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Sample records for craniofacial vertical bone

  1. Biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevlin, R; McArdle, A; Atashroo, D; Walmsley, G G; Senarath-Yapa, K; Zielins, E R; Paik, K J; Longaker, M T; Wan, D C

    2014-12-01

    Conditions such as congenital anomalies, cancers, and trauma can all result in devastating deficits of bone in the craniofacial skeleton. This can lead to significant alteration in function and appearance that may have significant implications for patients. In addition, large bone defects in this area can pose serious clinical dilemmas, which prove difficult to remedy, even with current gold standard surgical treatments. The craniofacial skeleton is complex and serves important functional demands. The necessity to develop new approaches for craniofacial reconstruction arises from the fact that traditional therapeutic modalities, such as autologous bone grafting, present myriad limitations and carry with them the potential for significant complications. While the optimal bone construct for tissue regeneration remains to be elucidated, much progress has been made in the past decade. Advances in tissue engineering have led to innovative scaffold design, complemented by progress in the understanding of stem cell-based therapy and growth factor enhancement of the healing cascade. This review focuses on the role of biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering, highlighting key advances in scaffold design and development. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  2. [Craniofacial bone abnormalities in von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi-Bakir, D; Graiess-Tlili, K; Turky, A; Gharbi, H; Bouzaiene, M; Kraiem, C; Bakir, A

    1995-01-01

    Cases of cranio-facial bone anomalies were observed in 40 cases of neurofibromatosis. The cranio-facial skeletal manifestations are numerous and varied. Radiographic investigation is important to confirm the diagnosis, when neurologic and cutaneous signs are absent. The diagnosis should be easily confirmed by a conventional radiographic study.

  3. Elastic Properties of Chimpanzee Craniofacial Cortical Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharpure, Poorva; Kontogiorgos, Elias D; Opperman, Lynne A; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Smith, Amanda; Pryor, Leslie C; Wang, Qian; Dechow, Paul C

    2016-12-01

    Relatively few assessments of cranial biomechanics formally take into account variation in the material properties of cranial cortical bone. Our aim was to characterize the elastic properties of chimpanzee craniofacial cortical bone and compare these to the elastic properties of dentate human craniofacial cortical bone. From seven cranial regions, 27 cylindrical samples were harvested from each of five chimpanzee crania. Assuming orthotropy, axes of maximum stiffness in the plane of the cortical plate were derived using modified equations of Hooke's law in a Mathcad program. Consistent orientations among individuals were observed in the zygomatic arch and alveolus. The density of cortical bone showed significant regional variation (P  E2  > E1 . Shear moduli were significantly different among regions (P < 0.001). The pattern by which chimpanzee cranial cortical bone varies in elastic properties resembled that seen in humans, perhaps suggesting that the elastic properties of craniofacial bone in fossil hominins can be estimated with at least some degree of confidence. Anat Rec, 299:1718-1733, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Bone tissue bioprinting for craniofacial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pallab; Ozbolat, Veli; Ayan, Bugra; Dhawan, Aman; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2017-11-01

    Craniofacial (CF) tissue is an architecturally complex tissue consisting of both bone and soft tissues with significant patient specific variations. Conditions of congenital abnormalities, tumor resection surgeries, and traumatic injuries of the CF skeleton can result in major deficits of bone tissue. Despite advances in surgical reconstruction techniques, management of CF osseous deficits remains a challenge. Due its inherent versatility, bioprinting offers a promising solution to address these issues. In this review, we present and analyze the current state of bioprinting of bone tissue and highlight how these techniques may be adapted to serve regenerative therapies for CF applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2424-2431. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Novel composite implant in craniofacial bone reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Matti J; Vallittu, Pekka K; Vuorinen, Ville; Aho, Allan A J; Puntala, Antti; Aitasalo, Kalle M J

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive glass (BAG) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) have been used in clinical applications. Antimicrobial BAG has the ability to attach chemically to surrounding bone, but it is not possible to bend, drill or shape BAG during the operation. PMMA has advantages in terms of shaping during the operation, but it does not attach chemically to the bone and is an exothermic material. To increase the usefulness of BAG and PMMA in skull bone defect reconstructions, a new composite implant containing BAG and PMMA in craniofacial reconstructions is presented. Three patients had pre-existing large defects in the calvarial and one in the midface area. An additive manufacturing (AM) model was used preoperatively for treatment planning and custom-made implant production. The trunk of the PMMA implant was coated with BAG granules. Clinical and radiological follow-up was performed postoperatively at 1 week, and 3, 6 and 12 months, and thereafter annually up to 5 years. Computer tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET-CT) were performed at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Uneventful clinical recovery with good esthetic and functional outcome was seen. CT and PET-CT findings supported good clinical outcome. The BAG-PMMA implant seems to be a promising craniofacial reconstruction alternative. However, more clinical experience is needed.

  6. Bone markers in craniofacial bone deformations and dysplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Seifert

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of bony deformations and dysplasias are often present in the facial skeleton. Bone defects can be either localized or general. Quite often they are not only present in the skull but also can be found in other parts of the skeleton. In many cases the presence and levels of specific bone markers should be measured in order to fully describe their activity and presence in the skeleton. Fibrous dysplasia (FD is the most common one in the facial skeleton; however, other bone deformations regarding bone growth and activity can also be present. Every clinician should be aware of all common, rare and uncommon bony diseases and conditions such as cherubism, Paget’s disease, osteogenesis imperfecta and others related to genetic conditions. We present standard (calcium, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, alkaline phosphatase, vitamin D and specialized bone markers (pyridinium, deoxypyridinium, hydroxyproline, RANKL/RANK/OPG pathway, growth hormone, insulin-like growth hormone-1 that can be used to evaluate, measure or describe the processes occurring in craniofacial bones.

  7. [Chin morphology in subjects with different vertical skeletal craniofacial pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pei-Zeng; Wu, Wei

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate whether there is difference with regard to chin morphology in subjects with different vertical skeletal craniofacial pattern and the relationship among them. The sample was composed of 80 adolescents who denied orthodontic treatment history and presented Class I skeletal pattern, aged (12.69+/-0.70) years. They were divided into three groups according to mandibular plane angle: High angle group (21 cases, FH/MP> or = 32 degrees), average angle group(43 cases, 22 degrees pattern were evaluated. In addition, chin dimensions studied included height, depth, ratio (depth/height), angle, and so on. They were compared between different groups with One-Way ANOVA. Correlation was analyzed between vertical skeletal craniofacial pattern and chin morphology. SNA, SNB and ANB presented no significant difference among three groups. Compared with the low angle group, high angle subjects exhibited increased chin height, depth/height ratio, concavity and decreased chin angle. Therefore the chin looked lathier and less protrusive in high angle group. Positive correlation was found between mandibular plane angle and chin height, concavity, curvature (Pskeletal pattern, which deserves to be taken into consideration in orthodontic treatment planning.

  8. Growth hormone therapy and craniofacial bones: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsas, G

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has significant effects on linear bone growth, bone mass and bone metabolism. The primary role of GH supplementation in children with GH deficiency, those born small for gestational age or with other types of disorders in somatic development is to increase linear growth. However, GH therapy seems to elicit varying responses in the craniofacial region. Whereas the effects of GH administration on somatic development are well documented, comparatively little is known of its effects on the craniofacial region. The purpose of this review was to search the literature and compile results from both animal and human studies related to the impact of GH on craniofacial growth. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Craniofacial and temporal bone CT findings in cleidocranial dysplasia

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    Gonzalez, Guido E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Departamento de Imagenes, Santiago (Chile); Caruso, Paul A.; Curtin, Hugh D. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Small, Juan E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Jyung, Robert W. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Otology, Boston, MA (United States); Troulis, Maria J. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a multistructural polyostotic genetic disorder that results from mutation of the CBFA1 gene. Hearing loss is a frequent finding in CCD. We describe the CT craniofacial findings in CCD and provide a comprehensive discussion of the CT temporal bone findings in these patients. (orig.)

