 11/11/04 31 %/235 aa gb|EFA04982.1| hypothetical pr...mology 11/11/04 31 %/235 aa gi|189238414|ref|XP_001812452.1| PREDICTED: similar to GA15982-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FY030330 bmte ...

  7. 76 FR 5431 - Publication of FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Publication of FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Departmental Offices, Treasury. ACTION: Notice of publication of Fiscal Year 2010 Service Contract Inventory. ] SUMMARY: The Department of the Treasury Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Service Contract Inventory is available to the public at http://www.treasury.gov/about...

  8. EST Table: FY011605 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY011605 rbmov3h21 11/11/04 49 %/238 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolution..._970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FY016706 bmov ...

  9. EST Table: FY016706 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY016706 rbmov17i21 11/12/09 n.h 11/11/04 45 %/247 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolution...1094187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FY016706 bmov ...

  10. EST Table: FY760046 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY760046 E_FL_famL_32D24_R_0 11/11/04 49 %/225 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolution...187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FY016706 famL ...

  11. The introduction to GNOS instrument for FY-3 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qifei

    2016-07-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Radio occultation (RO) has become a major atmospheric and ionospheric remote sensing technique and been widely used for numerical weather prediction and global climate monitoring applications. The first GNSS Occultation Sounder (GNOS) developed and manufactured by National Space Science Center (NSSC), Chinese Academy of Science is a RO payload, which has been onboard Fengyun-3 C (FY-3C) satellite and been launched on September 23, 2013. FY-3 series satellites are the Chinese second generation polar-orbiting meteorological satellites with sun-synchronous orbits. During RO events, the GNOS instruments measure the phase delay caused by the Earth's atmospheric and ionospheric refraction between the GNSS satellites and FY-3 satellites, as the relative position between the GNSS satellites and the FY-3 satellites varying, vertical profiles of RO observations (i.e. phase and amplitude) will be obtained, which can be used to derived the atmospheric and ionospheric physical properties such as press, temperature, humidity and ionospheric electron density. In my presentation, we present the characteristics of GNOS instruments for FY-3 series satellites and the result by the instrument in orbit. Firstly, we present the characteristics of GNOS instrument for FY-3C satellite and its precision of atmosphere occultation data. Additionally, we introduce the characteristics of GNOS instrument for FY-3D satellite which will be launched in 2016. Finally, we show the next generation GNOS instrument and its characteristics for the following FY-3 satellites.

  12. EST Table: FY745537 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY745537 E_FL_famL_27E06_F_0 11/11/04 78 %/254 aa ref|XP_001600886.1| PREDICTED: similar to aquarius...milar to Intron-binding protein aquarius (Intron-binding protein of 160 kDa) (IBP160) [Tribolium castaneum] FY745710 famL ...

  13. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe

  14. Summary of FY 17 Assessments Sandia National Laboratories: Evaluation of FY16 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John

    2017-03-01

    This report is the milestone deliverable M4FT-17SN111102091 “Summary of Assessments Performed FY17 by SNL QA POC” for work package FT-17SN11110209 titled “Quality Assurance – SNL”. This report summarizes the FY17 assessment performed on Fuel Cycle Technologies / Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition efforts.

  15. FY07 Final Report for Calibration Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Cannon, Bret D.; Ho, Nicolas

    2007-12-01

    Remote infrared (IR) sensing provides a valuable method for detection and identification of materials associated with nuclear proliferation. Current challenges for remote sensors include minimizing the size, mass, and power requirements for cheaper, smaller, and more deployable instruments without affecting the measurement performance. One area that is often overlooked is sensor calibration design that is optimized to minimize the cost, size, weight, and power of the payload. Yet, an on-board calibration system is essential to account for changes in the detector response once the instrument has been removed from the laboratory. The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact quantum cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared sensor systems in order to provide both a spectral and radiometric calibration while minimizing the impact on the instrument payload. In FY05, PNNL demonstrated a multi-level radiance scheme that provides six radiance levels for an enhanced linearity check compared to the currently accepted two-point scheme. PNNL began testing the repeatability of this scheme using a cryogenically cooled, single-mode quantum cascade laser (QCL). A cyclic variation in the power was observed that was attributed to the thermal cycling of the laser's dewar. In FY06, PNNL continued testing this scheme and installed an auxiliary liquid nitrogen reservoir to limit the thermal cycling effects. Although better repeatability was achieved over a longer time period, power fluctuations were still observed due to the thermal cycling. Due to the limitations with the cryogenic system, PNNL began testing Fabry-Perot QCLs that operate continuous-wave (cw) or quasi-cw at room temperature (RT) in FY06. PNNL demonstrated a multi-level scheme that provides five radiance levels in 105 seconds with excellent repeatability. We have continued testing this repeatability in FY07. A

  16. Land Acquisition Priority Plan for Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan discusses land acquisition priorities for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge). The proposed alternatives...

  17. Water chemistry - Thornton Creek Restoration Project Effectiveness Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA has designed and is currently implementing a hyporheic monitoring plan for the Thornton Creek watershed in North Seattle. This work is being conducted for...

  18. Aquatic Invertebrates - Thornton Creek Restoration Project Effectiveness Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA has designed and is currently implementing a hyporheic monitoring plan for the Thornton Creek watershed in North Seattle. This work is being conducted for...

  19. Diurnal variation of zooplankton in Malad creek, Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.; Desai, B.N.

    Variation in zooplankton biomass and composition in relation to the prevailing hydrographical conditions was studied for 24 h in Malad Creek, Bombay, Maharashtra, India, which was highly polluted by sewage. The adverse effect of pollution was more...

  20. Ecology of phytoplankton from Dharmatar Creek, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, L.R.; Nair, V.R.

    Phytoplankton pigment, cell count and species diversity wee studied at five locations in Dharamtar Creek during September 1984 to November 1985. Chemical parameters indicated a healthy system free of any environmental stress. The water...

  1. Bowdoin NWR : Information on Beaver Creek flow 1936-1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides a timeline of Beaver Creek flows, near Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, from 1936 to 1986. Parts Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge lie within...

  2. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative: Fiscal year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during fiscal year 1997. The report begins with an introduction...

  3. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: January through April, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1959. The report begins by summarizing...

  4. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  5. Water quality of the Swatara Creek Basin, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarren, Edward F.; Wark, J.W.; George, J.R.

    1964-01-01

    The Swatara Creek of the Susquehanna River Basin is the farthest downstream sub-basin that drains acid water (pH of 4.5 or less) from anthracite coal mines. The Swatara Creek drainage area includes 567 square miles of parts of Schuylkill, Berks, Lebanon, and Dauphin Counties in Pennsylvania.To learn what environmental factors and dissolved constituents in water were influencing the quality of Swatara Creek, a reconnaissance of the basin was begun during the summer of 1958. Most of the surface streams and the wells adjacent to the principal tributaries of the Creek were sampled for chemical analysis. Effluents from aquifers underlying the basin were chemically analyzed because ground water is the basic source of supply to surface streams in the Swatara Creek basin. When there is little runoff during droughts, ground water has a dominating influence on the quality of surface water. Field tests showed that all ground water in the basin was non-acidic. However, several streams were acidic. Sources of acidity in these streams were traced to the overflow of impounded water in unworked coal mines.Acidic mine effluents and washings from coal breakers were detected downstream in Swatara Creek as far as Harper Tavern, although the pH at Harper Tavern infrequently went below 6.0. Suspended-sediment sampling at this location showed the mean daily concentration ranged from 2 to 500 ppm. The concentration of suspended sediment is influenced by runoff and land use, and at Harper Tavern it consisted of natural sediments and coal wastes. The average daily suspended-sediment discharge there during the period May 8 to September 30, 1959, was 109 tons per day, and the computed annual suspended-sediment load, 450 tons per square mile. Only moderate treatment would be required to restore the quality of Swatara Creek at Harper Tavern for many uses. Above Ravine, however, the quality of the Creek is generally acidic and, therefore, of limited usefulness to public supplies, industries and

  6. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  7. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  8. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  9. Biotic health of Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge is in the process of converting over 5,000 acres of agricultural land back to native prairie and savanna. The refuge will...

  10. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report: September - December 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  11. [Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: January through April, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1960. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. Narrative report Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge: January - April, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: January through April, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1958. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. [Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: January through April, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1961. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Recreational Fishing Plan : Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Recreational Fishing Plan for Cypress Creek NWR. The Plan provides an introduction to the Refuge, information about conformance with statutory...

  16. St. Catherine Creek NWR Hunting Season Harvest Totals

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data summaries from hunting that occurs on St. Catherine Creek NWR. Reports include summarized harvest and hunter effort data and basic analysis of these data.

  17. Erosion and deposition for Fanno Creek, Oregon 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began investigating the sources and sinks of organic matter in Fanno Creek, a tributary of the Tualatin River, Oregon....

  18. Pond Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Pond Creek NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  19. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  20. St. Catherine Creek NWR Bird Point Count Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data collected during bird point counts at St. Catherine Creek NWR using the Lower Mississippi Valley Joint Venture protocol for forest dwelling birds.

  1. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  2. Estimation of sockeye and coho salmon escapement in Mortensens creek

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A fixed picket weir was operated on Mortensens Creek from 1 July to 26 October 2001. Coho salmon Onchorynchus kisutch was the most abundant species counted through...

  3. St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on St. Catherine Creek NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  4. Tidal flow characteristics at Kasheli (Kalwa/ Bassein creek), Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.; Suryanarayana, A.

