WorldWideScience

Sample records for creative writing studies

  1. Digitizing Craft: Creative Writing Studies and New Media--A Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This article identifies and examines a digital arm of creative writing studies and organizes that proposal into four categories through which to theorize the "craft" of creative production, each borrowed from Tim Mayers's "(Re)Writing Craft: Composition, Creative Writing, and the Future of English Studies": process, genre, author, and…

  2. LEARNING CREATIVE WRITING MODEL BASED ON NEUROLINGUISTIC PROGRAMMING

    OpenAIRE

    Rustan, Edhy

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to determine: (1) condition on learning creative writing at high school students in Makassar, (2) requirement of learning model in creative writing, (3) program planning and design model in ideal creative writing, (4) feasibility of model study based on creative writing in neurolinguistic programming, and (5) the effectiveness of the learning model based on creative writing in neurolinguisticprogramming.The method of this research uses research development of L...

  3. Teaching the Essential Understanding of Creative Writing

    OpenAIRE

    Kallionpää, Outi

    2010-01-01

    In my Master´s thesis I have researched teaching of creative writing for high school students. I have also created the concept called the Essential Understanding of Creative Writing, which I think is the base and the starting point of teaching creative writing. The term is hypothesis and it roughly means the subjectively understood essence of creative work and writing process, as well as the strengthening the inner motivation and author identity by writer. Collaboration seems to support the E...

  4. Improving the 5th Formers’ Continuous Writing Skills through the Creative Writing Module

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    Mohana Ram Murugiah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Writing is a complex task. The development of students’ writing skill depends on the teacher’s teaching strategy and also the materials used in the writing lesson. In the present study, the effectiveness of a creative writing module was examined that was designed to improve the writing skill of a group of excellent students. It was added with explicit teaching strategies. The selected group of students were students who were in the excellent group but lacked creativity and vocabulary in their writing. The creative writing module was designed to help these students. Students’ improvement was observed through observation in the classrooms during the lessons and through writing task as well as interviews. Two observations were made. One was before the creative writing project was started and another after the completion of the entire task of the module. The interview was carried out to learn about the students’ perception of the module and how do they find the module has helped them.  The result of the research showed that students have shown a great level of improvement in their writing skills. The outcome of this present study could be useful to assist language instructors in helping proficient learners to undergo a more effective second language learning experience.

  5. A Study Of Creative Writings In Urdu Of The Secondary School Students

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    M. Qamar Saleem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychologists and educators throughout the world paid attention to creativity and creative thinking. The routine type of tasks in the school appears to be very simple and uninteresting to the creative students. Atmosphere of some schools is conducive for the development of creative potential. Whereas the atmosphere of many schools comes in the way of its development. Children prefer to learn in creative ways rather than just memorizing information provided by a teacher or parents. It is generally assumed that Children are highly creative, with vivid imaginations, and that they learn by exploring, risking, manipulating, testing, and modifying ideas. Language allows children to talk to each other and to write their thoughts and ideas and mother tongue is the most important and comprehensive medium for expression. Self-expression in reading, writing and speech; reading of suitable general books of high quality with interest rather than concentration on textbooks: approach to literature as a source of joy and inspiration rather killjoy drill in grammar and vocabulary. Children learn to connect individual words with objects, ideas, and actions. In the process, they write their thoughts and ideas in very creative ways. The researcher took this study to know the written potential of Urdu medium students. In this paper, The researcher emphasized that Urdu speaking children are not less than children of any other language. The only problem is less opportunities for them. The Researcher found that Urdu medium students are naughty, distracted, disturbed due to various reasons but at the same time they are highly creative in writing.

  6. Creative writing in recovery from severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Robert; Neilsen, Philip; White, Emma

    2013-10-01

    There is evidence that creative writing forms an important part of the recovery experience of people affected by severe mental illness. In this paper, we consider theoretical models that explain how creative writing might contribute to recovery, and we discuss the potential for creative writing in psychosocial rehabilitation. We argue that the rehabilitation benefits of creative writing might be optimized through focus on process and technique in writing, rather than content, and that consequently, the involvement of professional writers might be important. We describe a pilot workshop that deployed these principles and was well-received by participants. Finally, we make recommendations regarding the role of creative writing in psychosocial rehabilitation for people recovering from severe mental illness and suggest that the development of an evidence base regarding the effectiveness of creative writing is a priority. © 2012 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. The Effectiveness of Collaborative Writing Strategy (CWS in Writing Lesson Regarded to The Students’ Creativity

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    Kiky Soraya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at finding out what appropriate methods to be usedin writing lesson seen from the students’ creativity especially for studentswho have high creativityand low creativity. This study used quasi experimental research. The population of the research was the eighth grade of a Junior High School in Wonosari in the academic year of 2013/2014. The sampling technique used was cluster random sampling. The sample in this study was 64 students covering 32 students of E as experimental class and 32 students of C as control class. The data or the students’ writing scores were analyzed in terms of their frequency distribution, normality, homogeneity, then ANOVA and Tuckey tests to test the research hypotheses. Based on the result, the research findings are: CWS is more effective than MWS in writing lesson; the high creativity students produced better writing rather than the low creativity student; and the interaction of teaching methods and the students’ creativity is existing in this writing lesson. In short, Collaborative Writing Strategy (CWS is effective to teach writing for the eighth grade of a Junior High School in Wonosari, Gunungkidul. Then, the research result implies that it is better for the teachers to apply CWS in teaching and learning process of writing, to improve the students’ writing achievement, CWS needs to be used in the classroom activities, then future research can conduct the similar research with different sample and different students’ condition.

  8. An Investigation into the Methods of Teaching Creative English Writing

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    Anastasiia Riabokrys

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the actual problem of teaching creative writing at the English lessons. The value of writing in the process of teaching English language is revealed. The principles and peculiarities of evaluation of creative writing are analyzed. The strategy of choosing methods in teaching creative writing is identified. The benefits of creative writing for learner and teachers are considered.

  9. More than words: applying the discipline of literary creative writing to the practice of reflective writing in health care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    This paper examines definitions and uses of reflective and creative writing in health care education classrooms and professional development settings. A review of articles related to writing in health care reveals that when teaching narrative competence is the goal, creative writing may produce the best outcomes. Ultimately, the paper describes the importance of defining literary creative writing as a distinct form of writing and recommends scholars interested in using literary creative writing to teach narrative competence study pedagogy of the field.

  10. Dream and Creative Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨公建

    2015-01-01

    Freud asserts that the unconscious will express its suppressed wishes and desires. The unconscious will then redirect andreshape these concealed wishes into acceptable social activities, presenting them in the form of images or symbols in our dreams and/or our writings. Dream is the unconscious which promotes the creative writing.

  11. Video Streaming for Creative Writing at International Elementary School

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    Deni Darmawan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at overcoming difficulty in learning language, both in Indonesian Language and English at international elementary school, especially in creative writing. Creative writing as part of human activity is creativity with language medium as prose (narrative, description, poem (old, new and modern, as well as drama (dialogue, role play, and sosio drama. Specific target to be achieved is the design of Video Streaming for all kinds of creative writing in the language of Indonesian and English. This investigation is a continuation of the previos investigation that has managed to make a video leaning in English for Math and Science as integrated learning to early class at international elementary school. The method used follow the principles of developmental reasearch. The firts stage is script writing video streaming through brainstorming with teachers, lecturers, teams of investigators Indonesia (UPI and Malaysia (USM. The second stage manuscript, making finalization Video Streaming, make the Web, media experts and creative writing material team investigators. The third stage, testing the Video Streaming, Web and dissemination of results into all the international elementary school in Indonesia and Malaysia.

  12. The Use of Computers to Aid the Teaching of Creative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, Mike

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the writing process is followed by a description of programs used in a computer-based creative writing scheme developed at Edinburgh University. An account of a project to study the program's effect on the creative writings of 11 year old pupils concludes the article. (EAO)

  13. Literature as a Network: Creative-Writing Scholarship in Literary Magazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Harriett E.

    2014-01-01

    With the increase in undergraduate and graduate programs for creative writing at institutions of higher education in North America, literary journals and magazines now serve as leading scholarly publishing outlets and research resources for creative-writing faculty and students. This study analyzes ten years of citations from nineteen leading…

  14. LUDIC WRITING: CHALLENGES IN GAMIFYING ENGLISH CREATIVE WRITING CLASS FOR TECHNOPRENEURIAL PURPOSES

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    SF. Luthfie Arguby Purnomo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper, first of three research parts, attempts to describe the challenges English Letters at IAIN (Institut Agama Islam Negeri/State Islamic Institute Surakarta faced in implementing gamification for technopreneurial purposes in regard to the transformation of a creative writing class into a ludic writing class, a gamification infused writing class. The challenges revealed are story-game script adaptation, integration portion, and monetization. Specific problems occur on each challenge. Story-game script adaptation exposes three problems namely (1 conditional branching system (2 visualization (3 copyrighted material issues (4 and writing mechanics adaptation. Integration portion challenge displays a problem on the insufficient alloted time for gamifying the creative writing class. Monetization challenge indicates three problems namely (1 the inexistence of monetization team, (2 the inexistence of institutional regulation for monetization management by study programs, (3 responses to gaming trends. Responding to these problems, solutions specifically designed based on the nature of the problems are implemented.

  15. Creative Writing Class as Crucible

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    Barron, Monica

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates her experiences as creative writing teacher and her views as a teacher in the aftermath of Virginia Tech shooting. As a teacher who had taught writing and literature for twenty years, the author had received a great deal of submissions from her students about serial killers, rapists, slashers, and murderers and…

  16. TRAVEL WRITING: AN APPLICATION OF WRITING WORKSHOP TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’S CREATIVE WRITING

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    Prayudias Margawati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Writing is often assumed as uneasy skill to either learn or teach. For students, they find it difficult to develop ideas in writing. On the other hand, teachers, many of them, only ready with the materials but confuse with the appropriate ways to teach. This paper intends to describe and discuss a method of teaching writing namely writing workshop to improve students’ writing skill through travel writing. Writing workshop proposed by Calkins that consists of mini lesson, work time, peer conferring and/or response groups, share sessions, and publication celebration is applied in writing class for methodological purposes. In mini lesson, teacher offers something to the class that is meant to introduce a writing strategy done at the beginning of the workshop. During work time point, students start their new piece of writing. Teacher moves among students conferring with them while checking their works. Peer conferences or response groups provide a forum for students to talk about works in progress. When students work in group, one of them could arrange his/ her group needs during the work time. A share session may be varied, one possible way is each group shares their process of writing to other students. At the end of writing class, student writers come together to publish and/ or celebrate their final work. The publication could be in the form of portfolio, students’ diary, blog, or others. Travel writing genre is chosen as it could develop students’ creativity in describing/ narrating their own stories during, let say holiday or things they used to see on the way home weekly or monthly. Furthermore, travel writing as the product of creative writing teaches the readers of values, characteristics, and way of life. Last but not least, a professional writing teacher should set the writing workshop components in variety ways to achieve effective running-class.

  17. Creative Writing Assignments in a Second Language Course: A Way to Engage Less Motivated Students

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    Arshavskaya, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    This article makes a case for using creative writing in a second language course. Creative writing increases students' enthusiasm for writing skills development and supports students' creativity, which is a fundamental aspect of education. In order to engage less motivated students, a series of creative writing assignments was implemented in a…

  18. Neural correlates of verbal creativity: Differences in resting-state functional connectivity associated with expertise in creative writing

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    Martin eLotze

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neural characteristics of verbal creativity as assessed by word generation tasks have been recently identified, but differences in resting-state functional connectivity (rFC between experts and non-experts in creative writing have not been reported yet. Previous electroencephalography (EEG coherence measures during rest demonstrated a decreased cooperation between brain areas in association with creative thinking ability. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare 20 experts in creative writing and 23 age-matched non-experts with respect to rFC strengths within a brain network previously found to be associated with creative writing. Decreased rFC for experts was found between areas 44 of both hemispheres. Increased rFC for experts was observed between right hemispheric caudate and intraparietal sulcus. Correlation analysis of verbal creativity indices with rFC values in the expert group revealed predominantly negative associations, particularly of rFC between left area 44 and left temporal pole. Overall, our data support previous findings on reduced connectivity between interhemispheric areas and increased right-hemispheric connectivity during rest in highly verbally creative individuals.

  19. The Knowledge Society and the Reform of Creative Writing

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    Cristina-Emanuela DASCĂLU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with how major top-down reforms in the Romanian higher education system have affected and will continue to affect student writing and have forever challenged and changed teachers’ and students’ traditional roles. The reform of student writing in Romania is initially due to the implementation in the Romanian education system of the Bologna Declaration of 2002 and continues ever stronger due to the extraordinary new Education Law passed by the Romanian Ministry of Education, Research and Innovation in 2011. One of the initial outcomes of the adherence of the Romanian education system to Bologna Declaration was that, while previously to this change Romanian universities demanded very little undergraduate writing especially the original, research-oriented one and, thus, grades relied heavily on the results of the traditional sit-down final examinations, most courses now in the Romanian higher education system include student essay writing and other types of writing and systematic teacher feedback. Creative writing has started to appear here and there, too in the university curriculum especially at private universities. As a result of Romania’s adherence to Bologna Declaration of 2002, Portfolio Assessment, which demands extended writing, has been also introduced in Romania, both at state universities and private ones. As a result of the new 2011 Education Law, even more emphasis will be placed on writing, research, competences and abilities, included practical ones, and creativity at all levels of education, higher education included therefore. The article presents some results from an evaluation of the educational reforms in Romania, mostly of the initial reforms following Romania’s adherence to Bologna Declaration of 2002, but the study considers some of the reforms that follow from the newly passed Romanian Education Law. Mainly the following questions are addressed in this research study (1 Why did the initial reforms

  20. PENGEMBANGAN KOMPETENSI CREATIVE WRITING DALAM PEMBELAJARAN SASTRA DI PERGURUAN TINGGI

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    Putra Manuaba

    2013-02-01

    literature learning as a compulsory course at universities, (2 theory and practice (practice being more dominant than theory for literature students, (3 attempts to make lecturers good at writing theory and practice, (4 reading enrichment in quality literary works, and (5 use of creative processes from high quality authors as inspiring part of creative work writing.

  1. Creative Writing and the Water Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rich; Virmani, Jyotika; Kusek, Kristen M.

    2001-01-01

    Uses the story "The Life of a Drop of Water" to initiate a creative writing activity and teach about the water cycle. Attempts to stimulate students' understanding of a scientific concept by using their imaginations. (YDS)

  2. From Minotaurs to Creative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Paul

    1992-01-01

    An integrated topic approach (on Theseus and the Minotaur) was used to develop creative writing skills of children (ages 12 and 13) with health- and stress-related disorders at a special school in England. Three elements of the topic (presentation, action, and interaction) were developed through which individual assessment, collaboration, and…

  3. Professional training in creative writing is associated with enhanced fronto-striatal activity in a literary text continuation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, K; Kessler, F; Neumann, N; Ortheil, H-J; Lotze, M

    2014-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore brain activities associated with creativity and expertise in literary writing. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we applied a real-life neuroscientific setting that consisted of different writing phases (brainstorming and creative writing; reading and copying as control conditions) to well-selected expert writers and to an inexperienced control group. During creative writing, experts showed cerebral activation in a predominantly left-hemispheric fronto-parieto-temporal network. When compared to inexperienced writers, experts showed increased left caudate nucleus and left dorsolateral and superior medial prefrontal cortex activation. In contrast, less experienced participants recruited increasingly bilateral visual areas. During creative writing activation in the right cuneus showed positive association with the creativity index in expert writers. High experience in creative writing seems to be associated with a network of prefrontal (mPFC and DLPFC) and basal ganglia (caudate) activation. In addition, our findings suggest that high verbal creativity specific to literary writing increases activation in the right cuneus associated with increased resources obtained for reading processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Interview with Alan Maley on Teaching and Learning Creative Writing

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    Ruzbeh Babaee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alan Maley is a British, award-winning, internationally-known writer and artist, highly regarded for his unique observation of life at the turn of the century. He has been involved in English Language Teaching (ELT for over 50 years. He worked for the British Council in Yugoslavia, Ghana, Italy, France, China and India and was the Director of the Bell Educational Trust in Cambridge for 5 years. He later worked in universities in Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia and UK. Alan has published over 40 books and numerous articles. In the following, Dr. Maley answered our questions on teaching creative writing in academic centers, the relationship between creative writing and language learning, and the status of creative writing in non-English speaking countries.

  5. Close Reading and Creative Writing in Clinical Education: Teaching Attention, Representation, and Affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Rita; Hermann, Nellie; Devlin, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Medical educators increasingly have embraced literary and narrative means of pedagogy, such as the use of learning portfolios, reading works of literature, reflective writing, and creative writing, to teach interpersonal and reflective aspects of medicine. Outcomes studies of such pedagogies support the hypotheses that narrative training can deepen the clinician's attention to a patient and can help to establish the clinician's affiliation with patients, colleagues, teachers, and the self. In this article, the authors propose that creative writing in particular is useful in the making of the physician. Of the conceptual frameworks that explain why narrative training is helpful for clinicians, the authors focus on aesthetic theories to articulate the mechanisms through which creative and reflective writing may have dividends in medical training. These theories propose that accurate perception requires representation and that representation requires reception, providing a rationale for teaching clinicians and trainees how to represent what they perceive in their clinical work and how to read one another's writings. The authors then describe the narrative pedagogy used at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Because faculty must read what their students write, they receive robust training in close reading. From this training emerged the Reading Guide for Reflective Writing, which has been useful to clinicians as they develop their skills as close readers. This institution-wide effort to teach close reading and creative writing aims to equip students and faculty with the prerequisites to provide attentive, empathic clinical care.

  6. Close Reading and Creative Writing in Clinical Education: Teaching Attention, Representation, and Affiliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Rita; Hermann, Nellie; Devlin, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical educators increasingly have embraced literary and narrative means of pedagogy, such as the use of learning portfolios, reading works of literature, reflective writing, and creative writing, to teach interpersonal and reflective aspects of medicine. Outcomes studies of such pedagogies support the hypotheses that narrative training can deepen the clinician's attention to a patient and can help to establish the clinician's affiliation with patients, colleagues, teachers, and the self. In this article, the authors propose that creative writing in particular is useful in the making of the physician. Of the conceptual frameworks that explain why narrative training is helpful for clinicians, the authors focus on aesthetic theories to articulate the mechanisms through which creative and reflective writing may have dividends in medical training. These theories propose that accurate perception requires representation and that representation requires reception, providing a rationale for teaching clinicians and trainees how to represent what they perceive in their clinical work and how to read one another's writings. The authors then describe the narrative pedagogy used at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Since faculty must read what their students write, they receive robust training in close reading. From this training emerged the Reading Guide for Reflective Writing, which has been useful to clinicians as they develop their skills as close readers. This institution-wide effort to teach close reading and creative writing aims to equip students and faculty with the pre-requisites to provide attentive, empathic clinical care. PMID:26200577

  7. Nigerian creative writing in French: Challenges and prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian creative writing in French is a recent phenomenon compared to Francophone or Lusophone literature. Since the publication of Ola Balogun's Sango suivi de le Roi elephant (1968), Nigerians have shown their creative abilities in a language, which is their second foreign language after English. This paper, seeks to ...

  8. Exploring Connections between Creative Thinking and Higher Attaining Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copping, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores writing pedagogy in the primary classroom and connections between children thinking creatively and their achievement in writing. Initially 'continuing professional development' for teachers, I designed and facilitated a two-day writing workshop with a class of children around the theme of a Victorian murder mystery. This was…

  9. A review of creative and expressive writing as a pedagogical tool in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S; Kaufman, Diane; Schoenherr, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    The act of writing offers an opportunity to foster self-expression and organisational abilities, along with observation and descriptive skills. These soft skills are relevant to clinical thinking and medical practice. Medical school curricula employ pedagogical approaches suitable for assessing medical and clinical knowledge, but teaching methods for soft skills in critical thinking, listening and verbal expression, which are important in patient communication and engagement, may be less formal. Creative and expressive writing that is incorporated into medical school courses or clerkships offers a vehicle for medical students to develop soft skills. The aim of this review was to explore creative and expressive writing as a pedagogical tool in medical schools in relation to outcomes of medical education. This project employed a scoping review approach to gather, evaluate and synthesise reports on the use of creative and expressive writing in US medical education. Ten databases were searched for scholarly articles reporting on creative or expressive writing during medical school. Limitation of the results to activities associated with US medical schools, produced 91 articles. A thematic analysis of the articles was conducted to identify how writing was incorporated into the curriculum. Enthusiasm for writing as a pedagogical tool was identified in 28 editorials and overviews. Quasi-experimental, mixed methods and qualitative studies, primarily writing activities, were aimed at helping students cognitively or emotionally process difficult challenges in medical education, develop a personal identity or reflect on interpersonal skills. The programmes and interventions using creative or expressive writing were largely associated with elective courses or clerkships, and not required courses. Writing was identified as a potentially relevant pedagogical tool, but not included as an essential component of medical school curricula. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effects of creative writing on adolescent students’ literary response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.; Braaksma, M.; Burke, M.; Fialho, O.; Zyngier, S.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines whether creative writing prior to reading influences students’ reading process and appreciation of short stories. Participants were 53 fifteen year old students, assigned to two conditions. In the writing condition students composed their own stories, and then read the authors᾽

  11. A Qualitative Case Study Comparing a Computer-Mediated Delivery System to a Face-to-Face Mediated Delivery System for Teaching Creative Writing Fiction Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Mindy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to compare the pedagogical and affective efficiency and efficacy of creative prose fiction writing workshops taught via asynchronous computer-mediated online distance education with creative prose fiction writing workshops taught face-to-face in order to better understand their operational pedagogy and…

  12. Multilingualism, Language Policy and Creative Writing in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbithi, Esther K

    2014-01-01

    Language use and creative writing go hand in hand. In the process of exploring language, we also engage in the study of literature. An engagement with literature is, indeed, a continuing process of improving our capacity to use language and refining our sensibility to good language use. In Kenya, there are clearly discernible patterns of creative…

  13. Writing Creatively in a Museum: Tracing Lines through Persons, Art Objects and Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeti, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Creative writing is often thought of as an individual and solitary pursuit. This is partly owing to Romantic (and still popular) notions of "creativity" as residing in highly gifted individuals, but also to the widely held belief that "writing" is a lonely rather than a social activity. The research presented in this paper…

  14. Is there a relationship between literature reading and creative writing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekkamp, H.; Janssen, T.; van den Bergh, H.

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to reliably measure literature reading and creative writing ability, and subsequently to determine whether a relationship exists between the two abilities. Participants were 19 eleventh-grade students: 11 were known to be good readers of literature, whereas 8 were known to be

  15. Elementary Teachers' Views on the Creative Writing Process: An Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, Nevin

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to discover and evaluate both the areas of personal interest and the views of 4th and 5th grade classroom teachers regarding the creative writing process. In this study, one of the qualitative study methods, state study, and related to this, single state design which refers to the whole has been chosen. Research was…

  16. Treating of Content-Based Instruction to Teach Writing Viewed from EFL Learners' Creativity

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    Jaelani, Selamet Riadi

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the research are to examine: (1) whether Content-Based Instruction is more effective than Problem-based learning to teach writing to the EFL Learners; (2) whether the EFL Learners having high creativity have better writing than those having low creativity; and (3) whether there is an interaction between teaching methods and EFL…

  17. Motivation and Creativity: Effects of Motivational Orientation on Creative Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    This study directly tested the hypothesis that intrinsic motivation is conducive to creativity and extrinsic motivation is detrimental. Chosen because they identified themselves as actively involved in creative writing, 72 young adults participated in individual laboratory sessions where they were asked to write two brief poems. Before writing the…

  18. Career writing : a creative, expressive and reflective approach to qualitative assessment and guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Frans Meijers; Reinekke Lengelle

    2015-01-01

    Career Writing is a narrative approach to qualitative career assessment whereby client (or student) groups use creative, reflective, and expressive forms of writing to foster an internal dialogue about career. It is intended to help individuals construct a career identity by uncovering life themes,

  19. Ctrl F: A Scholar's Tips for Delving into the World of Creative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchini, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In this experimental nonfiction essay, the author recounts her (many) experiences with having her creative work rejected by mainstream outlets. Detailing the blessing and the curse that is the "Ctrl Find" command, she pokes fun at the creative writing process, and links her difficulties as a writer to her work as a middle school Language…

  20. Stimulating Creative Writing Through Literature: A Guide for Teachers of the Intermediate Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon, Alice Barbara Cummings

    A structured writing program for the intermediate grades was designed, utilizing such children's literature as poems, legends, fairy tales, tall tales, and books to stimulate elementary school children to write creatively. Chapters in the teacher's guide for the program present many specific suggestions and activities to help children (1) use…

  1. Designing Creative Inter-Disciplinary Science and Art Interventions in Schools: The Case of Write a Science Opera (WASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Horin, Oded; Chappell, Kerry A.; Halstead, Jill; Espeland, Magne

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this qualitative study is to provide theoretical knowledge and design principles for a creative educational environment characterized by simultaneous study and exploration of science or math, and the arts: Write a Science Opera (WASO). To do so, we used a theory of creativity in education which links collaborative co-creation in…

  2. Essential Skills for Creative Writing: Integrating Multiple Domain-Specific Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Baptiste; Tan, Mei; Randi, Judi; Santa-Donato, Gabrielle; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to gather different perspectives on the "key ingredients" involved in creative writing by children--from experts of diverse disciplines, including teachers, linguists, psychologists, writers and art educators. Ultimately, we sought in the experts' convergence or divergence insights on the relative importance of the…

  3. Fairy-tale planet: creative science writing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Tiziana; D'Addezio, Giuliana

    2017-04-01

    During public events organized by our Institute sometimes we have predisposed a corner to entertain primary school children with fairy-tales about the planet. In that occasion we realized that even if children could take part in other activities more in fashion such as laboratories, theatre performances, exhibits, they were very attracted by fairy tales, such an "ancient" tradition. This year within the projects "alternanza scuola-lavoro" we are planning to involve also the students of the secondary schools to learn themselves how to animate a fairy-tale corner for children. The "alternanza scuola lavoro" (interchange school/work) has been recently introduced in the Italian school as a methodology for implementing the second cycle teaching. The general purpose is to ensure that 15 to 18 years old students, beside the access to basic knowledge, can acquire skills in the employment and real work environments experiencing other teaching methods based both on knowledge and know-how. We will then start a new adventure by investigating what will be the best way to introduce children to creative science writing for the planet. The aim would be that of creating a format suitable for children either for writing all together a planet fairy-tale in class, or individually. The final goal is to raise awareness about the environmental problems by stimulating in scholars their own creativity.

  4. Pleasantness of Creative Tasks and Creative Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenasni, Franck; Lubart, Todd

    2011-01-01

    To examine the impact of emotion on creative potential, experimental studies have typically focused on the impact of induced or spontaneous mood states on creative performance. In this report the relationship between the perceived pleasantness of tasks (using divergent thinking and story writing tasks) and creative performance was examined.…

  5. An Investigation of Gender Stereotypes as Revealed through Children's Creative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Schlegel, Mary Ann; Gray-Schlegel, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Examines the creative writing of third- and sixth-grade students for gender differences when provided with story starters that introduced either a male or a female character. Finds that identifiable difference and trends related to gender and age appeared in the stories, reflecting the pervasiveness and power of sex-role stereotypes. (RS)

  6. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Counting Pizza Toppings: A Creative Writing Learning Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Laura; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the application of a proofreading mnemonic learning strategy for proofreading creative writing assignments. The mnemonic--Ninja Turtles Counting Pizza Toppings--reminds students to check their work for name, title, capitalization, punctuation, and transition words. Application of the strategy, possible pitfalls, and…

  7. 'You're in FunDzaland': Pre-service teachers (reimagine audience on a creative writing course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Mendelowitz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how collaborative writing for a digital platform can enable students to (re imagine audience. Although in the context of process writing peer feedback is foreground, in practice, its effectiveness is uneven. The digital revolution offers new opportunities for alternative peer feedback through collaborative writing and re-imagining self and other in the process. This study examines data from a creative writing course in which pre-service teachers wrote collaborative short stories for the FunDza digital site and individual reflective essays about the process. The study’s research questions are the following: (1 what were the affordances of this multilayered audience for engaging the students’ imaginations? (2 How did this process of (reimagining audience impact on students’ conceptions of themselves as writers? The data set comprised 16 collaboratively authored stories (published on the site and 34 individual reflective essays. Six of the latter were selected for detailed analysis. Hence, the data for this study encompass detailed analysis of two groups’ reflective essays on the process of writing their stories. These groups were selected because they exemplified contrasting collaborative, imaginative writing processes. Group 1 was familiar with the FunDza audience and context, while Group 2 struggled to imagine it. Thematic content analysis was used for analysis. Each essay was read first in relation to the entire data set, then in relation to the other reflections in the author’s group. The combination of gearing stories towards the FunDza audience and writing stories collaboratively created two sets of audiences that writers needed to hold in mind simultaneously. Analysis indicates that both audiences challenged students to make imaginative leaps into the minds of an unfamiliar audience, deepening their understanding of the writing process. It also highlights students’ mastery of writing discourses and increasing

  8. Creative Thinking for 21st Century Composing Practices: Creativity Pedagogies across Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sohui; Carpenter, Russell

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the corpus of literature on creative thinking and applied creativity in higher education to help composition teacher-scholars and writing center practitioners improve the application of creativity in written, visual, and multimodal composing practices. From studies of creative thinking investigated across…

  9. The creativity maze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourgeois-Bougrine, Samira; Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Botella, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The present article aims to address a current gap in our understanding of creativity in screenplay writing by focusing on the cognitive, conative, affective, and environmental factors that come into play at different stages in the creative process. It reports a study employing in-depth interviews...... and or treatment), and, finally, intense periods of writing and rewriting the script. These 3 stages, and, in particular, the multiple and concrete decisions to be taken within each one of them, support a vision of the creative process in this domain metaphorically conceptualized as crossing a maze. Creators...

  10. Translation and Creative Writing: An Interview with Professor Margaret Rogers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzbeh Babaee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This interview was conducted with Emerita Professor Margaret Rogers with the aim of providing a brief but informative summary of the relationship between translation and creative writing. Emerita Professor Rogers is in the Centre for Translation Studies, School of English and Languages, University of Surrey, UK. She is also the founder of Terminology Network at the Institute of Translation and Interpreting in the UK. Professor Rogers introduced creative writing into the translation curriculum some 10 years ago at her own university.   The Interview   RB[1]: Do you believe in a theory of translation? MR[2]: There are many ways of trying to understand and, where we can, explain translation in all its guises, loci and times. To talk about ‘a theory’ in this context doesn’t help much. There are many different approaches to the academic study of translation: rather simply put, the particular approach which we choose to adopt may depend on our object of study (e.g. literary translation or specialised translation, what we want to find out about this (e.g. are we interested in product or process, in a historical or contemporary perspective, what resources we have available (e.g. a fully funded research team or a solo effort and so on. Many projects are interdisciplinary—this has long been recognised—and translation scholars are becoming much more resourceful in identifying, adopting and adapting relevant approaches from intersecting disciplines such as comparative literature, cultural studies, history, linguistics, philosophy, psychology and sociology. Some scholars are now advocating a problem-based approach. In any research project it is important to establish how the problem/phenomenon/issue which has been identified as the focus of the study can be tackled. For this, in an empirical study a method is crucial: in translation studies this is rarely something that can be picked off the shelf and is often a contribution to the

  11. Fostering the Memoir Writing Skills as a Creative Non-Fiction Genre Using a WebQuest Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed, Rania Kamal Muhammad; Abdel-Haq, Eman Muhammad; El-Deeb, Mervat Abou-Bakr; Ali, Mahsoub Abdel-Sadeq

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at developing the memoir writing skills as a creative non-fiction genre of second year distinguished governmental language preparatory school pupils using the a WebQuest model. Fifty participants from second year at Hassan Abu-Bakr Distinguished Governmental Language School at Al-Qanater Al-Khairia(Qalubia Governorate) were…

  12. Why Literature Students Should Practise Life Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardell, Kylie; Douglas, Kate

    2018-01-01

    This article considers our experiences teaching a hybrid literature/creative writing subject called "Life Writing." We consider the value of literature students engaging in creative writing practice--in this instance, the nonfiction subgenre of life writing--as part of their critical literary studies. We argue that in practicing life…

  13. Writing Like a Scientist: Exploring Elementary Teachers' Understandings and Practices of Writing in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Nicole J.; Dotger, Sharon

    2013-10-01

    This qualitative study examined the connections between elementary teachers’ conceptions of how scientists use writing and how the teachers used writing during science lessons. Data collected included lesson observations, interviews, handouts to students, and curriculum resources. The findings revealed that teachers in this study thought scientists write for several purposes: the presentation of data, observations, experiences, procedures, and facts. The teachers used writing tasks that mirrored this with their students. The teachers also had a limited definition of creativity in writing, and when they had students write creatively in science it was to add in fictional elements. Implications of this study include providing teachers with better models for how and why scientists write, including these models in more inquiry-based science lessons, and directly relating concepts of nature of science to elementary science writing.

  14. Emotional Life: Exploring Contradictions in Health Behavior Through Creative Writing in Public Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Lise

    2017-09-01

    Weaving personal experience with literature on social determinants and health humanities, the author argues that including art and literature in public health education will benefit efforts to integrate health care and public health by reminding practitioners that communities are composed of individuals with complicated and often contradictory impulses. She argues that those whose work involves planning interventions and reviewing population data also need to perform the tasks of mental flexibility, of imagination, to think about the people behind the numbers. Together with colleagues at the University of Missouri, the author researches the role of creative writing and imagination in reducing HIV stigma and finds hopeful signs in student responses that they are prepared to consider the contradictions present in human behavior if they are given the opportunity to reflect deeply upon them. Creative writing, literature, and art belong in public health education, she argues, because that is how we make space for emotion in our lives and how we connect with the emotional lives of others.

  15. Creativity in English Writing Instruction : Tracing the Discursive History of the Key Word

    OpenAIRE

    Kita, Kazutake

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s the field of English writing instruction has given a broad welcome to the term creative/creativity, which has been used without any strict definition and has taken on the features of a cant word. Presented in this paper is an attempt to provide a comprehensive description and explanation of various uses of the term found in this specific context. A historical review of ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly and The English Teachers’ Magazine reveals that the introduction of the term cre...

  16. Ideation in mathematical writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers idea generation during the mathematical writing process. Two contrasting explanations of the creative potential in connection to writing is presented; writing as a process of setting and obtaining rhetorical goals and writing as a process of discovery. These views...... are then related to two empirically found categories of functions that writing serves researchers in the field of mathematics, concluding that both views contributes to understanding the creative potential in relation to mathematical writing....

  17. Mediating between the muse and the masses: inspiration and the actualization of creative ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash, Todd M; Maruskin, Laura A; Cassidy, Scott E; Fryer, James W; Ryan, Richard M

    2010-03-01

    Within the creativity domain, inspiration is a motivational state posited to energize the actualization of creative ideas. The authors examined the construct validity, predictive utility, and function of inspiration in the writing process. Study 1, a cross-lagged panel study, showed that getting creative ideas and being inspired are distinct and that the former precedes the latter. In Study 2, inspiration, at the between-person level, predicted the creativity of scientific writing, whereas effort predicted technical merit. Within persons, peaks in inspiration predicted peaks in creativity and troughs in technical merit. In Study 3, inspiration predicted the creativity of poetry. Consistent with its posited transmission function, inspiration mediated between creativity of the idea and creativity of the product, whereas effort, positive affect, and awe did not. Study 4 extended the Study 3 findings to fiction writing. Openness to aesthetics and positive affect predicted creativity of the idea, whereas approach temperament moderated the relation between creativity of the idea and inspiration. Inspiration predicted efficiency, productivity, and use of shorter words, indicating that inspiration not only transmits creativity but does so economically.

  18. Repurposing "Lost," Discarded, or Forgotten Objects into a "Found" Treasure Trove of Creative Writing Instructional Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Through her years as an elementary teacher and now a university professor in teacher education, the author has developed many creative writing instructional ideas for use with all learners (i.e., elementary through graduate level). Resourcefulness and imaginative thinking proves invaluable to teaching artists' pedagogy in current economic…

  19. Creative Writing Education for Gifted Children-Üstün Yetenekli Çocuklarda Yaratıcı Yazma Eğitimi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal AKÇA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The etymological origin of the concept of creativity from the Latin word "Creare" is "Kreativitaet, creativitiy" in the western languages. This word is a dynamic process which means to create, to give birth, to bring to the square, to find and to explore. Creativity is a teaching without boundaries; Science and professions. This concept, which means that emotions, imagination, intuitions are combined with the right information and motivation, is at every moment of life and everywhere because of the nature of man being creative. Creativity is actually a way of thinking; For this reason he is dragging the person into reaching a certain reason. The ability to grasp the relationship between abstract or concrete objects with the help of concepts and perceptions, abstract thinking, reasoning, and ability to use these mental functions in a concerted way is called intelligence. In spite of the fact that there are notable talent expressions and different definitions, theories about intelligence all converge at the point where there is a capacity or potential for which intelligence can be developed and where there are biological bases. According to this intelligence, the individual is innately possessed, inherited from the western branch and the functions of the central nervous system, Experience, learning, and influencing factors. In this study, it was aimed to manifest by taking the concept “creativity” into account that, out of highly-gifted students, ones exhibiting extraordinary performance in the domain of verbal language competence in comparison with the others can prove to be successful after receiving creative writing trainings. Suggestions were proposed for the gifted children and the educators by compiling a great deal of sources on creative writing and references were made to the sources that they can make use of.

  20. Creativity in the Age of Technology: Measuring the Digital Creativity of Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Ivcevic, Zorana; Brackett, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology and its many uses form an emerging domain of creative expression for adolescents and young adults. To date, measures of self-reported creative behavior cover more traditional forms of creativity, including visual art, music, or writing, but do not include creativity in the digital domain. This article introduces a new measure,…

  1. Activities and Accomplishments in Various Domains: Relationships with Creative Personality and Creative Motivation in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined relationships between five personal traits and adolescents' creative activities and accomplishments in five domains--music, visual arts, creative writing, science, and technology. Participants were 439 tenth graders (220 males and 219 females) in China. The relationships were examined using confirmatory factor analysis.…

  2. The Cross-Cultural Invariance of Creative Cognition: A Case Study of Creative Writing in U.S. and Russian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Sergey A.; Kornilova, Tatiana V.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike intelligence, creativity has rarely been investigated from the standpoint of cross-cultural invariance of the structure of the instruments used to measure it. In the study reported in this article, we investigated the cross-cultural invariance of expert ratings of creative stories written by undergraduate students from the Russian…

  3. Increasing Creativity with the Self-Studies in Basic English Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagcioglu, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    There are many materials, books and resources for the self-studies which can be useful in the ESL and in the EFL classrooms. Choosing the ones which can make learners more creative and happier will help our students to develop their language skills in speaking, reading, writing and listening. This paper deals with the methods and approaches to…

  4. Decentering the creative self: How others make creativity possible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Lubart, Todd

    interact with a series of ‘gatekeepers’ specific for their domains while more distant others – the general public – are decisive in the case of music as a performance art. Conclusions: Others play a key formative, motivational, informational and regulatory role in the creative process. From internalised...... on a creator’s activity, and (b) what is the contribution others make to creative outcomes. Design: The study included 60 professional creators in France from the following domains: art, design, science, screenplay writing, and music composition. Methods: Participants were selected using convenience sampling...

  5. The Effect of Think-Pair-Share-Write Based on Hybrid Learning on Metakognitive Skills, Creative Thinking and Cognitive Learning at SMA Negeri 3 Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Yulianti Siregar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of biology learning observation show that there are many constraints during the learning process in the class and consultation meeting between teacher and students. The think-pair-share-write based on hybrid learning was conducted to analyze the effect on metacognitive skills, creative thinking and learning outcomes. The research design was quasi experiment with pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group design. The independent variable is think-pair-share-write based on Hybrid learning model, while the dependent variables are metacognitive skills, creative thinking, and cognitive learning outcomes. Metacognitive skills are measured by using metacognitive rubrics. Creative thinking skills and cognitive learning outcomes are measured by using a description test. The data were taken by conducting pretest and posttest. The hypothesis test used was anakova with level of significance 0,05 (P <0,05, as the test result was significant then the test was continued to LSD. Before the anakova test, normality and homogeneity test were performed. The results showed that think-pair-share-write based on Hybrid Learning significantly affecting: 1 the metacognitive skills with F arithmetic of 183,472 and Sig. 0,000; 2 the creative thinking skill with F value of 325,111 and Sig. 0,000; 3 the cognitive learning outcomes with F arithmetic of 175.068 and Sig. 0,000.

  6. Through Rubrics and Scaffolded Instruction: A Programmatic Self-Study of Writing Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanfu Mi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Colleagues in a teacher education program describe their journey of programmatic self-study as they examine how they teach and assess teacher candidates’ writing in a series of three required and sequenced undergraduate literacy courses. They lead the reader through the questions they asked themselves about their instruction and their reflective process with a goal of improving teacher candidates’ technical, reflective, and creative writing. Readers are encouraged to reflect on their expectations for teacher candidates’ writing in light of instruction and assessment. Implications for teacher education are explored.

  7. The MFA in Creative Writing: The Uses of a “Useless” Credential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Childress

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Over half of today’s Masters of Fine Arts programs in creative writing in the United States were founded after the year 2000. Has the MFA-CW become a necessary credential for novelists? Relying on participant observation field research in the American literary field and interviews with authors, publishers, MFA graduates, and instructors, this work focuses on a paradox: Despite widespread agreement that the credential doesn’t “teach” enrollees to be a good writers or open up a pathway to a professional writing career, many involved in the literary field hold an MFA-CW. In this paper, we look at the uses of the MFA-CW, finding that although the degree serves little if any jurisdictional or closure-related functions it is made useful in a variety of ways: for students as a symbolic resource for artistic identity, for working writers as a source of income and community, and for editors in publishing houses as a signal for possible marketing and publicity potential.Keywords: Credentialism, Professions, Literature, Books, Publishing, MFA  

  8. Right Writing (or Writing Right) for Creativity in Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, R. Charles

    1989-01-01

    Suggests techniques from Peter Elbow's book, "Writing with Power," for an advertising copywriting class. Describes in detail an eight-step procedure: warm-up, loop writing, sharing, revision, sharing, revision, editing group sharing, and revision. (MS)

  9. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  10. Nudging Students into Writing Creatively (Teaching Ideas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, George; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes ideas for writing prompts and assignments proposed by three different teachers: (1) writing poems inspired by smells of herbs and spices; (2) writing about past perceptions and feelings after looking at a photograph; and (3) writing a "self-portrait." (TB)

  11. Alfred Schütz’s writings from the perspective of a theory of action’s creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier L. Cristiano

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a review of the work of Schütz from the question about “creativity” of social action, which was not made expressly by the author but it is in his writings an important principle of response. After positioning the subject in some coordinates of the current sociological discussion, we present four specific fields from schütz’ contributions: the ability to expand and make a creative use of “the social heritage of knowledge”, the individual and collective capacity to imagine action projects, the ability to create and use symbols, and producing with them exclusive worlds of imaginary existence, as well as the ability to give birth to new experiences. It is stated that these four fields outline the contours of a phenomenology of creativity of action, which sets out some open fields for further research.