  10. The suture provides a niche for mesenchymal stem cells of craniofacial bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hu; Feng, Jifan; Ho, Thach-Vu; Grimes, Weston; Urata, Mark; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue undergoes constant turnover supported by stem cells. Recent studies showed that perivascular mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to the turnover of long bones. Craniofacial bones are flat bones derived from a different embryonic origin than the long bones. The identity and regulating niche for craniofacial bone MSCs remain unknown. Here, we identify Gli1+ cells within the suture mesenchyme as the major MSC population for craniofacial bones. They are not associated with vasculature, give rise to all craniofacial bones in the adult and are activated during injury repair. Gli1+ cells are typical MSCs in vitro. Ablation of Gli1+ cells leads to craniosynostosis and arrest of skull growth, indicating these cells are an indispensible stem cell population. Twist1+/− mice with craniosynostosis show reduced Gli1+ MSCs in sutures, suggesting that craniosynostosis may result from diminished suture stem cells. Our study indicates that craniofacial sutures provide a unique niche for MSCs for craniofacial bone homeostasis and repair. PMID:25799059

  11. The potential for vertical bone regeneration via maxillary periosteal elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraret, Sylvain; Von Kaeppler, Ericka; Bardet, Claire; Hunter, Daniel J; Chaussain, Catherine; Bouchard, Philippe; Helms, Jill A

    2014-12-01

    While many studies have been performed on the characteristics and regenerative capacity of long bone periosteum, the craniofacial periosteum remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential for a maxillary periosteum tunnelling procedure to induce vertical alveolar bone regeneration. We employed a murine injury model that activates skeletal stem cells in the periosteum without overtly damaging the underlying cortical bone, preserving the integrity of the long bone and maxilla, and avoiding the introduction of pathological motion at the injury site. Further, we introduced a collagen sponge to serve as a scaffold, providing the necessary space for vertical bone regeneration. Periosteal elevation alone resulted in bone formation in the tibia and delayed bone resorption in the maxilla. With the presence of the collagen sponge, new bone formation occurred in the maxilla. Periosteal response to injury varies with anatomical location, so conclusions from long bone studies should not be extrapolated for craniofacial applications. Murine maxillary periosteum has the osteogenic potential to induce vertical alveolar bone regeneration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavia, Paula Furlan; Rodrigues Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts' analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general.

  13. Quantitative study of new bone formation in distraction osteogenesis of craniofacial bones by bone scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojvachiranonda, Nond; Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Mahatumarat, Charan

    2007-09-01

    Although distraction osteogenesis is widely accepted as a technique to augment the craniofacial skeleton, timing to start distraction after an osteotomy or to remove distractors is basically based on studies on long bones. Because bone scintigraphy is well known to be the gold standard for quantitative measurement of bone formation, we conducted this pilot study to evaluate its feasibility as a tool for assessing new bone formation by distraction osteogenesis. Five patients with midface hypoplasia and four with mandibular hypoplasia were studied. Each patient had five bone scans: before surgery, 3 and 30 days after stopping distraction, and 3 days before and 3 months after distractor removal. Radiotracer uptake values at distraction sites were measured at 1 and 3 hours. Each uptake value was compared with preoperative study as uptake ratio. A typical pattern of radiotracer uptake ratio was observed in all cases with successful distraction. Uptake rose to the maximum during the consolidation period and remained at or above the preoperative level until the study end point. In one patient who had mandibular distraction and nonunion of the right ramus, there was no uptake peak during early consolidation as seen in the successfully distracted body and in the other cases. Bone scintigraphy was found to be a useful investigation in craniofacial distraction. It showed the dynamic of new bone formation by demonstrating the osteoblastic activity, which is important objective information for determining distraction rate and consolidation duration in each case. It may also be a tool that can predict the outcome of distraction osteogenesis.

  14. Rare Bone Diseases and Their Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B.L.; Ramnitz, M.S.; Gafni, R.I.; Burke, A.B.; Boyce, A.M.; Lee, J.S.; Wright, J.T.; Akintoye, S.O.; Somerman, M.J.; Collins, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals. In this review, we focus on dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations of rare bone diseases. Discussed are defects in 4 key physiologic processes in bone/tooth formation that serve as models for the understanding of other diseases in the skeleton and DOC complex: progenitor cell differentiation (fibrous dysplasia), extracellular matrix production (osteogenesis imperfecta), mineralization (familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia syndrome, hypophosphatemic rickets, and hypophosphatasia), and bone resorption (Gorham-Stout disease). For each condition, we highlight causative mutations (when known), etiopathology in the skeleton and DOC complex, and treatments. By understanding how these 4 foci are subverted to cause disease, we aim to improve the identification of genetic, molecular, and/or biologic causes, diagnoses, and treatment of these and other rare bone conditions that may share underlying mechanisms of disease. PMID:24700690

  15. Rare bone diseases and their dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B L; Ramnitz, M S; Gafni, R I; Burke, A B; Boyce, A M; Lee, J S; Wright, J T; Akintoye, S O; Somerman, M J; Collins, M T

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals. In this review, we focus on dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations of rare bone diseases. Discussed are defects in 4 key physiologic processes in bone/tooth formation that serve as models for the understanding of other diseases in the skeleton and DOC complex: progenitor cell differentiation (fibrous dysplasia), extracellular matrix production (osteogenesis imperfecta), mineralization (familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia syndrome, hypophosphatemic rickets, and hypophosphatasia), and bone resorption (Gorham-Stout disease). For each condition, we highlight causative mutations (when known), etiopathology in the skeleton and DOC complex, and treatments. By understanding how these 4 foci are subverted to cause disease, we aim to improve the identification of genetic, molecular, and/or biologic causes, diagnoses, and treatment of these and other rare bone conditions that may share underlying mechanisms of disease. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  16. Effects of reverse headgear on pharyngeal airway in patients with different vertical craniofacial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloş Tuncer, Burcu; Ulusoy, Çağrı; Tuncer, Cumhur; Türköz, Çağrı; Kale Varlik, Selin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of reverse headgear (RH) on pharyngeal airway morphology in two groups of Class III patients with different vertical craniofacial features in comparison with an untreated Class III group. Seventeen subjects (9 males, 8 females; mean age 11.3 ± 0.98 years) with optimum vertical growth and 17 subjects (10 males, 7 females, mean age 11.5 ± 1.1 years) with a vertical growth pattern treated with a removable intra-oral appliance and a Delaire type facemask were included. An untreated Class III control group of 11 subjects (8 males, 3 females, mean age 9.1 ± 1.1 years) was included to compare the treated groups. The paired t-test for intragroup and one-way ANOVA for intergroup comparisons were performed. The relationships between changes in the craniofacial morphology and airway were assessed by Spearman correlation analysis. The airway dimensions at the adenoid side and soft palate were increased in the treatment groups compared to the control group (p < 0.05). The nasopharyngeal area demonstrated a significant difference in normodivergent and control subjects (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the airway morphology due to different vertical features. The effect of RH treatment on the sagittal airway dimensions revealed no significant difference between different vertical craniofacial features in the short term.