    Tidal flow characteristics of waters at Kasheli, connected to the sea through Thane and Bassein Creeks in Bombay, Maharashtra, India are investigated based on tide and current observations carried out in 1980-81. The results establish that the tidal...

  5. Zooplankton composition in Dharamtar creek adjoining Bombay harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, L.R.; Nair, V.R.

    bedoti was the true inhabitant. In general zooplankton production indicated 1.5 fold increase towards the upper reaches of the creek where salinity variations were drastic. A more diversified faunal assemblage of oceanic and neritic species characterised...

  6. Sediment contaminant assessment for Shoal Creek, Lawrence County, Tennessee

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment samples were collected from ten locations along Shoal Creek and analyzed for l9 metals and 20 organochlorine compounds. For the organic analyses,...

  7. Survey of breeding birds Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a summary of the results of the second annual survey of breeding birds of Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge conducted in 1995. This series of...

  8. Dry Creek Rancheria Wastewater Treatment Plant; Proposed NPDES Permit Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is issuing a notice of proposed action under the Clean Water Act to issue a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit No. CA0005241 to: Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians.

  9. St. Catherine Creek NWR Deer Hunt Harvest Data Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data summaries from deer hunts that occur on St. Catherine Creek NWR. Reports include summarized deer harvest data and basic analysis of these data.

  10. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban runoff...

  11. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  12. Fish Creek Watershed Lake Classification, NPRA, Alaska, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This study focuses on the development of a 20 attribute lake cover classification scheme for the Fish Creek Watershed (FCW), which is located in the National...

  13. Fish Creek Federally Endangered Freshwater Mussel Impact Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment toxicity was evaluated for one site upstream and three sites downstream of a diesel fuel spill that occurred in Fish Creek (OH and IN) in September 1993...

  14. EAARL Topography--Potato Creek Watershed, Georgia, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in Georgia was produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation...

  15. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: September - December, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by...

  16. [Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: September - December, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by...

  17. Fishery management assessment Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides an assessment for fishery management on Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. The assessment concluded that existing Refuge waters are...

  18. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: May through August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Inventory and Monitoring Plan for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Inventory and Monitoring Plan (IMP) documents the inventory and monitoring surveys that will be conducted at Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge (CCNWR) from...

  20. Historical flows for Bridge Creek above East Canal, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bridge Creek originates along the northwestern slopes of Steens Mountain. It drains an area a fraction of the size of the Blitzen River watershed (approximately 30...

  1. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: September - December, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  2. 1965 Narrative report: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. 1964 Narrative report: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  4. 1966 Narrative report: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  5. The Trail Inventory of Whittlesey Creek NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  6. Proctor Creek Boone Boulevard Health Impact Assessment (HIA) Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the final report of the EPA-led Proctor Creek Boone Boulevard HIA, which aims to help inform the City of Atlanta’s decision on whether to implement the proposed Boone Boulevard Green Street Project as designed.

  7. Country Partnership Framework for the Socialist Republic of Vietnam for the Period FY18-FY22

    OpenAIRE

    Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency; International Finance Corporation; World Bank

    2017-01-01

    Thirty years after the launch of the economic reforms known as Doi Moi, Vietnam is considered a development success story—marked by remarkable poverty reduction and economic growth. Notwithstanding notable achievements, development challenges persist. The last World Bank Group (WBG) country strategy for Vietnam, the FY12–16 Country Partnership Strategy (CPS), was presented to the WBG Board...

  8. Fiscal performance of Six Selected Taluka Municipal Administration in Sindh Fy 2001 to Fy 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafique Ahmad Khan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Devolution of government financial authority has been an important component of the fiscal reforms implemented by the Musharraf government on the advice of the IMF, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank since 2000. Devolution of fiscal authorityhas been integrated into the scheme for the establishment of local government in Sindh.The legal framework for this devolution of fiscal authority is provided by the Sindh Local Government Ordinance (SLGO of 2001. The fiscal responsibility of Taluka and Town Municipal Authorities (TMAs have been significantly enhanced by this legislative act.This paper prevents an analysis of the fiscal performance of six Sindh TMAs during Fy 2001 to Fy 2005. Section 1 describes the work done by successive Provincial Finance Commissions (PFC established under SLGO 2001. Section II describes the fiscal responsibility of the TMAs and associated procedures for discharge of theseresponsibilities. Section III analysis the budgeting performance of six Sindh TMAs during Fy 2002 – Fy 2005 (Mithi, Badin, Naushahro Feroze, Dadu, Sanghar and Khairpur. Conclusion are presented in section IV.

  9. 78 FR 26065 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Jump Creek, Succor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Jump... Impact Statement (EIS) for the Jump Creek, Succor Creek, and Cow Creek Watersheds Grazing Permit Renewal... considered, the BLM must receive written comments on the Draft EIS for the Jump Creek, Succor Creek, and Cow...

  10. SOLID WASTE INTEGRATED FORECAST TECHNICAL (SWIFT) REPORT FY2003 THRU FY2046 VERSION 2003.1 VOLUME 2 [SEC 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARCOT, R.A.

    2003-12-01

    This report includes data requested on September 10, 2002 and includes radioactive solid waste forecasting updates through December 31, 2002. The FY2003.0 request is the primary forecast for fiscal year FY 2003.

  11. Discharge Forecast Modeling project FY87 progress report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borders, D.M.; Hyndman, D.W.; Railsback, S.F.

    1987-10-19

    This project originated as a result of the Strontium-90 Action Plan, a response to the abnormal release of radionuclides that occurred from White Oak Creek (WOC) during late November and early December 1985. Several notable problems became obvious during ORNL's response to this release: (1) no predetermined criteria existed for the operation of White Oak Dam (WOD) in response to spills, (2) the hydrodynamics of contaminant transport and dispersion within the WOC watershed and downstream were not adequately understood to support requests for modified reservoir releases, and (3) real-time data on streamflow, precipitation, and water quality within the watershed were not readily available in sufficient quantity and usable format. The modeling study was initiated to help address these problems. This report describes FY 87 accomplishments, including: improvements in data acquisition and evaluation; implementation and calibration of a model to forecast discharges of water and contaminants from the WOC watershed; implementation, documentation, and checking of a model to forecast concentrations of contaminants from WOC in the Clinch River; and three field studies that provide essential calibration data. Data from the field studies and user documentation of the Clinch River model are included as appendices to this report.

  12. A mangrove creek restoration plan utilizing hydraulic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marois, Darryl E; Mitsch, William J

    2017-11-01

    Despite the valuable ecosystem services provided by mangrove ecosystems they remain threatened around the globe. Urban development has been a primary cause for mangrove destruction and deterioration in south Florida USA for the last several decades. As a result, the restoration of mangrove forests has become an important topic of research. Using field sampling and remote-sensing we assessed the past and present hydrologic conditions of a mangrove creek and its connected mangrove forest and brackish marsh systems located on the coast of Naples Bay in southwest Florida. We concluded that the hydrology of these connected systems had been significantly altered from its natural state due to urban development. We propose here a mangrove creek restoration plan that would extend the existing creek channel 1.1 km inland through the adjacent mangrove forest and up to an adjacent brackish marsh. We then tested the hydrologic implications using a hydraulic model of the mangrove creek calibrated with tidal data from Naples Bay and water levels measured within the creek. The calibrated model was then used to simulate the resulting hydrology of our proposed restoration plan. Simulation results showed that the proposed creek extension would restore a twice-daily flooding regime to a majority of the adjacent mangrove forest and that there would still be minimal tidal influence on the brackish marsh area, keeping its salinity at an acceptable level. This study demonstrates the utility of combining field data and hydraulic modeling to aid in the design of mangrove restoration plans.

  13. CREEK Project's Microzooplankton Seasonal Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  14. CREEK Project's Nekton Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1998.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  15. Puente Willow Creek en Monterrey, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1965-09-01

    Full Text Available Of the 10 awards given every year by the Prestressed Concrete Institute for the most outstanding prestressed concrete projects, two have been awarded in California this year, one of them to the Willow Creek bridge, near Monterrey. The prestressed, double T girders of this bridge were made at a workshop, a great distance from the bridge site. These are 24 m long, 1.35 m high, and are stabilized by transversal diaphragms, 20 cm in thickness. The table deck is of reinforced concrete, being 8.85 m wide and 20 cm thick. The structure is straightforward, slender, and adapts itself pleasantly to the background. It has seven spans and crosses over a secondary road, in addition to bridging the Willow stream. The supporting piles are hollow, of rectangular cross section, and over them a cross beam carries the five girders and the deck itself. The end abutments consist of vertical reinforced concrete walls, and supporting, soil filled, structures. The above information was supplied by the California Road Department.De los diez premios que anualmente concede el Prestressed Concrete Institute para las obras de hormigón pretensado más notables, dos han correspondido a California y uno de ellos al puente de Willow Creek, situado en la región de Monterrey. Las vigas de hormigón pretensado, con sección en forma de doble T, se prefabricaron en un taller situado a gran distancia del puente. Tienen 24 m de longitud y 1,35 m de canto, estando arriostradas con diafragmas transversales de 20 cm de espesor. La losa del tablero, de hormigón armado, tiene 8,85 m de anchura y 20 cm de espesor. La estructura es sencilla, esbelta y armoniza perfectamente con el paisaje que la circunda. Tiene siete tramos y salva un paso inferior secundario y el arroyo Willow. Los soportes, se apoyan sobre pilotes, algunos de gran altura; son huecos, de sección rectangular y terminan en una cruceta que sirve de sostén a las cinco vigas que soportan la losa del tablero. Los estribos

  16. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2015 Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braase, Lori Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-29

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This report is a compilation of technical accomplishment summaries for FY-15. Emphasis is on advanced accident-tolerant LWR fuel systems, advanced transmutation fuels technologies, and capability development.