  12. “Dissociating Form and Meaning in Bilingual Creative Writing and Creative Translation Workshops”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure SCHULTZE

    2012-03-01

    nombre d’innovations linguistiques sont d’abord perçues comme des fautes ou manquements … avant de passer dans l’usage. Un autre pan de la réflexion ne peut alors que concerner l’ego du pédagogue : face aux écrits de ses étudiants, il est lui-même amené à opérer une dissociation, voire une dislocation, de ses habitudes mentales. Il se confronte notamment à un questionnement délicat de sa posture : comment être enseignant tout en ayant un devoir d’accueil des productions des étudiants dont il se trouve … lecteur. Il cherchera alors des pistes du côté de la critique postcoloniale, laquelle témoigne de ce que les erreurs de toutes sortes sont également des marqueurs de différence.This article considers the various ways in which the principle of a disjunction between form and meaning can be applied to creative language teaching, as practised in our bilingual creative writing and creative translation workshops. While traditionally, language teaching is much concerned with conforming to rules and norms, here we try to provide a space in which the onus is on enhancing a personal appropriation of language. To this end, our theoretical foundations (Bettelheim and Lafforgue’s approach to fairy-tales as an indirect mode of expression are only partially presented, and students are provided with bare plots to be filled with their own fictions or meaning. These ‘plots’ are designed to allow a creative engagement with the dynamics inherent in language, between intimacy and anonymity, familiarity and otherness, and thus to explore questions of identity. Similarly, language can be dismantled and reassembled afresh, in an apparently paradoxical pedagogy based on breaking, rather than making, monolingual linguistic habits. This contradicts the doxa according to which learning the rules comes first, any creativity later, and which we are not the only ones to believe unfounded. The study of New Englishes is also revealing in this light, with creativity

  13. Student-Centered Teaching and Creative Teaching Methods as They Relate to Enhancing Student Creativity in Advertising Copywriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaman, Ronda

    The issue of whether teaching methods can influence creativity in the advertising copy writing classroom can best be examined by breaking it into three areas of knowledge access (perceptual, action, and conceptual). One of the perceptions of creativity is that creativity ceases to develop once a student is of college age, and that college itself…

  14. Writing and Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Magasic, Coleen

    2012-01-01

    Writing activities are a sure way to assess and enhance students' science literacy. Sometimes the author's students use technical writing to communicate their lab experiences, just as practicing scientists do. Other times, they use creative writing to make connections to the topics they're learning. This article describes both types of writing…

  15. Construction of a Creative and Self-Transcending Life: George Sudarshan's Conception and Experience of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Maharaj

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a philosophical perspective on creativity as described in the writings of George Sudarshan, a highly accomplished theoretical physicist and natural philosopher whose vision of creativity was influenced by "the direct experience of transcendence." The article reviews his conceptualization of the various mental states…

  16. Creative Ageing? Selfhood, Temporality and the Older Adult Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeti, Shari

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on a long-term ethnography of an adult creative writing class situated in a major urban art gallery in the United Kingdom. It takes the claims of one group of older adults--that creative writing made them "feel younger"--as the starting point for exploring this connection further. It places these claims broadly within…

  17. Writing Plays Using Creative Problem-Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiser, Lynne; Hinson, Shirley

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a project which involved inner city elementary grade children with disabilities in writing and performing their own plays. A four-step playwriting process focuses on theme and character development, problem finding, and writing dialogue. The project has led to improved reading skills, attention, memory skills,…

  18. Students' Appropriation, Rejection and Perceptions of Creativity in Reflective Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Timothy S.; Dyment, Janet E.; Smith, Heidi A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the intersection of reflection, journal writing and creativity. Undergraduate students who participated in a residential field camp were required to keep a creative reflective journal to demonstrate their theoretical and practical understandings of their experience. This study reports on the content analysis of 42 student…

  19. Brain Matters: Neuroscience and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dean G.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a relationship between neuroscience and creativity for the sake of religious education. Citing creativity as a process that involves both originality and value, the writing articulates Howard Gardner's interplay between the talent of the person, the internal demands of a discipline, and the quality judgment of the field.…

  20. The Write Brain: How to Educate and Entertain with Learner-Centered Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual framework for the writing process to facilitate motivation, learning, retention, and knowledge transfer in readers of expository material. Drawing from four well-developed bodies of knowledge--cognitive science, learning theory, technical communication, and creative writing--the author creates a model that allows…

  1. Journaling and the Improvement of Writing Skills for Incoming College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight, Jim D.

    2013-01-01

    Journaling is an effective tool for the development of writing skills and creative thinking; however, research has not revealed how it improves writing skills in the college classroom. The majority of the studies related to journaling are elementary school studies, which do not provide statistics on how journaling can improve writing skills for…

  2. Sharing our stories. Using an online encyclopaedia as the basis for a general education module on local history, creative writing and social justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Stewart

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Reading can ignite the narrative imagination of the first-year university student, provoking an exploration of cultural diversity, social justice and identity. Novels, plays, poetry and short stories can engage the reader more deeply than factual studies, and engender a thoughtful, responsive and responsible attitude towards society. A sense of social justice is fundamental to the development of good citizenship, and it has been argued that the study of creative writing, especially that which is embedded in local and regional history, provides a sound scaffolding for student learning experiences though related writing activities and debate. Online literary and historical encyclopaedias can provide an ideal information landscape for the development of learning modules that focus on local literature. A structured e-learning module may build on such online sources by assisting the student to navigate the abundant references and discover materials that may be probed more deeply through reading assignments, writing tasks and discussion. This paper presents a case study of the design and development of a general education learning module – “Sharing our stories” – intended to provide students with enriching encounters with local literature while advancing their academic reading and writing skills. The module draws on the content of the Encyclopaedia of South African Arts, Culture and Heritage (ESAACH which plays an integral part as a springboard to the exploration of local writing.

  3. Wage Slavery or Creative Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirowsky, John

    2011-07-01

    Western philosophical and scientific traditions often view human work as inherently onerous, wearisome, and degrading. Adam Smith, writing in the eighteenth century, saw work as the toil and trouble that is the real price humans pay for everything they need or want. Karl Marx, writing in the nineteenth century, considered wage labor alienating, but saw the possibility of self-expressive work. Dupré and Gagnier, a philosopher and a critic writing near the end of the twentieth century, agreed that work could be self-fulfilling, but only for an elite minority. This article summarizes the Western philosophical views of work from ancient to modern times. It reframes the philosophical positions as empirical questions and addresses them with statistics and models drawn from a 1995 U.S. survey. Observations suggest that work, in modern America, is not usually alienated. The great majority of Americans rate their paid work or other main daily activities (mostly unpaid work) as more autonomous and creative than not. Emotional well-being and the sense of control over one's own life increase with the degree of autonomy and creativity. The employed report less autonomous but more creative activity than do the nonemployed. Emotional well-being and perceived control correlate more strongly with creativity than with autonomy. The overall association thus favors employment, especially for the poorly educated, even though they give up more autonomy when employed. On the whole, work in modern America seems more self-fulfilling than onerous, alienating, or degrading.

  4. WRITING ACTIVITIES IN A LITERACY BASED TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yentri Anggeraini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Literacy brings students to current and future learning, and for participation in the communication, society and workforce. As well as providing access to personal enrichment through literature, culture and social interaction. It provides access to material enrichment through further education, training and skilled employment. One of parts of literacy based teaching is writing. Writing is a principal form of communication, necessary in everyday life, in business, in creativity, in scholarly pursuits; in short, it is not a just tool of living, it is a tool of survival. It is the key activity in fostering language learners` awareness of how purpose audience and context affect the design of texts. In order to help the students to write effectively, the teacher should provide some interesting and useful activities. This paper aims at explaining what the literacy based teaching is and writing activities that can be used a literacy based teaching such as letter writing, journal writing, and creative writing

  5. Creative ways of knowing in engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Eodice, Michele

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a platform for engineering educators who are interested in implementing a “creative ways of knowing” approach to presenting engineering concepts. The case studies in this book reveal how students learn through creative engagement that includes not only design and build activities, but also creative presentations of learning, such as composing songs, writing poems and short stories, painting and drawing, as well as designing animations and comics. Any engineering educator will find common ground with the authors, who are all experienced engineering and liberal arts professors, who have taken the step to include creative activities and outlets for students learning engineering. • Demonstrates various methods for returning to the basics of engineering education, which include design and creativity, teamwork and interdisciplinary thinking; • Discusses a timely topic, as higher education puts more attention on the student experience of learning in all disciplines; • Includes actual stude...

  6. Students' Evaluation of Writing Assignments in an Abnormal Psychology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procidano, Mary E.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a study in which students in an abnormal psychology class rated the usefulness of drafts for two writing assignments. Reports that a research proposal was more effective than a case study in generating interest in psychology and opportunity for creativity. Concludes that writing assignments should reflect important aspects of a…

  7. Creativity and intelligence in children with and without developmental dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauni Jandé Roama Alves

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify if the creativity of children with Developmental Dyslexia (CG; n = 13 differs from children without difficulties in reading and writing (NG; n = 13. Furthermore, we sought to verify how creativity could be related to intelligence. The Raven Colored Progressive Matrices Test and the Child Figural Creativity Test were applied in both groups. High correlations were found between intelligence and creativity in both groups, and variable correlations for the same type of analysis were found in the literature. There were no significant intergroup differences for creativity, although the NG had a higher overall average in creativity and the CG, the highest averages in most evaluated creative characteristics. The possible involvement of psychological/neuropsychological constructs with creativity, such as spatial processing and emotion, was discussed.

  8. Photography and Writing: Alternative Ways of Learning for ESL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Helen Lepp

    2012-01-01

    To writing, painting, drawing, and photography as artistic media, the author would like to add teaching as a creative endeavor as well. Especially in a classroom where English is not the first language for many students, the writing teacher needs to be creative with assignments and activities that address nontraditional ways of learning. Her…

  9. Measuring Creative Capacity in Gifted Students: Comparing Teacher Ratings and Student Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Todd; Bower, Janessa

    2017-01-01

    Creativity and giftedness are frequently associated, and schools may use measures of creativity for identifying gifted and talented students. The researchers examined three aspects of elementary student creativity: (a) the relationship between a teacher's rating of student creativity and rubric-scored student writing samples, (b) group differences…

  10. Investigating Connections among Reading, Writing, and Language Development: A Multiliteracies Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesani, Kate

    2016-01-01

    This study explores relationships among reading literature, creative writing, and language development in a university-level advanced French grammar course through the theoretical lens of the multiliteracies framework. The goal is to investigate reading-writing connections and whether these literacy practices facilitate students' understanding and…

  11. EFFECTS OF THREE DIFFERENT STIMULI ON THE CREATIVITY OF CHILDREN'S COMPOSITIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAY, FRANK B.; TABACHNICK, B. ROBERT

    THIS STUDY BEGAN AN ATTEMPT TO DETERMINE THE BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE MOTIVATING STIMULI FOR USE IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL WRITING PROGRAMS. IN PARTICULAR, IT DEALT WITH THE EFFECTS OF ORGANIZED AND UNORGANIZED STIMULI ON THE CREATIVE WRITING ABILITY OF THIRD- AND SIXTH-GRADE STUDENTS. THE CHILDREN WERE DIVIDED INTO SIX GROUPS. ONE GROUP OF…

  12. "A Not-So-Simple Story from My Life": Using Auto-Ethnography and Creative Writing to Re-Frame the Heteronormative Narratives of School Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Reflecting on my experience as a teacher and a lesbian in a second-level school in Ireland in the early 1990s, I use an auto-ethnographic approach first to explore some of the ways dominant narratives can silence, constrain and marginalise some people. Projecting forward to an imagined future, I draw on creative writing to "re-frame" how…

  13. Creativity in Translator Training: Between the Possible, the Improbable and the (Apparently Impossible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hewson Lance

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this paper looks at how creativity has been explored in writings in the field of translation studies. It examines the stages in creative translation and investigates the creative process. The second part of the paper looks at how creativity can be exploited in the translation class by concentrating in particular on the liberating role of intralingual and interlingual paraphrase, while considering the various constraints operating on the selection of the optimal target text.

  14. Learning to Write and Draw

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share via email Print How Your Child’s Writing and Art Changes Over Time Creativity is a ... What Can You Do to Encourage Art and Writing Skills Resources and References Share on Twitter Share on ... Print You might also be interested in Article ...

  15. Field Botany and Creative Writing: Where the Science of Writing Meets the Writing of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingbeck, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Merging science and writing to enhance both subjects was the objective of a venture known as "Plant Notes." At first, teacher-written notes served as the inspiration for this writing assignment. Later, eclectic student-written novellas, poems, song lyrics, mnemonic devices, and field trip recollections made their way into "Plant Notes" and stole…

  16. Career Writing as a Dialogue about Work Experience: A Recipe for Luck Readiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengelle, Reinekke; Meijers, Frans; Poell, Rob; Geijsel, Femke; Post, Mijke

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we examined whether career writing--creative, expressive, and reflective writing--can increase luck readiness, which is the ability to respond and make use of (career) opportunities. Two 2-day writing courses were taught to third-year bachelor students, one before and one after work placements. In this exploratory study, results…

  17. Suddenly Sexy: Creative Nonfiction Rear-ends Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that there is a real chance right now for letting the possibilities of creative nonfiction infuse, improve, and invigorate the teaching of composition. Concludes that when allowed to explore literary nonfiction, writing students will develop a substantial set of strengths from which to undertake other disciplinary writing challenges as…

  18. Don't be afraid of writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Gyu

    1997-01-01

    This book deals with requirements of good writings, comprehension toward characters of language, understanding of subjects and materials, grasp of structure of writings, and reality of writing. It contains theoretical requirements of good writing such as creativity, clearness, probity, how to understand the right meanings of language by showing standard languages, dialects, foreign languages, loan words, newly coined words, in-words, slangs, jargon. It also introduces subjects, topics, materials, sentences, meaning, structure, type, requirement, length of paragraphs, diaries, letter writings, travel essays, descriptions, and essays.

  19. Becoming More than It Never (Actually) Was: Expressive Writing as Research-Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    In this article the author combines Chinese literary theory and new materialism with her ongoing research into creative writing. In the opening section, the author discusses how language and writing can be approached using new materialist theories. She then enters into a creative non-fiction "research-creation" piece that explores how…

  20. Mind, Machine, and Creativity: An Artist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Louise

    2014-06-01

    Harold Cohen is a renowned painter who has developed a computer program, AARON, to create art. While AARON has been hailed as one of the most creative AI programs, Cohen consistently rejects the claims of machine creativity. Questioning the possibility for AI to model human creativity, Cohen suggests in so many words that the human mind takes a different route to creativity, a route that privileges the relational, rather than the computational, dimension of cognition. This unique perspective on the tangled web of mind, machine, and creativity is explored by an application of three relational models of the mind to an analysis of Cohen's talks and writings, which are available on his website: www.aaronshome.com.

  1. Anaphoric Trajectories of Creative Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandvad, Sara Malou

    2017-01-01

    This chapter critically questions the strategy of applying the Actor-Network Theory to media studies. Arguing that an application of a fixed ANT-approach fundamentally opposes the ambition of Actor-Network Theory, this chapter outlines a different way of drawing inspiration from ANT. Based...... in the writings of the French cultural sociologist Antoine Hennion, who has been a pioneer in developing a cultural sociology inspired by ANT, and the recent writings of Bruno Latour addressing cultural production, the chapter suggests investigating the “anaphoric trajectories” of creative development processes...

  2. The Effect of Teaching Critical Thinking on Al-Buraimi University College students’ Writing Skills: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahia Ashour Mohammed AlKhoudary

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the role of writing in developing students’ critical thinking. It also sheds light on traditional writing assignments which fail to help students develop their comprehension of course content and evaluate their writing products critically. Moreover, this probe is to discover learners and teachers’ attitude towards the role of critical thinking in promoting the writing skills at AlBuraimi University College (BUC. The result of this study focuses on the effect of integrating critical thinking on learners’ performance. The procedure of this investigation is based on a combination of qualitative, quantitative (1 one hundred students who are taking writing course are selected randomly and divided into two groups; (2 pre- and posttests conducted to both groups; (3 twenty teachers were selected randomly (10 males and 10 females; questionnaires are administered to EFL teachers at BUC. The findings of this study illustrate that students who write critically are mostly motivated and their performance is affected positively. It also reveals that there are significant differences in posttest scores between treatment and controlled group. Moreover, teachers’ response to questionnaire supports the idea of integrating critical thinking in teaching the writing skills at BUC. Thus, is recommended that teachers should use thinking skills to enhance students’ writing performance and creativity.

  3. Multimodality, creativity and children's meaning-making: Drawings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multimodality, creativity and children's meaning-making: Drawings, writings, imaginings. ... Framed by social semiotic theories of communication, multimodal ... to create imaginary worlds and express meanings according to their interests.

  4. Exploring creativity and critical thinking in traditional and innovative problem-based learning groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2013-08-01

    To explore students' attitude towards problem-based learning, creativity and critical thinking, and the relevance to nursing education and clinical practice. Critical thinking and creativity are crucial in nursing education. The teaching approach of problem-based learning can help to reduce the difficulties of nurturing problem-solving skills. However, there is little in the literature on how to improve the effectiveness of a problem-based learning lesson by designing appropriate and innovative activities such as composing songs, writing poems and using role plays. Exploratory qualitative study. A sample of 100 students participated in seven semi-structured focus groups, of which two were innovative groups and five were standard groups, adopting three activities in problem-based learning, namely composing songs, writing poems and performing role plays. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. There are three themes extracted from the conversations: 'students' perceptions of problem-based learning', 'students' perceptions of creative thinking' and 'students' perceptions of critical thinking'. Participants generally agreed that critical thinking is more important than creativity in problem-based learning and clinical practice. Participants in the innovative groups perceived a significantly closer relationship between critical thinking and nursing care, and between creativity and nursing care than the standard groups. Both standard and innovative groups agreed that problem-based learning could significantly increase their critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Further, by composing songs, writing poems and using role plays, the innovative groups had significantly increased their awareness of the relationship among critical thinking, creativity and nursing care. Nursing educators should include more types of creative activities than it often does in conventional problem-based learning classes. The results could help nurse educators design an appropriate

  5. QUALITATIVE METHODS IN CREATIVITY STUDIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we will focus on developing a qualitative research design suitable for conducting case study in creativity. The case is a team of workers (See Hertel, 2015) doing industrial cleaning in the Danish food industry. The hypothesis is that these workers are both participating in......-specific methods, involving a discussion of creativity test, divergent and convergent thinking, for studying creativity in this specific setting. Beside from that we will develop a research design involving a combination of methods necessary for conducting a case study in the setting mentioned....

  6. Linguistic Audacity: Shakespeare's Language and Student Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Shakespeare molded language to meet his needs. Can students learn from his example? In this article, the author suggests studying Shakespeare's creative use of functional shift, spelling, and vocabulary to help students develop greater control of their own writing. The author is advocating that teachers approach Shakespeare as descriptive…

  7. ESL Students’ Perceptions of the use of Higher Order Thinking Skills in English Language Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini Ganapathy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of the education curriculum in the Malaysia Education Development Plan (PPPM 2013-2025 focuses on the Higher Order Thinking (HOT concept which aims to produce knowledgeable students who are critical and creative in their thinking and can compete at the international level. HOT skills encourage students to apply, analyse, evaluate and think creatively in and outside the classroom. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the impact of using HOT skills in a secondary ESL writing classroom. A total of 120 Form Two ESL students from three intact classes participated in this study. The students experienced project and group-based work both independently and collaboratively in groups during their writing lessons. The findings from the focus group interviews revealed the following student perceptions: felt engaged in active learning, experienced learner autonomy, developed their writing, researching and personal skills. The implications of this study suggest that using HOT skills in ESL writing lessons facilitate students’ writing ability and interest and it is recommended that HOT skills be explicitly infused in the teaching and learning of writing activities in ESL classrooms.

  8. Taiwanese Elementary Students' Creativity, Creative Personality, and Learning Styles: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2014-01-01

    In the field of education, creativity has been viewed as an important ability for children's development. The recognition of different learning styles is also important for both teachers and learners. Although a handful of studies have examined the relationship between creativity and personality, or between creativity and cognitive style, few have…

  9. [Creativeness and creative personalities--a study of successful entrepreneurs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, P

    1991-01-01

    The term creativity is defined, and the underlying creative process is described. The creative process is developed with the help of the new metaphors. The two most successful and creative from over 130 entrepreneurs involved in a research project are taken as examples. The essentials of the creative process the inexhaustible process of the phantasy concerning certain ideas and problems is enlarged in connection with the results of the Giessen Test S and the two above-mentioned entrepreneurs.

  10. Microcomputer Activities Which Encourage the Reading-Writing Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    Many reading teachers, cognizant of the creative opportunities for skill development allowed by new reading-writing software, are choosing to use microcomputers in their classrooms full-time. Adventure story creation programs capitalize on reading-writing integration by allowing children, with appropriate assistance, to create their own…

  11. Technical writing in America: A historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The standard distinction between poetic and referential language, the gulf between science and the humanities, and the distress many teachers of English feel when faced for the first time with the prospect of teaching technical writing are discussed. In the introduction of many technical writing textbooks. Technical communication is divorced from other forms of linguistic experience by making language limiting and reductive rather than creative and expansive. The emphasis on technical/scientific writing as radically different had blinded people to those traits it has in common with all species of composition and has led to a neglect of research, on fundamental rhetorical issues. A complete rhetorical theory of technical discourse should include information about the attitudes and motives of writers, the situations which motivate (or coerce) them to write, definitive features of technical style and form, interrelationship of expression and creativity, and functions of communication in shaping and preserving scientific networds and institutions. The previous areas should be explored with respect to contemporary practice and within an historical perspective.

  12. Creativity and Learning Jazz: The Practice of "Listening"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    This article is about interaction, culture, and creativity. The ethnographic setting is a set of jazz performance classes at a California university. Although I write about jazz music, the reader need not have a background in studying or performing jazz (or music in general) to understand this article. In the title of the article, the term…

  13. Teacher Professionalism on the Developing Children Creativier Professionalism on the Developing Children Creativity (Sociology of Education PerspectiveProfessionalism on the Developing Children Creativity (Sociology of Education Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummi Nurul Muslimah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is to study the concept of teachers’ professionalism and children creativity also the relation in sociology of educational perspective. This is a library research with a descriptive method. The writer collected the data from the writing sources published about some problems of teacher’s professionalism on the developing children creativity. Then, analyzing the thinking of every ideology and philosophy described clearly and completely, so the similarity and differences can be treated clearly by using the description of teacher professionalism on developing children creativity. The findings of this study showed that the relation between teacher professionalism and developing children creativity in sociology of education is every educator have an important role in children education, although in teaching learning process or in out class, educators have always supported and challenged abilities of the gift, talent and creativity. The reason is because the children are more often spend much time with teacher, so the teacher more to know and more responsible to their children.

  14. Improving Creativity Training: A Study of Designer Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsdóttir, Dagný; Onarheim, Balder; Li-Ying, Jason

    2016-01-01

    and Cross2001]. Establishing that creativity is important for design and innovation implies that identifying ways of improving creativity is a relevant research area within design studies. Creativity is a basic human skill and multiple studies have been published showing that creativity is a skill that can...... be directed at the individual level by enhancing individual creativity skills, but also improvement at the team level, rendering it important to first improve the understanding of both these levels of creativity in the design process.There are multiple ways to train creativity, although currently most...... optimal way of training creativity is through a combination of (1) educating individuals about creativity, thereby building a solid theoretical understanding, and (2) providing them with a real world case where they are trained in the use of creative tools and processes[Scott et al. 2004]. The latter...

  15. Studying creativity training programs: A methodological analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsdóttir, Dagný; Onarheim, Balder

    2017-01-01

    Throughout decades of creativity research, a range of creativity training programs have been developed, tested, and analyzed. In 2004 Scott and colleagues published a meta‐analysis of all creativity training programs to date, and the review presented here sat out to identify and analyze studies...... published since the seminal 2004 review. Focusing on quantitative studies of creativity training programs for adults, our systematic review resulted in 22 publications. All studies were analyzed, but comparing the reported effectiveness of training across studies proved difficult due to methodological...... inconsistencies, variations in reporting of results as well as types of measures used. Thus a consensus for future studies is called for to answer the question: Which elements make one creativity training program more effective than another? This is a question of equal relevance to academia and industry...

  16. Writing for Immediacy: Narrative Writing as a Teaching Technique in Undergraduate Cultural Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerby-Murray, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Narrative inquiry is an innovative means of encouraging students to internalize concepts, reflect on experiences or create applications for theoretical ideas. The use of first-person creative writing in a second-year cultural geography course prompted initial scepticism from students but eventually highlighted their constructivist engagement with…

  17. How a creative storytelling intervention can improve medical student attitude towards persons with dementia: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel R; Stuckey, Heather L; Whitehead, Megan M

    2014-05-01

    The creative arts can integrate humanistic experiences into geriatric education. This experiential learning case study evaluated whether medical student participation in TimeSlips, a creative storytelling program with persons affected by dementia, would improve attitudes towards this patient population. Twenty-two fourth-year medical students participated in TimeSlips for one month. The authors analyzed pre- and post-program scores of items, sub-domains for comfort and knowledge, and overall scale from the Dementia Attitudes Scale using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon Signed-rank tests to evaluate mean change in students' self-reported attitudes towards persons with dementia. A case study approach using student reflective writing and focus group data was used to explain quantitative results. Twelve of the 20 items, the two sub-domains, and the overall Dementia Attitudes Scale showed significant improvement post-intervention. Qualitative analysis identified four themes that added insight to quantitative results: (a) expressions of fear and discomfort felt before storytelling, (b) comfort experienced during storytelling, (c) creativity and openness achieved through storytelling, and (d) humanistic perspectives developed during storytelling can influence future patient care. This study provides preliminary evidence that participation in a creative storytelling program improves medical student attitudes towards persons with dementia, and suggests mechanisms for why attitudinal changes occurred.

  18. Creative Thinking and Creative Performance in Adolescents as Predictors of Creative Attainments in Adults: A Follow-Up Study after 18 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, Roberta M.; Hong, Eunsook

    1993-01-01

    Results of an 18-year longitudinal study of 48 Israeli high school students who were seniors at the study's start suggest that measures of creative thinking and creative leisure activities were more important than school-oriented predictors of intelligence and school grades in predicting creative attainments in adults. (DB)

  19. Creativity and Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilaran, Ildefonso (Fonsie) J.

    2012-01-01

    When I was an undergraduate physics major, I would often stay up late with my physics major roommate as we would digest the physics content we were learning in our courses and explore our respective imaginations armed with our new knowledge. Such activity during my undergraduate years was confined to informal settings, and the first formal creativity assignment in my physics education did not come until well into my graduate years when my graduate advisor demanded that I write a prospectus for my dissertation. I have often lamented the fact that the first formal assignment in which I was required to be creative, take responsibility for my own learning and research objectives, and see them to completion during my physics education came so late, considering the degree to which creative attributes are celebrated in the personalities of great physicists. In this essay I will apply some of the basic concepts as defined by creativity-related psychology literature to physics pedagogy, relate these concepts to the exchanges in this journal concerning Michael Sobel's paper "Physics for the Non-Scientist: A Middle Way," and provide the framework for a low-overhead creativity assignment that can easily be implemented at all levels of physics education.

  20. Archibabel: Tracing the Writing Architecture Project in Architectural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Sarah A.; Erk, Gül Kaçmaz; Martire, Agustina

    2015-01-01

    Though much recent scholarship has investigated the potential of writing in creative practice (including visual arts, drama, even choreography), there are few models in the literature which discuss writing in the context of architectural education. This article aims to address this dearth of pedagogical research, analysing the cross-disciplinary…

  1. The Adventures of Brown Sugar; Adventures in Creative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegall, Carrie

    A teacher's experience in guiding a group of 40 fourth-graders in writing a book is reported, and the book is included. Provided are descriptions of--(1) the step-by-step process of writing each chapter of the book, (2) the development of the students'"own English book"--rules for usage, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization, discovered by the…

  2. THE ADVENTURES OF BROWN SUGAR, ADVENTURES IN CREATIVE WRITING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STEGALL, CARRIE

    A TEACHER'S EXPERIENCE IN GUIDING A GROUP OF 40 FOURTH-GRADERS IN WRITING A BOOK IS REPORTED, AND THE BOOK IS INCLUDED. PROVIDED ARE DESCRIPTIONS OF--(1) THE STEP-BY-STEP PROCESS OF WRITING EACH CHAPTER OF THE BOOK, (2) THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE STUDENTS'"OWN ENGLISH BOOK"--RULES FOR USAGE, SPELLING, PUNCTUATION, AND CAPITALIZATION,…

  3. Study of science students' expectation for university writing courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi Nadarajan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The New Malaysia Education Blueprint (2012 states that the private sector continues to have concerns for Malaysian graduates’ English proficiency. The present study investigates the views and expectations of science students taking English courses in a public university. The findings revealed that learners saw opportunities to communicate and job applications process as important soft skills. They preferred practical learning methods above traditional teaching methods. Learners considered group performance, personal attitudes and online activities as important learning opportunities, while factual knowledge, report writing were least supported despite the fact that the majority viewed both assessments and instructional process as relevant. The data revealed that though they were dissatisfied with their existing level of proficiency, many students continued to expect an A for their course. An assessment of the learner’s’ language ability revealed that language ability was less under the learner’s control and more dependent on learner proficiency level. Taken together, this study suggests that the curriculum for the Professional Writing course should be highly diversified and balanced, with some emphasis on getting less proficient learners to read and improve their grammar skills while better students should be given opportunities to develop creative talents and interpersonal skills.

  4. The voices of neurosurgeons: doctors' non-medical writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Mark

    2007-05-01

    Biomedical publishing is an integral part of medicine--both to those who produce it and those who consume it to improve the care of their patients. Non-medical writing by surgeons usually takes the form of creative non-fiction, generally reflective essays on moving and emotionally charged situations such as working in the trenches in war-time or in natural disasters, or dealing with individual patients. Such writing is both creative and cathartic for neurosurgeons, and can help educate patients thus improving the doctor-patient relationship. The purpose of this article is to encourage fellow neurosurgeons to pursue this enjoyable and valuable endeavour, to utter a call to arms so to speak.

  5. Building a scholar in writing (BSW): A model for developing students' critical writing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Annette; Zanchetta, Margareth; Velasco, Divine; Pon, Gordon; Hassan, Aafreen

    2015-11-01

    Several authors have highlighted the importance of writing in developing reflective thinking skills, transforming knowledge, communicating expressions, and filling knowledge gaps. However, difficulties with higher order processing and critical analysis affect students' ability to write critical and thoughtful essays. The Building a Scholar in Writing (BSW) model is a 6-step process of increasing intricacies in critical writing development. Development of critical writing is proposed to occur in a processed manner that transitions from presenting simple ideas (just bones) in writing, to connecting ideas (connecting bones), to formulating a thesis and connecting key components (constructing a skeleton), to supporting ideas with evidence (adding muscle), to building creativity and originality (adding essential organs), and finally, developing strong, integrated, critical arguments (adding brain). This process symbolically represents the building of a scholar. The idea of building a scholar equates to progressively giving life and meaning to a piece of writing with unique scholarly characteristics. This progression involves a transformation in awareness, thinking, and understanding, as well as advancement in students' level of critical appraisal skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Students’ Aesthetics Experience, Creative Self-Efficacy and Creativity: Is Creativity Instruction Effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Cheng Chang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on creativity component theory, creativity system theory and creative self-efficacy theory, this study aims to explore the influence of college students’ aesthetics experience and creative self-efficacy on their creativity and the role of creativity instruction as a mediator variable. The participants were 338 college design majors in 50 teams who were working on their graduation exhibitions, and 50 advising professors from departments related to design. Hierarchical Linear Models were applied for analysis. The result showed that instruction on enhancing students’ creative intention positively affect students’ aesthetics experience. Students’ aesthetics experience affects their creativity and creative self-efficacy. Creativity instruction with focus on creativity skills by means of promoting aesthetic attitude, aesthetic understanding, and offering complete experiences had a moderating effect on students’ perception toward creative product. However, there was a negative moderating effect of creative instruction on perceived aesthetic pleasure and students’ perception toward creative product. There was no moderating effect of creative instruction on the relationship between students’ creative self-efficacy and creativity. Accordingly, the study concluded that in order to enhance students’ creativity, universities should stress on the development of students’ aesthetics experiences and re-evaluation of approaches to creativity instruction.

  7. Creativity in the English Class: Activities to Promote EFL Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán A. Avila

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a pedagogical intervention that includes a set of creative activities designed to improve the oral and written production of students in the English classroom, especially those who have shown a lack of interest or attention. It was observed that participants initially seemed careless about studying the language. Eventually they responded to the proposed methods positively and were more willing and motivated to participate in chain games, creative writing, and screenwriting exercises. The activities helped develop the students’ fluency in both oral and written production and improved their understanding of English grammar and structure.

  8. "The Return of the Unicorn": Creative Writing Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Kathy Huse; Kreitzer, Jack

    The classroom activities suggested in this resource booklet, proven successful by South Dakota poet Jack Kreitzer, are designed to spark or increase students' creativity by bringing the exciting language of poetry alive in the elementary and secondary classroom. Introductory comments present thoughts on what poetry is and how it should be taught,…

  9. Re-Theorizing the Role of Creative Writing in Composition Studies: Cautionary Notes towards Re-Thinking the Essay in the Teaching of Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julier, Laura

    An essay, often called a personal essay, familiar essay, lyric essay, the disjunctive or spiral essay, is a piece of writing which takes its form in the shifts and turns of a particular mind at work. The essay is a piece of writing which pays attention to and sometimes plays with form; often uses images and figures that are familiar with poetry;…

  10. What is on our children's minds? : an analysis of children's writings as reflections of group-specific socialization practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denessen, E.; Hornstra, L.; Bergh, van den L.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study it has been examined how children's creative writing tasks may contribute to teachers' understanding of children's values. Writings of 300 elementary school children about what they would do if they were the boss of The Netherlands were obtained and seemed to reflect different

  11. What is on our children's minds? An analysis of children's writings as reflections of group-specific socialisation practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Hornstra, T.E.; Bergh, L. van den

    2010-01-01

    In the present study it has been examined how children's creative writing tasks may contribute to teachers' understanding of children's values. Writings of 300 elementary school children about what they would do if they were the boss of The Netherlands were obtained and seemed to reflect different

  12. Using Comic Art to Improve Speaking, Reading and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowkett, Steve

    2011-01-01

    "Using Comic Art to Improve Speaking, Reading and Writing" uses children's interest in pictures, comics and graphic novels as a way of developing their creative writing abilities, reading skills and oracy. The book's underpinning strategy is the use of comic art images as a visual analogue to help children generate, organise and refine their ideas…

  13. Using Improvisational Exercises in General Education to Advance Creativity, Inventiveness and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackbert, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Creativity is the process of generating something new or original that has value to an individual, a group, an organization, an industry or a society. Improvisational theater techniques are used to enhance creative thinking and action in a variety of disciplines as broad as education, theater, dance, painting, writing and music, law, business, and…

  14. The Elephants Teach: Creative Writing since 1880

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, David Gershom

    2006-01-01

    When Vladimir Nabokov was up for a chair in literature at Harvard, the linguist Roman Jakobson protested: "What's next? Shall we appoint elephants to teach zoology?" That anecdote, with which D. G. Myers begins "The Elephants Teach", perfectly frames the issues this book tackles. Myers explores more than a century of debate over how writing should…

  15. Retrospective Analysis of Studying Psychological Nature of Creativity

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    N V Artjushkina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The creativity phenomenon analysis in the works of the domestic and foreign scientists is presented in this article. The authors focus their special attention on the factors of creativity manifestation during the various periods of ontogenesis and on the characteristic of the conditions necessary for the formation of a creative personality. On the basis of the retrospective analysis and the synthesis of the conceptual approaches to studying the parameters of creativity, the criteria by which it is possible to determine the level of the development of the creative personality are revealed.

  16. Designing Task-Based Syllabus For Writing Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundari Hanna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing is viewed as the most complex skill to learn and to teach. Beside learner factors, teacher, materials and syllabus may also affect the process of learning language as foreign language. Syllabus, in general, can be defined as a set of what is taught (content and the way it is taught (procedure. This current research aims to design a task-based syllabus for writing class at university level. This study was conducted by qualitative descriptive design with 92 students and 4 lecturers as respondents. As part of research and development project in one private university in Jakarta, a developed task-based syllabus was based on need analysis and the principles of task-based language teaching. Students’ proficiency levels are fair with sentence patterns and grammar as the most difficult aspects. Academic writing is more preferable orientation with the small portions of creative writing. Then, the developed task-based syllabus has been proposed for writing class which covers the components of goal (learning outcome, course description and objectives, a set of writing tasks, features of content focus and language focus and course evaluation. The developed syllabus, then, can guide the lecturers in designing lesson plan and selecting materials for writing class.

  17. Green IT empowerment, social capital, creativity and innovation: A case study of creative city, Bantul, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muafi Muafi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims at analyzing the role of empowerment of Green IT in SMEs and social capital of the creativity and innovation of creative SMEs in Bantul, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Design/methodology/approach: A statistical technique used in the present study was Partial Least Square. The primary data of the present research were obtained from questionnaires and interviews with some respondents. While secondary data were gained through the records and publications of related instancies. Findings: The research concluded that the empowerment of Green IT provides a significant role in creativity and innovation as well as social capital, and at the same time it also supplies a significant role in innovation. Research limitations/implications:. This study is proposed to fill the research gap and at the same time to emphasize the importance of the creative empowerment of SMEs in Indonesia in adopting Green IT and that they are not only ready to make use of Green IT. Green IT empowerment and social capital in the creative SMEs play an important function ingenerating of creativity and innovation in the Yogyakarta’s creative SMEs. Creative industries which capitalize creative ideas and skills are expected to positively contribute to support the national economy. Practical implications: Creative SMEs grow and develop rapidly here and form clusters of creative industries in accordance with the resources of each cluster. Originality/value: This paper is a first attempt to overlook the significant role of green IT empowerment in SMEs’ rapid development in Yogyakarta, a growing province in economic sector in Indonesia. The result of the study is expected to lead other similar research which in the future will craft out the role of economic development and the use of environmental friendly material of production.

  18. Creativity in Biographical Writing as the Necessary Fictions of Nonfiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Paula R.

    Biographical writing is highly imaginative writing and always has been. The task of the biographer is to weave a riveting story from the fabric of the subject's life. For example, a single pivotal incident in the lives of Percy Bysshe Shelley, the English poet, and Mary Godwin, author of "Frankenstein", at the grave of Mary's mother,…

  19. Career writing as a dialogue about work experience: a recipe for luck readiness?

    OpenAIRE

    Post, Mijke; Poell, Rob; Meijers, Frans; Lengelle, Reinekke; Geijsel, Femke

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examined whether career writing—creative, expressive, and reflective writing—can increase luck readiness, which is the ability to respond and make use of (career) opportunities. Two 2-day writing courses were taught to third-year bachelor students, one before and one after work placements. In this exploratory study, results showed that luck readiness and work competence increased when students engaged in career writing. Specifically, flexibility, risk, and persistence incr...

  20. Expanding Views of Creative Science: A Response to Ghassib's Productivist Industrial Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Don

    2010-01-01

    It was refreshing to read Hisham Ghassib's (2010) article outlining his model of scientific knowledge production. Too few scholarly writings in creative studies and gifted education deal with issues at the large-scale, panoramic level of analysis. Ghassib (2010) would not disappoint Albert Einstein who lamented that "I have little patience with…

  1. Lesson Play Tasks as a Creative Venture for Teachers and Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazkis, Rina

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on instances of creativity in the design of Lesson Play tasks and in prospective teachers' responses to the tasks. A Lesson Play task assumes a theatrical interpretation of the word "play" and requires teachers to write a script for an imaginary interaction between a teacher-character and student-characters, attending…

  2. Effects of Writing Instruction on Kindergarten Students' Writing Achievement: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cindy D'On

    2015-01-01

    This full-year experimental study examined how methods of writing instruction contribute to kindergarten students' acquisition of foundational and compositional early writing skills. Multiple regression with cluster analysis was used to compare 3 writing instructional groups: an interactive writing group, a writing workshop group, and a…

  3. Creativity and Waldorf Education: A Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    This paper discusses the comparative philosophical tenets and practices of Germany's Waldorf and state schools with regard to the creativity thinking ability of students. Waldorf schools, developed some 70 years ago, are based on the philosophy of creative idealism known as anthroposophy. A study of 1165 third through sixth grade children from…

  4. Using a creativity-focused science program to foster general creativity in young children: A teacher action research study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Joan Julieanne Mariani

    The importance of thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to integrate and analyze information has been recognized and yet may be lacking in schools. Creativity is inherently linked to problem finding, problem solving, and divergent thinking (Arieti, 1976; Csikszentmihalyi, 1990; Milgram, 1990). The importance of early childhood education and its role in the formation of young minds has been recognized (Caine & Caine, 1991; Montessori, 1967a, 1967b; Piaget, 1970). Early childhood education also impacts creativity (Gardner, 1999). The features of brain-based learning (Caine & Caine, 1991; Jensen, 1998; Sousa, 2001; Wolfe, 2001) have a clear connection to nurturing the creative potential in students. Intrinsic motivation and emotions affect student learning and creativity as well (Hennessey & Amabile, 1987). The purpose of this study was to discern if a creativity-focused science curriculum for the kindergarteners at a Montessori early learning center could increase creativity in students. This action research study included observations of the students in two classrooms, one using the creativity-focused science curriculum, and the other using the existing curriculum. The data collected for this interpretive study included interviews with the students, surveys and interviews with their parents and teachers, teacher observations, and the administration of Torrance's (1981) Thinking Creatively in Action and Movement (TCAM) test. The interpretation of the data indicated that the enhanced science curriculum played a role in enhancing the creativity of the children in the creativity-focused group. The results of the TCAM (Torrance, 1981) showed a significant increase in scores for the children in the creativity-focused group. The qualitative data revealed a heightened interest in science and the observation of creative traits, processes, and products in the creativity-focused group children. The implications of this study included the need for meaningful

  5. How Can Creative Workplaces Meet Creative Employees?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kolnhofer Derecskei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the individual and contextual factors that facilitate or hinder employees’ creativity. However, in this paper the literature is also referring to critical factors that impact employees’ creativity. According to the creativity’s state of the art, we focused on factors based on creativity’s 4P, choosing Person (characteristics of creative persons and Place (environmental factors that influence creativity. Considerable research efforts have been invested to explore the possible connections between these two domains by investigating the Hungarian labour market. We found that the probability that a creative person works in a creative workplace is twice greater than that of the case of a non-creative person. This study presents the requisites of a creative workplace so that employees’ creativity can be developed and a kind of work environment which facilitates organizational creativity can be created. First, we have collected and presented the best practices of recruitment-tools which help managers to hire the most creative applicants. With these two components, i.e. finding creative workers and securing them a creative friendly environment, the business success is guaranteed.