  17. Effects of reverse headgear on pharyngeal airway in patients with different vertical craniofacial features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu BALOŞ TUNCER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of reverse headgear (RH on pharyngeal airway morphology in two groups of Class III patients with different vertical craniofacial features in comparison with an untreated Class III group. Seventeen subjects (9 males, 8 females; mean age 11.3 ± 0.98 years with optimum vertical growth and 17 subjects (10 males, 7 females, mean age 11.5 ± 1.1 years with a vertical growth pattern treated with a removable intra-oral appliance and a Delaire type facemask were included. An untreated Class III control group of 11 subjects (8 males, 3 females, mean age 9.1 ± 1.1 years was included to compare the treated groups. The paired t-test for intragroup and one-way ANOVA for intergroup comparisons were performed. The relationships between changes in the craniofacial morphology and airway were assessed by Spearman correlation analysis. The airway dimensions at the adenoid side and soft palate were increased in the treatment groups compared to the control group (p < 0.05. The nasopharyngeal area demonstrated a significant difference in normodivergent and control subjects (p < 0.05. No significant difference was found in the airway morphology due to different vertical features. The effect of RH treatment on the sagittal airway dimensions revealed no significant difference between different vertical craniofacial features in the short term.

  18. Mineralization defects in cementum and craniofacial bone from loss of bone sialoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B.L.; Ao, M.; Willoughby, C.; Soenjaya, Y.; Holm, E.; Lukashova, L.; Tran, A. B.; Wimer, H.F.; Zerfas, P.M.; Nociti, F.H.; Kantovitz, K.R.; Quan, B.D.; Sone, E.D.; Goldberg, H.A.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein found in mineralized tissues, including bone, cartilage, tooth root cementum (both acellular and cellular types), and dentin. In order to define the role BSP plays in the process of biomineralization of these tissues, we analyzed cementogenesis, dentinogenesis, and osteogenesis (intramembranous and endochondral) in craniofacial bone in Bsp null mice and wild-type (WT) controls over a developmental period (1-60 days post natal; dpn) by histology, immunohistochemistry, undecalcified histochemistry, microcomputed tomography (microCT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Regions of intramembranous ossification in the alveolus, mandible, and calvaria presented delayed mineralization and osteoid accumulation, assessed by von Kossa and Goldner's trichrome stains at 1 and 14 dpn. Moreover, Bsp−/− mice featured increased cranial suture size at the early time point, 1 dpn. Immunostaining and PCR demonstrated that osteoblast markers, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, and osteopontin were unchanged in Bsp null mandibles compared to WT. Bsp−/− mouse molars featured a lack of functional acellular cementum formation by histology, SEM, and TEM, and subsequent loss of Sharpey's collagen fiber insertion into the tooth root structure. Bsp−/− mouse alveolar and mandibular bone featured equivalent or fewer osteoclasts at early ages (1 and 14 dpn), however, increased RANKL immunostaining and mRNA, and significantly increased number of osteoclast-like cells (2-5 fold) were found at later ages (26 and 60 dpn), corresponding to periodontal breakdown and severe alveolar bone resorption observed following molar teeth entering occlusion. Dentin formation was unperturbed in Bsp−/− mouse molars, with no delay in mineralization, no alteration in dentin dimensions, and no differences in odontoblast markers analyzed. No defects were identified

  19. Association between condylar position and vertical skeletal craniofacial morphology: A cone beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh

    2017-12-01

    Condylar position may play an important role in the establishment of different craniofacial morphologies. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible association between condylar position and vertical skeletal craniofacial morphology in subjects with normal sagittal skeletal pattern using CBCT. The CBCT images of 45 patients with Class I sagittal skeletal pattern were classified into three balanced groups on the basis of SN-MP angle. Each group contained 15 subjects: low angle, normal angle and high angle. The condylar position was determined for the left and right joints. Chi square test was applied to assess the association between condylar position and vertical skeletal growth pattern. The condyles were more anteriorly-positioned in patients with high angle vertical pattern than in those with normal and low angle vertical pattern. No significant differences were found in condylar position between low angle and normal angle subjects. A significant correlation between condylar position and vertical skeletal pattern was found in the present study. This relationship can be considered for predicting and establishing a proper treatment plan for temporomandibular diseases during orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Ellis Van Creveld2 is Required for Postnatal Craniofacial Bone Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Mohammed K; Zhang, Honghao; Ohyama, Yoshio; Venkitapathi, Sundharamani; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Takeda, Haruko; Ray, Manas; Scott, Greg; Tsuji, Takehito; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Mishina, Yuji; Mochida, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a genetic disorder with mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene. Previous case studies reported that EvC patients underwent orthodontic treatment, suggesting the presence of craniofacial bone phenotypes. To investigate whether a mutation in EVC2 gene causes a craniofacial bone phenotype, Evc2 knockout (KO) mice were generated and cephalometric analysis was performed. The heads of wild type (WT), heterozygous (Het) and homozygous Evc2 KO mice (1-, 3-, and 6-week-old) were prepared and cephalometric analysis based on the selected reference points on lateral X-ray radiographs was performed. The linear and angular bone measurements were then calculated, compared between WT, Het and KO and statistically analyzed at each time point. Our data showed that length of craniofacial bones in KO was significantly lowered by ∼20% to that of WT and Het, the growth of certain bones, including nasal bone, palatal length, and premaxilla was more affected in KO, and the reduction in these bone length was more significantly enhanced at later postnatal time points (3 and 6 weeks) than early time point (1 week). Furthermore, bone-to-bone relationship to cranial base and cranial vault in KO was remarkably changed, i.e. cranial vault and nasal bone were depressed and premaxilla and mandible were developed in a more ventral direction. Our study was the first to show the cause-effect relationship between Evc2 deficiency and craniofacial defects in EvC syndrome, demonstrating that Evc2 is required for craniofacial bone development and its deficiency leads to specific facial bone growth defect. Anat Rec, 299:1110-1120, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Three-dimensional analysis of craniofacial bones using three-dimensional computer tomography

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    Ono, Ichiro; Ohura, Takehiko; Kimura, Chu (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1989-08-01

    Three-dimensional computer tomography (3DCT) was performed in patients with various diseases to visualize stereoscopically the deformity of the craniofacial bones. The data obtained were analyzed by the 3DCT analyzing system. A new coordinate system was established using the median sagittal plane of the face (a plane passing through sella, nasion and basion) on the three-dimensional image. Three-dimensional profilograms were prepared for detailed analysis of the deformation of craniofacial bones for cleft lip and palate, mandibular prognathia and hemifacial microsomia. For patients, asymmetry in the frontal view and twist-formed complicated deformities were observed, as well as deformity of profiles in the anteroposterior and up-and-down directions. A newly developed technique allows three-dimensional visualization of changes in craniofacial deformity. It would aid in determining surgical strategy, including crani-facial surgery and maxillo-facial surgery, and in evaluating surgical outcome. (N.K.).