  17. FY 2014 LDRD Annual Report Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomchak, Dena [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The FY 2014 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enahnces technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  18. Tokamak power systems studies, FY 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1985-12-01

    The Tokamak Power System Studies (TPSS) at ANL in FY-1985 were devoted to exploring innovative design concepts which have the potential for making substantial improvements in the tokamak as a commercial power reactor. Major objectives of this work included improved reactor economics, improved environmental and safety features, and the exploration of a wide range of reactor plant outputs with emphasis on reduced plant sizes compared to STARFIRE. The activities concentrated on three areas: plasma engineering, impurity control, and blanket/first wall/shield technology. 205 refs., 125 figs., 107 tabs.

  19. FY10 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-09-28

    In FY10, LLNL conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall LLNL led 301 target shots involving the OMEGA laser system and 96 target shots involving the EP laser system. Approximately 40% of the total number of shots (137 OMEGA shots, 32 EP shots) shots supported the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The remainder was dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) (164 OMEGA shots, 64 EP shots).

  20. Laser Remote Sensing: FY07 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2007-09-30

    Standoff detection and characterization of chemical plumes using Frequency Modulated Differential Absorption Lidar (FM-DIAL) is a promising technique for the detection of nuclear proliferation activities. For the last several years Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been developing an FM-DIAL based remote sensing system as part of PNNL's Infrared Sensors project within NA-22's Enabling Technologies portfolio. In FY06 the remote sensing effort became a stand-alone project within the Plutonium Production portfolio with the primary goal of transitioning technology from the laboratory to the user community. Current systems remotely detect trace chemicals in the atmosphere over path lengths of hundreds of meters for monostatic operation (without a retro-reflector target) and up to ten kilometers for bistatic operation (with a retro-reflector target). The FM-DIAL sensor is sensitive and highly selective for chemicals with narrow-band absorption features on the order of 1-2 cm-1; as a result, the FM-DIAL sensors are best suited to simple di-atomic or tri-atomic molecules and other molecules with unusually narrow absorption features. A broadband sensor is currently being developed. It is designed to detect chemicals with spectral features on the order of several 10s of wavenumbers wide. This will expand the applicability of this technology to the detection of more complicated molecules. Our efforts in FY07 focused on the detection of chemicals associated with the PUREX process. The highest value performance measure for FY07, namely the demonstration of the Broadband Laser Spectrometer (BLS) during chemical release experiments, was successfully achieved in June, July and August of this year. Significant advancements have been made with each of the other tasks as well. A short-wave infrared version of the miniature FM-DIAL (FM-Mini) instrument was successfully demonstrated during field tests in June. During FY07 another version of the FM-Mini was

  1. Money Market Operations in FY2000

    OpenAIRE

    Open Market Operations Division

    2001-01-01

    In FY2000, the Bank of Japan changed the level of its interest rate target on two occasions, and switched its operating target from the overnight call rate to the aggregate balance of current account deposits held at the Bank. Furthermore, facing a major change to the settlement system with the introduction of RTGS (real-time gross settlement) for current accounts at the Bank and JGSs, the Bank realized the importance for the Bank's market operations to be both timely and flexible as ever bef...

  2. Annual Progress Report FY-82. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    hemodynamic improvement occurs; 5)Determine nature of any side effects; 6) Provisional nion wneter, on the basis ot clntcal signs, tue arug wK 14uVZU may...Hospital Dental Clinic ACCU,%?..ATiVE ifOCASE COST: ACULM’ATi WE CON;TRACT COST: ACUMPULATIVE SUPPLY COST: FY-83 SIC/Z: CONTRAcT COST: SUPPLY COST...conjunction with cord blood neutrophils and sera and neonatal spinal fluid. Interscience Conf on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Miami, Fla, 1982

  3. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  4. Advanced energy projects; FY 1995 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The AEP Division supports projects to explore novel energy-related concepts which are typically at an early stage of scientific development, and high-risk, exploratory concepts. Topical areas presently receiving support are: novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, exploring uses of new scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. There were 46 research projects during FY 1995; ten were initiated during that fiscal year. The summaries are separated into grant and laboratory programs, and small business innovation research programs.

  5. FY15 Final Annual Report for the Regional Test Centers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) manages four of the five PV Regional Test Centers (RTCs). This report reviews accomplishments made by the four Sandia-managed RTCs during FY2015 (October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015) as well as some programmatic improvements that apply to all five sites. The report is structured by Site first then by Partner within each site followed by the Current and Potential Partner summary table, the New Business Process, and finally the Plan for FY16 and beyond. Since no official SOPO was ever agreed to for FY15, this report does not include reporting on specific milestones and go/no-go decisions.

  6. FY11 Facility Assessment Study for Aeronautics Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, John A.; Sydnor, George H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the approach and results for the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) FY11 Facility Assessment Project. ATP commissioned assessments in FY07 and FY11 to aid in the understanding of the current condition and reliability of its facilities and their ability to meet current and future (five year horizon) test requirements. The principle output of the assessment was a database of facility unique, prioritized investments projects with budgetary cost estimates. This database was also used to identify trends for the condition of facility systems.

  7. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge on stream quality in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Foster, Guy M.

    2014-01-01

    Contaminants from point and other urban sources affect stream quality in Indian Creek, which is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities discharge to Indian Creek. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, during June 2004 through June 2013 were used to evaluate stream quality in Indian Creek. This fact sheet summarizes the effects of wastewater effluent discharge on physical, chemical, and biological conditions in Indian Creek downstream from the Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

  8. Tuttle Creek Hydroelectric Project feasibility assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-03-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility assessment study to determine if hydroelectric generation could be developed economically at the Corps of Engineers' Tuttle Creek Dam, an existing flood control structure on the Big Blue River near Manhattan, Kansas. The studies and investigations included site reconnaissance, system load characteristics, site hydrology, conceptual project arrangements and layouts, power studies, estimates of construction costs, development of capital costs, economic feasibility, development of a design and construction schedule and preliminary environmental review of the proposed Project. The dependable capacity of the Project as delivered into the existing transmission and distribution network is 12,290 kW and the average annual energy is 56,690 MWh. For the scheduled on-line date of July 1984, the Project is estimated to have a Total Investment Cost of $19,662,000 (equal to $1333/kW installed at that time frame) with an estimated annual cost for the first year of operation of $2,696,000, assuming REA financing at 9.5% interest rate. The Project is considered technically feasible and without any major environmental issues. It shows economic feasibility providing satisfactory financing terms are available. (LCL)

  9. Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Burris, J.A. (C. E. Environmental, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

  10. Determinants of persistence and tolerance of carnivores on Namibian ranches: implications for conservation on Southern African private lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Peter Andrew; Havemann, Carl Peter; Lines, Robin; Palazy, Lucille; Price, Aaron Ernest; Retief, Tarryn Anne; Rhebergen, Tiemen; Van der Waal, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    Changing land use patterns in southern Africa have potential to dramatically alter the prospects for carnivore conservation. Understanding these influences is essential for conservation planning. We interviewed 250 ranchers in Namibia to assess human tolerance towards and the distribution of large carnivores. Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), leopards (Panthera pardus) and brown hyaenas (Hyaena brunnea) were widely distributed on Namibian farmlands, spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta) had a narrower distribution, and wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) and lions (Panthera leo) are largely limited to areas near source populations. Farmers were most tolerant of leopards and least tolerant of lions, wild dogs and spotted hyaenas. Several factors relating to land use correlated consistently with carnivore-presence and landowner tolerance. Carnivores were more commonly present and/or tolerated where; wildlife diversity and biomass were higher; income from wildlife was higher; income from livestock was lower; livestock biomass was lower; in conservancies; game fencing was absent; and financial losses from livestock depredation were lower. Efforts to create conditions whereby the costs associated with carnivores are lowest, and which confer financial value to them are likely to be the most effective means of promoting carnivore conservation. Such conditions are achieved where land owners pool land to create conservancies where livestock are replaced with wildlife (or where livestock husbandry is improved) and where wildlife generates a significant proportion of ranch income. Additional measures, such as promoting improved livestock husbandry and educational outreach efforts may also help achieve coexistence with carnivores. Our findings provide insights into conditions more conducive to the persistence of and tolerance towards large carnivores might be increased on private (and even communal) lands in Namibia, elsewhere in southern and East Africa and other parts of the world where

  11. Determinants of persistence and tolerance of carnivores on Namibian ranches: implications for conservation on Southern African private lands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Andrew Lindsey

    Full Text Available Changing land use patterns in southern Africa have potential to dramatically alter the prospects for carnivore conservation. Understanding these influences is essential for conservation planning. We interviewed 250 ranchers in Namibia to assess human tolerance towards and the distribution of large carnivores. Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus, leopards (Panthera pardus and brown hyaenas (Hyaena brunnea were widely distributed on Namibian farmlands, spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta had a narrower distribution, and wild dogs (Lycaon pictus and lions (Panthera leo are largely limited to areas near source populations. Farmers were most tolerant of leopards and least tolerant of lions, wild dogs and spotted hyaenas. Several factors relating to land use correlated consistently with carnivore-presence and landowner tolerance. Carnivores were more commonly present and/or tolerated where; wildlife diversity and biomass were higher; income from wildlife was higher; income from livestock was lower; livestock biomass was lower; in conservancies; game fencing was absent; and financial losses from livestock depredation were lower. Efforts to create conditions whereby the costs associated with carnivores are lowest, and which confer financial value to them are likely to be the most effective means of promoting carnivore conservation. Such conditions are achieved where land owners pool land to create conservancies where livestock are replaced with wildlife (or where livestock husbandry is improved and where wildlife generates a significant proportion of ranch income. Additional measures, such as promoting improved livestock husbandry and educational outreach efforts may also help achieve coexistence with carnivores. Our findings provide insights into conditions more conducive to the persistence of and tolerance towards large carnivores might be increased on private (and even communal lands in Namibia, elsewhere in southern and East Africa and other parts of the world

  12. Remote Sensing Analysis of the Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, Hudspeth County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeMone, D. V.; Dodge, R.; Xie, H.; Langford, R. P.; Keller, G. R.