  6. Students’ Aesthetics Experience, Creative Self-Efficacy and Creativity: Is Creativity Instruction Effective?

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-Cheng Chang; Chia-Chun Hsiao

    2016-01-01

    Based on creativity component theory, creativity system theory and creative self-efficacy theory, this study aims to explore the influence of college students’ aesthetics experience and creative self-efficacy on their creativity and the role of creativity instruction as a mediator variable. The participants were 338 college design majors in 50 teams who were working on their graduation exhibitions, and 50 advising professors from departments related to design. Hierarchical Linear Models were ...

  7. Writing Anxiety: A Case Study on Students’ Reasons for Anxiety in Writing

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, Selma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. First, the present study set out to investigate the learners‟ attitudes towards academic writing courses that they have to take as part of their curriculum, whether they experience second language writing anxiety and what reasons they report for their anxiety and failure in academic writing courses. Second, the study aimed to develop a selfreport measure of second language writing anxiety reasons

  8. Creativity, alcohol and drug abuse: the pop icon Jim Morrison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Hadulla, Rainer M; Bertolino, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse is frequent among performers and pop musicians. Many of them hope that alcohol and drugs will enhance their creativity. Scientific studies are scarce and conclusions limited for methodological reasons. Furthermore, extraordinary creativity can hardly be grasped by empirical-statistical methods. Thus, ideographic studies are necessary to learn from extraordinarily creative persons about the relationship of creativity with alcohol and drugs. The pop icon Jim Morrison can serve as an exemplary case to investigate the interrelation between alcohol and drug abuse and creativity. Morrison's self-assessments in his works and letters as well as the descriptions by others are analyzed under the perspective of creativity research. In the lyrics of Jim Morrison and in biographical descriptions, we can see how Jim Morrison tried to cope with traumatic events, depressive moods and uncontrolled impulses through creative activities. His talent, skill and motivation to write creatively were independent from taking alcohol and drugs. He used alcohol and drugs to transgress restrictive social norms, to broaden his perceptions and to reinforce his struggle for self-actualization. In short, his motivation to create something new and authentic was reinforced by alcohol and drugs. More important was the influence of a supportive group that enabled Morrison's talents to flourish. However, soon the frequent use of high doses of alcohol and drugs weakened his capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is an exemplary case showing that heavy drinking and the abuse of LSD, mescaline and amphetamines damages the capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is typical of creative personalities like Amy Winehouse, Janis Joplin, Brian Jones and Jimmy Hendrix who burn their creativity in early adulthood through alcohol and drugs. We suppose that the sacrificial ritual of their decay offers some benefits for the excited spectators. One of these is the

  9. The Views of Turkish Pre-Service Teachers about Effectiveness of Cluster Method as a Teaching Writing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitis, Emine; Türkel, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out Turkish pre-service teachers' views on effectiveness of cluster method as a writing teaching method. The Cluster Method can be defined as a connotative creative writing method. The way the method works is that the person who brainstorms on connotations of a word or a concept in abscence of any kind of…

  10. A picture's worth a thousand words: engaging youth in CBPR using the creative arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonas, Michael A; Burke, Jessica G; Rak, Kimberly; Bennett, Antoine; Kelly, Vera; Gielen, Andrea C

    2009-01-01

    Engaging youth and incorporating their unique expertise into the research process is important when addressing issues related to their health. Visual Voices is an arts-based participatory data collection method designed to work together with young people and communities to collaboratively elicit, examine, and celebrate the perspectives of youth. To present a process for using the creative arts with young people as a participatory data collection method and to give examples of their perspectives on safety and violence. Using the creative arts, this study examined and illustrates the perspectives of how community factors influence safety and violence. Visual Voices was conducted with a total of 22 African-American youth in two urban neighborhoods. This method included creative arts-based writing, drawing, and painting activities designed to yield culturally relevant data generated and explored by youth. Qualitative data were captured through the creative content of writings, drawings, and paintings created by the youths as well as transcripts from audio recorded group discussion. Data was analyzed for thematic content and triangulated across traditional and nontraditional mediums. Findings were interpreted with participants and shared publicly for further reflection and utilization. The youth participants identified a range of issues related to community factors, community safety, and violence. Such topics included the role of schools and social networks within the community as safe places and corner stores and abandoned houses as unsafe places. Visual Voices is a creative research method that provides a unique opportunity for youth to generate a range of ideas through access to the multiple creative methods provided. It is an innovative process that generates rich and valuable data about topics of interest and the lived experiences of young community members.

  11. STUDY CREATIVE THINKING OF STUDENTS OF PEDAGOGICAL HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Valerievna Zhuina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of conduct theoretical and methodological analysis of the problem of creative thinking subjects of the educational environment; generalization of the results of an empirical study of creative thinking of students of pedagogical high school; formulation of conclusions and recommendations based on the results of empirical research.Methodology of work in the article used the following me-thods of psycho-pedagogical studies: theoretical analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature on research; empirical methods, «Torrance Test of creativity»; quantitative method of data processing (percent.Results for Beginning Students (1st and 2nd pedagogical university have a level of creativity lower than normal. Du-ring training, under the influence of modern psychological and pedagogical technologies, through participation in research and training activities of a creative nature (competitions, contests and so on. Level of creativity senior students increases. However, you need a specially organized system of work aimed at improving the efficiency of the learning process at the university, to develop the necessary professional competencies of students (including the development of creative thinking, contributing to the formation of highly qualified professionals in demand in the labor market.Practical implications of the study results have both theoretical and practical focus is to enhance the knowledge about the features of creative thinking of students about the factors and conditions of development of creative thinking techniques in the teaching process at the university. In addition, the results of empirical research, you can use a high school teacher, se-condary vocational institutions in order to organize educatio-nal activities aimed at improving the creative (creative thin-king subjects of education.

  12. "Everybody Wants Somebody to Hear Their Story": High School Students Writing Screenplays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Carol; Fuhrken, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Writing a screenplay was an assignment that was part of Storytelling Through Film, a program sponsored by the Austin Film Festival, a professional film organization. In six weeks, students in creative writing and English classes first learned about the genre of screenwriting and then wrote original screenplays. The curriculum was a collaborative…

  13. Exploring the Relationship between Writing Apprehension and Writing Performance: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrasawi, Kamal J. I.; Zubairi, Ainol; Idrus, Faizah

    2016-01-01

    Writing skill is seen as a cornerstone of university students' success in both academic and career life. This qualitative study was conducted to further explore the teachers' and students' perceptions on the relationship between writing apprehension and writing performance, contributing factors of writing apprehension, and strategies to reduce…

  14. A Cross-Cultural Study of Task Specificity in Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storme, Martin; Lubart, Todd; Myszkowski, Nils; Cheung, Ping Chung; Tong, Toby; Lau, Sing

    2017-01-01

    This study provides new evidence concerning task specificity in creativity--examining through a cross-cultural perspective the extent to which performance in graphic versus verbal creativity tasks (domain specificity) and in divergent versus convergent creativity tasks (process specificity) are correlated. The relations between different…

  15. Creativity-Relevant Personal Characteristics among Indonesia Creative Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho J. Setiadi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to identify Creativity-relevant Personal Characteristics among creative workers in Indonesia’s creative industry. Identification of the constituent elements of the nature of the changes needs to be measured. Researchers have advocated replacing creativity-relevant personal characteristics based on the five-factor model to investigate how individual differences stimulate creativity. This study presents data supporting reliability (internal consistency and validity (criterion and construct of the instrument. Validity of the instrument is based on the content validity involving art and design experts. The 220 creative workers from several creative industry firms in Indonesia participated as samples in this research. Results of a factor analysis indicated a five factor solution of creative characteristics and behavior. Discussion of findings and the most important ways in which individuals differ in their enduring emotional, interpersonal, experiential, attitudinal, and motivational styles for stimulating creativity are presented.

  16. Applying the neuroscience of creativity to creativity training

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    Balder eOnarheim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates how neuroscience in general, and neuroscience of creativity in particular, can be used in teaching 'applied creativity' and the usefulness of this approach to creativity training. The article is based on empirical data and our experiences from the Applied NeuroCreativity (ANC program, taught at business schools in Denmark and Canada. In line with previous studies of successful creativity training programs the ANC participants are first introduced to cognitive concepts of creativity, before applying these concepts to a relevant real world creative problem. The novelty in the ANC program is that the conceptualization of creativity is built on neuroscience, and a crucial aspect of the course is giving the students a thorough understanding of the neuroscience of creativity. Previous studies have reported that the conceptualization of creativity used in such training is of major importance for the success of the training, and we believe that the neuroscience of creativity offers a novel conceptualization for creativity training. Here we present two sets of empirical data, suggesting that principles from neuroscience can contribute effectively to creativity training and produce measurable results on creativity tests: 1 an experiment demonstrating how an ANC lecture on the neurobiology of creativity significantly decreased the number of fixations in a creative task, 2 pre/post-training tests showing that ANC students gained more fluency in divergent thinking (a traditional measure of trait creativity than those in highly similar courses without the neuroscience component. The evidence presented indicates that the inclusion of neuroscience principles in a creativity course can in 8 weeks increase divergent thinking skills with an individual relative average of 28.5%.

  17. Applying the neuroscience of creativity to creativity training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onarheim, Balder; Friis-Olivarius, Morten

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how neuroscience in general, and neuroscience of creativity in particular, can be used in teaching “applied creativity” and the usefulness of this approach to creativity training. The article is based on empirical data and our experiences from the Applied NeuroCreativity (ANC) program, taught at business schools in Denmark and Canada. In line with previous studies of successful creativity training programs the ANC participants are first introduced to cognitive concepts of creativity, before applying these concepts to a relevant real world creative problem. The novelty in the ANC program is that the conceptualization of creativity is built on neuroscience, and a crucial aspect of the course is giving the students a thorough understanding of the neuroscience of creativity. Previous studies have reported that the conceptualization of creativity used in such training is of major importance for the success of the training, and we believe that the neuroscience of creativity offers a novel conceptualization for creativity training. Here we present pre/post-training tests showing that ANC students gained more fluency in divergent thinking (a traditional measure of trait creativity) than those in highly similar courses without the neuroscience component, suggesting that principles from neuroscience can contribute effectively to creativity training and produce measurable results on creativity tests. The evidence presented indicates that the inclusion of neuroscience principles in a creativity course can in 8 weeks increase divergent thinking skills with an individual relative average of 28.5%. PMID:24137120

  18. "I wanted to communicate my feelings freely": a descriptive study of creative responses to enhance reflection in palliative medicine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lynn; Donnelly, Sinéad; Hilder, Jo; O'Leary, Clare; McKinlay, Eileen

    2015-10-23

    The recent growth of arts and humanities in medical education shows recognition that these disciplines can facilitate a breadth of thinking and result in personal and professional growth. However creative work can be a challenge to incorporate into a busy curriculum. Offering the option of creative media as a way of reflecting is an example of how this can occur. This study aimed to examine the medical student response to being given this option to explore a visit to a patient in a hospice. This was a mainly qualitative study. In the 2012 academic programme, the class of 86 students were given the option of using a creative medium to explore their responses to both the visit and their developing communication skills. Students were required to write an accompanying commentary if submitting the creative work option. Sixty-four percent of the class chose a creative medium e.g. poetry, visual art, narrative prose, music. These students were asked to take part in research including completing a short on-line survey and consenting for their creative work and commentaries to be further examined. The creative works were categorised by genre and the commentaries analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Seventeen students completed the on-line survey and fifteen consented to their work being used for this research. Thematic analysis of the student commentaries revealed the following themes: effectiveness for expressing emotion or ideas that are difficult to articulate; engaging and energising quality of the task; time for reflection; flexibility for individual learning styles and therapeutic value. Teaching the art of communicating at end-of-life is challenging especially when it involves patients, and teachers want to ensure students gain as much as possible from the experience. Offering the option to use creative media means that students can choose a medium for reflection that best suits them as individuals and that can enable them to benefit as much as possible from

  19. Suicide and creativity: the case of Sylvia Plath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runco, M A

    1998-01-01

    This article explores the idea that although much can be learned by viewing Sylvia Plath's poetry as an expression of her thinking and affect, additional insights are afforded by reversing the typical direction of effect and by viewing Plath's affect, and in particular her depression, as a result of her writing. Consistent with this interpretation is Plath's huge investment in writing. This may have contributed to the sensitivity that predisposed her to stress and depression. This perspective is tied to the existing creativity literature and interwoven and contrasted with existing descriptions of Plath's work and tragic death.

  20. A study on relationship between organizational climate and creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Ahmadi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between organizational climate and women employees' creativity of Tabriz Red Crescent Organization. The research method is descriptive correlation performed among 120 women employed at the Red Crescent and 100 cases were selected for the proposed study. For data collection, Hoy and Miskel (2005's organizational climate and Randsyp creativity questionnaires with 0.78 and 0.82 Cronbach's alpha coefficients were used. Pearson correlation and multiple regressions were used to analyze research hypotheses. Results showed that there was a significant relationship between two indices of manager and subordinate behaviors and creativity. In addition, in investigating the relationship between climate and creativity components, findings showed that there was a significant relationship only between cooperation and pretending to job dimensions and creativity. This study also has shown that managers' behavior is closed and employees' behavior is more open than managers are.

  1. Education the Way Ahead? An Evaluation of a Pilot Course on Scenario Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viebahn, Peter; Hilton, Gillian

    2006-01-01

    Scenario writing is a method to promote creative thinking and a proactive approach to dealing with the future. ATEE's Research and Development Centre "Curricula in Teacher Education" has adapted this method for use in teacher education. A Comenius funded course on Scenario writing was run over five days with teachers, teacher--educators,…

  2. A study of Korean students' creativity in science using structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Son Mi

    Through the review of creativity research I have found that studies lack certain crucial parts: (a) a theoretical framework for the study of creativity in science, (b) studies considering the unique components related to scientific creativity, and (c) studies of the interactions among key components through simultaneous analyses. The primary purpose of this study is to explore the dynamic interactions among four components (scientific proficiency, intrinsic motivation, creative competence, context supporting creativity) related to scientific creativity under the framework of scientific creativity. A total of 295 Korean middle school students participated. Well-known and commonly used measurements were selected and developed. Two scientific achievement scores and one score measured by performance-based assessment were used to measure student scientific knowledge/inquiry skills. Six items selected from the study of Lederman, Abd-El-Khalick, Bell, and Schwartz (2002) were used to assess how well students understand the nature of science. Five items were selected from the subscale of the scientific attitude inventory version II (Moore & Foy, 1997) to assess student attitude toward science. The Test of Creative Thinking-Drawing Production (Urban & Jellen, 1996) was used to measure creative competence. Eight items chosen from the 15 items of the Work Preference Inventory (1994) were applied to measure students' intrinsic motivation. To assess the level of context supporting creativity, eight items were adapted from measurement of the work environment (Amabile, Conti, Coon, Lazenby, and Herron, 1996). To assess scientific creativity, one open-ended science problem was used and three raters rated the level of scientific creativity through the Consensual Assessment Technique (Amabile, 1996). The results show that scientific proficiency and creative competence correlates with scientific creativity. Intrinsic motivation and context components do not predict scientific

  3. Implicit theories of creativity: Cross-cultural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankaraš Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyzed laypersons' implicit theories of creativity in two different national cultures: Serbia (N=257 and the United States of America (N=255. Relying on previous works in this field, we have constructed a questionnaire comprised of 52 indicative and 36 contra-indicative personal characteristic which were rated by respondents on a 5-point scale on criteria of their creativity and desirability. Results show that both groups have similar conceptions of a creative person, which they see as an energetic, self-confident individual, gifted with creative talents and exceptional intellectual abilities, with profound emotionality and brightness. The main difference between the two groups is that respondents from Serbia, contrary to their American counterparts, do not perceive characteristics which reflect obedience to social norms as a contra-indication to creativity. Respondents have mostly seen creative attributes as desirable, although there is a number of characteristics that are rated differently in terms of their creativity and desirability. These results confirm that creativity and desirability are two distinct concepts and indicate positive view of creativity as a phenomenon and creative person as such.

  4. The Topic of Life and Death in Verbal Creativity of Adolescents aged 14—16 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoziev V.B.,

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on how adolescents aged 14—16 years use the topic of life and death in their verbal creativity. The authors carried out an experimental research on the genesis of this process and describe how the topic evolves as a specific new formation of verbal creativity in adolescence. At the center of the research were conditions of verbal creativity. The subjects in three samples (traditional learning; spontaneous development; project-based-learning were asked to write an essay on any topic; these essays were subsequently assessed using content analysis. The outcomes revealed that the topic of life and death is likely to appear in the essays of those adolescents whose reference group is more comfortable psychologically. The literary merit of writing statistically correlates with the effectiveness of verbal creativity acquisition. In its psychological content the topic was actually a challenge, a manifestation of rebellion of a young man, an important attempt to get closer to the hidden boundary of the known, a significant step in initiation.

  5. Creative Writing, Problem-Based Learning, and Game-Based Learning Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trekles, Anastasia M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how virtual worlds and other advanced social media can be married with problem-based learning to encourage creativity and critical thinking in the English/Language Arts classroom, particularly for middle school, high school, and undergraduate college education. Virtual world experiences such as "Second Life," Jumpstart.com, and…

  6. Synthetic Literature : Writing Science Fiction in a Co-Creative Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manjavacas, Enrique; Karsdorp, F.B.; Burtenshaw, Ben; Kestemont, Mike

    This paper describes a co-creative text generation system applied within a science fiction setting to be used by an established novelist. The project was initiated as part of The Dutch Book Week, and the generated text will be published within a volume of science fiction stories. We explore the

  7. A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words: Engaging Youth in CBPR Using the Creative Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonas, Michael A.; Burke, Jessica G.; Rak, Kimberly; Bennett, Antoine; Kelly, Vera; Gielen, Andrea C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Engaging youth and incorporating their unique expertise into the research process is important when addressing issues related to their health. Visual Voices is an arts-based participatory data collection method designed to work together with young people and communities to collaboratively elicit, examine, and celebrate the perspectives of youth. Objectives To present a process for using the creative arts with young people as a participatory data collection method and to give examples of their perspectives on safety and violence. Methods Using the creative arts, this study examined and illustrates the perspectives of how community factors influence safety and violence. Visual Voices was conducted with a total of 22 African-American youth in two urban neighborhoods. This method included creative arts-based writing, drawing, and painting activities designed to yield culturally relevant data generated and explored by youth. Qualitative data were captured through the creative content of writings, drawings, and paintings created by the youths as well as transcripts from audio recorded group discussion. Data was analyzed for thematic content and triangulated across traditional and nontraditional mediums. Findings were interpreted with participants and shared publicly for further reflection and utilization. Conclusion The youth participants identified a range of issues related to community factors, community safety, and violence. Such topics included the role of schools and social networks within the community as safe places and corner stores and abandoned houses as unsafe places. Visual Voices is a creative research method that provides a unique opportunity for youth to generate a range of ideas through access to the multiple creative methods provided. It is an innovative process that generates rich and valuable data about topics of interest and the lived experiences of young community members. PMID:20097996

  8. Domain-specificity of creativity: a study on the relationship between Visual Creativity and Visual Mental Imagery’.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano ePalmiero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Creativity refers to the capability to catch original and valuable ideas and solutions. It involves different processes. In this study the extent to which visual creativity is related to cognitive processes underlying visual mental imagery was investigated. Fifty college students (25 women carried out: the Creative Synthesis Task, which measures the ability to produce creative objects belonging to a given category (originality, synthesis and transformation scores of pre-inventive forms, and originality and practicality scores of inventions were computed; an adaptation of Clark’s Drawing Ability Test, which measures the ability to produce actual creative artworks (graphic ability, aesthetic and creativity scores of drawings were assessed and three mental imagery tasks that investigate the three main cognitive processes involved in visual mental imagery: generation, inspection and transformation. Vividness of imagery and verbalizer-visualizer cognitive style were also measured using questionnaires. Correlation analysis revealed that all measures of the creativity tasks positively correlated with the image transformation imagery ability; practicality of inventions negatively correlated with vividness of imagery; originality of inventions positively correlated with the visualization cognitive style. However, regression analysis confirmed the predictive role of the transformation imagery ability only for the originality score of inventions and for the graphic ability and aesthetic scores of artistic drawings; on the other hand, the visualization cognitive style predicted the originality of inventions, whereas the vividness of imagery predicted practicality of inventions. These results are consistent with the notion that visual creativity is domain- and task-specific.

  9. Personality and Creativity: A Study in Spanish-Speaking Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Krumm

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at studying the relationship between personality from the Big Five Personality model and creativity through different techniques (i.e., a paper and pencil task, and scales and informants (i.e., the child and parents. We evaluated a sample of 359 Spanish-speaking school children of both genders, aged 9 to 13 years. Personality was assessed with the Argentine Questionnaire of children’s Personality (CAPI. Creativity was evaluated using the following instruments: The Torrance Test of Creative Thinking-Figural Form B; and the Creative Personality Scale (EPC. Pearson correlations and multiple linear regressions consistently showed that Neuroticism related negatively to creativity while competence has a positive relation. The results suggested that more creative children presented less vulnerability, irritability and psychological distress, eventually becoming more independent, competent and emotionally self-regulated in coping with environmental demands.

  10. Verbal creativity in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teresa Q; Miller, Zachary A; Adhimoolam, Babu; Zackey, Diana D; Khan, Baber K; Ketelle, Robin; Rankin, Katherine P; Miller, Bruce L

    2015-02-01

    Emergence of visual and musical creativity in the setting of neurologic disease has been reported in patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), also called semantic dementia (SD). It is hypothesized that loss of left anterior frontotemporal function facilitates activity of the right posterior hemispheric structures, leading to de novo creativity observed in visual artistic representation. We describe creativity in the verbal domain, for the first time, in three patients with svPPA. Clinical presentations are carefully described in three svPPA patients exhibiting verbal creativity, including neuropsychology, neurologic exam, and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was performed to quantify brain atrophy patterns in these patients against age-matched healthy controls. All three patients displayed new-onset creative writing behavior and produced extensive original work during the course of disease. Patient A developed interest in wordplay and generated a large volume of poetry. Patient B became fascinated with rhyming and punning. Patient C wrote and published a lifestyle guidebook. An overlap of their structural MR scans showed uniform sparing in the lateral portions of the language-dominant temporal lobe (superior and middle gyri) and atrophy in the medial temporal cortex (amygdala, limbic cortex). New-onset creativity in svPPA may represent a paradoxical functional facilitation. A similar drive for production is found in visually artistic and verbally creative patients. Mirroring the imaging findings in visually artistic patients, verbal preoccupation and creativity may be associated with medial atrophy in the language-dominant temporal lobe, but sparing of lateral dominant temporal and non-dominant posterior cortices.

  11. Studying visual and spatial reasoning for design creativity

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Creativity and design creativity in particular are being recognized as playing an increasing role in the social and economic wellbeing of a society. As a consequence creativity is becoming a focus of research. However, much of this burgeoning research is distributed across multiple disciplines that normally do not intersect with each other and researchers in one discipline are often unaware of related research in another discipline.  This volume brings together contributions from design science, computer science, cognitive science and neuroscience on studying visual and spatial reasoning applicable to design creativity. The book is the result of a unique NSF-funded workshop held in Aix-en-Provence, France. The aim of the workshop and the resulting volume was to allow researchers in disparate disciplines to be exposed to the other’s research, research methods and research results within the context of design creativity. Fifteen of the papers presented and discussed at the workshop are contained in this volu...

  12. Creativity and Self-Exploration in Projective Drawings of Abused Women: Evaluating the inside Me-outside Me Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollinger, Stephen J.; Kazmierczak, Elzbieta; Storkerson, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated a creative workshop where college students (N = 300) devised self-expressive products to explore their inner and outer worlds. Participants devised products with drawing and writing components to examine their relationships with negative life events, self-concepts, and worldviews. Participants then evaluated the workshop.…

  13. Writing the Right Contract: Getting What You Want.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Karen E.

    1998-01-01

    Outsourcing of school services creates a need for educators to learn how best to select a contractor. Contracted student transportation is used to illustrate flexibility and creativity in writing a request for proposal, the evaluation process, and the importance of contractors' willingness to work alongside the district as a genuine business…

  14. Teaching with Your Librarian: Reading About Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Sandy

    2005-01-01

    This document contains some book suggestions to help introduce all the various parts of writing. Helping students understand figures of speech takes more than a book ? it takes a creative teacher and interested students. One book that teachers and students have had a great time with is Monkey Business by Wallace Edwards, (Kids Can Press, 2004,…

  15. Creative Deviance: A Study of the Relationship between Creative Behavior and the Social Construct of Deviance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Don; Donnell, Alison J.; Thomas, Adrian; Mills, Melanie Sandifer; Miller, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Confirming a relationship between the social construct of deviance and creativity was the focus of this study. Two hundred and sixty-eight university students were administered assessments designed to elicit tendencies toward both creativity and deviant behavior. Their responses were factor analyzed and results indicated a seven-factor structure…

  16. Indicators of creativity in a technology class: a case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study we investigated how learners demonstrate creativity whilst en- gaging in the technological process employing a qualitative research strategy, with observation and focus group interviews as the methods of data collection. From this data, indicators of creativity emerged. Schools must encourage learners to be creative ...

  17. Mania risk and creativity: a multi-method study of the role of motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiter, Margina; Johnson, Sheri L

    2015-01-01

    Substantial literature has linked bipolar disorder and risk for bipolar disorder with creative accomplishment, but few multimodal studies of creativity are available, and little is known about mechanisms. We use a multi-method approach to test the association of bipolar risk with several creativity measures, including creative accomplishments, creative personality traits, and a laboratory index of insight. We also examined whether multiple facets of motivation accounted for the links of bipolar risk with creativity. Among 297 undergraduates, mania risk, as measured with the Hypomanic Personality Scale was related to lifetime creativity and creative personality, but not to performance on the insight task. Motivational traits appeared to mediate the links of mania risk with both lifetime creative accomplishments and self-rated creativity. The study relied on a cross-sectional design and a convenience sample. Future studies would benefit from exploring motivation as a positive aspect of manic vulnerability that may foster greater creativity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Applying the neuroscience of creativity to creativity training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onarheim, Balder; Friis-Olivarius, Morten

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how neuroscience in general, and neuroscience of creativity in particular, can be used in teaching "applied creativity" and the usefulness of this approach to creativity training. The article is based on empirical data and our experiences from the Applied Neuro...... in the ANC program is that the conceptualization of creativity is built on neuroscience, and a crucial aspect of the course is giving the students a thorough understanding of the neuroscience of creativity. Previous studies have reported that the conceptualization of creativity used in such training...... is of major importance for the success of the training, and we believe that the neuroscience of creativity offers a novel conceptualization for creativity training. Here we present pre/post-training tests showing that ANC students gained more fluency in divergent thinking (a traditional measure of trait...

  19. Using tracking software for writing instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sane M. Yagi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Writing is a complex skill that is hard to teach. Although the written product is what is often evaluated in the context of language teaching, the process of giving thought to linguistic form is fascinating. For almost forty years, language teachers have found it more effective to help learners in the writing process than in the written product; it is there that they could find sources of writing problems. Despite all controversy evoked by post-process approaches with respect to process writing, information technology has lately offered tools that can shed new light on how writing takes place. Software that can record keyboard, mouse, and screen activities is capable of unraveling mysteries of the writing process. Technology has given teachers and learners the option of examining the writing process as it unfolds, enabling them to diagnose strategy as well as wording problems, thus empowering teachers to guide learners individually in how to think about each of their trouble spots in the context of a specific product of writing. With these advances in information technology, metacognitive awareness and strategy training begin to acquire new dimensions of meaning. Technology lays open aspects of the writing process, offering unprecedented insight into creative text production as well. This paper attempts to explain how tracking software can influence writing instruction. It briefly examines the process and post-process approaches to assess their viability, explains the concept of tracking software, proposes methodology needed for the adoption of this technology, and then discusses the pedagogical implications of these issues.

  20. Where love flies free: women, home, and writing in Cook County Jail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Ann Folwell

    2005-01-01

    Several definitions of "home," drawn from dozens provided by the Oxford Dictionary of the English Language, underscore how a large urban county jail becomes many forms of home for the women detainees there. Drawing on the women's poetry and the mechanics of creative writing workshops facilitated by the author for the last seven years at Cook County Jail, this essay describes some of the realities of the criminal (in)justice system and how the women's writing becomes a way of writing against the grain of official discourse, thus altering certain definitions of this "home."

  1. Creativity and development of creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Nebřenská, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of my Bachelor's degree thesis is to analyse creativity and possibilities of development of creativity. The thesis is composed of nine chapters, each of them dealing with different aspect of creativity. Introductory chapter defines term creativity from different points of view as well problems connected with its defining. Then is provided an outline of historical concepts of creativity. Next part of text examines creative personality, deals with concept of creative personality, Gu...

  2. Writing case studies in information systems research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Blonk, H.C.

    Case study research can be reported in different ways. This paper explores the various ways in which researchers may choose to write down their case studies and then introduces a subsequent typology of writing case studies. The typology is based on a 2 x 2 matrix, resulting in four forms of writing

  3. The beautiful invisible creativity, imagination, and theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Vignale, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Challenging the image of theoretical physics as a dry discipline, The Beautiful Invisible shows that this highly abstract science is in fact teeming with beautiful concepts, and the task of imagining them demands profound creativity, just as creative as the work of poets or magical realist novelists such as Borges and Musil. "A good scientific theory is like a symbolic tale, an allegory of reality," writes Giovanni Vignale, as he uncovers the unexpected links between theoretical physics and artistic creativity. In engaging and at times poetic prose, and with ample quotations from many of the writers he admires, Vignale presents his own unorthodox accounts of fundamental theoretical concepts such as Newtonian mechanics, superconductivity, and Einstein's theory of relativity, illuminating their profound implications. Throughout, the author treats readers to glimpses of physics as "exercised in the still night, when only the moon rages." Indeed, as we delve behind now-familiar concepts such as "electron spin" an...

  4. A systematic review of creative thinking/creativity in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2013-11-01

    This systematic review aimed to identify the types of nursing course structure that promotes students' creative thinking and creativity. Systematic review. Five electronic databases: The British Nursing Index, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Scopus and Ovid Medline. The databases were systematically searched to identify studies that discussed the concept of creative thinking in nursing education or reported a strategy that improved students' creative thinking. Qualitative studies or studies that included qualitative data were included. After reading the full content of the included studies, key themes and concepts were extracted and synthesized. Eight studies were identified. Four main themes relating to the course structure in teaching creativity were developed: diversity learning, freedom to learn, learning with confidence and learning through group work. To promote creative thinking in nursing students, educators themselves need to be creative in designing courses that allow students to learn actively and convert thoughts into actions. Educators should balance course freedom and guidance to allow students to develop constructive and useful ideas. Confidence and group work may play significant roles in helping students to express themselves and think creatively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rethinking Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Despite more than half a century of psychological research on creativity we are still far from a clear understanding of the creative process, its antecedents and consequences and, most of all, the ways in which we can effectively support creativity. This is primarily due to a narrow focus...... on creative individuals isolated from culture and society. Rethinking Creativity proposes a fundamental review of this position and argues that creativity is not only a psychological but a sociocultural phenomenon. This edited volume aims to relocate creativity from inside individual minds to the material......, symbolic and social world of culture. It brings together eminent social and cultural psychologists who study dynamic, transformative and emergent phenomena, and invites them to conceptualise creativity in ways that depart from mainstream definitions and theoretical models existing in past and present...

  6. Affective creativity meets classic creativity in the scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchtold, Corinna M; Papousek, Ilona; Koschutnig, Karl; Rominger, Christian; Weber, Hannelore; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Fink, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The investigation of neurocognitive processes underlying more real-life creative behavior is among the greatest challenges in creativity research. In this fMRI study, we addressed this issue by investigating functional patterns of brain activity while participants were required to be creative in an affective context. Affective creativity was assessed in terms of individual's inventiveness in generating alternative appraisals for anger-evoking events, which has recently emerged as a new ability concept in cognitive reappraisal research. In addition, a classic divergent thinking task was administered. Both creativity tasks yielded strong activation in left prefrontal regions, indicating their shared cognitive processing demands like the inhibition of prepotent responses, shifting between different perspectives and controlled memory retrieval. Regarding task-specific differences, classic creative ideation activated a characteristic divergent thinking network comprising the left supramarginal, inferior temporal, and inferior frontal gyri. Affective creativity on the other hand specifically recruited the right superior frontal gyrus, presumably involved in the postretrieval monitoring of reappraisal success, and core hubs of the default-mode network, which are also implicated in social cognition. As a whole, by taking creativity research to the realm of emotion, this study advances our understanding of how more real-life creativity is rooted in the brain. Hum Brain Mapp 39:393-406, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. DEVELOP CREATIVE EMPLOYEES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    THAT SOME MANAGERS MUST BE ABLE TO HELP EMPLOYEES DEVELOP OR APPLY CREATIVITY. IN THIS CONFERENCE PAPER WE WILL ANALYSE A CASE STUDY IN ORDER TO PRODUCE A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK FOR IDENTIFYING WHEN AND HOW EMPLOYEES BECOME CREATIVE AT WORK. AN ESSENTIAL ASPECT OF THIS CONFERENCE PAPER WILL BE ANALYZING......PREVIOUS STUDIES (e.g. Hertel, 2015) HAS SHOWN THAT SOME CLEANING INDUSTRIES ARE ACTUALLY REQUIRING CREATIVE EMPLOYEES. HUMAN BEINGS ARE (c.f. Richards, 2010) BY DEFINITION CREATIVE BUT NOT ALL EMPLOYEES ARE USED TO OR ACTUALLY ALLOWED TO APPLY CREATIVITY IN EVERYDAY ORGANIZATIONAL LIFE. THIS MEANS...... THE CREATIVITY PRODUCED BY EMPLOEES. ANALYZING THE CREATIVITY PRODUCED WILL HELP US DEVELOP A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING HOW CREATIVE THE EMPLOYEES ACTUALLY BECOMES....

  8. [Creativity and Character Traits of University Students: Transversal Association Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Hernando; Sánchez, Ricardo

    2012-06-01

    This study was carried out to assess the relationship between character traits and creativity in a sample of students from a public university in Bogotá. A random sample of 157 students from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. The two instruments used for measuring character traits and creativity were the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE) and the Abbreviated Torrance Test for Adults (ATTA). Additional information about gender, psychopathological antecedents, current academic period and academic average have been recorded. Robust regression methods have been used to analyze the relationship between creativity and character traits. Creativity and narcissistic traits were associated. In a multivariate model, other variables showing a relationship with creativity were found, i.e., male gender, mental illness family antecedents, number of academic periods completed, and a high academic average. Relationship between creativity and narcissistic traits had not been reported in previous. Longitudinal studies using more accurate scales should be undertaken to determine the validity of these findings. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Science into art: A study of the creative process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchant, M. [Cosumnes River Coll., Folsom Lake Center, CA (United States); Sesko, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-03-14

    Objective was to examine the creative process, demonstrated by 5 student participants in a class at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA, from the germ of the creative idea through the final creative product. The students, drawn from classes sponsored by LLNL, were assigned the problem of representing ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, in a graphic, artistic, or multimedia product. As a result of this study, it was discovered that the process of creativity with these students was not linear in nature, nor did it strictly follow the traditional creativity 5-step schema of preparation, incubation, insight, evaluation, and elaboration. Of particular interest were several emergent themes of the creative process: spontaneous use of metaphor to describe the Laboratory; a general lack of interest in ``school`` science or mathematics by the American art students; a well developed sense of conscience; and finally, the symbolism inherent in the repeated use of a single artistic element. This use of the circle revealed a continuity of thinking and design perhaps related to the idealistic bias mentioned above.

  10. A correlational and predictive study of creativity and personality of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz de Acedo Baquedano, María Teresa; Sanz de Acedo Lizarraga, María Luisa

    2012-11-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the relationship between creativity and personality, to identify what personality variables better predict creativity, and to determine whether significant differences exist among them in relation to gender. The research was conducted with a sample of 87 students at the Universidad Pública de Navarra, Spain. We administered the Creative Intelligence Test (CREA), which provides a cognitive measure for creativity and the Situational Personality Questionnaire (SPQ), which is composed of 15 personality features. Positive and significant correlations between creativity and independence, cognitive control, and tolerance personality scales were found. Negative and significant correlations between creativity and anxious, dominant, and aggressive personalities were also found. Moreover, four personality variables that positively predicted creativity (efficacy, independence, cognitive control, and integrity-honesty) and another four that negatively predicted creativity (emotional stability, anxiety, dominance, and leadership) were identified. The results did not show significant differences in creativity and personality in relation to gender, except in self-concept and in social adjustment. In conclusion, the results from this study can potentially be used to expand the types of features that support creative personalities.

  11. Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies: Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. Aesthetic-Receptive and Critical-Creative in Appreciative Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titin Setiartin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Reading is a process of aesthetically appreciative receptive to emphasize critical-creative reading activities. Metacognitively students understand, address any and explore the idea of the author in the text. Students responded, criticize, and evaluate the author's ideas in the text. At this stage, students can construct their post read text into other forms (new text. The aim of this strategy equips students to understand the meaning of the story, explore ideas, responding critically, and creatively pouring backstory idea. Reading strategies aesthetically-critical-creative receptive grabbed cognitive, effective, and psychomotor toward literacy critical reading and creative writing. Read appreciative included into the activities of reading comprehension. This activity involves the sensitivity and ability to process aesthetically-receptive reading and critical-creative. Readers imagination roam the author to obtain meaningful understanding and experience of reading. Some models of reading comprehension proposed experts covering the steps before reading, when reading, and after reading. At that stage to enable students after reading thinking abilities. Activities that can be done at this stage, for example, examine the back story, retell, make drawings, diagrams, or maps the concept of reading, as well as making a road map that describes the event. Other activities that can be done is to transform our student's text stories through reinforcement form illustrated stories into comic book form, for example (transliteration.

  13. Bounded Creativity: Understanding the Restrictions on Creative Work in Advertising Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Anderson Romeiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The theme of creativity has gained prominence among practitioners and academics, and the emergence of creative industries, which combine creativity and commercial logic, has rendered the topic even more relevant. Creativity is frequently associated with the existence of flexible organizational structures and organizational cultures that favor autonomy and freedom of action. However, organizations commonly impose limits on the actions of creative professionals because of the timescales, budgets, and business and customer demands inherent to the organizational context. Knowledge of creativity in academia has advanced considerably in recent decades. However, empirical studies investigating the restrictions imposed on creative work in organizations are lacking. This study addresses this gap in the literature. Our objective was to investigate creativity within advertising agencies, a creative industry sector. The results reveal that creativity in such environments is marked by collective work, conditioned by time pressures for performing tasks, and influenced by the tension that originates from the interaction between two dimensions: the search for originality and the need for acceptance. On the basis of this research, we propose the concept of bounded creativity, which reflects the weakening of the creative experience in organizations.

  14. Classroom Writing Environments and Children's Early Writing Skills: An Observational Study in Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyi; Hur, Jinhee; Diamond, Karen E.; Powell, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the classroom writing environment in 31 Head Start classrooms, and explored the relations between the writing environment, children's (N = 262) name-writing, and children's letter knowledge using pathway analysis. Our analyses showed that Head Start classrooms provided opportunities (i.e., writing materials and teachers'…

  15. The assessment of creativity in creativity/psychopathology research - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, E; Sabbe, B; De Hert, M

    2014-01-01

    The possible link between creativity and psychopathology has been a long time focus of research up to the present day. However, this research is hampered by methodological problems, especially the definition and assessment of creativity. This makes interpretation and comparison of studies difficult and possibly accounts for the contradictory results of this research. In this systematic review of the literature, research articles in the field of creativity and psychopathology were searched for creativity assessment tools. The tools used in the collected articles are presented and discussed. The results indicate that a multitude of creativity assessment tools were used, that many studies only used one tool to assess creativity and that most of these tools were only used in a limited number of studies. A few assessment tools stand out by a more frequent use, also outside psychopathological research, and more solid psychometric properties. Most scales used to evaluate creativity have poor psychometric properties. The scattered methodology to assess creativity compromises the generalizability and validity of this research. The field should creatively develop new validated instruments.

  16. Exploration of student's creativity by integrating STEM knowledge into creative products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayasari, Tantri; Kadarohman, Asep; Rusdiana, Dadi; Kaniawati, Ida

    2016-02-01

    Creativity is an important capability that should be held to competitive standards in the 21st century in entering the era of information and knowledge. It requires a creative generation that is able to innovate to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex future. This study examines the student's creativity level by integrating STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) knowledge to make creative products in renewable energy (solar energy). Total respondents in this study were 29 students who take applied science course. This research used qualitative and quantitative method (mixed methods), and used "4P" dimension of creativity to assess student's creativity level. The result showed a creative product is influenced by STEM knowledge that can support student's creativity while collaborating an application of knowledge, skills, and ability to solve daily problems associated with STEM.

  17. Brain structure links everyday creativity to creative achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenfeng; Chen, Qunlin; Tang, Chaoying; Cao, Guikang; Hou, Yuling; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Although creativity is commonly considered to be a cornerstone of human progress and vital to all realms of our lives, its neural basis remains elusive, partly due to the different tasks and measurement methods applied in research. In particular, the neural correlates of everyday creativity that can be experienced by everyone, to some extent, are still unexplored. The present study was designed to investigate the brain structure underlying individual differences in everyday creativity, as measured by the Creative Behavioral Inventory (CBI) (N=163). The results revealed that more creative activities were significantly and positively associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the regional premotor cortex (PMC), which is a motor planning area involved in the creation and selection of novel actions and inhibition. In addition, the gray volume of the PMC had a significant positive relationship with creative achievement and Art scores, which supports the notion that training and practice may induce changes in brain structures. These results indicate that everyday creativity is linked to the PMC and that PMC volume can predict creative achievement, supporting the view that motor planning may play a crucial role in creative behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Story Starters on the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas. A Creative Writing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Steve; Henrich, Jean

    Designed to supplement an established language arts and social studies program, this books deals with the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas of Latin America. All of the "Story Starter" books are intended to give a variety of vocabulary and story ideas to help with the writing process. Each of the books is divided into four main sections: (1) an…

  19. [The facets of creativity in the light of bipolar mood alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakács, Réka

    2018-01-30

    The link between creativity, as the highest expression form of human achievement, and bipolar disorder came into focus of scientific investigations and research. Accomplished writers, composers and visual artists show a substantially higher rate of affective disorders, prodominantly bipolar mood disorders, comparing to the general population. Then again, patients afflicted with bipolar II subtype (hypomania and depression), as well as persons presenting the mildest form of bipolar mood swings (cyclothymia) possess higher creative skills. It evokes therefore that certain forms and mood states of bipolar disorder, notably hypomania might convey cognitive, emotional/affective, and motivational benefits to creativity. The aim of this paper is to display expression forms of creativity (writing, visual art, scientific work) as well as productivity (literary and scientific work output, number of artworks and exhibitions, awards) in the light of clinically diagnosed mood states at an eminent creative individual, treated for bipolar II disorder. Analysing the affective states, we found a striking relation between hypomanic episodes and visual artistic creativity and achievement, as well as scientific performance, whereas mild-moderate depressed mood promoted literary work. Severe depression and mixed states were not associated with creative activities, and intriguingly, long-term stabilised euthymic mood, exempted from marked affective lability, is disadvantageous regarding creativity. It seems, thereby, that mood functions as a sluice of creativity. Nevertheless, it is likely that there is a complex interaction between bipolar mood disorder spectrum and psychological factors promoting creativity, influenced also by individual variability due to medication, comorbid conditions, and course of disorder.

