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Sample records for creating minibeam patterns

  1. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  2. Bevalac Minibeam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Alonso, J.; Morgado, R.; Tobias, C.A.; Grunder, H.; Upham, F.T.; Windsor, A.; Armer, R.A.; Yang, T.C.H.; Gunn, J.T.

    1977-03-01

    The Minibeam Facility is a biomedical heavy-ion beam area at the Bevalac designed to satisfy the following requirements: (1) provide a beam incident in a vertical plane for experiments where a horizontal apparatus significantly increases the convenience of performing an experiment or even determines its feasibility; (2) provide an area that is well shielded with respect to electronic interference so that microvolt signals can be detected with acceptable signal-to-noise ratios; (3) provide a beam of small diameter, typically a few millimeters or less, for various studies of cellular function; and (4) provide a facility for experiments that require long setup and preparation times and apparatus that must be left relatively undisturbed between experiments and that need short periods of beam time. The design of such a facility and its main components is described. In addition to the above criteria, the design was constrained by the desire to have inexpensive, simple devices that work reliably and can be easily upgraded for interfacing to the Biomedical PDP 11/45 computer

  3. Mini-beam collimator applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shenglan, E-mail: sxu@anl.gov [GM/CA CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Keefe, Lisa J.; Mulichak, Anne [IMCA CAT, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Yan Lifen; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao Jiyong [X-ray Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fischetti, Robert F. [GM/CA CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    In 2007, the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA CAT, Sector 23, Advanced Photon Source) began providing mini-beam collimators to its users. These collimators contained individual, 5- or 10-{mu}m pinholes and were rapidly exchangeable, thereby allowing users to tailor the beam size to their experimental needs. The use of these collimators provided a reduction in background noise, and thus improved the signal-to-noise ratio . Recent improvements in the collimator design include construction of the device from a monolithic piece of molybdenum with multiple pinholes mounted inside . This allows users to select from various size options from within the beamline control software without the realignment that was previously necessary. In addition, a new, 20-{mu}m pinhole has been added to create a 'quad-collimator', resulting in greater flexibility for the users. The mini-beam collimator is now available at multiple crystallographic beamlines and also is a part of the first Moessbauer Microscopic system at sector 3-ID.

  4. Mini-beam collimator applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shenglan; Keefe, Lisa J.; Mulichak, Anne; Yan Lifen; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao Jiyong; Fischetti, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA CAT, Sector 23, Advanced Photon Source) began providing mini-beam collimators to its users. These collimators contained individual, 5- or 10-μm pinholes and were rapidly exchangeable, thereby allowing users to tailor the beam size to their experimental needs. The use of these collimators provided a reduction in background noise, and thus improved the signal-to-noise ratio . Recent improvements in the collimator design include construction of the device from a monolithic piece of molybdenum with multiple pinholes mounted inside . This allows users to select from various size options from within the beamline control software without the realignment that was previously necessary. In addition, a new, 20-μm pinhole has been added to create a 'quad-collimator', resulting in greater flexibility for the users. The mini-beam collimator is now available at multiple crystallographic beamlines and also is a part of the first Moessbauer Microscopic system at sector 3-ID.

  5. Creating science simulations through Computational Thinking Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basawapatna, Ashok Ram

    Computational thinking aims to outline fundamental skills from computer science that everyone should learn. As currently defined, with help from the National Science Foundation (NSF), these skills include problem formulation, logically organizing data, automating solutions through algorithmic thinking, and representing data through abstraction. One aim of the NSF is to integrate these and other computational thinking concepts into the classroom. End-user programming tools offer a unique opportunity to accomplish this goal. An end-user programming tool that allows students with little or no prior experience the ability to create simulations based on phenomena they see in-class could be a first step towards meeting most, if not all, of the above computational thinking goals. This thesis describes the creation, implementation and initial testing of a programming tool, called the Simulation Creation Toolkit, with which users apply high-level agent interactions called Computational Thinking Patterns (CTPs) to create simulations. Employing Computational Thinking Patterns obviates lower behavior-level programming and allows users to directly create agent interactions in a simulation by making an analogy with real world phenomena they are trying to represent. Data collected from 21 sixth grade students with no prior programming experience and 45 seventh grade students with minimal programming experience indicates that this is an effective first step towards enabling students to create simulations in the classroom environment. Furthermore, an analogical reasoning study that looked at how users might apply patterns to create simulations from high- level descriptions with little guidance shows promising results. These initial results indicate that the high level strategy employed by the Simulation Creation Toolkit is a promising strategy towards incorporating Computational Thinking concepts in the classroom environment.

  6. Cell adhesion pattern created by OSTE polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjia; Li, Yiyang; Ding, Xianting

    2017-04-24

    Engineering surfaces with functional polymers is a crucial issue in the field of micro/nanofabrication and cell-material interface studies. For many applications of surface patterning, it does not need cells to attach on the whole surface. Herein, we introduce a novel polymer fabrication protocol of off-stoichiometry thiol-ene (OSTE) polymers to create heterogeneity on the surface by utilizing 3D printing and soft-lithography. By choosing two OSTE polymers with different functional groups, we create a pattern where only parts of the surface can facilitate cell adhesion. We also study the hydrophilic property of OSTE polymers by mixing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) directly with pre-polymers and plasma treatments afterwards. Moreover, we investigate the effect of functional groups' excess ratio and hydrophilic property on the cell adhesion ability of OSTE polymers. The results show that the cell adhesion ability of OSTE materials can be tuned within a wide range by the coupling effect of functional groups' excess ratio and hydrophilic property. Meanwhile, by mixing PEG with pre-polymers and undergoing oxygen plasma treatment afterward can significantly improve the hydrophilic property of OSTE polymers.

  7. Proton-minibeam radiation therapy: A proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y. [IMNC-UMR 8165, CNRS, Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Fois, G. R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Strada provinciale Monserrato Sestu km 0.700, Monserrato, Cagliari 09042 (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This Monte Carlo simulation work aims at studying a new radiotherapy approach called proton-minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT). The main objective of this proof of concept was the evaluation of the possible gain in tissue sparing, thanks to the spatial fractionation of the dose, which could be used to deposit higher and potentially curative doses in clinical cases where tissue tolerances are a limit for conventional methods. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (GATE v.6) have been used as a method to calculate the ratio of the peak-to-valley doses (PVDR) for arrays of proton minibeams of 0.7 mm width and several center-to-center distances, at different depths in a water phantom. The beam penumbras were also evaluated as an important parameter for tissue sparing, for example, in the treatment of non-cancer diseases like epilepsy. Two proton energies were considered in this study: a clinically relevant energy (105 MeV) and a very high energy (1 GeV), to benefit from a reduced lateral scattering. For the latter case, an interlaced geometry was also evaluated. Results: Higher or similar PVDR than the ones obtained in x-rays minibeam radiation therapy were achieved in several pMBRT configurations. In addition, for the two energies studied, the beam penumbras are smaller than in the case of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Conclusions: The high PVDR obtained for some configurations and the small penumbras in comparison with existing radiosurgery techniques, suggest a potential gain in healthy tissue sparing in this new technique. Biological studies are warranted to assess the effects of pMBRT on both normal and tumoral tissues.

  8. Interleaved Carbon Minibeams: An Experimental Radiosurgery Method With Clinical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham, E-mail: dilmanian@bnl.gov [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); Department of Neurology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); Rusek, Adam [NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Fois, Giovanna R. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Physics Department, University of Cagliari, Sardinia (Italy); Olschowka, John [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Desnoyers, Nicolle R. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre, St. Kitts, West Indies (Country Unknown); Park, Jane Y. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Dioszegi, Istvan [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Dane, Bari; Wang Ruiliang [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Tomasi, Dardo [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Hedok [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Hurley, Sean D. [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Coyle, Patricia K. [Department of Neurology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); Meek, Allen G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); O' Banion, M. Kerry [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of 'interleaved carbon minibeams' for ablating a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain with little damage to the surrounding brain. The method is based on the well-established tissue-sparing effect of arrays of thin planes of radiation. Methods and Materials: Broad carbon beams from the National Aeronautics and Space Agency Space Radiation Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory were segmented into arrays of parallel, horizontal, 0.3-mm-thick planar beams (minibeams). The minibeams' gradual broadening in tissues resulted in 0.525-mm beam thickness at the target's proximal side in the spread-out Bragg peak. Interleaving was therefore implemented by choosing a 1.05 mm beam spacing on-center. The anesthetized rabbit, positioned vertically on a stage capable of rotating about a vertical axis, was exposed to arrays from four 90 Degree-Sign angles, with the stage moving up by 0.525 mm in between. This produced a solid radiation field at the target while exposing the nontargeted tissues to single minibeam arrays. The target 'physical' absorbed dose was 40.2 Gy. Results: The rabbit behaved normally during the 6-month observation period. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging and hematoxylin and eosin histology at 6 months showed substantial focal target damage with little damage to the surrounding brain. Conclusion: We plan to evaluate the method's therapeutic efficacy by comparing it with broad-beam carbon therapy in animal models. The method's merits would combine those of carbon therapy (i.e., tight target dose because of the carbon's Bragg-peak, sharp dose falloff, and high relative biological effectiveness at the target), together with the method's low impact on the nontargeted tissues. The method's smaller impact on the nontargeted brain might allow carbon therapy at higher target doses and/or lower normal tissue impact, thus leading to a more effective treatment of radioresistant

  9. Creating symmetry the artful mathematics of wallpaper patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Farris, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    This lavishly illustrated book provides a hands-on, step-by-step introduction to the intriguing mathematics of symmetry. Instead of breaking up patterns into blocks-a sort of potato-stamp method-Frank Farris offers a completely new waveform approach that enables you to create an endless variety of rosettes, friezes, and wallpaper patterns: dazzling art images where the beauty of nature meets the precision of mathematics. Featuring more than 100 stunning color illustrations and requiring only a modest background in math, Creating Symmetry begins by addressing the enigma of a simple curve, who

  10. Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Reduces Side Effects in an In Vivo Mouse Ear Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.girst@unibw.de [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, Christoph; Reindl, Judith [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Siebenwirth, Christian [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Zlobinskaya, Olga [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Walsh, Dietrich W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Ilicic, Katarina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel [Research Unit Analytical Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Oberschleißheim (Germany); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy is a novel approach to minimize normal tissue damage in the entrance channel by spatial fractionation while keeping tumor control through a homogeneous tumor dose using beam widening with an increasing track length. In the present study, the dose distributions for homogeneous broad beam and minibeam irradiation sessions were simulated. Also, in an animal study, acute normal tissue side effects of proton minibeam irradiation were compared with homogeneous irradiation in a tumor-free mouse ear model to account for the complex effects on the immune system and vasculature in an in vivo normal tissue model. Methods and Materials: At the ion microprobe SNAKE, 20-MeV protons were administered to the central part (7.2 × 7.2 mm{sup 2}) of the ear of BALB/c mice, using either a homogeneous field with a dose of 60 Gy or 16 minibeams with a nominal 6000 Gy (4 × 4 minibeams, size 0.18 × 0.18 mm{sup 2}, with a distance of 1.8 mm). The same average dose was used over the irradiated area. Results: No ear swelling or other skin reactions were observed at any point after minibeam irradiation. In contrast, significant ear swelling (up to fourfold), erythema, and desquamation developed in homogeneously irradiated ears 3 to 4 weeks after irradiation. Hair loss and the disappearance of sebaceous glands were only detected in the homogeneously irradiated fields. Conclusions: These results show that proton minibeam radiation therapy results in reduced adverse effects compared with conventional homogeneous broad-beam irradiation and, therefore, might have the potential to decrease the incidence of side effects resulting from clinical proton and/or heavy ion therapy.

  11. Poster - 23: Dosimetric Characterization and Transferability of an Accessory Mounted Mini-Beam Collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, William; Crewson, Cody; Alexander, Andrew; Cranmer-Sargison, Gavin; Kundapur, Vijayananda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The dosimetric characterization of an accessory-mounted mini-beam collimator across three beam matched linear accelerators. Materials and Methods: Percent depth dose and profiles were measured for the open and mini-beam collimated fields. The average beam quality and peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), the ratio of average peak dose to average valley dose, were obtained from these measurements. The open field relative output and the mini-beam collimator factor, the ratio of the mini-beam dose to open field dose at the beam center, were measured for square fields of side 2, 3, 4, and 5 cm. Mini-beam output as a function of collimator inclination angle relative to the central axis was also investigated. Results and Discussion: Beam quality for both the open and mini-beam collimated fields agreed across all linacs to within ±1.0%. The PVDR was found to vary by up to ±6.6% from the mean. For the 2, 3, and 4 cm fields the average open field relative output with respect to the 5 cm field was 0.874±0.4%, 0.921±0.3%, and 0.962±0.1%. The average collimator factors were 0.450±3.9%, 0.443±3.9%, 0.438±3.9%, and 0.434±3.9%. A decrease in collimator factor greater than 7% was found for an inclination angle change of 0.09°. Conclusion: The mini-beam collimator has revealed a difference between the three linacs not apparent in the open field data, yet transferability can still be attained through thorough dosimetric characterization.

  12. Poster - 23: Dosimetric Characterization and Transferability of an Accessory Mounted Mini-Beam Collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, William; Crewson, Cody; Alexander, Andrew; Cranmer-Sargison, Gavin; Kundapur, Vijayananda [University of Saskatchewan Department of Physics and engineering Physics, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency Department of Medical Physics, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency Department of Medical Physics, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency Department of Medical Physics, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency Department of Medical Physics (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Objective: The dosimetric characterization of an accessory-mounted mini-beam collimator across three beam matched linear accelerators. Materials and Methods: Percent depth dose and profiles were measured for the open and mini-beam collimated fields. The average beam quality and peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), the ratio of average peak dose to average valley dose, were obtained from these measurements. The open field relative output and the mini-beam collimator factor, the ratio of the mini-beam dose to open field dose at the beam center, were measured for square fields of side 2, 3, 4, and 5 cm. Mini-beam output as a function of collimator inclination angle relative to the central axis was also investigated. Results and Discussion: Beam quality for both the open and mini-beam collimated fields agreed across all linacs to within ±1.0%. The PVDR was found to vary by up to ±6.6% from the mean. For the 2, 3, and 4 cm fields the average open field relative output with respect to the 5 cm field was 0.874±0.4%, 0.921±0.3%, and 0.962±0.1%. The average collimator factors were 0.450±3.9%, 0.443±3.9%, 0.438±3.9%, and 0.434±3.9%. A decrease in collimator factor greater than 7% was found for an inclination angle change of 0.09°. Conclusion: The mini-beam collimator has revealed a difference between the three linacs not apparent in the open field data, yet transferability can still be attained through thorough dosimetric characterization.

  13. Medical linear accelerator mounted mini-beam collimator: design, fabrication and dosimetric characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer-Sargison, G; Crewson, C; Davis, W M; Sidhu, N P; Kundapur, V

    2015-09-07

    The goal of this work was to design, build and experimentally characterize a linear accelerator mounted mini-beam collimator for use at a nominal 6 MV beam energy. Monte Carlo simulation was used in the design and dosimetric characterization of a compact mini-beam collimator assembly mounted to a medical linear accelerator. After fabrication, experimental mini-beam dose profiles and central axis relative output were measured and the results used to validate the simulation data. The simulation data was then used to establish traceability back to an established dosimetric code of practice. The Monte Carlo simulation work revealed that changes in collimator blade width have a greater influence on the valley-to-peak dose ratio than do changes in blade height. There was good agreement between the modeled and measured profile data, with the exception of small differences on either side of the central peak dose. These differences were found to be systematic across all depths and result from limitations associated with the collimator fabrication. Experimental mini-beam relative output and simulation data agreed to better than ± 2.0%, which is well within the level of uncertainty required for dosimetric traceability of non-standard field geometries. A mini-beam collimator has now been designed, built and experimentally characterized for use with a commercial linear accelerator operated at a nominal 6 MV beam energy.

  14. Monochromatic minibeam radiotherapy: theoretical and experimental dosimetry for preclinical treatment plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deman, P; Vautrin, M; Stupar, V; Barbier, E L; Elleaume, H; Esteve, F; Adam, J F, E-mail: adam@esrf.fr [INSERM, U836, BP 170, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38042 (France)

    2011-07-21

    Monochromatic x-ray minibeam radiotherapy is a new radiosurgery approach based on arrays of submillimetric interlaced planar x-ray beams. The aim of this study was to characterize the dose distributions obtained with this new modality when being used for preclinical trials. Monte Carlo simulations were performed in water phantoms. Percentage depth-dose curves and dose profiles were computed for single incidences and interleaved incidences of 80 keV planar x-ray minibeam (0.6 x 5 mm) arrays. Peak to valley dose ratios were also computed at various depths for an increasing number of minibeams. 3D experimental polymer gel (nPAG) dosimetry measurements were performed using MRI devices designed for small animal imaging. These very high spatial resolution (50 {mu}m) dose maps were compared to the simulations. Preclinical minibeams dose distributions were fully characterized. Experimental dosimetry correlated well with Monte Carlo calculations (Student t-tests: p > 0.1). F98 tumor-bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams (80 keV, prescribed dose: 25 Gy). This associated preclinical trial serves as a proof of principle of the technique. The mean survival time of irradiated glioma-bearing rats increased significantly, when compared to the untreated animals (59.6 {+-} 2.8 days versus 28.25 {+-} 0.75 days, p < 0.001).

  15. Interleaved Carbon Minibeams: An Experimental Radiosurgery Method With Clinical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Rusek, Adam; Fois, Giovanna R.; Olschowka, John; Desnoyers, Nicolle R.; Park, Jane Y.; Dioszegi, Istvan; Dane, Bari; Wang Ruiliang; Tomasi, Dardo; Lee, Hedok; Hurley, Sean D.; Coyle, Patricia K.; Meek, Allen G.; O’Banion, M. Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of “interleaved carbon minibeams” for ablating a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain with little damage to the surrounding brain. The method is based on the well-established tissue-sparing effect of arrays of thin planes of radiation. Methods and Materials: Broad carbon beams from the National Aeronautics and Space Agency Space Radiation Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory were segmented into arrays of parallel, horizontal, 0.3-mm-thick planar beams (minibeams). The minibeams’ gradual broadening in tissues resulted in 0.525-mm beam thickness at the target’s proximal side in the spread-out Bragg peak. Interleaving was therefore implemented by choosing a 1.05 mm beam spacing on-center. The anesthetized rabbit, positioned vertically on a stage capable of rotating about a vertical axis, was exposed to arrays from four 90° angles, with the stage moving up by 0.525 mm in between. This produced a solid radiation field at the target while exposing the nontargeted tissues to single minibeam arrays. The target “physical” absorbed dose was 40.2 Gy. Results: The rabbit behaved normally during the 6-month observation period. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging and hematoxylin and eosin histology at 6 months showed substantial focal target damage with little damage to the surrounding brain. Conclusion: We plan to evaluate the method’s therapeutic efficacy by comparing it with broad-beam carbon therapy in animal models. The method’s merits would combine those of carbon therapy (i.e., tight target dose because of the carbon’s Bragg-peak, sharp dose falloff, and high relative biological effectiveness at the target), together with the method’s low impact on the nontargeted tissues. The method’s smaller impact on the nontargeted brain might allow carbon therapy at higher target doses and/or lower normal tissue impact, thus leading to a more effective treatment of radioresistant tumors. It should also make the method more

  16. A framework for creating pattern languages for enterprise architecture

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotzé, P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of patterns and pattern languages in enterprise architecture (EA) is a relatively novel concept. Although both the concepts of patterns and EA are over 30 years old, the notion of design patterns is hardly applied to EA. There is a lack...

  17. A 7 µm mini-beam improves diffraction data from small or imperfect crystals of macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanishvili, Ruslan; Nagarajan, Venugopalan; Yoder, Derek; Becker, Michael; Xu, Shenglan; Corcoran, Stephen; Akey, David L.; Smith, Janet L.; Fischetti, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    An X-ray mini-beam of 8 × 6 µm cross-section was used to collect diffraction data from protein microcrystals with volumes as small as 150–300 µm 3 . The benefits of the mini-beam for experiments with small crystals and with large inhomogeneous crystals are investigated. A simple apparatus for achieving beam sizes in the range 5-10 µm on a synchrotron beamline was implemented in combination with a small 125 × 25 µm focus. The resulting beam had sufficient flux for crystallographic data collection from samples smaller than 10 × 10 × 10 µm. Sample data were collected representing three different scenarios: (i) a complete 2.0 Å data set from a single strongly diffracting microcrystal, (ii) a complete and redundant 1.94 Å data set obtained by merging data from six microcrystals and (iii) a complete 2.24 Å data set from a needle-shaped crystal with less than 12 × 10 µm cross-section and average diffracting power. The resulting data were of high quality, leading to well refined structures with good electron-density maps. The signal-to-noise ratios for data collected from small crystals with the mini-beam were significantly higher than for equivalent data collected from the same crystal with a 125 × 25 µm beam. Relative to this large beam, use of the mini-beam also resulted in lower refined crystal mosaicities. The mini-beam proved to be advantageous for inhomogeneous large crystals, where better ordered regions could be selected by the smaller beam

  18. Monochromatic Minibeams Radiotherapy: From Healthy Tissue-Sparing Effect Studies Toward First Experimental Glioma Bearing Rats Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deman, Pierre; Vautrin, Mathias; Edouard, Magali; Stupar, Vasile; Bobyk, Laure; Farion, Régine; Elleaume, Hélène; Rémy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Estève, François; Adam, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate high-dose single fraction delivered with monochromatic X-rays minibeams for the radiotherapy of primary brain tumors in rats. Methods and Materials: Two groups of healthy rats were irradiated with one anteroposterior minibeam incidence (four minibeams, 123 Gy prescribed dose at 1 cm depth in the brain) or two interleaved incidences (54 Gy prescribed dose in a 5 × 5 × 4.8 mm 3 volume centered in the right hemisphere), respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed over 1 year. T2-weighted (T2w) images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and blood vessel permeability maps were acquired. F98 tumor bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams to achieve a homogeneous dose of 54 Gy delivered to an 8 × 8 × 7.8 mm 3 volume centered on the tumor. Anatomic and functional MRI follow-up was performed every 10 days after irradiation. T2w images, ADC, and perfusion maps were acquired. Results: All healthy rats were euthanized 1 year after irradiation without any clinical alteration visible by simple examination. T2w and ADC measurements remain stable for the single incidence irradiation group. Localized Gd-DOTA permeability, however, was observed 9 months after irradiation for the interleaved incidences group. The survival time of irradiated glioma bearing rats was significantly longer than that of untreated animals (49 ± 12.5 days versus 23.3 ± 2 days, p < 0.001). The tumoral cerebral blood flow and blood volume tend to decrease after irradiation. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the sparing effect of minibeams on healthy tissue. The increased life span achieved for irradiated glioma bearing rats was similar to the one obtained with other radiotherapy techniques. This experimental tumor therapy study shows the feasibility of using X-ray minibeams with high doses in brain tumor radiotherapy.

  19. Monochromatic Minibeams Radiotherapy: From Healthy Tissue-Sparing Effect Studies Toward First Experimental Glioma Bearing Rats Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deman, Pierre [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Vautrin, Mathias [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); Edouard, Magali [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Stupar, Vasile [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Bobyk, Laure; Farion, Regine [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Elleaume, Helene [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Remy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L. [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Esteve, Francois [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Adam, Jean-Francois, E-mail: adam@esrf.fr [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate high-dose single fraction delivered with monochromatic X-rays minibeams for the radiotherapy of primary brain tumors in rats. Methods and Materials: Two groups of healthy rats were irradiated with one anteroposterior minibeam incidence (four minibeams, 123 Gy prescribed dose at 1 cm depth in the brain) or two interleaved incidences (54 Gy prescribed dose in a 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 4.8 mm{sup 3} volume centered in the right hemisphere), respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed over 1 year. T2-weighted (T2w) images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and blood vessel permeability maps were acquired. F98 tumor bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams to achieve a homogeneous dose of 54 Gy delivered to an 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 Multiplication-Sign 7.8 mm{sup 3} volume centered on the tumor. Anatomic and functional MRI follow-up was performed every 10 days after irradiation. T2w images, ADC, and perfusion maps were acquired. Results: All healthy rats were euthanized 1 year after irradiation without any clinical alteration visible by simple examination. T2w and ADC measurements remain stable for the single incidence irradiation group. Localized Gd-DOTA permeability, however, was observed 9 months after irradiation for the interleaved incidences group. The survival time of irradiated glioma bearing rats was significantly longer than that of untreated animals (49 {+-} 12.5 days versus 23.3 {+-} 2 days, p < 0.001). The tumoral cerebral blood flow and blood volume tend to decrease after irradiation. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the sparing effect of minibeams on healthy tissue. The increased life span achieved for irradiated glioma bearing rats was similar to the one obtained with other radiotherapy techniques. This experimental tumor therapy study shows the feasibility of using X-ray minibeams with high doses in brain tumor radiotherapy.

  20. Embodied mind knowledge in leadership practice: creating space in patterned thoughts and behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssiens, Astra Elise Amaranta; van der Linden, Claartje; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.; Furtmueller-Ettinger, Elfriede

    2013-01-01

    This article invites leaders and managers who are successful in their work, but feel unfulfilled and stressed, to create space in their fixed patterns of thinking and acting. Creating such space generates the possibility of experiencing meaningfulness and satisfaction at work and producing

  1. Minibeam Therapy With Protons and Light Ions: Physical Feasibility and Potential to Reduce Radiation Side Effects and to Facilitate Hypofractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham, E-mail: avraham.dilmanian@stonybrook.edu [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Neurology, and Radiology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York (United States); Eley, John G. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Despite several advantages of proton therapy over megavoltage x-ray therapy, its lack of proximal tissue sparing is a concern. The method presented here adds proximal tissue sparing to protons and light ions by turning their uniform incident beams into arrays of parallel, small, or thin (0.3-mm) pencil or planar minibeams, which are known to spare tissues. As these minibeams penetrate the tissues, they gradually broaden and merge with each other to produce a solid beam. Methods and Materials: Broadening of 0.3-mm-diameter, 109-MeV proton pencil minibeams was measured using a stack of radiochromic films with plastic spacers. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the broadening in water of minibeams of protons and several light ions and the dose from neutron generated by collimator. Results: A central parameter was tissue depth, where the beam full width at half maximum (FWHM) reached 0.7 mm, beyond which tissue sparing decreases. This depth was 22 mm for 109-MeV protons in a film stack. It was also found by simulations in water to be 23.5 mm for 109 MeV proton pencil minibeams and 26 mm for 116 MeV proton planar minibeams. For light ions, all with 10 cm range in water, that depth increased with particle size; specifically it was 51 mm for Li-7 ions. The ∼2.7% photon equivalent neutron skin dose from the collimator was reduced 7-fold by introducing a gap between the collimator and the skin. Conclusions: Proton minibeams can be implemented at existing particle therapy centers. Because they spare the shallow tissues, they could augment the efficacy of proton therapy and light particle therapy, particularly in treating tumors that benefit from sparing of proximal tissues such as pediatric brain tumors. They should also allow hypofractionated treatment of all tumors by allowing the use of higher incident doses with less concern about proximal tissue damage.

  2. Chemically Patterned Inverse Opal Created by a Selective Photolysis Modification Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Gao, Ning; Gu, Chen; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Lan, Yue; Yin, Xianpeng; Li, Guangtao

    2015-09-02

    Anisotropic photonic crystal materials have long been pursued for their broad applications. A novel method for creating chemically patterned inverse opals is proposed here. The patterning technique is based on selective photolysis of a photolabile polymer together with postmodification on released amine groups. The patterning method allows regioselective modification within an inverse opal structure, taking advantage of selective chemical reaction. Moreover, combined with the unique signal self-reporting feature of the photonic crystal, the fabricated structure is capable of various applications, including gradient photonic bandgap and dynamic chemical patterns. The proposed method provides the ability to extend the structural and chemical complexity of the photonic crystal, as well as its potential applications.

  3. Note: Using a Kösters prism to create a fringe pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capellmann, R F; Bewerunge, J; Platten, F; Egelhaaf, S U

    2017-05-01

    The interference of two crossed laser beams results in a standing wave. Such fringe patterns are exploited in different instruments such as interferometers or laser-Doppler anemometers. We create a fringe pattern in the sample plane of a microscope using a compact apparatus based on a Kösters prism. The fringe pattern is shown to be spatially and temporally very stable, covers a large area, and its spacing is easily tunable. In addition, we exploit it to impose a sinusoidal potential on colloidal particles.

  4. SU-F-T-671: Effects of Collimator Material On Proton Minibeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E; Sandison, G; Cao, N; Stewart, R; Meyer, J; Eagle, J; Marsh, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of collimator material on spatially modulated proton minibeams (pMBRT). Methods: pMBRT holds promise to exhibit shallow depth normal-tissue sparing effects similar to synchrotron based microbeams while also retaining potential for uniform dose distributions for tumor targets. TOPAS Monte Carlo simulations were performed for a 5cm thick multislit collimator with 0.3mm slits and 1mm center-to-center spacing for a 50.5MeV proton minibeam while varying collimator material between brass, tungsten, and iron. The collimator was placed both “flush” at the water phantom surface and at 5cm distance to investigate the effects on surface dose, peak-to-valley-dose-ratio (PVDR) and neutron contribution. Results: For flush placement, the neutron dose at the phantom surface for the tungsten collimator was approximately 20% higher than for brass and iron. This was not reflected in the overall surface dose, which was comparable for all materials due to the relatively low neutron contribution of <0.1%. When the collimator was retracted, the overall neutron contribution was essentially identical for all three collimators. Surface dose dropped by ∼40% for all collimator materials with air gap compared to being flush with the phantom surface. This surface dose reduction was at the cost of increase in valley dose for all collimator materials due to increased angular divergence of the mini-beams at the surface and their consequent geometric penumbra at depth. When the collimator was placed at distance from the phantom surface the PVDR decreased. The peak-to-entrance-dose ratio was highest for the iron collimator with 5cm air gap. Conclusion: The dosimetric difference between the collimator materials is minimal despite the relatively higher neutron contribution at the phantom surface for the tungsten collimator when placed flush. The air gap between the collimator and phantom surface strongly influences all dosimetry parameters due to

  5. Minibeam radiotherapy with small animal irradiators; in vitro and in vivo feasibility studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyar, Soha; Inscoe, Christina R.; O'Brian, E. Timothy; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2017-12-01

    Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) delivers an ultrahigh dose of x-ray (⩾100 Gy) in 200-1000 µm beams (peaks), separated by wider non-irradiated regions (valleys) usually as a single temporal fraction. Preclinical studies performed at synchrotron facilities revealed that MBRT is able to ablate tumors while maintaining normal tissue integrity. The main purpose of the present study was to develop an efficient and accessible method to perform MBRT using a conventional x-ray irradiator. We then tested this new method both in vitro and in vivo. Using commercially available lead ribbon and polyethylene sheets, we constructed a collimator that converted the cone beam of an industrial irradiator to 44 identical beams (collimator size  ≈  4  ×  10 cm). The dosimetry characteristics of the generated beams were evaluated using two different radiochromic films (beam FWHM  =  246  ±  32 µm center-to-center  =  926  ±  23 µm peak-to-valley dose ratio  =  24.35  ±  2.10 collimator relative output factor  =  0.84  ±  0.04). Clonogenic assays demonstrated the ability of our method to induce radiobiological cell death in two radioresistant murine tumor cell lines (TRP  =  glioblastoma B16-F10  =  melanoma). A radiobiological equivalent dose (RBE) was calculated by evaluating the acute skin response to graded doses of MBRT and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Normal mouse skin demonstrated resistance to doses up to 150 Gy on peak. MBRT significantly extended the survival of mice with flank melanoma tumors compared to CRT when RBE were applied (overall p  film. In conclusion, the initial dosimetric, in vitro and in vivo evaluations confirmed the utility of this affordable and easy-to-replicate minibeam collimator for future preclinical studies.

  6. Survival Analysis of F98 Glioma Rat Cells Following Minibeam or Broad-Beam Synchrotron Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Silvia; Sarun, Sukhéna; Biete, Albert; Prezado, Yolanda; Sabés, Manel

    2011-01-01

    In the quest of a curative radiotherapy treatment for gliomas new delivery modes are being explored. At the Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), a new spatially-fractionated technique, called Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT) is under development. The aim of this work is to compare the effectiveness of MBRT and broad-beam (BB) synchrotron radiation to treat F98 glioma rat cells. A dose escalation study was performed in order to delimit the range of doses where a therapeutic effect could be expected. These results will help in the design and optimization of the forthcoming in vivo studies at the ESRF. Two hundred thousand F98 cells were seeded per well in 24-well plates, and incubated for 48 hours before being irradiated with spatially fractionated and seamless synchrotron x-rays at several doses. The percentage of each cell population (alive, early apoptotic and dead cells, where either late apoptotic as necrotic cells are included) was assessed by flow cytometry 48 hours after irradiation, whereas the metabolic activity of surviving cells was analyzed on days 3, 4, and 9 post-irradiation by using QBlue test. The endpoint (or threshold dose from which an important enhancement in the effectiveness of both radiation treatments is achieved) obtained by flow cytometry could be established just before 12 Gy in the two irradiation schemes, whilst the endpoints assessed by the QBlue reagent, taking into account the cell recovery, were set around 18 Gy in both cases. In addition, flow cytometric analysis pointed at a larger effectiveness for minibeams, due to the higher proportion of early apoptotic cells. When the valley doses in MBRT equal the dose deposited in the BB scheme, similar cell survival ratio and cell recovery were observed. However, a significant increase in the number of early apoptotic cells were found 48 hours after the minibeam radiation in comparison with the seamless mode

  7. Simple growth patterns can create complex trajectories for the ontogeny of constitutive chemical defences in seaweeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Paul

    Full Text Available All of the theory and most of the data on the ecology and evolution of chemical defences derive from terrestrial plants, which have considerable capacity for internal movement of resources. In contrast, most macroalgae--seaweeds--have no or very limited capacity for resource translocation, meaning that trade-offs between growth and defence, for example, should be localised rather than systemic. This may change the predictions of chemical defence theories for seaweeds. We developed a model that mimicked the simple growth pattern of the red seaweed Asparagopsis armata which is composed of repeating clusters of somatic cells and cells which contain deterrent secondary chemicals (gland cells. To do this we created a distinct growth curve for the somatic cells and another for the gland cells using empirical data. The somatic growth function was linked to the growth function for defence via differential equations modelling, which effectively generated a trade-off between growth and defence as these neighbouring cells develop. By treating growth and defence as separate functions we were also able to model a trade-off in growth of 2-3% under most circumstances. However, we found contrasting evidence for this trade-off in the empirical relationships between growth and defence, depending on the light level under which the alga was cultured. After developing a model that incorporated both branching and cell division rates, we formally demonstrated that positive correlations between growth and defence are predicted in many circumstances and also that allocation costs, if they exist, will be constrained by the intrinsic growth patterns of the seaweed. Growth patterns could therefore explain contrasting evidence for cost of constitutive chemical defence in many studies, highlighting the need to consider the fundamental biology and ontogeny of organisms when assessing the allocation theories for defence.

  8. SU-C-204-02: Behavioral and Pathologic Differences in Mice Exposed to Proton Minibeam Arrays Versus Proton Broad Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eley, J; Zhang, C; Wolfe, T; Vichaya, E; Quini, C; Chadha, A; Sahoo, N; Krishnan, S; Davis, J; Dilmanian, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Minibeam therapy using protons or light-ions offers a theoretical reduction of biologic damage to tissues upstream of a tumor compared to broad-beam therapy while providing equal tumor control. The purpose of this study was to investigate behavioral and pathologic differences in mice after exposure of healthy brain to proton minibeam arrays versus proton broad beams. Methods: Twenty-four C57BL/6J juvenile mice were divided into 5 study arms: sham irradiation (NoRT), broad-beam 10 Gy (BB10), minibeam 10Gy (MB10), broad-beam 30 Gy (BB30), and minibeam 30 Gy (MB30), approximate integral entrance doses. Circular beams of 100 MeV protons with 7-mm diameter were delivered laterally through the brain, either as broad beams or as planar minibeam arrays having 300-micron beam width and 1-mm spacing on center. Mice were followed for 8 months using standard behavioral tests. Pathologic studies were carried out at 8 months after irradiation. Results: Peak entrance doses were 10.0, 23.8, 30.0, and 71.3 Gy for mice in BB10, MB10, BB30, and MB30, respectively. Despite the high single-fraction doses, no animals showed signs of radiation sickness or neurophysical impairment over the 8-month study duration. The Morris water maze alternate-starting-position trial showed significant evidence of better spatial learning for mice in MB10 versus BB10 (p=0.026), but other behavioral tests showed no significant differences. Glial fibrillary acidic protein stains showed gliosis in arms BB10, BB30, and MB30 but not in NoRT or MB10. A secondary finding was categorically higher epilation in broad-beam arms compared with their minibeam dose counterparts. Conclusion: Our findings indicate trends that, despite the higher peak doses, proton minibeam therapy can reduce radiation side effects in shallow tissue and brain compared to proton broadbeam therapy. As the behavioral findings were mixed, confirmation studies are needed with larger numbers of animals. AAPM Research Seed Funding Grant

  9. SU-C-204-02: Behavioral and Pathologic Differences in Mice Exposed to Proton Minibeam Arrays Versus Proton Broad Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, J; Zhang, C [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wolfe, T; Vichaya, E; Quini, C; Chadha, A; Sahoo, N; Krishnan, S [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Davis, J; Dilmanian, F [Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Minibeam therapy using protons or light-ions offers a theoretical reduction of biologic damage to tissues upstream of a tumor compared to broad-beam therapy while providing equal tumor control. The purpose of this study was to investigate behavioral and pathologic differences in mice after exposure of healthy brain to proton minibeam arrays versus proton broad beams. Methods: Twenty-four C57BL/6J juvenile mice were divided into 5 study arms: sham irradiation (NoRT), broad-beam 10 Gy (BB10), minibeam 10Gy (MB10), broad-beam 30 Gy (BB30), and minibeam 30 Gy (MB30), approximate integral entrance doses. Circular beams of 100 MeV protons with 7-mm diameter were delivered laterally through the brain, either as broad beams or as planar minibeam arrays having 300-micron beam width and 1-mm spacing on center. Mice were followed for 8 months using standard behavioral tests. Pathologic studies were carried out at 8 months after irradiation. Results: Peak entrance doses were 10.0, 23.8, 30.0, and 71.3 Gy for mice in BB10, MB10, BB30, and MB30, respectively. Despite the high single-fraction doses, no animals showed signs of radiation sickness or neurophysical impairment over the 8-month study duration. The Morris water maze alternate-starting-position trial showed significant evidence of better spatial learning for mice in MB10 versus BB10 (p=0.026), but other behavioral tests showed no significant differences. Glial fibrillary acidic protein stains showed gliosis in arms BB10, BB30, and MB30 but not in NoRT or MB10. A secondary finding was categorically higher epilation in broad-beam arms compared with their minibeam dose counterparts. Conclusion: Our findings indicate trends that, despite the higher peak doses, proton minibeam therapy can reduce radiation side effects in shallow tissue and brain compared to proton broadbeam therapy. As the behavioral findings were mixed, confirmation studies are needed with larger numbers of animals. AAPM Research Seed Funding Grant.

  10. SU-F-T-673: Effects of Cardiac Induced Brain Pulsations On Proton Minibeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eagle, J; Marsh, S [University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Canterbury (New Zealand); Lee, E; Meyer, J [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of internal motion within the brain on spatially modulated proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMRT) for small animal research. Methods: The peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) is an essential dosimetric factor for pMRT. Motion of an animal brain caused by cardiac-induced pulsations (CIP) can impact dose deposition. For synchrotron generated high dose rate X-ray microbeams this effect is evaded due to the quasi-instantaneous delivery. By comparison, pMRT potentially suffers increased spread due to lower dose rates. However, for a given dose rate it is less susceptible to beam spread than microbeams, due to the spatial modulation being an order of magnitude larger. Monte Carlo simulations in TOPAS were used to model the beam spread for a 50.5MeV pMRT beam. Motion effects were simulated for a 50mm thick brass collimator with 0.3mm slit width and 1.0mm center-to-center spacing in a water phantom. The maximum motion in a rat brain due to CIP has been reported to be 0.06mm. Motion was simulated with a peak amplitude in the range 0–0.2mm. Results: The impact of 0.06mm peak motion was minimal and reduced the PVDR by about 1% at a depth of 10mm. For 0.2mm peak motion the PVDR was reduced by 16% at a depth of 10mm. Conclusion: For the pMRT beam the magnitude of cardiac-induced brain motion has minimal impact on the PVDR for the investigated collimator geometry. For more narrow beams the effect is likely to be larger. This indicates that delivery of pMRT to small animal brains should not be affected considerably by beamlines with linac compatible dose rates.

  11. Brain tumors and synchrotron radiation: new methods for mini-beams radiation therapy and treatment follow-up by functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deman, P.