    2002-02-26

    Remote sensing images provide useful physical information, revealing such features as geological structure, vegetation, drainage patterns, and variations in consolidated and unconsolidated lithologies. That technology has been applied to the failed Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) shallow burial low-level radioactive waste disposal site selected by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority. It has been re-examined using data from LANDSAT satellite series. The comparison of the earlier LANDSAT V (5/20/86) (30-m resolution) with the later new, higher resolution ETM imagery (10/23/99) LANDSAT VII data (15-m resolution) clearly shows the superiority of the LANDSAT VII data. The search for surficial indications of evidence of fatal flaws at the Sierra Blanca site utilizing was not successful, as it had been in the case of the earlier remote sensing analysis of the failed Fort Hancock site utilizing LANDSAT V data. The authors conclude that the tectonic activity at the Sierra Blanca site is much less recent and active than in the previously studied Fort Hancock site. The Sierra Blanca site failed primarily on the further needed documentation concerning a subsurface fault underneath the site and environmental justice issues. The presence of this fault was not revealed using the newer LANDSAT VII data. Despite this fact, it must be remembered that remote sensing provides baseline documentation for determining future physical and financial remediation responsibilities. On the basis of the two sites examined by LANDSAT remote sensing imaging, it is concluded that it is an essential, cost-effective tool that should be utilized not only in site examination but also in all nuclear-related facilities.

  13. 2nd Quarter Transportation Report FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, L. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States) (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the second quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2014 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. This report also includes annual summaries for FY 2014 in Tables 4 and 5. Tabular summaries are provided which include the following: Sources of and carriers for LLW and MLLW shipments to and from the NNSS; Number and external volume of LLW and MLLW shipments; Highway routes used by carriers; and Incident/accident data applicable to LLW and MLLW shipments. In this report shipments are accounted for upon arrival at the NNSS, while disposal volumes are accounted for upon waste burial. The disposal volumes presented in this report do not include minor volumes of non-radioactive materials that were approved for disposal. Volume reports showing cubic feet (ft3) generated using the Low-Level Waste Information System may vary slightly due to differing rounding conventions.

  14. Advanced evaporator technology progress report FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, D.; Hutter, J.C.; Leonard, R.A. [and others

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the work that was completed in FY 1992 on the program {open_quotes}Technology Development for Concentrating Process Streams.{close_quotes} The purpose of this program is to evaluate and develop evaporator technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process. Concentrating these streams and minimizing the volume of waste generated can significantly reduce disposal costs; however, equipment to concentrate the streams and recycle the decontaminated condensates must be installed. LICON, Inc., is developing an evaporator that shows a great deal of potential for this application. In this report, concepts that need to be incorporated into the design of an evaporator operated in a radioactive environment are discussed. These concepts include criticality safety, remote operation and maintenance, and materials of construction. Both solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data are needed to design an effective process for concentrating process streams. Therefore, literature surveys were completed and are summarized in this report. A model that is being developed to predict vapor phase compositions is described. A laboratory-scale evaporator was purchased and installed to study the evaporation process and to collect additional data. This unit is described in detail. Two new LICON evaporators are being designed for installation at Argonne-East in FY 1993 to process low-level radioactive waste generated throughout the laboratory. They will also provide operating data from a full-sized evaporator processing radioactive solutions. Details on these evaporators are included in this report.

  15. Optimising methods for community-based sea cucumber ranching: Experimental releases of cultured juvenile Holothuria scabra into seagrass meadows in Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Hair

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hatchery-cultured juveniles of the commercial holothurian, sandfish (Holothuria scabra, were used for release experiments in a variety of marine habitats under traditional marine tenure near Kavieng, Papua New Guinea (PNG. Juveniles of approximately 4 g mean weight were released inside 100 m2 sea pens installed within seagrass meadows nearby partner communities, under the care of local ‘wardens’. Within each sea pen, varying levels of protection (free release, 1-day cage and 7-day cage were provided at release in order to determine if short-term predator exclusion improved survival. Ossicles of juvenile sandfish were tagged with different fluorochromes for each treatment and sandfish survival and growth was recorded after release. A range of biophysical parameters were recorded at the four sites. Contrary to expectations, short-term cage protection did not lead to higher survival at three sites, while a fourth site, despite meeting all considered criteria for suitable release habitat, experienced total loss of juveniles. There were significant differences in mean weight of juveniles between sites after four months. Multivariate analysis of biophysical factors clearly separated the sea pen habitats, strongly differentiating the best-performing site from the others. However, further research is needed to elucidate which biophysical or human factors are most useful in predicting the quality of potential sea ranch sites. Methods developed or refined through these trials could be used to establish pilot test plots at potential ranching sites to assess site suitability and provide guidance on the level of animal husbandry required before commencing community sea ranching operations in New Ireland Province, PNG.

  16. Library Systems: FY 2013 Public Libraries Survey (Administrative Entity)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Find key information on library systems around the United States.These data include imputed values for libraries that did not submit information in the FY 2013 data...

  17. FY 2009 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — Published: February 2008 Pages: 37 This Supplement to the President`s Fiscal Year FY 2009 Budget provides a technical summary of the budget request for the...

  18. FY 2010 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This Supplement to the President`s Fiscal Year FY 2010 Budget provides a technical summary of the budget request for the Networking and Information Technology...

  19. FY 2007 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This Supplement to the President`s Fiscal Year FY 2007 Budget provides a technical summary of the budget request for the Networking and Information Technology...

  20. FY2010 Federal Government Greenhouse Gas Inventory by Agency

    Data.gov (United States)

    Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of the President — The comprehensive Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Inventory for the Federal Government accounts for emissions associated with Federal operations in FY 2010. Attached...

  1. Enhanced surveillance program FY97 accomplishments. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauzy, A. [ed.; Laake, B. [comp.

    1997-10-01

    This annual report is one volume of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) FY97 Accomplishments. The complete accomplishments report consists of 11 volumes. Volume 1 includes an ESP overview and a summary of selected unclassified FY97 program highlights. Volume 1 specifically targets a general audience, reflecting about half of the tasks conducted in FY97 and emphasizing key program accomplishments and contributions. The remaining volumes of the accomplishments report are classified, organized by program focus area, and present in technical detail the progress achieved in each of the 104 FY97 program tasks. Focus areas are as follows: pits; high explosives; organics; dynamics; diagnostics; systems; secondaries; nonnuclear materials; nonnuclear components; and Surveillance Test Program upgrades.

  2. FY 1986 scientific and technical reports, articles, papers and presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joyce E. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel in FY-86 are presented. Also included are papers of MSFC contractors.

  3. FY 1980 scientific and technical reports, articles, papers, and presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, O. L. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Abstracts are presented for 60 technical memoranda and 5 technical papers published in technical journals or presented by MSFC personnel in FY 1980. Conference and reference publications are cited along with contractor reports and papers cleared for presentation.

  4. Library Systems: FY 2014 Public Libraries Survey (Administrative Entity Data)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Find key information on library systems around the United States.These data include imputed values for libraries that did not submit information in the FY 2014 data...

  5. Environmental Solutions FY05: PNNL Contributions to Fluor Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Paul A.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2006-02-12

    This report describes Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's scientific and technical contributions to Fluor Hanford in FY05. This includes work on the spent nuclear fuel basins as well as cribs and trenches.

  6. Museum Universe Data File FY 2014 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2014. This list contains descriptive information about...

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R

    2001-05-24

    This Annual Report provides an overview of the FY2000 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents a summary of the results achieved by each project during the year.

  8. Museum Universe Data File FY 2015 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2015. This list contains descriptive information about...

  9. FY98 Class Convening Schedule for Coast Guard Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-12

    This Notice publishes the FY98 class convening schedule of Coast Guard Class "A" : and "C" resident and exportable training courses defined by program/force : managers as essential or directly related to mission accomplishment for : achievement of pr...

  10. FY 2011 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This Supplement to the President`s Fiscal Year FY 2011 Budget provides a technical summary of the budget request for the Networking and Information Technology...

  11. FY 2008 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This Supplement to the President`s Fiscal Year FY 2008 Budget provides a technical summary of the budget request for the Networking and Information Technology...

  12. Museum Universe Data File FY 2015 Q1

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the first quarter of FY 2015. This list contains descriptive information about...

  13. Library Systems: FY 2012 Public Libraries Survey (Administrative Entity)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Find key information on library systems around the United States.These data include imputed values for libraries that did not submit information in the FY 2012 data...

  14. Wildlife Health office annual report for FY2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report for the Wildlife Health office covers what the WHo (Wildlife Health office) is and their philosophy. Next the FY2015 deliverables are covered, and the...