  20. Copy-writing Post-Soviet Russia. Viktor Pelevin's work in Postcolonial Terms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordenbos, Boris; Brouwer, S

    2008-01-01

    The copywriters and creatives in Viktor Pelevin's novel Generation "II" (1999) both 'copy' and 'write' Russian identity. Through advertising texts, video scripts, and written scenario's for Russia's stage-set democracy, the commercial elite makes Russia into a superficial and virtual copy of 'the

  1. Peer Evaluation in CMC Learning Environment and Writing Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mellati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Peer evaluation and technology-based instruction as the various domains of language teaching perspectives might affect language development. Group work in a technology-based environment might be more successful when learners are involved in developing the assessment process particularly peer assessment. This study investigated the effectiveness of peer evaluation in technology-based language environment and its effects on English writing ability. To reach this goal, 70 Iranian learners were participated in English language writing context. They were divided into two groups, one group assigned to CMC (Computer-Mediated Communication language learning context and the other assigned to a traditional learning environment. Both groups were encouraged to evaluate their classmates’ writing tasks. In addition, interviews were conducted with two learners. Comparing these two groups provides comprehensive guidelines for teachers as well as curriculum designers to set adjusted writing language environment for more effective and creative language teaching and learning. E-collaboration classroom tasks have high intrinsic motivation as well as significant effects on learners’ outcomes. Cooperative tasks specifically in technology-based environment lead learners to group working and consequently group learning. Computer-Mediated Communication is meaningful, especially in contexts in which teachers stimulate group work activities.

  2. 8. ’How Women Should Write’: Russian Women’s Writing in the Nineteenth Century

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenholm, Arja; Savkina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    The question of how to write about women in Russian literature of the nineteenth-century can be solved in various ways. We can add women writers into literary history, or we can try to write a separate women’s history with the aim of identifying fields and genres where women’s presence seems to be obvious, as did Barbara Heldt. We can also look for the specificity, originality and independence of women’s creativity and discuss women’s writing within various models, which follow not the paradi...

  3. Being, Flow and Knowledge in Maori Arts Education: Assessing Indigenous Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Rawiri; Hynds, Anne S.; Phillips, Hazel; Rameka, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    This article reflects on issues of Indigenous creativity in Maori arts education, along with what we see as problematic tensions of the assessment of intangible elements. Our writing is motivated by a desire to start a global dialogue on Indigenous/Maori epistemologies, pedagogies and ontologies, and the contradictions and tensions that threaten…

  4. IMPLICITE THEORIES OF CREATIVITY: CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Kankaras

    Full Text Available In this work we analyzed laypersons’ implicit theories of creativity in twodifferent national cultures: Serbia (N=257 and the United States of America(N=255. Relying on previous works in this field, we have constructed aquestionnaire comprised of 52 indicative and 36 contra-indicative personalcharacteristic which were rated by respondents on a 5-point scale on criteria of theircreativity and desirability. Results show that both groups have similar conceptionsof a creative person, which they see as an energetic, self-confident individual, giftedwith creative talents and exceptional intellectual abilities, with profoundemotionality and brightness. The main difference between the two groups is thatrespondents from Serbia, contrary to their American counterparts, do not perceivecharacteristics which reflect obedience to social norms as a contra-indication tocreativity. Respondents have mostly seen creative attributes as desirable, althoughthere is a number of characteristics that are rated differently in terms of theircreativity and desirability. These results confirm that creativity and desirability aretwo distinct concepts and indicate positive view of creativity as a phenomenon andcreative person as such.

  5. Product creativity assessment of innovations: considering the creative process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsdóttir, Dagný; Onarheim, Balder; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    in creativity research, while the role of consumer’s knowledge of the creative process behind the product is fairly unexplored. In this paper, we present an empirical study investigating whether providing information about a complex development process could amplify consumer’s perception of product creativity......Creativity is a critical component that feeds into all stages of innovation and design processes by promoting inspiration, ideation, and implementation of ideas, revealing the need for thorough research to support design creativity. Assessment of product creativity is a reoccurring topic....... Does storytelling about the process contribute to amplifying creativity ratings? What form of storytelling is needed to make an impact? Results from 134 respondents showed a small but not significant amplifying effect from the additional process information; however, an important learning can be drawn...

  6. Distributed creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    This book challenges the standard view that creativity comes only from within an individual by arguing that creativity also exists ‘outside’ of the mind or more precisely, that the human mind extends through the means of action into the world. The notion of ‘distributed creativity’ is not commonly...... used within the literature and yet it has the potential to revolutionise the way we think about creativity, from how we define and measure it to what we can practically do to foster and develop creativity. Drawing on cultural psychology, ecological psychology and advances in cognitive science......, this book offers a basic framework for the study of distributed creativity that considers three main dimensions of creative work: sociality, materiality and temporality. Starting from the premise that creativity is distributed between people, between people and objects and across time, the book reviews...

  7. [Creativity and bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maçkalı, Zeynep; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Oral, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder has been an intriguing topic since ancient times. Early studies focused on describing characteristics of creative people. From the last quarter of the twentieth century, researchers began to focus on the relationship between mood disorders and creativity. Initially, the studies were based on biographical texts and the obtained results indicated a relationship between these two concepts. The limitations of the retrospective studies led the researchers to develop systematic investigations into this area. The systematic studies that have focused on artistic creativity have examined both the prevalence of mood disorders and the creative process. In addition, a group of researchers addressed the relationship in terms of affective temperaments. Through the end of the 90's, the scope of creativity was widened and the notion of everyday creativity was proposed. The emergence of this notion led researchers to investigate the associations of the creative process in ordinary (non-artist) individuals. In this review, the descriptions of creativity and creative process are mentioned. Also, the creative process is addressed with regards to bipolar disorder. Then, the relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder are evaluated in terms of aforementioned studies (biographical, systematic, psychobiographical, affective temperaments). In addition, a new model, the "Shared Vulnerability Model" which was developed to explain the relationship between creativity and psychopathology is introduced. Finally, the methodological limitations and the suggestions for resolving these limitations are included.

  8. ADVERTISING BETWEEN RULES AND CREATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina SUSANU

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Where would the world be without advertising? Stuart Henderson Britt strongly believed in it. Hesaid: “Doing business without advertising is like winking at a girl in the dark. You know what youare doing, but she doesn’t.” The work reviews the evolution of advertising, highlighting theuncontestable part played by it within organizations and society in general and it focuses on anessential element of it, that is the advertising print. The purpose of this paperwork is to highlight thenecessary rules for the making of a quality print, with the help of a comparative study on prints ofeight organizations. The print represents an exercise of writing and design, in words and images, fortransmitting the advertising message. The fulfillment of this task depends on the perspicacity,imagination and the creativity of the maker.

  9. Jawi Writing in Malay Archipelago Manuscript: A General Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Harun Makmur

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jawi writing is the main form of writing in various manuscripts recovered around the Archipelago, especially during the early arrival of Islam. These manuscripts are found to record history, art, culture, language, social, as well as ancient knowledge. The usage of Jawi writings had covered a number of calligraphy which are high in value with deep philosophical meaning, are full with creative notion as well as countless of patterns that went along with the call to Islam around the Archipelago in a relatively short period of time. The development of Jawi writing had been immortalized in various genres such as books, manuscripts and letters written by individual writers and in groups as a local way of living. This writing was also introduced through a long process using certain methods of writing and reading, and kept as individual as well as institutional collections all around the Archipelago. This article is focused in various manuscripts that not only were exclusively used as learning and teaching aids, but were also garnished as beautiful symbols and philosophical Islamic art that deserves a high degree of honour. This article’s objective is to deeply analyze the usage of this writing from manuscripts found around the Archipelago as a proof on the importance of this form of writing. The methodology of this article is library study, through a number of theories and methods. The implication of this article is hoped to form a certain standard as well as its own identity for the local society through their acceptance of this writing form, especially during the early arrival of Islam in the Archipelago thus deemed as a national treasure.

  10. Empirical Study on the Creative Accounting Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cernusca Lucian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the accounting professionals’ point of view as opposed to the students and master students’ one, regarding the creative accounting phenomenon existence and manifestation forms. In order to accomplish this objective, there has been used the poll/investigation, as a research method and the questionnaire, as a research instrument. Within the study, there is suggested the testing of more hypotheses that contribute to the clarifying of the aspects wished to be analyzed through the research. These hypotheses’ acceptance or rejection is based on the „chi-square“ (Karl Pearson statistical test and rank ordering method. Trying to elaborate a global conclusion of the questionnaire, there could be noticed the fact that over 50% from the questioned accounting students are not tempted to use the creative accounting practices and techniques in order to optimize the taxation without breaking the actual law regulations. At the opposite side, more than a half from the questioned accounting professionals would use these practices without breaking the law regulations that lead to the taxation’s optimization. The creative accounting has a negative connotation if the accurate image of the financial position and of the performance is not targeted because it represents the essential factor for elaborating and grounding the accounting policies. However, the positive side of the creative accounting is not excluded, given that one appeals to the „fair“ professional judgment of the accounting professionals and to the good faith of managers.

  11. An Exploratory Study of Creativity, Personality and Schooling Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Noémi; Tavani, Jean-Louis; Beasançon, Maud

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the link between schooling achievement and creativity scores, controlling for personality traits and other individual characteristics. Our study is based on field data collected in a secondary school situated in a Parisian suburb. Four scores of creativity were measured on 9th graders. Verbal divergent thinking negatively predicts…

  12. Creativity and Problem Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving...... approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools....

  13. Creative Self-Efficacy Development and Creative Performance over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Pamela; Farmer, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Building from an established framework of self-efficacy development, this study provides a longitudinal examination of the development of creative self-efficacy in an ongoing work context. Results show that increases in employee creative role identity and perceived creative expectation from supervisors over a 6-month time period were associated…

  14. Creativity and borderline personality disorder: evidence from a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutgeb, Verena; Ille, Rottraut; Wabnegger, Albert; Schienle, Anne; Schöggl, Helmut; Weber, Bernhard; Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Fink, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the history, various examples of eminent creative people suffering from mental disorders along with some empirical research reports strengthened the idea of a potential link between creativity and psychopathology. This study investigated different facets of psychometrically determined creativity in 20 females diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) relative to 19 healthy female controls. In addition, group differences in grey matter (GM) were examined. Behavioural findings revealed no significant differences between the BPD group and healthy controls with respect to verbal and figural-graphic creative task performance and creativity-related personality characteristics. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed a distinct pattern of GM reductions in the BPD group (relative to controls) in a network of brain regions closely associated with various cognitive and emotional functions (including the bilateral orbital inferior frontal gyri and the left superior temporal gyrus), partly overlapping with creativity-related brain regions. Correlation analyses moreover revealed that in the BPD group GM reductions in the orbital parts of the inferior and middle frontal gyri were associated with lower levels of creativity. This study provides no indications in favour of the putative link between creativity and psychopathology, as sometimes reported in the literature.

  15. Creativity in Medical Learning: A direction-finding study of junior hospital doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Talbot

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In a questionnaire study of creativity, the author has assessed the teaching and clinical practice of medical teachers, as observed by their students. The study has taken some preliminary steps to assess the place of creativity in postgraduate medical learning in the United Kingdom. Junior doctors were asked to compare their ‘best’ teacher with their ‘worst’ utilising a semantic differential scale and questions derived from Torrance’s definitions of creativity. The response rate was 81 (56.25% of 144 junior hospital doctors, in whose view, ‘best’ teachers showed greater creative behaviour as evidenced by significantly higher creativity scores on the majority of parameters (p<0.0001.

  16. K-11 students’ creative thinking ability on static fluid: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, I. U.; Muslim; Hasanah, L.; Samsudin, A.

    2018-05-01

    Creative thinking is one of the fundamental components of 21st-century education that needs to be possessed and developed in students. Thus, the students have the ability to find many alternative solutions to solve problems in physics learning. The study aimed at providing the students’ creative thinking ability on Static Fluid. A case study has been implemented through a single case, namely embedded design. Participants in this study are 27 K-11 students. The instrument utilized is Test for Creative Thinking-Static Fluid (TCT-SF) which has been validated by the experts. The result shows that 10.74 (approximately 35.8%) of the maximum scores. In conclusion, students’ creative thinking ability on Static Fluid is still stumpy, hence, it is needed to develop creative thinking ability in K-11 students’ context.

  17. UWE: Engaging with industry, creatively [case study

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Professional practice and enterprise modules along with a graduate placement scheme prepare design and media students for employability in the creative sector.\\ud \\ud Responding to professional challenges facing graduates and UWE’s Employability Agenda, the Faculty of Creative Arts created an innovative senior academic post specialising in Employability and Creative Industry Liaison in 2007. Senior lecturer Adrienne Noonan works with Communication Design and Media courses on employability, te...

  18. Development of Creative Behavior Observation Form: A Study on Validity and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Zeynep; Ömeroglu, Esra

    2018-01-01

    This study, Creative Behavior Observation Form was developed to assess creativity of the children. While the study group on the reliability and validity of Creative Behavior Observation Form was being developed, 257 children in total who were at the ages of 5-6 were used as samples with stratified sampling method. Content Validity Index (CVI) and…

  19. Creativity and problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Victor Valqui Vidal

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools.

  20. Re-writing the Script: Representations of Transgender Creativity in Contemporary Young Adult Fiction and Television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbury, Kate

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The transgender, gender-atypical or intersex protagonist challenges normative assumptions and expectations about gender, identity and sexuality. This article argues that contemporary transgender-themed young adult fiction and television uses the theme of creativity or the creative achievement script to override previously negative representations of adolescent transgender subjectivities. I consider three English-language novels and one television series for young adults and use script theory to analyse these four texts, each of which has an optimistic ending. The television series, Glee (2009- , is now in its sixth season and therefore has not yet formally concluded. This more recent selection of texts which date from 2011 validate young adult transgender experience and model diversity and acceptance. Cris Beam’s I Am J (2011 and Kirstin Cronn-Mills’ Beautiful Music for Ugly Children (2012, both originally published in the United States, depict female to male transitions. Alyssa Brugman’s Alex as Well (2013, originally published in Australia, foregrounds the experience of an intersex teenager, Alex, raised as a boy, but who, at the age of fourteen, decides she is female. Glee introduced the transgender character Unique in 2012, and she continues to be a central member of the New Directions choir. The Swedish graphic novel, Elias Ericson’s Åror (2013, includes two transgender characters who enact the creative achievement script and fall in love with each other. In other words, Ericson’s graphic novel goes further than the English-language texts to date. Collectively, these transgender, gender-atypical or intersex protagonists and central characters assert their individual agency and creative sense of self. The transgender character’s particular creativity ultimately secures a positive sense of self.

  1. School to Work: Using Active Learning to Teach Business Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmas, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    To succeed as tomorrow's workers in the knowledge society of the new century--a world characterized by ceaseless change, boundless knowledge and endless doubt, today's business writing students must develop the skills and traits needed to become creative problem-solvers, flexible team-players and risk-taking life-time learners (Bereiter, 2002a).…

  2. Creativity and Creative Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

  3. Mind the Gap: An attempt to bridge computational and neuroscientific approaches to study creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraint eWiggins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is the hallmark of human cognition, yet scientific understanding of creative processes is limited. However, there is increasing interest in revealing the neural correlates of human creativity. Though many of these studies, pioneering in nature, help demystification of creativity, but the field is still dominated by popular beliefs in associating creativity with right brain thinking, divergent thinking, altered states and so on (Dietrich and Kanso, 2010 . In this article, we discuss a computational framework for creativity based on Baars' global workspace theory (Baars, 1988 enhanced with mechanisms based on information theory. Next we propose a neurocognitive architecture of creativity with a strong focus on various facets (i.e., unconscious thought theory, mind wandering, spontaneous brain states of un/pre-conscious brain responses. Our principal argument is that pre-conscious creativity happens prior to conscious creativity happens prior to conscious creativity and the proposed computational model may provide a mechanism by which this transition is managed. This integrative approach, albeit unconventional, will hopefully stimulate future neuroscientific studies of the inscrutable phenomenon of creativity.

  4. Rethinking Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , symbolic and social world of culture. It brings together eminent social and cultural psychologists who study dynamic, transformative and emergent phenomena, and invites them to conceptualise creativity in ways that depart from mainstream definitions and theoretical models existing in past and present...... and the lives of those around them. It will be of key interest to both social and cultural psychologists, as well as to creativity researchers and those who, as part of their personal or professional life, try to understand creativity and develop creative forms of expression....

  5. Technical Writing Redesign and Assessment: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Gaye Bush

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare scores on writing assignments from traditional, fully online courses in technical writing to pilot, hybrid courses at a southern university. A total of 232 students' assignments were compared in this study. All writing assignments were scored by six trained instructors of English using the same five point…

  6. Importance of Technical Writing in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2010-12-01

    It is important to recognize technical writing as a creative vehicle to communicate with the audience. It is indeed possible to motivate a reluctant learner by encouraging student writing combined with reading and research. John Kosakowski is of the opinion that writing assignments actually help to strengthen the self-confidence of a lethargic learner (Kosakowski, 1998). Researchers in the area of cognitive science and educational psychology are also of the opinion that encouraging students to writing actually helps the learners cultivate a positive attitude toward the subject matter in question. One must also recognize the fact that the students are indeed very reluctant to devote time and effort that requiress descriptive long writing assignments. One has to be more creative towards assignments that utilize problem-solving pedagogy (Saxe, 1988; Senge, 1990; Sims, 1995; Young & Young, 1999). Education World writer Gloria Chaika (Chaika, 2000) states that “Talent is important, but practice creates the solid base that allows that unique talent to soar. Like athletes, writers learn by doing. Good writing requires the same kind of dedicated practice that athletes put in. Young writers often lack the support they need to practice writing and develop their talent to the fullest, though.” Writing assignments have several key elements and the author has outlined below, some ideas for conducting assessment. 1. Identification of a purpose. 2. Focusing on the subject matter. 3. Attracting the attention of audience. 4. Format, flow and familiarity of the structure. 5. Observation of formality, voice and tone. 6. Promotion of critical thinking. 7. Importance of Logic and evidence-based reasoning. 8. Follows a realistic time line. 9. Process and procedure are properly outlined. References: Barr, R. B., & Tagg, J. (1995, November/December). From teaching to learning: A new paradigm for undergraduate education. Change: The Magazine of Higher Education, 13-24. Cox, M. D

  7. The Openhearted Audience: Ten Authors Talk about Writing for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, Virginia, Ed.

    This book contains comments by ten authors of children's literature concerning the influences they feel account for the particular qualities that define their books and about creative writing and children's literature in general. In the first article, P. L. Travers stresses the importance of fairy tales, myths, and legends in shaping her work,…

  8. Metacognition as a Moderator of Creative Ideation and Creative Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puryear, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent theoretical work has called for exploration of the moderating effects of cognitive factors on the relationship between creative ideation and creative production. The Cognitive-Creative Sifting model suggests skills in processing and transforming information influence the association. This study used the Runco Ideational Behavior Scale,…

  9. Schizotypal traits in painters: Relations with intelligence, creativity and creative productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Međedović Janko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present research we explored the presence of schizotypal traits in painters. Furthermore, the relations of schizotypy and creativity-related variables (intelligence, creativity and creative productivity were analyzed. Study participants were divided into the criterion (132 students of art academy and art high school and control group (119 psychology students and members of grammar school. Two hypotheses were set: 1 schizotypal traits are more pronounced in painters than in control group; 2 schizotypy is more closely associated with the creativitylinked variables in the criterion than in control group. Schizotypy was operationalized by Disintegration construct and measured via DELTA 10 inventory. Intelligence was assessed by Advanced Progressive Matrices-18; creativity was measured by the same labeled scale from HEXACO-PI-R inventory and creative productivity was explored by a set of questions regarding the frequency of creative behavior. Results showed that Magical thinking, Enhanced awareness, Somatoform Dysregulation, Perceptual distortions and Social anhedonia were the schizotypal traits which were more pronounced in painters as compared to the control group. Factor analyses performed in each group separately revealed a latent component loaded both with schizotypal traits, creativity and creative productivity, but only in the group of painters: schizotypy and creativity were not so closely related in the control group. Thus, the study hypotheses were largely confirmed. Results provide a more detailed understanding of the relations between schizotypy and creativity.

  10. Emotional Creativity and Real-Life Involvement in Different Types of Creative Leisure Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Radek; Zahradnik, Martin; Kuška, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The role of emotional creativity in practicing creative leisure activities and in the preference of college majors remains unknown. This study aims to explore how emotional creativity measured by the Emotional Creativity Inventory (ECI; Averill, 1999) is interrelated with the real-life involvement in different types of specific creative leisure…

  11. THE BEHAVIOUR OF ROMANIAN ACCOUNTANTS FROM TIMIS COUNTY: CREATIVE OR NON-CREATIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Anca

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Creativity and innovation are two very trendy concepts for the current period which is characterized by a very difficult economic context. The creativity and the innovation usually stimulate the competitiveness of economic organizations. But what about creativity in the field of accounting? Are the accountants creative? Is creativity benefit for the quality of accounting information? The aim of our study is to review study the accounting literature and practical experience of Timis county organizations in order to create a picture of Timis county accountants’ behaviour. For the achievement of the proposed objectives the authors based their opinion on a research study by questionnaire realized at Timis county level.

  12. Managing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slavich, Barbara; Velikova, Silviya Svejenova

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at providing definitional clarity on creativity and a systematic understanding of its management in organizations. By drawing on the results of a content analysis of creativity definitions in 440 scholarly publications in the field of management between 1990 and 2014, this study...... clarifies how scholars in the management domain have defined the concept and identifies core categories shared by these definitions. It also brings together these conceptual categories into an integrative multilevel framework of relevance for managing creativity in organizations. The framework outlines...... a view of managing creativity, which involves managing interconnected processes as well as dualities, such as processes-outcomes, individuals-collectives, and permanent-temporary creativity units. Finally, it paves the way to new research frontiers for the domain....

  13. Different brain structures associated with artistic and scientific creativity: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Baoguo; Cao, Xiaoqing; Chen, Qunlin; Zhuang, Kaixiang; Qiu, Jiang

    2017-02-21

    Creativity is the ability to produce original and valuable ideas or behaviors. In real life, artistic and scientific creativity promoted the development of human civilization; however, to date, no studies have systematically investigated differences in the brain structures responsible for artistic and scientific creativity in a large sample. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), this study identified differences in regional gray matter volume (GMV) across the brain between artistic and scientific creativity (assessed by the Creative Achievement Questionnaire) in 356 young, healthy subjects. The results showed that artistic creativity was significantly negatively associated with the regional GMV of the supplementary motor area (SMA) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). In contrast, scientific creativity was significantly positively correlated with the regional GMV of the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) and left inferior occipital gyrus (IOG). Overall, artistic creativity was associated with the salience network (SN), whereas scientific creativity was associated with the executive attention network and semantic processing. These results may provide an effective marker that can be used to predict and evaluate individuals' creative performance in the fields of science and art.

  14. Creativity and Ethics: The Relationship of Creative and Ethical Problem-Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Michael D; Waples, Ethan P; Antes, Alison L; Brown, Ryan P; Connelly, Shane; Murphy, Stephen T; Devenport, Lynn D

    2010-02-01

    Students of creativity have long been interested in the relationship between creativity and deviant behaviors such as criminality, mental disease, and unethical behavior. In the present study we wished to examine the relationship between creative thinking skills and ethical decision-making among scientists. Accordingly, 258 doctoral students in the health, biological, and social sciences were asked to complete a measure of creative processing skills (e.g., problem definition, conceptual combination, idea generation) and a measure of ethical decision-making examining four domains, data management, study conduct, professional practices, and business practices. It was found that ethical decision-making in all four of these areas was related to creative problem-solving processes with late cycle processes (e.g., idea generation and solution monitoring) proving particularly important. The implications of these findings for understanding the relationship between creative and deviant thought are discussed.

  15. Richard Murphy: a life in writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Meihuizen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The Irish poet Richard Murphy published his autobiography “The kick: a life among writers” in 2003. From a slightly different perspective the subtitle of this work could be rewritten as “A life in writing” since it is an account of the agencies that moulded a life devoted to creative writing which forms the book’s essential impetus. The memoir is based on notebooks which Murphy kept throughout his life “to hold the scraps of verse, elusive images, dreams, desires and revelations” to be developed into poetry. Apart from contextualising his poetry by registering the relationships, circumstances and landscapes from which it germinated, Murphy also tells of the creative process itself and the personal poetics underlying this process. This article explores what is regarded as the central determining feature of Murphy’s identity as poet, namely the relationship between the creative self and a particular place, where the concept of “place” is seen as a cultural palimpsest which represents not only physical qualities, but also the shaping and development of the landscape through time according to a certain way of life.

  16. Schoolchildren’s Creative Abilities Development in the Course of Poetry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat'yana V. Petrovskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers some methodological aspects of the development of creative abilities of schoolchildren in the course of poetry study in elementary and primary schools. The development of creative and imaginative abilities and tropology of junior schoolchildren along with reading and artworks analysis is disclosed. The types of perception of poetic texts by children are studied. The work of teacher in the classes of the "Poetics" course, using study guides for the lower school is presented.The analysis of the studied data enabled to examine the problem of schoolchildren’s creative abilities development more thoroughly and to identify the possible prospects.

  17. The Risky Side of Creativity: Domain Specific Risk Taking in Creative Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Vaibhav; Hanoch, Yaniv; Hall, Stephen D.; Runco, Mark; Denham, Susan L.

    2017-01-01

    Risk taking is often associated with creativity, yet little evidence exists to support this association. The present article aimed to systematically explore this association. In two studies, we investigated the relationship between five different domains of risk taking (financial, health and safety, recreational, ethical and social) and five different measures of creativity. Results from the first (laboratory-based) offline study suggested that creativity is associated with high risk taking tendencies in the social domain but not the other domains. Indeed, in the second study conducted online with a larger and diverse sample, the likelihood of social risk taking was the strongest predictor of creative personality and ideation scores. These findings illustrate the necessity to treat creativity and risk taking as multi-dimensional traits and the need to have a more nuanced framework of creativity and other related cognitive functions. PMID:28217103

  18. The extensive writing. Teaching writing in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cassany Comas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Following the distinction between intensive and extensive reading, we introduce the extensive written tasks to promote the following learning objectives: 1 bringing writing closer to the learner’s personal life; 2 practicing the epistemic and communicative language functions; 3 giving the learner full responsibility for the creative act; 4 facilitating the development of cognitive processes, and 5 developing habits of written production in a variety of situations. As a consequence, extensive writing assignments produce longer texts, last longer, are self-directed by the learner-author, treat interdisciplinary topics and are not in the textbook. These tasks markedly differ from the more frequent written exercises in the classroom, which are teacher-led, contain shorter texts, work on executive or instrumental functions, and their correction is focused on spelling and grammar. We propose several educational tools in order to develop this type of tasks: portfolios (to save drafts, corrections and final versions of each text, formats (such as reading logs, lecture notes and laboratory protocols and contexts (common communicative tasks. We also discuss some basic parameters of extensive tasks, such as the length of the text, the use of several working sessions for text production, the practice of composition processes and the use of peer review, in pairs or teams.

  19. Indicators of creativity in a technology class: a case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teachers seem to lack the skills and knowledge needed to recognise when creativity is taking place. In this study we investigated how learners demonstrate creativity whilst engaging in the technological process employing a qualitative research strategy, with observation and focus group interviews as the methods of data ...

  20. The Creative Proteus Effect : How Self-Similarity, Embodiment, and Priming of Creative Stereotypes with Avatars Influences Creative Ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Alwin

    2017-01-01

    Creative ideation can be enhanced in 3D virtual environments by manipulating the appearance of a user’s avatar so that it primes a creative stereotype. However, not much is known about the factors that influence the effectiveness of using avatars to enhance creativity. In this study we investigate

  1. Writing in elementary school science: Factors that influence teacher beliefs and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Nicole J.

    Recent calls for scientifically literate citizens have prompted science educators to examine the roles that literacy holds in students' science learning processes. Although many studies have investigated the cognitive gains students acquire when they write in science, these writing-to-learn studies have typically been conducted with only middle and secondary school students. Few studies have explored how teachers, particularly elementary teachers, understand the use of writing in science and the factors that influence their science and writing lessons. This was a qualitative case study conducted in one suburban school with four elementary teachers. The purpose of this study was to understand: (a) how teachers' uses of and purposes for writing in science compared to that in English language arts; (b) the factors that drove teachers' pedagogical decisions to use writing in certain ways; (c) teachers' beliefs about science teaching and learning and its relation to how they used writing; (d) teachers' perceptions of students' writing abilities and its relation to how they used writing; and (e) teachers' views about how writing is used by scientists. Seven main findings resulted from this research. In summary, teachers' main uses of and purposes for writing were similar in science and English language arts. For much of the writing done in both subjects, teachers' expectations of students' writing were typically based on their general literacy writing skills. The teachers believed that scientific writing is factual, for the purpose of communicating about science, and is not as creative or "fun" as other types of writing. The teachers' pedagogical practices in science included teaching by experiences, reading, and the transmission of information. These practices were related to their understanding of scientific writing. Finally, additional factors drove the decisions teachers made regarding the use of writing in science, including time, knowledge of curriculum

  2. Exploring teachers views of creativity: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Shibazaki, Kagari; Marshall, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on creativity has focussed on what Balkin (1990) called ʻthe three ‘P’s of the creative equation’. Interviews were carried out with 12 music teachers. The two countries were selected as being appropriate representations of an ‘individualist’ and a ‘collectivist’ culture (Triandis, 1995). The study aimed to explore the extent to which the cultural ideology existing on a macro level, can impact on the beliefs and practices of teachers on a ‘micro’ level, in this instance the m...

  3. Playwright meets career coach : writing dialogues to promote awareness and self-direction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinekke Lengelle; dr. Frans Meijers

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we propose that writing dialogues in creative, expressive, and reflective ways can foster more awareness and self-direction among those who aim to start, build, or rescue their careers. In the first section of the chapter we sketch the societal issues for which narrative counselling

  4. General and Domain-Specific Contributions to Creative Ideation and Creative Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donggun An

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this study was to reexamine two views of creativity, one positing that there is a general creative capacity or talent and the other that creativity is domain-specific. These two views were compared by (a testing correlations among measures of domain-general and domain-specific creativity and (b examining how the general and the specific measures was each related to indices of knowledge, motivation, and personality. Participants were 147 college students enrolled in a foreign language course. Data were collected on participants’ domain knowledge, motivation, and creative personality, as well as four measures representing “General or Domain-Specific Creative Ideation” or “Creative Performance and Activity”. Results indicated that the four measures of creativity were correlated with one another, except for “General Performance and Activity” and “Domain-Specific Ideation.” A canonical correlation indicated that knowledge, motivation, and personality were significantly correlated with the four creativity measures (Rc = .49, p < .01. Multiple regressions uncovered particular relationships consistent with the view that creativity has both general and domain-specific contributions. Limitations, such as the focus on one domain, and future directions are discussed.

  5. Creativity Understandings, Evolution: from Genius to Creative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jūratė Černevičiūtė

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of creativity in the social sciencies became more complex with the course of time. The concepts of creative individual, creative process and environment are discussed. Looking at the environment, distinction was made on three levels: macro, meso and micro. The impact of environments on creativity is analyzed, focusing attention on the collective creativity as the positive micro-environmental factor for innovations. Insights are gained about the tendency to move from an exclusive, elite, narrow concept of creativity, measured by the creation of products and their abundance, towards a broader, democratic concept of everyday creativity of the most people. The conclusion is that the creative industries of the exceptional creativity of genius or talent and mysticism are gradually transformed to broader creativity as the governed system, emphasizing creativity links with internal elements of the system and with the social context.

  6. Literacy and teacher training: some reflections on reading and writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenise Sangoi Antunes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents reflections on reading and writing, from the research project “Literacy Lab: rethinking teacher training” which aims to establish exchanges between socially vulnerable schools and the Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM and contribute to the training of undergraduates in Pedagogy and Special Education, as well as the teachers of the schools involved. Adopting a qualitative methodology based on studies of Bogdan and Bicklen (1994, the project seeks to support the literacy process by proposing reflection on the current pedagogical practices in the early years of elementary school. The results show the existence of practices in elementary school which mostly ignore the creative ability of the students. It was concluded that this project has enhanced the relationship between initial and continuous training of teachers and practices of reading and writing.

  7. BIBLIOGRAPHY ON CREATIVITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Education.

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY LISTS MATERIAL ON VARIOUS ASPECTS OF CREATIVITY. APPROXIMATELY 50 UNANNOTATED REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED TO DOCUMENTS DATING FROM 1961 TO 1966. JOURNALS, BOOKS, AND REPORT MATERIALS ARE LISTED. SUBJECT AREAS INCLUDED ARE (1) IDENTIFICATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND MEASUREMENT OF CREATIVITY, (2) PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES OF CREATIVITY, (3)…

  8. Beyond Creativity Assessment: Comparing Methods and Identifying Consequences of Recognized Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsdóttir, Dagný; Onarheim, Balder

    2015-01-01

    Can people recognize and appreciate design creativity in products? It has previously been shown that creativity influences willingness to purchase products. Those results served as the inspiration for this study, however, it was of interest to investigate whether using adifferent research approach...... is outside the usual CAT frame. Despite the expansion of CAT a high interrater agreement existed for each attribute indicating that CAT was reliable. This study could, however, not reproduce the previous findings of a relationship between creativity and purchasability of design products. Aesthetic appeal...... would yield similar results. Thus the Consensual AssessmentTechnique (CAT) (Amabile, 1982) was adopted. Participants were asked to assess creativity level, technical advancement and aesthetic appeal, as required when applying CAT, adding purchasability to investigate appreciation of creativity, which...

  9. HUMOR STYLES, CREATIVE PERSONALITY TRAITS, AND CREATIVE THINKING IN A HONG KONG SAMPLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiao Dong; Hui, Anna Na

    2015-12-01

    Humor is found to be an essential element of creative thinking in Western culture. In Eastern culture, however, the relationship between creativity and humor is ambivalent. This study examined the relationship among humor styles, creative personality traits, and creative thinking abilities. A sample of 118 Chinese undergraduates in Hong Kong was recruited to complete the Humor Styles Questionnaire, the three Creative Personality subscales of the Chinese Personality Assessment Inventory-2 (CPAI-2), and the Verbal Test of the Wallach-Kogan Creativity Tests. Results show that humor styles are uncorrelated with creative thinking abilities of flexibility, fluency, and originality, but affiliative humor and aggressive humor are correlated with creative personality traits of novelty and diversity. A hierarchical multiple regression shows that both humor styles and creative personality traits of novelty and diversity account for non-significant variance on creative thinking abilities. These findings largely support a hypothesized non-association between humor styles and creative measures. They also pose a sharp contrast to findings obtained in the West, in which humor styles are typically correlated with both creative thinking abilities and creative personality traits.

  10. Vliv klasických postupů při nácviku dovednosti psaní na rozsah slovní zásoby ve srovnání s metodou psaní tvůrčího : The Influence of Classical Practices in Writing Skills Training on Vocabulary’s Extent Compared to the Creative Writing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Stárková

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with influence of creative writing on vocabulary’s extent in the written manifest of non-native speakers in compare with classical methods used in foreign language didactics. There are presented results of qualitative action research, probe, which was backed by Grant Agency of Charles University. Its respondents were 30 students of Czech as a foreign/second language levelled A2–B2 according to CEFR, from Charles University, Institute of Czech Studies. The respondents were divided into both two control and experimental groups. For analyzing the vocabulary extent, the Mistrík’s formula of repeated words Index was used and applied to the written works of the respondents. Next, the knowledge synonyms and antonyms was observed, on the entrance and final subtests. Probe’s result showed, that after using two different methods within one semester there was a comparable decrease of word’s rep, only half of the respondents, in both control and experimental groups I. In control group II, there was a slight decrease in rep, but experimental group II has a slight increase. The compare knowledge of synonyms and antonyms results that after using two different methods in both control and experimental groups causes increase, the growth was only in the control and experimental group I comparable, however. Due to similar research’s absence for Czech as a foreign/second language, there are briefly presented other researches on creative writing in foreign language tuition.

  11. Incremental effects of reward on creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, R; Rhoades, L

    2001-10-01

    The authors examined 2 ways reward might increase creativity. First, reward contingent on creativity might increase extrinsic motivation. Studies 1 and 2 found that repeatedly giving preadolescent students reward for creative performance in 1 task increased their creativity in subsequent tasks. Study 3 reported that reward promised for creativity increased college students' creative task performance. Second, expected reward for high performance might increase creativity by enhancing perceived self-determination and, therefore, intrinsic task interest. Study 4 found that employees' intrinsic job interest mediated a positive relationship between expected reward for high performance and creative suggestions offered at work. Study 5 found that employees' perceived self-determination mediated a positive relationship between expected reward for high performance and the creativity of anonymous suggestions for helping the organization.

  12. Exploring Creativity in Social Studies Education for Elementary Grades: Teachers' Opinions and Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucus, Sukran

    2018-01-01

    Creativity is the critical point to developing innovative and effective citizens and children in learning social studies. The purpose of this study is to explore how creativity is promoted in social studies classrooms for young children and to research teachers' opinions and interpretations of creativity in Turkish elementary schools. The study…

  13. The Effect of Creative Drama Activities Performed at the “Design Studies-1” Studio on Development of Creative Thinking Skills of Architecture Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent ARIDAĞ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is determining the effectiveness of teaching methods based on creative drama activities performed at the “Design Studies-1” studio on creative thinking and design skills. The research’s work group consisted of 67 students who attended the 15-week Design Studies-1 studio (45 female, 22 male. The research is a one-group pretest-posttest experimental design. The theoretical basis of the research is cognitive creativity. The practices stimulating the imagination and flexible thinking skills with the basis of creative drama were used as the creativity-improving techniques. Based on the assumption that creative thinking is teachable, the hypothesis that the “Design Studies-1” program conducted by the first researcher will improve the students’ creative thinking skills was accepted. The data were collected through Creative Thinking Tests (Form A and B, which was developed by Torrance (1974 and 1984 and whose Turkish version was composed by Aslan (1999, 2006. For the data analysis, SPSS 13 program was used. In data analysis, related group t-test and Mann-Whitney U statistical test were applied. The pretest and posttest scores mean of the students were compared and significant positive results were found in favor of posttest between the means of figural fluency, figural originality, abstractness of the titles, expressiveness of the titles, intrinsic visualization, liveliness of imagery, richness of imagery, fantasy, verbal fluency, verbal flexibility and verbal originality.

  14. My face, a window to communication: using creative design in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Elizabeth; Collins, Diane; Carey, Melissa

    2010-11-01

    Creative art as part of assessment in nursing is a powerful alternative to traditional methods of promoting engagement for students who have different learning styles, and who value engagement in creative activities. This paper describes an innovative assessment approach for first year nursing students which addressed the development of a beginning knowledge base in therapeutic communication as well as critical thinking and writing skills. Each student was asked to design a wearable mask to display an abstract interpretation of the therapeutic communication skills required as a nursing student, followed by a discussion about therapeutic nursing communication. Results from an evaluation of the assessment are described using Bigg's (1995) structure of observed learning outcome (SOLO) taxonomy. Seventy percent of students (n=35) found the new assessment to be an effective learning strategy. As a creative exercise, 82% (n=41) found the assessment to have engaged them at a personal level. More effort is needed for innovative assessment strategies to promote student engagement. Use of a creative assessment approach that incorporates art creation shows much promise in bridging the gap from a superficial understanding of concepts to an understanding characterised by deeper learning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mind the gap: an attempt to bridge computational and neuroscientific approaches to study creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Geraint A.; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is the hallmark of human cognition and is behind every innovation, scientific discovery, piece of music, artwork, and idea that have shaped our lives, from ancient times till today. Yet scientific understanding of creative processes is quite limited, mostly due to the traditional belief that considers creativity as a mysterious puzzle, a paradox, defying empirical enquiry. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in revealing the neural correlates of human creativity. Though many of these studies, pioneering in nature, help demystification of creativity, but the field is still dominated by popular beliefs in associating creativity with “right brain thinking”, “divergent thinking”, “altered states” and so on (Dietrich and Kanso, 2010). In this article, we discuss a computational framework for creativity based on Baars’ Global Workspace Theory (GWT; Baars, 1988) enhanced with mechanisms based on information theory. Next we propose a neurocognitive architecture of creativity with a strong focus on various facets (i.e., unconscious thought theory, mind wandering, spontaneous brain states) of un/pre-conscious brain responses. Our principal argument is that pre-conscious creativity happens prior to conscious creativity and the proposed computational model may provide a mechanism by which this transition is managed. This integrative approach, albeit unconventional, will hopefully stimulate future neuroscientific studies of the inscrutable phenomenon of creativity. PMID:25104930

  16. Craft Knowledge: Of Disciplinarity in Writing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that craft knowledge can provide a disciplinary rationale for writing studies. It draws from the ancient concepts of teche, phronesis, and the four causes of making and makes the case for a definition of disciplinary knowledge fitting for writing studies. The article concludes with a conceptual framework that can serve as a…

  17. Career writing as a dialogue about work experience : A recipe for luck readiness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lengelle, R.; Meyers, F.; Poell, R.F.; Geijsel, F.; Post, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we examined whether career writing—creative, expressive, and reflective writing—can increase luck readiness, which is the ability to respond and make use of (career) opportunities. Two 2-day writing courses were taught to third-year bachelor students, one before and one after work

  18. Career writing as a dialogue about work experience : a recipe for luck readiness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijke Post; Rob Poell; dr. Frans Meijers; Reinekke Lengelle; Femke Geijsel

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examined whether career writing—creative, expressive, and reflective writing—can increase luck readiness, which is the ability to respond and make use of (career) opportunities. Two 2-day writing courses were taught to third-year bachelor students, one before and one after work

  19. Career writing as a dialogue about work experience: A recipe for luck readiness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lengelle, R.; Meijers, F.; Poell, R.; Geijsel, F.; Post, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we examined whether career writing—creative, expressive, and reflective writing—can increase luck readiness, which is the ability to respond and make use of (career) opportunities. Two 2-day writing courses were taught to third-year bachelor students, one before and one after work

  20. Applied Creativity: The Creative Marketing Breakthrough Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of personal creativity in today's business environment, few conceptual creativity frameworks have been presented in the marketing education literature. The purpose of this article is to advance the integration of creativity instruction into marketing classrooms by presenting an applied creative marketing…

  1. Creativity in fashion design in Slovakia: the case study of Bratislava region

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf Pástor; Jana Parízková

    2013-01-01

    This paper is focused on creativity in the fashion design in Slovakia. The fashion design in Bratislava region was selected as one of the creative industry for our research. The aim of the paper is to analyze creativity and innovation activities between Slovak fashion designers. In the paper will be presented results from research carried out between Slovak fashion designers located in Bratislava region. The empirical work that provides the basis for this case study used a case study approach...