    2012-01-01

    An innovative method of synchrotron radiation therapy, called mini-beams, was proposed by A. Dilmanian et al. in 2006. Mini-beams consists in tumor irradiation with monochromatic sub-millimetric x-ray beams spatially fractionated produced by a synchrotron source. To obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume, an interleaving is realized using two orthogonal incidences. Adjacent healthy tissue is only partially irradiated by mini-beams, the areas between the beams only receive scattered radiation and therefore the energy deposited is 10 to 15 times lower than on one mini-beam axis, leading to a sparing effect of healthy tissue even when a high dose is deposited in the target volume. The thesis project is the development of this experimental method of monochromatic mini-beams, which involves the control of the irradiation geometry, the control of dosimetry and its modeling by Monte Carlo simulations. To evaluate the method, preclinical experiments on models of brain tumors implanted in rats (F98) are performed. Follow-up by anatomical and functional imaging is carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Functional imaging of cerebral perfusion (volume and cerebral blood flow, mean transit time of heavy elements) appears to be associated in the literature as a relevant method for monitoring prognostic. The key parameters of the cerebral vasculature are mainly studied in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because of the harmlessness of this imaging modality. The relation between MRI signal and contrast agent concentration is very complex and no quantitative relationship is well known. Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography (SRCT) is an imaging modality with performances to measure absolute contrast agent concentration very close to the theoretical limits and can be used as gold-standard. The used pharmacokinetic models need as input parameters a contrast agent concentration versus time. A comparison of perfusion measurements between MRI and SRCT

  12. Spin-wave interference patterns created by spin-torque nano-oscillators for memory and computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macia, Ferran; Kent, Andrew D; Hoppensteadt, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    Magnetization dynamics in nanomagnets has attracted broad interest since it was predicted that a dc current flowing through a thin magnetic layer can create spin-wave excitations. These excitations are due to spin momentum transfer, a transfer of spin angular momentum between conduction electrons and the background magnetization, that enables new types of information processing. Here we show how arrays of spin-torque nano-oscillators can create propagating spin-wave interference patterns of use for memory and computation. Memristic transponders distributed on the thin film respond to threshold tunnel magnetoresistance values, thereby allowing spin-wave detection and creating new excitation patterns. We show how groups of transponders create resonant (reverberating) spin-wave interference patterns that may be used for polychronous wave computation and information storage.

  13. Developing and setting up optical methods to study the speckle patterns created by optical beam smoothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surville, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have developed three main optical methods to study the speckles generated by a smoothed laser source. The first method addresses the measurement of the temporal and spatial correlation functions of the source, with a modified Michelson interferometer. The second one is a pump-probe technique created to shoot a picture of a speckle pattern generated at a set time. And the third one is an evolution of the second method dedicated to time-frequency coding, thanks to a frequency chirped probe pulse. Thus, the speckles can be followed in time and their motion can be described. According to these three methods, the average size and duration of the speckles can be measured. It is also possible to measure the size and the duration of each of them and mostly their velocity in a given direction. All the results obtained have been confronted to the different existing theories. We show that the statistical distributions of the measured speckles'size and speckles'intensity agree satisfactorily with theoretical values

  14. Impact of cardio-synchronous brain pulsations on Monte Carlo calculated doses for synchrotron micro- and mini-beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchado de Sola, Francisco; Vilches, Manuel; Prezado, Yolanda; Lallena, Antonio M

    2018-05-15

    To assess the effects of brain movements induced by heartbeat on dose distributions in synchrotron micro- and mini-beam radiaton therapy and to develop a model to help guide decisions and planning for future clinical trials. The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to simulate the irradiation of a human head phantom with a variety of micro- and mini-beam arrays, with beams narrower than 100 μm and above 500 μm, respectively, and with radiation fields of 1cm × 2cm and 2cm × 2cm. The dose in the phantom due to these beams was calculated by superposing the dose profiles obtained for a single beam of 1μm × 2cm. A parameter δ, accounting for the total displacement of the brain during the irradiation and due to the cardio-synchronous pulsation, was used to quantify the impact on peak-to-valley dose ratios and the full-width at half-maximum. The difference between the maximum (at the phantom entrance) and the minimum (at the phantom exit) values of the peak-to-valley dose ratio reduces when the parameter δ increases. The full-width at half-maximum remains almost constant with depth for any δ value. Sudden changes in the two quantities are observed at the interfaces between the various tissues (brain, skull and skin) present in the head phantom. The peak-to-valley dose ratio at the center of the head phantom reduces when δ increases, remaining above 70% of the static value only for mini-beams and δ smaller than ~ 200 μm. Optimal setups for brain treatments with synchrotron radiation micro- and mini-beam combs depend on the brain displacement due to cardio-synchronous pulsation. Peak-to-valley dose ratios larger than 90% of the maximum values obtained in the static case occur only for mini-beams and relatively large dose rates. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Creating von Laue patterns in crystal scattering with partially coherent sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.Y.D.; Kuebel, D.; Visser, T.D.; Wolf, E.

    2016-01-01

    When spatially coherent radiation is diffracted by a crystalline object, the field is scattered in specific directions, giving rise to so-called von Laue patterns. We examine the role of spatial coherence in this process. Using the first-order Born approximation, a general analytic expression for

  16. Creating periodic local strain in monolayer graphene with nanopillars patterned by self-assembled block copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Hongyi; Mikael, Solomon; Seo, Jung-Hun; Gui, Gui; Ma, Alice L.; Ma, Zhenqiang, E-mail: nealey@uchicago.edu, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Liu, Chi-Chun; Nealey, Paul F., E-mail: nealey@uchicago.edu, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    A simple and viable method was developed to produce biaxial strain in monolayer graphene on an array of SiO{sub 2} nanopillars. The array of SiO{sub 2} nanopillars (1 cm{sup 2} in area, 80 nm in height, and 40 nm in pitch) was fabricated by employing self-assembled block copolymer through simple dry etching and deposition processes. According to high resolution micro-Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy analyses, 0.9% of maximum biaxial tensile strain and 0.17% of averaged biaxial tensile strain in graphene were created. This technique provides a simple and viable method to form biaxial tensile strain in graphene and offers a practical platform for future studies in graphene strain engineering.

  17. Transfer of Minibeam Radiation Therapy into a cost-effective equipment for radiobiological studies: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezado, Y; Dos Santos, M; Gonzalez, W; Jouvion, G; Guardiola, C; Heinrich, S; Labiod, D; Juchaux, M; Jourdain, L; Sebrie, C; Pouzoulet, F

    2017-12-11

    Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) is an innovative synchrotron radiotherapy technique able to shift the normal tissue complication probability curves to significantly higher doses. However, its exploration was hindered due to the limited and expensive beamtime at synchrotrons. The aim of this work was to develop a cost-effective equipment to perform systematic radiobiological studies in view of MBRT. Tumor control for various tumor entities will be addressable as well as studies to unravel the distinct biological mechanisms involved in normal and tumor tissues responses when applying MBRT. With that aim, a series of modifications of a small animal irradiator were performed to make it suitable for MBRT experiments. In addition, the brains of two groups of rats were irradiated. Half of the animals received a standard irradiation, the other half, MBRT. The animals were followed-up for 6.5 months. Substantial brain damage was observed in the group receiving standard RT, in contrast to the MBRT group, where no significant lesions were observed. This work proves the feasibility of the transfer of MBRT outside synchrotron sources towards a small animal irradiator.

  18. An ecological mechanism to create regular patterns of surface dissolution in a low-relief carbonate landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. J.; Martin, J. B.; Mclaughlin, D. L.; Osborne, T.; Murray, A.; Watts, A. C.; Watts, D.; Heffernan, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Development of karst landscapes is controlled by focused delivery of water undersaturated with respect to the soluble rock minerals. As that water comes to equilibrium with the rock, secondary porosity is incrementally reinforced creating a positive feedback that acts to augment the drainage network and subsequent water delivery. In most self-organizing systems, spatial positive feedbacks create features (in landscapes: patches; in karst aquifers: conduits) whose size-frequency relationship follows a power function, indicating a higher probability of large features than would occur with a random or Gaussian genesis process. Power functions describe several aspects of secondary porosity in the Upper Floridan Aquifer in north Florida. In contrast, a different pattern arises in the karst landscape in southwest Florida (Big Cypress National Preserve; BICY), where low-relief and a shallow aquiclude govern regional hydrology. There, the landscape pattern is highly regular (Fig. 1), with circular cypress-dominated wetlands occupying depressions that are hydrologically isolated and distributed evenly in a matrix of pine uplands. Regular landscape patterning results from spatially coupled feedbacks, one positive operating locally that expands patches coupled to another negative that operates at distance, eventually inhibiting patch expansion. The positive feedback in BICY is thought to derive from the presence of surface depressions, which sustain prolonged inundation in this low-relief setting, and facilitate wetland development that greatly augments dissolution potential of infiltrating water in response to ecosystem metabolic processes. In short, wetlands "drill" into the carbonate leading to both vertical and lateral basin expansion. Wetland expansion occurs at the expense of surrounding upland area, which is the local catchment that subsidizes water availability. A distal inhibitory feedback on basin expansion thus occurs as the water necessary to sustain prolonged

  19. Twist on protein microarrays: layering wax-patterned nitrocellulose to create customizable and separable arrays of multiplexed affinity columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Victoria; Vörös, János

    2014-05-06

    We developed the simple and inexpensive FoRe microarray to simultaneously test several 1 μL samples for multiple proteins. By combining forward and reverse phase microarrays into an innovative three-dimensional format, the FoRe array exploits the advantages and eliminates several drawbacks of the traditional approaches (i.e., large sample volumes, protein loss, and cross-reactivity between detection antibodies). Samples are pipetted into an array of separable, multiplexed affinity columns. Several nitrocellulose membranes, each functionalized with a different capture antibody, are stacked to create a customizable affinity column. The nitrocellulose is patterned with wax to form 25 isolated microspots on each layer, allowing us to analyze multiple samples in parallel. After running the immunoassay, the stacks are quickly disassembled, revealing 2D microarrays of different fractions from multiple samples. By combining the stack-and-separate technique with wax patterning, we keep the arrays low cost and easily tailored to a variety of applications. We successfully performed 3D multiplexing using a model system with mouse and rabbit IgG. Binding proved to be independent of the position in the stack, and the limit of detection for a mouse IgG sandwich assay was 7.3 pM in BSA and 15 pM in human plasma. The FoRe microarray makes it possible to identify protein expression patterns across several minute volume samples; for example, it could be used to analyze cell lysate in drug response studies or pricks of blood from small animal studies.

  20. A User-Centered Framework for Deriving A Conceptual Design From User Experiences: Leveraging Personas and Patterns to Create Usable Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javahery, Homa; Deichman, Alexander; Seffah, Ahmed; Taleb, Mohamed

    Patterns are a design tool to capture best practices, tackling problems that occur in different contexts. A user interface (UI) design pattern spans several levels of design abstraction ranging from high-level navigation to low-level idioms detailing a screen layout. One challenge is to combine a set of patterns to create a conceptual design that reflects user experiences. In this chapter, we detail a user-centered design (UCD) framework that exploits the novel idea of using personas and patterns together. Personas are used initially to collect and model user experiences. UI patterns are selected based on personas pecifications; these patterns are then used as building blocks for constructing conceptual designs. Through the use of a case study, we illustrate how personas and patterns can act as complementary techniques in narrowing the gap between two major steps in UCD: capturing users and their experiences, and building an early design based on that information. As a result of lessons learned from the study and by refining our framework, we define a more systematic process called UX-P (User Experiences to Pattern), with a supporting tool. The process introduces intermediate analytical steps and supports designers in creating usable designs.

  1. A Quantitative Method for the Analysis of Nomothetic Relationships between Idiographic Structures: Dynamic Patterns Create Attractor States for Sustained Posttreatment Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Aaron J.; Newman, Michelle G.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present article aimed to demonstrate that the establishment of dynamic patterns during the course of psychotherapy can create attractor states for continued adaptive change following the conclusion of treatment. Method: This study is a secondary analysis of T. D. Borkovec and E. Costello (1993). Of the 55 participants in the…

  2. Creating standards: Creating illusions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Mai Skjøtt

    written standards may open up for the creation of illusions. These are created when written standards' content is not in accordance with the perception standard adopters and standard users have of the specific practice phenomenon's content. This general theoretical argument is exemplified by the specific...

  3. One-step patterning of hollow microstructures in paper by laser cutting to create microfluidic analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jinfang; Liang, Yuanzhi; Zhang, Yun; Le, Shangwang; Li, Dunnan; Zhang, Songbai

    2013-01-21

    In this paper, we report a simple, low-cost method for rapid, highly reproductive fabrication of paper-based microfluidics by using a commercially available, minitype CO(2) laser cutting/engraving machine. This method involves only one operation of cutting a piece of paper by laser according to a predesigned pattern. The hollow microstructures formed in the paper are used as the 'hydrophobic barriers' to define the hydrophilic flowing paths. A typical paper device on a 4 cm × 4 cm piece of paper can be fabricated within ∼7-20 s; it is ready for use once the cutting process is finished. The main fabrication parameters such as the applied current and cutting rate of the laser were optimized. The fabrication resolution and multiplexed analytical capability of the hollow microstructure-patterned paper were also characterized.

  4. Laser-assisted bioprinting for creating on-demand patterns of human osteoprogenitor cells and nano-hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catros, Sylvain; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Guillotin, Bertrand; Pippenger, Benjamin; Bareille, Reine; Remy, Murielle; Amedee, Joelle; Guillemot, Fabien; Lebraud, Eric; Desbat, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Developing tools to reproduce and manipulate the cell micro-environment, including the location and shape of cell patterns, is essential for tissue engineering. Parallel to inkjet printing and pressure-operated mechanical extruders, laser-assisted bioprinting (LAB) has emerged as an alternative technology to fabricate two- and three-dimensional tissue engineering products. The objective of this work was to determine laser printing parameters for patterning and assembling nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) and human osteoprogenitors (HOPs) in two and three dimensions with LAB. The LAB workstation used in this study comprised an infrared laser focused on a quartz ribbon that was coated with a thin absorbing layer of titanium and a layer of bioink. The scanning system, quartz ribbon and substrate were piloted by dedicated software, allowing the sequential printing of different biological materials into two and/or three dimensions. nHA printing material (bioink) was synthesized by chemical precipitation and was characterized prior and following printing using transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. HOP bioink was prepared using a 30 million cells ml -1 suspension in culture medium and cells were characterized after printing using a Live/Dead assay and osteoblastic phenotype markers (alcaline phosphatase and osteocalcin). The results revealed that LAB allows printing and organizing nHA and HOPs in two and three dimensions. LAB did not alter the physico-chemical properties of nHA, nor the viability, proliferation and phenotype of HOPs over time (up to 15 days). This study has demonstrated that LAB is a relevant method for patterning nHA and osteoblastic cells in 2D, and is also adapted to the bio-fabrication of 3D composite materials.

  5. Laser-assisted bioprinting for creating on-demand patterns of human osteoprogenitor cells and nano-hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catros, Sylvain; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Guillotin, Bertrand; Pippenger, Benjamin; Bareille, Reine; Remy, Murielle; Amedee, Joelle; Guillemot, Fabien [INSERM, U577, University Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux F-33076 (France); Lebraud, Eric [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, I.C.M.C.B., 87 Avenue du Dr A. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Desbat, Bernard, E-mail: sylvaincatros@hotmail.com [CBMN UMR-CNRS 5248, 2 rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France)

    2011-06-15

    Developing tools to reproduce and manipulate the cell micro-environment, including the location and shape of cell patterns, is essential for tissue engineering. Parallel to inkjet printing and pressure-operated mechanical extruders, laser-assisted bioprinting (LAB) has emerged as an alternative technology to fabricate two- and three-dimensional tissue engineering products. The objective of this work was to determine laser printing parameters for patterning and assembling nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) and human osteoprogenitors (HOPs) in two and three dimensions with LAB. The LAB workstation used in this study comprised an infrared laser focused on a quartz ribbon that was coated with a thin absorbing layer of titanium and a layer of bioink. The scanning system, quartz ribbon and substrate were piloted by dedicated software, allowing the sequential printing of different biological materials into two and/or three dimensions. nHA printing material (bioink) was synthesized by chemical precipitation and was characterized prior and following printing using transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. HOP bioink was prepared using a 30 million cells ml{sup -1} suspension in culture medium and cells were characterized after printing using a Live/Dead assay and osteoblastic phenotype markers (alcaline phosphatase and osteocalcin). The results revealed that LAB allows printing and organizing nHA and HOPs in two and three dimensions. LAB did not alter the physico-chemical properties of nHA, nor the viability, proliferation and phenotype of HOPs over time (up to 15 days). This study has demonstrated that LAB is a relevant method for patterning nHA and osteoblastic cells in 2D, and is also adapted to the bio-fabrication of 3D composite materials.

  6. International Differences in the Location and Use of Arteriovenous Accesses Created for Hemodialysis: Results From the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisoni, Ronald L; Zepel, Lindsay; Fluck, Richard; Lok, Charmaine E; Kawanishi, Hideki; Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Wasse, Haimanot; Tentori, Francesca; Zee, Jarcy; Li, Yun; Schaubel, Douglas; Burke, Steven; Robinson, Bruce

    2018-04-01

    Vascular access practice is strongly associated with clinical outcomes. There is substantial international variation in the use of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and grafts (AVGs), as well as AVF maturation time and location. Prospective cohort study. Hemodialysis patients participating in the prospective Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) from the United States, Japan, and Europe/ANZ (Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand), including 3,850 patients receiving 4,247 new AVFs and 842 patients receiving 1,129 new AVGs in 2009 to 2015. AVF location trends were based on 38,868 AVFs recorded in DOPPS 1 to 5 cross-sections (1996-2015). Demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis vintage, body mass index, facility percentage AVF use, median blood flow rate, and AVF location. AVF location; successful AVF/AVG use (≥30 days of continuous use); time-to-first successful AVF/AVG use (maturation). During DOPPS 1 to 5, the percentage of AVFs created in the lower arm was consistently ≥93% in Japan and 65% to 77% in Europe/ANZ, but in the United States, this value declined from 70% (DOPPS 1) to 32% (DOPPS 5). Patient characteristics associated with AVF location differed by region. Successful AVF use was 87% in Japan, 67% in Europe/ANZ, and 64% in the United States, whereas successful AVG use was 86%, 75%, and 78%, respectively. Successful AVF use was greater for upper- versus lower-arm AVFs in the United States, with little difference in Europe/ANZ and the opposite pattern in Japan. Median time until first successful AVF use was 10 days in Japan, 46 days in Europe/ANZ, and 82 days in United States; until first successful AVG use: 6, 24, and 29 days, respectively. Potential measurement error related to chart data abstraction in multiple hemodialysis facilities. Large international differences exist in AVF location, predictors of AVF location, successful use of AVFs, and time to first AVF/AVG use, challenging

  7. LHC Create

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    LHC Create is an upcoming 2-day workshop held at IdeaSquare in November. Participants from CERN and IPAC school of design will compete to design an exhibit that explains why CERN does what it does. The winner will have their exhibit fully realised and made available to experiments, institutes, and tourism agencies around the world.

  8. Creating Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, John

    Encouraging exploration and practice, this book offers hundreds of exercises and numerous tips covering every step involved in creating poetry. Each chapter is a self-contained unit offering an overview of material in the chapter, a definition of terms, and poetry examples from well-known authors designed to supplement the numerous exercises.…

  9. Privacy transparency patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siljee B.I.J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes two privacy patterns for creating privacy transparency: the Personal Data Table pattern and the Privacy Policy Icons pattern, as well as a full overview of privacy transparency patterns. It is a first step in creating a full set of privacy design patterns, which will aid

  10. Reaction of seawater with fresh mid-ocean ridge gabbro creates ';atypical' REE pattern and high REE fluid fluxes: Experiments at 425 and 475 °C, 400 and 1000 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beermann, O.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Holzheid, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    High-temperature MOR hydrothermalism significantly affects ocean chemistry. The Sisters Peak (SP) hydrothermal field at 5°S on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) emanates fluids >400°C [1] that have high concentrations of H2, transition metals, and rare earth elements (REE) exhibiting ';atypical' REE pattern characterized by depletions of LREE and HREE relative to MREE and no Eu anomaly [2]. This is in contrast to the ';typical' LREE enrichment and strong positive Eu anomaly known from many MOR vent fluids observed world-wide [e.g., 3]. Besides temperature, the seawater-to-rock ratio (w/r ratio) has significant control on the fluid chemistry [e.g., 4, 5]. To understand how vent fluid REE-signatures are generated during water-rock interaction processes we reacted unaltered gabbro with natural bottom seawater at 425 °C and 400 bar and at 425 and 475 °C at 1000 bar at variable w/r (mass) ratios ranging from 0.5-10 by using cold seal pressure vessels (CSPV). The run durations varied from 3-72 h. Reacted fluids were analysed for major and trace elements by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. In our experiments, ';atypical' REE fluid pattern similar to those of SP fluids were obtained at high w/r ratio (5 and 10) that might be characteristic for focused fluid-flow along e.g., detachment faults at slow-spreading MOR [6]. In contrast, more ';typical'-like REE pattern with elevated LREE and slightly positive Eu anomalies have been reproduced at low w/r ratio (0.5-1). Results of numerical simulations imply that strong positive Eu anomalies of fluids and altered gabbro from high temperature MOR hydrothermal systems can be created by intense rock leaching processes at high w/r ratio (5-10). This suggests that hydrothermal circulation through the ocean crust creates ';typical' REE fluid pattern with strong positive Eu anomalies if seawater reacts with gabbroic host rock that has been already leached in REE at high fluid fluxes. Simulations of the temporal chemical evolution of

  11. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate Share Create Your Plate ! Share: Seven Simple Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective ... foods within each food category. Try these seven steps to get started: Using your dinner plate, put ...

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Association Events Messaging Tools Recruiting Advocates Local Market Planning Training Webinars News & Events Advocacy News Call ... Meals > Create Your Plate Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your ...

  13. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the differences in types of vegetables. When creating your plate at home, remember that half of ... effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods ...

  14. Patterns and Prevalence of School Access, Transitions and Equity in South Africa: Secondary Analyses of BT20 Large-Scale Data Sources. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisch, Brahm; Shindler, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This monograph looks at patterns and prevalence of initial school enrolment, late entry, attainment promotion, and repetition in urban South Africa. The paper pays special attention to the particular gender nature of the patterns of school participation. The study analyses data generated in the genuine representative cohort study, Birth-to-Twenty…

  15. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community ... Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a ...

  16. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart- ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods ...

  18. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals > Create Your Plate Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create ... Type 2 Education Series Hear audio clips and full recordings of past Q&A events at your ...

  19. Creating more effective graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Naomi B

    2012-01-01

    A succinct and highly readable guide to creating effective graphs The right graph can be a powerful tool for communicating information, improving a presentation, or conveying your point in print. If your professional endeavors call for you to present data graphically, here's a book that can help you do it more effectively. Creating More Effective Graphs gives you the basic knowledge and techniques required to choose and create appropriate graphs for a broad range of applications. Using real-world examples everyone can relate to, the author draws on her years of experience in gr

  20. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a- ...

  1. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart- ...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

  3. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning ... serving of dairy or both as your meal plan allows. Choose healthy fats in small amounts. For ...

  4. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ...

  5. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And ... Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and ...

  6. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us in the Fight for a Cure Your tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research ... Close www.diabetes.org > Food and Fitness > Food > Planning Meals > Create Your Plate Share: Print Page Text ...

  7. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the lives of those with diabetes. $50 $100 $250 $500 Other Other Ways ... Meals > Create Your Plate ...

  8. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with ... Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy ...

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  10. Foam patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  11. Creating opioid dependence in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhye, Suneel

    2018-01-01

    Clinical question What is the risk of creating opioid dependence from an ED opioid prescription? Article chosen Barnett ML, Olenski AR, Jena AB. Opioid-prescribing patterns of emergency physicians and risk of long-term use. N Engl J Med 2017;376:663-73, doi:10.1056/NEJMsa1610524. This study examined the risk of creating long-term opioid dependence from a prescription written in an opioid-naive patient in the ED.

  12. Creating organizational cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.; Just, Sine Nørholm; Gabrielsen, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the relations between rhetorical strategies and material practices in the processes whereby leaders create or change organizational cultures. Design/methodology/approach – The authors compare and contrast two broad perspectives on cultural...... insights. The authors propose an integrated perspective in which material practices and rhetorical strategies are seen as two analytical sides of the same ontological coin. This enables a fuller and more detailed explanation of how organizational cultures are created or changed. A brief illustration...

  13. Creating Web Pages Simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Wooldridge, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The easiest way to learn how to create a Web page for your family or organization Do you want to share photos and family lore with relatives far away? Have you been put in charge of communication for your neighborhood group or nonprofit organization? A Web page is the way to get the word out, and Creating Web Pages Simplified offers an easy, visual way to learn how to build one. Full-color illustrations and concise instructions take you through all phases of Web publishing, from laying out and formatting text to enlivening pages with graphics and animation. This easy-to-follow visual guide sho

  14. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... meal-planning, . In this section Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a-future-without-diabetes-2.html A Future ...

  15. Creating Customer Delight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jim

    1995-01-01

    This article proposes that college admissions officers interested in improving service should focus on creating customer delight rather than simply satisfaction, studying the system when things go wrong rather than placing blame, establishing employee well-being as the highest priority of the organization, providing necessary tools and training…

  16. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tool is not to scale because of the differences in types of vegetables. When creating your plate ... function (data) { $('#survey-errors').remove(); $('.survey-form .form-group .survey-alert-wrap').remove(); if (data.submitSurveyResponse.success == ' ...

  17. Creating Pupils' Internet Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Branko; Šimic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an action research, which aimed to improve pupils' literary creativity and enable them to use computers connected to the internet. The study was conducted in a small district village school in Croatia. Creating a pupils' internet magazine appeared to be an excellent way for achieving the educational aims of almost all…

  18. Creating a Classroom Makerspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Luz

    2014-01-01

    What is a makerspace? Makerspaces are community-operated physical spaces where people (makers) create do-it-yourself projects together. These membership spaces serve as community labs where people learn together and collaborate on projects. Makerspaces often have tools and equipment like 3-D printers, laser cutters, and soldering irons.…

  19. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More Sites Search ≡ Are ... Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten ...

  20. Creating White Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLisky, Claire Louise; Carey, Jane

    Vedtagelsen af White Australien som regeringens politik i 1901 viser, at hvidheden var afgørende for den måde, hvorpå den nye nation i Australien blev konstitueret. Og alligevel har historikere i vid udstrækning overset hvidhed i deres studier af Australiens race fortid. 'Creating White Australia...

  1. Creating Innovative Opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungberg, Daniel; McKelvey, Maureen; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops lessons about how and why the founders and ventures involved in knowledge intensive entrepreneurship (KIE) manage the process of venture creation. The meta-analysis of the 86 case studies is based upon as conceptual model (from a systemic literature review), linked to illustra...... of knowledge networks to create innovative opportunities....

  2. Create Your State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Kris; Melvin, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Students are often encouraged to work together with their classmates, sometimes with other classes, occasionally with kids at other schools, but rarely with kids across the country. In this article the authors describe the Create Your State project, a collaborative nationwide project inspired by the Texas Chair Project wherein the artist, Damien…

  3. Creating a Third Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbuch, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author laments higher education's lack of concern towards the development of teaching in the public schools over the last half of the 20th century. Most of academe's work on the topic of teacher training has been done at the branches of state universities that needed to make money and create a niche. The author observes that…

  4. Creating resilient SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlberg, Rasmus; Guay, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    According to the EU, during the past five years, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) have created 85% of new jobs and two-thirds of private sector employment in the region. SMEs are considered the backbone of the economy in Europe and represent more than 95% of enterprises in USA and Australia....... They are considered more vulnerable to disasters because of their size. This paper argues, on the contrary, that SMEs also can be less vulnerable to sudden change than large corporations, drawing upon the ideas of Hayek and Taleb, and that networks of SMEs may contribute to the overall resilience of society...... if certain criteria are met. With this in mind, this paper will be examining how to create resilient SMEs. A well-known concept in the field is business continuity management. BCM is defined as “a holistic management process that identifies potential threats to an organization and the impacts to business...

  5. Creating flat design websites

    CERN Document Server

    Pratas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This book contains practical, step-by-step tutorials along with plenty of explanation about designing your flat website. Each section is introduced sequentially, building up your web design skills and completing your website.Creating Flat Design Websites is ideal for you if you are starting on your web development journey, but this book will also benefit seasoned developers wanting to start developing in flat.

  6. Creating a practice website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, P K

    2007-05-26

    A website is a window to the outside world. For a dental practice, it may be the first point of contact for a prospective new patient and will therefore provide them with their 'first impression'; this may be days or weeks before actually visiting the practice. This section considers the different ways of creating a dental practice website and lists some of the main dental website design companies. It also describes what factors make a successful website and offers advice on how to ensure that it complies with current regulations and recommendations.

  7. Creating corporate advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum.

  8. Creating sustainable performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreitzer, Gretchen; Porath, Christine

    2012-01-01

    What makes for sustainable individual and organizational performance? Employees who are thriving-not just satisfied and productive but also engaged in creating the future. The authors found that people who fit this description demonstrated 16% better overall performance, 125% less burnout, 32% more commitment to the organization, and 46% more job satisfaction than their peers. Thriving has two components: vitality, or the sense of being alive and excited, and learning, or the growth that comes from gaining knowledge and skills. Some people naturally build vitality and learning into their jobs, but most employees are influenced by their environment. Four mechanisms, none of which requires heroic effort or major resources, create the conditions for thriving: providing decision-making discretion, sharing information about the organization and its strategy, minimizing incivility, and offering performance feedback. Organizations such as Alaska Airlines, Zingerman's, Quicken Loans, and Caiman Consulting have found that helping people grow and remain energized at work is valiant on its own merits-but it can also boost performance in a sustainable way.

  9. Creating With Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    A subsidiary of SI Diamond Technology, Inc., Applied Nanotech, of Austin, Texas, is creating a buzz among various technology firms and venture capital groups interested in the company s progressive research on carbon-related field emission devices, including carbon nanotubes, filaments of pure carbon less than one ten-thousandth the width of human hair. Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have gained considerable attention due to their unique physical properties. For example, a single perfect carbon nanotube can range from 10 to 100 times stronger than steel, per unit weight. Recent studies also indicate that the nanotubes may be the best heat-conducting material in existence. These properties, combined with the ease of growing thin films or nanotubes by a variety of deposition techniques, make the carbon-based material one of the most desirable for cold field emission cathodes.

  10. Creating the living brand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendapudi, Neeli; Bendapudi, Venkat

    2005-05-01

    It's easy to conclude from the literature and the lore that top-notch customer service is the province of a few luxury companies and that any retailer outside that rarefied atmosphere is condemned to offer mediocre service at best. But even companies that position themselves for the mass market can provide outstanding customer-employee interactions and profit from them, if they train employees to reflect the brand's core values. The authors studied the convenience store industry in depth and focused on two that have developed a devoted following: QuikTrip (QT) and Wawa. Turnover rates at QT and Wawa are 14% and 22% respectively, much lower than the typical rate in retail. The authors found six principles that both firms embrace to create a strong culture of customer service. Know what you're looking for: A focus on candidates' intrinsic traits allows the companies to hire people who will naturally bring the right qualities to the job. Make the most of talent: In mass-market retail, talent is generally viewed as a commodity, but that outlook becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. Create pride in the brand: Service quality depends directly on employees' attachment to the brand. Build community: Wawa and QT have made concerted efforts to build customer loyalty through a sense of community. Share the business context: Employees need a clear understanding of how their company operates and how it defines success. Satisfy the soul: To win an employee's passionate engagement, a company must meet his or her needs for security, esteem, and justice.

  11. Creating an outcomes framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerge, J B

    2000-01-01

    Four constructs used to build a framework for outcomes management for a large midwestern tertiary hospital are described in this article. A system framework outlining a model of clinical integration and population management based in Steven Shortell's work is discussed. This framework includes key definitions of high-risk patients, target groups, populations and community. Roles for each level of population management and how they were implemented in the health care system are described. A point of service framework centered on seven dimensions of care is the next construct applied on each nursing unit. The third construct outlines the framework for role development. Three roles for nursing were created to implement strategies for target groups that are strategic disease categories; two of those roles are described in depth. The philosophy of nursing practice is centered on caring and existential advocacy. The final construct is the modification of the Dartmouth model as a common framework for outcomes. System applications of the scorecard and lessons learned in the 2-year process of implementation are shared

  12. Creating a disability mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S E

    1992-01-01

    People with disabilities have, for the most part, failed to identify with each other as a group. This has been detrimental because it has built a sense of isolation when a camaraderie based upon existing commonalities could have been developed. During the past ten to twenty years, there has been a great deal of discussion about appropriate language to use when discussing disability issues. This discussion has been a part of a larger debate concerning the existence of a disability culture. I believe that there is indeed a disability culture and I am a proponent of identifying and passing on stories which contribute to that culture. I have chosen to use mythology to convey this message and have begun with a focus on heroes - people who do something out of the ordinary. It is contended that almost all people with disabilities have performed heroic activities because of the pervasive discrimination encountered by each individual with a disability. Creating a disability mythology is an attempt to recognize and promote heroes within the disabled community and to advocate the importance of telling other people how positive change has occurred through instances of individual heroism.

  13. Creating a Social World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S.; Jacobson, Kristen C.; Gardner, Charles O.; Gillespie, Nathan; Aggen, Steven A.; Prescott, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Context Peer-group deviance is strongly associated with externalizing behaviors. We have limited knowledge of the sources of individual differences in peer-group deviance. Objective To clarify genetic and environmental contributions to peer-group deviance in twins from mid-childhood through early adulthood. Design Retrospective assessments using a life-history calendar. Analysis by biometric growth curves. Setting General community. Participants Members of male-male pairs from the population-based Virginia Twin Registry personally interviewed in 1998–2004 (n=1802). Main Outcome Measure Self-reported peer-group deviance at ages 8 to 11, 12 to 14, 15 to 17, 18 to 21, and 22 to 25 years. Results Mean and variance of peer-group deviance increased substantially with age. Genetic effects on peer-group deviance showed a strong and steady increase over time. Family environment generally declined in importance over time. Individual-specific environmental influences on peer-group deviance levels were stable in the first 3 age periods and then increased as most twins left home. When standardized, the heritability of peer-group deviance is approximately 30% at ages 8 to 11 years and rises to approximately 50% across the last 3 time periods. Both genes and shared environment contributed to individual differences in the developmental trajectory of peer-group deviance. However, while the correlation between childhood peer-group deviance levels and the subsequent slope of peer-group deviance over time resulting from genetic factors was positive, the same relationship resulting from shared environmental factors was negative. Conclusions As male twins mature and create their own social worlds, genetic factors play an increasingly important role in their choice of peers, while shared environment becomes less influential. The individual specific environment increases in importance when individuals leave home. Individuals who have deviant peers in childhood, as a result of genetic vs

  14. Creating a family health history

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000947.htm Creating a family health history To use the sharing ... Many health problems tend to run in families. Creating a family history can help you and your ...

  15. Creating optimized machine working patterns on agricultural fields

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Spekken

    2015-01-01

    In the current agricultural context, agricultural machine unproductivity on fields and their impacts on soil along pathways are unavoidable. These machines have direct and indirect costs associated to their work in field, with non-productive time spent in manoeuvres when these are reaching field borders; likewise, there is a double application of product when machines are covering headlands while adding farm inputs. Both issues aggravate under irregular field geometry. Moreover, unproductive ...

  16. Creating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristina Vaarst; Lorenzen, Mark; Laursen, Stine

    2012-01-01

    This unique book reveals the procedural aspects of knowledge-based urban planning, development and assessment. Concentrating on major knowledge city building processes, and providing state-of-the-art experiences and perspectives, this important compendium explores innovative models, approaches an...

  17. Creating Interdisciplinarity within Monodisciplinary Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Katrine

    discrepancies in the use of the term interdisciplinarity, which have repercussions for the practices and incentives of creating interdisciplinary education, research and collaboration. Overall, the thesis shows that interdisciplinary teaching and learning practices have to engage in a continuous balancing...

  18. Positive effects of creating mandalas

    OpenAIRE

    Toroš, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present master’s thesis is to examine the psychological effects of creating mandalas and to give recommendations for a better use of the mandalas in the practice of art assistance in order to help in this way others and oneself. Mandalas are sacred symbols, used in Hinduism and Buddhist religion practices as tools for meditation and concentration. They are geometrical representations of the creation of the cosmos and schemas of all that was created. Jung sat the foundations...

  19. Creating visual explanations improves learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Eliza; Tversky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Many topics in science are notoriously difficult for students to learn. Mechanisms and processes outside student experience present particular challenges. While instruction typically involves visualizations, students usually explain in words. Because visual explanations can show parts and processes of complex systems directly, creating them should have benefits beyond creating verbal explanations. We compared learning from creating visual or verbal explanations for two STEM domains, a mechanical system (bicycle pump) and a chemical system (bonding). Both kinds of explanations were analyzed for content and learning assess by a post-test. For the mechanical system, creating a visual explanation increased understanding particularly for participants of low spatial ability. For the chemical system, creating both visual and verbal explanations improved learning without new teaching. Creating a visual explanation was superior and benefitted participants of both high and low spatial ability. Visual explanations often included crucial yet invisible features. The greater effectiveness of visual explanations appears attributable to the checks they provide for completeness and coherence as well as to their roles as platforms for inference. The benefits should generalize to other domains like the social sciences, history, and archeology where important information can be visualized. Together, the findings provide support for the use of learner-generated visual explanations as a powerful learning tool.

  20. On Creating and Sustaining Alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Morten

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses an initiative aimed at creating direct and long lasting influence on the use and development of telemedicine and telehealth by healthcare professionals, patients and citizens. The initiative draws on ideas, insights, and lessons learned from Participatory Design...... (PD) as well as from innovation theory and software ecosystems. Last, but not least, the ongoing debate on public finances/economy versus tax evasion by major private companies has been an important element in shaping the vision and creating support for the initiative. This vision is about democratic...

  1. Journaling: creating space for "I".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Jennell P

    2010-01-01

    As nurses engaged in a caring profession, it is critical that we learn not only to care for others but also to care for ourselves. To care effectively for ourselves, we must create the space and time in which to do this. Journaling is one tool that scholars offer as a way to create this space. Although there is no clear consensus about the best techniques for journaling, there is evidence that journaling, as a reflective, meditative activity, can promote creativity, self-awareness, and personal development.

  2. Intentionality, consciousness, and creating community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinski, Violet M

    2009-01-01

    Intentionality is briefly explored from the perspective of seminal written works on therapeutic touch and recorded conversations with Martha E. Rogers. This overview hints at possible interrelationships among intentionality, consciousness, and creating community, along with conceptual ambiguities, which are explored in detail by Zahourek and Larkin in this column.

  3. We create our own reality

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    " Yes, we create our own reality. This is one of the most fundamental tenets of the ancient oriental religions, such as Buddhism. And during the last century, modern particle physics or quantum mechanics has discovered exactly the same thing" (1 page).

  4. Creating Space for Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As teachers struggle to balance the needs of their students with the requirements of commercial reading materials, educators need to consider how teachers will create space for children's literature in today's classrooms. In this article, 10 practical recommendations for incorporating children's literature in the reading instructional framework…

  5. Creating an Innovative Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how to create an innovative learning (iLearning) organization. It begins by discussing the life cycle of knowledge in an organization, followed by a description of the theoretical foundation for iLearning. Next, the article presents an example of iLearning, followed by a description of the distributed nature of work, the…

  6. Creating a New Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Dan, Ed.; Hannaway, Jane, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Considering that having a quality teacher is the foremost in-school predictor of students' success, ensuring teacher excellence is vital to the nation's educational system. In "Creating a New Teaching Profession," diverse scholars assess the state of human capital development in the teaching profession today and how to progress.

  7. Storyboards for Meaningful Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubon, Lucille P.; Shafer, Kathryn G.

    2010-01-01

    The initial focus of this kindergarten-level action research project was on identifying which students could create a pattern. The focus then shifted to helping all students successfully achieve this goal. The intervention uses a storyboard where students select colored cubes to represent objects and then snap the cubes together as indicated on…

  8. Painting Patterns with Pixels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoerg, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art unit for middle school students where they created their own original pattern through the use of "ClarisWorks Paint." Discusses the procedure for the project and the evaluation used at the end of the unit. Emphasizes the importance of learning about computers. (CMK)

  9. Polyhedral patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui; Tang, Chengcheng; Vaxman, Amir; Wonka, Peter; Pottmann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    We study the design and optimization of polyhedral patterns, which are patterns of planar polygonal faces on freeform surfaces. Working with polyhedral patterns is desirable in architectural geometry and industrial design. However, the classical

  10. Leadership Networking Connect, Collaborate, Create

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership; Baldwin, David

    2011-01-01

    Networking is essential to effective leadership in today's organizations. Leaders who are skilled networkers have access to people, information, and resources to help solve problems and create opportunities. Leaders who neglect their networks are missing out on a critical component of their role as leaders. This book will help leaders take a new view of networking and provide insight into how to enhance their networks and become effective at leadership networking.

  11. A METHOD FOR CREATING STRUCTURES OR DEVICES USING AN ORGANIC ICE RESIST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for creating an organic resist on a surface of a cooled substrate, the method comprising the steps of condensing a vapour into a solid film on the surface of the cooled substrate; patterning at least part of the solid film by exposing selected portions of said...... solid film to at least one electron beam thereby creating the organic resist on 5 the surface of the cooled substrate in accordance with a predetermined pattern; wherein the created organic resist remains essentially intact at ambient conditions; and using the created organic resist as a mask...... for creating semiconductor structures and/or semiconductor devices....

  12. Creating a digital medical illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the steps required to complete a medical illustration in a digital format using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. The project example is the surgical procedure for the release of the glenohumeral joint for the condition known as 'frozen shoulder'. The purpose is to demonstrate one method which an artist can use within digital media to create a colour illustration such as the release of the glenohumeral joint. Included is a general overview as how to deal with the administration of a medical illustration commission through the experience of a professional freelance artist.