  2. Application of Computer-Assisted Design and Manufacturing-Fabricated Artificial Bone in the Reconstruction of Craniofacial Bone Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Weiqiang; Yao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Zixian; Chen, Yuhong; Ji, Chenyang; Zhang, Jinming

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical application of individual craniofacial bone fabrications using computer-assisted design (CAD)-computer-assisted manufacturing technology for the reconstruction of craniofacial bone defects. A total of 8 patients diagnosed with craniofacial bone defects were enrolled in this study between May 2007 and August 2010. After computed tomography scans were obtained, the patients were fitted with artificial bone that was created using CAD software, rapid prototyping technology, and epoxy-methyl acrylate resin and hydroxyapatite materials. The fabrication was fixed to the defect area with titanium screws, and soft tissue defects were repaired if necessary. The fabrications were precisely fixed to the defect areas, and all wounds healed well without any serious complications except for 1 case with intraoral incision dehiscence, which required further treatment. Postoperative curative effects were retrospectively observed after 6 to 48 months, acceptable anatomic and cosmetic outcomes were obtained, and no rejections or other complications occurred. The use of CAD-computer-assisted manufacturing technology-assisted epoxy-methyl acrylate resin and hydroxyapatite composite artificial bone to treat patients with craniofacial bone defects could enable the precise reconstruction of these defects and obtain good anatomic and cosmetic outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Benign fibro-osseous lesions of the craniofacial complex with aneurysmal bone cyst formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldo, Ana Filipa; Mendes Dos Santos, Carolina; Tavares, Joana; Fernandes Sousa, Rita; Campos, Alexandre; Farias, João Paulo; Pimentel, José; Guedes Campos, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst are controversial osteolytic benign expansive lesions which occur more frequently in the metaphysis of long bones and spine. They are classified as primary or secondary lesions depending on the presence or absence of an associated bone pathology. The engraftment of aneurysmal bone cyst onto benign fibro-osseous lesions is established. However, in the craniofacial complex this combined lesion is rare.The authors present two histologically proven uncommon cases of benign fibro-osseous lesions (fibrous dysplasia and juvenile psammomatoid ossifying fibroma) with aneurysmal bone cyst formation, emphasizing the imaging characteristics of this hybrid entities.

  4. Sagittal and Vertical Craniofacial Growth Pattern and Timing of Circumpubertal Skeletal Maturation: A Multiple Regression Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinetti, Giuseppe; Rosso, Luigi; Riatti, Riccardo; Contardo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the associations between the timing of skeletal maturation and craniofacial growth is of primary importance when planning a functional treatment for most of the skeletal malocclusions. This cross-sectional study was thus aimed at evaluating whether sagittal and vertical craniofacial growth has an association with the timing of circumpubertal skeletal maturation. A total of 320 subjects (160 females and 160 males) were included in the study (mean age, 12.3 ± 1.7 years; range, 7.6-16.7 years). These subjects were equally distributed in the circumpubertal cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stages 2 to 5. Each CVM stage group also had equal number of females and males. Multiple regression models were run for each CVM stage group to assess the significance of the association of cephalometric parameters (ANB, SN/MP, and NSBa angles) with age of attainment of the corresponding CVM stage (in months). Significant associations were seen only for stage 3, where the SN/MP angle was negatively associated with age (β coefficient, -0.7). These results show that hyperdivergent and hypodivergent subjects may have an anticipated and delayed attainment of the pubertal CVM stage 3, respectively. However, such association remains of little entity and it would become clinically relevant only in extreme cases.

  5. The radiologic features of fibrous dysplasia of the craniofacial bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obisesan, A A; Lagundoye, S B; Daramola, J O; Ajagbe, H A; Oluwasanmi, J O

    1977-12-01

    The radiographs of twenty-five patients (eight males, seventeen females) with histologically proven craniofacial fibrous dysplasia were analyzed. The lesions could be classified into six radiologic types: (1) peau d'orange, (2) whorled plaquelike, (3) diffuse sclerotic, (4) cystlike (multilocular or unilocular), (5) pagetoid, and (6) chalky types. The peau d'orange type was by far the most common (40 per cent) followed by the plaquelike (20 per cent, cystlike (16 per cent), and sclerotic (12 per cent). Most of the patients were young, with 60 per cent being underthe age of 20 years and 96 per cent under the age of 40 years.

  6. A computerized tomography study of the morphological interrelationship between the temporal bones and the craniofacial complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Helder Nunes; Slavicek, Rudolf; Sato, Sadao

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis that the temporal bones are at the center of the dynamics of the craniofacial complex, directly influencing facial morphology, has been put forward long ago. This study examines the role of the spatial positioning of temporal bones (frontal and sagittal inclination) in terms of influencing overall facial morphology. Several 3D linear, angular and orthogonal measurements obtained through computerized analysis of virtual models of 163 modern human skulls reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography images were analyzed and correlated. Additionally, the sample was divided into two subgroups based on the median value of temporal bone sagittal inclination [anterior rotation group (n = 82); posterior rotation group (n = 81)], and differences between groups evaluated. Correlation coefficients showed that sagittal inclination of the temporal bone was significantly (P < 0.01) related to midline flexion, transversal width and anterior–posterior length of the basicranium, to the anterior–posterior positioning of the mandible and maxilla, and posterior midfacial height. Frontal inclination of the temporal bone was significantly related (P < 0.01) to basicranium anterior–posterior and transversal dimensions, and to posterior midfacial height. In comparison with the posterior rotation group, the anterior rotation group presented a less flexed and anterior–posteriorly longer cranial base, a narrower skull, porion and the articular eminence located more superiorly and posteriorly, a shorter posterior midfacial height, the palatal plane rotated clockwise, a more retrognathic maxilla and mandible, and the upper posterior occlusal plane more inclined and posteriorly located. The results suggest that differences in craniofacial morphology are highly integrated with differences in the positional relationship of the temporal bones. The sagittal inclination of the temporal bone seems to have a greater impact on the 3D morphology of the craniofacial complex than

  7. Lyophilized Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF Promotes Craniofacial Bone Regeneration through Runx2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-drying is an effective means to control scaffold pore size and preserve its composition. The purpose of the present study was to determine the applicability of lyophilized Platelet-rich fibrin (LPRF as a scaffold for craniofacial tissue regeneration and to compare its biological effects with commonly used fresh Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF. LPRF caused a 4.8-fold ± 0.4-fold elevation in Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2 expression in alveolar bone cells, compared to a 3.6-fold ± 0.2-fold increase when using fresh PRF, and a more than 10-fold rise of alkaline phosphatase levels and mineralization markers. LPRF-induced Runx2 expression only occurred in alveolar bone and not in periodontal or dental follicle cells. LPRF also caused a 1.6-fold increase in osteoblast proliferation (p < 0.001 when compared to fresh PRF. When applied in a rat craniofacial defect model for six weeks, LPRF resulted in 97% bony coverage of the defect, compared to 84% for fresh PRF, 64% for fibrin, and 16% without scaffold. Moreover, LPRF thickened the trabecular diameter by 25% when compared to fresh PRF and fibrin, and only LPRF and fresh PRF resulted in the formation of interconnected trabeculae across the defect. Together, these studies support the application of lyophilized PRF as a biomimetic scaffold for craniofacial bone regeneration and mineralized tissue engineering.