  2. An Empirical Review of Research Methodologies and Methods in Creativity Studies (2003-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Based on the data collected from 5 prestigious creativity journals, research methodologies and methods of 612 empirical studies on creativity, published between 2003 and 2012, were reviewed and compared to those in gifted education. Major findings included: (a) Creativity research was predominantly quantitative and psychometrics and experiment…

  3. Creativity Development in Adolescence: Insight from Behavior, Brain, and Training Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleibeuker, Sietske W.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Crone, Eveline A.

    2016-01-01

    Creativity is a multifaceted construct that recruits different cognitive processes. Here, we summarize studies that show that creativity develops considerably during adolescence with different developmental trajectories for insight, verbal divergent thinking, and visuospatial divergent thinking. Next, these developmental time courses are mapped to…

  4. The Effect of Dialogue Journal Writing on EFL Learners' Descriptive Writing Performance: A Quantitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Dabbagh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to evaluate the effect of dialogue journal writing on writing performance as well as its different sub-components, namely content, organization, vocabulary, language use, and mechanics (Following Polio, 2013. Participants were 84 EFL intermediate learners who were selected based on their performance on Oxford Quick Placement Test (2004 and divided randomly into experimental and control groups. While the participants in the control group took part in descriptive writing pre and post-tests only, their counterparts in experimental group were asked to write 3 journals a week for about 6 months in the period between the pre- and post-tests. The instructor of the experimental group provided feedback to each journal entry mostly on its content and message to which the participants replied in a dialogic manner. Results of independent sample t-test located a significant difference between the experimental and control group regarding the overall writing performance, as well as the sub-components of content, organization, and vocabulary in the post-test. However, the obtained results did not reveal a significant effect of dialogue journal writing on language use and mechanics of writing performance. The results which promise implications for writing instructors, curriculum developers, and material designers are fully discussed.

  5. Creativity: Creativity in Complex Military Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Novelty Goals,” Motivation and Emotion 35, no. 2 (June 2011): 141-142. 24 Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi, Creativity: The Psychology of Discovery and Invention...34 Motivation and Emotion (Springer Science and Business Media, LLC), no. 2 (February 2011): 135-143. Logan, Brian, and Tim Smither. "Creativity and Design...Army values creativity and extolls individuals to employ creative thinking in problem solving and planning. This reflects an understanding of the

  6. Characteristic of critical and creative thinking of students of mathematics education study program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochmad; Agoestanto, A.; Kharis, M.

    2018-03-01

    Critical and creative thinking give important role in learning matematics for mathematics education students. This research to explored the characteristic of critical and creative thinking of students of mathematics study program in mathematics department. Critical thinking and creative thinking can be illustrated as two sides of a coin, which one is associated to the other. In elementary linear algebra courses, however, critical thinking can be seen as a foundation to build students’ creative thinking.

  7. Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, James C.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Creativity is sometimes seen as irrelevant to educational practice. With an increased focus on standardized test scores, creative teachers and those who encourage creativity in the classroom often are accused of being idealists or missing the big picture. But the authors believe instead that creativity brings valuable benefits to the classroom. In…

  8. Conscious Augmentation of Creative State Enhances "Real" Creativity in Open-Ended Analogical Reasoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Weinberger

    Full Text Available Humans have an impressive ability to augment their creative state (i.e., to consciously try and succeed at thinking more creatively. Though this "thinking cap" phenomenon is commonly experienced, the range of its potential has not been fully explored by creativity research, which has often focused instead on creativity as a trait. A key question concerns the extent to which conscious augmentation of state creativity can improve creative reasoning. Although artistic creativity is also of great interest, it is creative reasoning that frequently leads to innovative advances in science and industry. Here, we studied state creativity in analogical reasoning, a form of relational reasoning that spans the conceptual divide between intelligence and creativity and is a core mechanism for creative innovation. Participants performed a novel Analogy Finding Task paradigm in which they sought valid analogical connections in a matrix of word-pairs. An explicit creativity cue elicited formation of substantially more creative analogical connections (measured via latent semantic analysis. Critically, the increase in creative analogy formation was not due to a generally more liberal criterion for analogy formation (that is, it appeared to reflect "real" creativity rather than divergence at the expense of appropriateness. The use of an online sample provided evidence that state creativity augmentation can be successfully elicited by remote cuing in an online environment. Analysis of an intelligence measure provided preliminary indication that the influential "threshold hypothesis," which has been proposed to characterize the relationship between intelligence and trait creativity, may be extensible to the new domain of state creativity.

  9. Conscious Augmentation of Creative State Enhances "Real" Creativity in Open-Ended Analogical Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Adam B; Iyer, Hari; Green, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Humans have an impressive ability to augment their creative state (i.e., to consciously try and succeed at thinking more creatively). Though this "thinking cap" phenomenon is commonly experienced, the range of its potential has not been fully explored by creativity research, which has often focused instead on creativity as a trait. A key question concerns the extent to which conscious augmentation of state creativity can improve creative reasoning. Although artistic creativity is also of great interest, it is creative reasoning that frequently leads to innovative advances in science and industry. Here, we studied state creativity in analogical reasoning, a form of relational reasoning that spans the conceptual divide between intelligence and creativity and is a core mechanism for creative innovation. Participants performed a novel Analogy Finding Task paradigm in which they sought valid analogical connections in a matrix of word-pairs. An explicit creativity cue elicited formation of substantially more creative analogical connections (measured via latent semantic analysis). Critically, the increase in creative analogy formation was not due to a generally more liberal criterion for analogy formation (that is, it appeared to reflect "real" creativity rather than divergence at the expense of appropriateness). The use of an online sample provided evidence that state creativity augmentation can be successfully elicited by remote cuing in an online environment. Analysis of an intelligence measure provided preliminary indication that the influential "threshold hypothesis," which has been proposed to characterize the relationship between intelligence and trait creativity, may be extensible to the new domain of state creativity.

  10. ENHANCING WRITING SKILL THROUGH WRITING PROCESS APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zaini Miftah

    2015-01-01

    The study is aimed at developing the implementation of Writing Process Approach (WPA) to enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. The study employed Classroom Action Research. The subjects of the study were 15 university students enrolled in the writing class. The data were gained from writing task, observation and field notes. The findings show that the implementation of WPA with the proper model procedures developed can enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. Before the strategy ...

  11. Teaching Creatively and Teaching for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief review of generally accepted ideas about creativity, followed by examples of music teachers teaching creatively and teaching their students to be more creative. Implications for teacher education and policy recommendations for music education are discussed.

  12. Investigation of Writing Strategies, Writing Apprehension, and Writing Achievement among Saudi EFL-Major Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asmari, AbdulRahman

    2013-01-01

    The tenet of this study is to investigate the use of writing strategies in reducing writing apprehension and uncovering its effect on EFL students' writing achievement. It also attempts to explore associations between foreign language apprehension, writing achievement and writing strategies. The primary aims of the study were to explore the…

  13. Parallel appearance of compulsive behaviors and artistic creativity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutsa, Juho; Martikainen, Kirsti; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2012-01-01

    A 55-year-old male with idiopathic Parkinson's disease developed three behavioral changes under combination therapy with selegiline, cabergoline and levodopa. Co-existent behaviors included severe pathological gambling, punding and novel skills in writing poetry (published poetry books). Brain [(18)F]fluorodopa PET imaging showed decreased tracer uptake in the striatum contralateral to the predominant motor symptoms, consistent with the clinical diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Uptake in the ventral striatum was markedly high. Brain MRI before and after behavioral changes showed no pathological findings. The patient was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease together with DSM-IV criteria-fulfilling pathological gambling and punding-like stereotyped behavior. There are no established criteria for the classification of emerged artistic creativity, although there are descriptions of the phenomenon in the literature. Inspired by the case, we conducted a preliminary survey - including 290 patients with Parkinson's disease - exploring the possible relationship between creativity and impulsive-compulsive behaviors. The case, supported by the results of the survey, adds to the cumulative evidence of the association between dopaminergic medication and enhanced creativity, and suggests a possible linkage between increased artistic creativity and impulsive-compulsive behaviors in Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, it could be speculated that the high mesolimbic dopamine function might relate to the behavioral changes observed in this patient, and is suggestive of the overlapping neurobiological mechanisms of compulsive behaviors and artistic creativity.

  14. Learning to write in science: A study of English language learners' writing experience in sixth-grade science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yang

    Writing is a predictor of academic achievement and is essential for student success in content area learning. Despite its importance, many students, including English language learners (ELLs), struggle with writing. There is thus a need to study students' writing experience in content area classrooms. Informed by systemic functional linguistics, this study examined 11 ELL students' writing experience in two sixth grade science classrooms in a southeastern state of the United States, including what they wrote, how they wrote, and why they wrote in the way they did. The written products produced by these students over one semester were collected. Also collected were teacher interviews, field notes from classroom observations, and classroom artifacts. Student writing samples were first categorized into extended and nonextended writing categories, and each extended essay was then analyzed with respect to its schematic structure and grammatical features. Teacher interviews and classroom observation notes were analyzed thematically to identify teacher expectations, beliefs, and practices regarding writing instruction for ELLs. It was found that the sixth-grade ELLs engaged in mostly non-extended writing in the science classroom, with extended writing (defined as writing a paragraph or longer) constituting roughly 11% of all writing assignments. Linguistic analysis of extended writing shows that the students (a) conveyed information through nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbial groups and prepositional phrases; (b) constructed interpersonal context through choices of mood, modality, and verb tense; and (c) structured text through thematic choices and conjunctions. The appropriateness of these lexicogrammatical choices for particular writing tasks was related to the students' English language proficiency levels. The linguistic analysis also uncovered several grammatical problems in the students' writing, including a limited range of word choices, inappropriate use of mood

  15. CREATIVITY IS EVERYONE’S BUSINESS: HOW TO ENHANCE EMPLOYEE CREATIVITY IN TELECOMMUNICATION SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARIM SEHRISH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With rapid cultural, demographical and economic changes in knowledge oriented economy, employee creativity has become a challenge for organizations, as this works as a core competence. We suggest that leaders with ethical commitment help to nourish creativity in employees. Using social learning theory, authors examined the influence of ethical leadership on employee creativity through the mediation of self-efficacy. This study also explored the moderating role of uncertainty avoidance between the relationship of ethical leadership and employee creativity. Data was collected from 180 employees along with their supervisors from four different telecommunication companies working in Pakistan. The questionnaire was adopted and tested on the criteria of five point Likert scale. Regression and Correlation tests were used to check hypothesis. Supervisors of these four companies evaluated the creativity of the selected staff member groups while the employees and staff members reported the perceptions about their supervisors in terms of ethical leadership. Results showed that ethical leadership was positively related to employee creativity and this relationship was mediated by self-efficacy and this mediation was partial. There was significant negative relationship between uncertainty avoidance and employee creativity, this is the main aspect of present study. According to the results uncertainty is negatively associated with the employee creativity it means high uncertainty results in low creativity of employees. This study was conducted in Pakistani context where uncertain attitude is very common in society so uncertainty avoidance affects creativity of the employee in Pakistani organizations. Our study offer practical implications for telecommunication companies in order to achieve competitive advantage by enhancing employee creativity, as employee creativity makes organization creative.

  16. Suburban creativity: The geography of creative industriesin Johannesburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory James J.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is an increasing scholarly focus for urban and economic geographers. The aim in this paper is to contribute to what is so far mainly a Northern literature around the locational characteristics of creative industries. The results are analysed from a comprehensive audit undertaken of creative industries in Johannesburg, South Africa’s leading economic hub. In common with certain other investigations of creative industries the largest component of enterprises in Johannesburg is creative services involving the production of goods or services for functional purposes. An aggregate picture emerges of the geography of creative industries in Johannesburg as strongly focused in suburban areas rather than the inner-city and its fringe areas. Nevertheless, certain differences are observed across the eight categories of creative industries. The evidence concerning the spatial distribution of creative industries in Johannesburg provides a further case for re-positioning the suburbs in post-Fordist debates around creative city economies and for re-examining neo-liberal cultural policies that preference inner-city areas.

  17. WHEN BUSINESS STRATEGY MEETS CREATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin-George TOMA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Our paper aims to present in short the theoretical foundation of the concepts of business strategy and creativity, and to highlight the relationship between them. Design/methodology/approach – Using the literature review, the study examined the conceptual framework of the notions of strategy, business strategy, and creativity. Also, it analysed the relationship between business strategy and creativity. Findings – The results confirm previous studies related to the beneficial impact of creativity on the business strategy of a company. As creativity has become an important input for a successful business strategy, companies are making significant efforts in order to bring creativity into play. Practical implications/originality/value – Business strategy and creativity are two interconnected concepts not only in theory, but also in practice. Also, creativity represents a fundamental asset of a successful company in turbulent times.

  18. The Effect of Observational Learning on Students' Performance, Processes, and Motivation in Two Creative Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendijk, Talita; Janssen, Tanja; Rijlaarsdam, Gert; van den Bergh, Huub

    2013-01-01

    Background. Previous research has shown that observation can be effective for learning in various domains, for example, argumentative writing and mathematics. The question in this paper is whether observational learning can also be beneficial when learning to perform creative tasks in visual and verbal arts. Aims. We hypothesized that observation…

  19. Fostering Employee Creativity through Transformational Leadership: Moderating Role of Creative Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Neeraj Kumar; Dhar, Rajib Lochan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the moderating role of creative self-efficacy in predictions of employees' creativity through transformational leadership. Data from a dyadic sample of 424 employees and their immediate supervisors were collected and analyzed. The results signify that transformational leaders promote creativity among their subordinates.…

  20. Teaching Creativity: Current Findings, Trends, and Controversies in the Psychology of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, the psychological study of creativity has accelerated greatly. To facilitate the teaching of creativity, I provide an overview of the recent literature. The overview begins by discussing recent empirical results and research trends. This discussion specifically treats creativity's cognitive, differential, developmental, and…

  1. Biochemical Support for the “Threshold” Theory of Creativity: A Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Flores, Ranee A.; Smith, Shirley M.; Caprihan, Arvind; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    A broadly accepted definition of creativity refers to the production of something both novel and useful within a given social context. Studies of patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders and neuroimaging studies of healthy controls have each drawn attention to frontal and temporal lobe contributions to creativity. Based on previous magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy studies demonstrating relationships between cognitive ability and concentrations of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), a common neurometabolite, we hypothesized that NAA assessed in gray and white matter (from a supraventricular slab) would relate to laboratory measures of creativity. MR imaging and divergent thinking measures were obtained in a cohort of 56 healthy controls. Independent judges ranked the creative products of each participant, from which a “Composite Creativity Index” (CCI) was created. Different patterns of correlations between NAA and CCI were found in higher verbal ability versus lower verbal ability participants, providing neurobiological support for a critical “threshold” regarding the relationship between intelligence and creativity. To our knowledge, this is the first report assessing the relationship between brain chemistry and creative cognition, as measured with divergent thinking, in a cohort comprised exclusively of normal, healthy participants. PMID:19386928

  2. Cooperation makes two less-creative individuals turn into a highly-creative pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hua; Lu, Kelong; Hao, Ning

    2018-05-15

    This study aimed to investigate which type of group (e.g., consisting of less-creative or highly-creative individuals) would perform better in solving creativity problems, and explore the underlying inter-brain neural correlates between team members. A preliminary test (an alternative-uses task) was performed to rank individuals' level of creativity, and divide participants into three types of dyads: high-high (two highly-creative individuals), low-low (two less-creative individuals), and high-low (one highly-creative and one less-creative individual). Dyads were then asked to solve a realistic presented problem (RPP; a typical creativity problem) during which a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-based hyperscanning device was used to record the variation of interpersonal brain synchronization (IBS). Results revealed that less-creative individuals, while working together, would perform as well as highly-creative individuals. The low-low dyads showed higher levels of cooperation behaviour than the other two types of dyads. The fNIRS results revealed increased IBS only for low-low dyads at PFC (prefrontal cortex) and rTPJ (right temporal-parietal junction) brain regions during RPP task performance. In the rDLPFC (right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), the IBS in the low-low dyads was stronger than that of high-high and high-low dyads. In the rTPJ, the IBS in the low-low dyads was only stronger than that of the high-low dyads. Besides, the IBS at rDLPFC and rTPJ regions in the low-low dyads was positively correlated with their cooperation behaviour and group creative performance. These findings indicated when two less-creative individuals worked on a creativity problem together, they tended to cooperate with each other (indicated by both behaviour index and increased IBS at rDLPFC and rTPJ), which benefited their creative performance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. ENHANCING WRITING SKILL THROUGH WRITING PROCESS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zaini Miftah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at developing the implementation of Writing Process Approach (WPA to enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. The study employed Classroom Action Research. The subjects of the study were 15 university students enrolled in the writing class. The data were gained from writing task, observation and field notes. The findings show that the implementation of WPA with the proper model procedures developed can enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. Before the strategy was implemented, the percentage of the students achieving the score greater than or equal to C (56-70 was 40.00% (6 students of the class. However, after the strategy was implemented in Cycle I, it enhanced enough to 60.00% (9 students of the class, but this result did not meet the criteria of success set up in the study. Next, in Cycle II it increased slightly to 86.67% (13 students of the class. Thus, the enhancement of the students’ skill in writing essay can be reached but it should follow the proper model procedures of the implementation of WPA developed. Keywords: writing process approach, writing skill, essay writing

  4. About Creativity and Study Skills: Some Observations and Thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mark E.

    This paper examines the concept of creativity through the identification of traits and characteristics found in the so-called creative personality. The works on creativity of several scholars and researchers are briefly reviewed, including those by Ellis Paul Torrance, Donald W. MacKinnon, Sarnoff A. Mednick, Paul Heist, Philip Wesley Jackson, and…

  5. The Creative Pathways of Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two studies of how the conduct of life in itself can be a creative act. Very often, creativity research is concerned with the study of what enables people to express themselves creatively or aesthetically or to produce creative ideas and products. Creativity as it arises in the mundane processes of everyday life is, however,…

  6. Study of Styles of Creativity and Achievement Motivation among Iranian EFL and Non- EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengameh Haniefi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was an attempt to investigate the relationship between styles of creativity and achievement motivation in EFL and Non- EFL learners. There were few studies conducted on the relationship between styles of creativity and achievement motivation among nursing, midwifery and foreign language learners. To this end, an ex-post facto study was done. Ninety EFL and Non- EFL learners took part in the study. It was a correlational descriptive study and sampling method was convenient. The values of these variables were measured through- Creativity Questionnaire (Duckworth, 2007; Runco, 2001 and Motivation Questionnaire (Vallerand, 1992. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for achievement motivation was 0.713, and for styles of creativity was 0.818. Based on the results, it can be said that there was a significant correlation between the RIBS and achievement motivation among Non- EFL learners. However, another creativity styles and achievement motivation were not statistically significant. The results also revealed that there were significant differences between learner's creativity in two groups on RIBS scale, avoiding novelty scale and academic selfefficacy scale. The results of the test have also shown that there were significant differences between learners' creativity in two groups in RIBS Scale. Therefore, the creativity of individuals changes the direction of achievement motivation. As implications, educators and teachers can apply efficient strategies and techniques in language classes in order to promote positive motivation and increase creativity among the students to learn language and raise the proficiency of their learners.

  7. Indonesian EFL Students’ Perspective on Writing Process: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imelda Hermilinda Abas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at understanding the EFL Indonesian students’ perspective on the writing process. The pilot study involved two male Indonesian postgraduate students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. The Indonesian students were selected based on the following criteria: (1 had enough knowledge in English writing, indicated by the completion of Academic Writing and Research Methodology courses taken in UUM; (2 had written an unpublished thesis during their undergraduate studies in Indonesia and they are writing their master or doctoral thesis in English; (3 used English extensively in writing their assignments, and in daily activities. Pseudonyms were used to refer to the participants as Sukarno and Suharto. The data were collected through in-depth interviews with the participants. The interview sessions took approximately 15-20 minutes for each participant and were videotaped and audiotaped. Semi-structured interview with 15 questions and probes were used. The results showed that the two participants had positive feelings and attitudes towards writing in English. Although they had a hard time in English writing during their undergraduate in Indonesia, they become fond of writing in English in their postgraduate time due to the exposure to English extensively. In composing, they used brainstorming, drafting, pausing, revising and editing in a recursive manner. Keywords: in-depth interview, pilot study, writing process, English as a Foreign Language (EFL

  8. Conscious Augmentation of Creative State Enhances “Real” Creativity in Open-Ended Analogical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Adam B.; Iyer, Hari; Green, Adam E.

    2016-01-01

    Humans have an impressive ability to augment their creative state (i.e., to consciously try and succeed at thinking more creatively). Though this “thinking cap” phenomenon is commonly experienced, the range of its potential has not been fully explored by creativity research, which has often focused instead on creativity as a trait. A key question concerns the extent to which conscious augmentation of state creativity can improve creative reasoning. Although artistic creativity is also of great interest, it is creative reasoning that frequently leads to innovative advances in science and industry. Here, we studied state creativity in analogical reasoning, a form of relational reasoning that spans the conceptual divide between intelligence and creativity and is a core mechanism for creative innovation. Participants performed a novel Analogy Finding Task paradigm in which they sought valid analogical connections in a matrix of word-pairs. An explicit creativity cue elicited formation of substantially more creative analogical connections (measured via latent semantic analysis). Critically, the increase in creative analogy formation was not due to a generally more liberal criterion for analogy formation (that is, it appeared to reflect “real” creativity rather than divergence at the expense of appropriateness). The use of an online sample provided evidence that state creativity augmentation can be successfully elicited by remote cuing in an online environment. Analysis of an intelligence measure provided preliminary indication that the influential “threshold hypothesis,” which has been proposed to characterize the relationship between intelligence and trait creativity, may be extensible to the new domain of state creativity. PMID:26959821

  9. Creative Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    Consciousness is creative. That creativity expresses in myriad ways – as moments in time in which decades of progress can be achieved overnight, as organizational innovations of immense power for social accomplishment; as creative social values that further influence the evolution of organizations and society; as the creativity of individuality in the leader, genius, artist and inventor; as social creativity that converts raw human experience into civilization; as cultural creativity that tra...

  10. Lab Aliens, Legendary Fossils, and Deadly Science Potions: Views of Science and Scientists from Fifth Graders in a Free-Choice Creative Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Leslie G.

    This qualitative study uses children's writing to explore the divide between a conception of Science as a humanistic discipline reliant on creativity, ingenuity and out of the box thinking and a persistent public perception of science and scientists as rigid and methodical. Artifacts reviewed were 506 scripts written during 2014 and 2016 by 5th graders participating in an out-of classroom, mentor supported, free-choice 10-week arts and literacy initiative. 47% (237) of these scripts were found to contain content relating to Science, Scientists, Science Education and the Nature of Science. These 237 scripts were coded for themes; characteristics of named scientist characters were tracked and analyzed. Findings included NOS understandings being expressed by representation of Science and Engineering Practices; Ingenuity being primarily linked to Engineering tasks; common portrayals of science as magical or scientists as villains; and a persistence in negative stereotypes of scientists, including a lack of gender equity amongst the named scientist characters. Findings suggest that representations of scientists in popular culture highly influence the portrayals of scientists constructed by the students. Recommendations to teachers include encouraging explicit consideration of big-picture NOS concepts such as ethics during elementary school and encouraging the replacement of documentary or educational shows with more engaging fictional media.

  11. In Pursuit of Everyday Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    2017-01-01

    Creativity researchers have long paid careful attention to individual creativity, beginning with studies of well-known geniuses, and expanding to personality, biographical, cognitive, and social-psychological studies of individual creative behavior. Little is known, however, about the everyday psychological experience and associated creative behavior in the life and work of ordinary individuals. Yet evidence is mounting that such individuals can be responsible for important instances of creat...

  12. Variability of writing disorders in Wernicke's aphasia underperforming different writing tasks: A single-case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozintseva, Elena; Skvortsov, Anatoliy

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our study was to evolve views on writing disorders in Wernicke's agraphia by comparing group data and analysis of a single patient. We showed how a single-case study can be useful in obtaining essential results that can be hidden by averaging group data. Analysis of a single patient proved to be important for resolving contradictions of the "holistic" and "elementaristic" paradigms of psychology and for the development of theoretical knowledge with the example of a writing disorder. The implementation of a holistic approach was undertaken by presenting the tasks differing in functions in which writing had been performed since its appearance in human culture (communicative, mnestic, and regulatory). In spite of the identical composition of involved psychological components, these differences were identified when certain types of errors were analyzed in the single subject. The results are discussed in terms of used writing strategy, resulting in a way of operation of involved components that lead to qualitative and quantitative changes of writing errors within the syndrome of Wernicke's agraphia. © 2016 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. A Time Use Diary Study of Adult Everyday Writing Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Dale J.; White, Sheida; Cohen, Steffaney B.

    2011-01-01

    The present study documents everyday adult writing by type of text and medium (computer or paper) in an "in vivo" diary study. The authors compare writing patterns by gender, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, age and working status. The study results reveal that (a) writing time varied with demographic variables for networkers, but…

  14. The Effect of Mobile Social Networking as a Supplementary Strategy on EFL Learners’ Writing Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Talakoub

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of mobile learning and social networking sites has encouraged second language instructors to integrate these technologies into learners’ curriculum. In this study, the learners were supposed to practice in an online jigsaw writing as an extra-curricular activity. They used their imagination and creativity to depict their thoughts using their previous knowledge. The current research had both a qualitative and quantitative phases. From the quantitative perspective, the effectiveness of mobile social networking on EFL learners’ writing ability was examined statistically. In doing so, 60 EFL learners were divided into the experimental and control groups. The learners of the experimental group were also assigned into three virtual groups in which they could help each other to write a piece of writing on pre-determined topics during twelve sessions. Running the t-test indicated that the students in the experimental group could significantly outperform their counterparts in the post-test. Therefore, it could be claimed that mobile social networking as a supplementary strategy had positive effects on EFL learners’ writing ability. In the qualitative phase of the study, a semi-structured interview was conducted in order to explore learners’ attitudes and beliefs about the experiment they had. The responses to the semi-structured interview also revealed that the learners had positive attitudes towards this online supplementary technology-supported writing. The pedagogical implications of the study were discussed and further suggestions were put forward.

  15. In Pursuit of Everyday Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    2017-01-01

    Creativity researchers have long paid careful attention to individual creativity, beginning with studies of well-known geniuses, and expanding to personality, biographical, cognitive, and social-psychological studies of individual creative behavior. Little is known, however, about the everyday psychological experience and associated creative…

  16. Neuroanatomy of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E.; Segall, Judith M.; Bockholt, H. Jeremy; Flores, Ranee A.; Smith, Shirley M.; Chavez, Robert S.; Haier, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Creativity has long been a construct of interest to philosophers, psychologists and, more recently, neuroscientists. Recent efforts have focused on cognitive processes likely to be important to the manifestation of novelty and usefulness within a given social context. One such cognitive process – divergent thinking – is the process by which one extrapolates many possible answers to an initial stimulus or target data set. We sought to link well established measures of divergent thinking and creative achievement (Creative Achievement Questionnaire – CAQ) to cortical thickness in a cohort of young (23.7 ± 4.2 years), healthy subjects. Three independent judges ranked the creative products of each subject using the consensual assessment technique (Amabile, 1982) from which a “composite creativity index” (CCI) was derived. Structural magnetic resonance imaging was obtained at 1.5 Tesla Siemens scanner. Cortical reconstruction and volumetric segmentation were performed with the FreeSurfer image analysis suite. A region within the lingual gyrus was negatively correlated with CCI; the right posterior cingulate correlated positively with the CCI. For the CAQ, lower left lateral orbitofrontal volume correlated with higher creative achievement; higher cortical thickness was related to higher scores on the CAQ in the right angular gyrus. This is the first study to link cortical thickness measures to psychometric measures of creativity. The distribution of brain regions, associated with both divergent thinking and creative achievement, suggests that cognitive control of information flow among brain areas may be critical to understanding creative cognition. PMID:19722171

  17. Unleashing creativity: The role of left temporoparietal regions in evaluating and inhibiting the generation of creative ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayseless, Naama; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone

    2014-11-01

    Human creativity is thought to entail two processes. One is idea generation, whereby ideas emerge in an associative manner, and the other is idea evaluation, whereby generated ideas are evaluated and screened. Thus far, neuroimaging studies have identified several brain regions as being involved in creativity, yet only a handful of studies have examined the neural basis underlying these two processes. We found that an individual with left temporoparietal hemorrhage who had no previous experience as an artist developed remarkable artistic creativity, which diminished as the hemorrhage receded. We thus hypothesized that damage to the evaluation network of creativity during the initial hematoma had a releasing effect on creativity by "freeing" the idea generation system. In line with this hypothesis, we conducted a subsequent fMRI study showing that decreased left temporal and parietal activations among healthy individuals as they evaluated creative ideas selectively predicted higher creativity. The current studies provide converging multi-method evidence suggesting that the left temporoparietal area is part of a neural network involved in evaluating creativity, and that as such may act as inhibitors of creativity. We propose an explanatory model of creativity centered upon the key role of the left temporoparietal regions in evaluating and inhibiting creativity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. "Making the Ordinary More Extraordinary": Exploring Creativity as a Health Promotion Practice Among Older Adults in a Community-Based Professionally Taught Arts Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Adelita G; Fleuriet, K Jill

    2018-06-01

    Document psychosocial and mental well-being outcomes across artistic mediums and classes of a community-based, professionally taught arts program for older adults. One hundred and thirty-eight students completed pre and post class surveys about expectations/experiences when creating art in four mediums (painting, drawing, mixed media, creative writing). In addition, 162 students composed one-paragraph biographical narratives describing their relationships to art and creative engagement. Text was coded for a priori and emergent themes to identify and explain well-being outcomes. Results of this new study supported and expanded our earlier model of improved psychosocial and mental well-being due to creative engagement: impact of class-cognitive focus and outcome of class-cognitive focus, happiness as component of mental and social well-being due to creative engagement, and robust sense of calmness during the creative process. Results suggest that professionally taught arts programming can contribute to well-being and may contribute to brain health through promoting an enhanced ability to focus. Holistic nursing treats creativity as healing, and results suggest that creative engagement should be a priority in therapeutic programming, and individual counseling for older adults to begin engaging in some form of art making suited to their abilities should be incorporated into nursing practice.

  19. Words and wards: a model of reflective writing and its uses in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna; Kasman, Deborah; Shafer, Audrey

    2006-01-01

    Personal, creative writing as a process for reflection on patient care and socialization into medicine ("reflective writing") has important potential uses in educating medical students and residents. Based on the authors' experiences with a range of writing activities in academic medical settings, this article sets forth a conceptual model for considering the processes and effects of such writing. The first phase (writing) is individual and solitary, consisting of personal reflection and creation. Here, introspection and imagination guide learners from loss of certainty to reclaiming a personal voice; identifying the patient's voice; acknowledging simultaneously valid yet often conflicting perspectives; and recognizing and responding to the range of emotions triggered in patient care. The next phase (small-group reading and discussion) is public and communal, where sharing one's writing results in acknowledging vulnerability, risk-taking, and self-disclosure. Listening to others' writing becomes an exercise in mindfulness and presence, including witnessing suffering and confusion experienced by others. Specific pedagogical goals in three arenas-professional development, patient care and practitioner well-being - are linked to the writing/reading/listening process. The intent of presenting this model is to help frame future intellectual inquiry and investigation into this innovative pedagogical modality.

  20. Self-reported creativity in bipolar disorder: prevalence, types and associated outcomes in mania versus hypomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCraw, Stacey; Parker, Gordon; Fletcher, Kathryn; Friend, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Bipolar (BP) disorder has been linked to creativity following investigation of prominent artists and controlled trials of creativity in BP disorder patients. However, it is unclear whether creativity is differentially expressed across the BP I and BP II subtypes. 219 patients (aged 19-63 years) diagnosed with BP disorder by clinical interview and DSM-IV criteria were asked whether they tended to be more creative during hypo/manic episodes, and answered five questions about personality styles associated with creativity. Qualitative analyses were performed on a smaller subset of 69 BP patients (n=19 BP I, n=50 BP II) who provided written responses of the types of creative activities engaged in when hypo/manic and any perceived advantages or disadvantages of their creative pursuits. 82% of BP patients affirmed being creative when hypo/manic, with comparable results for the BP I and BP II subtypes (84% and 81% respectively). Both BP subtypes engaged mostly in writing, painting, work or business ideas and 'other' forms of art; however BP II patients were more likely to draw and be musical. Both subgroups reported the consequences of feeling good, being productive or quitting their project. BP I patients were more likely to overspend during their creative highs while BP II patients were more likely to experience improved focus and clarity. BP patients affirming creative highs were significantly more likely to report creative personality styles more generally outside of a mood episode. BP patients' self-reported creative activities were not retrospectively judged for quality or originality and so may reflect common creative abilities rather than exceptional quality. The impact of depressive episodes on creativity was not assessed. Uneven sample sizes in the BP I and BP II subgroups may have compromised statistical power. Creativity during hypo/manic episodes was extremely common in both BP subtypes. While some nuances in activity type and outcomes were observed, no

  1. Magazine Publishing Innovation: Two Case Studies on Managing Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Das

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight a link between publishing business innovation and how editors manage creativity in the digital era. Examining the changing industrial and historical business context for the U.K. magazine publishing industry, two case studies are analyzed as representatives of different ends of the publishing company spectrum (one a newly launched magazine published by a major, the other an independent ‘magazine’ website start-up. Qualitative data analysis on publishing innovation and managing creativity is presented as a springboard for further research on magazine media management.

  2. Creativity fostering teacher behaviour around the world: Annotations of studies using the CFTIndex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaycheng Soh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Teachers play a critical role in the development of student creativity. How well they play this role depends on whether they demonstrate creativity fostering behaviour when interacting with their students. There is, however, a dearth of suitable instruments for measuring this type of teacher behaviour, although there are many instruments for measuring student creativity. Based on Arthur J. Cropley’s nine principles, the Creativity Fostering Teacher Behaviour Index (CFTIndex was developed and trialled with a group of teachers (N = 117 in Singapore. There are evidence showing its internal consistency reliability and concurrent validity. The need for an instrument such as the CFTIndex is witnessed by many studies based using it subsequent to its first publication. The scale has since been used by researchers in America, Canada, Chile, Hong Kong, Korea, Mexico, Nigeria, Turkey and Singapore since its first appearance in the Journal of Creativity Behavior in 2000. Creativity researchers have used the CFTIndex for varied purposes, including several Ph.D. theses. This article highlights information directly related to CFTIndex to provide an integrated database and to facilitate future research. Possible further research studies using the CFTIndex are suggested and discussed.

  3. Writing Trojan Horses and War Machines: The Creative Political in Music Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    North American music education is a commodity sold to pre-service and in-service music teachers. Like all mass-produced consumables, it is valuable to the extent that it is not creative, that is, to the extent that it is reproducible. This is demonstrated in curricular materials, notably general music series textbook and music scores available…

  4. Digital Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson Brooks, Eva; Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the outcomes from children’s play with technology in early childhood learning practices. The paper addresses questions related to how digital technology can foster creativity in early childhood learning environments. It consists of an analysis of children......’s interaction with the KidSmart furniture focusing on digital creativity potentials and play values suggested by the technology. The study applied a qualitative approach and included125 children (aged three to five), 10 pedagogues, and two librarians. The results suggests that educators should sensitively...... consider intervening when children are interacting with technology, and rather put emphasize into the integration of the technology into the environment and to the curriculum in order to shape playful structures for children’s digital creativity....

  5. Reader-Centered Technical Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Technical writing is an essential part of professional communication and in recent years it has shifted from a genre-based approach. Formerly, technical writing primarily focused on generating templates of documents and sometimes it was creating or reproducing traditional forms with minor modifications and updates. Now, technical writing looks at the situations surrounding the need to write. This involves deep thinking about the goals and objectives of the project on hand. Furthermore, one observes that it is very important for any participatory process to have the full support of management. This support needs to be well understood and believed by employees. Professional writing may be very persuasive in some cases. When presented in the appropriate context, technical writing can persuade a company to improve work conditions ensuring employee safety and timely production. However, one must recognize that lot of professional writing still continues to make use of reports and instruction manuals. Normally, technical and professional writing addresses four aspects. Objective: The need for generating a given professionally written technical document and the goals the document is expected to achieve and accomplish. Clientele: The clientele who will utilize the technical document. This may include the people in the organization. This may also include "unintended readers." Customers: The population that may be affected by the content of the technical document generated. This includes the stakeholders who will be influenced. Environment: The background in which the document is created. Also, the nature of the situation that warranted the generation of the document. Swiss Psychologist Jean Piaget's view of Learning focuses on three aspects. The author likes to extend Jean Piaget's ideas to students, who are asked to prepare and submit Reader-Centered Technical Writing reports and exercises. Assimilation: Writers may benefit specifically, by assimilating a new object into

  6. Right along the Border: Mexican-American Students Write Themselves into The(ir) World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerling, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Hidalgo County, Texas, is one of the poorest in the country. The population in the Lower Rio Grande Valley is 85% Mexican-American. Underprepared for college and juggling full time jobs, their own children, and sometimes dysfunctional extended families, students often do not expect to succeed. I recently taught a Creative Writing course which…

  7. The Mad Genie in the Attic: Performances of Identity in Year 6 Boys' Creative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Identity studies relating to writing in educational setting have tended to focus on the analysis of non-fiction texts. Aligning a Bakhtinian view of language with the concept of identity as participation in "figured worlds" [Holland et al. 1998, "Identity and Agency in Cultural Worlds". London: Harvard University Press], this…

  8. The perceptions of creativity and creative potentials of future kindergarten and class teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Radmila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research studies on teaching practice have shown that not enough attention is paid to the problem of children’s creativity development in our schools in spite of the fact that the development of creative potentials in preschool institutions and school figures as one of the priority educational tasks. The perceptions of creativity and creative potentials of future kindergarten and class teachers can serve as an important basis for encouraging the development of their professional competences. This research was aimed at examining students’ knowledge and beliefs on creativity, obtaining self-assessment of their own creative potentials and determining the level of expression of students’ creativity based on their abilities of creative problem-solving. The sample included the students of the Faculty of Pedagogical Sciences in Jagodina and Teacher Training College in Vranje (N=300. For examining students’ creative potentials we used the Epstein Creativity Competences Inventory and a version of the Saugstad & Rahaim Problem Solving Tests. Research results have confirmed that students possess the knowledge and the beliefs compatible with the modern scientific beliefs on creativity. They assess their own creative potentials as very high and they do possess them. The obtained results can serve as a better foundation for working with students towards fostering the development of their creative potentials and professional competences. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179034: Od podsticanja inicijative, saradnje, stvaralaštva u obrazovanju do novih uloga i identiteta u društvu i br. 47008: Unapređivanje kvaliteta i dostupnosti obrazovanja u procesima modernizacije Srbije

  9. Centrality and Creativity:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristina Vaarst; Lorenzen, Mark

    2009-01-01

    To provide new insights into urban hierarchy, this article brings together one of economic geography’s oldest and most well-established notions with one of its newest and most disputed notions: Christäller’s centrality and Florida’s creative class. Using a novel original database, the article...... compares the distribution of the general population and the creative class across 444 city regions in 8 European countries. It finds that the two groups are both distributed according to the rank-size rule, but exhibit different distinct phases with different slopes. The article argues that the two...... distributions are different because market thresholds for creative services and jobs are lower than thresholds for less specialized services and jobs. The article hence concludes that centrality exerts a strong influence upon urban hierarchies of creativity and that the study of creative urban city hierarchies...

  10. DEVELOPING CREATIVE THINKING SKILLS AND CREATIVE ATTITUDE THROUGH PROBLEM BASED GREEN VISION CHEMISTRY ENVIRONMENT LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nuswowati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to build creative thinking skills and creative attitude of students through a model of problem-based lectures Environmental Chemistry (PBL Green Chemistry visionary. Mixed methods research design experimental models embedded with pretest-posttest control group were used in this study, and the differences between assumed initial end-tests as the effects of the treatment. Creative thinking skills measured by the essay tests, non test while the creative attitude is measured from the completed questionnaires consisting of positive and negative statements of markers creative attitude. Data measurement N-gain of creative thinking skills for the control and experimental group were 0.40 and 0.71, while the creative attitude were 0.08 and 0.34. Improved tests of creative thinking skills or creative attitudes were analyzed by t-test. Implementation of research findings indicate environmental chemistry lecture- problems based Green Chemistry vision can improve thinking skills and of creative student.

  11. The art of writing good research proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ekelenburg, Henk

    2010-01-01

    Whilst scientists are by default motivated by intellectual challenges linked to the area of their interest rather than have an interest in the financial component related to their work, the reality of today is that funding for their work does not come automatically More and more governments provide project-related funding rather than multipurpose funding that covers the total annual costs of a research performing entity (such as a university department). So, like it or not, researchers have to present their research ideas and convince funding bodies about the usefulness and importance of their intended research work. Writing the research proposal is not simply typing words and punctuation. It requires succinctly and clearly chronicling the facts, as well as crafting a convincing line of reasoning for funding the project. For the best result, both the logical, verbal left side of the brain and the intuitive, creative right side of the brain need to work as a team. This article covers the process of writing a proposal, from research idea to submission to the funding body. The key to good writing is linking the text into a logical project flow. Therefore, in the early stage of writing an RTD proposal, developing the chain of reasoning and creating a flow chart is recommended to get a clear overview of the entire project and to visualise how the many work packages are connected.

  12. Group Creativity: Mapping the Creative Process of a Cappella Choirs in Hong Kong and the United Kingdom Using the Musical Creativities Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai Chen, Jason Chi

    2018-01-01

    A cappella is a musical performance genre with a long history. Although many people compose and arrange a cappella works, the connection between a cappella and musical creativity has not yet been considered. This study examines the background of the musical creativities framework [Burnard, P. 2012. "Musical Creativities in Practice."…

  13. How criticality affects student's creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, I analyse if there is an inherent paradox between creativity and criticality. With critical thinking being among the core values in higher education, can we then also foster creative thinking? In answering this question, I use the masters degree LAICS (Leadership And Innovation...... in Complex Systems) as a case study. Interviews with students are used to shed light on creative teaching and learning. It is shown that creativity can be taught by teaching creatively. I conclude that creativity and criticality are not entirely different ways of thinking and both are important in academia...

  14. A Study of Early Childhood Teachers' Conceptions of Creativity in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Rebecca Hun Ping; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to uncover the conceptions of creativity among early childhood teachers in Hong Kong. The sample comprised 563 early childhood teachers. Factor analysis supported the multidimensional hypothesis of teachers' conceptions of creativity. Five dimensions were found: novelty, product, problem solving, cognitive processes and personal…

  15. Creative Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Natarajan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is creative. That creativity expresses in myriad ways – as moments in time in which decades of progress can be achieved overnight, as organizational innovations of immense power for social accomplishment; as creative social values that further influence the evolution of organizations and society; as the creativity of individuality in the leader, genius, artist and inventor; as social creativity that converts raw human experience into civilization; as cultural creativity that transforms human relationships into sources of rich emotional capacity; and as value-based educational creativity that can awaken and nurture young minds to develop and discover their own inherent capacity for knowledge in freedom. Through such moments do society and humanity evolve. Education is society’s most advanced institution for conscious social evolution. Values are the essence of society’s knowledge for highest accomplishment. Education that imparts values is an evolutionary social organization that can hasten the emergence of that creative consciousness.