  13. Creating Cross-disciplinary Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Elaine R

    2012-01-01

    Because of its focus on the biological underpinnings of action and behavior, neuroscience intersects with many fields of human endeavor. Some of these cross-disciplinary intersections have been long standing, while others, such as neurotheology or neuroeconomics, are more recently formed fields. Many undergraduate institutions have sought to include cross-disciplinary courses in their curriculum because this style of pedagogy is often seen as applicable to real world problems. However, it can be difficult for faculty with specialized training within their discipline to expand beyond their own fields to offer cross-disciplinary courses. I have been creating a series of multi- or cross-disciplinary courses and have found some strategies that have helped me successfully teach these classes. I will discuss general strategies and tools in developing these types of courses including: 1) creating mixed experience classrooms of students and contributing faculty 2) finding the right tools that will allow you to teach to a mixed population without prerequisites 3) examining the topic using multiple disciplinary perspectives 4) feeding off student experience and interest 5) assessing the impact of these courses on student outcomes and your neuroscience program. This last tool in particular is important in establishing the validity of this type of teaching for neuroscience students and the general student population.

  14. Creating your own leadership brand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Karlene

    2002-01-01

    Building equity in a brand happens through many encounters. The initial attraction must be followed by the meeting of expectations. This creates a loyalty that is part of an emotional connection to that brand. This is the same process people go through when they first meet a leader and decide if this is a person they want to buy into. People will examine your style, your competence, and your standards. If you fail on any of these fronts, your ability to lead will be severely compromised. People expect more of leaders now, because they know and recognize good leaders. And, predictably, people are now more cynical of leaders because of the well-publicized excess of a few leaders who advanced their own causes at the expense of their people and their financial future. This will turn out to be a good thing, because it will create a higher standard of leadership that all must aspire to achieve. When the bar is raised for us, our standards of performance are also raised.

  15. Creating nanoscale emulsions using condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Ingrid F; Anand, Sushant; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2017-11-08

    Nanoscale emulsions are essential components in numerous products, ranging from processed foods to novel drug delivery systems. Existing emulsification methods rely either on the breakup of larger droplets or solvent exchange/inversion. Here we report a simple, scalable method of creating nanoscale water-in-oil emulsions by condensing water vapor onto a subcooled oil-surfactant solution. Our technique enables a bottom-up approach to forming small-scale emulsions. Nanoscale water droplets nucleate at the oil/air interface and spontaneously disperse within the oil, due to the spreading dynamics of oil on water. Oil-soluble surfactants stabilize the resulting emulsions. We find that the oil-surfactant concentration controls the spreading behavior of oil on water, as well as the peak size, polydispersity, and stability of the resulting emulsions. Using condensation, we form emulsions with peak radii around 100 nm and polydispersities around 10%. This emulsion formation technique may open different routes to creating emulsions, colloidal systems, and emulsion-based materials.

  16. OPPOSITIONS CREATING HOMOUR IN JOKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umral Deveci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings, who perceive the reality of death however who do not know when it will happen, begin their life with this deficiency. Therefore, throughout their lives, they struggle to consummate and make up for the things that they perceive as deficiency or shortcomings through different ways. Humor is one of these means. The fact that deficiencies are eliminated results in superiority and relaxation. The sense of humor and relaxation simultaneously provide laughter. When theories of humor such as superiority, incongruous and relief are taken into consideration, it seems that these theories are related and support each other. Each text is whole with its form and content, which should be evaluated as a whole as much as possible. Hence this study dwells on shortcomings in jokes and in the lights of these shortcomings and theories of humor, it is intended tomake humor in stories, in terms of structural and semantic context, more concrete. Five stories/jokes randomly selected through samples are analyzed in this article. There are two basic types of opposition. The firstone is opposition that creates situation, the second one is thatcreates laughter. The first opposition depicts the shortcomings of knowledge, skill, patience arrogance and jealousyand prepares the second opposition. The opposition that creates laughter make up for shortcomings through cause and effect relationship and laughter comes out.

  17. Creating an effective poster presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, H M; Arslanian, C

    2000-01-01

    One way to build knowledge in nursing is to share research findings or clinical program outcomes. The dissemination of these findings is often a difficult final step in a project that has taken months or years to complete. One method of sharing findings in a relaxed and informal setting is a poster presentation. This method is an effective form for presenting findings using an interactive approach. The milieu of a poster presentation enables the presenters to interact and dialogue with colleagues. Guidelines for size and format require that the poster is clear and informative. Application of design helps to create visually appealing posters. This article summarizes elements of designing and conducting a poster presentation.

  18. Supporting SMEs in creating jobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela PASNICU

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available SMEs are the most dynamic sector of the economy, representing a key factor in employment growth. Although SMEs have been severely affected by the economic crisis from 2008, they continue to be a more and more important source of generating jobs, regardless of size class. Given the differentiated contribution of SMEs to job creation as a result of their heterogeneity, the article analyses the dynamics of staff in enterprises by size classes and activities of the national economy. The statistical analysis is followed by a SWOT analysis of policies and tools to support SMEs in creating jobs both with direct action - management, recruitment, training and indirectly action by addressing general business issues. Measures that support the economic growth of SMEs through internationalization, innovation and improved access to finance foster competitiveness and, implicitly, the creation of new jobs.

  19. Creating breakthroughs at 3M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hippel, E; Thomke, S; Sonnack, M

    1999-01-01

    Most senior managers want their product development teams to create break-throughs--new products that will allow their companies to grow rapidly and maintain high margins. But more often they get incremental improvements to existing products. That's partly because companies must compete in the short term. Searching for breakthroughs is expensive and time consuming; line extensions can help the bottom line immediately. In addition, developers simply don't know how to achieve breakthroughs, and there is usually no system in place to guide them. By the mid-1990s, the lack of such a system was a problem even for an innovative company like 3M. Then a project team in 3M's Medical-Surgical Markets Division became acquainted with a method for developing breakthrough products: the lead user process. The process is based on the fact that many commercially important products are initially thought of and even prototyped by "lead users"--companies, organizations, or individuals that are well ahead of market trends. Their needs are so far beyond those of the average user that lead users create innovations on their own that may later contribute to commercially attractive breakthroughs. The lead user process transforms the job of inventing breakthroughs into a systematic task of identifying lead users and learning from them. The authors explain the process and how the 3M project team successfully navigated through it. In the end, the team proposed three major new product lines and a change in the division's strategy that has led to the development of breakthrough products. And now several more divisions are using the process to break away from incrementalism.

  20. Polyhedral patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui

    2015-10-27

    We study the design and optimization of polyhedral patterns, which are patterns of planar polygonal faces on freeform surfaces. Working with polyhedral patterns is desirable in architectural geometry and industrial design. However, the classical tiling patterns on the plane must take on various shapes in order to faithfully and feasibly approximate curved surfaces. We define and analyze the deformations these tiles must undertake to account for curvature, and discover the symmetries that remain invariant under such deformations. We propose a novel method to regularize polyhedral patterns while maintaining these symmetries into a plethora of aesthetic and feasible patterns.

  1. Specialization Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Consel, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Design patterns offer many advantages for software development, but can introduce inefficiency into the final program. Program specialization can eliminate such overheads, but is most effective when targeted by the user to specific bottlenecks. Consequently, we propose that these concepts...... are complementary. Program specialization can optimize programs written using design patterns, and design patterns provide information about the program structure that can guide specialization. Concretely, we propose specialization patterns, which describe how to apply program specialization to optimize uses...... of design patterns. In this paper, we analyze the specialization opportunities provided by specific uses of design patterns. Based on the analysis of each design pattern, we define the associated specialization pattern. These specialization opportunities can be declared using the specialization classes...

  2. Creating responsible partnerships in tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Spitzer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Organisations do not provide sufficient time and effort to seek out companies for partners that would, with the assistance of responsible cooperation, contribute to better quality offers and consequently to increased income and the good reputation of both companies. Responsibilities and ethics is where organizations on bothsides would take on and accept their own norms, tasks, obligations and be aware that in a relationship there is a need to give explanations and justify one’s actions, such partnerships will be long and prosperous. This requires a great deal of knowledge and maturity together with a very important personal characteristic that is care. This study examines whether the creation of long term partnerships through responsible and more personal (friendlyrelations brings the organization to greater success.Purpose: The purpose of this research is to determine how important it is for organizations in the tourism industry to build long term relationships, what it should be based on and whether companies are willing to change the current methods of operations.Method: The method of research was an interview with individuals that had a certain position within a tourism company and had contacts with partners and were obligated to see out new ones. A paradigm model was built and the responses analysed.Results: The survey results are encouraging. The interviews showed that respondents were aware that it is necessary to have long term and responsible partnerships. They recognized that in today’s world there is a lack of collaboration that is based on understanding andthat there should be more relations on a personal level. It isrequired that this changes in the future. The participants specifically highlight financial irresponsibility in many companies that destroys collaboration.Organization: With the help of this study, the author attempts to contribute ideas to organizations on how to create solid collaboration with partners, as

  3. Interactive design of generic chemical patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, Karen T; Wetzer, Lars; Rarey, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    Every medicinal chemist has to create chemical patterns occasionally for querying databases, applying filters or describing functional groups. However, the representations of chemical patterns have been so far limited to languages with highly complex syntax, handicapping the application of patterns. Graphic pattern editors similar to chemical editors can facilitate the work with patterns. In this article, we review the interfaces of frequently used web search engines for chemical patterns. We take a look at pattern editing concepts of standalone chemical editors and finally present a completely new, unpublished graphical approach to pattern design, the SMARTSeditor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Creating experimental color harmony map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamaret, Christel; Urban, Fabrice; Lepinel, Josselin

    2014-02-01

    Starting in the 17th century with Newton, color harmony is a topic that did not reach a consensus on definition, representation or modeling so far. Previous work highlighted specific characteristics for color harmony on com- bination of color doublets or triplets by means of a human rating on a harmony scale. However, there were no investigation involving complex stimuli or pointing out how harmony is spatially located within a picture. The modeling of such concept as well as a reliable ground-truth would be of high value for the community, since the applications are wide and concern several communities: from psychology to computer graphics. We propose a protocol for creating color harmony maps from a controlled experiment. Through an eye-tracking protocol, we focus on the identification of disharmonious colors in pictures. The experiment was composed of a free viewing pass in order to let the observer be familiar with the content before a second pass where we asked "to search for the most disharmonious areas in the picture". Twenty-seven observers participated to the experiments that was composed of a total of 30 different stimuli. The high inter-observer agreement as well as a cross-validation confirm the validity of the proposed ground-truth.

  5. Creating a winning organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert James

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the idea of how to create a winning organizational culture. By definition, a winning organizational culture is one that is able to make current innovations stick, while continuously changing based on the demands of the marketplace. More importantly, the article explores the notion that a winning organizational culture can have a profound impact on the conscious of the workforce, helping each individual to become a better, more productive person, who provides important services and products to the community. To form a basis toward defining the structure of what a winning organization culture looks like, 4 experts were asked 12 questions related to the development of an organizational culture. Three of the experts have worked intimately within the health care industry, while a fourth has been charged with turning around an organization that has had a losing culture for 17 years. The article provides insight into the role that values, norms, goals, leadership style, familiarity, and hiring practices play in developing a winning organizational culture. The article also emphasizes the important role that leaders perform in developing an organizational culture.

  6. CREATING AND PROCESSING A CORPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prihantoro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to describe some crucial importance of corpus and text processing. Corpus is a projection of how language is used by its speakers. Technology support has improved corpus for easier maintenance, made it space-saving, and it may electronically structure its data. The latest offers much freedom for corpus users to access and exploit it for language teaching, analysis or other specified tasks. This paper will demonstrate how to use open-access corpus on internet such as Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA and British National Corpus (BNC. Besides how to use a corpus, another crucial importance that this paper seeks to describe is how to build a corpus. In this paper, the writer will use UNITEX, a corpus (text-based processing software. This software will demonstrate steps of corpus building, ranging from text collection, annotation, electronic dictionary application to some natural language based operations ranging from pattern matching, concordance, to simple extraction. It will show how graph technology may outperform regular expression, a retrieval method exploited by other corpus processor, in terms of writing output.

  7. Development of soil properties and nitrogen cycling in created wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, K.L.; Ahn, C.; Noe, G.B.

    2011-01-01

    Mitigation wetlands are expected to compensate for the loss of structure and function of natural wetlands within 5–10 years of creation; however, the age-based trajectory of development in wetlands is unclear. This study investigates the development of coupled structural (soil properties) and functional (nitrogen cycling) attributes of created non-tidal freshwater wetlands of varying ages and natural reference wetlands to determine if created wetlands attain the water quality ecosystem service of nitrogen (N) cycling over time. Soil condition component and its constituents, gravimetric soil moisture, total organic carbon, and total N, generally increased and bulk density decreased with age of the created wetland. Nitrogen flux rates demonstrated age-related patterns, with younger created wetlands having lower rates of ammonification, nitrification, nitrogen mineralization, and denitrification potential than older created wetlands and natural reference wetlands. Results show a clear age-related trajectory in coupled soil condition and N cycle development, which is essential for water quality improvement. These findings can be used to enhance N processing in created wetlands and inform the regulatory evaluation of mitigation wetlands by identifying structural indicators of N processing performance.

  8. Specialization Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz , Ulrik Pagh; Lawall , Julia ,; Consel , Charles

    1999-01-01

    Design patterns offer numerous advantages for software development, but can introduce inefficiency into the finished program. Program specialization can eliminate such overheads, but is most effective when targeted by the user to specific bottlenecks. Consequently, we propose to consider program specialization and design patterns as complementary concepts. On the one hand, program specialization can optimize object-oriented programs written using design patterns. On the other hand, design pat...

  9. Pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Theodoridis, Sergios

    2003-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a scientific discipline that is becoming increasingly important in the age of automation and information handling and retrieval. Patter Recognition, 2e covers the entire spectrum of pattern recognition applications, from image analysis to speech recognition and communications. This book presents cutting-edge material on neural networks, - a set of linked microprocessors that can form associations and uses pattern recognition to ""learn"" -and enhances student motivation by approaching pattern recognition from the designer's point of view. A direct result of more than 10

  10. Geodesic patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut; Huang, Qixing; Deng, Bailin; Schiftner, Alexander; Kilian, Martin; Guibas, Leonidas J.; Wallner, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Geodesic curves in surfaces are not only minimizers of distance, but they are also the curves of zero geodesic (sideways) curvature. It turns out that this property makes patterns of geodesics the basic geometric entity when dealing with the cladding of a freeform surface with wooden panels which do not bend sideways. Likewise a geodesic is the favored shape of timber support elements in freeform architecture, for reasons of manufacturing and statics. Both problem areas are fundamental in freeform architecture, but so far only experimental solutions have been available. This paper provides a systematic treatment and shows how to design geodesic patterns in different ways: The evolution of geodesic curves is good for local studies and simple patterns; the level set formulation can deal with the global layout of multiple patterns of geodesics; finally geodesic vector fields allow us to interactively model geodesic patterns and perform surface segmentation into panelizable parts. © 2010 ACM.

  11. Geodesic patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2010-07-26

    Geodesic curves in surfaces are not only minimizers of distance, but they are also the curves of zero geodesic (sideways) curvature. It turns out that this property makes patterns of geodesics the basic geometric entity when dealing with the cladding of a freeform surface with wooden panels which do not bend sideways. Likewise a geodesic is the favored shape of timber support elements in freeform architecture, for reasons of manufacturing and statics. Both problem areas are fundamental in freeform architecture, but so far only experimental solutions have been available. This paper provides a systematic treatment and shows how to design geodesic patterns in different ways: The evolution of geodesic curves is good for local studies and simple patterns; the level set formulation can deal with the global layout of multiple patterns of geodesics; finally geodesic vector fields allow us to interactively model geodesic patterns and perform surface segmentation into panelizable parts. © 2010 ACM.

  12. Search Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Morville, Peter

    2010-01-01

    What people are saying about Search Patterns "Search Patterns is a delight to read -- very thoughtful and thought provoking. It's the most comprehensive survey of designing effective search experiences I've seen." --Irene Au, Director of User Experience, Google "I love this book! Thanks to Peter and Jeffery, I now know that search (yes, boring old yucky who cares search) is one of the coolest ways around of looking at the world." --Dan Roam, author, The Back of the Napkin (Portfolio Hardcover) "Search Patterns is a playful guide to the practical concerns of search interface design. It cont

  13. PUPIL-TEACHER ADJUSTEMENT AND MUTUAL ADAPTATION IN CREATING CLASSROOM LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOX, ROBERT S.; AND OTHERS

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE DYNAMICS OF THE LEARNING SITUATIONS IN A VARIETY OF PUBLIC SCHOOL CLASSROOMS WAS UNDERTAKEN. THE PROJECT MADE A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE PATTERNS OF COOPERATION OR ALIENATION AMONG PARENTS, TEACHERS, PEERS, AND INDIVIDUAL PUPILS. THE PATTERNS CREATE LEARNING CULTURES OF DIFFERENT PRODUCTIVITY IN VARIOUS CLASSROOMS. THE DATA…

  14. Creating and Viewing HTML Files with Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Turkel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This lesson uses Python to create and view an HTML file. If you write programs that output HTML, you can use any browser to look at your results. This is especially convenient if your program is automatically creating hyperlinks or graphic entities like charts and diagrams. Here you will learn how to create HTML files with Python scripts, and how to use Python to automatically open an HTML file in Firefox.

  15. Creating and Viewing HTML Files with Python

    OpenAIRE

    William J. Turkel; Adam Crymble

    2012-01-01

    This lesson uses Python to create and view an HTML file. If you write programs that output HTML, you can use any browser to look at your results. This is especially convenient if your program is automatically creating hyperlinks or graphic entities like charts and diagrams. Here you will learn how to create HTML files with Python scripts, and how to use Python to automatically open an HTML file in Firefox.

  16. Identification of creat (Andrographis paniculata Ness as basic for concervation and make use of germ plasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAMBANG PUJIASMANTO

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is to learn the creat potention for cultivated as medical material producer plant. So that, the limited creat as medical material not occur. The method of research which used is survey. The survai include identification and creat distribution pattern. There was used vegetative analysis with quadrat method. The research result showed that 1 in creat habitat find out 11 species of tree, 20 species herba (include creat, and 16 species grasses, 2 The highest of importance value indeks Tectona grandis L. (tree group, Andrographis paniculata Ness (herb group, and Portulaca oleraceae L. (grasses group, 3 Distribution pattern of creat is clumped, and the herb others is uniform, 4 The creat growth on the common under shading Tectona grandis L. tree. The results of this research are domestication concept and theories which to basic the cultivated technology packet of creat wild plant which the statue increased be medical material produce crop. In the next ,expected can used for get conclusion policy of medical crop and planning, especially on creat propertion of creat medical material.

  17. A new intelligent algorithm to create a profile for user based on web interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab khademali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to classify the web user’s navigation patterns automatically. The proposed model of this paper classifies user’s navigation patterns and predicts his/her upcoming requirements. To create users’ profile, a new method is introduced by recording user’s settings active and user’s similarity measurement with neighboring users. The proposed model is capable of creating the profile implicitly. Besides, it updates the profile based on created changes. In fact, we try to improve the function of recommender engine using user’s navigation patterns and clustering. The method is based on user’s navigation patterns and is able to present the result of recommender engine based on user’s requirement and interest. In addition, this method has the ability to help customize websites, more efficiently.

  18. Fundamentals of thinking, patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, O. M.; Gafurov, D. O.; Syryamkin, V. I.

    2018-05-01

    The authors analyze the fundamentals of thinking and propose to consider a model of the brain based on the presence of magnetic properties of gliacytes (Schwann cells) because of their oxygen saturation (oxygen has paramagnetic properties). The authors also propose to take into account the motion of electrical discharges through synapses causing electric and magnetic fields as well as additional effects such as paramagnetic resonance, which allows combining multisensory object-related information located in different parts of the brain. Therefore, the events of the surrounding world are reflected and remembered in the cortex columns, thus, creating isolated subnets with altered magnetic properties (patterns) and subsequently participate in recognition of objects, form a memory, and so on. The possibilities for the pattern-based thinking are based on the practical experience of applying methods and technologies of artificial neural networks in the form of a neuroemulator and neuromorphic computing devices.

  19. Creating Gaze Annotations in Head Mounted Displays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbeigi, Diako; Qvarfordt, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate distributed communication in mobile settings, we developed GazeNote for creating and sharing gaze annotations in head mounted displays (HMDs). With gaze annotations it possible to point out objects of interest within an image and add a verbal description. To create an annota- tion...

  20. Creating Safe Spaces for Music Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Karin S.; Smith, Tawnya D.; Stanuch, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a practical model for fostering emotionally safe learning environments that instill in music students a positive sense of self-belief, freedom, and purpose. The authors examine the implications for music educators of creating effective learning environments and present recommendations for creating a safe space for learning,…

  1. Generative design visualize, program, and create with processing

    CERN Document Server

    Bohnacker, Hartmut; Laub, Julia; Lazzeroni, Claudius

    2012-01-01

    Generative design is a revolutionary new method of creating artwork, models, and animations from sets of rules, or algorithms. By using accessible programming languages such as Processing, artists and designers are producing extravagant, crystalline structures that can form the basis of anything from patterned textiles and typography to lighting, scientific diagrams, sculptures, films, and even fantastical buildings. Opening with a gallery of thirty-five illustrated case studies, Generative Design takes users through specific, practical instructions on how to create their own visual experiments by combining simple-to-use programming codes with basic design principles. A detailed handbook of advanced strategies provides visual artists with all the tools to achieve proficiency. Both a how-to manual and a showcase for recent work in this exciting new field, Generative Design is the definitive study and reference book that designers have been waiting for.

  2. THE USE OF CONSUMER COMMUNITIES TO CREATE SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Skorek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an explanation of the essence of creation of consumer communities that have been developing for several years on the marketing market. A hypothesis was made that says that the mechanism of interdependence existing in the consumer community can be used to create sustainable consumption on the market. The method of literature study was used in the article. In the introduction it was proved that regardless of whether a community is formed independently around the brand or not, its existence is initiated by a company and its members interact by providing one another with the patterns of consumption. The reasons for consumers’ belonging to communities around the brand were described. The presented literature analysis revealed that the appropriate management of the community around the brand can serve the company to create a sustainable product consumption. 

  3. Online Access Patterns and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Butrous

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper follows accessing patterns of five cohorts of postgraduate students enrolled in a core unit within a master of business administration (MBA program. The unit is designed to provide numerous opportunities for student participation in Discussion Boards using Blackboard technology. Discussion Boards create numerous opportunities for interaction amongst online learners to share and exchange their experiences, creating a sense of a virtual community. Relationships between accessing patterns for each week of the semester for each student are explored in relation to their performance using course statistics generated by the Blackboard technology. Close examination of the significant differences in access patterns to the course window and its components of communication, content, and student areas reveal middle of the semester (week 7 as the common critical point that differentiates high achieving students from low achieving students. Identifying critical points provides the faculty staff member an opportunity to introduce intervention strategies in order to improve the learning experience of all the students.

  4. Root patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Laskowski, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that pattern lateral root primordial are essential for the elaboration of root system architecture, a trait of key importance for future crop breeding. But which are most important: periodic or local cues? In this issue of Journal of Experimental Botany (pages 1411-1420), Kircher

  5. Granular patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Aranson, Igor S

    2009-01-01

    This title presents a review of experiments and novel theoretical concepts needed to understand the mechanisms of pattern formation in granular materials. An effort is made to connect concepts and ideas developed in granular physics with new emergent fields, especially in biology, such as cytoskeleton dynamics.

  6. Potential roles for transposable elements in creating imprinted expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah N; Springer, Nathan M

    2018-04-01

    Changes in gene expression can have profound effects on phenotype. Nature has provided many complex patterns of gene regulation such as imprinting. Imprinted genes exhibit differences in the expression of the maternal and paternal alleles, even though they reside in the same nucleus with access to the same trans-acting factors. Significant attention has been focused on the potential reasons that imprinted expression could be beneficial and stabilized by selection. However, less attention has focused on understanding how imprinted expression might arise or decay. We discuss the evidence for frequent turnover of imprinted expression based on evolutionary analyses in plants and the potential role for transposable elements (TEs) in creating imprinted expression patterns. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Creating mobile apps with Appcelerator Titanium

    CERN Document Server

    Brousseau, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Creating Mobile Apps with Appcelerator Titanium provides a hands-on approach and working examples on creating apps and games as well as embedding them onto a social networking website. Developers can then move on from there to develop their own applications based on the ones they have developed throughout the course of this book.""Creating Mobile Apps with Appcelerator Titanium"" is for developers who have experience with modern languages and development environments. Also, if you are familiar with the concepts of Object-oriented Programming (OOP), reusable components, AJAX closures, and so on

  8. Creating Web Sites The Missing Manual

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Think you have to be a technical wizard to build a great web site? Think again. For anyone who wants to create an engaging web site--for either personal or business purposes--Creating Web Sites: The Missing Manual demystifies the process and provides tools, techniques, and expert guidance for developing a professional and reliable web presence. Like every Missing Manual, you can count on Creating Web Sites: The Missing Manual to be entertaining and insightful and complete with all the vital information, clear-headed advice, and detailed instructions you need to master the task at hand. Autho

  9. Creating Future Memories: A Dialogue on Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehder, Mads Middelboe

    2016-01-01

    This contribution documents the generative method we used to create a two-day public workshop on archiving digital memory, which occurred in April 2016 at the Counterplay Festival in Aarhus. Our group members, collectively known as the Futuremaking group created two distinct experiences. The “Help...... Desk of the Future” was created as a means of acting out how unhelpful many helpdesks actually are and to imagine how algorithms may be positioning our futures for us. The Museum of Random Memory functioned as a pop-up curatorial event where participants could offer up memories, experiences...

  10. Creating Space Plasma from the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0179 CREATING SPACE PLASMA FROM THE GROUND Herbert C Carlson UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY Final Report 05/12/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 05/14/2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 08/14/2012-05/14/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Creating space plasma from...Report (2016) Creating Space Plasma from the Ground Grant FA9550-11-1-0236 AFOSR Program Manager Dr. Kent Miller PI: Herbert C. Carlson Center for

  11. Pattern optimizing verification of self-align quadruple patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Masatoshi; Yamada, Kazuki; Oyama, Kenichi; Hara, Arisa; Natori, Sakurako; Yamauchi, Shouhei; Koike, Kyohei; Yaegashi, Hidetami

    2017-03-01

    Lithographic scaling continues to advance by extending the life of 193nm immersion technology, and spacer-type multi-patterning is undeniably the driving force behind this trend. Multi-patterning techniques such as self-aligned double patterning (SADP) and self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) have come to be used in memory devices, and they have also been adopted in logic devices to create constituent patterns in the formation of 1D layout designs. Multi-patterning has consequently become an indispensible technology in the fabrication of all advanced devices. In general, items that must be managed when using multi-patterning include critical dimension uniformity (CDU), line edge roughness (LER), and line width roughness (LWR). Recently, moreover, there has been increasing focus on judging and managing pattern resolution performance from a more detailed perspective and on making a right/wrong judgment from the perspective of edge placement error (EPE). To begin with, pattern resolution performance in spacer-type multi-patterning is affected by the process accuracy of the core (mandrel) pattern. Improving the controllability of CD and LER of the mandrel is most important, and to reduce LER, an appropriate smoothing technique should be carefully selected. In addition, the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique is generally used to meet the need for high accuracy in forming the spacer film. Advances in scaling are accompanied by stricter requirements in the controllability of fine processing. In this paper, we first describe our efforts in improving controllability by selecting the most appropriate materials for the mandrel pattern and spacer film. Then, based on the materials selected, we present experimental results on a technique for improving etching selectivity.

  12. A summary of the CMS Create event

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; GASTAL, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The maiden CMS Create event took place in November 2015 and was a huge success. The output from all the participants was fantastic. As organisers we learnt a lot and hope to build on our experience for the 2016 event!

  13. Towards Creating Sustainable Ecotourism Interventions: Practical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-01

    May 1, 2017 ... Keywords: Tourism, Development, Livelihoods, Assets, Adaptive .... widely reported in the Ghanaian media that farmers in some ..... created an outlet for revenue which, when accrued, was invested prudently in social.

  14. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  15. More Sci- than Fi, Physicists Create Antimatter

    CERN Multimedia

    Overbye, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Physicists working in Europe announced yesterday that they had passed through nature's looking glass and had created atoms made of antimatter, or antiatoms, opening up the possibility of experiments in a realm once reserved for science fiction writers (5 pages)

  16. Creating Healthy Environments For Youth Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has created a presentation and companion checklist to help coaches and athletic administrators better understand the environmental health risks associated with youth sports and the steps they can follow to protect young athletes.

  17. Creating Great Neighborhoods: Density in Your Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report highlights nine community-led efforts to create vibrant neighborhoods through density, discusses the connections between smart growth and density, and introduces design principles to ensure that density becomes a community asset.

  18. Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business Environment in the ... the scope of operations of private sector enterprises in the West Bank and Gaza. ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management.

  19. ICT and Pragmatism: Creating sustainable Employment for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    effort to create self employment, this can galvanize unexpected revolution whose consequences will be very grave. The reading .... having a significant impact on the service industries. ..... secure your investment. Additional ..... Nigeria may fail.

  20. Proof patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This innovative textbook introduces a new pattern-based approach to learning proof methods in the mathematical sciences. Readers will discover techniques that will enable them to learn new proofs across different areas of pure mathematics with ease. The patterns in proofs from diverse fields such as algebra, analysis, topology and number theory are explored. Specific topics examined include game theory, combinatorics, and Euclidean geometry, enabling a broad familiarity. The author, an experienced lecturer and researcher renowned for his innovative view and intuitive style, illuminates a wide range of techniques and examples from duplicating the cube to triangulating polygons to the infinitude of primes to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Intended as a companion for undergraduate students, this text is an essential addition to every aspiring mathematician’s toolkit.

  1. Creating Societal Benefits and Corporate Profits

    OpenAIRE

    Raisch, Sebastian; Probst, Gilbert; Gomez, Peter; Zimmermann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The odds of launching a new business that creates value for both the company and the public can be improved with good planning. An in-depth analysis of how four companies created for-profit initiatives that also have high societal value suggests that each followed a similar step-by-step process to achieve what the researchers call synergistic value creation. Those steps include establishing cross-business incubators and installing multi-perspective monitoring systems.

  2. ISO 55000: Creating an asset management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Chris; Main, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    In the October 2014 issue of HEJ, Keith Hamer, group vice-president, Asset Management & Engineering at Sodexo, and marketing director at Asset Wisdom, Kevin Main, argued that the new ISO 55000 standards present facilities managers with an opportunity to create 'a joined-up, whole lifecycle approach' to managing and delivering value from assets. In this article, Kevin Main and Chris Bradley, who runs various asset management projects, examine the process of creating an asset management system.

  3. Creating Math Videos: Comparing Platforms and Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Reza O.; Sieben, John T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a short tutorial on creating mini-videos using two platforms--PCs and tablets such as iPads--and software packages that work with these devices. Specifically, we describe the step-by-step process of creating and editing videos using a Wacom Intuos pen-tablet plus Camtasia software on a PC platform and using the software…

  4. Pattern classification

    CERN Document Server

    Duda, Richard O; Stork, David G

    2001-01-01

    The first edition, published in 1973, has become a classic reference in the field. Now with the second edition, readers will find information on key new topics such as neural networks and statistical pattern recognition, the theory of machine learning, and the theory of invariances. Also included are worked examples, comparisons between different methods, extensive graphics, expanded exercises and computer project topics. An Instructor's Manual presenting detailed solutions to all the problems in the book is available from the Wiley editorial department.

  5. Innovation for creating a smart future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang M. Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, we live in a dynamic and turbulent global community. The wave of mega-trends, including rapid change in globalization and technological advances, is creating new market forces. For any organization to survive and prosper in such an environment, innovation is imperative. However, innovation is no longer just for creating value to benefit individuals, organizations, or societies. The ultimate purpose of innovation should be much more far reaching, helping create a smart future where people can enjoy the best quality of life possible. Thus, innovation must search for intelligent solutions to tackle major social ills, seek more proactive approaches to predict the uncertain future, and pursue strategies to remove barriers to the smart future. This study explores the detailed requirements of a smart future, including both hardware types and soft social/cultural components.

  6. Can Physical Examination Create a Stener Lesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankachandra, Manesha; Eggers, John P; Bogener, James W; Hutchison, Richard L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a Stener lesion can be created while testing stability of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the thumb. Testing was performed in a manner that reproduced clinical examination. Six fresh frozen hand and forearm specimens underwent sequential sectioning of the accessory UCL, the proper UCL, and the ulnar sagittal band. Measurements of radial deviation of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint were taken with the thumb in neutral rotation, pronation and supination, both with 0 degrees and with 30 degrees of flexion of the MCP joint. Visual examination was performed to assess the presence of a Stener lesion. No Stener lesion was created in any position as long as the fascial origin of the ulnar sagittal band at the adductor pollicis longus remained intact. After creating a defect in the ulnar sagittal band, a Stener lesion was created in two specimens, but only when the thumb was flexed and supinated. Pronation provided more stability, and supination provided less stability, with one or both components cut, especially when testing at 30° of flexion. Compared to both components cut without flexion or rotation, there was a statistically significant difference in angulation with the 30 degrees of MCP joint flexion in both neutral rotation in supination. Performing a physical examination to assess the amount of instability of an ulnar collateral ligament injury did not create a Stener lesion if the exam was performed in a controlled, gentle manner with the thumb held without rotation. If the thumb is held in neutral rotation during the exam, an iatrogenic Stener lesion should not be created.

  7. Creating dynamic UI with Android fragments

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Jim

    2013-01-01

    A fast-paced tutorial that guides you through everything you need to know about dynamic UI design for Android devices.This book is for developers with a basic understanding of Android programming who would like to improve the appearance and usability of their applications. Whether you're looking to create a more interactive user experience, create more dynamically adaptive UIs, provide better support for tablets and smartphones in a single app, reduce the complexity of managing your app UIs, or you are just trying to expand your UI design philosophy, then this book is for you.

  8. Creating e-learning games with Unity

    CERN Document Server

    Horachek, David

    2014-01-01

    Unity is a fully integrated development engine providing the required functionality to create games and interactive 3D content, while reducing the time, effort, and cost of developing the content. Nowadays, many people have started to use Unity in an eLearning setting as it allows them to create real-world scenarios, or models, for training purposes. With Unity, one can develop video games that are not only fun, but are also effective teaching and learning tools. When properly designed, an engaging game is an ideal platform for the presentation, testing, and application of learning objectives.

  9. Creating a Website The Missing Manual

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Think you need an army of skilled programmers to build a website? Think again. With nothing more than an ordinary PC, some raw ambition, and this book, you'll learn how to create and maintain a professional-looking, visitor-friendly site. This Missing Manual gives you all the tools, techniques, and expert advice you need. Plan your site. Create web pages by learning the basics of HTML and HTML5.Control page design with CSS. Format text, images, links, tables, and other elements.Attract visitors. Ensure that people can find your site through popular search engines.Build a community. Add forums

  10. Creating a web site the missing manual

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Think you have to be a technical wizard to build a great web site? Think again. If you want to create an engaging web site, this thoroughly revised, completely updated edition of Creating a Web Site: The Missing Manual demystifies the process and provides tools, techniques, and expert guidance for developing a professional and reliable web presence. Whether you want to build a personal web site, an e-commerce site, a blog, or a web site for a specific occasion or promotion, this book gives you detailed instructions and clear-headed advice for: Everything from planning to launching. From pi

  11. Creating library tutorials for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Heidi

    2010-04-01

    This article describes one librarian's experiences with creating, promoting, and assessing online library tutorials. Tutorials were designed to provide on-demand and accessible library instruction to nursing students at Michigan State University. Topics for tutorials were chosen based on the librarian's liaison experiences and suggestions from nursing faculty. The tutorials were created using Camtasia and required the application of several tools and techniques. Tutorials were promoted through Web pages, the ANGEL course management system, blog posts, librarian interactions, e-mails, and more. In order to assess the tutorials' perceived effectiveness, feedback was gathered using a short survey. Future plans for the nursing tutorials project are also discussed.

  12. How to create a serious game?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Heidmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Serious games are video games designed to achieve an educational effect and achieve some degree of training in a certain area. They are nowadays used in industries such as defense, education, scientific exploration, health care, emergency management, city planning, engineering, and many others. As it still a nascent subject who doesn’t follow exactly the same rules and practices than the commercial video games industry, questions remain about how to create and use serious games. This article presents some know-how on the subject of creating serious games.

  13. Separation vortices and pattern formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper examples are given of the importance of flow separation for fluid patterns at moderate Reynolds numbers—both in the stationary and in the time-dependent domain. In the case of circular hydraulic jumps, it has been shown recently that it is possible to generalise the Prandtl–Kármán–P...... results for the vortex patterns behind a flapping foil in a flowing soap film, which shows the interaction and competition between the vortices shed from the round leading edge (like the von Kármán vortex street) and those created at the sharp trailing edge....

  14. Controlling disease and creating disparities: a fundamental cause perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Jo C; Link, Bruce G

    2005-10-01

    The United States and other developed countries experienced enormous improvements in population health during the 20th century. In the context of this dramatic positive change, health disparities by race and socioeconomic status emerged for several potent killers. Any explanation for current health disparities must take these changing patterns into account. Any explanation that ignores large improvements in population health and fails to account for the emergence of disparities for specific diseases is an inadequate explanation of current disparities. We argue that genetic explanations and some prominent social causation explanations are incompatible with these facts. We propose that the theory of "fundamental causes" can account for both vast improvements in population health and the creation of large socioeconomic and racial disparities in mortality for specific causes of death over time. Specifically, we argue that it is our enormously expanded capacity to control disease and death in combination with existing social and economic inequalities that create health disparities by race and socioeconomic status: When we develop the ability to control disease and death, the benefits of this new-found ability are distributed according to resources of knowledge, money, power, prestige, and beneficial social connections. We present data on changing mortality patterns by race and socioeconomic status for two types of diseases: those for which our capacity to prevent death has increased significantly and those for which we remain largely unable to prevent death. Time trends in mortality patterns are consistent with the fundamental cause explanation.

  15. Hybrid foundry patterns of bevel gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budzik G.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of making hybrid foundry patterns of bevel gears for investment casting process are presented. Rapid prototyping of gears with complex tooth forms is possible with the use of modern methods. One of such methods is the stereo-lithography, where a pattern is obtained as a result of resin curing with laser beam. Patterns of that type are applicable in precision casting. Removing of stereo-lithographic pattern from foundry mould requires use of high temperatures. Resin burning would generate significant amounts of harmful gases. In case of a solid stereo-lithographic pattern, the pressure created during gas burning may cause the mould to crack. A gas volume reduction may be achieved by using patterns of honeycomb structure. However, this technique causes a significant worsening of accuracy of stereo-lithographic patterns in respect of their dimensions and shape. In cooperation with WSK PZL Rzeszów, the Machine Design Department of Rzeszow University of Technology carried out research on the design of hybrid stereo-lithographic patterns. Hybrid pattern consists of a section made by stereo-lithographic process and a section made of casting wax. The latter material is used for stereo-lithographic pattern filling and for mould gating system. The hybrid pattern process consists of two stages: wax melting and then the burn-out of stereolithographic pattern. Use of hybrid patterns reduces the costs of production of stereolithographic patterns. High dimensional accuracy remains preserved in this process.

  16. Creating a Total Object of Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klie, Evelyn Busch

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a workshop that accompanied the author's exhibit, "A Sense of Place: Paintings by Evelyn Busch Klie." Explains that students created a watercolor painting and a clay frame or base with details in it. Includes a list of art materials and learning objectives. (CMK)

  17. Strategies for Creating New Venture Legitimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Tomas; Middleton, Karen Williams

    2015-01-01

    New ventures, being heavily subjected to liabilities of newness, are seen to engage in legitimacy strategies to overcome these liabilities. Building on an adapted theoretical framework of organizational legitimacy, self-reported weekly diaries of twelve entrepreneurs were analysed to identify strategies used by new ventures to create legitimacy.…

  18. Creating by Reusing Learning Design Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Harrer, Andreas; Dodero, Juan Manuel; Asensio-Pérez, Juan; Burgos, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Hernández-Leo, D., Harrer, A., Dodero, J. M., Asension-Pérez, J. I., & Burgos, D. (2006). Creating by reusing Learning Design solutions. Proceedings of 8th Simposo Internacional de Informática Educativa, León, Spain: IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technology. Retrieved October 3rd, 2006, from

  19. Creating Innovative Student Projects with App Smashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The potential for using various apps to improve student learning is tremendous. Yet, despite the iPad's possibilities, apps are often limited in their functionality. No one has created that magical, one-size-fits-all app that accomplishes all of the tasks that you had in mind. Luckily, there is an answer to this common problem: app smashing.…

  20. How do entrepreneurs think they create value?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyth Frederiksen, Dennis; Brem, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The means with which entrepreneurs create and capture value can be difficult to get a comprehensive picture of. Looking at the tools they use can offer insights, and in this context, the book “The Lean Startup” by Eric Ries has received a tremendous amount of attention. Supposedly, many...