  15. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Jim [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03

    The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

  16. An analysis of stream channel cross section technique as a means to determine anthropogenic change in second order streams at the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Meagher County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeff Boice

    1999-01-01

    Five second order tributaries to Tenderfoot Creek were investigated: Upper Tenderfoot Creek, Sun Creek, Spring Park Creek, Bubbling Creek, and Stringer Creek. Second order reaches were initially located on 7.5 minute topographic maps using techniques first applied by Strahler (1952). Reach breaks were determined in the field through visual inspection. Vegetation type (...

  17. Considerations of potential vectors and animal reservoirs in an emerging cutaneous leishmaniasis area in São Domingos ranch, Paraná State in Southearn Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Norberto Assis Membrive; Flora Hisatugo; Thaís Gomes Verzignassi Silveira; Jorge Juarez Vieira Teixeira; Kárin Rosi Reinhold-Castro; Ueslei Teodoro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to better understand the dynamics of Leishmania sand flies and reservoirs in São Domingos ranch, Arapongas municipality, Paraná State, an anthropic environment in an endemic area of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Sand flies were collected in wild animal burrows, residences and in the forest, with Falcão light trap (FA), Shannon trap (SH) and quadrangular pyramidal trap (QP). The search for Leishmania was made on sand flies, biological samples of wild rodents ...

  18. Annual Progress Report (FY-80) Department of Clinical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-30

    allergen. There was only one patient who had both positive skin tests and allergic rhinitis history. Number of subiects to he studd before comnle-.in of...of Immunologic Imbalance in Atopic Dermatitis. 392 (FY-78 F) 3151 Allergic Disease Center Study of Hymenoptera Insect Venom as an 3941 Agent for... PEDIATRICS continued PAC;E 6025 Role of Surfacc Tension Measurement of Amniotic Fluid Lipid 510 Extract in Prediction of RDS in the Newborn. ’(FY-78 1

  19. EST Table: FY027405 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY027405 bmte17e20 11/12/09 n.h 11/11/04 66 %/126 aa ref|XP_001849588.1| quick-to-c...ourt [Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS30534.1| quick-to-court [Culex quinquefasciatus] 11/11/04 55 %/120 aa FB...240093|ref|XP_972388.2| PREDICTED: similar to quick-to-court [Tribolium castaneum] FY027405 bmte ...

  20. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY13 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Strasburg, Jana D.

    2013-09-30

    In Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) the SNAP demonstration was enhanced with respect to query and navigation usability issues.

  1. EST Table: FY042327 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY042327 rbmte28p05 11/12/09 n.h 11/11/04 60 %/232 aa ref|XP_001664237.1| breast cancer metastasis...-suppressor [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT33713.1| breast cancer metastasis-suppressor [Aedes aegypti...11/04 57 %/173 aa gi|91080755|ref|XP_966988.1| PREDICTED: similar to breast cancer metastasis-suppressor 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FY042327 bmte ...

  2. LLNL FY10 Greenhouse Gas Inventory - Quarters 1 and 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C. Susi [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-09-29

    This report only represents LLNL’s GHG emissions for the first three quarters of FY10 as agreed upon by Karin King, Livermore Site Office, to be followed by a full report for FY10 by the end of November. This report represents calculations based on the best data available at this time and will be revised as necessary to accommodate either changes in guidance or data quality.

  3. EST Table: FY025063 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY025063 bmte10m16 11/11/04 37 %/188 aa ref|XP_001989926.1| GH18525 [Drosophila grims...hawi] gb|EDV92988.1| GH18525 [Drosophila grimshawi] 11/11/04 n.h 11/11/04 n.h 11/11/04 n.h 11/11/04 n.h 11/11/04 n.h FY738348 bmte ...

  4. FY 1997 Financial Reporting by The Defense Automated Printing Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-23

    FINANCIAL REPORTING BY THE DEFENSE AUTOMATED PRINTING SERVICE Report No. 98-201 September 23, 1998 Office of the Inspector...ACCOUNTING SERVICE DIRECTOR, DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY DIRECTOR, DEFENSE AUTOMATED PRINTING SERVICE SUBJECT: Audit Report on FY 1997 Financial Reporting by the...General for Auditing Office of the Inspector General, DoD Report No. 98-201 September 23, 1998 (Project No. 8FJ-2002.04) FY 1997 Financial Reporting by

  5. U.S. Army Research Institute Program in Basic Research FY 2005 and FY 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    ELEMENT NUMBERFY 2005 and FY 20066102 611102A 6. AUTHOR(S) 5c. PROJECT NUMBER Basic Research Unit B74F 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...animal experiments for some time to come. Research Approach The project uses a technique called genetic algorithms to develop and test possible...Our primary model is a reputation-building model of altruistic retribution, which we call the -Reputation Game." In this model, simple agents interact

  6. NPDES Permit for Soap Creek Associates Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit number MT-0023183, Soap Creek Associates, Inc. is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in West, Bighorn County, Montana, to Soap Creek.

  7. Water‐Data Report 413723083123801 Crane Creek at Ottawa NWR-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water levels and water quality parameters recorded on Crane Creek. Water-Data Report 2013 413723083123801 Crane Creek Mouth at Ottawa NWR LOCATION: Lat. 41°37'23"N,...

  8. Water‐Data Report 413723083123801 Crane Creek at Ottawa NWR-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water levels and water quality parameters recorded on Crane Creek. Water-Data Report 2013 413723083123801 Crane Creek Mouth at Ottawa NWR LOCATION: Lat. 41°37'23"N,...

  9. 77 FR 5519 - Public Availability of the Federal Communications Commission's FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... COMMISSION Public Availability of the Federal Communications Commission's FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory and FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory Analysis AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice of public availability of service contract inventory and analysis. SUMMARY: The Federal...

  10. InterProScan Result: FY738709 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY738709 FY738709_3_ORF1 18429BBA61DECF2E SUPERFAMILY SSF103473 MFS general substra...te transporter 1.2e-25 T IPR016196 Major facilitator superfamily, general substrate transporter ...

  11. Library Systems: FY 1992-2012 Public Libraries Survey Trends (Administrative Entity)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Find key information on trends in library systems around the United States from FY 1992 to FY 2012.These data include imputed values for libraries that did not...

  12. MRT 5711 - Scope Radiochemical Analysis Comparison: Joint LANL-LLNL FY17 L-2 Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, S. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, A. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-14

    A 2016 Level-1 milestone highlighted surprising differences in fundamental data used by the two US design laboratories. To better understand and ultimately resolve those differences, two Level-2 milestones were developed for execution in FY-17 and FY-18.

  13. Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McRoberts, Heidi

    2006-03-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed are coordinated with the Clearwater National Forest and Potlatch Corporation. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed of the Clearwater River in 1996. Fencing to exclude cattle for stream banks, stream bank stabilization, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts are the primary focuses of this effort. The successful completion of the replacement and removal of several passage blocking culverts represent a major improvement to the watershed. These projects, coupled with other recently completed projects and those anticipated in the future, are a significant step in improving habitat conditions in Lolo Creek.

  14. 76 FR 13344 - Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project, Ashland Ranger District, Custer National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Forest Service Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project, Ashland Ranger District, Custer National Forest... Environmental Impact Statement for the Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project in the Federal Register (75 FR... Creek Landscape Management Project was published in the Federal Register on October 15, 2010 (75 FR...

  15. 33 CFR 334.475 - Brickyard Creek and tributaries and the Broad River at Beaufort, SC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shoreline of the MCAS to a point along the northern shoreline of Mulligan Creek at latitude 32.48993°, longitude 80.69836°, thence southwesterly across Mulligan Creek to the shoreline of the MCAS, latitude 32... portion of Mulligan Creek located on the southern side of the MCAS runway, beginning at a point on the...

  16. 76 FR 27890 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Severn River, Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Severn River, Spa Creek... Annapolis'' triathlon, a marine event to be held on the waters of Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor on May 14... Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor during the event. DATES: This rule is effective from 6 a.m. until 9 a.m...

  17. 75 FR 68780 - Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... Doc No: 2010-28232] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. RC11-1-000] Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing November 2, 2010. Take notice that on October 27, 2010, Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC (Cedar Creek) filed an appeal with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

  18. Acculturation into the Creek Traditions: Growing in Depth and Breadth of Understanding within the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Margaret B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is in part, a reflective analysis of 15 years living with the state-recognized Florida Creek Indians of the Central Florida Muskogee Creek Tribe and the Pasco Band of Creek Indians, formally of Lacoochee, FL and currently in Brooksville, FL, respectively. It addresses the power structures within tribal organizations. Selected Creek…

  19. 78 FR 25484 - License Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... COMMISSION License Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County... compliance (POC) wells and the deletion of License Condition (LC) No. 47 for its Bear Creek Uranium Mill...: [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Bear Creek Uranium Mill operated...

  20. Trace metals in intertidal sediment of mangrove-sheltered creeks in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trace metals (Zn, Cu and Pb) fluxes were studied in five intertidal flats at Bodo Creek, Eastern Niger Delta, Nigeria in 2006, and re-evaluated in 2010 following two major oil spills that occurred in the creek. This study is the first to look at trace metal loads in the interstitial sediments of Bodo creek. Standard methods were ...

  1. 77 FR 2493 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor, Annapolis, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Spa Creek... ``TriRock Triathlon Series'', a marine event to be held on the waters of Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor... portion of the Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor during the event. DATES: Comments and related material must...