  8. Alcohol exposure induces chick craniofacial bone defects by negatively affecting cranial neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guang; Lin, Zhuangling; Wu, Yushi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Meng; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Chuai, Manli; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-11-05

    Excess alcohol consumption during pregnancy could lead to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). However, the molecular mechanism leading to craniofacial abnormality, a feature of FAS, is still poorly understood. The cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) contribute to the formation of the craniofacial bones. Therefore, NCCs exposed to ethanol was investigated - using chick embryos and in vitro explant culture as experimental models. We demonstrated that exposure to 2% ethanol induced craniofacial defects, which includes parietal defect, in the developing chick fetus. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that ethanol treatment downregulated Ap-2ɑ, Pax7 and HNK-1 expressions by cranial NCCs. Using double-immunofluorescent stainings for Ap-2ɑ/pHIS3 and Ap-2ɑ/c-Caspase3, we showed that ethanol treatment inhibited cranial NCC proliferation and increased NCC apoptosis, respectively. Moreover, ethanol treatment of the dorsal neuroepithelium increased Laminin, N-Cadherin and Cadherin 6B expressions while Cadherin 7 expression was repressed. In situ hybridization also revealed that ethanol treatment up-regulated Cadherin 6B expression but down-regulated slug, Msx1, FoxD3 and BMP4 expressions. In summary, our experimental results demonstrated that ethanol treatment interferes with the production of cranial NCCs by affecting the proliferation and apoptosis of these cells. In addition, ethanol affected the delamination, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration of cranial NCCs, which may have contributed to the etiology of the craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Synchrotron Phase Tomography: An Emerging Imaging Method for Microvessel Detection in Engineered Bone of Craniofacial Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Giuliani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of large 3D constructs, such as certain craniofacial bone districts, is nowadays a critical challenge. Indeed, the amount of oxygen needed for cell survival is able to reach a maximum diffusion distance of ~150–200 μm from the original vascularization vector, often hampering the long-term survival of the regenerated tissues. Thus, the rapid growth of new blood vessels, delivering oxygen and nutrients also to the inner cells of the bone grafts, is mandatory for their long-term function in clinical practice. Unfortunately, significant progress in this direction is currently hindered by a lack of methods with which to visualize these processes in 3D and reliably quantify them. In this regard, a challenging method for simultaneous 3D imaging and analysis of microvascularization and bone microstructure has emerged in recent years: it is based on the use of synchrotron phase tomography. This technique is able to simultaneously identify multiple tissue features in a craniofacial bone site (e.g., the microvascular and the calcified tissue structure. Moreover, it overcomes the intrinsic limitations of both histology, achieving only a 2D characterization, and conventional tomographic approaches, poorly resolving the vascularization net in the case of an incomplete filling of the newly formed microvessels by contrast agents. Indeed, phase tomography, being based on phase differences among the scattered X-ray waves, is capable of discriminating tissues with similar absorption coefficients (like vessels and woven bone in defined experimental conditions. The approach reviewed here is based on the most recent experiences applied to bone regeneration in the craniofacial region.

  10. Evaluation of bone regeneration potential of dental follicle stem cells for treatment of craniofacial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, Maryam; Bova, Jonathan F; Orooji, Mahdi; Pepping, Jennifer; Qureshi, Ammar; Del Piero, Fabio; Hayes, Daniel; Yao, Shaomian

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell-based tissue regeneration offers potential for treatment of craniofacial bone defects. The dental follicle, a loose connective tissue surrounding the unerupted tooth, has been shown to contain progenitor/stem cells. Dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) have strong osteogenesis capability, which makes them suitable for repairing skeletal defects. The objective of this study was to evaluate bone regeneration capability of DFSCs loaded into polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold for treatment of craniofacial defects. DFSCs were isolated from the first mandibular molars of postnatal Sprague-Dawley rats and seeded into the PCL scaffold. Cell attachment and cell viability on the scaffold were examined with the use of scanning electron microscopy and alamar blue reduction assay. For in vivo transplantation, critical-size defects were created on the skulls of 5-month-old immunocompetent rats, and the cell-scaffold constructs were transplanted into the defects. Skulls were collected at 4 and 8 weeks after transplantation, and bone regeneration in the defects was evaluated with the use of micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and Alamar blue assay demonstrated attachment and proliferation of DFSCs in the PCL scaffold. Bone regeneration was observed in the defects treated with DFSC transplantation but not in the controls without DFSC transplant. Transplanting DFSC-PCL with or without osteogenic induction before transplantation achieved approximately 50% bone regeneration at 8 weeks. Formation of woven bone was observed in the DFSC-PCL treatment group. Similar results were seen when osteogenic-induced DFSC-PCL was transplanted to the critical-size defects. This study demonstrated that transplantation of DFSCs seeded into PCL scaffolds can be used to repair craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of AMOR in Craniofacial Rabbit Bone Bioengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Freire

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous molecular and cellular mediators modulate tissue repair and regeneration. We have recently described antibody mediated osseous regeneration (AMOR as a novel strategy for bioengineering bone in rat calvarial defect. This entails application of anti-BMP-2 antibodies capable of in vivo capturing of endogenous osteogenic BMPs (BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-7. The present study sought to investigate the feasibility of AMOR in other animal models. To that end, we examined the efficacy of a panel of anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and a polyclonal Ab immobilized on absorbable collagen sponge (ACS to mediate bone regeneration within rabbit calvarial critical size defects. After 6 weeks, de novo bone formation was demonstrated by micro-CT imaging, histology, and histomorphometric analysis. Only certain anti-BMP-2 mAb clones mediated significant in vivo bone regeneration, suggesting that the epitopes with which anti-BMP-2 mAbs react are critical to AMOR. Increased localization of BMP-2 protein and expression of osteocalcin were observed within defects, suggesting accumulation of endogenous BMP-2 and/or increased de novo expression of BMP-2 protein within sites undergoing bone repair by AMOR. Considering the ultimate objective of translation of this therapeutic strategy in humans, preclinical studies will be necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of AMOR in progressively larger animal models.

  12. Bioactive Nano-fibrous Scaffold for Vascularized Craniofacial Bone Regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabha, Rahul Damodaran; Kraft, David Christian Evar; Harkness, Linda

    2017-01-01

    and biocompatibility properties of the new scaffold material. Our results indicate PVA-PCL-HAB scaffolds support attachment and growth of stromal stem cells; (human bone marrow skeletal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSC)). In addition, the scaffold supported in vitro osteogenic...... the limitation of cell penetration of electrospun scaffolds and improve on its osteoconductive nature, in this study, we fabricated a novel electrospun composite scaffold of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) - poly (ε) caprolactone (PCL) - Bioceramic (HAB), namely, PVA-PCL-HAB. The scaffold prepared by dual...... electrospinning of PVA and PCL with HAB overcomes reduced cell attachment associated with hydrophobic poly (ε) caprolactone (PCL) by combination with a hydrophilic polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and the bioceramic (HAB) can contribute to enhance osteo-conductivity. We characterized the physicochemical...

  13. Electrospun PVA-PCL-HAB scaffold for craniofacial bone regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabha, Rahul; Kraft, David Christian Evar; Melsen, Birte

    2015-01-01

    body fluid immersed scaffold samples. Culturing human adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) and human bone marrow derived MSC seeded on PVA-PCL-HAB scaffold showed enhanced cell proliferation and in vitro osteoblastic differentiation. Cell-containing scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in immune......-caprolactone (PCL)- triphasic bioceramic(HAB) scaffold to biomimic native tissue and we tested its ability to support osteogenic differentiation of stromal stem cells ( MSC) and its suitability for regeneration of craniofa- cial defects. Physiochemical characterizations of the scaffold, including con- tact angle...... deficient mice. Histologic ex- amination of retrieved implant sections stained with H&E, Col- lagenType I and Human Vimentin antibody demonstrated that the cells survived in vivo in the implants for at least 8 weeks with evidence of osteoblastic differentiation and angiogenesis within the implants. Our...