  1. Creating social impact with side-events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hover, Paul; Dijk, Bake; Breedveld, Koen; van Eekeren, Frank; Slender, Hans

    All over the world, sport events are seen as significant tools for creating positive social impact. This is understandable, as sport events have the power to attract enthusiastic participants, volunteers and to reach large audiences of visitors and followers via (social) media. Outbursts of

  2. Creating Spaces to Support Transgender Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jenifer K.; Conover-Williams, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the opportunity to create spaces within the family, school, and community that specifically promote the well-being of transgender adolescents and young adults. When social contexts are supportive, transgender youth report significantly less risk. Supportive home and school environments have been linked to better outcomes…

  3. Does the New Economy Create Higher Productivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilling-Hansen, Mogens; Madsen, Erik Strøjer; Smith, Valdemar

    2002-01-01

    The rapid and continuous growth in the US in the 1990s and the simultaneous boom in the IT industry created the concept "The New Economy". What connects the two phenomena is that the IT industry alone is considered productive, and increased productivity in other industries, as a result of increased...

  4. The NAi effect: creating architecture culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figueiredo, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    At a time when cultural institutions (both in the Netherlands and abroad) are adjusting to new societal and political conditions (and financial restrictions), The NAi Effect aims to elucidate the social and cultural aims of architecture museums and their impact in creating architecture culture.

  5. Creating a Sun-Safe Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrey, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Strategies for minimizing sun exposure of campers and staff include educating campers about the sun's effect on their skin, scheduling activities when the sun is less intense, creating shade at the camp site, incorporating sun protection into camp dress code, and training staff regarding sun protection. Addresses OSHA and liability issues. (LP)

  6. Inclusive Information Societies: Creating Growth and Employment ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Employment for youth and women. The project has two components. The first focuses on outsourcing service sector work (micro-work and rural impact sourcing) in India, Sri Lanka, and the Philippines. This sector can play a vital role in creating employment, particularly for youth and women in semi-urban and rural areas.

  7. Creating the networking enterprises - logistics determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kulińska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The article describes the determinants of creating network enterprises with peculiar consideration of logistic factors which are conditioning the organization of processes, exchange of resources and competences. On the basis of literature analysis, there is proposed a model of creating network enterprises. A model is verified in the application part of the thesis. Methods: Within the publication a literature review of submitted scope of the interest was presented, as well as the empirical research. A research substance attaches the enterprises created on the basis of the reactivation of organizations which has collapsed due to bankruptcy proceeding. The research was based upon direct interviews with employees of the net-forming entities. Results and conclusions: Results of the research shows that taking up the cooperation and net-cooperation was the only possibility for new entities to come into existence, that were  based upon old assets and human resources liquidated during bankruptcy proceeding. There was indentified many determinants of enterprises network cooperation, however due to the research a conclusion draws, that basic factors of creating network cooperation are those which are profit-achieving oriented.

  8. CREATING INPUT TABLES FROM WAPDEG FOR RIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.G. Mon

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to create tables for input into RIP ver. 5.18 (Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems) from WAPDEG ver. 3.06 (Waste Package Degradation) output. This calculation details the creation of the RIP input tables for TSPA-VA REV.00

  9. Leadership: creating a cuiture of caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaola, Dominick P

    2004-01-01

    Leadership is characterized in terms of accomplishing mutual goals for the organization, its employees, and its community through vision and creating a community of caring. The examples of Herb Kelleher of Southwest Airlines, Walt Disney, and Dean Arthur A. Dugoni of the University of the Pacific are used to illustrate how this style of leadership plays out in specific accomplishments.

  10. System and method for creating expert systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Peter M. (Inventor); Luczak, Edward C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system and method provides for the creation of a highly graphical expert system without the need for programming in code. An expert system is created by initially building a data interface, defining appropriate Mission, User-Defined, Inferred, and externally-generated GenSAA (EGG) data variables whose data values will be updated and input into the expert system. Next, rules of the expert system are created by building appropriate conditions of the rules which must be satisfied and then by building appropriate actions of rules which are to be executed upon corresponding conditions being satisfied. Finally, an appropriate user interface is built which can be highly graphical in nature and which can include appropriate message display and/or modification of display characteristics of a graphical display object, to visually alert a user of the expert system of varying data values, upon conditions of a created rule being satisfied. The data interface building, rule building, and user interface building are done in an efficient manner and can be created without the need for programming in code.

  11. Practice It: Create a Weekly Activity Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    At the beginning of the week, create an activity plan to help you reach your goals. Start by identifying your goals for the week. Based on your goals, write down when you are going to exercise and what you are going to do.

  12. Understanding Critical Thinking to Create Better Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayapragassarazan, Zayabalaradjane; Menon, Vikas; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Batmanabane, Gitanjali

    2016-01-01

    Medical students master an enormous body of knowledge, but lack systematic problem solving ability and effective clinical decision making. High profile reports have called for reforms in medical education to create a better generation of doctors who can cope with the system based problems they would encounter in an interdisciplinary and…

  13. Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business Environment in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The prospect of indefinite Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories, and their extreme dependence on foreign assistance and Israeli-controlled customs revenues, had led to the conclusion that the Palestinian ...

  14. Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Creating an Economically Enabling and Competitive Business Environment in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The prospect of indefinite Israeli occupation of the ... Impact of implementing the Palestinian banking law on the performance of the private sector [Arabic language]. Documents. Impact of the commercial agents law ...

  15. Creating Smart-er Cities: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwinkle, Sam; Cruickshank, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The following offers an overview of what it means for cities to be "smart." It draws the supporting definitions and critical insights into smart cities from a series of papers presented at the 2009 Trans-national Conference on Creating Smart(er) Cities. What the papers all have in common is their desire to overcome the all too often…

  16. Engineering Encounters: Creating a Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kristin Leigh; Bush, Sarah B.; Cox, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The power of 3D printing technology has grown exponentially in just the past few years--people around the world are using 3D printers to prepare food, create tailored clothing, build cars and homes, and advance the medical field in ways that never seemed possible. In classrooms across the nation, 3D printers have become increasingly common because…

  17. Photocatalytic Solutions Create Self-Cleaning Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A Stennis Space Center researcher investigating the effectiveness of photocatalytic materials for keeping the Center's buildings free of grime turned to a solution created by PURETi Inc. of New York City. Testing proved successful, and NASA and the company now share a Dual Use Technology partnership. PURETi's coatings keep surfaces clean and purify surrounding air, eliminating pollution, odors, and microbes.

  18. Creating Sustainable Development through Sustainability Bildung

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-05-12

    May 12, 2018 ... ... to quit their jobs, sell their house, take their children out of school ... the globe is perceived as an object that human beings can affect, damage or protect, but ... have created a fantasy in which we believe that we can distance ...

  19. Creating Teams Increases Extension Educator Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalker-Scott, Linda; Daniels, Catherine H.; Martini, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The Garden Team at Washington State University is a transdisciplinary group of faculty, staff, and students with expertise in applied plant and soil sciences and an interest in Extension education. The team's primary mission is to create current, relevant, and peer-reviewed materials as Extension publications for home gardeners. The average yearly…

  20. creating social presence in large classes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social presence refers to the ability of students to project themselves as 'real people' in an online learning community. While it is difficult to create social presence in large classes, educational technologies can enhance the social dimension of online learning if educators relinquish the use of technology as an instrument of ...

  1. The Media Creates Us in Its Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Propaganda in all its forms is the culture of a mass society. The media transmits propaganda to form public opinion and recreate the human being. Reversing the Western ideal of a rational and free individual, the media creates a childish conformist ensconced in the peer group, who acts unconsciously.

  2. Creating a winning team: lessons from football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Sherri Lee

    2005-01-01

    There are tasks best done on an individual basis when caring for a neonate, but the ultimate outcome for infants and their families results from a team effort. Incorporating ten strategies drawn from football can help the NICU manager create and foster effective teamwork.

  3. Creating a Data Warehouse using SQL Server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Otto; Alnor, Karl

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we construct a Star Join Schema and show how this schema can be created using the basic tools delivered with SQL Server 7.0. Major objectives are to keep the operational database unchanged so that data loading can be done with out disturbing the business logic of the operational...

  4. Creating social impact with sport events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hover, P.; Dijk, B.; Breedveld, K.; Eekeren, F.J.A. van; Slender, H.

    2016-01-01

    All over the world, sport events are seen as significant tools for creating positive social impact. This is understandable, as sport events have the power to attract enthusiastic participants, volunteers and to reach large audiences of visitors and followers via (social) media. Outbursts of

  5. Creating the Grateful School in Four Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Owen M.

    2018-01-01

    Author and educator Owen Griffith shares how leaders can infuse small acts of gratitude to energize their schools and create a positive, thriving culture. Leaders must begin by practicing gratitude personally, then slowly introducing the practice to their faculty and eventually students. With the right attitude and creativity, the acts of…

  6. Creating the Total Quality Effective School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezotte, Lawrence W.

    This book shows how Deming's Total Quality Management (TQM) theory for organizational management can be integrated with the effective-schools literature. Part 1 compares the 14 principles of TQM with the tenets of effective-schools research. The second part develops a blueprint for creating the total quality effective school. The conceptual…

  7. Extending the "Knowledge Advantage": Creating Learning Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Tayyab; Walker, Derek; Finegan, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a synergy between the approaches of knowledge management in a learning organisation and supply chain management so that learning chains can be created in order to unleash innovation and creativity by managing knowledge in supply chains. Design/methodology/approach: Through extensive literature…

  8. Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Procházka

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal signal analysis based on sophisticated sensors, efficient communicationsystems and fast parallel processing methods has a rapidly increasing range of multidisciplinaryapplications. The present paper is devoted to pattern recognition, machine learning, and the analysisof sleep stages in the detection of sleep disorders using polysomnography (PSG data, includingelectroencephalography (EEG, breathing (Flow, and electro-oculogram (EOG signals. The proposedmethod is based on the classification of selected features by a neural network system with sigmoidaland softmax transfer functions using Bayesian methods for the evaluation of the probabilities of theseparate classes. The application is devoted to the analysis of the sleep stages of 184 individualswith different diagnoses, using EEG and further PSG signals. Data analysis points to an averageincrease of the length of the Wake stage by 2.7% per 10 years and a decrease of the length of theRapid Eye Movement (REM stages by 0.8% per 10 years. The mean classification accuracy for givensets of records and single EEG and multimodal features is 88.7% ( standard deviation, STD: 2.1 and89.6% (STD:1.9, respectively. The proposed methods enable the use of adaptive learning processesfor the detection and classification of health disorders based on prior specialist experience andman–machine interaction.

  9. Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi, E-mail: dhagat@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10 μm wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3 μm dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

  10. Creating a culture for information systems success

    CERN Document Server

    Belkhamza, Zakariya

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely reported that issues related to organizational context appear frequently in discussions of information systems success. The statement that the information system did not fit the behavioral context in an organization is often part of the explanation of why particular information system encountered unanticipated resistance and never met expectation. While this context has been intensively studied, we still lack evidence on how this organizational context is affecting the success of information system from a managerial action perspective. This type of managerial involvement is often neglected to the extent that it became an essential obstacle to organizational performance. The objective of Creating a Culture for Information Systems Success is to assist CIOs and IT managers on how to use their managerial actions to create a suitable cultural environment in the organization, which leads to a successful implementation of information systems. This  book will also provide guidelines fo...

  11. Designing value-creating supply chain networks

    CERN Document Server

    Martel, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on the design of robust value-creating supply chain networks (SCN) and key strategic issues related to the number; location, capacity and mission of supply chain facilities (plants, distribution centers) – as well as the network structure required to provide flexibility and resilience in an uncertain world – this book presents an innovative methodology for SCN reengineering that can be used to significantly improve the bottom line of supply chain dependent businesses. Providing readers with the tools needed to analyze and model value creation activities, Designing Value-Creating Supply Chain Networks examines the risks faced by modern supply chains, and shows how to develop plausible future scenarios to evaluate potential SCN designs. The design methods proposed are based on a visual representation formalism that facilitates the analysis and modeling of SCN design problems, book chapters incorporate several example problems and exercises which can be solved with Excel tools (Analysis tools and So...

  12. Creating sustainable city by enhancing social capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affandi, R. A.; Mursitama, T. N.

    2018-03-01

    Scholars have been discussing social capital since the last two decades. They analyzed from various perspectives such as sociology, education, political participation, strengthening democratic values and economic empowerment of the society. However, study related to the implementation that benefits directly to the society is needed. This study examines how to create a sustainable city by enhancing social capital from both macro and micro analyses. This combination of analysis offers deeper understanding both from decision makers at city level and individuals, groups and society. We will conduct qualitative approach mainly by interviews and direct observation to collect the data. also, we also analyze publicly available data. Finally, this study contributes to new understanding in creating a sustainable city, not only about the environment and physical aspects, but also about ensuring political economic, democratic values, and social welfare.

  13. Digital Media Creates Youth Voices Heard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Sallee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oklahoma 4-H clubs and military service centers partnered with the Adobe Youth Voices (AYV program to give youth opportunities to raise their voices through digital media. This program reached out to underrepresented youth and gave them the tools and technology to effectively express themselves. The intent of this project was for 4-H members to create videos to educate, help and raise awareness in their communities of topics that were important to the youth. These experiences help youth gain knowledge towards helping others solve farm, home, and community problems. Participating youth selected issues that were important to them and created a short video, educating others and sharing their convictions on the topics of horse therapy, citizenship, bullying, and distracted driving.

  14. Co-creating meaning through Artful Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to point out the need for aesthetic and artful methods for reflection, learning and co-creation. The context is management education focused on developing innovation competency. The data derive from action research, observations and written reports. The main contrib...... of leadership icons as well as co-creating with tangible materials can give rise to new meaning and transformational learning.......The purpose of this chapter is to point out the need for aesthetic and artful methods for reflection, learning and co-creation. The context is management education focused on developing innovation competency. The data derive from action research, observations and written reports. The main...... contribution of this chapter is the introduction of a model for Artful Inquiry, which involves constructing powerful questions and finding appropriate artistic methods for reflecting and for co-creating with people or with artistic material. It is argued that Artful Inquiry can access deeper layers of knowing...

  15. Creating interdisciplinary education within monodisciplinary structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Katrine; Lyall, Catherine; R. Meagher, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The literature on interdisciplinary higher education is influenced by two overall trends: one looks at the institutional level of specially designed interdisciplinary institutions, while the other assesses individual interdisciplinary educational activities. Much less attention is given...... to the processes of creating interdisciplinary education initiatives within traditional monodisciplinary universities. In this study, we thus explore how interdisciplinary education and teaching emerge and develop within universities that have little or no established infrastructure to support interdisciplinarity....... Using qualitative data from a multi-part case study, we examine the development of diverse interdisciplinary educational efforts within a traditional faculty-structured university in order to map the ways in which interdisciplinary educational elements have been created, supported, challenged or even...

  16. Novel device for creating continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a novel capsulorhexis system. Mechatronics Laboratory, University of Erciyes and Kayseri Maya Eye Hospital. A 3D model was created and simulations were conducted to develop a new device which was designed, fabricated and tested for continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC). The name of this system is the electro-mechanical capsulorhexis system (EMCS). The 3D model was created by using a commercial design software and a 3D printer was used to fabricate the EMCS Finite element analysis and geometrical relation tests of the EMCS for different sized lenses were performed. The results show that the EMCS is a perfect solution for capsulorhexis surgeries, without mechanical or geometrical problems. The EMCS can open the anterior lens capsule more easily and effectively than manual CCC applications and needs less experience.

  17. Editorial: Creating, Supporting, Sustaining and Evaluating Virtual Learning Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Ge

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This special issue is dedicated to creating, building, supporting, sustaining and evaluating virtual learning communities (VLCs using emerging technologies. The contributors from diverse disciplines have come together to share their valuable experiences and findings through their research in the following themes: (a instructional models, strategies, approaches for building, supporting and evaluating VLCs, (b designing effective use of tools to promote discourse and scaffold peer interactions among members, (c iterative processes and models of designing and evaluating VLCs; and (d various variables concerning VLCs, such as virtual community behaviors, cultural factors, adoption patterns of tools. It is hoped that these articles will provide practical guidance and offer valuable experience to both educators and researchers who are interested in designing effective VLCs and examining various aspects of VLCs to advance our understanding of VLCs.

  18. Can cognitive science create a cognitive economics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chater, Nick

    2015-02-01

    Cognitive science can intersect with economics in at least three productive ways: by providing richer models of individual behaviour for use in economic analysis; by drawing from economic theory in order to model distributed cognition; and jointly to create more powerful 'rational' models of cognitive processes and social interaction. There is the prospect of moving from behavioural economics to a genuinely cognitive economics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Story-dialogue: creating community through storytelling

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle-Jones, Carol Sarah

    2006-01-01

    This narrative case study examines the role of storytelling in creating community with a grade 7 class. Twelve girls and eleven boys, ages 12 to 13, participated in this classroom-based study. Students engaged in three structured storytelling activities incorporating home-to-school stories, story responses, and classroom presentations. First, students’ parents/guardians told a coming-of-age or Confirmation story to their child. Second, at school, students shared their family story with a part...

  20. Strong branding creates a competitive edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    This article encompasses the basics of branding and how it relates to radiology organizations. It also provides tools to help develop your brand. To effectively use branding as a component of your marketing strategy, it is important to follow 3 basic principles: focus on where you excel, understand the existing markets, and be consistent. You do not need to be a large hospital, imaging center, or department to create a brand identity.

  1. Creating an Asthma-Friendly School

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-08

    This podcast features real-life success stories of students with asthma who, thanks to their schools' implementation of asthma-friendly policies and programs, now have their asthma under control.  Created: 11/8/2007 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH).   Date Released: 5/20/2008.

  2. Creating marketing strategies for higher education institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Lidia Białoń

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a thesis that the primary premise of creating marketing strategies for higher education institution is a three-dimensional notion of marketing. The first dimension lies in the theoretical notions of the essence of marketing, including the transactional marketing (1.0), relationship marketing (2.0) and spiritual marketing (3.0). The second dimension is formed by methods of marketing research and accurate notions of marketing, while the third are channels of marketing infor...

  3. Cognitive abilities and creating metaphorical names

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanesyan, Marina O.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive processing of metaphor creation has been insufficiently investigated. Creating metaphors requires the ability to work in a fantastic, impossible context, using symbolic and associative means to express oneís thoughts. It has been shown recently that intelligence plays an important role in the creation of metaphors, but it is not the main factor in determining their success. The present research explores the roles of conceptual abilities, categorical abilities, and flexibility (as the factor creativity in metaphor creation. Participants (n = 38 young adults were asked to come up with names for three photos, without any special instruction to create metaphors. To classify conceptual abilities we used ìConceptual Synthesisî (M. A. Kholodnaya, 2012; to measure categorical ability we used the subtest ìSimilaritiesî (D. Wechsler, 1955; to identify the role of creativity in the metaphor process we used the test of ìUnusual Usesî (J. P. Guilford, 1960. The creation of complex metaphorical names was associated with a tendency to create highly organized mental structures and to retain them within the general semantic context (r = 0.344, p < 0.05. The tendency to create single-level situational connections was associated with a tendency to give specific names to photos (r = 0.475, p < 0.01. Photographic images proved out to be fruitful stimuli to investigate the processing of visual information. We developed a preliminary classification of names: 1 concrete; 2 situational; 3 abstract; 4 metaphorical (M1 and M2. We identified two types of metaphorical names — perceptual and complex metaphors — that relate to conceptual abilities in different ways. It is inaccurate to speak about a general concept of ìmetaphorical abilitiesî; we should differentiate the psychological mechanisms that lie at their base.

  4. Creating load for new hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation provides an update of the activities of the Hydrogen Village. The Hydrogen Village is a public-private partnership of approximately 40 companies with the goal of advancing awareness of the environmental, economic and social benefits of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The intent of the hydrogen village is to create a sustainable commercial market for these technologies within the Greater Toronto Area and to help to catalyze such markets in other areas

  5. Creating the next generation control system software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new 1980's style support package for future accelerator control systems is proposed. It provides a way to create accelerator applications software without traditional programming. Visual Interactive Applications (VIA) is designed to meet the needs of expanded accelerator complexes in a more cost effective way than past experience with procedural languages by using technology from the personal computer and artificial intelligence communities. 4 refs

  6. Creating Life in an Urban Space

    OpenAIRE

    Fredrickson, Kirsten I.

    1999-01-01

    Creating Life in an Urban Space Kirsten Fredrickson Abstract Towns contain spaces defined by human interaction with their surroundings. In any town, certain places seem inviting while others seem cold and unfriendly. This is the result of subtle design decisions that directly effect the character of a place. This investigation focuses on the interaction of architecture in our daily lives and how it affects us in ways that we often overlook. The life of a town is in its rela...

  7. Patterns for Effectively Documenting Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Ademar; David, Gabriel

    Good design and implementation are necessary but not sufficient pre-requisites for successfully reusing object-oriented frameworks. Although not always recognized, good documentation is crucial for effective framework reuse, and often hard, costly, and tiresome, coming with many issues, especially when we are not aware of the key problems and respective ways of addressing them. Based on existing literature, case studies and lessons learned, the authors have been mining proven solutions to recurrent problems of documenting object-oriented frameworks, and writing them in pattern form, as patterns are a very effective way of communicating expertise and best practices. This paper presents a small set of patterns addressing problems related to the framework documentation itself, here seen as an autonomous and tangible product independent of the process used to create it. The patterns aim at helping non-experts on cost-effectively documenting object-oriented frameworks. In concrete, these patterns provide guidance on choosing the kinds of documents to produce, how to relate them, and which contents to include. Although the focus is more on the documents themselves, rather than on the process and tools to produce them, some guidelines are also presented in the paper to help on applying the patterns to a specific framework.

  8. Pupil-Teacher Adjustment and Mutual Adaptation in Creating Classroom Learning Environments. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert S.; And Others

    This investigation is directed toward an analysis of the dynamics of the learning situations in a variety of public school elementary and secondary classrooms. The focus of the project is to make a comparative analysis of the patterns of cooperation or alienation among parents, teachers, peers and individual pupils which create learning cultures…

  9. Use of created cattail ( Typha) wetlands in mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobberteen, Ross A.; Nickerson, Norton H.

    1991-11-01

    In order to balance pressures for land-use development with protection of wetland resources, artificial wetlands have been constructed in an effort to replace lost ecosystems. Despite its regulatory appeal and prominent role in current mitigation strategies, it is unclear whether or not created systems actually compensate for lost wetland resources. Mitigation predictions that rely on artificial wetlands must be analyzed critically in terms of their efficacy. Destruction of wetlands due to burial by coal fly ash at a municipal landfill in Danvers, Massachusetts, USA, provided an opportunity to compare resulting growth of created cattail ( Typha) marshes with natural wetland areas. Once the appropriate cattail species was identified for growth under disturbed landfill conditions, two types of artificial wetlands were constructed. The two systems differed in their hydrologic attributes: while one had a surface water flow characteristic of most cattail wetlands, the second system mimicked soil and water conditions found in naturally occurring floating cattail marshes. Comparison of plant growth measurements for two years from the artificial systems with published values for natural cattail marshes revealed similar structure and growth patterns. Experiments are now in progress to investigate the ability of created cattail marshes to remove and accumulate heavy metals from polluted landfill leachate. Research of the type reported here must be pursued aggressively in order to document the performance of artificial wetlands in terms of plant structure and wetland functions. Such research should allow us to start to evaluate whether artificial systems actually compensate for lost wetlands by performing similar functions and providing the concomitant public benefits.

  10. CREATE-IP and CREATE-V: Data and Services Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, L.; Potter, G. L.; Hertz, J.; Peters, J.; Maxwell, T. P.; Strong, S.; Shute, J.; Shen, Y.; Duffy, D.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center and the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) are working together to build a uniform environment for the comparative study and use of a group of reanalysis datasets of particular importance to the research community. This effort is called the Collaborative REAnalysis Technical Environment (CREATE) and it contains two components: the CREATE-Intercomparison Project (CREATE-IP) and CREATE-V. This year's efforts included generating and publishing an atmospheric reanalysis ensemble mean and spread and improving the analytics available through CREATE-V. Related activities included adding access to subsets of the reanalysis data through ArcGIS and expanding the visualization tool to GMAO forecast data. This poster will present the access mechanisms to this data and use cases including example Jupyter Notebook code. The reanalysis ensemble was generated using two methods, first using standard Python tools for regridding, extracting levels and creating the ensemble mean and spread on a virtual server in the NCCS environment. The second was using a new analytics software suite, the Earth Data Analytics Services (EDAS), coupled with a high-performance Data Analytics and Storage System (DASS) developed at the NCCS. Results were compared to validate the EDAS methodologies, and the results, including time to process, will be presented. The ensemble includes selected 6 hourly and monthly variables, regridded to 1.25 degrees, with 24 common levels used for the 3D variables. Use cases for the new data and services will be presented, including the use of EDAS for the backend analytics on CREATE-V, the use of the GMAO forecast aerosol and cloud data in CREATE-V, and the ability to connect CREATE-V data to NCCS ArcGIS services.

  11. Creating space for biodiversity by planning swath patterns and field marging using accurate geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de S.; Heijting, S.; Klompe, A.; Lerink, P.; Vonk, M.; Wal, van der T.

    2009-01-01

    Potential benefits of field margins or boundary strips include promotion of biodiversity and farm wildlife, maintaining landscape diversity, exploiting pest predators and parasites and enhancing crop pollinator populations. In this paper we propose and demonstrate a method to relocate areas of

  12. Balancing selection and genetic drift create unusual patterns of MHCII variation in Galapagos mockingbirds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, Jakub; Hoeck, P. E. A.; Keller, L. F.; Wayhart, J. P.; Dolinová, I.; Štefka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 19 (2016), s. 4757-4772 ISSN 0962-1083 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP506/12/P529 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : major histocompatibility complex * Mimus * genetic diversity * population size * trans-species polymorphism Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 6.086, year: 2016

  13. Creating virtual electrodes with 2D current steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas C.; Fallon, James B.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Current steering techniques have shown promise in retinal prostheses as a way to increase the number of distinct percepts elicitable without increasing the number of implanted electrodes. Previously, it has been shown that ‘virtual’ electrodes can be created between simultaneously stimulated electrode pairs, producing unique cortical response patterns. This study investigated whether virtual electrodes could be created using 2D current steering, and whether these virtual electrodes can produce cortical responses with predictable spatial characteristics. Approach. Normally-sighted eyes of seven adult anaesthetised cats were implanted with a 42-channel electrode array in the suprachoroidal space and multi-unit neural activity was recorded from the visual cortex. Stimuli were delivered to individual physical electrodes, or electrodes grouped into triangular, rectangular, and hexagonal arrangements. Varying proportions of charge were applied to each electrode in a group to ‘steer’ current and create virtual electrodes. The centroids of cortical responses to stimulation of virtual electrodes were compared to those evoked by stimulation of single physical electrodes. Main results. Responses to stimulation of groups of up to six electrodes with equal ratios of charge on each electrode resulted in cortical activation patterns that were similar to those elicited by the central physical electrode (centroids: RM ANOVA on ranks, p  >  0.05 neural spread: one-way ANOVA on Ranks, p  >  0.05). We were also able to steer the centroid of activation towards the direction of any of the electrodes of the group by applying a greater charge to that electrode, but the movement in the centroid was not found to be significant. Significance. The results suggest that current steering is possible in two dimensions between up to at least six electrodes, indicating it may be possible to increase the number of percepts in patients without increasing the number

  14. Create a new vision for indigenous development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez Alba, Rafael; Sanchez Arancibia, Oscar Armando [TRANSIERRA S.A., Santa Cruz (Bolivia)

    2009-07-01

    Transierra is a Bolivian company created in the year 2000 with the goal of transporting natural gas from the fields of San Alberto and San Antonio, in Tarija, to the Rio Grande Gas Compression Plant in Santa Cruz, for export to Brazil. Transierra has implemented a Social Action Plan, which allowed it to execute more than 800 community projects for the benefit of over 40 thousand families living in it's area of influence, with the presence of 146 indigenous communities, generally lagging behind in economic and productive life in the region and country. The Support Program to Guarani Development Plans (PA-PDG) is part of the Social Plan and is part of a long-term agreement signed between Transierra and indigenous organizations. The program has implemented more than one hundred projects for productive development, health, education, cultural revaluation, and strengthening organizational infrastructure, generating huge benefits in improving the living conditions of thousands of families of the Guarani people. This year a unique initiative was created with 4 Indigenous Captains and with the support of the International Finance Corporation (World Bank Group), including Business Plans to promote sustainable economic growth, created productive economic cycles involving improvements to the production and productivity to enter the commercial distribution of local and national markets. These four initiatives have meant a shift in the implementation and is helping to generate new dynamics in production, in addition to capturing significant resources from public and private investment, laying the groundwork for the improvement of the incomes and quality of life of its beneficiaries. (author)

  15. 10 ways to create shareholder value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Alfred

    2006-09-01

    Executives have developed tunnel vision in their pursuit of shareholder value, focusing on short-term performance at the expense of investing in long-term growth. It's time to broaden that perspective and begin shaping business strategies in light of the competitive landscape, not the shareholder list. In this article, Alfred Rappaport offers ten basic principles to help executives create lasting shareholder value. For starters, companies should not manage earnings or provide earnings guidance; those that fail to embrace this first principle of shareholder value will almost certainly be unable to follow the rest. Additionally, leaders should make strategic decisions and acquisitions and carry assets that maximize expected value, even if near-term earnings are negatively affected as a result. During times when there are no credible value-creating opportunities to invest in the business, companies should avoid using excess cash to make investments that look good on the surface but might end up destroying value, such as ill-advised, overpriced acquisitions. It would be better to return the cash to shareholders in the form of dividends and buybacks. Rappaport also offers guidelines for establishing effective pay incentives at every level of management; emphasizes that senior executives need to lay their wealth on the line just as shareholders do; and urges companies to embrace full disclosure, an antidote to short-term earnings obsession that serves to lessen investor uncertainty, which could reduce the cost of capital and increase the share price. The author notes that a few types of companies--high-tech start-ups, for example, and severely capital-constrained organizations--cannot afford to ignore market pressures for short-term performance. Most companies with a sound, well-executed business model, however, could better realize their potential for creating shareholder value by adopting the ten principles.

  16. Creating a culture of mutual respect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kathryn; Mestel, Pamela; Feldman, David L

    2010-04-01

    The Joint Commission mandates that hospitals seeking accreditation have a process to define and address disruptive behavior. Leaders at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, took the initiative to create a code of mutual respect that not only requires respectful behavior, but also encourages sensitivity and awareness to the causes of frustration that often lead to inappropriate behavior. Steps to implementing the code included selecting code advocates, setting up a system for mediating disputes, tracking and addressing operational system issues, providing training for personnel, developing a formal accountability process, and measuring the results. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Workshop: Creating Your Institutional Research Repository

    KAUST Repository

    Grenz, Daryl M.

    2016-11-08

    In 2002, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) proposed the concept of an institutional repository to simultaneously disrupt and enhance the state of scholarly communications in the academic world. Thirteen years later, thousands of universities and other institutions have answered this call, but many more have not due to gaps in budgets, awareness and, most of all, practical guidance on creating an institutional repository. This workshop provides you with an essential primer on what it takes to establish a fully-functioning institutional repository. Every aspect of the process will be covered, including policies, procedures, staffing guidelines, workflows and repository technologies.

  18. Hospital culture--why create one?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovie, M D

    1993-01-01

    Hospitals, to survive, must be transformed into responsive, participative organizations capable of new practices that produce improved results in both quality of care and service at reduced costs. Creating, managing, and changing the culture are critical leadership functions that will enable the hospital to succeed. Strategic planning and effective implementation of planned change will produce the desired culture. Work restructuring, a focus on quality management along with changes in clinical practices, as well as the care and support processes, are all a part of the necessary hospital cultural revolution.

  19. Creating Posters for Effective Scientific Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavdekar, Sandeep B; Vyas, Shruti; Anand, Varun

    2017-08-01

    A scientific poster is a summary of one's research that is presented in a visually engaging manner. Posters are presented as a means of short and quick scientific communications at conferences and scientific meetings. Presenting posters has advantages for the presenters and for conference attendees and organizers. It also plays a part in dissemination of research findings and furthering science. An effective poster is the one that focuses on a single message and conveys it through a concise and artistically attractive manner. This communication intends to provide tips on creating an effective poster to young scientists. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  20. Do Treasure Islands Create Firm Value?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Tat-kei; Ng, Travis

    They do! Otherwise, their use would not have been so prevalent among firms. How much firm value they create, however, is still an open question. Exploiting a political event in the U.K. that suddenly raised the cost of using tax havens, we find that there was a 0.87% reduction in cumulative...... abnormal return (CAR) among the sampled firms, corresponding to about £532 million in market capitalization. The firms of stronger corporate governance registered a stronger reduction in CAR. A simple linear extrapolation suggests that the firm value contributed by tax havens can be as much as £31 billion....

  1. ECONOMIC STRATEGY CREATED THROUGH THEORY FOCUSED PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru-Alexandru Bodislav

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The research done for this article is following the elaboration of a moldable model on the actual economic context, in which there are considered continuous learning elements on facts and commercial niches, evaluating a business starting from causality diagram and structuring its processes. Analyzing the evolution of a business and on the market in which they are deploying their activity through quantitative and qualitative measurement methods focused on trends. Testing hypotheses and business suppositions that are the main engine of theory focused on planning, a model of creating a strategic management process that will be developed in this article.

  2. Green electronics manufacturing creating environmental sensible products

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, John X

    2012-01-01

    Going ""green"" is becoming a major component of the mission for electronics manufacturers worldwide. While this goal seems simplistic, it poses daunting dilemmas. Yet, to compete effectively in the global economy, manufacturers must take the initiative to drive this crucial movement. Green Electronics Manufacturing: Creating Environmental Sensible Products provides you with a complete reference to design, develop, build, and install an electronic product with special consideration for the product's environmental impacts during its whole life cycle. The author discusses how to integrate the st

  3. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  4. Creating an anisotropic plasma resistivity with waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, N.J.; Boozer, A.H.

    1980-05-01

    An anisotropic plasma resistivity may be created by preferential heating of electrons traveling in one direction. This can result in a steady-state toroidal current in a tokamak even in the absence of net wave momentum. In fact, at high wave phase velocities, the current associated with the change in resistivity is greater than that associated with net momentum input. An immediate implication is that other waves, such as electron cyclotron waves, may be competitive with lower-hybrid waves as a means for generating current. An analytical expression is derived for the current generated per power dissipated which agrees remarkably well with numerical calculations

  5. Creating three-dimensional thermal maps

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Price

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Price_2011.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 30895 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Price_2011.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Creating Three...-Dimensional Thermal Maps Mathew Price Cogency cc Cape Town Email: mathew@cogency.co.za Jeremy Green CSIR Centre for Mining Innovation Johannesburg Email: jgreen@csir.co.za John Dickens CSIR Centre for Mining Innovation Johannesburg Email: jdickens...

  6. ESTEEM manual. Deliverable 5 of Create Acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolivet, E. [IAE, Toulouse (France); Mourik, R.; Raven, R.P.J.M.; Feenstra, C.F.J. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Alcantud Torrent, A.; Schaefer, B. [EcoInstitute, Barcelona (Spain); Heiskanen, E. [National Consumer Research Centre NCRC, Helsinki (Finland); Hodson, M. [Centre for Sustainable Urban and Regional Futures SURF, Manchester (United Kingdom); Oniszk-Poplawska, A. [Institute for Renewable Energy IEO, Warszawa (Poland); Difiore, M.; Fucsko, J. [Hungarian Environmental Economics Center MAKK, Budapest (Hungary); Maack, M.H. [Icelandic New Energy INE, Reykjavik (Iceland); Poti, B.M. [CERIS-CNR, Rome (Italy); Prasad, G. [University of Cape Town UCT, Capetown (South Africa); Brohmann, B.; Fritsche, U.R.; Huenecke, K. [OEKO Institut, Freiburg (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    The ESTEEM tool is one of the outcomes of Create Acceptance. ESTEEM (Engage stake-holders through a systematic toolbox to manage new energy projects) is a six step tool which is performed by a consultant in close cooperation with the project manager of a new energy project. The focus of the tool is put on the early recognition and discussion of stakeholders expectations and the integration of these in the design of the project. ESTEEM, including background information is freely available via www.esteem-tool.eu.

  7. Nuclear power creates new possibilities for marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Vuren, K.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of food presents various advantages over other forms of food sterilization and preservation: 1) food is disinfested of insects, microorganisms and parasites without harming the fooddstuff itself; 2) food is handled in its packaged form when irradiated; 3) the irradiation process is a 'cold' process, i.e. foodstuff need not undergo a rise in temperature; this prevents harming of the tissues; and 4) the storage life is increased, creating new possibilities for marketing and trade. A few experiments with vegetables, fruit and meat are described

  8. Creating and probing coherent atomic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Physics Div.]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Frey, M.T.; Dunning, F.B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The authors present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical time resolved studies of the evolution of atomic wavepackets. In particular, wavepackets comprising a superposition of very-high-lying Rydberg states which are created either using a short half-cycle pulse (HCP) or by rapid application of a DC field. The properties of the wavepackets are probed using a second HCP that is applied following a variable time delay and ionizes a fraction of the atoms, much like a passing-by ion in atomic collisions.

  9. Implementation Support of Security Design Patterns Using Test Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Yoshizawa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Security patterns are intended to support software developers as the patterns encapsulate security expert knowledge. However, these patterns may be inappropriately applied because most developers are not security experts, leading to threats and vulnerabilities. Here we propose a support method for security design patterns in the implementation phase of software development. Our method creates a test template from a security design pattern, consisting of an “aspect test template” to observe the internal processing and a “test case template”. Providing design information creates a test from the test template with a tool. Because our test template is reusable, it can easily perform a test to validate a security design pattern. In an experiment involving four students majoring in information sciences, we confirm that our method can realize an effective test, verify pattern applications, and support pattern implementation.

  10. Creating a culture where employee engagement Thrives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Groover, C.S.P. [Behavioral Science Technology, Ojai, CA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Safety leaders across industries face a critical challenge: engaging employees. While engagement of a few people may be easy in short-term projects, it is significantly more difficult with long-term processes. In this session we show leaders how they can create a culture where workers are more open and even eager to be involved in safety efforts. Our experience with safety leaders in the nuclear industry has verified that when the factors that drive organizational functioning are understood, leaders are enabled to augment employee engagement and attain significant improvement in safety outcomes. The underlying factors that influence employee engagement, performance, outcomes, and organizational culture are the same the world over. We will also show how safety is capable, by its intrinsic value, of winning profound support and direct engagement of employees. In this session, we will examine how leaders can leverage their decisions and actions to win over employees to safety and support them in their endeavors to promote it. Using the safety leadership best practices Vision, Credibility, Accountability, Communication, Collaboration, Action Orientation, and Recognition and Feedback, leaders increase their impact on their organization in favor of a culture that supports safety and employee engagement. Leaders that create a climate and culture where employee engagement thrives, realize better safety results. Leadership is not exclusively an inborn talent; it can be developed and enhanced. To this end, we will also show the advantages of transformational leadership style by comparing it to more classical transactional leadership.

  11. Data Programming: Creating Large Training Sets, Quickly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Alexander; De Sa, Christopher; Wu, Sen; Selsam, Daniel; Ré, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Large labeled training sets are the critical building blocks of supervised learning methods and are key enablers of deep learning techniques. For some applications, creating labeled training sets is the most time-consuming and expensive part of applying machine learning. We therefore propose a paradigm for the programmatic creation of training sets called data programming in which users express weak supervision strategies or domain heuristics as labeling functions, which are programs that label subsets of the data, but that are noisy and may conflict. We show that by explicitly representing this training set labeling process as a generative model, we can “denoise” the generated training set, and establish theoretically that we can recover the parameters of these generative models in a handful of settings. We then show how to modify a discriminative loss function to make it noise-aware, and demonstrate our method over a range of discriminative models including logistic regression and LSTMs. Experimentally, on the 2014 TAC-KBP Slot Filling challenge, we show that data programming would have led to a new winning score, and also show that applying data programming to an LSTM model leads to a TAC-KBP score almost 6 F1 points over a state-of-the-art LSTM baseline (and into second place in the competition). Additionally, in initial user studies we observed that data programming may be an easier way for non-experts to create machine learning models when training data is limited or unavailable. PMID:29872252

  12. Creating a culture where employee engagement Thrives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don Groover, C.S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Safety leaders across industries face a critical challenge: engaging employees. While engagement of a few people may be easy in short-term projects, it is significantly more difficult with long-term processes. In this session we show leaders how they can create a culture where workers are more open and even eager to be involved in safety efforts. Our experience with safety leaders in the nuclear industry has verified that when the factors that drive organizational functioning are understood, leaders are enabled to augment employee engagement and attain significant improvement in safety outcomes. The underlying factors that influence employee engagement, performance, outcomes, and organizational culture are the same the world over. We will also show how safety is capable, by its intrinsic value, of winning profound support and direct engagement of employees. In this session, we will examine how leaders can leverage their decisions and actions to win over employees to safety and support them in their endeavors to promote it. Using the safety leadership best practices Vision, Credibility, Accountability, Communication, Collaboration, Action Orientation, and Recognition and Feedback, leaders increase their impact on their organization in favor of a culture that supports safety and employee engagement. Leaders that create a climate and culture where employee engagement thrives, realize better safety results. Leadership is not exclusively an inborn talent; it can be developed and enhanced. To this end, we will also show the advantages of transformational leadership style by comparing it to more classical transactional leadership

  13. Creating a Regional Healthcare Network: People First.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-Verkerke, Margreet B

    2016-01-01

    Care organizations in the Dutch region Apeldoorn want to collaborate more in order to improve the care provision to elderly and psychiatric patients living independently. In order to support the collaboration they intend to create a regional digital healthcare network. The research was focused on the relevance of a regional healthcare network for care providers. Eleven semi-structured interviews based on the USE IT-model, were conducted with care providers and staff members. Results show that care providers need to tune their activities for this target group and create an agreement on integrated care. The relevance of a digital communication and collaboration platform is high. The regional healthcare network should support the collaboration between care providers by: 1. Offering a communication platform to replace the time consuming communication by telephone; 2. Making patient information available for patient and care provider at patients' homes; 3. Giving insight in who is giving what care to whom; and 4. Giving access to knowledge about the target group: elderly and psychiatric patients living independently.