  2. 77 FR 15602 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor, Annapolis, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Spa Creek... Triathlon Series'', a marine event to be held on the waters of Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor on May 12... the Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor during the event. DATES: This rule is effective and will be...

  3. 78 FR 20066 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor; Annapolis, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Spa Creek and...Rock Triathlon Series'', a marine event to be held on the waters of Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor on... portion of Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor during the event. ] DATES: Comments and related material must be...

  4. 78 FR 38000 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor; Annapolis, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ...--AA08 Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor; Annapolis, MD AGENCY...,'' a marine event to be held on the waters of Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor on July 20, 2013. The...; Marine Events, Spa Creek and Annapolis Harbor; Annapolis, MD'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 20066). The...

  5. 75 FR 3195 - Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Mill Creek; Allotment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Forest Service Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Mill Creek; Allotment... Mountain Ranger District. These four allotments are: Cox, Craig, Mill Creek, and Old Dry Creek. The.... ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Bill Queen, District Ranger, Lookout Mountain District, Ochoco National...

  6. Impact of Urban Effluents on the Macroinvertebrates of a Creek in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nima Creek showed characteristics of a disturbed urban creek. A total of 19 macroinvertebrate taxa, comprising a total of 11,613 individuals, were collected. Estimated Shannon-Weiner Diversity Index (H´) was low at the midstream section of the creek, H'= 1.14, where the effluents were concentrated than at the ...

  7. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosensteel, B.A. [JAYCOR, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trettin, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation.

  8. The Utilization of Historical Data and Geospatial Technology Advances at the Jornada Experimental Range to Support Western America Ranching Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Havstad

    2011-09-01

    that afford the opportunity to obtain high (5 cm resolution data now required for rangeland monitoring. The Jornada team is now a leader in civil UAV applications in the USA. The scientific advances at the Jornada in fields such as remote sensing can be traced to the original Western America ranching culture that established the Jornada in 1912 and which persists as an important influence in shaping research directions today.

  9. 77 FR 9620 - Public Availability of FY 2011 Service Contract Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Public Availability of FY 2011 Service Contract Inventories AGENCY: Office of Procurement and Property Management, Departmental Management, Department of Agriculture. ACTION: Notice of public availability of FY... to advise the public of the availability of the FY 2011 Service Contract inventory. This inventory...

  10. Foundation for the Future. 2013-2015 Strategic Plan. FY13 Organizational Performance Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    regions and colleges Develop partnership with new customers, identify training needs, and deliver appropriate support Develop partnership with new...component acquisition organizations, and the Defense Acquisition Workforce and community. Objectives: 1. Update Customer Relationship Management ( CRM ...tr t ic l Objective FY13 FY14 FY15 Update Customer Relationship Management Program Update CRM program with greater emphasis on outreach Develop

  11. Parasites gastro-intestinaux d'antilopes et de buffles (Syncerus caffer brachyceros du ranch de gibier de Nazinga au Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belem AMG.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-intestinal parasites of antelopes and buffalos (Syncerus caffer brachyceros from the Nazinga game ranch in Burkina Faso. Parasitological survey done on the digestive tracts of antelopes [roans (Hippotragus equinus koba, hartebeests (Alcelaphus buselaphus major, defassa waterbucks (Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa, oribis (Ourebia ourebi quadriscopa] and buffalos (Syncerus caffer brachyceros from the Nazinga game ranch in Burkina Faso allowed the identification of gastrointestinal parasites and the estimation of their prevalence and load. Nine different nematode species and three cestode species were found. Females and larvae of Cooperia were not identified up to the species level and were recognized as Cooperia spp. The nematode species found were: Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus axei, Cooperia curticei, Cooperia spatulata, Skrjabinema sp., Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Trichuris ovis, Bunostomum phlebotomum, and Oesophagostomum sp. Cestodes’ species were: Moniezia expansa, Avitellina centripunctata, and Stilesia globipunctata. It was also noted without a thorough investigation the presence of Setaria labiato-papillosa in the abdominal cavity and paramphistomes in the rumen. In spite of the presence of parasites on the antelopes and buffalos, their killing out percentages (47.5 to 54.7% indicated a good physical status.

  12. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  13. FY2016 Ceramic Fuels Development Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2016 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY16 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  14. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2011 Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01

    One of the major research and development (R&D) areas under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is advanced fuels development. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has the responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY 20) 2011 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section. The order of the accomplishments in this report is consistent with the AFC work breakdown structure (WBS).

  15. Defense waste vitrification studies during FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorklund, W.J.

    1981-08-01

    During FY-1980, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) tested three vitrification processes on simulated high-level radioactive waste typical of that stored or being produced at US defense facilities. Processes tested included a spray calciner/in-can melter, spray calciner/ceramic melter and direct liquid feeding of a ceramic melter. Tests were made on pilot-scale as well as fullscale equipment. Over 16,000 kg of glass product were produced from 68,000 L of simulated waste. Several compositions were tested, and the glass products were evaluated. Emphasis was placed on determining the processing rates and the ability of the waste to be processed. Off-gas data were collected on several runs. Major conclusions drawn from this test program are divided into processing results, glass-product results, and general information.

  16. FY17 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ali, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benstead, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doeppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Panella, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gumbrell, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hua, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Krygier, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kuranz, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marley, E. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Poole, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubery, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Saunders, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swadling, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-26

    The Capseed campaign goal is to measure shock front velocity non-uniformities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator materials and quantify the level of non-uniformity caused by intrinsic effects. This is done using the Omega High Resolution Velocimeter (OHRV) to obtain velocity maps of the optically reflecting shock front following release of the ablator material into either PMMA for the warm experiments or cryogenic deuterium for the cryo experiments. For the three half-days in FY17 the focus was twofold: complete measurements on the impact of oxygen heterogeneity and oxygen mitigation layers for glow discharge polymer (GDP), and begin measuring velocity non-uniformities on deep release from Be, GDP, and highdensity carbon (HDC) into D2 with improved velocity sensitivity.

  17. 2020 Vision Project Summary, FY98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Munoz; J. C. Clausen; K. P. Scott; K. W. Gordon

    1998-11-01

    The 2020 Vision project began in 1996 with two participating teachers and four classes. It has since grown to comprise more than a dozen participating teachers and hundreds of students across the country. Much of this growth took place in FY98, thanks to the accomplishment of several major goals: implementation of a mentor program, enhanced teacher training, a mid-year conference for students, recruitment of distant schools, and the development of an interactive Web site. The first part of this report describes these accomplishments, as well as future directions for 2020 Vision. The second part summarized the scenarios students wrote during the 1997-98 school year. it identifies recurrent themes in the students' scenarios and compares/contrasts them with scenarios written in the first two years of the project.

  18. Wind Powering America FY06 Activities Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-02-01

    The Wind Powering America FY06 Activities Summary reflects the accomplishments of our state wind working groups, our programs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and our partner organizations. The national WPA team remains a leading force for moving wind energy forward in the United States. WPA continues to work with its national, regional, and state partners to communicate the opportunities and benefits of wind energy to a diverse set of stakeholders. WPA now has 29 state wind working groups (welcoming New Jersey, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri in 2006) that form strategic alliances to communicate wind's benefits to the state stakeholders. More than 120 members of national and state public and private sector organizations from 34 states attended the 5th Annual WPA All-States Summit in Pittsburgh in June.

  19. Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-03-01

    This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups.

  20. Institutional plan. FY 1997-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The FY 1997-2002 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. Of particular significance this year is the role of computing sciences in supporting a broad range of research activities, at Berkeley Lab in particular and throughout the entire Department of Energy system in general. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s mission and programs and is an element of Department of Energy`s strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives.

  1. Preliminary Chemical and Biological Assessment of Ogbe Creek ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    drainage, and habitat to wildlife, creating neighborhood beauty and improving quality of life. In developing countries, there has been a systematic loss of creeks to overuse, ... Plankton samples were collected using standard plankton net of 55 µm mesh size. The plankton count was carried out using a 1 ml Sedgwick rafter ...

  2. 75 FR 8036 - Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Forest Service Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent...-Toiyabe National Forest will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on a proposal to authorize..., Little Fish Lake, Monitor Complex, Saulsbury and Stone Cabin allotments have active term grazing permits...

  3. Short notes and reviews The fossil fauna of Mazon Creek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultze, Hans-Peter

    1998-01-01

    Review of: Richardson’s Guide to the Fossil Fauna of Mazon Creek, edited by Charles W. Shabica & Andrew A. Hay. Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, Illinois, 1997: XVIII + 308 pp., 385 figs., 4 tables, 1 faunal list; $75.00 (hard cover) ISBN 0-925065-21-8. Since the last century, the area

  4. The Wilson’s Creek Staff Ride and Battlefield Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    cross Wilson’s Creek to ard the s Plummer advanced, he sought to siIen PI~mrne~~s command was i sha 3d Louisiana and 2d ansas retreat. Qsition...Redskins. Experiences in Army Life of Colonel George B. Sanford, 1861-1866. Norman: University of Oklahoma Resa , 1969. Tunnard, William H. A Southern

  5. Research in the Caspar Creek Experimental Watersheds, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Lewis; Rand E. Eads; Robert R. Ziemer

    2000-01-01

    For the past four decades, researchers from the Pacific Southwest Research Station's Redwood Sciences Laboratory, in cooperation with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, have been studying the effects of logging in the Caspar Creek Experimental Watersheds on the Jackson Demonstration State Forest near Fort Bragg, California. Their findings...

  6. 75 FR 63431 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications... 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal Communications Commission proposes to amend 47 CFR part 73 as follows: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 1. The...