  14. [The hyoid bone and vertical dimension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doual, A; Léger, J L; Doual, J M; Hadjiat, F

    2003-09-01

    Located at the center of the neck and the pharyngeal column and, thanks to its attachments, tied to the base of the skull, to the mandible, to the tongue, to the larynx, and to the scapular belt, the hyoid bone is intimately related to an extensive tendino-muscular complex. From this strategic position, the hyoid bone participates in all functional and nutritional activities of the oro-facial complex. Heavily involved in the physiology of the pharyngeal column, it appears to enjoy a remarkable stability in relation to its surrounding structures as it participates in the critical process of vertical ontogenetic development. Deceptively simple in its shape and location it is anything but. While it would be easy to scorn it as a vestigial organ of little importance, the hyoid bone is actually an ancient witness of the evolution of the first human vertebrae and a vestige of the 2nd and 3rd brachial arches. Like a toy buffeted by powerful groups of muscles and tendons, the hyoid bone occupies a crossroads position where it is solicited by many vital functions, the most critical of which is respiration. Its functional behavior seems to have evolved considerably over the course of phylogeny. By piecing together the conceptions of many authors, we can conclude that the similarities--and, later, the differences--existing between the human fetus and those of other primates, and, then between young children and young primates, are related to an essentially different status quo, which modifies the delicate equilibrium of the pharyngeal region. In metamorphosing from a sagittal equilibrium to one that is vertical, this very status quo maintains an open respiratory airway during each time frame, continuously permitting the articulation and modulation of sounds, particularly during the vertical period. The hyoid bone is unpaired, in a mid-line position, symmetrical, and located just below the mandible with which it shares, to an astonishing extent, certain morphological

  15. Craniofacial bone anomalies in Von Recklinghausen`s neurofibromatosis; Les anomalies osseuses cranio-faciales dans la neurofibromatose de Von Recklinghausen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abassi-Bakir, D.; Gharbi, H.; Kraiem, C.; Graiess-Tlili, K.; Turky, A.; Bouzaiene, M.; Bakir, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Sousse (Tunisia)

    1995-12-31

    Cases of cranio-facial bone anomalies were observed in 40 cases of neurofibromatosis. The cranio-facial skeletal manifestations are numerous and varied. Radiographic investigation is important to confirm the diagnosis, when neurologic and cutaneous signs are absent. The diagnosis should be easily confirmed by a conventional radiographic study. (authors). 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Examination of craniofacial bones associated with auricular anomaly using three-dimensional computer tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Ichiro; Ohura, Takehiko; Iwao, Fumiya (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1989-07-01

    Three-dimensional computer tomography (3D-CT) was performed in 60 patients with auricular anomaly to determine the site and severity of deformity in the hemifacial microsomia. Auricular anomaly, underdevelopment and malposition of the cranium, temporo-mandibular joint, zygoma, maxilla and mandible were observed in almost all of the patients; however, the severity of these malformations varied from patient to patient. Regarding severest deformity, there were positional differences among patients. According to impairment sites, hemifacial microsomia fell into the following five types: (1) cranium type, (2) maxillary alveolar process type, (3) localized mandibular ramus type, (4) overall mandibular type, and (5) complex type (combination of the aforementioned types). Facial asymmetry accompanied by auricular anomaly was associated with various pathologic conditions. The temporomandibular joint was often deviated towards the anteromedial side for localized mandibular ramus type and overall mandibular type. Posterial deviation was predominant for cranium type. In patients with hemifacial microsomia of the cranium type associated with protrusion mainly in the occipital region on the affected side, deformity was considered attributable to underdevelopment of the temporal bone and delay in closure of the temporo-occipital suture. The deformity for cranium type may be defined as the second branchial syndrome. In conclusion, hemifacial microsomia have various deformities and may fall into five categories. Craniofacial microsomia and hemi-auriculo-temporo-mandibular dysplastic syndrome give a more precise concept for auricular anomaly. (N.K.).

  17. Biomechanical effects on maxillary protraction of the craniofacial skeleton with cleft lip and palate after alveolar bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengxi; Pan, Xiaogang; Shao, Qinghua; Chen, Zhenqi

    2013-03-01

    To explore the biomechanical effects of maxillary protraction on the craniofacial skeleton in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) after alveolar bone graft (ABG) and resorption of ABG, thus to provide theoretical basis for the clinical application of maxillary protraction, which can improve the facial deformity of the UCLP patients. A finite element model of a UCLP patient's skull was generated using data from spiral computed tomographic (CT) scans. Based on this finite element model, another 6 ABG finite element models were constructed to simulate ABG and resorption of ABG, respectively (nonresorption model, upper one-third resorption of the grafted bone model, upper two-thirds resorption of the grafted bone model, lower one-third resorption of the grafted bone model, lower two-thirds resorption of the grafted bone model, upper one-third and lower one-third resorption of the grafted bone model). Two additional models were developed to simulate maxillary protraction with expansion and maxillary protraction alone. All models were loaded with orthopedic force (30 degrees downward and forward to the occlusal plane, 500 g per side) on the region of alveolar of maxillary canine. Before ABG, the cleft side showed larger displacement than the noncleft side, when it came to the stress distribution in the craniofacial suture, it showed an asymmetric pattern as well. After ABG, the displacement difference between the cleft side and the noncleft side decreased, and the stress distribution in the craniofacial suture showed more symmetric than that before ABG. The pterygopalatine suture obtained the largest value, followed by zygomaticotemporal, zygomaticomaxillary, and zygomaticofrontal sutures among the observed sutures. Higher stresses and pronounced forward displacement were generated in the craniofacial sutures after maxillary protraction with expansion. Maxillary protraction after ABG performed a more favorable outcome. Among the ABG models, nonresorption

  18. Influence of differences in the hardness and calcium content of diets on the growth of craniofacial bone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shota; Fujita, Yuko; Hotta, Maika; Sugiyama, Ayako; Maki, Kenshi

    2015-11-01

    To examine the effects of a soft diet and a low-calcium diet on the craniofacial growth and bone architectures of the maxilla and mandible. Male rats (n  =  20, 3 weeks old) were divided into four groups. Ten rats were given a normal-calcium diet, and the other rats were given a low-calcium diet. Each group was then divided into two subgroups, which were fed a hard or a soft diet. After 4 weeks, craniofacial growth and architecture in maxillary and mandibular bone were analyzed using cephalometry, micro-computed tomography, and histopathology. The low-calcium diet had no effect on serum calcium levels. The low-calcium diet had the greatest effect on craniofacial bone growth, while the soft diet affected the growth of several bone sites that are attached to the masseter muscle. A low-calcium diet resulted in the deterioration of the connectivity of the trabeculae in the furcation region of the maxillary and mandibular first molar, while a soft diet resulted in the diffuse disappearance of trabeculae in the central part of the furcation regions. In the midpalatal suture, a low-calcium diet resulted in inhibition of cartilaginous ossification, although the midpalatal suture had a normal cartilaginous structure. A soft diet resulted in narrower cartilage cell layers in the midpalatal suture. We demonstrated that a low-calcium diet and a soft diet resulted in a deterioration of bone structures in both the maxilla and in the mandible; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects differed between diets.