  14. Our Lunar Destiny: Creating a Lunar Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    "Our Lunar Destiny: Creating a Lunar Economy" supports a vision of people moving freely and economically between the earth and the Moon in an expansive space and lunar economy. It makes the economic case for the creation of a lunar space economy and projects the business plan that will make the venture an economic success. In addition, this paper argues that this vision can be created and sustained only by private enterprise and the legal right of private property in space and on the Moon. Finally, this paper advocates the use of lunar land grants as the key to unleashing the needed capital and the economic power of private enterprise in the creation of a 21st century lunar space economy. It is clear that the history of our United States economic system proves the value of private property rights in the creation of any new economy. It also teaches us that the successful development of new frontiers-those that provide economic opportunity for freedom-loving people-are frontiers that encourage, respect and protect the possession of private property and the fruits of labor and industry. Any new 21st century space and lunar economy should therefore be founded on this same principle.

  15. Creating Sister Cities: An Exchange Across Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. T.; Cabezon, S. A.; Hardy, E.; Harrison, R. J.

    2008-06-01

    Sponsored by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), this project creates a cultural and educational exchange program between communities in South and North America, linking San Pedro de Atacama in Chile and Magdalena, New Mexico in the United States. Both communities have similar demographics, are in relatively undeveloped regions of high-elevation desert, and are located near major international radio astronomy research facilities. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is just 40 km east of San Pedro; the Very Large Array (VLA) is just 40 km west of Magdalena. In February 2007, the Mayor of San Pedro and two teachers visited Magdalena for two weeks; in July 2007 three teachers from Magdalena will visit San Pedro. These visits enable the communities to lay the foundation for a permanent, unique partnership. The teachers are sharing expertise and teaching methodologies for physics and astronomy. In addition to creating science education opportunities, this project offers students linguistic and cultural connections. The town of San Pedro, Chile, hosts nearly 100,000 tourists per year, and English language skills are highly valued by local students. Through exchanges enabled by email and distance conferencing, San Pedro and Magdalena students will improve English and Spanish language skills while teaching each other about science and their respective cultures. This poster describes the AUI/NRAO Sister Cities program, including the challenges of cross-cultural communication and the rewards of interpersonal exchanges between continents and cultures.

  16. Creating a Multi-axis Machining Postprocessor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Vavruška

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the postprocessor creation process. When using standard commercially available postprocessors it is often very difficult to modify its internal source code, and it is a very complex process, in many cases even impossible, to implement the newly-developed functions. It is therefore very important to have a method for creating a postprocessor for any CAM system, which allows CL data (Cutter Location data to be generated to a separate text file. The goal of our work is to verify the proposed method for creating a postprocessor. Postprocessor functions for multi-axis machiningare dealt with in this work. A file with CL data must be translated by the postprocessor into an NC program that has been customized for a specific production machine and its control system. The postprocessor is therefore verified by applications for machining free-form surfaces of complex parts, and by executing the NC programs that are generated on real machine tools. This is also presented here.

  17. Property Specification Patterns for intelligence building software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Seungsu

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, through the property specification pattern research for Modal MU(μ) logical aspects present a single framework based on the pattern of intelligence building software. In this study, broken down by state property specification pattern classification of Dwyer (S) and action (A) and was subdivided into it again strong (A) and weaknesses (E). Through these means based on a hierarchical pattern classification of the property specification pattern analysis of logical aspects Mu(μ) was applied to the pattern classification of the examples used in the actual model checker. As a result, not only can a more accurate classification than the existing classification systems were easy to create and understand the attributes specified.

  18. Creating the Perfect Umbilicus: A Systematic Review of Recent Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Walter J; Sinno, Sammy; Brownstone, Nicholas D; Mirrer, Joshua; Thanik, Vishal D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to perform an updated systematic review of the literature over the last 10 years, analyzing and comparing the many published techniques with the hope of providing plastic surgeons with a new standard in creating the perfect umbilicus in the setting of both abdominoplasty and abdominally based free-flap breast reconstruction. An initial search using the PubMed online database with the keyword "umbilicoplasty" was performed. These results were filtered to only include articles published within the last 10 years. The remaining articles were thoroughly reviewed by the authors and only those pertaining to techniques for umbilicoplasty in the setting of abdominoplasty and abdominally based free flap were included. Of the 10 unique techniques yielded by our search, 9/10 (90 %) initially incised the native umbilicus with a round, oval, or vertical ellipse pattern. Of the 9 techniques that initially perform a round incision, 4 of them (44.4 %) later modify the round umbilicus with either an inferior or superior excision to create either a "U"- or "inverted U"-shaped umbilicus. In terms of the shape of the incision made in the abdominal flap for umbilical reinsertion, the most common were either a round incision or an inverted "V" or "U," both of which accounted for 4/10 (40 %) and 3/10 (30 %), respectively. Almost all of the studies (8/10; 80 %) describe "defatting" or trimming of the subcutaneous adipose tissue around the incision to create a periumbilical concavity following inset of the umbilicus. 4/10 (40 %) of the techniques describe suturing the dermis of the umbilical skin to rectus fascia. Furthermore, 3/10 (30 %) advise that stalk plication is a necessary step to their technique. 7/9 techniques (77.8 %) preferred nondissolvable sutures for skin closure, with nylon being the most common suture material used. Only 2/9 (22.2 %) used dissolvable sutures. Although future studies are necessary, it is our hope that this systematic

  19. Creating transient cell membrane pores using a standard inkjet printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarczak, Alexander B; Shuford, Stephen O; Wood, Scott T; Deitch, Sandra; Dean, Delphine

    2012-03-16

    Bioprinting has a wide range of applications and significance, including tissue engineering, direct cell application therapies, and biosensor microfabrication. Recently, thermal inkjet printing has also been used for gene transfection. The thermal inkjet printing process was shown to temporarily disrupt the cell membranes without affecting cell viability. The transient pores in the membrane can be used to introduce molecules, which would otherwise be too large to pass through the membrane, into the cell cytoplasm. The application being demonstrated here is the use of thermal inkjet printing for the incorporation of fluorescently labeled g-actin monomers into cells. The advantage of using thermal ink-jet printing to inject molecules into cells is that the technique is relatively benign to cells. Cell viability after printing has been shown to be similar to standard cell plating methods. In addition, inkjet printing can process thousands of cells in minutes, which is much faster than manual microinjection. The pores created by printing have been shown to close within about two hours. However, there is a limit to the size of the pore created (~10 nm) with this printing technique, which limits the technique to injecting cells with small proteins and/or particles. A standard HP DeskJet 500 printer was modified to allow for cell printing. The cover of the printer was removed and the paper feed mechanism was bypassed using a mechanical lever. A stage was created to allow for placement of microscope slides and coverslips directly under the print head. Ink cartridges were opened, the ink was removed and they were cleaned prior to use with cells. The printing pattern was created using standard drawing software, which then controlled the printer through a simple print command. 3T3 fibroblasts were grown to confluence, trypsinized, and then resuspended into phosphate buffered saline with soluble fluorescently labeled g-actin monomers. The cell suspension was pipetted into the

  20. Evaporative lithographic patterning of binary colloidal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel J; Conrad, Jacinta C; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2009-12-28

    Evaporative lithography offers a promising new route for patterning a broad array of soft materials. In this approach, a mask is placed above a drying film to create regions of free and hindered evaporation, which drive fluid convection and entrained particles to regions of highest evaporative flux. We show that binary colloidal films exhibit remarkable pattern formation when subjected to a periodic evaporative landscape during drying.

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced herringbone patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcell, Erik M.; Lam, Billy; Guo, Chunlei

    2018-06-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced herringbone patterns are formed on copper (Cu). These novel periodic structures are created following s-polarized, large incident angle, femtosecond laser pulses. Forming as slanted and axially symmetric laser-induced periodic surface structures along the side walls of ablated channels, the result is a series of v-shaped structures that resemble a herringbone pattern. Fluence mapping, incident angle studies, as well as polarization studies have been conducted and provide a clear understanding of this new structure.

  2. Vertebrate Embryonic Cleavage Pattern Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasley, Andrew; Chavez, Shawn; Danilchik, Michael; Wühr, Martin; Pelegri, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The pattern of the earliest cell divisions in a vertebrate embryo lays the groundwork for later developmental events such as gastrulation, organogenesis, and overall body plan establishment. Understanding these early cleavage patterns and the mechanisms that create them is thus crucial for the study of vertebrate development. This chapter describes the early cleavage stages for species representing ray-finned fish, amphibians, birds, reptiles, mammals, and proto-vertebrate ascidians and summarizes current understanding of the mechanisms that govern these patterns. The nearly universal influence of cell shape on orientation and positioning of spindles and cleavage furrows and the mechanisms that mediate this influence are discussed. We discuss in particular models of aster and spindle centering and orientation in large embryonic blastomeres that rely on asymmetric internal pulling forces generated by the cleavage furrow for the previous cell cycle. Also explored are mechanisms that integrate cell division given the limited supply of cellular building blocks in the egg and several-fold changes of cell size during early development, as well as cytoskeletal specializations specific to early blastomeres including processes leading to blastomere cohesion. Finally, we discuss evolutionary conclusions beginning to emerge from the contemporary analysis of the phylogenetic distributions of cleavage patterns. In sum, this chapter seeks to summarize our current understanding of vertebrate early embryonic cleavage patterns and their control and evolution.

  3. Creating a sustainable energy future for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneborn, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    A joint industry approach is needed to put in place a sustainable energy system that is economically and technologically feasible. The industry sectors involved must include the renewable energy industry, energy efficiency industry and the natural gas industry. Conventional forecasts of energy futures make far less use of these industries than is economically and technically feasible. Existing forecasts make the trade off between acceptable levels of economic growth, limitation of greenhouse gases and dependence on coal and oil appear more difficult than they actually are and overlook the benefits of sustainable energy industry development. This paper outlines how national gains from carefully targeted action can exceed national losses while substantially reducing greenhouse gases and creating jobs at zero or negative costs. (author). 3 figs., 27 refs

  4. Creating innovative programs for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Patricia E; Keough, Vicki A; Armstrong, Myrna L

    2013-09-01

    Although several major national mandates advocate for a better educated workforce, this push comes at a time when the competition for faculty, financial resources, advanced technology, and students remains strong. If nurse educators are seriously considering creating a new nurse program at their school, some key points are essential during the development stage. Using the innovation frameworks from the Institute of Healthcare Improvement, from the global design firm IDEO, and from Gladwell's The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, this article examines the informal, formal, internal, and external work needed during program conceptualization, initial program exploration, resource infrastructure, support, and evaluation for an effective and innovative plan. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, MaryJoe K; Ruder, Warren C

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems. (review)

  6. Creating a false memory in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Steve; Liu, Xu; Lin, Pei-Ann; Suh, Junghyup; Pignatelli, Michele; Redondo, Roger L; Ryan, Tomás J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2013-07-26

    Memories can be unreliable. We created a false memory in mice by optogenetically manipulating memory engram-bearing cells in the hippocampus. Dentate gyrus (DG) or CA1 neurons activated by exposure to a particular context were labeled with channelrhodopsin-2. These neurons were later optically reactivated during fear conditioning in a different context. The DG experimental group showed increased freezing in the original context, in which a foot shock was never delivered. The recall of this false memory was context-specific, activated similar downstream regions engaged during natural fear memory recall, and was also capable of driving an active fear response. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to generate an internally represented and behaviorally expressed fear memory via artificial means.

  7. Creating Effective Dialogue Around Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehl, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Communicating climate change to people from diverse sectors of society has proven to be difficult in the United States. It is widely recognized that difficulties arise from a number of sources, including: basic science understanding, the psychologically affect laden content surrounding climate change, and the diversity of value systems that exist in our society. I explore ways of working with the affect that arises around climate change and describe specific methods to work with the resistance often encountered when communicating this important issue. The techniques I describe are rooted in psychology and group process and provide means for creating more effective narratives to break through the barriers to communicating climate change science. Examples are given from personal experiences in presenting climate change to diverse groups.

  8. Minkowski metrics in creating universal ranking algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ameljańczyk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a general procedure for creating the rankings of a set of objects, while the relation of preference based on any ranking function. The analysis was possible to use the ranking functions began by showing the fundamental drawbacks of commonly used functions in the form of a weighted sum. As a special case of the ranking procedure in the space of a relation, the procedure based on the notion of an ideal element and generalized Minkowski distance from the element was proposed. This procedure, presented as universal ranking algorithm, eliminates most of the disadvantages of ranking functions in the form of a weighted sum.[b]Keywords[/b]: ranking functions, preference relation, ranking clusters, categories, ideal point, universal ranking algorithm

  9. Creating Inclusive Youth Programs for LGBTQ+ Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Soule

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is vital for youth to experience inclusive programming that is welcoming. Extension has a responsibility and an obligation to provide youth with programs and spaces that are inclusive of all sexes, gender identities, gender expressions, and sexual orientations. This article provides an overview of appropriate terminology, as well as steps for creating inclusive Extension spaces and programs for youth who identify as members of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer/questioning (LGBTQ+ communities. With a focus on urban Extension audiences, this article uses accessible language, self-reflective prompts, and supporting visual aids to share lessons learned from ongoing inclusivity trainings with Extension personnel across the nation, as well as from research activities and inclusive programming.

  10. Challenging Unjust Authority and Creating a Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doona, Mary Ellen

    2017-05-01

    The emergence of the trained nurse as a new profession for women coincided with the transformation of hospitals from refuges for the sick and poor into treatment facilities. The hospital was an apt setting for learning nursing's fundamentals, but the domestic demands of the setting soon took precedence over nursing education. Nursing superintendents struggled to honor the right of pupil nurses to an education over the might of the hospital's demands. The 20th anniversary of the Trained Nurse Movement in 1893 proved the decisive moment when nursing superintendents created professional associations and gathered the nursing diaspora into a coherent force. Recourse to the law followed with nurses seeking legal validation of their authority over nursing education. Now, as then, a nurse's authority is a right that has to be protected when the might of individuals and institutions, both subtle and blatant, interferes with nurses caring for the well-being of society.

  11. Creating Visual Design and Meaningful Audience Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur; Ion Wille, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the EU Interreg funded Classical Composition Music and Experience Design project, was to rethink audience experiences and develop knowledge of applied technologies connected to classical music and live concerts. The project and its main objectives was motivated by at least thee...... conditions. The most important being 1) the development in new technology creating new expectations in audiences attending cultural events, including classical concerts, 2) resent decline in audiences attending classical music and 3) a will to strengthen relations between cultural institutions, creative...... businesses and educational institutions in the Øresund region (including the city and surroundings of Malmø and Copenhagen). Therefore the project Classical Composition Music and Experience Design focused on developing new and meaningful audience experiences where live classical music meets new digital...

  12. Creating marketing strategies for higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Białoń

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a thesis that the primary premise of creating marketing strategies for higher education institution is a three-dimensional notion of marketing. The first dimension lies in the theoretical notions of the essence of marketing, including the transactional marketing (1.0, relationship marketing (2.0 and spiritual marketing (3.0. The second dimension is formed by methods of marketing research and accurate notions of marketing, while the third are channels of marketing information. Harmonizing these three dimensions is a precondition for effective marketing. Among other conditions for effective strategies there are: aligning goals of the chosen strategy with the mission of higher education institution, correct choice of targeted segments of the market and of marketing tools. The article also gives a sample classification of marketing strategies based on these criteria, with emphasis on the fact, that every higher education institution employs its own strategy.

  13. How to create high-performing teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Samuel M

    2010-02-01

    This article is intended to discuss inspirational aspects on how to lead a high-performance team. Cogent topics discussed include how to hire staff through methods of "topgrading" with reference to Geoff Smart and "getting the right people on the bus" referencing Jim Collins' work. In addition, once the staff is hired, this article covers how to separate the "eagles from the ducks" and how to inspire one's staff by creating the right culture with suggestions for further reading by Don Miguel Ruiz (The four agreements) and John Maxwell (21 Irrefutable laws of leadership). In addition, Simon Sinek's concept of "Start with Why" is elaborated to help a leader know what the core element should be with any superior culture. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  14. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, MaryJoe K; Ruder, Warren C

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  15. Creating an interactive environment for pediatric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Armas Weber, D; Easley-Rosenberg, A

    2001-01-01

    An interactive assessment room (IAR) was conceived to explore the effect of a dynamic environment on the pediatric assessment process and subsequent individualized goal development. Selection of a central theme, creation of a multipurpose space, provision of multisensory experiences, maximization of environmental affordances, provision of effective motivators and opportunities for goal attainment, and facilitation of a transdisciplinary assessment were identified as integral to designing the IAR. A central farm theme was selected to create five task-oriented activity stations. The IAR offered a creative assessment environment for transdisciplinary, practice-based application of current motor development and behavioral models. In addition, the IAR facilitated exploratory play essential to promoting the client's optimal performance to arrive at the development of appropriate treatment goals.

  16. Consistency between recognition and behavior creates consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Inaba

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available What is consciousness? Is it possible to create consciousness mechanically? Various studies have been performed in the fields of psychology and cerebral science to answer these questions. As of yet, however, no researchers have proposed a model capable of explaining the mind-body problem described by Descartes or replicating a consciousness as advanced as that of human beings. Ancient people believed that the consciousness resided in a Homunculus, a human in miniature who lived in the brain. It is no mystery that the ancients came up with such an idea; for consciousness has always been veiled in mystery, beyond the reach of our explorative powers. We can assert, however, that consciousness does not "live" in us, but "exists" in us. Insofar as the processes occurring inside the human brain are a product of the physical activity of the neurons that reside there, we believe that it should be possible to define consciousness systematically.

  17. Tissue loading created during spinal manipulation in comparison to loading created by passive spinal movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Martha; Kawchuk, Gregory N; Vette, Albert H; Goldsmith, Peter; Prasad, Narasimha

    2016-12-01

    Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) creates health benefits for some while for others, no benefit or even adverse events. Understanding these differential responses is important to optimize patient care and safety. Toward this, characterizing how loads created by SMT relate to those created by typical motions is fundamental. Using robotic testing, it is now possible to make these comparisons to determine if SMT generates unique loading scenarios. In 12 porcine cadavers, SMT and passive motions were applied to the L3/L4 segment and the resulting kinematics tracked. The L3/L4 segment was removed, mounted in a parallel robot and kinematics of SMT and passive movements replayed robotically. The resulting forces experienced by L3/L4 were collected. Overall, SMT created both significantly greater and smaller loads compared to passive motions, with SMT generating greater anterioposterior peak force (the direction of force application) compared to all passive motions. In some comparisons, SMT did not create significantly different loads in the intact specimen, but did so in specific spinal tissues. Despite methodological differences between studies, SMT forces and loading rates fell below published injury values. Future studies are warranted to understand if loading scenarios unique to SMT confer its differential therapeutic effects.

  18. Winter barley mutants created in the Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayats, O.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Increasing fodder and protein production is one of the objectives of the development of agriculture in Ukraine. Higher productivity of fodder crops, due to new highly productive varieties, is the means to meet this aim. Winter barley is an important crop for fodder purposes. The climate of the Ukraine is favourable for growing this crop. The areas used for the growth of winter barley are however, small (500,000-550,000 ha) and there is a shortage of good quality varieties. The main aim of the work was therefore to create new varieties of highly productive winter barley, of good quality. The new varieties and mutation lines of winter barley were created under the influence of water solutions of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMH - 0,012, 0,005%), N-nitroso-N-ethylurea (NEH - 0,05; 0.025; 0,012%) ethyleneimine (EI - 0,02; 0,01; 0,005%) on winter barley seeds of the varieties of local and foreign selections. On the basis of many years of investigations (1984-94) the following mutations were described: hard-grained, winter-hardiness, earliness, middle-maturity, late-maturity, wide and large leaves, narrow leaves, multinodal, great number of leaves, great number of flowers, strong stem (lodging resistant), tallness, semi-dwarfness, dwarfness, and high productivity. Particularly valuable are mutants with high productivity of green bulk. Their potential yield is 70 t/ha. As a result of the work two varieties of winter barley 'Shyrokolysty' and 'Kormovy' were released into the State register of plant varieties of the Ukraine. The other valuable mutant genotypes are used in cross breeding programmes. (author)

  19. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  20. Face recognition system and method using face pattern words and face pattern bytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-12-23

    The present invention provides a novel system and method for identifying individuals and for face recognition utilizing facial features for face identification. The system and method of the invention comprise creating facial features or face patterns called face pattern words and face pattern bytes for face identification. The invention also provides for pattern recognitions for identification other than face recognition. The invention further provides a means for identifying individuals based on visible and/or thermal images of those individuals by utilizing computer software implemented by instructions on a computer or computer system and a computer readable medium containing instructions on a computer system for face recognition and identification.

  1. EVALUATION OF CAREER PATTERNS OF ACADEMIC STAFF IN A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-31

    Jan 31, 2013 ... Keywords Absorbing Markov Chain; Academic Staff; Career Pattern; Grade; Faculty. INTRODUCTION ... faculty is created from the then Faculty of Science ..... who already have PhD with cognate teaching and research ...

  2. Exotic high activity surface patterns in PtAu nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    of the truncated octahedron cluster motif. Exotic surface patterns are obtained particularly for Pt-rich compositions, where Pt atoms are being surrounded by Au atoms. These surface arrangements boost the catalytic activity by creating a large number of active

  3. CREATING COMPETITIVE ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY USING THE FUNNEL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Stefanovska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the highly competitive environment of the 21st century, organizations must be able to effectively change through the application of effective strategies, quickly and in a way that the competitors will be unable to imitate. Therefore, the essential question in any organization is how to achieve and maintain competitive advantage. In this regard, strategic leaders should first logically consider what will bring a substantial advantage to the organization in a long-term, and then start with the process of creating the strategy. To achieve this, researchers in the field of managerial issues offer a concept of continuous process that begins by looking at the customers pattern, through defining the competitive environment and the place of business in it and finally categorizing several strategic business conditions, as a precondition for election and creation of a competitive strategy. This process can be presented as the “funnel for selection of competitive strategy”, in whose widest part we can put the customer matrix, in the middle part we can place definitions of the business outlook of the business and the position of the organization in those perspectives. In order to implement the "Funnel method" of strategic planning teams we need accurate, timely and relevant information based on which we can bring appropriate organizational strategy. The subject of this paper is displaying the Funnel method for selection of the competitive strategy, and presentation of the situation in some of the organizations in the Pelagonija region, related to the way and the information used to create organizational strategies through the Funnel method.

  4. Selective functionalization of patterned glass surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploetz, E.; Visser, B.; Slingenbergh, W.; Evers, K.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Pei, Y. T.; Feringa, B. L.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Cordes, T.; van Dorp, W. F.

    2014-01-01

    Tailored writing and specific positioning of molecules on nanostructures is a key step for creating functional materials and nano-optical devices, or interfaces for synthetic machines in various applications. We present a novel approach for the selective functionalization of patterned glass surfaces

  5. Designing interfaces patterns for effective interaction design

    CERN Document Server

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2005-01-01

    This convenient resource offers advice on creating user-friendly interface designs--whether they're delivered on the Web, a CD, or a smart" devices like a cell phone. Solutions to common UI design problems are expressed as a collection of patterns--each one containing concrete examples, recommendations, and warnings. Intended for designers with basic UI design knowledge

  6. Pattern activation/recognition theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Castel, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    In his 2012 book How to Create a Mind, Ray Kurzweil defines a "Pattern Recognition Theory of Mind" that states that the brain uses millions of pattern recognizers, plus modules to check, organize, and augment them. In this article, I further the theory to go beyond pattern recognition and include also pattern activation, thus encompassing both sensory and motor functions. In addition, I treat checking, organizing, and augmentation as patterns of patterns instead of separate modules, therefore handling them the same as patterns in general. Henceforth I put forward a unified theory I call "Pattern Activation/Recognition Theory of Mind." While the original theory was based on hierarchical hidden Markov models, this evolution is based on their precursor: stochastic grammars. I demonstrate that a class of self-describing stochastic grammars allows for unifying pattern activation, recognition, organization, consistency checking, metaphor, and learning, into a single theory that expresses patterns throughout. I have implemented the model as a probabilistic programming language specialized in activation/recognition grammatical and neural operations. I use this prototype to compute and present diagrams for each stochastic grammar and corresponding neural circuit. I then discuss the theory as it relates to artificial network developments, common coding, neural reuse, and unity of mind, concluding by proposing potential paths to validation.

  7. Food web heterogeneity and succession in created saltmarshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, M C; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Whitcraft, CR; Rismondo, A.; McMillan, P.; Gonzales, J P; Levin, L A

    2015-01-01

    1. Ecological restoration must achieve functional as well as structural recovery. Functional metrics for reestablishment of trophic interactions can be used to complement traditional monitoring of structural attributes. In addition, topographic effects on food web structure provide added information within a restoration context; often, created sites may require spatial heterogeneity to effectively match structure and function of natural habitats. 2. We addressed both of these issues in our study of successional development of benthic food web structure, with focus on bottom–up driven changes in macroinvertebrate consumer assemblages in the salt marshes of the Venice Lagoon, Italy. We combined quantified estimates of the changing community composition with stable isotope data (13C:12C and 15N:14N) to compare the general trophic structure between created (2–14 years) marshes and reference sites and along topographic elevation gradients within salt marshes. 3. Macrofaunal invertebrate consumers exhibited local, habitat-specific trophic patterns. Stable isotope-based trophic structure changed with increasing marsh age, in particular with regards to mid-elevation (Salicornia) habitats. In young marshes, the mid-elevation consumer signatures resembled those of unvegetated ponds. The mid elevation of older and natural marshes had a more distinct Salicornia-zone food web, occasionally resembling that of the highest (Sarcocornia-dominated) elevation. In summary, this indicates that primary producers and availability of vascular plant detritus structure consumer trophic interactions and the flow of carbon. 4. Functionally different consumers, subsurface-feeding detritivores (Oligochaeta) and surface grazers (Hydrobia sp.), showed distinct but converging trajectories of isotopic change over time, indicating that successional development may be asymmetric between ‘brown’ (detrital) guilds and ‘green’ (grazing) guilds in the food web. 5. Synthesis and applications

  8. Dancing Lights: Creating the Aurora Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. L.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Science tells a story about our world, our existence, our history, and the larger environment our planet occupies. Bearing this in mind, we created a series of lessons for 3rd-5th grades using a cross-disciplinary approach to teaching about the aurora by incorporating stories, photos, movies, and geography into the science in order to paint a broad picture and answer the question, “why do we care?” The fundamental backbone of the program is literacy. Students write and illustrate fiction and non-fiction work, poetry, and brochures that solidify both language arts skills and science content. In a time when elementary teachers relegate science to less than one hour per week, we have developed a novel science program that can be easily integrated with other topics during the typical school day to increase the amount of science taught in a school year. We are inspiring students to take an interest in the natural world with this program, a stepping-stone for larger things.

  9. When and how to create strategic alliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsvold, C.

    1994-01-01

    As oil prices remain flat and discoveries become more costly, the relationships between suppliers and operators are changing. Arms-length, unit pricing buying practices remain the norm for many buyers, but others have identified advantages of forming alliances that make greater use of the suppliers' capabilities. Recently, operators and the service industry have started to evolve a new culture that provides value-added solutions in an incentive environment. coupled with long-term risk-sharing or partnering arrangements, the potential advantages to both the operator and supplier are clear. An alliance is a long-term commitment between the operator and one or more supplier organizations, formed to achieve well-defined project objectives in a way that is beneficial to all alliance partners. Alliances take many forms and are adapted to meet the needs of the project. Successful alliances are characterized by trust, common goals and open communication. They build on the efficiencies, capabilities and strengths each partner brings to the relationship. The nine steps to creating a successful alliance are described

  10. Creating energy citizenship through material participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryghaug, Marianne; Skjølsvold, Tomas Moe; Heidenreich, Sara

    2018-04-01

    Transitions towards low-carbon energy systems will be comprehensive and demanding, requiring substantial public support. One important contribution from STS is to highlight the roles of citizens and public engagement. Until recently, energy users have often been treated as customers and passive market actors, or as recipients of technology at the margins of centralized systems. With respect to the latter role, critical or hesitant public action has been explained in terms of NIMBYism and knowledge deficits. This article focuses on the production of energy citizenship when considering public participation in low-carbon energy transitions. We draw upon the theory of 'material participation' to highlight how introducing and using emergent energy technologies may create new energy practices. We analyze an ongoing introduction of new material objects, highlighting the way these technologies can be seen as material interventions co-constructing temporalities of new and sustainable practices. We argue that artefacts such as the electric car, the smart meter and photovoltaic panels may become objects of participation and engagement, and that the introduction of such technologies may foster material participation and energy citizenship. The paper concludes with a discussion about the role of policies for low-carbon energy transitions on the making of energy citizenship, as well as limits of introducing a materially based energy citizenship.

  11. Creating a Masters in Numeracy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Gaze

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Master of Science in Numeracy program at Alfred University received full approval from the New York State Education Department (NYSED in May of 2007. This first-of-its-kind program seeks to provide teachers at all levels, from across the curriculum, the skills, and more importantly the confidence, to introduce relevant quantitative concepts in their own disciplines. Created to be a complement of the MS Ed. in Literacy, the 30-hour MS in Numeracy program consists of four required core courses (Teaching Numeracy, Teaching with Data, Assessment and Learning Theories in Numeracy, and Doing Science and Numeracy, five electives from a list of numeracy and literacy courses, and a Masters project. The program graduated its first student in May 2008 and three more since then. Major challenges for the program have included the uncertain (i.e., by-application connection between an MS and licensure (in contrast to the automatic professional certification for MS Ed. degrees and the small number of faculty involved in teaching the numeracy courses. The current status of the program is questionable as the person (the author who taught the first three core courses has left the University and has not yet been replaced. Even so, I believe this MS in Numeracy program offers a potentially useful example of a strategy to enhance the spread of QL through teacher preparation.

  12. Creating the optimized international marketing mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubor Aleksandar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the international practice of Serbian companies still dominant approach is based on traditional foreign trade approach, which in the significant dimension ballast effective inclusion of domestic companies in the contemporary business. Such practice is a result of the modality of international trading evolved and stimulated recently including long lasting period of self managing socialism-business as well international orientation in trading was originated by the state support, which procured in the edification of so-called national corporations as a chief exporter. Long-time existing of that modality of the international trading procured in the shrinking and limitation possibilities for comprehensive development of the international orientation of domestic i.e local companies, which is an argument of objectively difficult international position of Serbian firms in the moment. Paper discuss different issues including assessment that incoming presence of regional or international investors on the domestic market will proffer possibilities for enhancement a domestic management and marketing know - how among others. So, this is a way how local management circles could make substantial progress in creating the optimized international marketing mix within domestic companies following on-going business experience.

  13. Creating cultures of excellence: Strategies and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mintrom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research findings on effective support for learning, the development of expertise, and the psychology of success suggest that the pursuit of excellence is teachable. Within the emerging field of research and practice termed “the scholarship of teaching and learning,” considerable effort has been made to document the practices of teachers who, by various measures, have been deemed excellent. In contrast, no effort has been made to codify how students can be trained to self-consciously build behaviors that generate excellent outcomes. This article reports on a multi-year effort to create cultures of excellence among cohorts of graduate students. A statistical analysis of subsequent student performance on a significant, related task indicates that explicitly promoting a culture of excellence among course participants can have a positive and sustained impact on their individual practices. Comments from subsequent student reflections further support this claim. The teaching strategies reported here could be refined, replicated, and reinvented to good effect across higher education. They are also of special relevance to those delivering professional development training to early- and mid-career professionals.

  14. Creating a Universe, a Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Johnson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Space is something. Space inherently contains laws of nature: universal rules (mathematics, space dimensions, types of forces, types of fields, and particle species, laws (relativity, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism and symmetries (Lorentz, Gauge, and symmetry breaking. We have significant knowledge about these laws of nature because all our scientific theories assume their presence. Their existence is critical for developing either a unique theory of our universe or more speculative multiverse theories. Scientists generally ignore the laws of nature because they “are what they are” and because visualizing different laws of nature challenges the imagination. This article defines a conceptual model separating space (laws of nature from the universe’s energy source (initial conditions and expansion (big bang. By considering the ramifications of changing the laws of nature, initial condition parameters, and two variables in the big bang theory, the model demonstrates that traditional fine tuning is not the whole story when creating a universe. Supporting the model, space and “nothing” are related to the laws of nature, mathematics and multiverse possibilities. Speculation on the beginning of time completes the model.

  15. Dental practice websites: creating a Web presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Syrene A; Forrest, Jane L

    2002-07-01

    Web technology provides an opportunity for dentists to showcase their practice philosophy, quality of care, office setting, and staff in a creative manner. Having a Website provides a practice with innovative and cost-effective communications and marketing tools for current and potential patients who use the Internet. The main benefits of using a Website to promote one's practice are: Making office time more productive, tasks more timely, follow-up less necessary Engaging patients in an interactive and visual learning process Providing online forms and procedure examples for patients Projecting a competent and current image Tracking the usage of Web pages. Several options are available when considering the development of a Website. These options range in cost based on customization of the site and ongoing support services, such as site updates, technical assistance, and Web usage statistics. In most cases, Websites are less expensive than advertising in the phone book. Options in creating a Website include building one's own, employing a company that offers Website templates, and employing a company that offers customized sites. These development options and benefits will continue to grow as individuals access the Web and more information and sites become available.

  16. Creating conditions for cooperative learning: Basic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ševkušić-Mandić Slavica G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a large number of research evidence speak out in favor of cooperative learning, its effectiveness in teaching does not depend only on teacher’s and students’ enthusiasm and willingness to work in such a manner. Creating cooperative situations in learning demands a serious preparation and engagement on the part of teacher who is structuring various aspects of work in the classroom. Although there exist a large number of models and techniques of cooperative learning, which vary in the way in which students work together, in the structure of learning tasks as well as in the degree to which cooperative efforts of students are coupled with competition among groups, some elements should be present in the structure of conditions irrespective of the type of group work in question. Potential effects of cooperation are not likely to emerge unless teachers apply five basic elements of cooperative structure: 1. structuring of the learning task and students’ positive interdependence, 2. individual responsibility, 3. upgrading of "face to face" interaction, 4. training of students’ social skills, and 5. evaluation of group processes. The paper discusses various strategies for establishing the mentioned elements and concrete examples for teaching practice are provided, which should be of assistance to teachers for as much successful cooperative learning application as possible in work with children.

  17. Leveraging Metadata to Create Interactive Images... Today!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Robert L.; Squires, G. K.; Llamas, J.; Rosenthal, C.; Brinkworth, C.; Fay, J.

    2011-01-01

    The image gallery for NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has been newly rebuilt to fully support the Astronomy Visualization Metadata (AVM) standard to create a new user experience both on the website and in other applications. We encapsulate all the key descriptive information for a public image, including color representations and astronomical and sky coordinates and make it accessible in a user-friendly form on the website, but also embed the same metadata within the image files themselves. Thus, images downloaded from the site will carry with them all their descriptive information. Real-world benefits include display of general metadata when such images are imported into image editing software (e.g. Photoshop) or image catalog software (e.g. iPhoto). More advanced support in Microsoft's WorldWide Telescope can open a tagged image after it has been downloaded and display it in its correct sky position, allowing comparison with observations from other observatories. An increasing number of software developers are implementing AVM support in applications and an online image archive for tagged images is under development at the Spitzer Science Center. Tagging images following the AVM offers ever-increasing benefits to public-friendly imagery in all its standard forms (JPEG, TIFF, PNG). The AVM standard is one part of the Virtual Astronomy Multimedia Project (VAMP); http://www.communicatingastronomy.org

  18. Creating healthy work environments: a strategic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Bonnie J

    2010-01-01

    Although I find Graham Lowe and Ben Chan's logic model and work environment metrics thought provoking, a healthy work environment framework must be more comprehensive and consider the addition of recommended diagnostic tools, vehicles to deliver the necessary change and a sustainability strategy that allows for the tweaking and refinement of ideas. Basic structure is required to frame and initiate an effective process, while allowing creativity and enhancements to be made by organizations as they learn. I support the construction of a suggested Canadian health sector framework for measuring the health of an organization, but I feel that organizations need to have some freedom in that design and the ability to incorporate their own indicators within the established proven drivers. Reflecting on my organization's experience with large-scale transformation efforts, I find that emotional intelligence along with formal leadership development and front-line engagement in Lean process improvement activities are essential for creating healthy work environments that produce the balanced set of outcomes listed in my hospital's Balanced Scorecard.

  19. Creating Affording Situations: Coaching through Animate Objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, Chris; Khattab, Ahmad; Russell, Martin; Hermsdörfer, Joachim; Wing, Alan

    2017-10-11

    We explore the ways in which animate objects can be used to cue actions as part of coaching in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). In this case, changing the appearance or behavior of a physical object is intended to cue actions which are appropriate for a given context. The context is defined by the intention of the users, the state of the objects and the tasks for which these objects can be used. We present initial design prototypes and simple user trials which explore the impact of different cues on activity. It is shown that raising the handle of a jug, for example, not only cues the act of picking up the jug but also encourages use of the hand adjacent to the handle; that combinations of lights (on the objects) and auditory cues influence activity through reducing uncertainty; and that cueing can challenge pre-learned action sequences. We interpret these results in terms of the idea that the animate objects can be used to create affording situations, and discuss implications of this work to support relearning of ADL following brain damage or injury, such as might arise following a stroke.

  20. Creating Affording Situations: Coaching through Animate Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Baber

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the ways in which animate objects can be used to cue actions as part of coaching in Activities of Daily Living (ADL. In this case, changing the appearance or behavior of a physical object is intended to cue actions which are appropriate for a given context. The context is defined by the intention of the users, the state of the objects and the tasks for which these objects can be used. We present initial design prototypes and simple user trials which explore the impact of different cues on activity. It is shown that raising the handle of a jug, for example, not only cues the act of picking up the jug but also encourages use of the hand adjacent to the handle; that combinations of lights (on the objects and auditory cues influence activity through reducing uncertainty; and that cueing can challenge pre-learned action sequences. We interpret these results in terms of the idea that the animate objects can be used to create affording situations, and discuss implications of this work to support relearning of ADL following brain damage or injury, such as might arise following a stroke.

  1. Rapid Gorge Formation in an Artificially Created Waterfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, L.; Mather, A. E.; Stokes, M.; Munoz Martin, A.

    2014-12-01

    A number of studies have examined rates of gorge formation, nick point retreat, and the controls on those rates via bedrock erodibility, the effectiveness of bedrock erosion mechanisms and the role of hillslope processes. Most findings are based on conceptual / empirical models or long term landscape analysis; but studies of recent quantifiable events are scarce yet highly valuable. Here we present expert eye witness account and quantitative survey of large and rapid fluvial erosion events that occurred over an artificially created waterfall at a spillway mouth. In 6 years a ~270 m long, ~100 m deep and ~100 to 160 m wide canyon was carved, and ~1.58 x106 m3 of granite bedrock was removed from the spillway site. Available flow data indicates that the erosion took place under unremarkable flood discharge conditions. The analysis of historic topographic maps enables the reconstruction of the former topography and successive erosion events, enabling the quantification of bedrock erosion amounts, and rates. Analysis of bedrock erodibility and discontinuity patterns demonstrates that the bedrock is mechanically strong, and that similar rock strength and fracture patterns are found throughout the region. It is apparent that structural pre-conditioning through fracture density and orientation in relation to flow and slope direction is of paramount importance in the gorge development. The presented example provides an exceptional opportunity for studying the evolution process of a bedrock canyon and to precisely measure the rate of bedrock channel erosion over a six year period. Results illustrate the highly episodic nature of the erosion and highlight several key observations for the adjustability of bedrock rivers. The observations have implications for the efficiency of bedrock erosion and raise important questions about incision rates, driving mechanisms and timescale assumptions' in models of landscape change.

  2. Creating Active Device Materials for Nanoelectronics Using Block Copolymer Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian Cummins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The prolonged and aggressive nature of scaling to augment the performance of silicon integrated circuits (ICs and the technical challenges and costs associated with this has led to the study of alternative materials that can use processing schemes analogous to semiconductor manufacturing. We examine the status of recent efforts to develop active device elements using nontraditional lithography in this article, with a specific focus on block copolymer (BCP feature patterning. An elegant route is demonstrated using directed self-assembly (DSA of BCPs for the fabrication of aligned tungsten trioxide (WO3 nanowires towards nanoelectronic device application. The strategy described avoids conventional lithography practices such as optical patterning as well as repeated etching and deposition protocols and opens up a new approach for device development. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL silsesquioxane (SSQ-based trenches were utilized in order to align a cylinder forming poly(styrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine (PS-b-P4VP BCP soft template. We outline WO3 nanowire fabrication using a spin-on process and the symmetric current-voltage characteristics of the resulting Ti/Au (5 nm/45 nm contacted WO3 nanowires. The results highlight the simplicity of a solution-based approach that allows creating active device elements and controlling the chemistry of specific self-assembling building blocks. The process enables one to dictate nanoscale chemistry with an unprecedented level of sophistication, forging the way for next-generation nanoelectronic devices. We lastly outline views and future research studies towards improving the current platform to achieve the desired device performance.