  7. Coyote Creek (Santa Clara County) Pilot Revegetation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    John T. Stanley; L. R. Silva; H. C. Appleton; M. S. Marangio; W. J. Lapaz; B. H. Goldner

    1989-01-01

    The Santa Clara Valley Water District, located in Northern California, is currently evaluating a pilot riparian revegetation project on a 1.6 ha (4 ac) site adjacent to Coyote Creek in the south San Francisco Bay Area. Specific techniques used during the design, site preparation and installation of 3640 plants (including seed planting locations) are described. This...

  8. The Caspar Creek Watersheds--a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. R. Ziemer

    1990-01-01

    Caspar Creek experimental watersheds are located on the Jackson Demonstration State Forest. Sponsors are the Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW), USDA Forest Service, and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF). Both organizations have been working cooperatively since 1962

  9. Tillman Creek Mitigation Site As-Build Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresham, Doug [Otak, Inc.

    2009-05-29

    This as-built report describes site conditions at the Tillman Creek mitigation site in South Cle Elum, Washington. This mitigation site was constructed in 2006-2007 to compensate for wetland impacts from the Yakama Nation hatchery. This as-built report provides information on the construction sequence, as-built survey, and establishment of baseline monitoring stations.

  10. Preliminary chemical and biological assessment of Ogbe Creek ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The macro benthos harvested consisted of 123 invertebrates comprising four pollution tolerant taxa, Erpobdella, Chironomus, Eristalis and Brachydeutera. The low plankton and macro benthos diversity further indicated the impact of the perturbational stress on the organisms inhabiting the creek. Monitoring and evaluation ...

  11. Snake Creek embankment research study subsides for season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Snake Creek Embankment on U.S. Highway 83 between Lake Audubon and Lake Sakakawea was home to a research project on bird strikes with power lines this year. This...

  12. Streamflow characteristics and trends along Soldier Creek, Northeast Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2017-08-16

    Historical data for six selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages along Soldier Creek in northeast Kansas were used in an assessment of streamflow characteristics and trends. This information is required by the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation for the effective management of tribal water resources, including drought contingency planning. Streamflow data for the period of record at each streamgage were used to assess annual mean streamflow, annual mean base flow, mean monthly flow, annual peak flow, and annual minimum flow.Annual mean streamflows along Soldier Creek were characterized by substantial year-to-year variability with no pronounced long-term trends. On average, annual mean base flow accounted for about 20 percent of annual mean streamflow. Mean monthly flows followed a general seasonal pattern that included peak values in spring and low values in winter. Annual peak flows, which were characterized by considerable year-to-year variability, were most likely to occur in May and June and least likely to occur during November through February. With the exception of a weak yet statistically significant increasing trend at the Soldier Creek near Topeka, Kansas, streamgage, there were no pronounced long-term trends in annual peak flows. Annual 1-day, 30-day, and 90-day mean minimum flows were characterized by considerable year-to-year variability with no pronounced long-term trend. During an extreme drought, as was the case in the mid-1950s, there may be zero flow in Soldier Creek continuously for a period of one to several months.

  13. 76 FR 13524 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications... Congressional Review Act, see U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting... as follows: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 0 1. The authority citation for part 73 continues to...

  14. 78 FR 37474 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, Colorado AGENCY: Federal Communications... CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Chief, Audio... amends 47 CFR part 73 as follows: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 0 1. The authority citation for Part...

  15. 77 FR 75946 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 . Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, CO AGENCY: Federal Communications... 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant... Communications Commission proposes to amend 47 CFR Part 73 as follows: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 1. The...

  16. 75 FR 8895 - Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... include a new natural gas-fired combustion turbine set, a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and a steam turbine generator set. DATES: With this notice, RUS invites any affected Federal, State, and local...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station AGENCY...

  17. 75 FR 33238 - Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... turbine set, a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and a steam turbine generator set. DATES: Written...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station AGENCY... Basin Electric Power Cooperative's (Basin Electric) application for a RUS loan and a Western...

  18. 75 FR 43915 - Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... generator, and a steam turbine generator set. ADDRESSES: To obtain copies of the ROD, or for further... Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station AGENCY: Rural Utilities... environmental impacts of and alternatives to Basin Electric Power Cooperative's (Basin Electric) application for...

  19. Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1999 Habitat Conservation Projects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, Duane G.

    2000-10-01

    The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a summary of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. Up until last year, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and was the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices are the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. However, the watershed stream evaluation team used in the watershed analysis determined that there were problems along the Pataha Creek that needed to be addressed that would add further protection to the banks and therefore a further reduction of sedimentation into the stream. 1999 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. In stream work was not addressed this year because of the costs associated with these projects and the low impact of the sediment issue concerning Pataha Creeks impact on Chinook Salmon in the Tucannon River.

  20. Meteorological factors in the Quartz Creek forest fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. T. Gisborne

    1927-01-01

    It is not often that a large forest fire occurs conveniently near a weather station specially equipped for measuring forest-fire weather. The 13,000-acre Quartz Creek fire on the Kaniksu National Forest during the summer of 1936 was close enough to the Priest River Experimental Forest of the Northern Rocky Mountain Forest Experiment Station for the roar of the flumes...

  1. Preliminary investigations on the Ichthyodiversity of Kilifi Creek, Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acan bloc. Cara igno. Cyna gilc. Gaza mina. Gerrfila. H ils kele. Leia equu. Leia sp. Leth mahs. Lutj sang. Oxyu papa. Poma multi. Scorn lysa. Tera jarb. Tera ther. Upen sulp. Upen vitt. PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATIONS ON THE ICHTHYODIVERSITY OF KILIFI CREEK 19 irregular use of hand—nets besides literally hitting.

  2. Estimate of Water Residence Times in Tudor Creek, Kenya Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, even though the observed salinity gradient in the creek appeared consistent with dry and rain periods, estimates of river runoffs were not good enough to calculate water exchange, based on salt conservation. Runoff in general was also too small to give reliable rating curves (correlation between rainfall and river ...

  3. 75 FR 52463 - Safety Zone; Raccoon Creek, Bridgeport, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... life and property on navigable waters while contractors replace steel I-beams. This safety zone is... plans on replacing steel I-beams used to support the Route 130 Bridge spanning the Raccoon Creek in... temporary safety zone is for all navigable waters within 400 yards on either side of the Route 130 Bridge...

  4. PAH concentrations in sediment from Jones Creek Delta State, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EC) priority pollutants - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediment and shrimp samples in Jones Creek southern Nigeria was investigated from March 2015 to August 2016. The ΣPAHs ranged from 0.32±0.07 to 48.38± 2.47 mg/kg for ...

  5. Bacteriological water quality of Elechi creek in Port Harcourt, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with pathogenic bacteria; hence the water is of low quality and should not be used for human consumption. The low counts of hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria confirmed absence of a possible source of contamination of the creek by crude oil and its products. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol.

  6. Cherry Creek Research Natural Area: guidebook supplement 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid Schuller; Jennie Sperling; Tim. Rodenkirk

    2011-01-01

    This guidebook describes Cherry Creek Research Natural Area, a 239-ha (590-ac) area that supports old-growth Douglas-fir-western hemlock (Pseudotsuga menziesii- Tsuga heterophylla) forest occurring on sedimentary materials in the southern Oregon Coast Range. Major plant associations present within the area include the western hemlock/Oregon oxalis...

  7. 78 FR 2990 - Bear Creek Storage Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Bear Creek Storage Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization Take notice that on December 21, 2012, Bear Creek Storage Company, L.L.C. (Bear Creek), 569... the Natural Gas Act, and Bear Creek's blanket certificate issued in Docket No. CP10-28-000 on January...

  8. A baseline and watershed assessment in the Lynx Creek, Brenot Creek, and Portage Creek watersheds near Hudson's Hope, BC : summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matscha, G.; Sutherland, D. [British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection, Prince George, BC (Canada)

    2005-06-15

    This report summarized a baseline monitoring program for the Lynx Creek, Brenot Creek, and Portage Creek watersheds located near Hudson's Hope, British Columbia (BC). The monitoring program was designed to more accurately determine the effects of potential coalbed gas developments in the region, as well as to assess levels of agricultural and forest harvesting, and the impacts of current land use activities on water quantity and quality. Water quality was sampled at 18 sites during 5 different flow regimes, including summer and fall low flows; ice cover; spring run-off; and high flows after a heavy summer rain event. Sample sites were located up and downstream of both forest and agricultural activities. The water samples were analyzed for 70 contaminants including ions, nutrients, metals, hydrocarbons, and hydrocarbon fractions. Results showed that while many analyzed parameters met current BC water quality guidelines, total organic carbon, manganese, cadmium, E. coli, fecal coliforms, and fecal streptococci often exceeded recommended guidelines. Aluminum and cobalt values exceeded drinking water guidelines. The samples also had a slightly alkaline pH and showed high conductance. A multiple barrier approach was recommended to reduce potential risks of contamination from the watersheds. It was concluded that a more refined bacteria source tracking method is needed to determine whether fecal pollution has emanated from human, livestock or wildlife sources. 1 tab., 9 figs.