  19. EFFECTS OF GROWTH HORMONE ON THE ONTOGENETIC ALLOMETRY OF CRANIOFACIAL BONES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Paula N.; Kristensen, Erika; Morck, Douglas W.; Boyd, Steven; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    Organism size is controlled by interactions between genetic and environmental factors mediated by hormones with systemic and local effects. As changes in size are usually not isometric, a considerable diversity in shape can be generated through modifications in the patterns of ontogenetic allometry. In this study we evaluated the role of timing and dose of growth hormone (GH) release on growth and correlated shape changes in craniofacial bones. Using a longitudinal study design, we analyzed GH deficient mice treated with GH supplementation commencing pre- and post-puberty. We obtained 3D in vivo micro-CT images of the skull between 21 and 60 days of age and used geometric morphometrics to analyze size and shape changes among control and GH deficient treated and non-treated mice. The variable levels of circulating GH altered the size and shape of the adult skull, and influenced the cranial base, vault, and face differently. While cranial base synchondroses and facial sutures were susceptible to either the direct or indirect effect of GH supplementation, its effect was negligible on the vault. Such different responses support the role of intrinsic growth trajectories of skeletal components in controlling the modifications induced by systemic factors. Contrary to the expected, the timing of GH treatment did not have an effect on catch-up growth. GH levels also altered the ontogenetic trajectories by inducing changes in their location and extension in the shape space, indicating that differences arose before 21 days and were further accentuated by a truncation of the ontogenetic trajectories in GHD groups. PMID:25098638

  20. Craniofacial Microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Kathleyn A; Patel, Krishna G

    2016-11-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) encompasses a broad spectrum of phenotypes. It is thought to result from defective development of the first and second pharyngeal arch structures, and generally presents with anomalies of the mandible and other facial bones, ears, and overlying soft tissues. The cause of CFM is thought to involve both extrinsic and genetic risk factors. Several classification systems have been developed to help stratify patients based on the severity of their defects. Treatment of patients includes repair of bony asymmetry as well as soft tissue defects and auricular anomalies. Surgical intervention is individualized based on each patient's deficits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Craniofacial morphology in patients with hypophosphatemic rickets: a cephalometric study focusing on differences between bone of cartilaginous and intramembranous origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Kjaer, Inger; Sonnesen, Ane Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    on bony structures of intramembranous origin. The aim of the present study was to describe the osseous morphology of the craniofacial structures in patients with HR compared to healthy controls, and to investigate the impact of different bone origin on the osseous morphology. Fifty-three patients with HR...... (17 males, 36 females), aged 3-74 yrs, were included. Fifty HR patients had dominant X-linked disease, and in three patients no mutations were identified. A total of 79 healthy individuals (37 males, 42 females), aged 6-79 yrs, with normal occlusion served as controls. Significant cephalometric...... differences were found between HR patients and controls. In HR patients, the cranial base was flattened and the depth of the posterior cranial fossa was decreased. The anterior height of the cranium, the angle nasion-sella-frontale, and the thickness of theca were increased. The length of the nasal bone...

  2. Creating a virtual surgical atlas of craniofacial procedures: Part II. Surgical animations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Roberto L; Deluccia, Nicholette; Oliker, Aaron; McCarthy, Joseph G

    2010-12-01

    Craniofacial surgery can be challenging to teach and learn. To augment the intraoperative learning experience for surgical trainees and to provide a resource for practicing craniofacial surgeons to review uncommonly performed procedures before entering the operating room, a series of three-dimensional animations were created encompassing the most commonly performed craniofacial procedures. Previously created three-dimensional craniofacial digital models were used to create digital animations of craniofacial surgical procedures using Maya 8.5. Digital models were altered systematically within Maya to recreate the ordered steps of each craniofacial procedure. Surgical tools were imported into Maya for use in the animations using computer-aided manufacturing files obtained directly from the manufacturer. Nine craniofacial procedures were animated: genioplasty, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy, Le Fort I osteotomy, unifocal mandibular distraction, mandibular transport distraction, fronto-orbital advancement with cranial vault remodeling, Le Fort III advancement/distraction, and monobloc advancement/distraction. All major surgical steps are demonstrated, including exposure, execution of the osteotomy, displacement of the bone composite, and the predicted morphologic changes to the craniofacial contour. Throughout the surgical animation, the view of the surgeon in the operating room is incorporated to reproduce the vantage of the surgeon, and the overlying tissue is rendered transparent to illustrate critical underlying anatomical relationships. The first virtual surgical atlas of craniofacial procedures is presented. These animations should serve as a resource for trainees and practicing surgeons in preparation for craniofacial surgical procedures.

  3. Vertical bone augmentation procedures: basics and techniques in dental implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draenert, F G; Huetzen, D; Neff, A; Mueller, W E G

    2014-05-01

    An appropriate bony situation is essential for dental implant placement and bony support of soft tissues (pink esthetic). Loss of teeth often results in complex horizontal and vertical alveolar ridge defects. They demand advanced bone augmentation techniques for reconstruction. We present the different techniques and materials used in complex bone augmentation. Clinical cases show the application of the methods in the clinical setting. We present current techniques and materials used in complex bone augmentations. Clinical cases show the application of the methods in the clinical setting. Applied techniques include stabilized-guided bone regeneration (GBR), autologous local block augmentation, modified techniques such as Gellrich shell technique including piezosurgery, pelvic bone blocks, complex materials such as graft-derived bone blocks and their unique handling problems. Successful basic principles are reduction of cortical bone healing due to long remodeling time and possible late loss; extended application of materials with interconnecting porous system and particulate material resulting in fast healing analogous to cancellous bone; mechanical stabilization of the augmentation to allow bony healing in vertical defect situations. GBR and autologous bone blocks with minimal cortical thickness and a high volume of particulated material are most favorable techniques. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Two Stage Repair of Composite Craniofacial Defects with Antibiotic Releasing Porous Poly(methyl methacrylate) Space Maintainers and Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Patrick

    Craniofacial defects resulting from trauma and resection present many challenges to reconstruction due to the complex structure, combinations of tissues, and environment, with exposure to the oral, skin and nasal mucosal pathogens. Tissue engineering seeks to regenerate the tissues lost in these defects; however, the composite nature and proximity to colonizing bacteria remain difficult to overcome. Additionally, many tissue engineering approaches have further hurdles to overcome in the regulatory process to clinical translation. As such these studies investigated a two stage strategy employing an antibiotic-releasing porous polymethylmethacrylate space maintainer fabricated with materials currently part of products approved or cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration, expediting the translation to the clinic. This porous space maintainer holds the bone defect open allowing soft tissue to heal around the defect. The space maintainer can then be removed and one regenerated in the defect. These studies investigated the individual components of this strategy. The porous space maintainer showed similar soft tissue healing and response to non-porous space maintainers in a rabbit composite tissue defect. The antibiotic-releasing space maintainers showed release of antibiotics from 1-5 weeks, which could be controlled by loading and fabrication parameters. In vivo, space maintainers releasing a high dose of antibiotics for an extended period of time increased soft tissue healing over burst release space maintainers in an infected composite tissue defect model in a rabbit mandible. Finally, stabilization of bone defects and regeneration could be improved through scaffold structures and delivery of a bone forming growth factor. These studies illustrate the possibility of the two stage strategy for repair of composite tissue defects of the craniofacial complex.