  16. Creativity Assessment in Subjects with Tourette Syndrome vs. Patients with Parkinson’s Disease: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Zanaboni Dina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Literature suggests that high levels of dopamine are associated with creative thoughts. Tourette Syndrome (TS patients have high dopamine levels, while Parkinson’s Disease (PD subjects have low dopamine levels. Consequently, TS individuals are supposed to have a major and PD patients less creative output. Moreover, dopamine medications may alter the level of creativity, and therefore Quality of Life, in both pathologies. (2 Methods: The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis of TS patients having higher creative scores than PD patients. The assessment consisted of the administration of the Creative Thinking ASK Test. There were 54 participants—36 males and 18 females—i.e., 27 TS patients and 27 PD subjects. Age of the sample was 35 to 57 years old, high school certificate was required. (3 Results: TS sample (103.11 ASK average score was more creative than PD sample (94.11 ASK average score. (4 Conclusions: The results supported the aforementioned hypothesis: TS sample resulted in having higher creative scores than PD sample. Dopamine and other neurotransmitters of TS and PS appear to affect subject’s creativity. Further studies with creative assessments in TS and PD patients are needed to support the preliminary results of our study.

  17. Threshold Effects of Creative Problem-Solving Attributes on Creativity in the Math Abilities of Taiwanese Upper Elementary Students

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chia-Yi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to help determine what the typology of math creative problem-solving is. Different from studies that have discussed the threshold effect between creativity and intelligence, this research investigated the threshold effect between creativity and other attributes. The typology of the math creative problem-solving abilities of 409 fifth- and sixth-grade Taiwanese students was identified and compared in this study. A Creative Problem-Solving Attribute Instrument was devised for t...

  18. Matołek Broda. Creative and publishing adventures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Staroń

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses issues related to the creative process and the editorial fate of The Adventures of Matołek the Billy-Goat by Kornel Makuszyński. It contains collected informations on the appearance of an idea for a book-comic for children (as told by Makuszyński’s wife – Janina, Marian Walentynowicz, Jan Gebethner, through the actual process of writing, the first edition and post-war issue. Also it discusses drawings from The 120 adventures of Matołek the Billy-Goat which sometimes differ quite significantly depending on the edition.

  19. Enduringness and change in creative personality and the prediction of occupational creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helson, R; Roberts, B; Agronick, G

    1995-12-01

    Participants in a longitudinal study of women's adult development were scored at midlife on the Occupational Creativity Scale (OCS), which draws on J. L. Holland's (1985) model of vocational environments in the assessment of participants' creative achievement. College measures of cognitive-affective style and career aspirations predicted OCS scores at age 52, and consistency of creative temperament (H. G. Gough, 1992), motivation, and overall attributes of creative personality were demonstrated with both self-report and observer data over several times of testing. However, there was change along with this enduringness: Large fluctuations in creative temperament over one period of life or another were common in individuals, and OCS scores were associated with an increase in level of effective functioning over 30 years.

  20. Exploring the Domain Specificity of Creativity in Children: The Relationship between a Non-Verbal Creative Production Test and Creative Problem-Solving Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study, we explored whether creativity was domain specific or domain general. The relationships between students’ scores on three creative problem-solving activities (math, spa-tial artistic, and oral linguistic in the DIS-COVER assessment (Discovering Intellectual Strengths and Capabilities While Observing Varied Ethnic Responses and the TCT-DP (Test of Creative Thinking-Drawing Produc-tion, a non-verbal general measure of creativi-ty, were examined. The participants were 135 first and second graders from two schools in the Southwestern United States from linguisti-cally and culturally diverse backgrounds. Pearson correlations, canonical correlations, and multiple regression analyses were calcu-lated to describe the relationship between the TCT-DP and the three DISCOVER creative problem-solving activities. We found that crea-tivity has both domain-specific and domain-general aspects, but that the domain-specific component seemed more prominent. One im-plication of these results is that educators should consider assessing creativity in specific domains to place students in special programs for gifted students rather than relying only on domain-general measures of divergent think-ing or creativity.

  1. Test of Creative Imagination: Validity and Reliability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogan, Aysun; Ari, Meziyet; Gonen, Mubeccel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate validity and reliability of the test of creative imagination. This study was conducted with the participation of 1000 children, aged between 9-14 and were studying in six primary schools in the city center of Denizli Province, chosen by cluster ratio sampling. In the study, it was revealed that the…

  2. Flow, affect and visual creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseh, Genevieve M; Phillips, Louise H; Pearson, David G

    2015-01-01

    Flow (being in the zone) is purported to have positive consequences in terms of affect and performance; however, there is no empirical evidence about these links in visual creativity. Positive affect often--but inconsistently--facilitates creativity, and both may be linked to experiencing flow. This study aimed to determine relationships between these variables within visual creativity. Participants performed the creative mental synthesis task to simulate the creative process. Affect change (pre- vs. post-task) and flow were measured via questionnaires. The creativity of synthesis drawings was rated objectively and subjectively by judges. Findings empirically demonstrate that flow is related to affect improvement during visual creativity. Affect change was linked to productivity and self-rated creativity, but no other objective or subjective performance measures. Flow was unrelated to all external performance measures but was highly correlated with self-rated creativity; flow may therefore motivate perseverance towards eventual excellence rather than provide direct cognitive enhancement.

  3. Measurement of children's creativity by tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Slavica B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available After over a 50-year permanent development of tests designed to measure creativity and the results they produced, a question is raised if creativity can be measured by tests at all. A special problem are procedures for measuring creative potential in younger children because children, unlike adults, do not possess creative products that are a single reliable evidence of creativity in the real world. The paper considers test reliability and validity in measuring creativity as well as the dilemma: how much justifiable it is to measure children's creativity by tests if it is not clear what they measure and if there is not a significant relationship between creativity scores and creativity in life. Unsatisfactory creativity test reliability and validity does not mean those tests should be given up the majority of researchers agree. Of the tests of creativity administered in work with the young, the status of Urban-Jellen Test of Creative Thinking - Drawing Production (TCT-DP is given prominence due to the fact that over the past ten years or so it has been used in a larger number of studies as well as in some studies carried out in this country. In TCT-DP scoring is not based on statistical uncommonness of the figures produced but on a number of criteria derived from Gestalt psychology. The factor analyses of the defined criteria of creativity, applied on samples in various settings yielded that the test contains an essential factor of creativity "novelty".

  4. Peer Effect on Students' Creative Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Creative self-concept has become a notable construct of interest in creativity literature in the last decade. The predictors, correlates, determinants, and consequences of self-rated creativity, creative self-efficacy, creative personal identity, and creative metacognition--as well as other self-concept constructs--have been studied intensively,…

  5. A multiple feedback methodology for the study of creativity evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2012-01-01

    The cultural psychology perspective emphasizes the role of communication and social interaction in the construction of representations and evaluations concerning creativity. In terms of creativity assessment, this approach leads to the use of a multiple feedback methodology selecting several groups...... useful for investigating the social and cultural dynamics of creativity....

  6. Culture and Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    INTRODUCTION The present publication deals with issues of imagination and creativity as a notion, philosophy – and social and cultural form, with point of departure in current debates on visual culture. Whereas these debates cover a large ground, spanning from media studies over design to cultural...... studies, they seldom reflect on the basic fact that visual culture in its present form indicates a huge collective creativity in some capacity, implicating the entire postwar era. From early focuses on the possible social and cultural roles of the image in the 1950s and 60s - e.g. in work of Roland...... and cognitive science. Thus visual culture points to an interesting inroad to - and a possible novel focus on - the image - pictorial representation - as an issue of cultural creativity. For one thing the current interest in visual culture goes along with a surge in concrete interest in culture and creativity...

  7. Bringing us back to our creative senses: Fostering creativity in graduate-level nursing education: A literary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Karen V

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore empirical findings of five studies related to graduate-level nurse educators' and nursing students' perceptions about the roles of creativity and creative problem-solving in traditional and innovative pedagogies, and examines conceptual differences in the value of creativity from teacher and student viewpoints. Five peer-reviewed scholarly articles; professional nursing organizations; conceptual frameworks of noted scholars specializing in creativity and creative problem-solving; business-related sources; primary and secondary sources of esteemed nurse scholars. Quantitative and qualitative studies were examined that used a variety of methodologies, including surveys, focus groups, 1:1 interviews, and convenience sampling of both nursing and non-nursing college students and faculty. Innovative teaching strategies supported student creativity and creative problem-solving development. Teacher personality traits and teaching styles receptive to students' needs led to greater student success in creative development. Adequate time allocation and perceived usefulness of creativity and creative problem-solving by graduate-level nurse educators must be reflected in classroom activities and course design. Findings indicated conservative teaching norms, evident in graduate nursing education today, should be revised to promote creativity and creative problem-solving development in graduate-level nursing students for best practice outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Creativity and Strategy Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    This paper focus on how creative thinking, processes and methods can support the strategy development and planning process in organisations. First, several fundamental concepts related to both strategy development and planning are stipulated. In addition, the concept of living organisation...... will be discussed as well as the interaction between strategy and creativity. Then, methodological ideas to support the strategy making process are presented enhancing the use of creative methods and tools. Finally, a case study related to the development of a strategy for organisational development using...... creativity tools is discussed....

  9. A Qualitative Study on the Effects of Psychoactive Substance use upon Artistic Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iszaj, Fruzsina; Ehmann, Bea; Griffiths, Mark D; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2017-11-29

    Psychoactive substance use has often been claimed to help generate and facilitate the artistic creative process. This study explored the role of artists' substance use in their creative processes and their efforts to balance between enhancement and relaxation. Semistructured interviews concerning the artistic creative process and the role of psychoactive substance use were recorded with 72 artists and analyzed using content analysis. The participants were classified according to their substance use in three groups (Cannabis Group, Alcohol Group, and Control Group). Results show that both alcohol and cannabis were used to facilitate creativity and the emotional states that are necessary for the artistic creative process. Participants in the Control group reported that listening to music might function as a mind-altering tool. It was also found that for some artists, substance use is not only characteristic to creation, but it is also part of their everyday lives. Artists are aware of the balancing phenomenon during the artistic creative process. Whether psychoactive substance(s) or other environmental stimuli (such as music) are used to reach the required effect appears to depend upon the individual.

  10. INVESTIGATION OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ EFL WRITING APPREHENSION: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Kostić Bobanović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Writing apprehension defines a person's ability to write under various stress types. Depending on a situation, an average person might perform below expectations, or be less apprehensive about writing than a professional. The purpose of this research is to investigate Croatian University students’ English as a foreign language writing apprehension. For the purpose to determine if the variables of students' gender and academic level (age play a role in their writing apprehension, we adapted WAT (Writing Apprehension Test so this would be tailored to our study popu-lation. A longitudinal study was conducted among the students who were studying at the University of Juraj Dobrila, Pula. The participants were tested twice: in the first and in the third year. The results of the study indicated that, in contrary to respondents’ gender, academic level was significant variable in their estimates of writing apprehension. In accordance with the findings stated above, a number of recommendations for handling writing apprehension were set.

  11. Creative Leadership for Social Impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejenova, Silviya; Højgaard Christiansen, Lærke

    2018-01-01

    This study explores how creative leadership unfolds in the pursuit of social purpose. Drawing on the case of an architectural firm’s development of novel social housing model, we identify claims of three creative leadership processes and of scaling up for social impact. The study expands...... the conceptualization of creative leadership to the context of social change. It also adds to the understanding of creative industries by suggesting social purpose as a distinctive, yet underexplored driver of innovation and a source of different balancing act, as well as an important frontier for research...

  12. The Creativity Passdown Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to suggest that translating a design theory (DT) into practice (e.g. creating an instance design artifact (IDA)) is hardly straight-forward and requires substantial creativity. Specifically the authors suggest that adopting a DT embodies a creativity passdown...... effect in which the creative thinking of a team of design theorist(s) inherent in DT invokes a creative mind of a team of artifact instance designer(s) in creating an IDA. In this study, the authors empirically investigate the creativity passdown effect through an action case in which a DT (DT nexus...... designer team introducing a previously published DT as a basis for creating an IDA. Findings – The experience in the action case suggests that using a DT in creating an IDA may encourage design thinking, and in certain way increase its power and practical relevance by fostering the creative mind...

  13. Factors for Radical Creativity, Incremental Creativity, and Routine, Noncreative Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjar, Nora; Greenberg, Ellen; Chen, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    This study extends theory and research by differentiating between routine, noncreative performance and 2 distinct types of creativity: radical and incremental. We also use a sensemaking perspective to examine the interplay of social and personal factors that may influence a person's engagement in a certain level of creative action versus routine,…

  14. Are Individuals with Schizophrenia or Schizotypy More Creative? Evidence from Multiple Tests of Creative Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixia; Xu, Xiaobo; Wang, Qing; Healey, Grace; Su, Liang; Pang, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia and schizotypy have been often associated with above average creativity; however, empirical studies on the relationship between schizophrenia spectrum disorders and enhanced creativity generated inconsistent results. This research investigates if the association between schizophrenia spectrum disorders and creative potential levels…

  15. Threshold Effects of Creative Problem-Solving Attributes on Creativity in the Math Abilities of Taiwanese Upper Elementary Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yi Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to help determine what the typology of math creative problem-solving is. Different from studies that have discussed the threshold effect between creativity and intelligence, this research investigated the threshold effect between creativity and other attributes. The typology of the math creative problem-solving abilities of 409 fifth- and sixth-grade Taiwanese students was identified and compared in this study. A Creative Problem-Solving Attribute Instrument was devised for this study, with the aim of measuring students’ perceptions on their motivation, knowledge, and skills, both in general and in specific domains. Divergent and convergent thinking were also measured. Cluster analyses yielded three creative problem-solving typologies: High, Medium, and Low. The High Attribute group scored significantly higher in the Math Creative Problem-Solving Ability Test than did the Medium Attribute and Low Attribute groups. The results suggest a threshold effect from several attributes—divergent thinking, convergent thinking, motivation, general knowledge and skills, domain-specific knowledge and skills, and environment—on students’ creative problem-solving abilities. Balanced development of attributes may be an important consideration in nurturing creativity in children.

  16. Considering Collaborative Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a framework for understanding the creation of online content on social media sites. Focusing on creativity and its social context, the study is narrowed to the field of fanfiction and fanfiction sites. Using the Systems Model of Creativity by Csiksze- ntmihalyi as a template...

  17. EVALUASI KOMPETENSI PENULISAN TESIS MAHASISWA S2 PROGRAM STUDI PENDIDIKAN TEKNOLOGI DAN KEJURAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Sudira

    2015-06-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate: (1 the progress of writing a thesis; (2 the competence of writing a thesis; (3 factors that influence the writing of the thesis; (4 the dominant factors that influence the writing of the thesis; (5 creativity of students in writing a thesis. This study was an internal formative evaluation conducted in May and October 2014. Respondents of this study were master degree students on Vocational and Technology Education Study Programs class of 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 as many as 59 people. The data were collected using questionnaires and interviews. The data were analyzed using quantitative descriptive analysis techniques. The results showed that the progress of the thesis was classified in the excellent category. The competence of students in writing thesis was classified in very well category. Thesis writing is influenced by internal and exsternal campus factors. The dominant factors affecting the thesis were the availability of a discussion with the supervisor, the ability to apply research methods and data analysis, workload in the workplace, the ability to understand foreign literatur, supervisor support, administrative processes, motivation to pass quickly, family support, and scholarship. The level of creativity of students was clasified in the excellent category.Keywords: evaluation, thesis, student competence, Vocational and Technology Education

  18. Directing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte; Ibbotson, Piers

    2008-01-01

    In this article we argue that leaders facing complex challenges can learn from the arts, specifically that leaders can learn by examining how theatre directors direct creativity through creative constraints. We suggest that perceiving creativity as a boundary phenomenon is helpful for directing it....... Like leaders, who are caught in paradoxical situations where they have to manage production and logistics simultaneously with making space for creativity and innovation, theatre directors need to find the delicate balance between on one hand renewal of perceptions, acting and interaction...... and on the other hand getting ready for the opening night. We conclude that the art of directing creativity is linked to developing competencies of conscious presence, attention and vigilance, whereas the craft of directing creativity concerns communication, framing and choice....

  19. CREATIVITY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP. METHODS OF STIMULATING CREATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Irina Dromereschi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Creativity as producing new information system, you can put in what seems unconnected connection, after so many forms of the unfold plan and in content. An entrepreneur will think and do new things or old things in a new form trying to transform ideas into tangible things, products and services. Entrepreneurship is the process through which all functions, activities and actions are shared to identify business opportunities and creating organizations through which they will be used in order to obtain profit and meeting social interests. Boosting creativity is justified in that creative activity is educated, even if some native elements have their own importance in the creative process. If we start from the idea that most barriers to creative thinking are all human creations, tributaries of the left hemisphere, will have to find alternative responses to stimulation, shaping and maintaining the creative process and even create organizational culture conducive to the creative process. Ideas are our tenement dwellers and often are near us in the simplest and quickest form. Just educate us the activation process and instituting the ideas process which involves methods fall under three broad categories: imaginative, heuristics and logical approach. Subject to the risk taken, the combination of these methods can provide as many alternatives to a reality whose details they ultimately determines who assumes the risk of their own decisions.

  20. Creativity, synthetic intelligence and high ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sainz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyze the construct of creativity and its relationship with high ability, presenting different definitions, assessment tools and strategies to encourage their development in the school context. The paper is structured into five sections: firstly, we define the concept of creativity. Secondly, we present the most relevant instruments used in the analysis of high ability students’ creativity. Thirdly, we look into several studies on creativity and high abilitiy, highlighting the main limitations of the research carried out. Fourthly, we present principles and strategies in order to foster creativity in the school context. Finally, some conclusions are drawn on the relationship between creativity and high ability.

  1. On Creativity: A Case Study of Military Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    three perspectives. This organization is inspired by how ethnographic researchers create personas, or archetypes, representing important and distinct...organization is inspired by how ethnographic researchers create personas, or archetypes, representing important and distinct characters that stand...view that draws on four lines of creativity research . This thesis explores whether factors found to influence creativity in this wide field of

  2. Creativity and Psychopathology: Sex Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Brufau, Ramón; Corbalán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The association between creativity and psychopathology has, for decades, been a focus of heated debate fuelled by contradictory findings. Nevertheless, the findings suggest complex associations between creativity and psychopathology. Other studies have investigated the association between creativity and sex, with inconsistent results. The aim of…

  3. Placebo can enhance creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenkrantz, Liron; Mayo, Avraham E; Ilan, Tomer; Hart, Yuval; Noy, Lior; Alon, Uri

    2017-01-01

    The placebo effect is usually studied in clinical settings for decreasing negative symptoms such as pain, depression and anxiety. There is interest in exploring the placebo effect also outside the clinic, for enhancing positive aspects of performance or cognition. Several studies indicate that placebo can enhance cognitive abilities including memory, implicit learning and general knowledge. Here, we ask whether placebo can enhance creativity, an important aspect of human cognition. Subjects were randomly assigned to a control group who smelled and rated an odorant (n = 45), and a placebo group who were treated identically but were also told that the odorant increases creativity and reduces inhibitions (n = 45). Subjects completed a recently developed automated test for creativity, the creative foraging game (CFG), and a randomly chosen subset (n = 57) also completed two manual standardized creativity tests, the alternate uses test (AUT) and the Torrance test (TTCT). In all three tests, participants were asked to create as many original solutions and were scored for originality, flexibility and fluency. The placebo group showed higher originality than the control group both in the CFG (pcreativity. This strengthens the view that placebo can be used not only to reduce negative clinical symptoms, but also to enhance positive aspects of cognition. Furthermore, we find that the impact of placebo on creativity can be tested by CFG, which can quantify multiple aspects of creative search without need for manual coding. This approach opens the way to explore the behavioral and neural mechanisms by which placebo might amplify creativity.

  4. Placebo can enhance creativity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Rozenkrantz

    Full Text Available The placebo effect is usually studied in clinical settings for decreasing negative symptoms such as pain, depression and anxiety. There is interest in exploring the placebo effect also outside the clinic, for enhancing positive aspects of performance or cognition. Several studies indicate that placebo can enhance cognitive abilities including memory, implicit learning and general knowledge. Here, we ask whether placebo can enhance creativity, an important aspect of human cognition.Subjects were randomly assigned to a control group who smelled and rated an odorant (n = 45, and a placebo group who were treated identically but were also told that the odorant increases creativity and reduces inhibitions (n = 45. Subjects completed a recently developed automated test for creativity, the creative foraging game (CFG, and a randomly chosen subset (n = 57 also completed two manual standardized creativity tests, the alternate uses test (AUT and the Torrance test (TTCT. In all three tests, participants were asked to create as many original solutions and were scored for originality, flexibility and fluency.The placebo group showed higher originality than the control group both in the CFG (p<0.04, effect size = 0.5 and in the AUT (p<0.05, effect size = 0.4, but not in the Torrance test. The placebo group also found more shapes outside of the standard categories found by a set of 100 CFG players in a previous study, a feature termed out-of-the-boxness (p<0.01, effect size = 0.6.The findings indicate that placebo can enhance the originality aspect of creativity. This strengthens the view that placebo can be used not only to reduce negative clinical symptoms, but also to enhance positive aspects of cognition. Furthermore, we find that the impact of placebo on creativity can be tested by CFG, which can quantify multiple aspects of creative search without need for manual coding. This approach opens the way to explore the behavioral and neural mechanisms by which

  5. Crossing the invisible line: De-differentiation of wake, sleep and dreaming may engender both creative insight and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Sue

    2016-11-01

    Writing about dreaming, the poet Raymond Carver said "I feel as if I've crossed some kind of invisible line". In creative people, the "line" between wake, dreaming and psychopathology may be porous, engendering a de-differentiated, super-critical, hybrid state. Evidence exists for a relationship between creativity and psychopathology but its nature has been elusive. De-differentiation between wake, sleep and dreaming may be the common substrate, as dream-like cognition pervades wake and wake-like neurophysiology suffuses sleep. Chaos theory posits brain states as inherently labile, transient and dynamically unstable. Over and above transient dissociations, an enduring and, sometimes, progressive, de-differentiation may be possible. Evidence indicates that sleep and dreaming facilitate creative insight. In consequence, a mild to moderate form of de-differentiation may enhance creativity but if wake-like neurobiology permeates sleep this may disrupt sleep-dependent memory processing and emotional regulation. If de-differentiation is progressive and enduring, various forms of psychopathology may result. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of observational learning on students' performance, processes, and motivation in two creative domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendijk, Talita; Janssen, Tanja; Rijlaarsdam, Gert; van den Bergh, Huub

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has shown that observation can be effective for learning in various domains, for example, argumentative writing and mathematics. The question in this paper is whether observational learning can also be beneficial when learning to perform creative tasks in visual and verbal arts. We hypothesized that observation has a positive effect on performance, process, and motivation. We expected similarity in competence between the model and the observer to influence the effectiveness of observation. Sample.  A total of 131 Dutch students (10(th) grade, 15 years old) participated. Two experiments were carried out (one for visual and one for verbal arts). Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions; two observational learning conditions and a control condition (learning by practising). The observational learning conditions differed in instructional focus (on the weaker or the more competent model of a pair to be observed). We found positive effects of observation on creative products, creative processes, and motivation in the visual domain. In the verbal domain, observation seemed to affect the creative process, but not the other variables. The model similarity hypothesis was not confirmed. Results suggest that observation may foster learning in creative domains, especially in the visual arts. © 2011 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Creativity and psychopathology: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, Erik; Sabbe, Bernard; De Hert, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The possible link between creativity and psychopathology has been a long-time focus of research up to the present day. However, the research results in this field are heterogeneous and contradictory. Links between creativity and specific psychiatric disorders have been confirmed and refuted in different studies. This disparity is partly explained by the methodological challenges peculiar to this field. In this systematic review of the literature from 1950, research articles in the field of creativity and psychopathology are presented, focusing on the methodology and results of the collected studies. This review confirms the methodological problems and the heterogeneity of the study designs and results. The assessment of psychopathology, but more so of creativity, remains a fundamental challenge. On the whole, study results cautiously confirm an association between creativity and both bipolar disorder and schizotypy. The research on creativity and psychopathology is hampered by serious methodological problems. Study results are to be interpreted with caution and future research needs more methodological rigor. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. A (Creative) Portrait of the Uncertain Individual: Self-Uncertainty and Individualism Enhance Creative Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Kimberly; Markman, Keith D; Schroeder, Juliana; Dyczewski, Elizabeth A

    2014-08-01

    Building on findings that self-uncertainty motivates attempts to restore certainty about the self, particularly in ways that highlight one's distinctiveness from others, we show that self-uncertainty, relative to uncertainty in general, increases creative generation among individualists. In Studies 1 to 3, high (but not low) individualists performed better on a creative generation task after being primed with self-uncertainty as opposed to general uncertainty. In Study 4, this effect emerged only among those who were told that the task measured creative as opposed to analytical thinking, suggesting that the positive effects of self-uncertainty on performance are specific to tasks that bolster perceptions of uniqueness. In Study 5, self-uncertain individualists experienced a restoration of self-clarity after being induced to think about themselves as more (vs. less) creative. Implications for compensatory responses to self-uncertainty and factors that influence creativity are discussed. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  9. Humorous Writing Exercise Using Internet Memes On English Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Aziz Turhan Kariko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses Internet memes found by Internet users and how they appeal for them, by deconstructing what internet meme is and what it does. Analysis are conducted especially on how the relation between images, text, and meanings connect with each other to form social messages, political messages, universal emotions, or merely to make humor and entertain its users. Researcher examines five samples of internet memes on the internet and decodes their relation between images, texts, and meanings using semiotics. These samples are then introduced as writing assignments to two BINUS University’s English department classes and one Global English Class. The study reveals that humor and creativity in using internet memes are related to the students’ achievement in their studies.

  10. The Role of Creative Drama in Improving the Creativity of 4-6 Years Old Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Momeni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the influence of creative drama on the creativity of 4 to 6 years old children. Accordingly, using a multi-stage cluster sampling, 52 children (21 girls and 31 boys, of district of Ahwaz city, were chosen and then randomly divided into two groups of experimental (33 people and control (19 people. The researched was directly involved in intervention as regarded the experimental group. The intervention group participated in creative drama activities for two months (15 sessions. The creativity level of the children in these two groups, before and after the intervention, was measured using the creativity test of Jean-Louis Cellier? This test includes verbal creativity, completing and interpreting the pictures that are determinative of creativity components, fluidity, extension, flexibility and originality. The data and the results were analyzed based on descriptive statistical and inferential methods such as frequency, mean, standard deviation and non-parametric rank (Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon and the Spearman correlation. The results indicated that the creative drama significantly increased the creativity of children at the ages of 4 to 6.

  11. THE ANALYSIS OF PROFESSIONAL EXPECTATIONS OF THE STUDYING CREATIVE YOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiya Mikhailovna Protopopova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to the analysis of professional expectations of students of full-time courses (№ 104 who study in the following directions: choreography, musical art, art and theater. The research was conducted in March-May of 2017 in the city of Yakutsk. The creative youth as socially-demographic, professional group is distinguished by the increased motivation level to creative activity and need of self-realization for art. Professional expectations belong to structure of the vital purposes and plans of the personality, they are defined as a set of ideas of the individual of the professional future, mediated by personal, micro and macrosocial socially-psychological factors. A creativity role for students, factors of the choice of future specialty, satisfaction with process of training and vital prospects are also considered. Method: primary sociological information was received as a result of the conducted structured questionnaire. Results. Young respondents identify their future profession as a way to express themselves, their thoughts and feelings. Respondents note that creative abilities on average at everyone have begun to be shown in the childhood aged from 6–13. It was revealed that the main motives in the choice of specialty and educational institution were realization of students’ abilities and talents, satisfaction of their own interests and knowledge acquisition. After graduating from educational institution 73,0% of students plan to continue work on the specialty in the sphere of culture and art. It was defined that for respondents of young residents of Yakutsk vital values were an opportunity to realize the talent, successful professional activity and family happiness. It was established that the most of respondents had positive professional expectations in relation to the received specialty, they hoped to self-actualize in the future creative profession. The creative youth of Yakutia considers the profession

  12. Creative ICT

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Promoting pupils' creativity when they use ICT, this book also encourages learning across core as well as foundation subjects. It includes: flexible activities for pupils to refer to as they work through the activities; helpful examples of work so pupils know what to aim for; additional support sheets that can be used by the pupil of the teacher; departure points for integrated studies; extension activities that will encourage further creativity.

  13. Understanding Creativity in the Workplace: An Examination of Individual Styles and Training in Relation to Creative Confidence and Creative Self-Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Sherry; Young, Angela M.

    2003-01-01

    Creative Self-Leadership and Creative Confidence were examined in relation to Creative Style Preference and Training. It was hypothesized that perceptions of Creative Self-Leadership and Creative Confidence were related to personal Creative Style Preferences and that Training would be associated with higher levels of Creative Self-Leadership and…

  14. Creativity as Action: Findings from Five Creative Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad eGlaveanu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper outlines an action theory of creativity and substantiates this approach by investigating creative expression in five different domains. We propose an action framework for the analysis of creative acts built on the assumption that creativity is a relational, inter-subjective phenomenon. This framework, drawing extensively from the work of Dewey (1934 on art as experience, is used to derive a coding frame for the analysis of interview material. The article reports findings from the analysis of 60 interviews with recognised French creators in five creative domains: art, design, science, scriptwriting, and music. Results point to complex models of action and inter-action specific for each domain and also to interesting patterns of similarity and differences between domains. These findings highlight the fact that creative action takes place not ‘inside’ individual creators but ‘in between’ actors and their environment. Implications for the field of educational psychology are discussed.

  15. We learn to write by reading, but writing can make you smarter We learn to write by reading, but writing can make you smarter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Krashen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available My goal in this paper is to make Iwo points: Writing style does not come from writing or from direct instruction, but from reading. Actual writing can help us solve problems and can make us smarter. Writing Style Comes from Readino, A substantial amount of research strongly suggests that we learn to write by reading. To be more precise, we acquire writing style, the special language of writing, by reading. Hypothesizing that writing style comes from reading, not from writing or instniction, is consistent with what is known about language acquisition: Most of language acquisition lakes place subconsciously, not through deliberate study, and it is a result of input (comprehension, not output (production (Krashen, 1982. My goal in this paper is to make Iwo points: Writing style does not come from writing or from direct instruction, but from reading. Actual writing can help us solve problems and can make us smarter. Writing Style Comes from Readino, A substantial amount of research strongly suggests that we learn to write by reading. To be more precise, we acquire writing style, the special language of writing, by reading. Hypothesizing that writing style comes from reading, not from writing or instniction, is consistent with what is known about language acquisition: Most of language acquisition lakes place subconsciously, not through deliberate study, and it is a result of input (comprehension, not output (production (Krashen, 1982.

  16. Creativity: resource or risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Aranguren

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to review some of the present perspectives and outstanding contributions that examine the relationship between creativity, psychopathology and psychological well-being. We know that creativity is a psychological process, which involves and integrates cognitive, volitional and emotional aspects of human behavior. In addition, creativity is associated with a greater flow of ideas, cognitive flexibility, ability to solve problems and originality (Guilford, 1956, 1968; Torrance, 1966, all qualities that lead to think of a better quality of life. Many of the humanist psychologists and others from the psychoanalytic stream stress that creativity is an element linked to sublimation, play, symbolic thought, transcendence and self-realization (Maslow, Rogers, Winnicott, Frankl, Freud, among others. However, many empirical studies show that highly creative individuals are more vulnerable to mental disorders, especially in the spectrum of mood disorders. Some current studies attempt to clarify the issue of creativity and psychopathology, taking into account different perspectives, which may explain the possible links between these two conceptual entities. The perspectives or contributions, which are considered in the present article to address this problem, are: (a the historical-social perspective, (b the contributions of psychometric studies and cognitive psychology, in relation to personality traits and cognitive styles, (c the “systemic” perspective or contributions from fractal geometry, and (d the contributions from positive psychology. 

  17. Putting Words in Their Mouth: Writing Dialogue for Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2018-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This issue discusses dialogue writing guidelines most relevant to case writing.

  18. Enhancing Systems Engineering Education Through Case Study Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jennifer Stenger

    2016-01-01

    Developing and refining methods for teaching systems engineering is part of Systems Engineering grand challenges and agenda for research in the SE research community. Retention of systems engineering knowledge is a growing concern in the United States as the baby boom generation continues to retire and the faster pace of technology development does not allow for younger generations to gain experiential knowledge through years of practice. Government agencies, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), develop their own curricula and SE leadership development programs to "grow their own" systems engineers. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducts its own Center-focused Marshall Systems Engineering Leadership Development Program (MSELDP), a competitive program consisting of coursework, a guest lecture series, and a rotational assignment into an unfamiliar organization engaged in systems engineering. Independently, MSFC developed two courses to address knowledge retention and sharing concerns: Real World Marshall Mission Success course and its Case Study Writers Workshop and Writers Experience. Teaching case study writing and leading students through a hands-on experience at writing a case study on an SE topic can enhance SE training and has the potential to accelerate the transfer of experiential knowledge. This paper is an overview of the pilot experiences with teaching case study writing, its application in case study-based learning, and identifies potential areas of research and application for case study writing in systems engineering education.

  19. The creative pathways of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2015-01-01

    interested in the simultaneous development of persons and social practices. Pathways are created in ordinary life; their formation may involve creativity and the improvisational co-creation of opportunities for action. Studying pathways may therefore direct creativity researchers toward the potentials...... in the mundane processes of everyday life is, however, seldom highlighted by researchers working explicitly on creativity. The premise of the present paper is that a focus on everyday life can help us understand creative processes in broader terms. I “creative pathways” may serve as a useful term for researchers...... of creativity in daily life and shed light of the processes of creativity. Creative pathways are present in existing ways of moving and doing things; they are also created in the here-and-now by persons acting in correspondence with the affordances in social practices. A focus on creative pathways is consistent...

  20. Commentary: Toward Convergence in Creativity Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ai-Girl; Wong, Meng-Ee

    2015-01-01

    This commentary is about reflection in the new language of creativity and the meanings of inquiry into creative life. The authors of the commentary adopt the cultural paradigm of psychology of creativity. They praise effortful creativity of the authors who submitted the articles to this special issue. Their studies employed diverse methods of…

  1. THE STUDENTS’ ACADEMIC WRITING SKILL AFTER IMPLEMENTING BLENDED LEARNING USING FACEBOOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Sulisworo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Almost all students use smartphone for their daily activities. Nowadays, the student’s literacy on information technology is very good, but sometimes it has not been considered in school learning. One of the essential competencies of undergraduate school is academic writing skill. There is a gap between the student competencies and the learning strategy in certain learning subjects. The aim of this research is to examine the effectiveness of blended mobile learning activity using Facebook to improve student writing skill. This research used timed essay examination to measure the writing skill after one semester learning activity using this strategy and student satisfaction responses to learning. There were four aspects used as criteria of writing skill: ideas, organization, wording, and flavor. The results showed that this learning approach had shown good results in some aspects, particularly in improving the skill of shaping ideas and organizing the ideas into written form. The uses of various learning strategies that make students more active and centered on students tend to increase the ability of students to search for new ideas creatively. Among others, the positive aspect is the students have the knowledge and understanding of new concepts that can support the idea of writing in the aspect of idea and various choices of words.

  2. Neural Correlates of Musical Creativity: Differences between High and Low Creative Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Mirta F.; Cerquetti, Daniel; Caruso, Silvina; Schwarcz López Aranguren, Violeta; Gerschcovich, Eliana Roldán; Frega, Ana Lucía; Leiguarda, Ramón C.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of musical creativity suggest that this process involves multi-regional intra and interhemispheric interactions, particularly in the prefrontal cortex. However, the activity of the prefrontal cortex and that of the parieto-temporal regions, seems to depend on the domains of creativity that are evaluated and the task that is performed. In the field of music, only few studies have investigated the brain process of a creative task and none of them have investigated the effect of the level of creativity on the recruit networks. In this work we used magnetic resonance imaging to explore these issues by comparing the brain activities of subjects with higher creative abilities to those with lesser abilities, while the subjects improvised on different rhythmic fragments. We evaluated the products the subjects created during the fMRI scan using two musical parameters: fluidity and flexibility, and classified the subjects according to their punctuation. We examined the relation between brain activity and creativity level. Subjects with higher abilities generated their own creations based on modifications of the original rhythm with little adhesion to it. They showed activation in prefrontal regions of both hemispheres and the right insula. Subjects with lower abilities made only partial changes to the original musical patterns. In these subjects, activation was only observed in left unimodal areas. We demonstrated that the activations of prefrontal and paralimbic areas, such as the insula, are related to creativity level, which is related to a widespread integration of networks that are mainly associated with cognitive, motivational and emotional processes. PMID:24069414

  3. Measuring Creative Imagery Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota M. Jankowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the decades, creativity and imagination research developed in parallel, but they surprisingly rarely intersected. This paper introduces a new theoretical model of creative imagination, which bridges creativity and imagination research, as well as presents a new psychometric instrument, called the Test of Creative Imagery Abilities (TCIA, developed to measure creative imagery abilities understood in accordance with this model. Creative imagination is understood as constituted by three interrelated components: vividness (the ability to create images characterized by a high level of complexity and detail, originality (the ability to produce unique imagery, and transformativeness (the ability to control imagery. TCIA enables valid and reliable measurement of these three groups of abilities, yielding the general score of imagery abilities and at the same time making profile analysis possible. We present the results of eight studies on a total sample of more than 1,700 participants, showing the factor structure of TCIA using confirmatory factor analysis, as well as provide data confirming this instrument’s validity and reliability. The availability of TCIA for interested researchers may result in new insights and possibilities of integrating the fields of creativity and imagination science.

  4. A creative look at giftedness. Possibilities and difficulties in the identification of creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Borgstede

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study reflects upon the identification process for gifted or highly able children through a systematic study of the literature, with the aim of providing them with an adequate and stimulating education beginning at an early age. The identification process requires an adequate diagnostic process of giftedness, and creativity is an important determining factor. Creativity, however, is a very complex construct due to differences in definition in the psychology field. This study aims to make a valuable contribution by discussing how to measure creativity in gifted or highly able children, as well as proving recommendations in the diagnostic process.

  5. A Research on the Structure of Intelligence and Creativity, and Creativity Style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyzullah Şahin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between intelligence and creativity may be linked to the difficulties in defining and measuring methodology. Threshold theory is one of the theories which is used to explain the relationship between them. The aim of this study is to investigate the structures which the creative thinking ability of the gifted students and their intellectual structure is grouped and the structure which their creative thinking ability are alone. Data was gathered using Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-R and Torrance Thinking Creativity Test (TTCT. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted with data from 278 gifted primary school students which contained the grade range of 1 to 3. The results indicate that the TTCT subscores consist of 2 factors called adaptive and innovative rather than a single factor. Besides, the results of the analyses provide support that creativity and intelligence are independent from each other.

  6. Incorporating the Creative Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endrissat, Nada; Kärreman, Dan; Noppeney, Claus

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of branding, identity and control. It develops the notion of identity-incentive branding and links research on the collective-associative construction of occupational identities with work on identity incentives as an engaging form of control. Empirically, we...... draw on a case study of a North American grocery chain that is known for employing art-school graduates and other creative talents in creative (store artist) and non-creative shop-floor positions. The study shows that the brand is partly built outside–in through association with employees who embody...... brand-relevant characteristics in their identities and lifestyles. In return, those employees receive identity opportunities to validate their desired sense of self as ‘creative subject’. We discuss the dual nature of identity-incentive branding as neo-normative control and outline its implications...

  7. Fostering Individual and Organizational Creativity in Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine E. Leigh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Demand for creativity has moved from individual to organizational levels encompassing work environments in which organizations, competing for customers and clients, must demonstrate increased creativity and innovation as the pace of change escalates. Creativity, as a means to produce innovative outcomes, invites individuals and organizations to generate and embrace new ideas and ways of accomplishing work tasks. Facilitators of individual and organizational creativity, in non-design organizations, have revealed climate factors consistent in measuring workplace creativity; however, research findings have suggested differences between creative and non-creative environments regarding the importance of resources, time pressure, and autonomy relative to work tasks in studies of architectural and advertising work environments. This paper focuses on findings of two empirical studies used to identify key factors influencing creativity at the individual and organizational levels.

  8. Making Creative Metaphors: The Importance of Fluid Intelligence for Creative Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvia, Paul J.; Beaty, Roger E.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between intelligence and creativity remains controversial. The present research explored this issue by studying the role of fluid intelligence (Gf) in the generation of creative metaphors. Participants (n = 132 young adults) completed six nonverbal tests of Gf (primarily tests of inductive reasoning) and were then asked to create…

  9. Relating Inter-Individual Differences in Verbal Creative Thinking to Cerebral Structures: An Optimal Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feifei; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Creativity can be defined the capacity of an individual to produce something original and useful. An important measurable component of creativity is divergent thinking. Despite existing studies on creativity-related cerebral structural basis, no study has used a large sample to investigate the relationship between individual verbal creativity and regional gray matter volumes (GMVs) and white matter volumes (WMVs). In the present work, optimal voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was employed to identify the structure that correlates verbal creativity (measured by the verbal form of Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking) across the brain in young healthy subjects. Verbal creativity was found to be significantly positively correlated with regional GMV in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), which is believed to be responsible for language production and comprehension, new semantic representation, and memory retrieval, and in the right IFG, which may involve inhibitory control and attention switching. A relationship between verbal creativity and regional WMV in the left and right IFG was also observed. Overall, a highly verbal creative individual with superior verbal skills may demonstrate a greater computational efficiency in the brain areas involved in high-level cognitive processes including language production, semantic representation and cognitive control. PMID:24223921

  10. Relating inter-individual differences in verbal creative thinking to cerebral structures: an optimal voxel-based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Zhu

    Full Text Available Creativity can be defined the capacity of an individual to produce something original and useful. An important measurable component of creativity is divergent thinking. Despite existing studies on creativity-related cerebral structural basis, no study has used a large sample to investigate the relationship between individual verbal creativity and regional gray matter volumes (GMVs and white matter volumes (WMVs. In the present work, optimal voxel-based morphometry (VBM was employed to identify the structure that correlates verbal creativity (measured by the verbal form of Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking across the brain in young healthy subjects. Verbal creativity was found to be significantly positively correlated with regional GMV in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, which is believed to be responsible for language production and comprehension, new semantic representation, and memory retrieval, and in the right IFG, which may involve inhibitory control and attention switching. A relationship between verbal creativity and regional WMV in the left and right IFG was also observed. Overall, a highly verbal creative individual with superior verbal skills may demonstrate a greater computational efficiency in the brain areas involved in high-level cognitive processes including language production, semantic representation and cognitive control.