  3. Creating Active Device Materials for Nanoelectronics Using Block Copolymer Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Cian; Bell, Alan P; Morris, Michael A

    2017-09-30

    The prolonged and aggressive nature of scaling to augment the performance of silicon integrated circuits (ICs) and the technical challenges and costs associated with this has led to the study of alternative materials that can use processing schemes analogous to semiconductor manufacturing. We examine the status of recent efforts to develop active device elements using nontraditional lithography in this article, with a specific focus on block copolymer (BCP) feature patterning. An elegant route is demonstrated using directed self-assembly (DSA) of BCPs for the fabrication of aligned tungsten trioxide (WO₃) nanowires towards nanoelectronic device application. The strategy described avoids conventional lithography practices such as optical patterning as well as repeated etching and deposition protocols and opens up a new approach for device development. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) silsesquioxane (SSQ)-based trenches were utilized in order to align a cylinder forming poly(styrene)- block -poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS- b -P4VP) BCP soft template. We outline WO₃ nanowire fabrication using a spin-on process and the symmetric current-voltage characteristics of the resulting Ti/Au (5 nm/45 nm) contacted WO₃ nanowires. The results highlight the simplicity of a solution-based approach that allows creating active device elements and controlling the chemistry of specific self-assembling building blocks. The process enables one to dictate nanoscale chemistry with an unprecedented level of sophistication, forging the way for next-generation nanoelectronic devices. We lastly outline views and future research studies towards improving the current platform to achieve the desired device performance.

  4. Non-coaxial-based microwave ablation antennas for creating symmetric and asymmetric coagulation zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtashami, Yahya; Luyen, Hung; Hagness, Susan C.; Behdad, Nader

    2018-06-01

    We present an investigation of a new class of microwave ablation (MWA) antennas capable of producing axially symmetric or asymmetric heating patterns. The antenna design is based on a dipole fed by a balanced parallel-wire transmission line. The angle and direction of the deployed dipole arms are used to control the heating pattern. We analyzed the specific absorption rate and temperature profiles using electromagnetic and thermal simulations. Two prototypes were fabricated and tested in ex vivo ablation experiments: one was designed to produce symmetric heating patterns and the other was designed to generate asymmetric heating patterns. Both fabricated prototypes exhibited good impedance matching and produced localized coagulation zones as predicted by the simulations. The prototype operating in porcine muscle created an ˜10 cm3 symmetric ablation zone after 10 min of ablation with a power level of 18 W. The prototype operating in egg white created an ˜4 cm3 asymmetric ablation zone with a directionality ratio of 40% after 5 min of ablation with a power level of 25 W. The proposed MWA antenna design shows promise for minimally invasive treatment of tumors in various clinical scenarios where, depending on the situation, a symmetric or an asymmetric heating pattern may be needed.

  5. Peculiarities of Creating Foreign Students’ Lexical Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aigul Eskermesovna Sadenova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Teaching of vocabulary includes several aspects of teaching content: linguistic, methodological and psychological. Teaching of vocabulary is a process which is inextricably entwined with understanding relations between new words and phonetic and grammar aspects of the language. On the one hand, simultaneous learning of two languages complicates the tasks set to the students, but, on the other hand, it simplifies the process. The complexity is in the scope of vocabulary to be remembered, as well as in the differences between grammar structures used in Russian and Kazakh. The simplification is in the fact that students are fully aware that lexical competence is formed gradually, and that every language has its lexical base required at the initial stage, and that such base is to be developed for mastering a specific language. Before identifying the methods of vocabulary semantization in the course of teaching a language to foreign students, students shall be offered active vocabulary, used to express their ideas orally and in written form, and passive vocabulary, used to perceive oral and written information. It is not possible to teach semantics only. It is necessary to create paradigmatic, syntactic and associative relations. The formation of lexical skills is connected with the solidity of vocabulary retention. In order to ensure reinforcement of the vocabulary learnt, the students shall be offered exercises contributing to the development of their skills of using vocabulary in listening, speaking, reading and writing. All above mentioned types of vocabulary semantization constitute a unified whole. Different ways of semantization are set forth for methodological purposes, to facilitate the achievement of the desired result. Translation and non-translation techniques for vocabulary presentation, as well as some tips and exercises, are given. The use of basic vocabulary at elementary and advanced levels is suggested. Certain methods for the

  6. Creating Porcine Biomedical Models Through Recombineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence B. Schook

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genomics provide genetic information from humans and other mammals (mouse, rat, dog and primates traditionally used as models as well as new candidates (pigs and cattle. In addition, linked enabling technologies, such as transgenesis and animal cloning, provide innovative ways to design and perform experiments to dissect complex biological systems. Exploitation of genomic information overcomes the traditional need to choose naturally occurring models. Thus, investigators can utilize emerging genomic knowledge and tools to create relevant animal models. This approach is referred to as reverse genetics. In contrast to ‘forward genetics’, in which gene(s responsible for a particular phenotype are identified by positional cloning (phenotype to genotype, the ‘reverse genetics’ approach determines the function of a gene and predicts the phenotype of a cell, tissue, or organism (genotype to phenotype. The convergence of classical and reverse genetics, along with genomics, provides a working definition of a ‘genetic model’ organism (3. The recent construction of phenotypic maps defining quantitative trait loci (QTL in various domesticated species provides insights into how allelic variations contribute to phenotypic diversity. Targeted chromosomal regions are characterized by the construction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC contigs to isolate and characterize genes contributing towards phenotypic variation. Recombineering provides a powerful methodology to harvest genetic information responsible for phenotype. Linking recombineering with gene-targeted homologous recombination, coupled with nuclear transfer (NT technology can provide ‘clones’ of genetically modified animals.

  7. Creating a Lunar EVA Work Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brand N.; Howard, Robert; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Smitherman, David

    2009-01-01

    A work envelope has been defined for weightless Extravehicular Activity (EVA) based on the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), but there is no equivalent for planetary operations. The weightless work envelope is essential for planning all EVA tasks because it determines the location of removable parts, making sure they are within reach and visibility of the suited crew member. In addition, using the envelope positions the structural hard points for foot restraints that allow placing both hands on the job and provides a load path for reacting forces. EVA operations are always constrained by time. Tasks are carefully planned to ensure the crew has enough breathing oxygen, cooling water, and battery power. Planning first involves computers using a virtual work envelope to model tasks, next suited crew members in a simulated environment refine the tasks. For weightless operations, this process is well developed, but planetary EVA is different and no work envelope has been defined. The primary difference between weightless and planetary work envelopes is gravity. It influences anthropometry, horizontal and vertical mobility, and reaction load paths and introduces effort into doing "overhead" work. Additionally, the use of spacesuits other than the EMU, and their impacts on range of motion, must be taken into account. This paper presents the analysis leading to a concept for a planetary EVA work envelope with emphasis on lunar operations. There is some urgency in creating this concept because NASA has begun building and testing development hardware for the lunar surface, including rovers, habitats and cargo off-loading equipment. Just as with microgravity operations, a lunar EVA work envelope is needed to guide designers in the formative stages of the program with the objective of avoiding difficult and costly rework.

  8. Creating the environment for innovation and entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Lane

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Innovation generation and diffusion have been widely acknowledged as hinging upon the complex set of institutional, social and psychological processes. The objective of the paper is to examine the need and possibilities of creating the environment for innovation and entrepreneurship in the university setting. In particular, this paper focuses on interrelationships and roles of specific groups of university members: the administration, faculty and students. The study is exploratory in character, based on observations and literature review. It starts with defining modern-day university as home of innovation emphasizing the need for interdisciplinary and interinstitutional approaches. The paper discusses the need of faculty to learn to reach across the institution and beyond to work with others, working across silos of academia and meeting with others from very different disciplines. Second it examines ways the university administration support can encourage innovation among its faculty, staff and students. Third, it draws on existing research to identify key dimensions of change. The study proposes pathways that may activate the mechanisms of climate and infrastructure for innovation. The proposed dimensions and analyzed areas of change can potentially form the foundations of a framework for universities seeking to diagnose their existing condition and use such findings to enhance the generation and diffusion of innovation. The university quest to break down the barriers and reach across the disciplines to generate innovation takes commitment which needs to be coupled with administrative change such as the reward structures lined up with the vision and changes regarding the teaching and learning practices as well as the physical environment for the classes, the class rooms and meeting spaces of students and faculty.

  9. Employee satisfaction: creating a positive work force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M

    1998-01-01

    In the early 1990s, El Camino Hospital (ECH) streamlined its operations in order to remain competitive. In 1992, the hospital's District Board voted to turn the hospital's management over to a nonprofit company and it became an integrated delivery system (IDS). Hospital employees continued to suffer as their work and work schedules changed in ongoing efforts by the new administration to streamline. Finally, in early 1997, the IDS, Camino Healthcare, was dissolved. The director of radiology and radiation oncology services became aware of increasing employee problems, from high turnover rates and increased absenteeism, to morale and productivity issues. Employees also worried about job redesign, re-engineering and a lack of clear direction and expectations from department leadership. The director of the department created a task force to respond to the needs of staff members. With so much anger directed at department leadership, supervisory staff were not included in the task force. The task force worked first to identify rumors and innuendos and followed with a plan to resolve such issues. The second step was to agree to focus on issues that they could change and to let go of those they couldn't. They selected five priority issues or concerns. The group met weekly and made progress by replacing negative talk and attitudes with positive ones. Meanwhile, the director researched employee satisfaction issues so she would be prepared to discuss such issues and concerns with employees. She focused on a common theme, of having a personal mission or goal for one's self. She encouraged staff members to be aware of their own behavior when communicating with others. Although several informal surveys proved there was still much work to be done, there was positive response--a light at the end of the long tunnel.

  10. DOES CIVIL SOCIETY CREATE SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauca Oana

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether civil society itself can enhance or stimulate the creation of social entrepreneurs, by studying the traits of the civil society and the various definitions attributed to it. The main question that the paper wants to answer to is Does civil society create social entrepreneurs and the main approach used in this research paper is the theoretical one. By studying existing articles and books on the topic, the paper tries to emphasize the various dimensions that civil society can embrace, as pictured by various authors, as well as how these dimensions can relate to social entrepreneurs and the emergence of social businesses. The paper is not meant to be a breakthrough in the field, but rather to launch a question that is related to very important topics these days, social entrepreneurship, social innovation, social businesses and their connection to a very much debated topic-civil society. The paper is work-in progress and wants to stimulate research regarding the search of the sources of social entrepreneurship, in order to analyze them and better establish them as incubators for the future. It wants to be of use to whoever is researching the concepts illustrated above, as well as for those who want to get in touch with the new buzz words of the academic and entrepreneurial fields. The hereby paper stands, as previously stated, in a theoretical framework and the findings represent a mere analysis of the cause-effect relationship between the characteristics of civil society and those of social entrepreneurs. However, we are of the opinion that it can be a very good starting point for the ones interested in the domain, to analyze more sources of social entrepreneurship or further refine the answer to the question addressed in this article.

  11. Breaking ground creating a greener, healthier city : conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This regional conference focused on urban green space issues with recommendations for new directions and strategic actions for A greener, healthier urban community. The conference theme was a green infrastructure for Calgary, which includes benefits such as less automobile emissions and improved public health. Urban land trusts were also examined as protection and acquisition tools. Participants submitted a recommendation to create a task force to examine water management with emphasis on adopting a watershed approach to water systems. Other topics of discussion included the greening of urban village parks as a vital ecological component to urban settings. Innovative techniques to make use of open space as Calgary grows, were also presented. The green infrastructure framework is based on minimizing the consumption of essential natural assets while developing a more efficient use of urban space. The pattern of growth is more significant than the amount of growth in determining the level and efficiency of resource use and traffic congestion. The many opportunities, incentives and obstacles to sustainable development were presented. refs., figs

  12. Microbial bebop: creating music from complex dynamics in microbial ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Larsen

    Full Text Available In order for society to make effective policy decisions on complex and far-reaching subjects, such as appropriate responses to global climate change, scientists must effectively communicate complex results to the non-scientifically specialized public. However, there are few ways however to transform highly complicated scientific data into formats that are engaging to the general community. Taking inspiration from patterns observed in nature and from some of the principles of jazz bebop improvisation, we have generated Microbial Bebop, a method by which microbial environmental data are transformed into music. Microbial Bebop uses meter, pitch, duration, and harmony to highlight the relationships between multiple data types in complex biological datasets. We use a comprehensive microbial ecology, time course dataset collected at the L4 marine monitoring station in the Western English Channel as an example of microbial ecological data that can be transformed into music. Four compositions were generated (www.bio.anl.gov/MicrobialBebop.htm. from L4 Station data using Microbial Bebop. Each composition, though deriving from the same dataset, is created to highlight different relationships between environmental conditions and microbial community structure. The approach presented here can be applied to a wide variety of complex biological datasets.

  13. Microbial bebop: creating music from complex dynamics in microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter; Gilbert, Jack

    2013-01-01

    In order for society to make effective policy decisions on complex and far-reaching subjects, such as appropriate responses to global climate change, scientists must effectively communicate complex results to the non-scientifically specialized public. However, there are few ways however to transform highly complicated scientific data into formats that are engaging to the general community. Taking inspiration from patterns observed in nature and from some of the principles of jazz bebop improvisation, we have generated Microbial Bebop, a method by which microbial environmental data are transformed into music. Microbial Bebop uses meter, pitch, duration, and harmony to highlight the relationships between multiple data types in complex biological datasets. We use a comprehensive microbial ecology, time course dataset collected at the L4 marine monitoring station in the Western English Channel as an example of microbial ecological data that can be transformed into music. Four compositions were generated (www.bio.anl.gov/MicrobialBebop.htm.) from L4 Station data using Microbial Bebop. Each composition, though deriving from the same dataset, is created to highlight different relationships between environmental conditions and microbial community structure. The approach presented here can be applied to a wide variety of complex biological datasets.

  14. Creating Time: Social Collaboration in Music Improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Ashley E; Washburn, Auriel; Langland-Hassan, Peter; Chemero, Anthony; Kloos, Heidi; Richardson, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Musical collaboration emerges from the complex interaction of environmental and informational constraints, including those of the instruments and the performance context. Music improvisation in particular is more like everyday interaction in that dynamics emerge spontaneously without a rehearsed score or script. We examined how the structure of the musical context affords and shapes interactions between improvising musicians. Six pairs of professional piano players improvised with two different backing tracks while we recorded both the music produced and the movements of their heads, left arms, and right arms. The backing tracks varied in rhythmic and harmonic information, from a chord progression to a continuous drone. Differences in movement coordination and playing behavior were evaluated using the mathematical tools of complex dynamical systems, with the aim of uncovering the multiscale dynamics that characterize musical collaboration. Collectively, the findings indicated that each backing track afforded the emergence of different patterns of coordination with respect to how the musicians played together, how they moved together, as well as their experience collaborating with each other. Additionally, listeners' experiences of the music when rating audio recordings of the improvised performances were related to the way the musicians coordinated both their playing behavior and their bodily movements. Accordingly, the study revealed how complex dynamical systems methods (namely recurrence analysis) can capture the turn-taking dynamics that characterized both the social exchange of the music improvisation and the sounds of collaboration more generally. The study also demonstrated how musical improvisation provides a way of understanding how social interaction emerges from the structure of the behavioral task context. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  15. Creating internal culture to ensure transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, E.

    2007-01-01

    Among the keys to achieving public confidence, is openness and transparency to those one serves. As a Federal regulator entrusted by the American people to protect them against the hazards of radiation, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission recognizes the need for openness and a strong 'safety culture and climate' where there is a 'safety-first focus' by its employees as well as those it regulates. For the NRC and nuclear industry, safety culture is typically the assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organisations and individuals which establishes nuclear safety as an overriding priority. Strong safety cultures include conservative decision making, strict adherence to procedures, questioning attitudes, and an environment in which employees feel free to raise safety concerns. A strong internal safety culture that is transparent to others helps the NRC to be more effective in carrying out its safety job to protect the public through its oversight of the nation's nuclear power plants and other civilian uses of nuclear energy. Creating the appropriate environment or culture and communicating NBC's contribution to safety can affect employee and ultimately public perceptions about the agency's commitment to safety in its daily activities. Where there is openness and transparency, trust and confidence are likely to follow. To assess and measure its safety culture, the NRC commissioned three independent surveys to be performed in conjunction with some use of focus groups over an 8-year period. The results identified strengths and weakness, and were compared to previous survey results as well as to other U.S. government organisations and national benchmarks. Perhaps the most surprising results came from the 2002 survey that found a third of NRC employees questioned the agency's commitment to safety, and almost half of the staff said that they did not feel it was safe to speak up in the agency. Some changes at the agency were made and the 2005 survey results showed

  16. Polytypic pattern matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, J.T.

    1995-01-01

    The pattern matching problem can be informally specified as follows: given a pattern and a text, find all occurrences of the pattern in the text. The pattern and the text may both be lists, or they may both be trees, or they may both be multi-dimensional arrays, etc. This paper describes a general

  17. Creating and Exploring Huge Parameter Spaces: Interactive Evolution as a Tool for Sound Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a program is presented that applies interactive evolution to sound generation, i.e., preferred individuals are repeatedly selected from a population of genetically bred sound objects, created with various synthesis and pattern generation algorithms. This simplifies aural exploration...... applications. It is also shown how this technique can be used to simplify sound design in standard hardware synthesizers, a task normally avoided by most musicians, due to the required amount of technical understanding....

  18. A CASE OF THE SELF- HARMING BEHAVIOUR CREATED WITH COMPULSIVE SYNCOPE EPISODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetiner OZCAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, self-harming behavioural pattern with recurrent syncope episodes in a 15 years old adolescent has been reviewed. In self-harm behavior, tissue damage can often be seen macroscopically. Whereas in this case, the extraordinary situation is possibility of occurrence of the hypoxic encephalopathyc changes with syncope episodes created by the patient, without macroscopic tissue damage. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 78-80

  19. Customized Geological Map Patterns for the Macintosh Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Paul Slayton

    1986-01-01

    Describes how the graphics capabilities of the Apple Macintosh computer can be used in geological teaching by customizing fill patterns with lithologic symbols. Presents two methods for doing this: creating a dummy document, or by changing the pattern resource resident in the operating system. Special symbols can also replace fonts. (TW)

  20. Creating a Servitude to solve an encroachment Dispute: A Solution or creating another Problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsa-Zsa Temmers Boggenpoel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of this note is the case of Roseveare v Katmer, Katmer v Roseveare 2013 ZAGPJHC 18, which provides an interesting (though possibly constitutionally problematic perspective to the encroachment problem. The decision in this case has opened the door for courts to create servitudes in instances where encroachments are left intact based on policy reasons. Concerning these policy reasons, the note investigates the reasonableness standard as it was applied in the case. It is argued that it is important to differentiate between the applications of reasonableness in encroachment cases and alleged nuisance disputes. The decision in this case creates the impression that courts may now order that a servitude be registered in favour of the encroacher against the affected landowner’s property. It seems as though the court had in mind the creation of a praedial servitude to justify the continued existence of the encroachment. The servitude is created by court order against the will of the affected landowner. At common law, the creation of a servitude in this respect does not exist, and the authority from which the power derives to make an order like this is not entirely clear. The court also does not provide any authority for the creation of the servitude in favour of the encroacher. Consequently, it is argued that this may have serious constitutional implications. For one, lack of authority for the deprivation that results may be unconstitutional because there is no law of general application that authorises the deprivation in terms of section 25(1. The creation of a servitude to explain the continued existence of the encroachment is not automatically included in the general discretion to replace removal with compensation. It is contended that an order that forces the affected landowner to register a servitude in favour of the encroacher to preserve the existing encroachment situation will be in conflict with section 25(1 as far as the common

  1. Shifting focus to create knowledge collaboratively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Voog

    2013-12-01

    the journals/editors point of view and then follow up with a more practical session on where, how and what kind of information you search in order to find relevant information about possible journals to send manuscripts to. This course design creates dynamic connections between the more classic way of academic lectures/discussions and tools that improve the PhD students' generic skills. As a result, valuable connections are being made and it is also a way of visualizing how academia works and how the culture is communicated in different ways. This includes everything from demystifying the "back-stage processes" of academia as well as finding relevant tools to navigate in a rapidly changing publication process. Both workshops and home assignments are built upon the idea of constructive alignment. The students are to focus on their respective subject field when working with the assignments, to make them matter to the individual.

  2. Difficult Sudoku Puzzles Created by Replica Exchange Monte Carlo Method

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm to create difficult Sudoku puzzles is proposed. An Ising spin-glass like Hamiltonian describing difficulty of puzzles is defined, and difficult puzzles are created by minimizing the energy of the Hamiltonian. We adopt the replica exchange Monte Carlo method with simultaneous temperature adjustments to search lower energy states efficiently, and we succeed in creating a puzzle which is the world hardest ever created in our definition, to our best knowledge. (Added on Mar. 11, the ...

  3. Gender differentiation in the Bible: created and recognized

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper, however, does not discuss the issue of the treament of women in ... obvious here is that God did not create another 'adam, but he created 'issha who .... According to 1:27, God created 'adam in his image.27 Here, the singular in v. ...... Theological Interpretation of Genesis 1-3 (New York: The MacMillan Company,.

  4. Effects of Pattern Matching, Pattern Discrimination, and Experience in the Development of Diagnostic Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Frank; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In this study an artificial intelligence assessment tool used disease-by-feature frequency estimates to create disease prototypes for nine common causes of acute chest pain. The tool then used each subject's prototypes and a pattern-recognition-based decision-making mechanism to diagnose 18 myocardial infarction cases. (MLW)

  5. Airflow patterns in complex workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, J.; Selby, J.M.; Lynch, T.P.; Langer, G.; Vallario, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    There are many considerations in obtaining an accurate evaluation of aerosols. One aspect that has been neglected is the study of airflow patterns within the workplace. In many nuclear facilities, the operations performed required extensive equipment (e.g., glove boxes, piping) that create complex arrangements of physical barriers to flow. To provide samples of the airborne materials, particularly particles, knowledge of these complex airflow patterns is required for sampler placement. Recent studies have shown that materials introduced into the air flow within a workplace act as plumes embedded in major airflow streams. Portions of the plumes can recycle through the ventilated area, be lost to dead air pockets, or exhaust through unusual, unexpected outlets. Unusual flow patterns are observed even in relatively uncomplicated arrangements of equipment. This behavior must be factored into sampling/monitoring programs for evaluation of the airborne hazard to personnel within the workplace consistent with the objective of the program. Other factors that also must be considered to provide valid samples of airborne particulate materials are objectives of the sampling program, characteristics of the airborne particulate materials, nonsegregatory transport for the extracted materials, and requirements for the measurement techniques used

  6. On Tree Pattern Matching by Pushdown Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Flouri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tree pattern matching is an important operation in Computer Science on which a number of tasks such as mechanical theorem proving, term-rewriting, symbolic computation and non-procedural programming languages are based on. Work has begun on a systematic approach to the construction of tree pattern matchers by deterministic pushdown automata which read subject trees in prefix notation. The method is analogous to the construction of string pattern matchers: for given patterns, a non-deterministic pushdown automaton is created and then it is determinised. In this first paper, we present the proposed non-deterministic pushdown automaton which will serve as a basis for the determinisation process, and prove its correctness. 

  7. Patterning pentacene surfaces by local oxidation nanolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losilla, N.S.; Martinez, J.; Bystrenova, E.; Greco, P.; Biscarini, F.; Garcia, R.

    2010-01-01

    Sequential and parallel local oxidation nanolithographies have been applied to pattern pentacene samples by creating a variety of nanostructures. The sequential local oxidation process is performed with an atomic force microscope and requires the application of a sequence of voltage pulses of 36 V for 1 ms. The parallel local oxidation process is performed by using a conductive and patterned stamp. Then, a voltage pulse is applied between the stamp and the pentacene surface. Patterns formed by arrays of parallel lines covering 1 mm 2 regions and with a periodicity of less than 1 μm have been generated in a few seconds. We also show that the patterns can be used as templates for the deposition of antibodies.

  8. Creating student awareness to improve cultural competence: creating the critical incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Venita W; Sharp, Penny C; Crandall, Sonia J

    2002-09-01

    Teaching medical students to recognize the need for cultural competence and accept their shortcomings in this area is a challenge. A simulated patient scenario was developed to address this challenge. The objective of the simulation is to enhance students' readiness to learn by moving them from 'unconscious incompetence' to 'conscious incompetence'. The patient scenario presents a Cherokee Indian woman with a complaint of abnormal menstrual bleeding who is resistant to gynaecologic care from male providers. A faculty member facilitates a small-group videotape review of student interviews. As students discuss their encounters, they realize they 'misdiagnose' and mishandle the interview. They are confronted by their inability to recognize cultural cues and the impact they may have on health outcomes and begin to question whether cultural beliefs are affecting the care of other patients. This simulation creates an eye-opening situation that must be handled carefully. This activity is an effective method to create awareness in students who feel they 'know all this stuff.'

  9. MRI enhancing patterns of non-meningioma meningeal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Xiaofeng; Ding Juan; Xiao Xiangsheng; Shi Zengru; Yu Hong; Gu Qian

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the MRI appearances of meningeal diseases and to study MRI diagnostic value of enhancing patterns in different meningeal processes. Methods: Sixty-one patients with integrated clinical data, including 27 infectious meningitis, 4 inflammatory meningitis (2 eosinophilic granuloma, 1 Wegener granuloma, and 1 unknown etiological factor), 12 meningeal metastasis, 2 meningeal lymphoma, 8 cerebrovascular disease, and 8 postoperative changes, were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were examined on MRI before and after contrast administration. Results: (1) MR plain scan: positive findings of plain scan were revealed in only 3 cases, including 1 linear meningeal thickening pattern and 2 nodular pattern. (2) MR enhancement: All cases showed 3 kinds of enhancing patterns: 19 dural-arachnoid pattern, 32 pia-arachnoid pattern, and 10 total meninges pattern, respectively. Conclusion: Different meningeal diseases have different MR imaging manifestations. Creating the enhancement patterns of various diseases can have great clinical significance. (authors)

  10. Wavenumber locking and pattern formation in spatially forced systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manor, Rotem; Meron, Ehud; Hagberg, Aric

    2009-01-01

    We study wavenumber locking and pattern formation resulting from weak spatially periodic one-dimensional forcing of two-dimensional systems. We consider systems that produce stationary or traveling stripe patterns when unforced and apply forcing aligned with the stripes. Forcing at close to twice the pattern wavenumber selects, stabilizes, or creates resonant stripes locked at half the forcing wavenumber. If the mismatch between the forcing and pattern wavenumber is high we find that the pattern still locks but develops a wave vector component perpendicular to the forcing direction and forms rectangular and oblique patterns. When the unforced system supports traveling waves, resonant rectangular patterns remain stationary but oblique patterns travel in a direction orthogonal to the traveling waves.

  11. Microcontact printing with aminosilanes: creating biomolecule micro- and nanoarrays for multiplexed microfluidic bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Shivani; Ricoult, Sébastien G; Toda-Peters, Kazumi; Shen, Amy Q

    2017-05-21

    Microfluidic systems integrated with protein and DNA micro- and nanoarrays have been the most sought-after technologies to satisfy the growing demand for high-throughput disease diagnostics. As the sensitivity of these systems relies on the bio-functionalities of the patterned recognition biomolecules, the primary concern has been to develop simple technologies that enable biomolecule immobilization within microfluidic devices whilst preserving bio-functionalities. To address this concern, we introduce a two-step patterning approach to create micro- and nanoarrays of biomolecules within microfluidic devices. First, we introduce a simple aqueous based microcontact printing (μCP) method to pattern arrays of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on glass substrates, with feature sizes ranging from a few hundred microns down to 200 nm (for the first time). Next, these substrates are integrated with microfluidic channels to then covalently couple DNA aptamers and antibodies with the micro- and nanopatterned APTES. As these biomolecules are covalently tethered to the device substrates, the resulting bonds enable them to withstand the high shear stresses originating from the flow in these devices. We further demonstrated the flexibility of this technique, by immobilizing multiple proteins onto these APTES-patterned substrates using liquid-dispensing robots to create multiple microarrays. Next, to validate the functionalities of these microfluidic biomolecule microarrays, we perform (i) aptamer-based sandwich immunoassays to detect human interleukin 6 (IL6); and (ii) antibody-based sandwich immunoassays to detect human c-reactive protein (hCRP) with the limit of detection at 5 nM, a level below the range required for clinical screening. Lastly, the shelf-life potential of these ready-to-use microfluidic microarray devices is validated by effectively functionalizing the patterns with biomolecules up to 3 months post-printing. In summary, with a single printing step, this

  12. Taking action on overuse: Creating the culture for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchman, Michael L; Henrikson, Nora B; Blasi, Paula R; Buist, Diana S; Penfold, Robert; Austin, Brian; Ganos, Emily H

    2017-12-01

    Unnecessary care contributes to high costs and places patients at risk of harm. While most providers support reducing low-value care, changing established practice patterns is difficult and requires active engagement in sustained behavioral, organizational, and cultural change. Here we describe an action-planning framework to engage providers in reducing overused services. The framework is informed by a comprehensive review of social science theory and literature, published reports of successful and unsuccessful efforts to reduce low-value care, and interviews with innovators of value-based care initiatives in twenty-three health care organizations across the United States. A multi-stakeholder advisory committee provided feedback on the framework and guidance on optimizing it for use in practice. The framework describes four conditions necessary for change: prioritize addressing low-value care; build a culture of trust, innovation and improvement; establish shared language and purpose; and commit resources to measurements. These conditions foster productive sense-making conversations between providers, between providers and patients, and among members of the health care team about the potential for harm from overuse and reflection on current frequency of use. Through these conversations providers, patients and team members think together as a group, learn how to coordinate individual behaviors, and jointly develop possibilities for coordinated action around specific areas of overuse. Organizational efforts to engage providers in value-based care focused on creating conditions for productive sense-making conversations that lead to change. Organizations can use this framework to enhance and strengthen provider engagement efforts to do less of what potentially harms and more of what truly helps patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Male pattern baldness (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked characteristic that is passed from mother to child. A man can more accurately predict his chances of developing male pattern baldness by observing his mother's father than by looking ...

  14. Male pattern baldness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alopecia in men; Baldness - male; Hair loss in men; Androgenetic alopecia ... Male pattern baldness is related to your genes and male sex hormones. It usually follows a pattern of receding hairline and ...

  15. Caching Patterns and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Paul ROTARU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitious access to remote resources, usually data, constitutes a bottleneck for many software systems. Caching is a technique that can drastically improve the performance of any database application, by avoiding multiple read operations for the same data. This paper addresses the caching problems from a pattern perspective. Both Caching and caching strategies, like primed and on demand, are presented as patterns and a pattern-based flexible caching implementation is proposed.The Caching pattern provides method of expensive resources reacquisition circumvention. Primed Cache pattern is applied in situations in which the set of required resources, or at least a part of it, can be predicted, while Demand Cache pattern is applied whenever the resources set required cannot be predicted or is unfeasible to be buffered.The advantages and disadvantages of all the caching patterns presented are also discussed, and the lessons learned are applied in the implementation of the pattern-based flexible caching solution proposed.

  16. Understanding and management of female pattern alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Matt

    2008-11-01

    Female pattern hair loss is devastating to many of the 21 million U.S. women who suffer from it. It is essential to differentiate female pattern hair loss from other types of hair loss to ensure appropriate treatment. Through use of follicular units, follicular families, and follicular pairing between existing hair follicles, natural-looking results can be achieved in women. Hair transplants create the benefit of increasing density and providing options for hair styling and can be combined with medications, devices, and styling aids such as minoxidil, low-level laser therapy, and topical powder makeup, respectively.

  17. Afrikaans Syllabification Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilla Fick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to English, automatic hyphenation by computer of Afrikaans words is a problem that still needs to be addressed, since errors are still often encountered in printed text. An initial step in this task is the ability to automatically syllabify words. Since new words are created continuously by joining words, it is necessary to develop an “intelligent” technique for syllabification. As a first phase of the research, we consider only the orthographic information of words, and disregard both syntactic and morphological information. This approach allows us to use machine-learning techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees that are known for their pattern recognition abilities. Both these techniques are trained with isolated patterns consisting of input patterns and corresponding outputs (or targets that indicate whether the input pattern should be split at a certain position, or not. In the process of compiling a list of syllabified words from which to generate training data for the  syllabification problem, irregular patterns were identified. The same letter patterns are split differently in different words and complete words that are spelled identically are split differently due to meaning. We also identified irregularities in and between  the different dictionaries that we used. We examined the influence range of letters that are involved in irregularities. For example, for their in agter-ente and vaste-rente we have to consider three letters to the left of r to be certain where the hyphen should be inserted. The influence range of the k in verstek-waarde and kleinste-kwadrate is four to the left and three to the right. In an analysis of letter patterns in Afrikaans words we found that the letter e has the highest frequency overall (16,2% of all letters in the word list. The frequency of words starting with s is the highest, while the frequency of words ending with e is the highest. It is important to

  18. Making Pattern Mining Useful

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeken, J.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of patterns plays an important role in data mining. A pattern can be any type of regularity displayed in that data, such as, e.g. which items are typically sold together, which genes are mostly active for patients of a certain disease, etc, etc. Generally speaking, finding a pattern is

  19. Laravel design patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Kilicdagi, Arda

    2014-01-01

    This book is a practical guide packed with clear examples that will help you get to grips with the best practices in Laravel design patterns to create advanced web applications. This book is intended for web application developers working with Laravel who want to increase the efficiency of their web applications. It assumes that you have some experience with the Laravel PHP framework and are familiar with coding OOP methods.

  20. Semantic acquisition games harnessing manpower for creating semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Šimko, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive and extensive review of state-of-the-art in semantics acquisition game (SAG) design A set of design patterns for SAG designers A set of case studies (real SAG projects) demonstrating the use of SAG design patterns

  1. Creating 3D gelatin phantoms for experimental evaluation in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Nils

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe and evaluate a setup to create gelatin phantoms by robotic 3D printing. Key aspects are the large workspace, reproducibility and resolution of the created phantoms. Given its soft tissue nature, the gelatin is kept fluid during inside the system and we present parameters for additive printing of homogeneous, solid objects. The results indicate that 3D printing of gelatin can be an alternative for quickly creating larger soft tissue phantoms without the need for casting a mold.

  2. CREATING A CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP STRATEGY FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    OpenAIRE

    ENGİNOĞLU, Didem; ARIKAN, Cenk Laçin

    2016-01-01

    Current competitive environment is rapidly changing. In today’s business environment, organizations are having an increasingly difficult time in creating competitive advantages. The main reason for this is the ease in contemporary business life for organizations to reach the same or very similar resources. Firms need innovation to create and sustain success and effectiveness. In such a highly competitive business life, the importance of creating competitive advantages for organizations based ...

  3. Creating visual guidelines for a Finnish fashion brand

    OpenAIRE

    Morozova, Elizaveta

    2017-01-01

    Visual communication is an essential part of branding. Visual elements like logo, brand colours, and typography create associations with a brand and make it distinctive. Graphic design is a tool for visual communication that allows creating aesthetic and functional visual elements that convey some messages. The client of this thesis is a Finnish fashion company that does not have clear and consistent visual image, and the goal is to create it based on company’s values and desired image...

  4. Patterning of the turtle shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E; Cebra-Thomas, Judith; Gilbert, Scott F

    2017-08-01

    Interest in the origin and evolution of the turtle shell has resulted in a most unlikely clade becoming an important research group for investigating morphological diversity in developmental biology. Many turtles generate a two-component shell that nearly surrounds the body in a bony exoskeleton. The ectoderm covering the shell produces epidermal scutes that form a phylogenetically stable pattern. In some lineages, the bones of the shell and their ectodermal covering become reduced or lost, and this is generally associated with different ecological habits. The similarity and diversity of turtles allows research into how changes in development create evolutionary novelty, interacting modules, and adaptive physiology and anatomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Creating a Curriculum for Training Health Profession Faculty Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Pamela H; Robins, Lynne S; Schaad, Dotiglas

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: An interprofessional, collaborative group of educators, patient safety officers, and Federal program directors teamed up to create an integrated, patient safety-centered curriculum for the education...

  6. A PIXE mini-beam setup at the Bonn cyclotron for archeometric metal analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; Beier, T.; Diehl, U.; Lambrecht, D.; Mommsen, H.; Pantenburg, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The exact analysis of the elemental composition at and around a soldering joint of an antique piece of jewelry can elucidate the joining technologies and give hints of the genuineness of the object. As analytical method we use PIXE, which is nondestructive, multielemental and with fundamental parameter calculations gives absolute concentration values. To obtain the necessary spot size of the H 2 + beam at the Bonn cyclotron we use a piezo-controlled diaphragm, whose demagnified image is focussed on the target by two magnetic quadrupole triplets. With an electrostatic deflector the beam spot of 0.1x0.3 mm 2 size can be moved 2 mm in each direction on the target. With a laser beam, which simulates the ion beam, an irregularly shaped archeological object can be positioned. The laser is also used to obtain the alignment of the target surface to the ion beam direction and the small beam size makes it easier to find a flat part on the surface of the object; both of these are important preconditions for using the fundamental parameter method. A scan over a joint of modern gold alloys demonstrates the ability to detect soldering joints. The analysis of four pieces of Roman gold jewelry found in the area of Cologne and Bonn shows examples of brazing with a solder as well as diffusion soldering. (orig.)

  7. Nanolithography and nanochemistry: probe-related patterning techniques and chemical modification for nanometer-sized devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, D.; Schubert, U.S.

    2004-01-01

    The size regime for devices produced by photolithographic techniques is limited. Therefore, other patterning techniques have been intensively studied to create smaller structures. Scanning-probe-based patterning techniques, such as dip-pen lithography, local force-induced patterning, and local-probe

  8. Net-Zero Building Technologies Create Substantial Energy Savings -

    Science.gov (United States)

    only an estimated 1% of commercial buildings are built to net-zero energy criteria. One reason for this Continuum Magazine | NREL Net-Zero Building Technologies Create Substantial Energy Savings Net -Zero Building Technologies Create Substantial Energy Savings Researchers work to package and share step

  9. Talent Management for Creating a Performance Work Environment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the extent to which talent management can contribute towards creating a performance work environment (PWE) that can enhance sustainable talent identifi cation and development in the public service. The literature analysis results reveal that talent management is essential in creating a PWE in the ...

  10. Creating Futures through Participation and open-ended experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Mia; Bladt, Mette; Tofteng, Ditte Maria Børglum

    This workshop will engage participants in a process that enables ‘ordinary people’ to take responsibility for creating new futures and to bring about new anticipations for democratic developments of local and societal issues. Founded in the Critical Utopian Action Research Tradition, the workshop...... will engage participants in a brief version of a Future Creating Workshop....

  11. 5 CFR 9701.372 - Creating initial pay ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Creating initial pay ranges. 9701.372... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Transitional Provisions § 9701.372 Creating initial pay ranges. (a) DHS must, after coordination with OPM, set the initial band rate ranges for the...

  12. Creating Cartoons to Promote Leaderships Skills and Explore Leadership Qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Latisha L.; Clausen, Courtney K.; Teske, Jolene K.; Ghayoorrad, Maryam; Gray, Phyllis; Al Subia, Sukainah; Atwood-Blaine, Dana; Rule, Audrey C.

    2015-01-01

    This document describes a strategy for increasing student leadership and creativity skills through the creation of cartoons. Creating cartoons engages students in divergent thinking and cognitive processes, such as perception, recall, and mental processing. When students create cartoons focused on a particular topic, they are making connections to…

  13. Fundamental Characteristics of Incentive Streams Created by Legal Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dari Mattiacci, G.

    2002-01-01

    The law shapes people’s behaviour by creating incentives. For example, tort law induces motorists to drive carefully by making them pay compensation for the accidents they may cause. This study analyses the way the law can create incentives in those cases in which the courts or the administrative

  14. Mandatory Parent Education Programs Can Create Positive Youth Sport Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Jennifer; Strand, Bradford

    2016-01-01

    Youth sport leaders must not ignore the influence parents have on creating a positive developmental experience for young athletes. Therefore, expectations involving parental involvement and conduct must be addressed prior to athletes' participation. This article aims to examine the importance of creating mandatory parental training programs for…

  15. Utilizing Educational Corporate Culture To Create a Quality School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Bill

    Strategies for utilizing educational corporate culture to create a quality school are presented in this paper, which argues that the understanding of the shared belief system of organizational members is crucial to the process. Creating a quality school entails moving from a "teach the process" oriented model to one that internalizes the…

  16. Some remarks concerning the indicators for appreciation the performance and the value created by the enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina Pacurari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The appreciation of the performances of the enterprise are made, as a rule, by ways of indicators which are of accounting type, the result of financial exercise, profit or loss, being mostly used. This result can be determined differently, according to approaches of patrimonial, economic or financial nature. Due to the handling potential of this indicator, the attention of the analysts focused in time also on other computing patterns, uninfluenced by the accounting methods and techniques used by the enterprise. The investors’ need of information determined the conception of some performance computing models based on the concept of creating value for the shareholders. Among these, those which express the ability of the enterprise to create value on long term, based on discounted cash flow, are the most appreciated. Nevertheless, within the Romanian economic context, the most used performance indicators are still of accounting nature for being accessible and understandable.

  17. Pattern recognition & machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Anzai, Y

    1992-01-01

    This is the first text to provide a unified and self-contained introduction to visual pattern recognition and machine learning. It is useful as a general introduction to artifical intelligence and knowledge engineering, and no previous knowledge of pattern recognition or machine learning is necessary. Basic for various pattern recognition and machine learning methods. Translated from Japanese, the book also features chapter exercises, keywords, and summaries.