  9. FY 1999 annual work plan for infrastructure program WBS 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-08-27

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 DynCorp Annual Work Plan (AWP) relates DOE-RL work breakdown structure (WBS) to Cost Accounts and to Organizational Structure. Each Cost Account includes a workscope narrative and justification performance and service standards, goals, and deliverables. Basis of estimates are included within each Cost Account to demonstrate the relationship of budget to defined workscope. The FY 1999 AWP reflects the planning assumptions and initiatives that are included in the PHMC Strategic Plan for Infrastructure Optimization which was established in FY 1998. Development of the FY 1999 AWP was in accordance with a sequential series of events and efforts described in the Infrastructure Annual Work Planning and Budget Cycle which was developed and established in conjunction with the Strategic Plan. The Strategic Plan covers a rolling five year span of time and is updated at the start of each fiscal year as the beginning of the annual work planning and budget cycle for the following fiscal year. Accordingly the planning for the FY 1999 AWP began in January 1998. Also included in the annual work planning and budget cycle, and the basis for the budget in this AWP, is the development of a requirements-based budget.

  10. Environmental management compliance reengineering project, FY 1997 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanVliet, J.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    Through an integrated reengineering effort, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is successfully implementing process improvements that will permit safe and compliant operations to continue during the next 5 years, even though $80 million was removed from the Environmental Management (EM) program budget. A 2-year analysis, design, and implementation project will reengineer compliance-related activities and reduce operating costs by approximately $17 million per year from Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 through 2002, while continuing to meet the INEEL`s environment, safety, and health requirements and milestone commitments. Compliance reengineer`s focus is improving processes, not avoiding full compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws. In FY 1997, compliance reengineering used a three-phase approach to analyze, design, and implement the changes that would decrease operating costs. Implementation for seven specific improvement projects was completed in FY 1997, while five projects will complete implementation in FY 1998. During FY 1998, the three-phase process will be repeated to continue reengineering the INEEL.

  11. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY POINT-OF-USE (POU) REVERSE OSMOSIS. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SUNSET RANCH DEVELOPMENT IN HOMEDALE, ID. FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Sunset Ranch Development in Homedale, ID. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: 1) the effectiveness of a point of use (POU) re...

  12. Wildfire impacts on stream sedimentation: re-visiting the Boulder Creek Burn in Little Granite Creek, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra Ryan; Kathleen Dwire

    2012-01-01

    In this study of a burned watershed in northwestern Wyoming, USA, sedimentation impacts following a moderately-sized fire (Boulder Creek burn, 2000) were evaluated against sediment loads estimated for the period prior to burning. Early observations of suspended sediment yield showed substantially elevated loads (5x) the first year post-fire (2001), followed by less...

  13. Characterization of Fog Water Collection Potential and Quality on California State University Monterey Bay and Glen Deven Ranch Near Big Sur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, G. E.

    2005-12-01

    Since June 25, 2005 I have had three standard fog collectors (SFCs) in place at various locales throughout the Greater Monterey Area. From June 25 until July 22, the three SFCs were all located on the California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) campus, only a few meters above sea level. Their orientations were all due west. On July 22 two of the SFCs were relocated to a hilly coastal location in Big Sur several hundred meters above sea level known as Glen Deven Ranch. They will remain there until October 15. An SFC is a device that collects fog water from the air. They each consist of a 1 m2 copper frame with a mesh net wound around it. This frame is affixed to two steel posts and is 2 m off the ground. Below the frame sits a trough that has a bottom slanted so that all water in it flows towards a spout at one end. This spout is connected by a tube to a container or data logging rain gauge. Preliminary data analysis shows that maximal collection occurs in the early morning hours at CSUMB and during the evening at Glen Deven Ranch. The weekly volumes of water collected at Glen Deven thus far have been between 2 and 30 times the volume collected on CSUMB. During the time period of operation, the SFCs connected to containers collected 114.37 L in total. The maximum collected for one week is 6.75 L on campus and 19.21 L at the ranch. The data logged by the rain gauge is currently being analyzed to determine how much water has been collected by the SFC it has been connected to. Water from the Glen Deven SFCs and from the CSUMB SFC has been sent to the Santa Clara Municipal Water District where the purity and potability of the water are being investigated. Initially, I wanted to determine about how much water could be obtained in this fashion for use in the Monterey Bay Area. I assumed my results would be broadly applicable, but due to the high variability of fog collection rates I observed even in collectors only a couple hundred of meters apart, any conclusions I

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2007-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

  15. Optimal imaging for treaty verification FY2014 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilton, Nathan R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, William C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brubaker, Erik M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Kupinski, Matthew Alan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); MacGahan, Christopher Jonathan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2014-10-01

    FY2014 technical report of our project funded by DNN R&D that leverages advanced inference methods developed for medical and adaptive imaging to address arms control applications. We seek a method to acquire and analyze imaging data of declared treaty-accountable items without creating an image of those objects or otherwise storing or revealing any classified information. Such a method would avoid the use of classified-information barriers. We present our progress on FY2014 tasks defined in our life-cycle plan. We also describe some future work that is part of the continuation of this project in FY2015 and beyond as part of a venture that joins ours with a related PNNL project.

  16. Third annual environmental restoration monitoring and assessment report for FY 1994 of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A.; Guth, M.A.S. [eds.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring, field investigations, and assessments conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, providing an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. The results presented are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) Project. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The Remedial Investigation Plan (DOE 1992) for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator and the major conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. During FY 1992, the remedial investigation activities were integrated with a series of environmental monitoring and SI activities at ORNL that address pathways and processes important for contaminant movement to gain a more integrated perspective of contamination movement at the watershed scale.

  17. Developing flood-inundation maps for Johnson Creek, Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonewall, Adam J.; Beal, Benjamin A.

    2017-04-14

    Digital flood-inundation maps were created for a 12.9‑mile reach of Johnson Creek by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The flood-inundation maps depict estimates of water depth and areal extent of flooding from the mouth of Johnson Creek to just upstream of Southeast 174th Avenue in Portland, Oregon. Each flood-inundation map is based on a specific water level and associated streamflow at the USGS streamgage, Johnson Creek at Sycamore, Oregon (14211500), which is located near the upstream boundary of the maps. The maps produced by the USGS, and the forecasted flood hydrographs produced by National Weather Service River Forecast Center can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapper Web site (http://wimcloud.usgs.gov/apps/FIM/FloodInundationMapper.html).Water-surface elevations were computed for Johnson Creek using a combined one-dimensional and two‑dimensional unsteady hydraulic flow model. The model was calibrated using data collected from the flood of December 2015 (including the calculated streamflows at two USGS streamgages on Johnson Creek) and validated with data from the flood of January 2009. Results were typically within 0.6 foot (ft) of recorded or measured water-surface elevations from the December 2015 flood, and within 0.8 ft from the January 2009 flood. Output from the hydraulic model was used to create eight flood inundation maps ranging in stage from 9 to 16 ft. Boundary condition hydrographs were identical in shape to those from the December 2015 flood event, but were scaled up or down to produce the amount of streamflow corresponding to a specific water-surface elevation at the Sycamore streamgage (14211500). Sensitivity analyses using other hydrograph shapes, and a version of the model in which the peak flow is maintained for an extended period of time, showed minimal variation, except for overbank areas near the Foster Floodplain Natural Area.Simulated water-surface profiles were combined with light detection and ranging (lidar

  18. Plutonium stabilization and disposition focus area, FY 1999 and FY 2000 multi-year program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Consistent with the Environmental Management`s (EM`s) plan titled, ``Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure``, and ongoing efforts within the Executive Branch and Congress, this Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Plutonium Focus Area was written to ensure that technical gap projects are effectively managed and measured. The Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) defines and manages technology development programs that contribute to the effective stabilization of nuclear materials and their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of PFA activities includes the complete spectrum of plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA enables solutions to site-specific and complex-wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. The report describes the current technical activities, namely: Plutonium stabilization (9 studies); Highly enriched uranium stabilization (2 studies); Russian collaboration program (2 studies); Packaging and storage technologies (6 studies); and PFA management work package/product line (3 studies). Budget information for FY 1999 and FY 2000 is provided.

  19. NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU 366) FY2013 and FY2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Mizell, Steve [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Campbell, Scott [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is conducting a field assessment of the potential for contaminated soil transport from the Plutonium Valley Contamination Area (CA) as a result of wind transport and storm runoff in support of Nevada Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) efforts to complete regulatory closure of the contamination areas. The DRI work is intended to confirm the likely mechanism(s) of transport and determine the meteorological conditions that might cause movement of contaminated soils. Emphasis is given to collecting sediment transported by channelized storm runoff at the Plutonium Valley investigation sites. These data will inform closure plans that are being developed, which will facilitate appropriate closure design and postclosure monitoring. Desert Research Institute installed two meteorological monitoring stations south (station number 1) and north (station number 2) of the Plutonium Valley CA and a runoff sediment sampling station within the CA in 2011. Temperature, wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity, precipitation, solar radiation, barometric pressure, soil temperature, and airborne particulate concentration are collected at both meteorological stations. The maximum, minimum, and average or total (as appropriate) for each of these parameters is recorded for each 10-minute interval. The sediment sampling station includes an automatically activated ISCO sampling pump with collection bottles for suspended sediment, which is activated when sufficient flow is present in the channel, and passive traps for bedload material that is transported down the channel during runoff events. This report presents data collected from these stations during FY2013 and FY2014.

  20. EST Table: FY033047 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY033047 rbmte3b19 11/12/09 n.h 11/11/04 43 %/139 aa ref|XP_974421.1| PREDICTED: similar to synoviolin...staneum] 11/11/04 n.h 11/11/04 n.h 11/11/04 n.h 11/11/04 n.h 11/11/04 39 %/139 aa gi|91087035|ref|XP_974421.1| PREDICTED: similar to synoviolin [Tribolium castaneum] FY033047 bmte ...