  11. Writing anxiety: an affective filter for essay writing instruction among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study which adopted the descriptive research design investigated the relationship between writing anxiety and students' achievement in essay writing. SS2 Students from six schools in Ibadan Metropolis were used for the study. The instruments used were Essay Writing Achievement Test(r=0.81) and Writing Anxiety ...

  12. Creative leaders create 'unsung heroes':leader creativity and subordinate organizational citizenship behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Deng; Zhishuang Guan

    2017-01-01

    As leader creativity is found to be effective at promoting outcomes for organizations,more and more organizations select creative individuals as leaders.However,the influence of leader creativity has not received enough attention.Thus,this research seeks to focus on the potential influences of leader creativity in organizations.Based on social cognitive theory,we explore the relationship between leader creativity and subordinate organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).We find that leader creativity is positively related to subordinate OCB,and perceived team creative efficacy mediates the relationship.Moreover,creative self-efficacy moderates the relationships between perceived team creative efficacy and subordinate OCB.We then discuss implications and limitations,and suggest directions for future research.

  13. An interview-based study of professional creative activity with inter-domain comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Botella, Marion; Bourgeois, Samira

    , designers and scientists represent distinctive professional cultures associated with recognized forms of creative activity because the expression of creativity appears to be culture-specific (Bhawuk, 2003; Lubart, 1999; Weiner, 2000). The research presented here explores the main factors required...... of cultural and contextual influences and three types of professional cultures that foster creativity will be discussed based on the systemic model of creativity (Feldman, Csikszentmihalyi & Gardner, 1994). In the end, practical suggestions to improve creativity and innovation management will be offered...

  14. Exploring boundary-spanning practices among creativity managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Kragh, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – External inputs are critical for organisational creativity. In order to bridge different thought worlds and cross-organisational barriers, managers must initiate and motivate boundary spanning processes. The purpose of this paper is to explore how boundary spanners manage creativity...... and observation. Findings – Three meta-practices used by managers to manage boundary-spanning creative projects are presented: defining the creative space, making space for creativity and acting in the creative space. These practices are detailed in seven case studies of creative projects. Research limitations...

  15. Does entrepreneurial leadership foster creativity among employees and team? : The mediating role of creative efficacy beliefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Wenjing; Lysova, E.; Khapova, S.N.; Bossink, Bart

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how entrepreneurial leadership relates to workplace creativity in organizations from the compatibility perspective. Drawing on social cognitive theory, we propose that individual creative self-efficacy and team creative efficacy beliefs

  16. Observing writing processes of struggling adult writers with collaborative writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afra Sturm

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated how struggling adult writers solve a writing task and what they know about writing and themselves as writers. The writing process of the adult writers was examined by combining three elements: the observation of collaborative writing tasks, analyses of their written texts, and structured individual interviews that included both retrospective and prospective parts. This methodical approach provides productive tools to assess writing processes and writing knowledge of struggling adult writers. The triangulation of data from the different sources is visualized in a case study. Findings from the case study suggest both similarities and differences between struggling adult and younger writers. Concerning the writing process of both groups, planning and revision play a limited role. However, alongside these similar limitations in their writing process, struggling adult writers distinguish themselves from their young counterparts through their relatively extensive knowledge about themselves as writers.

  17. Why Reject Creative Ideas? Fear as a Driver of Implicit Bias against Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Soo; Chang, Jae Yoon; Choi, Jin Nam

    2017-01-01

    Biases against creativity seem to be activated when people are motivated to reduce uncertainty. Drawing on the appraisal model of emotion, this study tested whether and how emotions with varying levels of uncertainty appraisals affect biases against creativity. This experimental study showed that fear, characterized by a high-uncertainty…

  18. Creativity, visualization abilities, and visual cognitive style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, Maria; Kozhevnikov, Michael; Yu, Chen Jiao; Blazhenkova, Olesya

    2013-06-01

    Despite the recent evidence for a multi-component nature of both visual imagery and creativity, there have been no systematic studies on how the different dimensions of creativity and imagery might interrelate. The main goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between different dimensions of creativity (artistic and scientific) and dimensions of visualization abilities and styles (object and spatial). In addition, we compared the contributions of object and spatial visualization abilities versus corresponding styles to scientific and artistic dimensions of creativity. Twenty-four undergraduate students (12 females) were recruited for the first study, and 75 additional participants (36 females) were recruited for an additional experiment. Participants were administered a number of object and spatial visualization abilities and style assessments as well as a number of artistic and scientific creativity tests. The results show that object visualization relates to artistic creativity and spatial visualization relates to scientific creativity, while both are distinct from verbal creativity. Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that style predicts corresponding dimension of creativity even after removing shared variance between style and visualization ability. The results suggest that styles might be a more ecologically valid construct in predicting real-life creative behaviour, such as performance in different professional domains. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  19. The scientific study of inspiration in the creative process: Challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C. Oleynick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Inspiration is a motivational state that compels individuals to bring ideas into fruition. Creators have long argued that inspiration is important to the creative process, but until recently, scientists have not investigated this claim. In this article, we review challenges to the study of creative inspiration, as well as solutions to these challenges afforded by theoretical and empirical work on inspiration over the past decade. First, we discuss the problem of definitional ambiguity, which has been addressed through an integrative process of construct conceptualization. Second, we discuss the challenge of how to operationalize inspiration. This challenge has been overcome by the development and validation of the Inspiration Scale, which may be used to assess trait or state inspiration. Third, we address ambiguity regarding how inspiration differs from related concepts (creativity, insight, positive affect by discussing discriminant validity. Next, we discuss the preconception that inspiration is less important than perspiration (effort, and we review empirical evidence that inspiration and effort both play important—but different—roles in the creative process. Finally, with many challenges overcome, we argue that the foundation is now set for a new generation of research focused on neural underpinnings. We discuss potential challenges to and opportunities for the neuroscientific study of inspiration. A better understanding of the biological basis of inspiration will illuminate the process through which creative ideas fire the soul, such that individuals are compelled to transform ideas into products and solutions that may benefit society.

  20. Association study between COMT 158Met and creativity scores in bipolar disorder and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Gerhardt Soeiro-de-Souza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Bipolar disorder (BD patients have been reported to be associated higher creativity abilities, and recent data tend to support the hypothesis that dopaminergic system that could be associated with creativity. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is one of the major enzymes involved in the metabolic degradation of dopamine. The COMT gene polymorphism (rs4680 or Val158Met Met allele is reported to cause decreased activity of this enzyme in prefrontal cortex and improve performance in several cognitive domains. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of Val158Met on creativity in BD type I and healthy controls. Methods Ninety-seven healthy volunteers and 120 BD type I were genotyped for COMT rs4680 and tested for creativity (Barrow Welsh Art Scale – BWAS and intelligence Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI. Results COMT Met allele positively influenced creativity scores in healthy controls but not in BD subjects during mood episodes and euthymia. The presence of allele Met did not influence IQ scores. No influence of IQ total score on creativity was observed. Limitations control group presented higher IQ scores and euthymic group was under medication use. Discussion Our research suggests positive effect of COMT rs4680 (allele Met on creativity scores in healthy controls. One possible interpretation is that creativity is more likely to be associated with lesser degrees of bipolarity. The fact that the same results were not observed in BD may be associated to dysfunctions in the dopaminergic system that characterizes this disorder. Further studies with larger samples and other types of BD should explore the role of the dopaminergic system in creativity.

  1. How creative potential is related to metacognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Sanz de Acedo Lizarraga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the possible links between metacognition and narrative (or verbal and graphic creative potential as well as the contribution of the former variable to creativity. The second objective was to study the effect of gender on these variables. This study was conducted with 360 men and women students from the Public University of Navarra enrolled in applied sociology, social work, and specialising in infant and primary education. Participants were given the Adult Creative Imagination Test and the Creative Metacognition Scale during their regular school schedule and during a single session. The results showed that the relationships between the assessed variables were significant and positive. Furthermore, metacognition moderately predicted narrative creativity; thus, cognitive processes do not operate in isolation because they affect and are affected by other factors. The findings also revealed that students obtained different results with regard to verbal and graphic creativity, and men and women differed only in narrative creative potential. The most important conclusion to be drawn from this research is that creative and metacognitive skills should be explicitly involved in higher education to stimulate the creative potential of future professionals

  2. We learn to write by reading, but writing can make you smarter We learn to write by reading, but writing can make you smarter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Krashen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available My goal in this paper is to make two points: 1. Writing style does not come from writing or from direct instruction, but from reading. 2. Actual writing can help us solve problems and can make us smarter. Writing Style Comes from Reading A substantial amount of research slrongly suggests that wc learn to write by reading. To be more precise, wc acquire writing style, the special language of writing, by reading. Hypothesizing that writing style comes from reading, not from writing or instruction, is consistent with what is known about language acquisition: Most of language acquisition takes place subconsciously, not through deliberate study, and it is a result of input (comprehension, not output (production (Krashen, 1982. Thus, if you wrile a page a day, your writing style or your command of mechanics will not improve. On Ihe other hand, other good things may result from your writing, as we shall see in the second section of this paper. My goal in this paper is to make two points: 1. Writing style does not come from writing or from direct instruction, but from reading. 2. Actual writing can help us solve problems and can make us smarter. Writing Style Comes from Reading A substantial amount of research slrongly suggests that wc learn to write by reading. To be more precise, wc acquire writing style, the special language of writing, by reading. Hypothesizing that writing style comes from reading, not from writing or instruction, is consistent with what is known about language acquisition: Most of language acquisition takes place subconsciously, not through deliberate study, and it is a result of input (comprehension, not output (production (Krashen, 1982. Thus, if you wrile a page a day, your writing style or your command of mechanics will not improve. On Ihe other hand, other good things may result from your writing, as we shall see in the second section of this paper.

  3. Chinese students' writing in English implications from a corpus-driven study

    CERN Document Server

    Leedham, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Chinese students are the largest international student group in UK universities today, yet little is known about their undergraduate writing and the challenges they face. Drawing on the British Academic Written English corpus - a large corpus of proficient undergraduate student writing collected in the UK in the early 2000s - this study explores Chinese students' written assignments in English in a range of university disciplines, contrasting these with assignments from British students. The study is supplemented by questionnaire and interview datasets with discipline lecturers, writing tutors and students, and provides a comprehensive picture of the Chinese student writer today. Theoretically framed through work within academic literacies and lexical priming, the author seeks to explore what we know about Chinese students' writing and to extend these findings to undergraduate writing more generally. In a globalized educational environment, it is important for educators to understand differences in writing st...

  4. Creativity and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Puente-Diaz, Rogelio; Agogue, Marine

    2016-01-01

    Creativity is a vibrant field of scientific research with important applied implications for the management of innovation. In this article, we argue that the proliferation of creativity research has led to positive and less positive outcomes and discuss five relevant research themes. We first...... introduce our readers to the different proposed dimensions of a creative object. Next, we explain recent developments on the level of the creativity magnitude issue. Based on that, we review how researchers currently operationalize creativity. After discussing how creativity is conceptualized...... and operationalized, we outline how it might be enhanced. Finally, we present an overview of the wide variety of methodological approaches currently used in creativity research. We close by calling for more interdisciplinary research and offering other suggestions for future directions....

  5. Creativity and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Puente-Diaz, Rogelio; Agogue, Marine

    2016-01-01

    Creativity is a vibrant field of scientific research with important applied implications for the management of innovation. In this article, we argue that the proliferation of creativity research has led to positive and less positive outcomes and discuss five relevant research themes. We first...... and operationalized, we outline how it might be enhanced. Finally, we present an overview of the wide variety of methodological approaches currently used in creativity research. We close by calling for more interdisciplinary research and offering other suggestions for future directions....... introduce our readers to the different proposed dimensions of a creative object. Next, we explain recent developments on the level of the creativity magnitude issue. Based on that, we review how researchers currently operationalize creativity. After discussing how creativity is conceptualized...

  6. CREATIVE COMMUNICATIVE BEHAVIOR AS A MEANS OF CREATIVE SELF-REALIZATION OF THE INDIVIDUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina I. Zhelezovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to designate a problem of formation of creative communicative behaviour of graduates mastering at “Creative Economics” through the system of vocational training. Methods. The research is constructed on the review and the comparative analysis of works of the foreign and Russian scientists dealing with the subject of creativeness, psychology of creativity and studying of communicative behaviour.Results and scientific novelty. The article explains the need to prepare students for the development of creativity. Concept definition «creative formation» is given; the system of requirements shown to educational process corresponding to it is designated. Research positions in the field of creativeness studying, different lines of thought to its interpretation and directions of scientific search of the decision of a problem of formation of creative communicative behaviour are considered. Complexity of a problem is connected with the crudity of theories and techniques of the system, and complex description of communicative behaviour of this or that generality and absence of a common opinion concerning the issue that it is still uncertain, which scientific representatives should be engaged in this field. The authors suppose that studying of communicative behaviour is a synthetic philological and socially-anthropological perspective scientific direction. On the one hand, the description of communicative behaviour is a component of the description of any language as cultural-historical phenomenon; on the other, the given behaviour is based on the certain developed and standard social norms. This behaviour can be implemented in oral and written speech of participants of process of communications, and also in nonverbal displays of dialogue, and may serve as a means of self-realisation of the person. The problem of vocational training system is to create conditions for development of skills of such behaviour. The future

  7. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  8. Creativity, Psychopathology, and Emotion Processing: A Liberal Response Bias for Remembering Negative Information Is Associated with Higher Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drus, Marina; Kozbelt, Aaron; Hughes, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    To what extent do more creative people process emotional information differently than less creative people? This study examined the role of emotion processing in creativity and its implications for the creativity-psychopathology association. A total of 117 participants performed a memory recognition task for negative, positive, and neutral words;…

  9. Transitions of Creatives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld

    The degree of transferability of skills and knowledge from an creative occupation in the creative industries to the wider economy is a great point of discussion within research in the arts and cultural and creative industries. By applying human capital theory on the labor market for creatives...

  10. Examining small "c" creativity in the science classroom: Multiple case studies of five high school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Dorothea Shawn

    As the US continues to strive toward building capacity for a workforce in STEM fields (NSF, 2006), educational organizations and researchers have constructed frameworks that focus on increasing competencies in creativity in order to achieve this goal (ISTE, 2007; Karoly & Panis, 2004; Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2007). Despite these recommendations, many teachers either do not believe in the relevance of nurturing creativity in their students (Kaufman & Sternberg, 2007) or accept the importance of it, but do not know how best to foster it in their classrooms (Kampylis et al., 2009). Researchers conclude that teachers need to revise their ideas about the kind of creativity they can expect from their students to reflect the idea of small 'c' versus large 'C' creativity. There is a dearth of literature that looks closely at teacher practice surrounding creativity in the US and gives teachers a set of practical suggestions they can follow easily. I examined five case studies of teachers as they participated in and implemented a large-scale, NSF-funded project premised on the idea that training teachers in 21 st century pedagogies, (for example, problem-based learning), helps teachers create classrooms that increase science competencies in students. I investigated how teachers' curricular choices affect the amount of student creativity produced in their classrooms. Analysis included determining CAT scores for student products and continua scores along the Small 'c' Creativity Framework. In the study, I present an understanding of how teachers' beliefs influence practice and how creativity is fostered in students through various styles of teacher practice. The data showed a relationship between teachers' CAT scores, framework scores, and school context. Thus, alongside CAT, the framework was determined to be a successful tool for understanding the degree to which teachers foster small 'c' creativity. Other themes emerged, which included teachers' allotment of

  11. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CREATIVE THINKING AND MOTIVATION TO LEARN CREATIVE THINKING AMONG PRE-SCHOOLERS IN JORDAN

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ahmad Abdelaziz Al-Zu'bi; Mohd Sofian Omar-Fauzee; Amrita Kaur

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the level of creative thinking and motivation to learn creative thinking, and the relationship between both of them, in Jordan is still insufficient due to lack of interest and research among researchers and scholars. Therefore, this study examines the relationship between creative thinking and motivation to learn creative thinking among pre-school children in Jordan. A total of 102 students from one kindergarten was examined. Parental consent was obtained before the stud...

  12. Exploring the Experience of Novelty When Viewing Creative Adverts: An ERP Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujin Zhou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrophysiological correlates of experiencing novelty in creative advertising were studied in 28 healthy subjects using event-related potentials. Participants viewed images that were difficult to interpret until a description was presented providing either a creative description (CD featuring an unexpected description of the image based on the original advertisement, or a normal description (ND, which was a literal description of the image (and served as a baseline condition. Participants evaluated the level of creativity of the description. The results showed that the N2 amplitude was higher for CDs than for NDs across middle and right scalp regions between 240 and 270 ms, most likely reflecting conflict detection. Moreover, CDs demonstrated greater N400 than NDs in a time window between 380 and 500 ms, it is argued that this reflects semantic integration. The present study investigates the electrophysiological correlates of experiencing novelty in advertising with ecologically valid stimuli. This substantially extends the findings of earlier laboratory studies with more artificial stimuli.

  13. Applying MacKinnon's 4Ps to Foster Creative Thinking and Creative Behaviours in Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, Vassiliki; Chronopoulou, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify certain strategies and conditions that should be used by teachers in kindergarten so as to foster creative thinking and creative behaviours to children. We used a quasi-experimental research design for 6 months in a public kindergarten in a suburban area of Greece, and we developed a creative music and…

  14. IBSE and Creativity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Creativity plays a very important role in education. Most of educational systems support creativity as relevant competence for the 21st century. According to the findings of experts, teachers' creativity is important for the development of students' creativity. We introduce a theoretical base of creativity and styles of creativity. Based on our…

  15. How specialized are writing-specific brain regions? An fMRI study of writing, drawing and oral spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planton, Samuel; Longcamp, Marieke; Péran, Patrice; Démonet, Jean-François; Jucla, Mélanie

    2017-03-01

    Several brain imaging studies identified brain regions that are consistently involved in writing tasks; the left premotor and superior parietal cortices have been associated with the peripheral components of writing performance as opposed to other regions that support the central, orthographic components. Based on a meta-analysis by Planton, Jucla, Roux, and Demonet (2013), we focused on five such writing areas and questioned the task-specificity and hemispheric lateralization profile of the brain response in an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment where 16 right-handed participants wrote down, spelled out orally object names, and drew shapes from object pictures. All writing-related areas were activated by drawing, and some of them by oral spelling, thus questioning their specialization for written production. The graphemic/motor frontal area (GMFA), a subpart of the superior premotor cortex close to Exner's area (Roux et al., 2009), was the only area with a writing-specific lateralization profile, that is, clear left lateralization during handwriting, and bilateral activity during drawing. Furthermore, the relative lateralization and levels of activation in the superior parietal cortex, ventral premotor cortex, ventral occipitotemporal cortex and right cerebellum across the three tasks brought out new evidence regarding their respective contributions to the writing processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Writing, Editing and Publishing an Article in a Scientific Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Bahadur Khattri

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to discuss some important aspects involved while writing an article to publish in a scientific journal. This is a review article. I argue that writing an article is technical as well as creative art of an author which facilitates acceptance of article for publication in a scientific journal. Academicians are obliged to conduct research and publish articles to demonstrate their job efficiency. To publish an article in a scientific journal is the first necessary condition to meet standard norms i.e. journal's guideline for authors and the next is to follow the editing processes of the journal. Writing an article for printed version is becoming an old fashion. Therefore, authors need to learn how to submit a scholarly written article online and follow review processes. Writing and publishing of a scientific article is not only important for individuals and specific scientific community, it is also important to the wider society which helps to enhance stock of knowledge, and sharing and learning culture. Key words: Online publication; author aid; open access; copy editing; peer review DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v3i0.2787 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.3 2009 185-196

  17. Electronic outlining as a writing strategy: Effects on students' writing products, mental effort and writing process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smet, Milou; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Leijten, Mariëlle; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    This study addresses to what extent and how electronic outlining enhances students' writing performance. To this end, the focus of this study is not only on students' final writing products but also on the organisation of the writing process (i.e., planning, translating, and reviewing) and perceived

  18. Organizational Creativity and IT-based Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina M. Olszak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to provide a theoretically and empirically grounded discussion on IT-based organizational creativity support. This study attempts to answer the following questions: (1 what is the issue of organizational creativity and its IT-based support, (2 what is the demand for IT –based organizational creativity support; (3 what are the main determinants and barriers to IT-based organizational creativity support; and (4 what success factors are crucial for IT-based organizational creativity support. This paper presents the analysis results of a survey conducted in 25 selected organizations. The paper provides valuable information on the possibilities of IT applications in organizational creativity support as well as the associated success factors. It makes useful contribution to our better understanding of IT-based organizational creativity support issues.

  19. Homo creator: facet of creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Grekova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to highlight the essence of the concepts of «creativity» and «creative person». We give a definition of «Homo creator», which is treated as a creative person. For definition of creativity as a term analyzes existing in modern and ancient philosophical literature interpretation. «Homo creator» is analyzed as a person free from fears and experiences, some of the faces and boundaries that limit a person; active, open, proactive and creative person can create something new and unknown; constantly provides further restructuring of nature, creates a new objective environment in which developing human civilization and nature. Outlined the phenomenon of creativity as a complex complex phenomenon. It is proved that creativity is a social and cultural phenomenon that is focused basically on something new and expressing the present culture. Creativity - a special quality of that belongs to man as a social being and promotes change and development in all spheres of public life and undoubtedly overcomes various crisis conditions and situations that pose basic questions of human existence and the meaning of its relationships with the outside world . The phenomenon of creativity as an option to overcome the existential crisis of identity. The problem of studying the influence of modern art to overcome the «boundary» conditions of human life and further reflection on existential experiences of her creative life position is relevant to the subject of scientific research.

  20. Big Questions, Small Works, Lots of Layers: Documentary Video Production and the Teaching of Academic Research and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbritter, Bump; Blon, Noah; Creighton, Caron

    2011-01-01

    Documentary movie making is not academic writing. Nor is it traditional academic research. However, I have found it to be a remarkable vehicle for teaching both of these things...each semester I am amazed and humbled by the creativity and sincerity that my students bring to their work.

  1. Young Children's Creativity and Pretend Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses commonalities among experts' descriptions of creative individuals, including rational thinking, high levels of emotional development, talent, and higher levels of consciousness. Maintains that creativity studies justify the development of educational creativity training programs. Asserts that teachers can promote children's…

  2. Creative Learning and Innovative Teaching: Final Report on the Study on Creativity and Innovation in Education in EU Member States

    OpenAIRE

    Romina Cachia; Anusca Ferrari; Kirsti Ala-Mutka; Yves Punie

    2010-01-01

    EU policies call for the strengthening of Europe's innovative capacity and the development of a creative and knowledge-intensive economy and society through reinforcing the role of education and training in the knowledge triangle and focusing school curricula on creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship. This report brings evidence to the debate on the status, barriers and enablers for creativity and innovation in compulsory schooling in Europe. It is the final report of the project: ‘Creat...

  3. Enhancement of figural creativity by motor activation: effects of unilateral hand contractions on creativity are moderated by positive schizotypy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominger, Christian; Papousek, Ilona; Fink, Andreas; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is an important trait necessary to achieve innovations in science, economy, arts and daily life. Therefore, the enhancement of creative performance is a significant field of investigation. A recent experiment showed enhanced verbal creativity after unilateral left-hand contractions, which was attributed to elevated activation of the right hemisphere. The present study aimed to extend these findings to the domain of figural creativity. Furthermore, as creativity and positive schizotypy may share some neurobiological underpinnings associated with the right hemisphere, we studied the potential moderating effect of positive schizotypy on the effects of the experimental modification of relative hemispheric activation on creativity. In a gender-balanced sample (20 men and 20 women), squeezing a hand gripper with the left hand enhanced figural creativity on the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking compared to squeezing the gripper with the right hand. However, this was only true when positive schizotypy was low. The moderating effect of schizotypy may be produced by relatively greater activity of certain parts of the right hemisphere being a shared neuronal correlate of creativity and positive schizotypy.

  4. "Your Writing, Not My Writing": Discourse Analysis of Student Talk about Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Patrick D.

    2017-01-01

    Student voice is a difficult concept to capture in research. This study attempts to provide a vehicle for understanding student perceptions about writing and writing instruction through a case study supported by discourse analysis of student talk. The high school students in this study participated in interviews and focus groups about their…

  5. Creativity in a Relational Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Hersted

    2015-01-01

    We have inherited a strongly individualistic view of creativity from Western culture and psychologists studying creativity are typically taught to study the individual mind and behavior focusing on cognitive processes and behavioral actions. Much attention has been paid to people who are consider...... of the lone genius or the misunderstood, “antisocial” outsider working within a solitary venue. Instead of seeing the artist as an isolated individual, my paper focuses mainly on the impact of relational factors that seem conducive to creativity....

  6. Fostering Creativity in Design Education: Using the Creative Product Analysis Matrix with Chinese Undergraduates in Macau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore to what extent the use of a more structured mode of assessing creative products--specifically, the CPAM--could beneficially influence design students' product creativity and creative processes. For this qualitative inquiry, following our CPAM-based intervention, students wrote reflective papers in…

  7. Asian Creativity, Chapter One: Creativity across Three Chinese Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-Jyi; Albanese, Dale

    2010-01-01

    This commentary looks at the contributions and future research implications of the four articles in this Special Issue of "Thinking Skills and Creativity" to the fields of creativity and creativity education, both in culture-specific and culture-general terms. The articles included in this Special Issue draw attention to issues of…

  8. Nurses' creativity: advantage or disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari Isfahani, Sara; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood; Peyrovi, Hamid; Khanke, Hamid Reza

    2015-02-01

    Recently, global nursing experts have been aggressively encouraging nurses to pursue creativity and innovation in nursing to improve nursing outcomes. Nurses' creativity plays a significant role in health and well-being. In most health systems across the world, nurses provide up to 80% of the primary health care; therefore, they are critically positioned to provide creative solutions for current and future global health challenges. The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian nurses' perceptions and experiences toward the expression of creativity in clinical settings and the outcomes of their creativity for health care organizations. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Data were collected through in-depth semistructured interviews with 14 nurses who were involved in the creative process in educational hospitals affiliated to Jahrom and Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Four themes emerged from the data analysis, including a) Improvement in quality of patient care, b) Improvement in nurses' quality of work, personal and social life, c) Promotion of organization, and d) Unpleasant outcomes. The findings indicated that nurses' creativity in health care organizations can lead to major changes of nursing practice, improvement of care and organizational performance. Therefore, policymakers, nurse educators, nursing and hospital managers should provide a nurturing environment that is conducive to creative thinking, giving the nurses opportunity for flexibility, creativity, support for change, and risk taking.

  9. Style and creativity in design

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chiu-Shui

    2015-01-01

    This book looks at causative reasons behind creative acts and stylistic expressions. It explores how creativity is initiated by design cognition and explains relationships between style and creativity. The book establishes a new cognitive theory of style and creativity in design and provides designers with insights into their own cognitive processes and styles of thinking, supporting a better understanding of the qualities present in their own design.  An explanation of the nature of design cognition begins this work, with a look at how design knowledge is formulated, developed, structured and utilized, and how this utilization triggers style and creativity. The author goes on to review historical studies of style, considering a series of psychological experiments relating to the operational definition, degree, measurement, and creation of style. The work conceptually summarizes the recognition of individual style in products, as well as the creation of such styles as a process before reviewing studies on cr...

  10. Culture and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharine Dishke Hondzel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Creativity and divergent thinking are components of learning in childhood that often go unmeasured in favor of standardized subject assessments. To better understand the ways in which creativity develops and is related to environmental and cross-cultural factors, this study reports on the scores obtained by 8-year-old students living in differently sized communities in Norway and Canada measured using the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT. Results of multivariate analyses indicate statistically significant differences between Norwegian and Canadian children on several Torrance Test subscales as well as surprising relationships between the size of the community in which the children lived and the scores they obtained. Results and discussion are framed in reference to the ways in which culture and communities potentially shape the development of divergent thinking skills and open up questions about the ways in which social environments can influence the development of creativity in childhood.

  11. Unpacking the Value of Writing: Exploring College Students' Perceptions of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbrunn, Sharon; Carter, Yvette M.; Conklin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This study explored college students' beliefs about the value of writing, their past experiences with writing, and the relationship between students' prior experiences with writing and writing value beliefs. One hundred fourteen undergraduates from a public Southeastern university participated in the study. Using expectancy-value theory as a…

  12. Special Features of Creativity at the Teenage Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumakova N.B.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to a study of the aged differences in creativity of junior adolescents. The paper presents the results of an empirical study of the dynamics of verbal and nonverbal (figural creativity of the school children of the 4th, 5th and 7th classes. The hypothesis tested was that the creativity of the adolescents characterized by special features which are manifested in its qualitative uniqueness, but not in the quantity indicators of fluency, flexibility and originality. Within the framework study is proposed the original test of the study of verbal and figural creativity. In the study took part 147 school boys and girls at the age from 10 to 14 years old. It was shown that the dynamics of the indices of verbal and figural creativity at the teenage period has opposite direction: an increase in verbal creativity is accompanied by reduction in the figural (at the level of tendency. The special features of adolescent’s creativity are revealed in the qualitative uniqueness both of the verbal and nonverbal manifestations of the creativity.

  13. Teaching for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Allison Antink

    2012-01-01

    Science teachers are often content to leave creativity to the arts and humanities classes. Fostering creativity in science, if attempted at all, is a challenge often relegated to the gifted classroom. But not just the privileged few have the capacity to be creative. Simply restructuring existing lessons can help promote creativity in all science…

  14. The Creative Class and the Creative Economy in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, Juan Miguel; Bergua, José Angel; Pac, David

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an application in Spain of Florida's model (2002/2010, 2005) about creativity, economy and growth. Creativity is an indicator that measures and combines technology, talent, and tolerance. Each of these is composed of three subindices. The most important conclusion from the data reported here is that creativity in particular,…

  15. A Critical Evaluation of the Influence of Creative Thinking on Marketing Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Sebastian RÜCKER

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid technological development and a globally competitive business environment, creative marketing methods become increasingly important for a unique value proposition. As a result, the aim of this research paper is to critically evaluate the influence of creative thinking on marketing creativity. In order to evaluate this correlation, examples of creative marketing concepts in traditional marketing and online marketing campaigns are examined and analysed in regards to potentially required creative thinking processes. This evaluation led to the conclusion that creative thinking influences marketing creativity in a holistic way by creating experiences, forming relationships, and addressing large audiences in a cost-efficient way.

  16. Creativity for designers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to modern and interdisciplinary concepts related to creativity and creative processes. The selected topics are of special relevance to professionals of any kind in connection with their work as designers. Some useful creative tools and approaches are also...... outlined. Finally, practical recommendations to enhance and apply creative work in design are elaborated....

  17. Measuring Functional Creativity: Non-Expert Raters and the Creative Solution Diagnosis Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropley, David H.; Kaufman, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The Creative Solution Diagnosis Scale (CSDS) is a 30-item scale based on a core of four criteria: Relevance & Effectiveness, Novelty, Elegance, and Genesis. The CSDS offers potential for the consensual assessment of functional product creativity. This article describes an empirical study in which non-expert judges rated a series of mousetrap…

  18. Meditacija i kreativnost / Meditation and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Popadić

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a pioneering attempt to draw attention to the connection between meditation and creativity. The author compares the creative process to the process of meditation. Meditation, just like the creative process, results in a piece of creative work, which informs us about the possibility of using meditation as a creative technique with the aim of improving our creativity. The first part of the paper defines the basic concepts: creativity and meditation. The paper goes on to inform us about the place that meditation takes in contemporary psychology. The author explains that various kinds of meditation techniques can be divided into two groups: concentration meditations and mindfulness (or vipassana meditations. The paper gives special attention to higher states of consciousness or the so called flow that can be described as the optimal state of consciousness in which levels of cognitive functioning are at the maximum. There are also examples illustrating how the skills that help us get into the flow state are developed. The conclusion is that meditation directly increases one’s ability to assess the quality of the content one is dealing with, whether it is by observing, using or creating it. Although this area has not been the subject of scientific studies so far, based on some case studies (involving meditation masters, it can be confidently stated that there is a clear connection between meditation and creativity, meaning that people who meditate regularly are at the same time increasing their creative abilities and creative output.

  19. Creativity In Conscience Society

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Gh. Rosca; Dumitru Todoroi

    2011-01-01

    Creativity is a result of brain activity which differentiates individuals and could ensure an important competitive advantage for persons, for companies, and for Society in general. Very innovative branches – like software industry, computer industry, car industry – consider creativity as the key of business success. Natural Intelligence Creativity can develop basic creative activities, but Artificial Intelligence Creativity, and, especially, Conscience Intelligence Creativity should be devel...

  20. Creativity is linked to ambition across the bipolar spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheri L; Murray, Greg; Hou, Sharon; Staudenmaier, Paige J; Freeman, Michael A; Michalak, Erin E

    2015-06-01

    Beyond evidence for an association, little is known about the mechanism linking creativity bipolar spectrum conditions. Theory suggests that ambition, which is heightened in bipolar disorder (BD) and associated with creativity in the general population, might be an important variable. The overarching aim of this project was to evaluate whether ambition is related to creativity among those with bipolar spectrum conditions. Across two studies, we examined correlations between a validated self-report measure of ambition, the WASSUP, and creativity. In Study One, 22 individuals diagnosed with BD who self-identified as highly creative completed the WASSUP and a measure of lifetime creative accomplishment. In Study Two, 221 undergraduates completed the WASSUP, a measure of mania risk (the Hypomanic Personality Scale, HPS) and a measure designed to assess creativity in business projects and tasks. In Study One, WASSUP scores were significantly elevated compared to normative levels in BD, and WASSUP scores were correlated with lifetime creative accomplishment within the artistic sample. In Study Two, mania risk was related to greater ambition and creativity, and ambition was also directly related to greater creativity. Both studies were limited by the reliance on self-reported ambition. Ambition could be one important component of creative success across the bipolar spectrum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Does Creativity Make You Happy? The Influence of Creative Activity on Hedonic and Eudaimonic Well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Bujacz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate if a change in psychological well-being can result from engagement in creative activity. In an online experimental study participants will be randomly assigned to solve either a creative or a non-creative task. Their experience of completing the task will be compared with their average daily well-being level. Involvement in a creative task is expected to boost both positive feelings (hedonic well-being and good functioning (eudaimonic well-being. Personal characteristics, such as a need for closure, and task features, e.g. difficulty level, will also be tested for their moderating effects.

  2. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Dumas

    Full Text Available Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  3. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Denis; Dunbar, Kevin N

    2016-01-01

    Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  4. Indonesian EFL Students' Perspective on Writing Process: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermilinda Abas, Imelda; Aziz, Noor Hashima Abd

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at understanding the EFL Indonesian students' perspective on the writing process. The pilot study involved two male Indonesian postgraduate students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. The Indonesian students were selected based on the following criteria: (1) had enough knowledge in English writing, indicated by the completion of…

  5. INTENATIONAL RESEARCH REGARDING CREATIVE ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berinde Sorin Romulus

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although creative accounting practices are not at all recent, only since 2000 this phenomenon has been widely publicized because of the financial scandals that had erupted worldwide. Obviously, creative accounting practices came to be used with nonchalance at enterprise level, irrespective of their size or the industry within which they operate, fact that appears from different studies undertaken globally in recent years.Even though there are many studies based on the creative accounting phenomenon and on other subjects deriving from it, we considered both interesting and necessary an analysis of the articles that tackle different aspects concerning creative accounting, published after 1990 until now within the highest rated journals in the field of accounting. The main objective of this study is to identify the main research areas in order to emphasize the main existent shortcomings and to outline possible solutions concerning future research directions in this field. Of course, from this main objective derive a few sub-objectives which we will try to achieve by means of the quantitative study. The quantitative study is based on the analysis of researches performed in the filed of creative accounting and its aim is to observe their evolution within the concerned period of time, to analyze the main research directions approached, but also to study the predominant research current and the main type of research applied. Moreover, within this stage we have also analyzed the geographical areas on which the studies performed within the selected articles were based. The present study is far from being exhaustive, but it surely represents a starting point and an informative source for future research in the field of creative accounting. We may conclude that most of the researches conducted within the creative accounting field fall within the main research current, which in our case is positivism. Concerning the type of research, we can observe that the

  6. A Case Study of Using Facebook in an EFL English Writing Class: The Perspective of a Writing Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Tang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to address a writing teacher's perspective about integrating Facebook, a social networking site, into a university-level English writing course in Taiwan. Data, including interviews with the teacher and class postings on Facebook, were analyzed inductively, qualitatively, and interpretively, resulting in three…

  7. Creativity as action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Lubart, Todd; Bonnardel, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    The present paper outlines an action theory of creativity and substantiates this approach by investigating creative expression in five different domains. We propose an action framework for the analysis of creative acts built on the assumption that creativity is a relational, inter......, science, scriptwriting, and music. Results point to complex models of action and inter-action specific for each domain and also to interesting patterns of similarity and differences between domains. These findings highlight the fact that creative action takes place not “inside” individual creators but “in...

  8. Local Integration Ontological Model of Creative Class Migrants for Creative Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangkakorn, Korawan; Chakpitak, Nopasit; Yodmongkol, Pitipong

    2015-01-01

    An innovative creative class drives creative cities, urban areas in which diverse cultures are integrated into social and economic functions. The creative city of Chiang Mai, Thailand is renowned for its vibrant Lan Na culture and traditions, and draws new migrants from other areas in Thailand seeking to become part of the creative class. This…

  9. Creativity and Bipolar Disorder: Igniting a Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheri L; Moezpoor, Michelle; Murray, Greg; Hole, Rachelle; Barnes, Steven J; Michalak, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) has been related to heightened creativity, yet core questions remain unaddressed about this association. We used qualitative methods to investigate how highly creative individuals with BD understand the role of symptoms and treatment in their creativity, and possible mechanisms underpinning this link. Twenty-two individuals self-identified as highly creative and living with BD took part in focus groups and completed quantitative measures of symptoms, quality of life (QoL), and creativity. Using thematic analysis, five themes emerged: the pros and cons of mania for creativity, benefits of altered thinking, the relationship between creativity and medication, creativity as central to one's identity, and creativity's importance in stigma reduction and treatment. Despite reliance on a small sample who self-identified as having BD, findings shed light on previously mixed results regarding the influence of mania and treatment and suggest new directions for the study of mechanisms driving the creative advantage in BD. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Scaffolding EFL Students' Writing through the Writing Process Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Avan Kamal Aziz

    2015-01-01

    This research reports a study conducted at Koya University/English Language Department, and it aims at presenting the effect of scaffolding on EFL students' writing ability through the writing process. In this study, the students have taken the role of writers, so they need to follow the same steps that writers apply during their writing process.…

  11. Intrinsic Motivation and Creativity Related to Product: A Meta-Analysis of the Studies Published between 1990-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Saul Neves; Rus, Claudia Lenuta; Lens, Willy; Imaginário, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Although the relationship between motivation (especially intrinsic motivation) and creativity (especially as a product), no meta-analyses have been conducted on the relationship between these 2 concepts. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between intrinsic motivation and creativity related to product (i.e., creative outcomes) through…

  12. Perception of Time, Creative Attitudes, and Adoption of Innovations: A Cross-Cultural Study from Chinese and US College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hee Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how earlier (vs. later adopters of innovation differ in time perception and creative attitudes, comparing Chinese and US college students. Research on the perception of time and creative attitudes is useful to understand how sustainability and creative collaboration might work together. Various relationships exist between different levels of innovation adoption groups and creative attitudes or perceptions of time. We found that earlier adopters scored higher on economic time and future time orientation. This may indicate that earlier adopters are sensitive about their planned schedule. Also, earlier adopters with a future time orientation are forward-thinking and anticipate the introduction of new styles, items, or events in the future. We also find that Chinese (vs. US participants scored higher on creative capacity and creative collaboration but did not differ in general creative attitudes or creative risk-taking. For all participants from these two countries, earlier adopters (vs. later scored higher on all aspects of creative attitudes. This study suggests academic and practical implications regarding sustainability issues. From an academic perspective, this study adds a new perspective to the literature about the relationships among time of adoption, time perception, creative attitudes, and cultural values, and is especially useful for how these four variables influence sustainability. From a practitioner perspective, this study provides information of how consumer values and attitudes in a developing economy (China and a developed economy (US might facilitate open innovation and induce sustainability.

  13. THE STATE OF CREATIVE ECONOMICS IN CHUVASHIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sergeevna Ukolova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The main condition of developing of «economics of science» is now represented by creative industries, that synthesize creative and business activities. Advertisement, architecture, design, fashion, software development, cinema and videogame industry and many others are considered as creative industries. They characterized by innovations, humanitarian orientation and digital distribution channels. In Eastern countries the role of creative economics as social, cultural, geological and economic factor is understood well, but in Russia we only find the beginning of study this question. This work is not exception.The purpose of this article is to represent the common state of creative economics in Chuvash Republic.Methodology of this paper – elements of specific cart analyzing method (BOP Consulting, based on statistic data about activity of creative branches in Chuvash Republic in 2009 – 2011 years.Results: Creative industries plays important role in regional economics structure: make region more investement attractive, create new workplaces, contribute to upgrade living standards, forming cultural diversity and positive image of republic. By the way it cannot be said about wide development of creative industries in Chuvashia: their percentage is too small; out-turn and salary is low, their product is not demanded by the community. The reasons lie in specific for each branch and common reasons. As common reasons we can point: from consumers – community does not have free resources for buying creative product, conservativity, low level of education; from creative leaders and companies – low professional qualification, bad mobility, orientation on a secondary creative activity; from creative space – creative institutional infrastructure is not developed enough.Practical implications: results can be used by academic community in studies of creative economics in other regions; applied in developing cultural politics and economic planning in

  14. The Development of Creative Tourism in China: The Case Studies of Hangzhou, Xiamen and Qingdao

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Jingyao

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the application of creativity has referred to each field including tourism industry. Based on the idea of creativity, creative industry has showed its importance for economic growth. Western countries paid earlier attention to the potential of creativity and creative industry, while developing countries such as China also found out the possibility of usage of creativity. On the other hand, as an extension of cultural tourism, creative tourism adopts creativity into the touris...

  15. Effects of setting creative goals of different specificity on judged creativity of the product

    OpenAIRE

    Čorko, Irena; Vranić, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    The study examined the effect of setting creative goals of different specificity on judged creativity of the product. Female psychology students (N=47) were divided in 3 groups. Experimental task was to make a collage. Groups differed in the level of specificity of the given goal. Collages were judged by 11 judges using the consensual assessment technique. Factor analysis of these judgments confirmed 2 orthogonal factors: creativity and technical goodness. Results show that setting a specific...