  18. Learning Python design patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Zlobin, Gennadiy

    2013-01-01

    This book takes a tutorial-based and user-friendly approach to covering Python design patterns. Its concise presentation means that in a short space of time, you will get a good introduction to various design patterns.If you are an intermediate level Python user, this book is for you. Prior knowledge of Python programming is essential. Some knowledge of UML is also required to understand the UML diagrams which are used to describe some design patterns.

  19. Patterns of Peeragogy

    OpenAIRE

    Corneli, Joseph; Danoff, Charles Jeffrey; Pierce, Charlotte; Ricaurte, Paola; MacDonald, Lisa Snow

    2015-01-01

    We describe nine design patterns that we have developed in our work on the Peeragogy project, in which we aim to help design the future of learning, inside and outside of institutions, drawing on the principles of free/libre/open source software and open culture. We use these patterns to build an “emergent roadmap” for the project. Our use of design patterns has some novel features that will be relevant to others working in projects with emergent structure.

  20. Creating a learning organisation through content based document management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremdal, B.; Johansen, F.; Spaggiari, C.; Engels, R.; Jones, R.

    1999-01-01

    The discussion on the concept of the Learning Organisation dates back approximately 20 years in the management literature. People that pioneered this concept include Chris Argyris (Argyris 77), Peter Senge (Senge 90), Fiol and Lyles (Fiol 85), Levitt and March (Levitt 89), Ray Stata (Stata 89). All of them introduced various definitions of the concept. These definitions circumscribe issues like the following: 'Better knowledge and understanding', 'process of improving actions', 'processing of information', 'change of behaviour', 'encoding inferences from history into routines that guide behaviour', 'process of detecting and correcting error', 'the need for shared insights, knowledge and mental models', 'building on past knowledge and experience'. Peter Senge's work (Senge 90) is often used as reference for the concept. His ideas put forward in the book The fifth Discipline have had a profound effect on modern organisational thinking far beyond the management community itself. According to Senge a Learning Organisation can be described as follows: 'A Learning Organisation is a place where people continually expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning how to learn together'. Organisational learning must be seen as part of an overall process of continuous improvement. But practical and systematic measures must accompany a vision if a real change is desired. Garvin (Garvin 93) is concerned about the lack of an operational basis or framework that can systematically instantiate the concept into a viable strategy and a set of systematic actions. He identifies five properties that learning organisations master well: Systematic problem solving, experimentation with new approaches, learning from their own experience and past history, learning from the experiences and best practices of others, and transferring

  1. Statistical density modification using local pattern matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2003-01-01

    Statistical density modification can make use of local patterns of density found in protein structures to improve crystallographic phases. A method for improving crystallographic phases is presented that is based on the preferential occurrence of certain local patterns of electron density in macromolecular electron-density maps. The method focuses on the relationship between the value of electron density at a point in the map and the pattern of density surrounding this point. Patterns of density that can be superimposed by rotation about the central point are considered equivalent. Standard templates are created from experimental or model electron-density maps by clustering and averaging local patterns of electron density. The clustering is based on correlation coefficients after rotation to maximize the correlation. Experimental or model maps are also used to create histograms relating the value of electron density at the central point to the correlation coefficient of the density surrounding this point with each member of the set of standard patterns. These histograms are then used to estimate the electron density at each point in a new experimental electron-density map using the pattern of electron density at points surrounding that point and the correlation coefficient of this density to each of the set of standard templates, again after rotation to maximize the correlation. The method is strengthened by excluding any information from the point in question from both the templates and the local pattern of density in the calculation. A function based on the origin of the Patterson function is used to remove information about the electron density at the point in question from nearby electron density. This allows an estimation of the electron density at each point in a map, using only information from other points in the process. The resulting estimates of electron density are shown to have errors that are nearly independent of the errors in the original map using

  2. Optical Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Jutamulia, Suganda

    2008-10-01

    Contributors; Preface; 1. Pattern recognition with optics Francis T. S. Yu and Don A. Gregory; 2. Hybrid neural networks for nonlinear pattern recognition Taiwei Lu; 3. Wavelets, optics, and pattern recognition Yao Li and Yunglong Sheng; 4. Applications of the fractional Fourier transform to optical pattern recognition David Mendlovic, Zeev Zalesky and Haldum M. Oxaktas; 5. Optical implementation of mathematical morphology Tien-Hsin Chao; 6. Nonlinear optical correlators with improved discrimination capability for object location and recognition Leonid P. Yaroslavsky; 7. Distortion-invariant quadratic filters Gregory Gheen; 8. Composite filter synthesis as applied to pattern recognition Shizhou Yin and Guowen Lu; 9. Iterative procedures in electro-optical pattern recognition Joseph Shamir; 10. Optoelectronic hybrid system for three-dimensional object pattern recognition Guoguang Mu, Mingzhe Lu and Ying Sun; 11. Applications of photrefractive devices in optical pattern recognition Ziangyang Yang; 12. Optical pattern recognition with microlasers Eung-Gi Paek; 13. Optical properties and applications of bacteriorhodopsin Q. Wang Song and Yu-He Zhang; 14. Liquid-crystal spatial light modulators Aris Tanone and Suganda Jutamulia; 15. Representations of fully complex functions on real-time spatial light modulators Robert W. Cohn and Laurence G. Hassbrook; Index.

  3. Professional ASPNET Design Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Millett, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Professional ASP.NET Design Patterns will show you how to implement design patterns in real ASP.NET applications by introducing you to the basic OOP skills needed to understand and interpret design patterns. A sample application used throughout the book is an enterprise level ASP.NET website with multi-tiered, SOA design techniques that can be applied to your future ASP.NET projects. Read about each design pattern in detail, including how to interpret the UML design, how to implement it in ASP.NET, its importance for ASP.NET development, and how it's integrated into the final project.

  4. Patterns - "A crime solver".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasupriya, A; Dhanapal, Raghu; Reena, K; Saraswathi, Tr; Ramachandran, Cr

    2011-01-01

    This study is intended to analyze the predominant pattern of lip and finger prints in males and females and to correlate lip print and finger print for gender identity. The study sample comprised of 200 students of Vishnu Dental College, Bhimavaram, Andhra Pradesh, 100 males and 100 females aged between 18 to 27 years. Brown/pink colored lip stick was applied on the lips and the subject was asked to spread it uniformly over the lips. Lip prints were traced in the normal rest position of the lips with the help of cellophane tape. The imprint of the left thumb was taken on a white chart sheet and visualized using magnifying lens. While three main types of finger prints are identified, the classification of lip prints is simplified into branched, reticular, and vertical types. Association between lip prints and finger prints was statistically tested using Chi-square test. This study showed that lip and finger patterns did not reveal statistically significant results within the gender. The correlation between lip and finger patterns for gender identification, was statistically significant. In males, branched type of lip pattern associated with arch, loop, and whorl type of finger pattern was most significant. In females, vertical lip pattern associated with arch finger pattern and reticular lip pattern associated with whorl finger patterns were most significant. We conclude that a correlative study between the lip print and finger print will be very useful in forensic science for gender identification.

  5. Patterns and Interfaces in Dissipative Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pismen, L.M

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous pattern formation in nonlinear dissipative systems far from equilibrium is a paradigmatic case of emergent behaviour associated with complex systems. It is encountered in a great variety of settings, both in nature and technology, and has numerous applications ranging from nonlinear optics through solid and fluid mechanics, physical chemistry and chemical engineering to biology. Nature creates its variety of forms through spontaneous pattern formation and self-assembly, and this strategy is likely to be imitated by future biomorphic technologies. This book is a first-hand account by one of the leading players in this field, which gives in-depth descriptions of analytical methods elucidating the complex evolution of nonlinear dissipative systems, and brings the reader to the forefront of current research. The introductory chapter on the theory of dynamical systems is written with a view to applications of its powerful methods to spatial and spatio-temporal patterns. It is followed by two chapters t...

  6. Pattern database applications from design to manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Linda; Zhu, Annie; Zhang, Yifan; Sweis, Jason; Lai, Ya-Chieh

    2017-03-01

    Pattern-based approaches are becoming more common and popular as the industry moves to advanced technology nodes. At the beginning of a new technology node, a library of process weak point patterns for physical and electrical verification are starting to build up and used to prevent known hotspots from re-occurring on new designs. Then the pattern set is expanded to create test keys for process development in order to verify the manufacturing capability and precheck new tape-out designs for any potential yield detractors. With the database growing, the adoption of pattern-based approaches has expanded from design flows to technology development and then needed for mass-production purposes. This paper will present the complete downstream working flows of a design pattern database(PDB). This pattern-based data analysis flow covers different applications across different functional teams from generating enhancement kits to improving design manufacturability, populating new testing design data based on previous-learning, generating analysis data to improve mass-production efficiency and manufacturing equipment in-line control to check machine status consistency across different fab sites.

  7. Thermodynamics of complexity and pattern manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Andrew J. P.; Thompson, Jayne; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2017-04-01

    Many organisms capitalize on their ability to predict the environment to maximize available free energy and reinvest this energy to create new complex structures. This functionality relies on the manipulation of patterns—temporally ordered sequences of data. Here, we propose a framework to describe pattern manipulators—devices that convert thermodynamic work to patterns or vice versa—and use them to build a "pattern engine" that facilitates a thermodynamic cycle of pattern creation and consumption. We show that the least heat dissipation is achieved by the provably simplest devices, the ones that exhibit desired operational behavior while maintaining the least internal memory. We derive the ultimate limits of this heat dissipation and show that it is generally nonzero and connected with the pattern's intrinsic crypticity—a complexity theoretic quantity that captures the puzzling difference between the amount of information the pattern's past behavior reveals about its future and the amount one needs to communicate about this past to optimally predict the future.

  8. Deregulated power prices: comparison of diurnal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying Li; Flynn, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine electrical power price, and in particular its daily and average weekday vs. weekend pattern of change, for 14 deregulated markets. Power price in deregulated markets shows fundamentally different patterns. North American markets show a monotonic diurnal weekday price pattern, while all other markets studied show more than one price peak. Deregulated power markets differ in maximum vs. minimum daily average price and in average weekday to weekend price, in turn creating a different incentive for a consumer to time shift power consuming activities. Markets differ in the extent to which a small fraction of the days shapes the average diurnal pattern and value of price. Deregulated markets show a wide variation in the correlation between load and price. Some deregulated markets, most notably Britain and Spain, show patterns that are predictable and consistent, and hence that can encourage a customer to shape consumption behaviors. Other markets, for example South Australia, have patterns that are inconsistent and irregular, and hence are hard for a customer to interpret; a customer in such a market will have a higher incentive to escape risk through hedging mechanisms. (Author)

  9. Deregulated power prices: comparison of diurnal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Flynn, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine electrical power price, and in particular its daily and average weekday vs. weekend pattern of change, for 14 deregulated markets. Power price in deregulated markets shows fundamentally different patterns. North American markets show a monotonic diurnal weekday price pattern, while all other markets studied show more than one price peak. Deregulated power markets differ in maximum vs. minimum daily average price and in average weekday to weekend price, in turn creating a different incentive for a consumer to time shift power consuming activities. Markets differ in the extent to which a small fraction of the days shapes the average diurnal pattern and value of price. Deregulated markets show a wide variation in the correlation between load and price. Some deregulated markets, most notably Britain and Spain, show patterns that are predictable and consistent, and hence that can encourage a customer to shape consumption behaviors. Other markets, for example South Australia, have patterns that are inconsistent and irregular, and hence are hard for a customer to interpret; a customer in such a market will have a higher incentive to escape risk through hedging mechanisms

  10. Does AFTA Create More Trade for Thailand? An Investigation of Some Key Trade Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriya Pholphirul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines whether the ASEAN Free Trade Agreement (AFTA creates trade for Thailand or actually diverts it away from the country. It does this by analyzing various trade indicators: the Export Similarity Index, the Intra-Industry Trade Index, and Revealed Comparative Advantage (RCA rank correlation. By examining the patterns of trade between Thailand and other members of ASEAN, it reveals a high degree of similarity regarding the trade structure between Thailand and AFTA, which indicates that there will be fewer trade-creation benefits from AFTA and a greater likelihood of trade diversion once the AFTA scheme has been fully implemented. This similarity pattern explains the reasons for future collaboration among member countries and supportive arguments for the future extension of ASEAN ("ASEAN+". Market-penetration and development strategies should be employed by Thai exporters when accessing the ASEAN market.

  11. Patterns in natural systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sewalt, L.

    2016-01-01

    In the thesis, `Patterns in natural systems’ the formation and evolution of patterns as solutions of several partial differential systems are studied. These mathematical systems model three different biological and ecological processes. First, the way that plankton concentrates in the water column,

  12. Discovery: Pile Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestre, Neville

    2017-01-01

    Earlier "Discovery" articles (de Mestre, 1999, 2003, 2006, 2010, 2011) considered patterns from many mathematical situations. This article presents a group of patterns used in 19th century mathematical textbooks. In the days of earlier warfare, cannon balls were stacked in various arrangements depending on the shape of the pile base…

  13. Patterns in Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Aino Vonge

    the university and I entered a project to industry within Center for Object Technology (COT). I focused on promoting the pattern concept to the Danish software industry in order to help them take advantage of the benefits of applying patterns in system development. In the obligatory stay abroad, I chose to visit...

  14. Complex Systems and Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Although the term 'pattern' is often used in science, it is an elusive term and can have different dialectic meanings in various disciplines. Yet, the 'feel' for this term is fairly consistent; it usually requires little explanation to understand what a pattern is, and therefore it usually tends to

  15. Patterns of Academic Procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Victor; Mensink, David; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Uses the Academic Procrastination Questionnaire to measure procrastination and six possible patterns underlying it among undergraduate students. Finds that the most common patterns for clients involved Evaluation Anxiety or being Discouraged/Depressed, or Dependent. Supports individualized assessment and solutions for academic procrastination. (SC)

  16. Engaging with Islamic Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Islamic patterns were a regular feature in mathematics classrooms, and probably still feature in many wall displays. However, as part of the learning process, these ancient designs appear to have lost any significant contemporary appeal. Here, the power of software is engaged to bring the construction of Islamic type patterns up to date. Forget…

  17. Is It a Pattern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how in early mathematics learning, young children are often asked to recognize and describe visual patterns in their environment--perhaps on their clothing, a toy, or the carpet; around a picture frame; or in the playground equipment. Exploring patterns in the early years is seen as an important introduction to algebraic…

  18. Patterns of Knowledge Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify knowledge construction patterns in a local learning community. Observation, documents, and semistructured interviews were employed to collect data. Twenty learners were interviewed. Data were analyzed inductively using the constant comparative method. Five major patterns--radiation, circulation,…

  19. Online by design the essentials of creating information literacy courses

    CERN Document Server

    Mery, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    As online instruction becomes more popular, librarians will want to develop the knowledge and skills needed to create an effective online information literacy course. Online by Design: The Essentials of Creating Information Literacy Courses will guide librarians as they go through the process of designing, developing, and delivering online information literacy courses. Yvonne Mery & Jill Newby offer proven techniques and tips for creating quality online courses that are engaging and effective. This handbook is perfect for instruction librarians who are interesting in developing new courses or

  20. 3D game environments create professional 3D game worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Ahearn, Luke

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate resource to help you create triple-A quality art for a variety of game worlds; 3D Game Environments offers detailed tutorials on creating 3D models, applying 2D art to 3D models, and clear concise advice on issues of efficiency and optimization for a 3D game engine. Using Photoshop and 3ds Max as his primary tools, Luke Ahearn explains how to create realistic textures from photo source and uses a variety of techniques to portray dynamic and believable game worlds.From a modern city to a steamy jungle, learn about the planning and technological considerations for 3D modelin

  1. Creating a Podcast/Vodcast: A How-To Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, C. C.

    2011-09-01

    Creating podcasts and vodcasts is a wonderful way to share news of science research. Public affairs officers use them to reveal the latest discoveries done by scientists in their institutions. Educators can offer podcast/vodcast creation for students who want a unique way to demonstrate their mastery of science topics. Anyone with a computer and a USB microphone can create a podcast. To do a vodcast, you also need a digital video camera and video editing software. This session focused mainly on creating a podcast - writing the script and recording the soundtrack. Attendees also did a short activity to learn to write effective narrative copy for a podcast/vodcast.

  2. Resonant fields created by spiral electric currents in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Caldas, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of the resonant magnetic perturbations, created by electric currents in spirals, on the plasma confinement in a tokamak with circular section and large aspect ratio is investigated. These perturbations create magnetic islands around the rational magnetic surface which has the helicity of the helicoidal currents. The intensities of these currents are calculated in order to the magnetic islands reach the limiter or others rational surfaces, what could provoke the plasma disrupture. The electric current intensities are estimated, in two spiral sets with different helicities, which create a predominantly stocastic region among the rational magnetic surfaces with these helicities. (L.C.) [pt

  3. Evolving building blocks of rhythm: how human cognition creates music via cultural transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravignani, Andrea; Thompson, Bill; Grossi, Thomas; Delgado, Tania; Kirby, Simon

    2018-03-06

    Why does musical rhythm have the structure it does? Musical rhythm, in all its cross-cultural diversity, exhibits commonalities across world cultures. Traditionally, music research has been split into two fields. Some scientists focused on musicality, namely the human biocognitive predispositions for music, with an emphasis on cross-cultural similarities. Other scholars investigated music, seen as a cultural product, focusing on the variation in world musical cultures. Recent experiments found deep connections between music and musicality, reconciling these opposing views. Here, we address the question of how individual cognitive biases affect the process of cultural evolution of music. Data from two experiments are analyzed using two complementary techniques. In the experiments, participants hear drumming patterns and imitate them. These patterns are then given to the same or another participant to imitate. The structure of these initially random patterns is tracked along experimental "generations." Frequentist statistics show how participants' biases are amplified by cultural transmission, making drumming patterns more structured. Structure is achieved faster in transmission within rather than between participants. A Bayesian model approximates the motif structures participants learned and created. Our data and models suggest that individual biases for musicality may shape the cultural transmission of musical rhythm. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Using Proven Reference Monitor Patterns for Security Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Heckman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most effective approach to evaluating the security of complex systems is to deliberately construct the systems using security patterns specifically designed to make them evaluable. Just such an integrated set of security patterns was created decades ago based on the Reference Monitor abstraction. An associated systematic security engineering and evaluation methodology was codified as an engineering standard in the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria (TCSEC. This paper explains how the TCSEC and its Trusted Network Interpretation (TNI constitute a set of security patterns for large, complex and distributed systems and how those patterns have been repeatedly and successfully used to create and evaluate some of the most secure government and commercial systems ever developed.

  5. Modelling biomechanics of bark patterning in grasstrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Holly; Runions, Adam; Hobill, David; Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    2014-09-01

    Bark patterns are a visually important characteristic of trees, typically attributed to fractures occurring during secondary growth of the trunk and branches. An understanding of bark pattern formation has been hampered by insufficient information regarding the biomechanical properties of bark and the corresponding difficulties in faithfully modelling bark fractures using continuum mechanics. This study focuses on the genus Xanthorrhoea (grasstrees), which have an unusual bark-like structure composed of distinct leaf bases connected by sticky resin. Due to its discrete character, this structure is well suited for computational studies. A dynamic computational model of grasstree development was created. The model captures both the phyllotactic pattern of leaf bases during primary growth and the changes in the trunk's width during secondary growth. A biomechanical representation based on a system of masses connected by springs is used for the surface of the trunk, permitting the emergence of fractures during secondary growth to be simulated. The resulting fracture patterns were analysed statistically and compared with images of real trees. The model reproduces key features of grasstree bark patterns, including their variability, spanning elongated and reticulate forms. The patterns produced by the model have the same statistical character as those seen in real trees. The model was able to support the general hypothesis that the patterns observed in the grasstree bark-like layer may be explained in terms of mechanical fractures driven by secondary growth. Although the generality of the results is limited by the unusual structure of grasstree bark, it supports the hypothesis that bark pattern formation is primarily a biomechanical phenomenon.

  6. An Algorithm for Creating Virtual Controls Using Integrated and Harmonized Longitudinal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, William B; Chen, Shyh-Huei; Saldana, Santiago; Ip, Edward H

    2018-06-01

    We introduce a strategy for creating virtual control groups-cases generated through computer algorithms that, when aggregated, may serve as experimental comparators where live controls are difficult to recruit, such as when programs are widely disseminated and randomization is not feasible. We integrated and harmonized data from eight archived longitudinal adolescent-focused data sets spanning the decades from 1980 to 2010. Collectively, these studies examined numerous psychosocial variables and assessed past 30-day alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use. Additional treatment and control group data from two archived randomized control trials were used to test the virtual control algorithm. Both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessed intentions, normative beliefs, and values as well as past 30-day alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use. We developed an algorithm that used percentile scores from the integrated data set to create age- and gender-specific latent psychosocial scores. The algorithm matched treatment case observed psychosocial scores at pretest to create a virtual control case that figuratively "matured" based on age-related changes, holding the virtual case's percentile constant. Virtual controls matched treatment case occurrence, eliminating differential attrition as a threat to validity. Virtual case substance use was estimated from the virtual case's latent psychosocial score using logistic regression coefficients derived from analyzing the treatment group. Averaging across virtual cases created group estimates of prevalence. Two criteria were established to evaluate the adequacy of virtual control cases: (1) virtual control group pretest drug prevalence rates should match those of the treatment group and (2) virtual control group patterns of drug prevalence over time should match live controls. The algorithm successfully matched pretest prevalence for both RCTs. Increases in prevalence were observed, although there were discrepancies between live

  7. Retreating academics: creating spaces for the scholarship of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , this paper explores particular spaces created to support academic engagement in the scholarship of teaching and learning: the space of writing retreats. The metaphor of 'tapestry' is used to capture the development of a complex conceptual ...

  8. Creating a panorama of the heart with digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebrock, L

    2000-01-01

    Digital imaging offers new opportunities still being discovered by users. This article describes a technique that was created using a digital camera to photograph the entire surface of a rat heart. The technique may have other applications as well.

  9. Creating a collage: a meaningful interactive classroom strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, R J

    1995-01-01

    How can students be helped to make personal meaning of their nursing knowledge? The author describes one strategy, that of creating a collage, that promoted interactive learning and the making of meaning.

  10. Creating Simple Admin Tools Using Info*Engine and Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey; Kapatos, Dennis; Skradski, Cory; Felkins, J. D.

    2012-01-01

    PTC has provided a simple way to dynamically interact with Windchill using Info*Engine. This presentation will describe how to create a simple Info*Engine Tasks capable of saving Windchill 10.0 administration of tedious work.

  11. DES Science Portal: II- Creating Science-Ready Catalogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fausti Neto, Angelo; et al.

    2017-08-18

    We present a novel approach for creating science-ready catalogs through a software infrastructure developed for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We integrate the data products released by the DES Data Management and additional products created by the DES collaboration in an environment known as DES Science Portal. Each step involved in the creation of a science-ready catalog is recorded in a relational database and can be recovered at any time. We describe how the DES Science Portal automates the creation and characterization of lightweight catalogs for DES Year 1 Annual Release, and show its flexibility in creating multiple catalogs with different inputs and configurations. Finally, we discuss the advantages of this infrastructure for large surveys such as DES and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. The capability of creating science-ready catalogs efficiently and with full control of the inputs and configurations used is an important asset for supporting science analysis using data from large astronomical surveys.

  12. Creating an adaptive healing room for neurology patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, E.M.L; Behere, S.; Cuppen, R.P.G.; Facey, J.; Flinsenberg, I.C.M.; Loenen, van E.J.; Rajae-Joordens, R.J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Informed by the experiences of patients and medical staff, Philips has designed a room for neurology patients that retains a clinical feel when treatment is being carried out, but can flex to create a moretailored, personal ambiende.

  13. Future Combat Systems (FCS) Creates Cannon and Mortar Synergy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beard, Kirby; James, Jeff; Tolbert, Vincent J

    2008-01-01

    .... The NLOS-C is one of the eight MGVs. Program Manager FCS (Brigade Combat Team (PM FCS(BCT)) is leveraging previous and current research and development efforts to create synergy between cannons and mortars, without duplication of effort...

  14. Communicating Disparity: How Social Design can create Public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chrischisoni

    Key words: Inequality; communication; social design; storytelling ... created unevenness, which can destroy dignity, self-confidence and esteem. .... divides, which involves gaps between groups in awareness, adoption, skills, devices, use and.

  15. Creating a Database for Test Items in National Examinations (pp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    different programmers create files and application programs over a long period. .... In theory or essay questions, alternative methods of solving problems are explored and ... Unworthy items are those that do not focus on the central concept or.

  16. Kids Create Healthy Comics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Students Using Medline Plus Kids Create Healthy Comics Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of Contents Fresh, ... use of reliable health information resources." The Four Comic Books Are: The Expert Investigator explores the impact ...

  17. Control of invasive plant species in created wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) has been using a herbicide in the form of glyphosate for the control of unwanted species in created wetlands. Results with this particular herbicide have been somewhat mixed. It was requested that the ...

  18. Creating sustainable learning environments in schools by means of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creating sustainable learning environments in schools by means of strategic ... be addressed by means of proper strategic planning of the education system as such ... The authors who are academics at a university and who are specializing in ...

  19. Creating photo-realistic works in a 3D scene using layers styles to create an animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramescu, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Creating realist objects in a 3D scene is not an easy work. We have to be very careful to make the creation very detailed. If we don't know how to make these photo-realistic works, by using the techniques and a good reference photo we can create an amazing amount of detail and realism. For example, in this article there are some of these detailed methods from which we can learn the techniques necessary to make beautiful and realistic objects in a scene. More precisely, in this paper, we present how to create a 3D animated scene, mainly using the Pen Tool and Blending Options. Indeed, this work is based on teaching some simple ways of using the Layer Styles to create some great shadows, lights, textures and a realistic sense of 3 Dimension. The present work involves also showing how some interesting ways of using the illuminating and rendering options can create a realistic effect in a scene. Moreover, this article shows how to create photo realistic 3D models from a digital image. The present work proposes to present how to use Illustrator paths, texturing, basic lighting and rendering, how to apply textures and how to parent the building and objects components. We also propose to use this proposition to recreate smaller details or 3D objects from a 2D image. After a critic art stage, we are able now to present in this paper the architecture of a design method that proposes to create an animation. The aim is to create a conceptual and methodological tutorial to address this issue both scientifically and in practice. This objective also includes proposing, on strong scientific basis, a model that gives the possibility of a better understanding of the techniques necessary to create a realistic animation.

  20. Creating Practitioners of Design for Quality through Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Antony John

    1998-01-01

    The above paper described my experiences of teaching engineering students to be able to create products of the highest design quality. The paper identifies the need to have a good understanding of the needs of the customer and to be able to create products, which have a range of quality attributes...... would be of higher quality and provide greater customer satisfaction if designers were continually aware of all life-phase needs....

  1. Use FOMO to Create Urgency in the Booking Process

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Create a sense of urgency and “fear of missing out” (FOMO) to nudge people to book faster. People feel more compelled to buy if they believe they are about to miss out on a limited-time offer or a good deal. This type of urgency is about creating “scarcity value,” a concept that OTAs have mastered and implemented systematically on their OTA websites to stimulate purchase behavior.

  2. Management challenges in creating value from business analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Vidgen, Richard; Shaw, S.; Grant, D.G.

    2017-01-01

    The popularity of big data and business analytics has increased tremendously in the last decade and a key challenge for organizations is in understanding how to leverage them to create business value. However, while the literature acknowledges the importance of these topics little work has addressed them from the organization’s point of view. This paper investigates the challenges faced by organizational managers seeking to become more data and information-driven in order to create value. Emp...

  3. Soft Systems Methodology Embedded in Organizational Knowledge-Creating Process

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Taketoshi

    2005-01-01

    We clarify the role of tacit knowing in the soft systems methodology. For the purpose we investigate the basic structure of its seven-stage model, while embedding the soft systems methodology in organizational knowledge-creating process. This leads to the introduction of concept creation to the methodology. This changes the basic shape of the soft systems methodology from learning cycle to organizational knowledge-creating spiral where concept creation is the key point.

  4. Creating Intangible Value through a Corporate Employee Portal

    OpenAIRE

    David Mendes; Jorge Gomes; Mário Romao

    2017-01-01

    Organizations create competitive advantage by creating more economic value than their rivals. Increasing business competition and information technology development have both led to huge corporate organizational changes and have raised the importance of intangible assets along the value chain. Value creation and the success of organizations increasingly depends on the leverage of knowledge available internally, as nowadays it has become essential to understand employee portals’ business value...

  5. Creating Virtual Exhibitions for Educational and Cultural Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela DUMITRESCU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents different tools and mechanisms to implement a virtual exhibition in different cultural areas, such as museums and libraries. Quality characteristics of virtual exhibitions are identified and described. The possibility to create native mobile applications for virtual exhibitions presentation is analyzed. The functional flow of creating a virtual exhibition is presented and discussed. The Seals - History Treasure exhibition is presented and significant historical documents are revealed.

  6. Legal and Organizational Issues in Collaborative User-Created Content

    OpenAIRE

    Sarvas, Risto

    2005-01-01

    Introduction In this paper we look into issues that arise when people collaboratively create digital content and want to publicly distribute it. We identify and analyze the issues based on four case studies on amateur content production. In our analysis we discuss the issues both from the amateurs’ point of view, and also, from the game brand owners’ perspective. User-created content (UCC) in games has become popular as demonstrated by game-related skins, mods and extensions, screenshots, gam...

  7. Creating value through CSR across company functions and NGO collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodsgård, Lise; Aagaard, Annabeth

    2017-01-01

    -NGO partnerships in the creation of sustainable innovation. The purpose of this study is to set up a model for defining these business-NGO partnerships and to investigate through a multiple cross-sectoral case-study how the different partnership types are managed to create strategic value through sustainable...... innovation. The findings reveal different practices, opportunities and challenges in creating sustainable innovation within the different types of business-NGO partnerships....

  8. Upgrading well plates using open microfluidic patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Samuel B; Zhang, Tianzi; Day, John H; Su, Xiaojing; Wilson, Ilham Z; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B

    2017-12-05

    Cellular communication between multiple cell types is a ubiquitous process that is responsible for vital physiological responses observed in vivo (e.g., immune response, organ function). Many in vitro coculture strategies have been developed, both in traditional culture and microscale systems, and have shown the potential to recreate some of the physiological behaviors of organs or groups of cells. A fundamental limitation of current systems is the difficulty of reconciling the additional engineering requirements for creating soluble factor signaling systems (e.g., segregated cell culture) with the use of well-characterized materials and platforms that have demonstrated successful results and biocompatibility in assays. We present a new open-microfluidic platform, the Monorail Device, that is placed in any existing well plate or Petri dish and enables patterning of segregated coculture regions, thereby allowing the direct upgrade of monoculture experiments into multiculture assays. Our platform patterns biocompatible hydrogel walls via microfluidic spontaneous capillary flow (SCF) along a rail insert set inside commercially available cultureware, creating customized pipette-accessible cell culture chambers that require fewer cells than standard macroscale culture. Importantly, the device allows the use of native surfaces without additional modification or treatments, while creating permeable dividers for the diffusion of soluble factors. Additionally, the ease of patterning afforded by our platform makes reconfiguration of the culture region as simple as changing the rail insert. We demonstrate the ability of the device to pattern flows on a variety of cell culture surfaces and create hydrogel walls in complex and precise shapes. We characterize the physical parameters that enable a reproducible SCF-driven flow and highlight specialized design features that increase the ease of use of the device and control of the open microfluidic flow. Further, we present the

  9. Developing Visual Editors for High-Resolution Haptic Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuartielles, David; Göransson, Andreas; Olsson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In this article we give an overview of our iterative work in developing visual editors for creating high resolution haptic patterns to be used in wearable, haptic feedback devices. During the past four years we have found the need to address the question of how to represent, construct and edit high...... resolution haptic patterns so that they translate naturally to the user’s haptic experience. To solve this question we have developed and tested several visual editors...

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of pattern formation and pattern recognition in the rabbit olfactory bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Bill

    1986-10-01

    A mathematical model of the process of pattern recognition in the first olfactory sensory cortex of the rabbit is presented. It explains the formation and alteration of spatial patterns in neural activity observed experimentally during classical Pavlovian conditioning. On each inspiration of the animal, a surge of receptor input enters the olfactory bulb. EEG activity recorded at the surface of the bulb undergoes a transition from a low amplitude background state of temporal disorder to coherent oscillation. There is a distinctive spatial pattern of rms amplitude in this oscillation which changes reliably to a second pattern during each successful recognition by the animal of a conditioned stimulus odor. When a new odor is paired as conditioned stimulus, these patterns are replaced by new patterns that stabilize as the animal adapts to the new environment. I will argue that a unification of the theories of pattern formation and associative memory is required to account for these observations. This is achieved in a model of the bulb as a discrete excitable medium with spatially inhomogeneous coupling expressed by a connection matrix. The theory of multiple Hopf bifurcations is employed to find coupled equations for the amplitudes of competing unstable oscillatory modes. These may be created in the system by proper coupling and selectively evoked by specific classes of inputs. This allows a view of limit cycle attractors as “stored” fixed points of a gradient vector field and thereby recovers the more familiar dynamical systems picture of associative memory.

  11. Modified Tumescent Solution for Creating Working Space During Endoscopic Thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Yong; Zhao, Wen-Xin; Wang, Bo; Yan, Shou-Yi; Wen, Jia

    2018-04-01

    To study the feasibility of gas-liquid mixing tumescent solution for creating a working space (WS) in endoscopic thyroidectomy (ET). A prospective study was performed on 186 patients with thyroid tumor who had undergone ET via chest and breast approach. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups to receive traditional tumescent solution as group A and modified tumescent solution (gas-liquid mixing tumescent solution) as group B. This study compares the following surgical outcome parameters between the 2 groups, including changes of blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation before and after creating a WS, time for creating a WS, operative time, hemorrhage volume for creating a WS, overall hemorrhage volume, overall postoperative drainage volume, postoperative pain score, postoperative hospitalization, number of retrieved lymph nodes, total serum calcium, serum parathyroid hormone, and cases of transient and permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. No postoperative bleeding, permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, incision and surgical site infection, air embolism, flap injury occurred in both groups. The mean time for creating a WS and the whole operation in group B was significantly shorter than that in group A ( P .05). The clinical application of gas-liquid mixing tumescent solution can effectively reduce the time for creating a WS and whole operative time, and worthy of being widely used in ET as a safe and effective technique.

  12. Cavitation microstreaming and stress fields created by microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, James; Manasseh, Richard; Liovic, Petar; Tho, Paul; Ooi, Andrew; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Zhu, Yonggang

    2010-02-01

    Cavitation microstreaming plays a role in the therapeutic action of microbubbles driven by ultrasound, such as the sonoporative and sonothrombolytic phenomena. Microscopic particle-image velocimetry experiments are presented. Results show that many different microstreaming patterns are possible around a microbubble when it is on a surface, albeit for microbubbles much larger than used in clinical practice. Each pattern is associated with a particular oscillation mode of the bubble, and changing between patterns is achieved by changing the sound frequency. Each microstreaming pattern also generates different shear stress and stretch/compression distributions in the vicinity of a bubble on a wall. Analysis of the micro-PIV results also shows that ultrasound-driven microstreaming flows around bubbles are feasible mechanisms for mixing therapeutic agents into the surrounding blood, as well as assisting sonoporative delivery of molecules across cell membranes. Patterns show significant variations around the bubble, suggesting sonoporation may be either enhanced or inhibited in different zones across a cellular surface. Thus, alternating the patterns may result in improved sonoporation and sonothrombolysis. The clear and reproducible delineation of microstreaming patterns based on driving frequency makes frequency-based pattern alternation a feasible alternative to the clinically less desirable practice of increasing sound pressure for equivalent sonoporative or sonothrombolytic effect. Surface divergence is proposed as a measure relevant to sonoporation.

  13. Statistical Pattern Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Statistical pattern recognition relates to the use of statistical techniques for analysing data measurements in order to extract information and make justified decisions.  It is a very active area of study and research, which has seen many advances in recent years. Applications such as data mining, web searching, multimedia data retrieval, face recognition, and cursive handwriting recognition, all require robust and efficient pattern recognition techniques. This third edition provides an introduction to statistical pattern theory and techniques, with material drawn from a wide range of fields,

  14. Parallel Algorithms and Patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, Robert W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-16

    This is a powerpoint presentation on parallel algorithms and patterns. A parallel algorithm is a well-defined, step-by-step computational procedure that emphasizes concurrency to solve a problem. Examples of problems include: Sorting, searching, optimization, matrix operations. A parallel pattern is a computational step in a sequence of independent, potentially concurrent operations that occurs in diverse scenarios with some frequency. Examples are: Reductions, prefix scans, ghost cell updates. We only touch on parallel patterns in this presentation. It really deserves its own detailed discussion which Gabe Rockefeller would like to develop.

  15. User Identification Using Gait Patterns on UbiFloorII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jaeseok

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a system of identifying individuals by their gait patterns. We take into account various distinguishable features that can be extracted from a user’s gait and then divide them into two classes: walking pattern and stepping pattern. The conditions we assume are that our target environments are domestic areas, the number of users is smaller than 10, and all users ambulate with bare feet considering the everyday lifestyle of the Korean home. Under these conditions, we have developed a system that identifies individuals’ gait patterns using our biometric sensor, UbiFloorII. We have created UbiFloorII to collect walking samples and created software modules to extract the user’s gait pattern. To identify the users based on the gait patterns extracted from walking samples over UbiFloorII, we have deployed multilayer perceptron network, a feedforward artificial neural network model. The results show that both walking pattern and stepping pattern extracted from users’ gait over the UbiFloorII are distinguishable enough to identify the users and that fusing two classifiers at the matching score level improves the recognition accuracy. Therefore, our proposed system may provide unobtrusive and automatic user identification methods in ubiquitous computing environments, particularly in domestic areas. PMID:22163758

  16. Edge enhancement improves disruptive camouflage by emphasising false edges and creating pictorial relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, John; Sharman, Rebecca J; Scott-Brown, Kenneth C; Lovell, Paul George

    2016-12-06

    Disruptive colouration is a visual camouflage composed of false edges and boundaries. Many disruptively camouflaged animals feature enhanced edges; light patches are surrounded by a lighter outline and/or a dark patches are surrounded by a darker outline. This camouflage is particularly common in amphibians, reptiles and lepidopterans. We explored the role that this pattern has in creating effective camouflage. In a visual search task utilising an ultra-large display area mimicking search tasks that might be found in nature, edge enhanced disruptive camouflage increases crypsis, even on substrates that do not provide an obvious visual match. Specifically, edge enhanced camouflage is effective on backgrounds both with and without shadows; i.e. this is not solely due to background matching of the dark edge enhancement element with the shadows. Furthermore, when the dark component of the edge enhancement is omitted the camouflage still provided better crypsis than control patterns without edge enhancement. This kind of edge enhancement improved camouflage on all background types. Lastly, we show that edge enhancement can create a perception of multiple surfaces. We conclude that edge enhancement increases the effectiveness of disruptive camouflage through mechanisms that may include the improved disruption of the object outline by implying pictorial relief.

  17. The Application of Data Mining Techniques to Create Promotion Strategy for Mobile Phone Shop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanah, A. U.; Wibowo, K. S.; Dewantoro, H. F.

    2017-12-01

    The number of mobile shop is growing very fast in various regions in Indonesia including in Yogyakarta due to the increasing demand of mobile phone. This fact leads high competition among the mobile phone shops. In these conditions the mobile phone shop should have a good promotion strategy in order to survive in competition, especially for a small mobile phone shop. To create attractive promotion strategy, the companies/shops should know their customer segmentation and the buying pattern of their target market. These kind of analysis can be done using Data mining technique. This study aims to segment customer using Agglomerative Hierarchical Clustering and know customer buying pattern using Association Rule Mining. This result conducted in a mobile shop in Sleman Yogyakarta. The clustering result shows that the biggest customer segment of the shop was male university student who come on weekend and from association rule mining, it can be concluded that tempered glass and smart phone “x” as well as action camera and waterproof monopod and power bank have strong relationship. This results that used to create promotion strategies which are presented in the end of the study.

  18. Antenna Pattern Range (APR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TheAntenna Pattern Range (APR)features a non-metallic arch with a trolley to move the transmit antenna from the horizon to zenith. At the center of the ground plane,...

  19. Four integration patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygstad, Bendik; Nielsen, Peter Axel; Munkvold, Bjørn Erik

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a theory of integration within the field of IS project management. Integration is a key IS project management issue when new systems are developed and implemented into an increasingly integrated information infrastructure in corporate and governmental organizations....... Expanding the perspective of traditional project management research, we draw extensively on central insights from IS research. Building on socio-technical IS research and Software Engineering research we suggest four generic patterns of integration: Big Bang, Stakeholder Integration, Technical Integration...... and Socio-Technical Integration. We analyze and describe the advantages and disadvantages of each pattern. The four patterns are ideal types. To explore the forces and challenges in these patterns three longitudinal case studies were conducted. In particular we investigate the management challenges for each...

  20. Life History Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Owen

    2016-01-01

    of these patterns and highlights the need to consider senescence from a broad taxonomic scope to truly understand the evolution of aging. Keywords: Aging; Demography; Evolution; Fertility; Gompertz; Life span; Mortality; Ontogenescence; Reproduction; Reproductive senescence; Senescence; Survivorship...