  16. Creativity in the Later Life: Factors Associated with the Creativity of the Chinese Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Niu, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    This study examined a total of 140 elderly Chinese from China and the United States to investigate the relationship between attitude toward aging, daily activities, general health, education, and other demographics and rated creativity as measured by collage making and storytelling. The result of this study shows that creativity declines with age.…

  17. Managing for creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida, Richard; Goodnight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    A company's most important asset isn't raw materials, transportation systems, or political influence. It's creative capital--simply put, an arsenal of creative thinkers whose ideas can be turned into valuable products and services. Creative employees pioneer new technologies, birth new industries, and power economic growth. If you want your company to succeed, these are the people you entrust it to. But how do you accommodate the complex and chaotic nature of the creative process while increasing efficiency, improving quality, and raising productivity? Most businesses haven't figured this out. A notable exception is SAS Institute, the world's largest privately held software company. SAS makes Fortune's 100 Best Companies to Work For list every year. The company has enjoyed low employee turnover, high customer satisfaction, and 28 straight years of revenue growth. What's the secret to all this success? The authors, an academic and a CEO, approach this question differently, but they've come to the same conclusion: SAS has learned how to harness the creative energies of all its stakeholders, including its customers, software developers, managers, and support staff. Its framework for managing creativity rests on three guiding principles. First, help employees do their best work by keeping them intellectually engaged and by removing distractions. Second, make managers responsible for sparking creativity and eliminate arbitrary distinctions between "suits" and "creatives". And third, engage customers as creative partners so you can deliver superior products. Underlying all three principles is a mandate to foster interaction--not just to collect individuals' ideas. By nurturing relationships among developers, salespeople, and customers, SAS is investing in its future creative capital. Within a management framework like SAS's, creativity and productivity flourish, flexibility and profitability go hand in hand, and work/life balance and hard work aren't mutually exclusive.

  18. The Effectiveness of the Creative Reversal Act (CREACT) on Students' Creative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Ugur; Oz, Ozge

    2010-01-01

    A research study using one-group pretest-posttest design was carried out on the effectiveness of the Creative Reversal Act (CREACT) on creative thinking. The CREACT is a new, teaching technique developed based on the theory of the janusian process. The research participants included 34 students who were attending 10th grade at a social studies…

  19. The role of instrumental emotion regulation in the emotions-creativity link: how worries render individuals with high neuroticism more creative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Angela K-Y; Liou, Shyhnan; Qiu, Lin; Kwan, Letty Y-Y; Chiu, Chi-Yue; Yong, Jose C

    2014-10-01

    Based on the instrumental account of emotion regulation (Tamir, 2005), the current research seeks to offer a novel perspective to the emotions-creativity debate by investigating the instrumental value of trait-consistent emotions in creativity. We hypothesize that emotions such as worry (vs. happy) are trait-consistent experiences for individuals higher on trait neuroticism and experiencing these emotions can facilitate performance in a creativity task. In 3 studies, we found support for our hypothesis. First, individuals higher in neuroticism had a greater preference for recalling worrisome (vs. happy) events in anticipation of performing a creativity task (Study 1). Moreover, when induced to recall a worrisome (vs. happy) event, individuals higher in neuroticism came up with more creative design (Study 2) and more flexible uses of a brick (Study 3) when the task was a cognitively demanding one. Further, Study 3 offers preliminary support that increased intrinsic task enjoyment and motivation mediates the relationship between trait-consistent emotion regulation and creative performance. These findings offer a new perspective to the controversy concerning the emotions-creativity relationship and further demonstrate the role of instrumental emotion regulation in the domain of creative performance. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Role of Frontal Alpha Oscillations in Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R.; Foulser, A. Alban; Mellin, Juliann M.; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent EEG data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8 – 12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a fundamental role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking, a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40Hz-tACS was used in instead of 10Hz-tACS to rule out a general “electrical stimulation” effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal gamma stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. PMID:25913062

  1. Technology-Enhanced Mathematics Education for Creative Engineering Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Eva; Timcenko, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This project explores the opportunities and challenges of integrating digital technologies in mathematics education in creative engineering studies. Students in such studies lack motivation and do not perceive the mathematics the same way as mathematics students do. Digital technologies offer new...... are conceptualized. Then, we are going to apply this field data in designing learning technologies, which will be introduced in university classrooms. The effect of this introduction will be evaluated through educational design experiments....

  2. PERSEPSI MAHASISWA AKUNTANSI TENTANG PRAKTIK CREATIVE ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Lutfi Saiful Arif

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Accounting Students Perceptions about Creative Accounting Practices. This study aims to determine the students' perceptions about the accounting practices of creative accounting viewed from business ethics theory. This research was conducted with descriptive qualitative method. Data was collected by interview to 5 accounting students of the Faculty of Economics, University Trunojoyo as key informants. Results of interviews on creative accounting was then analyzed by employing theory of business ethics. The results of this study showed that creative accounting can not be accepted from ethics theory of deontology, utilitarianism, and ethical egoism. Students also perceived that creative accounting is unethical act.

  3. Typology on Leadership toward Creativity in Virtual Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris A Humala

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This study aims to develop a descriptive typology to better identify leadership toward creativity in virtual work in different types of companies. Background: The study empirically explores how leadership toward creativity occurs in virtual work and uses the theoretical lenses of creativity-conducive leadership and heterarchy to generate a typology. Methodology\t: A multiple qualitative case study design, interpretivist approach, and abductive analysis are applied. Data is collected by interviewing 21 leaders and employees face-to-face in four companies in the ICT sector and one business advisor company. Contribution: The empirical evidence of this study enriches the understanding of leadership toward creativity in virtual work and contributes to the limited empirical knowledge on leadership that stimulates a virtual workforce to achieve creativity. Findings: The four different types of companies in the typology utilize various transitions toward leadership creativity in virtual work. The trend in leadership in the existing virtually networked business environment is toward the “collective mind” company, which is characterized by shared values, meaningful work, collective intelligence, conscious reflection, transparency, coaching, empowering leadership by example, effective multichannel interaction, and assertiveness. The findings empirically support applying a heterarchy perspective to lead a virtual workforce toward creativity and promote leaders who are genuinely interested in people, their development, collaboration, and technology. Recommendations for Practitioners: The typology helps professionals realize the need to develop leadership, communication, interaction, learning, and growth to foster creative interaction and improve productivity and competitiveness. Recommendation for Researchers: This study enables researchers to more rigorously and creatively conceptualize the conditions and relationships in leadership that

  4. The integration of creative drama into science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Bracha (Bari)

    This study explored the inclusion of creative drama into science teaching as an instructional strategy for enhancing elementary school students' understanding of scientific concepts. A treatment group of sixth grade students was taught a Full Option Science System (FOSS) science unit on Mixtures and Solutions with the addition of creative drama while a control group was taught using only the FOSS teaching protocol. Quantitative and qualitative data analyses demonstrated that students who studied science through creative drama exhibited a greater understanding of scientific content of the lessons and preferred learning science through creative drama. Treatment group students stated that they enjoyed participating in the activities with their friends and that the creative drama helped them to better understand abstract scientific concepts. Teachers involved with the creative drama activities were positively impressed and believed creative drama is a good tool for teaching science. Observations revealed that creative drama created a positive classroom environment, improved social interactions and self-esteem, that all students enjoyed creative drama, and that teachers' teaching style affected students' use of creative drama. The researcher concluded that the inclusion of creative drama with the FOSS unit enhanced students' scientific knowledge and understanding beyond that of the FOSS unit alone, that both teachers and students reacted positively to creative drama in science and that creative drama requires more time.

  5. Where do bright ideas occur in our brain? Meta-analytic evidence from neuroimaging studies of domain-specific creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Palermo, Liana; Nori, Raffaella; Palmiero, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have assessed the neural underpinnings of creativity, failing to find a clear anatomical localization. We aimed to provide evidence for a multi-componential neural system for creativity. We applied a general activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis to 45 fMRI studies. Three individual ALE analyses were performed to assess creativity in different cognitive domains (Musical, Verbal, and Visuo-spatial). The general ALE revealed that creativity relies on clusters of activations in the bilateral occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal lobes. The individual ALE revealed different maximal activation in different domains. Musical creativity yields activations in the bilateral medial frontal gyrus, in the left cingulate gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, and inferior parietal lobule and in the right postcentral and fusiform gyri. Verbal creativity yields activations mainly located in the left hemisphere, in the prefrontal cortex, middle and superior temporal gyri, inferior parietal lobule, postcentral and supramarginal gyri, middle occipital gyrus, and insula. The right inferior frontal gyrus and the lingual gyrus were also activated. Visuo-spatial creativity activates the right middle and inferior frontal gyri, the bilateral thalamus and the left precentral gyrus. This evidence suggests that creativity relies on multi-componential neural networks and that different creativity domains depend on different brain regions. PMID:26322002

  6. Intelligence, creativity, and cognitive control: The common and differential involvement of executive functions in intelligence and creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Mathias; Jauk, Emanuel; Sommer, Markus; Arendasy, Martin; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    2014-01-01

    Intelligence and creativity are known to be correlated constructs suggesting that they share a common cognitive basis. The present study assessed three specific executive abilities – updating, shifting, and inhibition – and examined their common and differential relations to fluid intelligence and creativity (i.e., divergent thinking ability) within a latent variable model approach. Additionally, it was tested whether the correlation of fluid intelligence and creativity can be explained by a common executive involvement. As expected, fluid intelligence was strongly predicted by updating, but not by shifting or inhibition. Creativity was predicted by updating and inhibition, but not by shifting. Moreover, updating (and the personality factor openness) was found to explain a relevant part of the shared variance between intelligence and creativity. The findings provide direct support for the executive involvement in creative thought and shed further light on the functional relationship between intelligence and creativity. PMID:25278640

  7. Secondary Students' Writing Achievement Goals: Assessing the Mediating Effects of Mastery and Performance Goals on Writing Self-Efficacy, Affect, and Writing Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz Soylu, Meryem; Zeleny, Mary G.; Zhao, Ruomeng; Bruning, Roger H.; Dempsey, Michael S.; Kauffman, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    The two studies reported here explored the factor structure of the newly constructed Writing Achievement Goal Scale (WAGS), and examined relationships among secondary students' writing achievement goals, writing self-efficacy, affect for writing, and writing achievement. In the first study, 697 middle school students completed the WAGS. A confirmatory factor analysis revealed a good fit for this data with a three-factor model that corresponds with mastery, performance approach, and performance avoidance goals. The results of Study 1 were an indication for the researchers to move forward with Study 2, which included 563 high school students. The secondary students completed the WAGS, as well as the Self-efficacy for Writing Scale, and the Liking Writing Scale. Students also self-reported grades for writing and for language arts courses. Approximately 6 weeks later, students completed a statewide writing assessment. We tested a theoretical model representing relationships among Study 2 variables using structural equation modeling including students' responses to the study scales and students' scores on the statewide assessment. Results from Study 2 revealed a good fit between a model depicting proposed relationships among the constructs and the data. Findings are discussed relative to achievement goal theory and writing. PMID:28878707

  8. A Brief Study of Scoring in Chinese Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofi Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A writing test is a comprehensive test. It not only tests students' vocabulary, grammar, usage of language elements, but also tests their constructional ability, analytical ability, expressional ability, logical reasoning, on a variety of stylistic mastery. This paper tries to describe and summarize the problems on Chinese writing as second language learning with the theories of writing evaluation and the writing evaluation of research results.  

  9. An Explicit Cue Improves Creative Analogical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Adam E.; Cohen, Michael S.; Kim, Joseph U.; Gray, Jeremy R.

    2012-01-01

    Creativity is likely to be related to intelligence, though the nature of this relationship remains largely unresolved and few studies have examined creativity in the context of measures traditionally related to intelligence. Like intelligence, creativity has often been studied as a static trait or as subject to change over long durations through…

  10. Creativity, Visualization Abilities, and Visual Cognitive Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, Maria; Kozhevnikov, Michael; Yu, Chen Jiao; Blazhenkova, Olesya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the recent evidence for a multi-component nature of both visual imagery and creativity, there have been no systematic studies on how the different dimensions of creativity and imagery might interrelate. Aims: The main goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between different dimensions of creativity (artistic and…

  11. Creative Teaching in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Vikki; Hains-Wesson, Rachael; Young, Karen

    2018-01-01

    If Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines in higher education are to retain students, there needs to be a shift towards teaching in more enriching and interesting ways. Creative teaching needs to become more prominent in STEM. This article presents a study that defines creative teaching in the STEM context and…

  12. Creativity: an organizational schema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Richard J

    2009-09-01

    To describe an organizational schema of human creativity. Previous research has concluded that creativity involves something novel and useful, but whether creativity is common or rare, domain-specific or domain-general, quantitative or qualitative, or personal or social remains unresolved. Extant research from neurobiology, psychology, cognitive science, and neuroeconomics was used to generate a novel synthesis that explains human creative behavior. Creativity is the attempt to bridge the gap between what is and what should be. It emerges from the interplay of 5 commonly shared factors: motivation, perception, action, temperament, and social interaction. The reward value of what exists compared with an imagined possibility generates the motivational voltage that drives the creative effort. Action to attain the goal requires a dexterously executed plan, and dexterity levels are influenced by both practice effects and biologic biases. Temperament sustains the creative effort during periods of nonreward in anticipation of goal completion. Societal esthetics measure the success of creative efforts. Personal skill sets derived from nature and nurture vary between individuals and determine one's own creative phenotype. Despite great qualitative and quantitative differences between individuals, the neurobiologic principles of creative behavior are the same from the least to the most creative among us.

  13. Brain and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliverio, A.

    Creativity can be considered from different points of view. Afirst possibility is to trace its natural history in mammals, mostly in non human primates. A second one is to consider mental processes, such as analogies, that may result in creative associations as evident in many fields, from arts to sciences. These two approaches lead to a better understanding of cognitive systems at the roots of creative behaviour. A third strategy relies on an analysis of primary and secondary states of mind characterizing flow and creativity. Flow, the mental state of operation in which a person is fully immersed in what he or she is doing, typical of intense problem solving activities, has been explained in terms of reduced prefrontal activity. While it is not difficult to carry out tests of problem solving activity, creativity is much more elusive and it is not easy to measure it. Thus, flow has often been simplistically assimilated to creativity and it has been assumed that also creati ve performance depends on low prefrontal activity. It is instead proposed that creativity involves two consecutive steps: 1. Generation of novelty, mostly in the ventral striatum. 2. Analysis of novelty by the prefrontal cortex that transforms it into creative behaviour. The emergence of creativity has been explained through a Darwinian process based upon the classic variation-selection procedure. Thus, basal ganglia, with their implicit strategies and memories, may be regarded as a mechanism that continuously generates novelty (variation) while the prefrontal cortex, possibly its dorsolateral areas, may be considered as the computational mechanism that transforms novelty (selection) into explicit creative behaviours.

  14. An Empirical Study of Industrial Engineering and Management Curriculum Reform in Fostering Students' Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Kuang; Jiang, Bernard C.; Hsu, Kuang-Yiao

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of a creativity-fostering program in industrial engineering and management (IE&M) curriculum reform. Fostering creativity in students has become a crucial issue in industrial engineering education. In a survey of previous studies, we found few on IE&M curriculum reform. In…

  15. The ADAPT-r Creativity Book

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The ADAPT-r Creativity book provides an account of creative practitioners on their creative processes. The book does not take a theoretical, statistical or experimental point fo view, but includes testimonies and experiences by creative people.......The ADAPT-r Creativity book provides an account of creative practitioners on their creative processes. The book does not take a theoretical, statistical or experimental point fo view, but includes testimonies and experiences by creative people....

  16. The Effect of Text Chat Assisted with Word Processors on Saudi English Major Students' Writing Accuracy and Productivity of Authentic Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mosa Batianeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstractــ-This study explored the effects of using online chat and word processors on students' writing skills that include; organizing a text, spelling, punctuation, grammar, phrasal verbs, idioms, idiomatic expressions, pragmatics, creativity, vocabulary growth, content, relational words, conjunctions, authenticity, figures of speech, imagination, coherence, style, socio-cultural aspects, language use, and the production of authentic text. The study group consisted of students in the Department of Languages and Translation at Taibah University who registered for the Writing Two course in the first semester of the 2012 - 2013 academic year. Fourty subjects were divided into two sections: section one was assigned as an experimental group (supported by Facebook and Skype and section two was assigned as a control group and was asked to write their essays with paper and pencil. Facebook and Skype accounts were created for every student in the experimental group. Data was analyzed from pre-test and post-test results to evaluate the question posed by the study: Does the use of online text chat assisted with word processors help undergraduate students develop their writing skills more than traditional methods of teaching? The results revealed that students who worked with Facebook and Skype showed a significant improvement in their writing skills when compared to the control group. In light of these findings, it is recommended that online discussions via Facebook, Skype, and other social media sites should be utilized when teaching writing and the other language skills.

  17. High school boys' and girls' writing conceptions and writing self-efficacy beliefs : what is their role in writing performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Villalón Molina, Ruth; Mateos, Mar; Cuevas, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the conceptions about writing and writing self-efficacy beliefs held by high school students in relation to the students’ gender as well as their associations with writing achievement. The results show that female students have more sophisticated writing conceptions than their male counterparts but no gender differences were found in writing self-efficacy beliefs. In addition, results reveal that writing self-efficacy beliefs and gender play an important role...

  18. Half the Right People Network Density and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Giuffre

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Social scientists investigating the attributes associated with creativity have for the most part confined their research to the study only of creative people. This re-search attempts to compare creativity with non-creativity by comparing creative with non-creative periods in the lives of three famously isolated creators (Emily Dickinson, Paul Gauguin, and Charlotte Brontë to argue that the social networks of the individuals are different during creative periods than during non-creative periods. By using the correspondence of each of the artists to construct social networks, it is possible to analyze the artist’s relationships with regard to density and betweenness and to compare those across creative and non-creative time pe-riods. The average network density of the first order zone network around each of the artists was 0.475 during periods of creativity. There was no correlation with a particular betweenness score.

  19. Creativity and folk art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2013-01-01

    This article explores creativity in craftwork using the case of Easter egg decoration, a folk art chosen for its traditional roots and diversity of artistic outcomes. This research contributes to the literature at (a) a theoretical level, by conceptualizing a pragmatist-inspired framework...... of creative activity; (b) a methodological level, by using, beside observation and interview, subjective cameras to record activity; and (c) an empirical level, considering the fact that creativity in folk art has often been a neglected topic. A total of 20 egg decorators of various ages from the village...... for, particularly in terms of expert–novice differences. These studies revealed the many ways in which creativity is intrinsic to Easter egg decoration, and the final discussion of the article summarizes them with reference to processes of combination and change, copying and translation, personal...

  20. Creativity in Lif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Rubí-Barquero

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author explains the following ideas: that creativity is not restricted to the sphere of art, as it is usually considered, since art is just an expression of creativity; that people do many things that require creativity; and that not even creativity is an attribute of humans, since, from certain critical levels, we may observe behaviors in living beings that involve different degrees of aesthetic cognition.

  1. Creativity from Constraints in Engineering Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onarheim, Balder

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of constraints in limiting and enhancing creativity in engineering design. Based on a review of literature relating constraints to creativity, the paper presents a longitudinal participatory study from Coloplast A/S, a major international producer of disposable...... and ownership of formal constraints played a crucial role in defining their influence on creativity – along with the tacit constraints held by the designers. The designers were found to be highly constraint focused, and four main creative strategies for constraint manipulation were observed: blackboxing...

  2. A Gender Bias in the Attribution of Creativity: Archival and Experimental Evidence for the Perceived Association Between Masculinity and Creative Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Devon; Kay, Aaron C; Koval, Christy Z

    2015-11-01

    We propose that the propensity to think creatively tends to be associated with independence and self-direction-qualities generally ascribed to men-so that men are often perceived to be more creative than women. In two experiments, we found that "outside the box" creativity is more strongly associated with stereotypically masculine characteristics (e.g., daring and self-reliance) than with stereotypically feminine characteristics (e.g., cooperativeness and supportiveness; Study 1) and that a man is ascribed more creativity than a woman when they produce identical output (Study 2). Analyzing archival data, we found that men's ideas are evaluated as more ingenious than women's ideas (Study 3) and that female executives are stereotyped as less innovative than their male counterparts when evaluated by their supervisors (Study 4). Finally, we observed that stereotypically masculine behavior enhances a man's perceived creativity, whereas identical behavior does not enhance a woman's perceived creativity (Study 5). This boost in men's perceived creativity is mediated by attributions of agency, not competence, and predicts perceptions of reward deservingness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Role of Creativity in the Effectiveness of Cognitive Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As a well-recognized and widely adopted emotional regulation strategy, cognitive reappraisal has generally been proven to be efficient. However, the cognitive mechanism underlying regulatory efficiency, particularly the role of creativity, in cognitive reappraisal is unclear. Although previous studies have evaluated the relationship between creativity and reappraisal from the perspectives of generation (i.e., generating cognitive reappraisals and generating creative ideas involve similar cognitive neural networks and individual differences (i.e., the ability to generate different cognitive reappraisals can be predicted by scores on creativity-related tests, how cognitive reappraisal’s efficiency can be related to creativity is still unknown. In this research, we assessed the relationship between cognitive reappraisal’s creativity and its effectiveness in regulating negative emotion. In Study 1, participants were asked to generate reappraisals of negative stimuli and then evaluate the creativity and regulatory effectiveness of these reappraisals. The results indicated positive correlation between creativity rating and regulatory effectiveness, but we found that it was difficult for the participants to generate highly creative reappraisals on their own. Therefore, in Study 2, we showed participants well-prepared reappraisal materials that varied in their creativity and asked them to evaluate their regulatory effectiveness and creativity. The results suggested that creativity and appropriateness were significant predictors of the regulating effects of the reappraisal and that creativity was the most dominant predictor. In summary, both experiments found a positive correlation between reappraisal’s creativity and effectiveness, thus implying that creativity plays an important role in reappraisal.

  4. Writing Chinese and mathematics achievement: A study with Chinese-American undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chieh; Nuttall, Ronald

    2001-04-01

    Two recent studies indicated that writing Chinese is correlated to Chinese-American (CA) students' spatial skills. The current study investigated whether writing Chinese would have the same relationship to mathematics skills. The Scholastic Assessment Test—Mathematics (SAT-Math) scores were analysed for 150 CA undergraduates: 42 writers of Chinese and 108 non-writers of Chinese. The results suggested a strong correlation between writing Chinese and success on SAT-Math. An underlying mechanism may be the common cognitive components that encompass writing Chinese, spatial tasks, and SAT-Math. Contrary to previous findings with other populations in the USA, CA females scored slightly higher on SAT-Math than males. The finding supports the cultural relativity theory of gender difference on SAT-Math.

  5. New Bulgarian Work on Psychology of Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Mariyana D. Nyagolova

    2012-01-01

    A new Bulgarian work on Psychology of Creativity has been published recently. This book focuses on theoretical and methodological approaches to creativity. The results from a study of students' creativity are presented. They are related to the motives for success.

  6. Secondary Students' Writing Achievement Goals: Assessing the Mediating Effects of Mastery and Performance Goals on Writing Self-Efficacy, Affect, and Writing Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Yilmaz Soylu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The two studies reported here explored the factor structure of the newly constructed Writing Achievement Goal Scale (WAGS, and examined relationships among secondary students' writing achievement goals, writing self-efficacy, affect for writing, and writing achievement. In the first study, 697 middle school students completed the WAGS. A confirmatory factor analysis revealed a good fit for this data with a three-factor model that corresponds with mastery, performance approach, and performance avoidance goals. The results of Study 1 were an indication for the researchers to move forward with Study 2, which included 563 high school students. The secondary students completed the WAGS, as well as the Self-efficacy for Writing Scale, and the Liking Writing Scale. Students also self-reported grades for writing and for language arts courses. Approximately 6 weeks later, students completed a statewide writing assessment. We tested a theoretical model representing relationships among Study 2 variables using structural equation modeling including students' responses to the study scales and students' scores on the statewide assessment. Results from Study 2 revealed a good fit between a model depicting proposed relationships among the constructs and the data. Findings are discussed relative to achievement goal theory and writing.

  7. An Empirical Study of the Construct Validity of Social Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchiroud, Christophe; Bernoussi, Aurore

    2008-01-01

    Creativity can be broadly defined as a combination of interacting individual and environmental resources leading to the production of valuable solutions. This paper concentrates on the type of creativity that can be expressed in solving social problems. After reviewing the potentially relevant psychological and contextual variables intervening in…

  8. Why Isn't Creativity More Important to Educational Psychologists? Potentials, Pitfalls, and Future Directions in Creativity Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; Beghetto, Ronald A.; Dow, Gayle T.

    2004-01-01

    The construct of creativity has a great deal to offer educational psychology. Creativity appears to be an important component of problem-solving and other cognitive abilities, healthy social and emotional well-being, and scholastic and adult success. Yet the study of creativity is not nearly as robust as one would expect, due in part to the…

  9. Conceiving creativity: The nature and consequences of laypeople's beliefs about the realization of creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, M.; Koch, S.; Nijstad, B.A.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2015-01-01

    To examine laypeople’s beliefs about the conception of creativity, we asked people (N = 891) to indicate the extent to which they believed that certain cognitive processes, mind states, and circumstances were conducive to creativity (Studies 1-3). We further examined whether these beliefs are in

  10. A Situational Study for the Identification of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Creative Thinking and Creative Scientific Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir Kaçan, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted with the participation of 33 pre-service teachers attending the department science teaching of a Turkish university. Participants self-reported using the "Self-assessment of creativity scale" and were asked to choose the most appropriate answer to the five-choice self-assessment question "Which category best…

  11. Comparison of Writing Anxiety and Writing Dispositions of Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Grade Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifat Ramazan Berk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine sixth, seventh and eighth grade students’ writing anxiety and dispositions and to examine to what extent they predict each other. The basis of this study is to determine whether writing disposition is the significant predictor of writing anxiety or not and whether students’ grade levels and genders are significant predictor of writing anxiety and dispositions or not. The research was designed according to survey model. The study group, selected through simple sampling method, is made up of 860 students studying at 6th, 7th and 8th grades in elementary schools of Şarkışla District, Sivas. While “Writing Anxiety Scale”, adapted into Turkish by Özbay and Zorbay (2011, was administered to determine the study group’s writing anxiety level, “Writing Disposition Scale”, adapted into Turkish by İşeri and Ünal (2010, was used to determine the writing disposition level. At the end of the study, it was found that writing disposition is a significant predictor of writing anxiety and students’ grade levels and genders are significant predictors of writing anxiety and dispositions. An education environment to create a strong writing disposition for students is recommended. Also, similar studies on different dimensions of the issue can be conducted.

  12. The relationship between internationalisation, creativity and transformation: A case study of higher education in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie K. Smith

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this article is to explore the relationship between internationalisation, creativity and transformation in the context of higher education. It is argued in academic theory that the process of internationalisation in higher education has two pillars: transformational learning and creative development, and that creativity is an integral part of transformational learning. To explore this relationship further, the authors draw on primary research undertaken in the context of a higher education institution in Budapest, Hungary. A Delphi study with senior academic staff and a focus group with Hungarian and international students were included in the research. Questions were asked which aimed to determine whether creativity is indeed an integral part of transformational learning, and whether creativity and transformation are the most important elements of internationalisation. Staff and students recognise the creative and transformative potential of internationalisation, but they also identified several challenges. These include encouraging students to go beyond instrumental approaches to learning, providing staff with the relevant training and support, changing the culture of institutions and overcoming the lack of flexibility in existing national education structures. Overall, the research findings reinforced theoretical perspectives, which propose creative thinking, cooperative and communicative learning, project-based and problem-solving activities as some of the main tools in the process of transformational learning and prerequisites for internationalisation.

  13. Lay Theories of Creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, Simone; Rietzschel, Eric; Zedelius, Claire; Müller, Barbara; Schooler, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is of great appeal and importance to people, and they strive to understand creativity by developing lay theories. Such lay theories about creativity concern, for example, the characteristics of creative persons, such as the ‘mad genius’ idea, or environmental factors that contribute to

  14. Creativity in Organizational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szobiová Eva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is focused on the conditions which allow the application of creativity in the context of an organization. The aim of the article is to reveal the work environment factors influencing the creativity of the employees. Another aim is to demonstrate how management style of an organization can affect the creativity of employees in order to successfully exploit their creative potential. The contribution also presents the manner how a manager can influence creativity of one’s own employees. Moreover, the article deals with the process of innovation and transmission of creative ideas and solutions into practice.

  15. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-04-01

    The human hypothalamus produces an endogenous membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase inhibitor, digoxin, which regulates neuronal transmission. The digoxin status and neurotransmitter patterns were studied in creative and non-creative individuals, as well as in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance, in order to find out the role of cerebral dominance in this respect. The activity of HMG CoA reductase and serum levels of digoxin, magnesium, tryptophan catabolites, and tyrosine catabolites were measured in creative/non-creative individuals, and in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance. In creative individuals there was increased digoxin synthesis, decreased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, increased tryptophan catabolites (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and decreased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). The pattern in creative individuals correlated with right hemispheric dominance. In non-creative individuals there was decreased digoxin synthesis, increased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, decreased tryptophan catabolites (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and increased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). This pattern in non-creative individuals correlated with that obtained in left hemispheric chemical dominance. Hemispheric chemical dominance and hypothalamic digoxin could regulate the predisposition to creative tendency.

  16. [About creativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2006-01-01

    The term 'creativity', meaning to produce something out of nothing, is not accurate. A definition that included the establishment, the founding or the introduction of something anew for the first time would be rather appropiate. The most accurate interpretation of the creativity process is the one proposed by Alfred Rothenberg which establishes the hypothesis that creativity is due to what he calls a 'janusian thinking' characterized by conceiving simultaneously two or more opposed ideas, images or concepts. Two examples illustrate such way of thinking: one is Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and the other is Darwin's Theory of Natural Selection. The overcome of a dualistic thinking while keeping full consciousnees, that is, the utilization of both the primary and the secondary processes postulated by Freud, would be the key to creative thinking. From a neurophysiological point of view, it is very likely that the right hemisphere is rather connected to creativity, given that it is a mental state that requires non-focalized attention, greater right hemisphere activation, and low levels of prefrontal cortical activation allowing cognitive inhibition.

  17. Creativity for Operational Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications of Creativity- OR are brie y reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support OR work are also presented. Finally, the paper...... outlines the author's experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, and design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems....

  18. Creativity for Operational Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications of Creativity-OR are briefly reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support OR work are also presented. Finally, the paper...... outlines the author's experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, and design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems....

  19. Creativity and other Fundamentalisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The magic word these days is 'creativity'. And not just for artists: managers and policymakers alike demand creativity. Even family therapists and mediators urge us to find more creative solutions. Nowadays, creativity is all about positive morality. We expect nothing but good from it. But what

  20. Increasing the Writing Performance of Urban Seniors Placed At-Risk through Goal-Setting in a Culturally Responsive and Creativity-Centered Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Brittany; Warren, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to support marginalized students require not only identifying systemic inequities, but providing a classroom infrastructure that supports the academic achievement of all students. This action research study examined the effects of implementing goal-setting strategies and emphasizing creativity in a culturally responsive classroom (CRC) on…

  1. Gamification in Fostering Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Kalinauskas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – to analyze gamification, as the method for fostering creativity.Design/methodology/approach – Author analyses the precognitions, which allowed gamification to attract mainstream attention, the diversity of understandings about the phenomenon, and the possible relations between usage of gamified platform and the development of creativity. The paper is based on the comparative analysis of scientific literature and related sources from sociology, business, and entertainment. The engagement is analyzed through the theories of self-determination and the “flow”. Creativity is understood as “any act, idea, or product that changes an existing domain, or that transforms an existing domain into a new one” (Csikszentmihalyi, 1996. Gamification is analyzed as “use of game design elements in non-game context” (Deterding, Dixon, Khaled, and Nacke (2011. Findings – Although the gamification is gaining more public attention, there is a lack of studies which would reveal its relations in fostering creativity. One of the main goals of any gamified platform is to raise the engagement of the participant while keeping subject interested in the process or activity. In some cases, there is a relation between “flow” and creativity. However, the strength of this relationship depends from the users of gamified content and the domain of interest.Research limitations / implications – There are very few empirical studies which would support correlation between experiencing the “flow” state and a raise of creativity. This issue requires more surveys, which would ground the idea.Practical implications – By developing further research in usage of gamification while fostering creativity it is possible to determine, whether or not the “creative domains” should apply more measures of gamification in their activities.Value – The article emphasizes on theoretical analysis of gamification and its applicability in fostering creativity

  2. Techniques for motivating students to write, for teaching writing and for systematizing writing assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Küçükal, Şerife

    1990-01-01

    Ankara : Faculty of Letters and the Institute of Economics and Social Science of Bilkent Univ., 1990. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1990. Includes bibliographical references. The purpose of this study is to investigate the suggestions that experts in the field of teaching composition have for motivating students to write, teaching writing and assessing writing and the ways that these suggestions could be used in Turkish EFL Hazirlik classes for elementary level students. ...

  3. Intelligence, General Knowledge and Personality as Predictors of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batey, Mark; Furnham, Adrian; Safiullina, Xeniya

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to examine the contribution of fluid intelligence, general knowledge and Big Five personality traits in predicting four indices of creativity: Divergent Thinking (DT) fluency, Rated DT, Creative Achievement and Self-Rated creativity and a combined Total Creativity variable. When creativity was assessed by DT test, the consistent…

  4. THE COMPLEX ANALYSIS METHOD OF SEMANTIC ASSOCIATIONS IN STUDYING THE STUDENTS’ CREATIVE ETHOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Starikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates the sociological research findings concerning the students’ ideas of creativity based on the questionnaires and testing of the students of the natural science, humanities and technical profiles at Siberian Federal University over the period of 2007-2011.The author suggests a new method of semantic association analysis in order to identify the latent groups of notions related to the concept of creativity. The range of students’ common opinions demonstrate the obvious trend for humanizing the idea of creativity, considering  it as the perfect mode of human existence, which coincide with the ideas of K. Rogers, A. Maslow and other scholars. Today’s students associate creativity primarily with pleasure, self-development, self-expression, inspiration, improvisation, spontaneity; and the resulting semantic complex incorporates such characteristics of creative work as goodness, abundance of energy, integrity, health, freedom and independence, self-development and spirituality.The obtained data prove the importance of the inspiration experience in creative pedagogy; the research outcomes along with the continuing monitoring of students attitude to creativity development can optimize the learning process. The author emphasizes the necessity of introducing some special courses, based on the integral approach (including social, philosophical, psychological, psycho-social and technical aspects, and aimed at developing students’ creative competence. 

  5. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Creative Drama Study in Turkey about Mevlana Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuzer, Yasemin; Dikici, Ayhan; Gundogdu, Rezzan

    2008-01-01

    In Turkey, creative drama has been incorporated into many fields; in particular, it has been used in training teachers. In learning how to use drama to teach different subjects, trainee teachers have always participated willingly in drama studies. Part of the reason for this is that Turkish people are familiar with drama activities through…

  7. Computers and Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Dyke, Richard P.

    1982-01-01

    A traditional question is whether or not computers shall ever think like humans. This question is redirected to a discussion of whether computers shall ever be truly creative. Creativity is defined and a program is described that is designed to complete creatively a series problem in mathematics. (MP)

  8. High School Boys' and Girls' Writing Conceptions and Writing Self-Efficacy Beliefs: What Is Their Role in Writing Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalón, Ruth; Mateos, Mar; Cuevas, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the conceptions about writing and writing self-efficacy beliefs held by high school students in relation to the students' gender as well as their associations with writing achievement. The results show that female students have more sophisticated writing conceptions than their male counterparts but no gender differences…

  9. Google Docs as a Tool for Collaborative Writing in the Middle School Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Fan

    2017-10-01

    fluencies participated more equally when they were able to remain anonymous. Face-to-face writing exhibited the highest overall scores, and students enjoyed working on Google Docs. Recommendations for Practitioners: Future and current teachers are encouraged to be open to new technologies and be creative in the use of technology to facilitate student learning. They should have the opportunity to participate in the discussion on how, not if, integrating technology impacts the cognitive, social, and cultural dimensions of teaching. Recommendation for Researchers: After this initial quantitative study on students’ reactions to various modalities of technology-supported writing formats, the next questions to ask may be how students were engaging in dialogues during face-to-face sessions or chat features of Google Docs trials, and what types of edits students are making. Researchers should turn their focus on secondary school classrooms where there is an increasing impact of technology-assisted collaborative writing on student learning and teaching pedagogy. Impact on Society: As online technology has become an integral part of daily life, it is beneficial to educators, policy makers, and classroom teachers to understand how technology can be integrated in writing programs and to what extent the integration can help boost student motivation and participation. Future Research: More longitudinal research on online assisted collaborative writing and addi-tional quantitative data are needed to further understand the complexities of the writing process in-group online writing and the nature of collaboration.

  10. Creative Accounting Sebagai Informasi Yang Baik Atau Menyesatkan?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Nyoman Alit

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini untuk melihat creative accounting sebagai informasi yang baik atau menyesatkan bagi investor. Metode penelitian yang digunakan kualitatif dengan pendekatan deskriptif. Teknik analisis yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini dengan pendekatan studi pustaka. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan creative accounting yang dilakukan oleh manajemen untuk menaikkan nilai perusahaan dan memberikan kepuasaan pada investor. Fenomena creative accounting lebih banyak terjadi di antara periode 2002 sampai 2008. Upaya creative accounting meskipun dapat dibenarkan dalam tataran teori, namun tidak dapat diterima dari sisi etika. Pelaporan kegiatan perusahaan dengan upaya creative accounting secara norma salah, dikarenakan hal ini memberikan informasi yang menyesatkan bagi pengguna informasi tersebut, seperti calon investor. Secara empiris, sejak diberlakukannya IFRS (International Financial Reporting Standards , berita media tentang creative accounting pada perusahaan-perusahaan besar di beberapa negara mulai berkurang. Namun, dalam meta analisis studi dari Dechow (2011, menemukan cara baru untuk mendeteksi upaya creative accounting dengan model reverse.

  11. Perspectives on the Social Psychology of Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Amabile, Teresa M.; Pillemer, Julianna

    2012-01-01

    Scholars began serious study into the social psychology of creativity about 25 years after the field of creativity research had taken root. Over the past 35 years, examination of social and environmental influences on creativity has become increasingly vigorous, with broad implications for the psychology of human performance, and with applications to education, business, and beyond. In this article, we revisit the origins of the social psychology of creativity, trace its arc, and suggest dire...

  12. The Spawns of Creative Behavior in Team Sports: A Creativity Developmental Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara D L; Memmert, Daniel; Sampaio, Jaime; Leite, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Developing creativity in team sports players is becoming an increasing focus in sports sciences. The Creativity Developmental Framework is presented to provide an updated science based background. This Framework describes five incremental creative stages (beginner, explorer, illuminati, creator, and rise) and combines them into multidisciplinary approaches embodied in creative assumptions. In the first training stages, the emphasis is placed on the enrollment in diversification, deliberate play and physical literacy approaches grounded in nonlinear pedagogies. These approaches allow more freedom to discover different movement patterns increasing the likelihood of emerging novel, adaptive and functional solutions. In the later stages, the progressive specialization in sports and the differential learning commitment are extremely important to push the limits of the creative progress at higher levels of performance by increasing the range of skills configurations. Notwithstanding, during all developmental stages the teaching games for understanding, a game-centered approach, linked with the constraints-led approach play an important role to boost the tactical creative behavior. Both perspectives might encourage players to explore all actions possibilities (improving divergent thinking) and prevents the standardization in their actions. Overall, considering the aforementioned practice conditions the Creativity Developmental Framework scrutinizes the main directions that lead to a long-term improvement of the creative behavior in team sports. Nevertheless, this framework should be seen as a work in progress to be later used as the paramount reference in creativity training.

  13. Creativity and Marketing: Interview With Marie Taillard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Taillard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this interview Dr. Taillard discusses her interest and ongoing research in the areas of marketing, consumer behaviour and creativity. She considers how academic training can be applied to a business context and describes the newly formed Creativity Marketing Centre at ESCP Europe. Exploring the multiple intersections between creativity and marketing represents not only a paradigmatic change for those interested in business and consumer behaviour but also for researchers of creativity who can start envisioning and studying consumption as a creative act. This interview will offer valuable points of reflection for all those interested to know more about this approach.

  14. The Associative Nature of Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Olivarius, Morten

    The overarching objective of this doctoral dissertation is to advance our understanding of the role of associations in creative thought and creativity training. While research in associative abilities and creativity has a long history and lies at the heart of many prevailing theories of creativity......, Thomas Z. Ramsøy, Hartwig Siebner: Viewing objects activates the creative mind. III: Balder Onarheim & Morten Friis-Olivarius (2013): Applying the neuroscience of creativity to creativity training. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Volume 7, Article 656...

  15. Four PPPPerspectives on Computational Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Jordanous, Anna

    2015-01-01

    From what perspective should creativity of a system be considered? Are we interested in the creativity of the system’s out- put? The creativity of the system itself? Or of its creative processes? Creativity as measured by internal features or by external feedback? Traditionally within computational creativity the focus had been on the creativity of the system’s Products or of its Processes, though this focus has widened recently regarding the role of the audience or the field surrounding the ...

  16. Learning Science through Writing: Associations with Prior Conceptions of Writing and Perceptions of a Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert A.; Taylor, Charlotte E.; Drury, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Students in a large undergraduate biology course were expected to write a scientific report as a key part of their course design. This study investigates the quality of learning arising from the writing experience and how it relates to the quality of students' preconceptions of learning through writing and their perceptions of their writing…

  17. Suspicious spirits, flexible minds: when distrust enhances creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jennifer; Mussweiler, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Intuitively, as well as in light of prior research, distrust and creativity appear incompatible. The social consequences of distrust include reluctance to share information, a quality detrimental to creativity in social settings. At the same time, the cognitive concomitants of distrust bear resemblance to creative cognition: Distrust seems to foster thinking about nonobvious alternatives to potentially deceptive appearances. These cognitive underpinnings of distrust hold the provocative implication that distrust may foster creativity. Mirroring these contradictory findings, we suggest that the social versus cognitive consequences of distrust have diverging implications for creativity. We address this question in Study 1 by introducing private/public as a moderating variable for effects of distrust on creativity. Consistent with distrust's social consequences, subliminal distrust (vs. trust) priming had detrimental effects on creative generation presumed to be public. Consistent with distrust's cognitive consequences, though, an opposite tendency emerged in private. Study 2 confirmed a beneficial effect of distrust on private creative generation with a different priming method and pointed to cognitive flexibility as the mediating process. Studies 3 and 4 showed increased category inclusiveness versus increased remote semantic spread after distrust priming, consistent with enhanced cognitive flexibility as a consequence of distrust. Taken together, these results provide evidence for the creativity-enhancing potential of distrust and suggest cognitive flexibility as its underlying mechanism.

  18. Creativity for a Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Hellen

    2011-01-01

    Creativity in primary science is even more important now than when it was first raised with the publication of the report "All our futures: creativity, culture and education." Creativity needs to involve both the teacher and the children. Exciting, creative and practical opportunities provided by the teacher will increase children's motivation and…

  19. Creativity for Problem Solvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications related to the theme are briefly reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support problem solving are also presented. Finally......, the paper outlines the author’s experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems, and creative design of software optimisation for complex non...

  20. Holistic versus Analytic Evaluation of EFL Writing: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalib, Thikra K.; Al-Hattami, Abdulghani A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of holistic and analytic scoring rubrics in the context of EFL writing. Specifically, the paper compares EFL students' scores on a writing task using holistic and analytic scoring rubrics. The data for the study was collected from 30 participants attending an English undergraduate program in a Yemeni…