  1. Dietary Patterns in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Louise Beltoft Borup

    A healthy diet is essential for healthy growth and development during childhood and may prevent obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases throughout life. Traditionally, diet has been investigated as single nutrients. However, people do not eat one single nutrient and they do not even eat one...... single food. People consume meals and these meals vary during a day, over a year and during a life time. To comprehend some of this complexity it could be advantageous to investigate dietary patterns representing the whole diet as patterns might be better markers of growth and health than single...... childhood. These associations might contribute to the identification of families, who would benefit from guidance to help them establish healthy dietary patterns for their infants. Finding tracking for some infants and changes in adherence to dietary patterns for others as well as the association between...

  2. Caregiving and travel patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the impact of caregiving for older adults on mobility and travel : patterns. Specifically, the focus was on how caregivers managed trips on behalf of : another who receives care. Caregiving is becoming increasingly common as the :...

  3. Windowed fringe pattern analyis

    CERN Document Server

    Kemao, Qian

    2013-01-01

    This book provides solutions to the challenges involved in fringe pattern analysis, covering techniques for full-field, noncontact, and high-sensitivity measurement. The primary goal of fringe pattern analysis is to extract the hidden phase distributions that generally relate to the physical quantities being measured. Both theoretical analysis and algorithm development are covered to facilitate the work of researchers and engineers. The information presented is also appropriate as a specialized subject for students of optical and computer engineering.

  4. Hyponymy Patterns in Romanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verginica Barbu Mititelu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hyponymy is a lexical-semantic relation that has been studied in Romanian linguistics only occasionally and almost exclusively in connection to other relations. However, for computational engineers it offers a very effective way of organizing the lexical material useful in many applications involving Natural Language Processing. In this paper we present two methods of identifying Romanian hyponymy patterns, their results and evaluation; we also envisage the applicability of these patterns and future work

  5. Female pattern hair loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İdil Ünal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Female androgenetic alopecia is the commonest cause of hair loss in women. It is characterized by a diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline and a characteristic pattern distribution in genetically predisposed women. Because of the uncertain relationship with the androgens Female Pattern Hair Loss (FPHL is the most preferred definition of the condition. This review has been focused on the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment alternatives of FPHL.

  6. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy to prepare, cost-effective, and versatile with regards to modification and functionalization. Patterned colloidal PCs contribute a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate-induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification, is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, improved detection sensitivity and response speed of the sensors, control over the flow direction and wicking rate of microfluidic channels, recognition of cross-reactive molecules through an array-patterned microchip, fabrication of display devices with tunable patterns, well-arranged RGB units, and wide viewing-angles, and the ability to construct anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Fuel pattern recognition device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomomi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors normal fuel exchange upon fuel exchanging operation carried out in a reactor of a nuclear power plant. Namely, a fuel exchanger is movably disposed to the upper portion of the reactor and exchanges fuels. An exclusive computer receives operation signals of the fuel exchanger during operation as inputs, and outputs reactor core fuel pattern information signals to a fuel arrangement diagnosis device. An underwater television camera outputs image signals of a fuel pattern in the reactor core to an image processing device. If there is any change in the image signals for the fuel pattern as a result of the fuel exchange operation of the fuel exchanger, the image processing device outputs the change as image signals to the fuel pattern diagnosis device. The fuel pattern diagnosis device compares the pattern information signals from the exclusive computer with the image signals from the image processing device, to diagnose the result of the fuel exchange operation performed by the fuel exchanger and inform the diagnosis by means of an image display. (I.S.)

  8. The global coherence initiative: creating a coherent planetary standing wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCraty, Rollin; Deyhle, Annette; Childre, Doc

    2012-03-01

    via biological, electromagnetic, and nonlocal fields, it stands to reason that humans can work together in a co-creative relationship to consciously increase the coherence in the global field environment, which in turn distributes this information to all living systems within the field. GCI was established to help facilitate the shift in global consciousness from instability and discord to balance, cooperation, and enduring peace. A primary goal of GCI is to test the hypothesis that large numbers of people when in a heart-coherent state and holding a shared intention can encode information on the earth's energetic and geomagnetic fields, which act as carrier waves of this physiologically patterned and relevant information. In order to conduct this research, a global network of 12 to 14 ultrasensitive magnetic field detectors specifically designed to measure the earth's magnetic resonances is being installed strategically around the planet. More important is GCI's primary goal to motivate as many people as possible to work together in a more coherent and collaborative manner to increase the collective human consciousness. If we are persuaded that not only external fields of solar and cosmic origins but also human attention and emotion can directly affect the physical world and the mental and emotional states of others (consciousness), it broadens our view of what interconnectedness means and how it can be intentionally utilized to shape the future of the world we live in. It implies that our attitudes, emotions, and intentions matter and that coherent, cooperative intent can have positive effects. GCI hypothesizes that when enough individuals and social groups increase their coherence baseline and utilize that increased coherence to intentionally create a more coherent standing reference wave in the global field, it will help increase global consciousness. This can be achieved when an increasing number of people move towards more balanced and self-regulated emotions

  9. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyka G. Jayasinghe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. : Jayasinghe et al. identify nearly 2,000 splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs from over 8,000 tumor samples across 33 cancer types. They provide a more accurate interpretation of previously mis-annotated mutations, highlighting the importance of integrating data types to understand the functional and the clinical implications of splicing mutations in human disease. Keywords: splicing, RNA, mutations of clinical relevance

  10. IBES: A Tool for Creating Instructions Based on Event Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina eMura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Receiving informative, well-structured, and well-designed instructions supports performance and memory in assembly tasks. We describe IBES, a tool with which users can quickly and easily create multimedia, step-by-step instructions by segmenting a video of a task into segments. In a validation study we demonstrate that the step-by-step structure of the visual instructions created by the tool corresponds to the natural event boundaries, which are assessed by event segmentation and are known to play an important role in memory processes. In one part of the study, twenty participants created instructions based on videos of two different scenarios by using the proposed tool. In the other part of the study, ten and twelve participants respectively segmented videos of the same scenarios yielding event boundaries for coarse and fine events. We found that the visual steps chosen by the participants for creating the instruction manual had corresponding events in the event segmentation. The number of instructional steps was a compromise between the number of fine and coarse events. Our interpretation of results is that the tool picks up on natural human event perception processes of segmenting an ongoing activity into events and enables the convenient transfer into meaningful multimedia instructions for assembly tasks. We discuss the practical application of IBES, for example, creating manuals for differing expertise levels, and give suggestions for research on user-oriented instructional design based on this tool.

  11. IBES: a tool for creating instructions based on event segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Katharina; Petersen, Nils; Huff, Markus; Ghose, Tandra

    2013-12-26

    Receiving informative, well-structured, and well-designed instructions supports performance and memory in assembly tasks. We describe IBES, a tool with which users can quickly and easily create multimedia, step-by-step instructions by segmenting a video of a task into segments. In a validation study we demonstrate that the step-by-step structure of the visual instructions created by the tool corresponds to the natural event boundaries, which are assessed by event segmentation and are known to play an important role in memory processes. In one part of the study, 20 participants created instructions based on videos of two different scenarios by using the proposed tool. In the other part of the study, 10 and 12 participants respectively segmented videos of the same scenarios yielding event boundaries for coarse and fine events. We found that the visual steps chosen by the participants for creating the instruction manual had corresponding events in the event segmentation. The number of instructional steps was a compromise between the number of fine and coarse events. Our interpretation of results is that the tool picks up on natural human event perception processes of segmenting an ongoing activity into events and enables the convenient transfer into meaningful multimedia instructions for assembly tasks. We discuss the practical application of IBES, for example, creating manuals for differing expertise levels, and give suggestions for research on user-oriented instructional design based on this tool.

  12. Single-unit pattern generators for quadruped locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morse, Gregory; Risi, Sebastian; Snyder, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Legged robots can potentially venture beyond the limits of wheeled vehicles. While creating controllers for such robots by hand is possible, evolutionary algorithms are an alternative that can reduce the burden of hand-crafting robotic controllers. Although major evolutionary approaches to legged...... on a new type of neuron called a single-unit pattern generator (SUPG). The SUPG, which is indirectly encoded by a compositional pattern producing network (CPPN) evolved by HyperNEAT, produces a flexible temporal activation pattern that can be reset and repeated at any time through an explicit trigger input...

  13. Android design patterns interaction design solutions for developers

    CERN Document Server

    Nudelman, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Master the challenges of Android user interface development with these sample patterns With Android 4, Google brings the full power of its Android OS to both smartphone and tablet computing. Designing effective user interfaces that work on multiple Android devices is extremely challenging. This book provides more than 75 patterns that you can use to create versatile user interfaces for both smartphones and tablets, saving countless hours of development time. Patterns cover the most common and yet difficult types of user interactions, and each is supported with richly illustrate

  14. Method and Apparatus for Creating a Topography at a Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David P.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Mayer, Thomas M.; Vasile, Michael J.; Sweatt, William C.

    2008-11-11

    Methods and apparatus whereby an optical interferometer is utilized to monitor and provide feedback control to an integrated energetic particle column, to create desired topographies, including the depth, shape and/or roughness of features, at a surface of a specimen. Energetic particle columns can direct energetic species including, ions, photons and/or neutral particles to a surface to create features having in-plane dimensions on the order of 1 micron, and a height or depth on the order of 1 nanometer. Energetic processes can include subtractive processes such as sputtering, ablation, focused ion beam milling and, additive processes, such as energetic beam induced chemical vapor deposition. The integration of interferometric methods with processing by energetic species offers the ability to create desired topographies at surfaces, including planar and curved shapes.

  15. Creating healthy work in small enterprises - from understanding to action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephen, Legg; Ian S., laird; Olsen, Kirsten Bendix

    2014-01-01

    Although much is known about small and medium enterprises (SMEs), our current knowledge and understanding of occupational health and safety (OHS) and the work environment in SMEs is limited. Far less is known about how SMEs put our knowledge of OSH into action. In short, how do we create healthy...... work and healthy lives as well as ‘healthy business' in SMEs? The present paper, which also acts as an editorial for this special issue, addresses these questions by providing a summary of current knowledge - our understanding - about how to create healthy work and healthy lives for workers and owner......-managers in SMEs whilst concurrently also aiming to create a healthy business (in terms of profitability and sustainability). This paper and the special issue also emphasise the need to convert this knowledge into action - ‘from understanding to action'....

  16. Creating safety by strengthening clinicians' capacity for reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This commentary explores the nature of creating safety in the here-and-now. Creating safety encompasses two dimensions: revisiting specific behaviours by focusing on substandard performance (reflection), and a more broad-ranging attention to everyday behaviours that are taken as given (reflexivity). The piece pays particular attention to this second dimension of creating safety. Two techniques that promote reflexivity are discussed: video-filming real-time, everyday clinical practice and inviting clinicians' feedback about their own footage, and reflecting on the knowledge and questions that patients and families have about their care, and about unexpected outcomes and clinical incidents. The piece concludes that feedback about everyday practice using these methods is critical to enhancing the safety of everyday activity. PMID:21450780

  17. Creating Value through Virtual Teams: A Current Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akemi Takeoka Chatfield

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Globally, virtual teams (VT as ICT-enabled emergent network organisation forms have gained international validity by innovative organisations, with a corresponding surge of interest in understanding how organisations can leverage VT to create business value. Despite growing deliberations in VT literature on managing VT, tasks and outcomes, however, creating business value through VT remains an unresolved theoretical and pragmatic conundrum. A review of prior relevant literature is essential to advancing knowledge. The paucity of published review articles seems to have impeded the field’s accumulation of VT knowledge. This research, therefore, reviews the current literature on case studies of VT to address the question: What are organisational challenges in creating business value through VT in the organisation? The key challenges found in the literature are effective communication, knowledge sharing, trust, and interpersonal skills in the new virtual boundary-less environment. Drawing on the IT business value model, we also discuss their resource-based implications.

  18. Creating the future with all finance and financial conglomerates

    CERN Document Server

    Berghe, Lutgart

    1998-01-01

    Creating the Future with All Finance and Financial Conglomerates comprises an academic search for an understanding of all finance and financial conglomerates. It presents a strategic and economic analysis of diversification strategies and the growing interface between different types of financial firms. On the basis of a solid analysis of theoretical foundations and practical value, the book develops basic concepts of creating the future: especially solutions in managing risks and fresh ideas for the development of integrated financial services. The structure of the book is logical: starting on theoretical foundations (section 1, part A) and examining the economic value of All Finance and Financial Conglomerates (part B), leads to creating a concept for the future (part C). Case studies add additional practical value to this research. The review of the subject is completed by aspects of risk management in this sector and by political guidelines for the EU single market (section 2). The book builds further on ...

  19. Understanding User Behavioral Patterns in Open Knowledge Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianmin; Song, Shuqiang; Zhao, Xinshuo; Yu, Shengquan

    2018-01-01

    Open knowledge communities (OKCs) have become popular in the era of knowledge economy. This study aimed to explore how users collaboratively create and share knowledge in OKCs. In particular, this research identified the behavior distribution and behavioral patterns of users by conducting frequency distribution and lag sequential analyses. Some…

  20. CREATING DIGITAL ELEVATION MODEL USING A MOBILE DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. İ. Durmaz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available DEM (Digital Elevation Models is the best way to interpret topography on the ground. In recent years, lidar technology allows to create more accurate elevation models. However, the problem is this technology is not common all over the world. Also if Lidar data are not provided by government agencies freely, people have to pay lots of money to reach these point clouds. In this article, we will discuss how we can create digital elevation model from less accurate mobile devices’ GPS data. Moreover, we will evaluate these data on the same mobile device which we collected data to reduce cost of this modeling.

  1. Combine To Create Size or Growing From Small To Big?

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Thian Han

    2013-01-01

    Many companies seek to acquire or merge to grow. Size has always been the underlying rationale for mergers and acquisitions (“M&A”) as the creation of larger entities will purportedly increase the capacity of the entities hence allowing them to take advantage of economies of scale and scope. Another reason for M&A is to create a “portfolio of core competences” by combining and exploiting the core competences of the two entities to create synergy and to enhance the competitive edge for the enl...

  2. Blender production creating short animations from start to finish

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Blender has become one of the most popular 3D animation tools on the market because it is robust and absolutely free. Blender Production is the definitive resource for anyone who wants to create short animations from scratch. With this book, and Blender, you have the ideal platform to make it happen.  Blender expert and author Roland Hess walks you through the entire process of creating a short animation including: writing, storyboarding, blocking, character creation, animation, rendering, and production. The associated web site includes the full Blender software kit and a compl

  3. Twelve tips for creating an academic teaching portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little-Wienert, Kim; Mazziotti, Mark

    2018-01-01

    An academic teaching portfolio is not only a requirement at many academic teaching institutions, but it is also important in a medical educator's growth and development through documentation, reflection, evaluation, and change. Creating an academic portfolio may appear daunting at first but with careful advanced preparation, organized evidence collection of your educational work, proof of scholarship, and thorough documentation of self-reflection and change, you can produce a successful product that accurately represents your educational beliefs, accomplishments, and growth throughout your career. This article provides medical educators with twelve steps for creating a successful academic teaching portfolio.

  4. Creating perturbations from a decaying field during inflation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazumdar, A.; Wang, L.

    2013-01-01

    Typically, the fluctuations generated from a decaying field during inflation do not contribute to the large scale structures. In this paper, we provide an example where it is possible for a field which slowly rolls and then decays during inflation to create all the matter perturbations with a sli......Typically, the fluctuations generated from a decaying field during inflation do not contribute to the large scale structures. In this paper, we provide an example where it is possible for a field which slowly rolls and then decays during inflation to create all the matter perturbations...

  5. Picture models for 2-scene comics creating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki UENO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, computer understanding pictures and stories becomes one of the most important research topics in computer science. However, there are few researches about human like understanding by computers because pictures have not certain format and contain more lyric aspect than that of natural laguage. For picture understanding, a comic is the suitable target because it is consisted by clear and simple plot of stories and separated scenes.In this paper, we propose 2 different types of picture models for 2-scene comics creating system. We also show the method of the application of 2-scene comics creating system by means of proposed picture model.

  6. Creating multithemed ecological regions for macroscale ecology: Testing a flexible, repeatable, and accessible clustering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvelil, Kendra Spence; Yuan, Shuai; Webster, Katherine E.; Tan, Pang-Ning; Lapierre, Jean-Francois; Collins, Sarah M.; Fergus, C. Emi; Scott, Caren E.; Norton Henry, Emily; Soranno, Patricia A.; Filstrup, Christopher T.; Wagner, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    Understanding broad-scale ecological patterns and processes often involves accounting for regional-scale heterogeneity. A common way to do so is to include ecological regions in sampling schemes and empirical models. However, most existing ecological regions were developed for specific purposes, using a limited set of geospatial features and irreproducible methods. Our study purpose was to: (1) describe a method that takes advantage of recent computational advances and increased availability of regional and global data sets to create customizable and reproducible ecological regions, (2) make this algorithm available for use and modification by others studying different ecosystems, variables of interest, study extents, and macroscale ecology research questions, and (3) demonstrate the power of this approach for the research question—How well do these regions capture regional-scale variation in lake water quality? To achieve our purpose we: (1) used a spatially constrained spectral clustering algorithm that balances geospatial homogeneity and region contiguity to create ecological regions using multiple terrestrial, climatic, and freshwater geospatial data for 17 northeastern U.S. states (~1,800,000 km2); (2) identified which of the 52 geospatial features were most influential in creating the resulting 100 regions; and (3) tested the ability of these ecological regions to capture regional variation in water nutrients and clarity for ~6,000 lakes. We found that: (1) a combination of terrestrial, climatic, and freshwater geospatial features influenced region creation, suggesting that the oft-ignored freshwater landscape provides novel information on landscape variability not captured by traditionally used climate and terrestrial metrics; and (2) the delineated regions captured macroscale heterogeneity in ecosystem properties not included in region delineation—approximately 40% of the variation in total phosphorus and water clarity among lakes was at the regional

  7. Chemomechanical functionalization and patterning of silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Lua, Yit-Yian; Lee, Michael V; Linford, Matthew R

    2005-12-01

    The chemomechanical method has emerged as a straightforward and convenient tool for simultaneously functionalizing and patterning silicon. This technique simply consists of wetting (or exposing) a silicon surface to a reactive chemical and then scribing. Scribing activates the surface and leads to monolayer formation. The properties of the monolayers are dependent on the reactive chemicals used, and mixed monolayers and funtionalized monolayers are easily produced with mixed chemicals or alpha,omega-bifunctional compounds, respectively. Both micrometer and nanometer sized functionalized features have been created. It has been shown that this technique has potential in a variety of applications.

  8. Pattern graph rewrite systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleks Kissinger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available String diagrams are a powerful tool for reasoning about physical processes, logic circuits, tensor networks, and many other compositional structures. Dixon, Duncan and Kissinger introduced string graphs, which are a combinatoric representations of string diagrams, amenable to automated reasoning about diagrammatic theories via graph rewrite systems. In this extended abstract, we show how the power of such rewrite systems can be greatly extended by introducing pattern graphs, which provide a means of expressing infinite families of rewrite rules where certain marked subgraphs, called !-boxes ("bang boxes", on both sides of a rule can be copied any number of times or removed. After reviewing the string graph formalism, we show how string graphs can be extended to pattern graphs and how pattern graphs and pattern rewrite rules can be instantiated to concrete string graphs and rewrite rules. We then provide examples demonstrating the expressive power of pattern graphs and how they can be applied to study interacting algebraic structures that are central to categorical quantum mechanics.

  9. How Business Idea Fit Affects Sustainability and Creates Opportunities for Value Co-Creation in Nascent Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Luca Casali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A well-defined business idea is essential for nascent business sustainability in the future. The business idea must fit firm knowledge and resources to a profitable business opportunity. This work adopts the framework of value co-creation, strongly related to the service-dominant logic paradigm. We ask how does business idea fit affect new venture sustainability and create opportunities for value co-creation. We propose that a business idea that lacks fit is less sustainable, but it could create opportunities for value co-creation. This study develops and validates an empirically grounded taxonomy of business idea fit based on 729 Australian nascent firms using quantitative data generated from the results of a large study called CAUSEE (Comprehensive Australian Study of Entrepreneurial Emergence. A cluster analysis is used to identify distinct patterns of business idea fit. The empirical taxonomy developed in this study found four distinct clusters of firms, which were distinguished by the fit of their new business idea to knowledge, resources and market profitability: very good fit, low knowledge fit, low profit fit and low fit. Results show how these different patterns of fit create opportunities for value co-creation to create business future sustainability.

  10. Three-dimensional recurring patterns in excitable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biton, Y.; Rabinovitch, A.; Braunstein, D.; Friedman, M.; Aviram, I.

    2011-01-01

    A new method to create three-dimensional periodic patterns in excitable media is presented. The method is demonstrated and the patterns are obtained with the help of two types of 3D 'spiral pairs' generators, which are respectively based on a 'corner effect' and a 'unidirectional propagation' processes. The results portray time-repeating patterns resembling fruits or potteries. The method is easy to implement and can be used to form other types of 3D patterns in excitable media. The question of periodicity of the patterns thus obtained is resolved by calculating the singular lines (filaments) around which they evolve and showing their unique reattachment property. Actual realizations could be conceived e.g. in chemical reactions such as Belousov-Zhabotinsky. Possible severe cardiac arrhythmias following the appearance of such patterns in the action potential of the heart are considered. -- Highlights: → New method to create three-dimensional periodic patterns in excitable media. → Singular lines (filaments) for the corner effect are presented. → Filaments are shown to exhibit periodic behavior.

  11. Nekton density patterns and hurricane recovery in submerged aquatic vegetation, and along non-vegetated natural and created edge habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Peyre, M.K.; Gordon, J.

    2012-01-01

    We compared nekton habitat value of submerged aquatic vegetation, flooded non-vegetated natural and man-made edge habitats in mesohaline interior marsh areas in southwest Louisiana using a 1-m 2 throw trap and 3-mm bag seine. When present, SAV habitats supported close to 4 times greater densities and higher species richness of nekton as compared to either natural or man-made edge habitats, which supported similar densities to one another. Three species of concern (bayou killifish, diamond killifish, chain pipefish) were targeted in the analysis, and two of the three were collected almost entirely in SAV habitat. During the course of the study, Hurricanes Ike and Gustav passed directly over the study sites in September 2008. Subsequent analyses indicated significant reductions in resident nekton density 1-mo post hurricanes, and only limited recovery 13-mo post-hurricane. Possible alteration of environmental characteristics such as scouring of SAV habitat, deposition of sediment over SAV, edge erosion and marsh loss, and extended high salinities may explain these lasting impacts. ?? 2011.

  12. G ∘ F Patterns

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The book of design patterns known as Gang of Four has been a kind of Bible for all the developers of my generation. Its main pro has been giving us a common vocabulary: when a programmer says “here I used a strategy pattern” all colleagues know of what he is speaking about. Nevertheless the biggest issue with this is that almost all patterns listed in that book, especially the behavioural ones, are a only workaround for a missing abstraction: higher order functions. The introduction of lambda expressions in Java 8 finally allows all Java developers to remove this no longer necessary and cumbersome object oriented infrastructure from their code. The purpose of this talk is showing, through a series of live coding examples, how the most common GoF patterns can be rethought and reimplemented in a simpler and more concise functional way leveraging Java 8 lambdas.

  13. Settlement patterns and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Kåre

    This paper discusses settlement patterns and sustainability. Generally urbanization is recognised as an inevitable development driven by job opportunities, better service supply, education, and health services, and it is argued that this is the main driver for centralisation. Research based...... on economic and demographic studies and a large series of interviews problematize this. In Greenland the historical correlation between settlement pattern and livelihood has been decoupled, so that distributions of jobs and potential earnings to a growing extend is a consequence of political and...

  14. Patterns of data modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Blaha, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Best-selling author and database expert with more than 25 years of experience modeling application and enterprise data, Dr. Michael Blaha provides tried and tested data model patterns, to help readers avoid common modeling mistakes and unnecessary frustration on their way to building effective data models. Unlike the typical methodology book, "Patterns of Data Modeling" provides advanced techniques for those who have mastered the basics. Recognizing that database representation sets the path for software, determines its flexibility, affects its quality, and influences whether it succ

  15. Workflow User Interfaces Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta una colección de patrones de diseño de interfaces de usuario para sistemas de información para el flujo de trabajo; la colección incluye cuarenta y tres patrones clasificados en siete categorías identificados a partir de la lógica del ciclo de vida de la tarea sobre la base de la oferta y la asignación de tareas a los responsables de realizarlas (i. e. recursos humanos durante el flujo de trabajo. Cada patrón de la interfaz de usuario de flujo de trabajo (WUIP, por sus siglas en inglés se caracteriza por las propiedades expresadas en el lenguaje PLML para expresar patrones y complementado por otros atributos y modelos que se adjuntan a dicho modelo: la interfaz de usuario abstracta y el modelo de tareas correspondiente. Estos modelos se especifican en un lenguaje de descripción de interfaces de usuario. Todos los WUIPs se almacenan en una biblioteca y se pueden recuperar a través de un editor de flujo de trabajo que vincula a cada patrón de asignación de trabajo a su WUIP correspondiente.A collection of user interface design patterns for workflow information systems is presented that contains forty three resource patterns classified in seven categories. These categories and their corresponding patterns have been logically identified from the task life cycle based on offering and allocation operations. Each Workflow User Interface Pattern (WUIP is characterized by properties expressed in the PLML markup language for expressing patterns and augmented by additional attributes and models attached to the pattern: the abstract user interface and the corresponding task model. These models are specified in a User Interface Description Language. All WUIPs are stored in a library and can be retrieved within a workflow editor that links each workflow pattern to its corresponding WUIP, thus giving rise to a user interface for each workflow pattern.

  16. Does pattern-welding make Anglo-Saxon swords stronger?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    to assess whether the technique affects mechanical properties, this experimental study compared pattern-welded and plain forged blanks in a series of material tests. Specimens were subject to tensile, Charpy and Vickers diamond hardness testing. This was to investigate the relative strength, ductility......The purpose of pattern-welding, used for the construction of some Anglo-Saxon swords, has yet to be fully resolved. One suggestion is that the technique enhanced the mechanical properties of a blade. Another explanation is that pattern-welding created a desired aesthetic appearance. In order...... and toughness of pattern-welding. The results were inconclusive, however the study revealed that the fracture performance of pattern-welding may relate to its use....

  17. A Global Online Handwriting Recognition Approach Based on Frequent Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gmati

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the handwriting signals are represented based on geometric and spatio-temporal characteristics to increase the feature vectors relevance of each object. The main goal was to extract features in the form of a numeric vector based on the extraction of frequent patterns. We used two types of frequent motifs (closed frequent patterns and maximal frequent patterns that can represent handwritten characters pertinently. These common features patterns are generated from a raw data transformation method to achieve high relevance. A database of words consisting of two different letters was created. The proposed application gives promising results and highlights the advantages that frequent pattern extraction algorithms can achieve, as well as the central role played by the “minimum threshold” parameter in the overall description of the characters.

  18. Creating Ribo-T: (Design, Build, Test)n.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Erik D

    2015-11-20

    Engineering biology is especially challenging given our relatively poor ability to rationally design within life's complex design landscape. Thus, moving through the engineering "design, build, test" cycle multiple times accumulates system knowledge and hopefully yields a successful design. Here I discuss the engineering process behind our recently published work creating a ribosome with tethered subunits, Ribo-T.

  19. Recommendations from the Field: Creating an LGBTQ Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaekel, Kathryn S.

    2015-01-01

    This article details the creation of a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) learning community. Created because of research that indicates chilly campus climates (Rankin, 2005), as well as particular needs of LGBTQ students in the classroom, this learning community focused upon LGBTQ topics in and out of the classroom. While…

  20. The Ties that Bind: Creating Great Customer Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Offers suggestions for libraries on how to develop a customer service plan to provide excellent service, create a positive environment for staff members, foster new and continued positive relationships with patrons, and evaluate customer service goals and objectives. Also discusses policies and building appearance. (Author/LRW)

  1. Creating a Winning Game Plan. The Secondary Teacher's Playbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Michael D.

    This book offers strategies for high school teachers that provide tools for creating, repairing, and tweaking all the discernible components of teaching. The book is organized to move from context to teaching to discipline to thriving in teaching. The book includes tips on how to minimize discipline problems with effective curriculum and sound…

  2. Panel Discussion: Creating a Spirit of Inquiry in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leh, Sandra Kundrik; Melincavage, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    A paucity of published literature exists related to the use of panel discussion as a teaching strategy. This article describes the panel discussion, the underpinnings of constructivism and the use of panel discussion to create a constructivist classroom environment. Details of planning, evaluating, and challenges of a panel discussion are also…

  3. Learning through Creating Robotic Models of Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperman, Dan; Verner, Igor M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers an approach to studying issues in technology and science, which integrates design and inquiry activities towards creating and exploring technological models of scientific phenomena. We implemented this approach in a context where the learner inquires into a biological phenomenon and develops its representation in the form of a…

  4. Creating a Model for Graduate Student Inclusion and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duranczyk, Irene M.; Franko, Jennifer; Osifuye, Shade'; Barton, Amy; Higbee, Jeanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring and advising are critical aspects of the graduate student experience, and can have a significant impact on the professional lives of future postsecondary faculty and staff and a rippling effect throughout higher education and the global economy. This paper describes the process a new department undertook to create a graduate program that…

  5. Teaching Statistics: Creating an Intersection for Intra and Interdisciplinarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Annie; Manuel, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Statistics is taught in mathematics courses in all school levels. We suggest that using rich tasks in statistics can develop statistical reasoning and create both intra and interdisciplinary links in students. In this paper, we present three case studies where middle school mathematics teachers used different tasks in lessons on pie charts. We…

  6. Identifying the challenges of creating an optimal dissemination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is crucial that census data is disseminated in such a way that it satisfies most user needs as far as possible, to ensure that there is optimum use of the information and that maximum value for money is provided. In the past, Statistics South Africa disseminated data at the same geographic level created for data collection.

  7. Creating a streaming video collection for your library

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Cheryl J

    2014-01-01

    Creating a Streaming Video Collection for Your Library covers the main processes associated with streaming video, from licensing to access and evaluation, and will serve as a key reference and source of best practices for libraries adding streaming video titles to their collections.

  8. Creating a Total Quality Environment (TQE) for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Jann E.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a model for creating a total quality environment (TQE) for learning in which everyone is considered a learner. The model consists of 11 interrelated characteristics derived from the literature in the areas of continuous improvement, leadership, learning, learning organizations, and spirituality. The characteristics in the…

  9. Creating Complex Repository Collections, Such as Journals, with Manakin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Jack; Mikeal, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a devised method of collection organisation within a DSpace repository using a Manakin theme and descriptive metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Using a Manakin theme, a user interface for a repository collection containing the contents of a serial was created to divide the collection into…

  10. Inclusive Teaching Circles: Mechanisms for Creating Welcoming Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sharon; Wallace, Sherri L.; Schack, Gina; Thomas, M. Shelley; Lewis, Linda; Wilson, Linda; Miller, Shawnise; D'Antoni, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines the Inclusive Teaching Circle (ITC) as a mechanism for faculty development in creating instructional tools that embrace an inclusive pedagogy reflecting diversity, cultural competence and social justice. We describe one group's year-long participation in an ITC at a large, metropolitan research university in the south. Next, we…

  11. Creating an Excellence Oriented Post-merged Organisational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article specifically focuses on the importance of a structured approach to the implementation of employee engagement strategies in creating a post-merged organisational culture of excellent work performance. Theoretical insights from existing literature illustrate how a structured approach to the implementation of ...

  12. Businesses Partner with Schools, Community to Create Alternative Career Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Stephenie

    2012-01-01

    Business, education and community leaders are working together to create alternative career pathways for young people who are not profiting from the four-year college track. The new Pathways to Prosperity Network brings together the Pathways to Prosperity Project at Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), Jobs for the Future (JFF) and six…

  13. Creating high energy density in nuclei with energetic antiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of creating a phase change in nuclear matter using energetic antiprotons and antideuterons is examined. It is found that energy densities of the order of 2 GeV/c can be obtained for periods of approx.2 fm/c with the proper experimental selection of events. 10 refs., 7 figs

  14. Higher Education Technology and Research: Creating Excellence through State Investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Jersey Commission on Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Colleges and universities in New Jersey play a critical role in building and sustaining economic prosperity and quality of life in the state and beyond. Through advancements in technology and research, higher education helps to create new jobs, improve the workforce, develop new knowledge, and boost the overall economy. This report summarizes…

  15. Sing, Play, and Create: All in 20 Minutes!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Young teachers often struggle with pacing and the ability to cover more than one or two songs and activities in a single 30-minute general music class. Included in this article are lesson activities that show it is not only possible to include many of the National Standards in a single lesson, but also possible to sing, play, and create in every…

  16. Creating a Ninth-Grade Community of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Cheryl R.; Kiefer, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative case study analyzed how one large high school created a community of care for ninth-grade students. Data were collected during the 2006-2007 school year, including observations, individual interviews, and focus group interviews of 1 female teacher and 9 of her students. Findings suggest the Freshman Focus teachers and program…

  17. Reflections from the Field: Creating an Elementary Living Learning Makerspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    This article features the creation of a makerspace in the elementary education (ELED) living and learning community (LLC) residence hall. This space was created based on the growing body of literature demonstrating the rise of makerspaces across learning environments as well as the need to expose pre-service teachers (PSTs) to early field…

  18. Creating Value Through the Freemium Business Model: A Consumer Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Rietveld (Joost)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper develops a consumer-centric framework for creating value through the freemium business model. Goods that are commercialized through the freemium business model offer basic functionality for free and monetize users for extended use or complementary features. Compared to premium

  19. Value-Creating Networks: Organizational Issues and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allee, Verna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide examples of evaluating value-creating networks and to address the organizational issues and challenges of a network orientation. Design/methodology/approach: Value network analysis was first developed in 1993 and was adapted in 1997 for intangible asset management. It has been applied from shopfloor…

  20. Creating Fiscal Space for Social Sectors Development in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses fiscal space creation and use in the context of development of social sectors in Tanzania. The paper observes that Tanzania is making good progress in creating and using her fiscal space. The priority being accorded to social sectors, especially in education and health is in the right direction. However ...

  1. Measuring and Communicating the Value Created by an Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, W. Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers a different perspective in measuring the value created by an organization. It does so in the context of an undergraduate course in managerial accounting. In order to break down the functional silo approach to problem solving that has become the model of traditional business education, applications of shadow accounting, the…

  2. Creating an Authentic Learning Environment in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Larisa

    2011-01-01

    Theatrical activities are widely used by language educators to promote and facilitate language learning. Involving students in production of their own video or a short movie in the target language allows a seamless fusion of language learning, art, and popular culture. The activity is also conducive for creating an authentic learning situation…

  3. Lathe creates hardwood flakes for manufacture of "super strong" flakeboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Koch

    1973-01-01

    Most industry members got their first look at a prototype of the Koch lathe at this year's Southern Forest Products Assn. Machinery Exhibition held in Atlanta. With the residue from this machine, Dr. Peter Koch, project leader at the Southern Forest Experiment Station in Pineville, LA thinks it will be possible to create a flake that can be used for making a...

  4. Innovation Zones: Creating Policy Flexibility for Personalized Learning. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Susan; Gentz, Susan

    2016-01-01

    There is a new state education policy concept termed either innovation zones or districts of innovation. State education agencies interested in shifting their role from enforcing compliance to one of supporting innovation and building capacity in districts are working to spur new innovative instructional models and create space for…

  5. Creating Work Opportunities for the Poor through Home Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article seeks to investigate how Home Community Based Care (HCBC) is used as a strategy to create work opportunities for the poor. Quantitative and qualitative data from 65 HCBC organisations with three years of active involvement in HCBC that are funded by the Department of Health was collected. This was done ...

  6. Creating a Single South African Keyboard Layout to Promote ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R.B. Ruthven

    examined, but strategic objectives such as ensuring its wide adoption and creating ... keyboard for all South African languages are also discussed. .... ease of use and adoption, considering the different types of users (touch ... guage pride, challenge negative language perceptions and build a ... 3.2 Revisiting orthographies.

  7. Duplex ultrasound: Indications and findings in a newly created ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duplex ultrasound: Indications and findings in a newly created facility at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. ... It is recommended that timely referrals be made, and mobile Doppler units be acquired to save more lives and limbs in the developing world. Keywords: Calabar, deep venous thrombosis, duplex ...

  8. Envisioning the Educational Possibilities of User-Created Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, David M.; Modaress, Nellie

    2008-01-01

    Educational games and simulations can engage students in higher-level cognitive thinking, such as interpreting, analyzing, discovering, evaluating, acting, and problem solving. Recent technical advances in multiplayer, user-created virtual worlds have significantly expanded the capabilities of user interaction and development within these…

  9. Read, Sing, Play, and Create a Musical Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2012-01-01

    Dayle Ann Dodds and Rosanne Litzinger's children's book, "Sing, Sophie!" provides the elementary general music teacher with an opportunity to read a captivating children's story, sing the main character's song and play her guitar, and create a song as well as instrumental music. Lessons outlined in this article may culminate in a veritable musical…

  10. The partnership of parents, educators and principles in creating a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the partnership of parents, educators, and principals in creating a culture of teaching and learning in schools. To this end, a Culture of Learning and Teaching Partnership Scale (COLTPS) and Factors Contributing to the Decline of a Culture of Learning and Teaching Scale (FCDCOLTS) were used.

  11. Where am I? Creating spatial awareness in unmanned ground ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents a survey of Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (SLAM) algorithms for unmanned ground robots. SLAM is the process of creating a map of the environment, sometimes unknown a priori, while at the same time localizing the robot in the same map. The map could be one of different types i.e. metrical, ...

  12. Creating a School Community for Learning and Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Four years ago, the author assumed the job of Director of Education for a school serving elementary children who had been traumatized by homelessness and associated problems, such as family, domestic, or community violence. The paper relates the struggle of her staff to create a healing school out of a chaotic program that lacked both an effective…

  13. Creating E-Books in a Distributed and Collaborative Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Ruth Cobos; Alaman, Xavier

    2002-01-01

    Describes how groups of authors can create electronic books through unsupervised collaborative work. Proposes a Web-based groupware system that allows building Web sites that can be considered as electronic books without the need of an editor, and describes experiences at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). (Author/LRW)

  14. "Changing Our Skin": Creating Collective Knowledge in American Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechevsky, Mara

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, the author explores the notion that the focus of learning in classrooms and schools extends beyond the learning of individuals to create a collective body of knowledge that is larger than what any one person knows. This idea was examined in a collaboration between Project Zero researchers and educators from the municipal preschools…

  15. Creating Food Futures. Trade, Ethics and the Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farnworth, C.R.; Jiggins, J.L.S.; Thomas, E.V.

    2008-01-01

    A global transformation in food supply and consumption is placing our food security at risk. What changes need to be made to the ways we trade, process and purchase our food if everyone in the world is going to have enough wholesome food to eat? Is there genuine scope for creating food futures that

  16. Creating a conceptual hydrological soil response map for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-03

    Mar 3, 2014 ... a digital soil mapping (DSM) approach to soil mapping can speed up the mapping process and thereby extend soil map use in the field of ... This research uses an expert-knowledge DSM approach to create a soil map for Stevenson Hamilton .... the different bands of the Landsat and SPOT 5 images.

  17. Affective ambiences created with lighting for older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijsters, A.; Redi, J.; Ruyter, B.E.R. de; Seuntiens, P.; Heynderickx, I.

    2015-01-01

    Current lighting technologies provide huge flexibility in creating ambiences that may be adapted to the needs of an occupant in a room. These ambiences not only satisfy visual needs, but may also improve people’s well-being. This paper describes one possible application of adaptable light ambiences,

  18. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  19. Creating quality improvement culture in public health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mary V; Mahanna, Elizabeth; Joly, Brenda; Zelek, Michael; Riley, William; Verma, Pooja; Fisher, Jessica Solomon

    2014-01-01

    We conducted case studies of 10 agencies that participated in early quality improvement efforts. The agencies participated in a project conducted by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (2007-2008). Case study participants included health directors and quality improvement team leaders and members. We implemented multiple qualitative analysis processes, including cross-case analysis and logic modeling. We categorized agencies according to the extent to which they had developed a quality improvement culture. Agencies were conducting informal quality improvement projects (n = 4), conducting formal quality improvement projects (n = 3), or creating a quality improvement culture (n = 4). Agencies conducting formal quality improvement and creating a quality improvement culture had leadership support for quality improvement, participated in national quality improvement initiatives, had a greater number of staff trained in quality improvement and quality improvement teams that met regularly with decision-making authority. Agencies conducting informal quality improvement were likely to report that accreditation is the major driver for quality improvement work. Agencies creating a quality improvement culture were more likely to have a history of evidence-based decision-making and use quality improvement to address emerging issues. Our findings support previous research and add the roles of national public health accreditation and emerging issues as factors in agencies' ability to create and sustain a quality improvement culture.

  20. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Reyka G; Cao, Song; Gao, Qingsong; Wendl, Michael C; Vo, Nam Sy; Reynolds, Sheila M; Zhao, Yanyan; Climente-González, Héctor; Chai, Shengjie; Wang, Fang; Varghese, Rajees; Huang, Mo; Liang, Wen-Wei; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Sengupta, Sohini; Li, Zhi; Payne, Samuel H; Fenyö, David; Miner, Jeffrey H; Walter, Matthew J; Vincent, Benjamin; Eyras, Eduardo; Chen, Ken; Shmulevich, Ilya; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2018-04-03

    For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs) across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.