  5. Efficacy of Honeycomb TCP-induced Microenvironment on Bone Tissue Regeneration in Craniofacial Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoko; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Ito, Satoshi; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Artificial bone materials that exhibit high biocompatibility have been developed and are being widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, there are no biomaterials that are minimally invasive and safe. In a previous study, we succeeded in developing honeycomb β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) which has through-and-through holes and is able to mimic the bone microenvironment for bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, we investigated how the difference in hole-diameter of honeycomb β-TCP (hole-diameter: 75, 300, 500, and 1600 μm) influences bone tissue regeneration histologically. Its osteoconductivity was also evaluated by implantation into zygomatic bone defects in rats. The results showed that the maximum bone formation was observed on the β-TCP with hole-diameter 300μm, included bone marrow-like tissue and the pattern of bone tissue formation similar to host bone. Therefore, the results indicated that we could control bone tissue formation by creating a bone microenvironment provided by β-TCP. Also, in zygomatic bone defect model with honeycomb β-TCP, the result showed there was osseous union and the continuity was reproduced between the both edges of resected bone and β-TCP, which indicated the zygomatic bone reproduction fully succeeded. It is thus thought that honeycomb β-TCP may serve as an excellent biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration in the head, neck and face regions, expected in clinical applications.

  6. Vertical distraction osteogenesis of fibular bone flap in reconstructed mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eski, Muhitdin; Turegun, Murat; Deveci, Mustafa; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Sengezer, Mustafa

    2006-12-01

    Excellent functional and aesthetic results can be achieved in mandibular reconstructions with using free fibular bone flap. However, the vertical deficiency between the reconstructed segment and the occlusal plane made dental rehabilitation impossible in some cases. We encountered this problem in our 3 patients who had mandibular reconstruction with fibular flap due to extensive bone defect result from gunshot injury. To overcome this segmental vertical distraction of the reconstructed mandible was performed. Fibular bone segments (40-70 mm) were distracted with using extraoral distraction device after a latency period of 5-7 days. The rate of distraction was 1 mm/day, and the rhythm was 4 times (4 x 0.25 mm). Distraction was continued until the desired height was achieved, and the distractor left in place for 12 weeks for bony consolidation. No minor or major complications were encountered. The increase of vertical height was between 9 and 13 mm, and it was stable during the follow-up period (7-22 months). Following the vertical distraction and vestibuloplasty operations, the dental restoration of the patients was performed with mandibular removable partial dentures.

  7. Effect of sex-hormone levels, sex, body mass index and other host factors on human craniofacial bone regeneration with bioactive tricalcium phosphate grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, Christine; Mele, Aynur; Kann, Peter Herbert; Peleska, Barbara; Adel-Khattab, Doaa; Renz, Harald; Reuss, Alexander; Bohner, Marc; Stiller, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Little is known regarding the associations between sex-hormone levels, sex, body mass index (BMI), age, other host factors and biomaterial stimulated bone regeneration in the human craniofacial skeleton. The aim of this study was to elucidate the associations between these factors and bone formation after sinus floor augmentation procedures (SFA) utilizing a bioactive tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bone grafting material. We conducted a prospective study in a human population in which 60 male and 60 female participants underwent SFA and dental implant placement using a staged approach. BMI as well as levels of serum estradiol (E2), total testosterone (TT), and the free androgen index (FAI) were measured by radioimmunoassay and electrochemoluminescent-immunoassay. At implant placement, 6 months after SFA, bone biopsy specimens were harvested for hard tissue histology, the amount of bone formation was evaluated by histomorphometry and immunohistochemical analysis of osteogenic marker expression. The Wilcoxon rank-sum U test, Spearman correlations and linear regression analysis were used to explore the association between bone formation and BMI, hormonal and other host factors. BMI and log E2 were significantly positively associated with bone formation in male individuals (p < 0.05). Histomorphometry revealed trends toward greater bone formation and osteogenic marker expression with non-smokers compared to smokers. In male patients, higher E2 levels and higher BMI enhanced TCP stimulated craniofacial i.e. intramembranous bone repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Craniofacial Distraction Osteogenesis: Effects of rhythm of distraction on bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U.M. Djasim (Urville)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractDistraction osteogenesis is defined as the formation of new bone tissue between bone segments that are divided by an osteotomy and then gradually separated by exerting an external force to the mobile bone segment(s). The resulting callus tissue in the distraction gap will eventually

  9. Topological optimization for designing patient-specific large craniofacial segmental bone replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Alok; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Miller, Michael J.; Nguyen, Tam H.

    2010-01-01

    Restoring normal function and appearance after massive facial injuries with bone loss is an important unsolved problem in surgery. An important limitation of the current methods is heuristic ad hoc design of bone replacements by the operating surgeon at the time of surgery. This problem might be addressed by incorporating a computational method known as topological optimization into routine surgical planning. We tested the feasibility of using a multiresolution three-dimensional topological optimization to design replacements for massive midface injuries with bone loss. The final solution to meet functional requirements may be shaped differently than the natural human bone but be optimized for functional needs sufficient to support full restoration using a combination of soft tissue repair and synthetic prosthetics. Topological optimization for designing facial bone tissue replacements might improve current clinical methods and provide essential enabling technology to translate generic bone tissue engineering methods into specific solutions for individual patients. PMID:20628014

  10. Nanophase bone substitute for craniofacial load bearing application: Pilot study in the rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Jonathan Z; Soenjaya, Yohannes; McMasters, James; Ko, Alvin; Vasanji, Amit; Morris, Nathan; Eppell, Steven J

    2017-02-14

    An exploratory pilot study shows that a rodent mandibular defect model is useful in determining the biological response to a nanophase collagen/apatite composite designed as a biomimetic load-bearing bone substitute. Using a critical size defect, eight groups of rats (n = 3) were implanted with four renditions of the nanophase bone substitute (NBS) biomaterial. Each rendition was tested with and without recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). NBS biomaterial renditions were: baseline, hyper-densified, d-ribose crosslinked, and d-ribose crosslinked and hyper-densified. Biological outcomes were assessed surgically, radiologically, and histologically. With the limited power available due to the small N's involved, some interesting hypotheses were generated that will be more fully investigated in future studies. BMP2 loaded NBS, when uncrosslinked, resulted in robust bone formation in the entire defect volume (regardless of porosity). Unloaded NBS were well tolerated but did not cause significant new bone formation in the defect volume. Densification alone had little effect on in vivo performance. Crosslinking thwarted implant uptake of BMP2 and resulted in fibrous encapsulation. It is concluded that the nanophase bone substitute is well tolerated in this bone defect model. When loaded with BMP2, implantation resulted in complete bony healing and defect closure with implant density (porosity) having little effect on bone healing or remodeling. Without BMP2 the biomaterial did not result in defect closure. Crosslinking, necessary to increase mechanical properties in an aqueous environment, disrupts osteointegration and BMP2 uptake. Alternate implant fabrication strategies will be necessary to achieve an improved balance between material strength and osteointegration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Accelerated craniofacial bone regeneration through dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with dental pulp stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamieh, Frédéric; Collignon, Anne-Margaux; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Lesieur, Julie; Ribes, Sandy; Sadoine, Jérémy; Llorens, Annie; Nicoletti, Antonino; Letourneur, Didier; Colombier, Marie-Laure; Nazhat, Showan N.; Bouchard, Philippe; Chaussain, Catherine; Rochefort, Gael Y.

    2016-12-01

    Therapies using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeded scaffolds may be applicable to various fields of regenerative medicine, including craniomaxillofacial surgery. Plastic compression of collagen scaffolds seeded with MSC has been shown to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of MSC as it increases the collagen fibrillary density. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the osteogenic effects of dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) on bone regeneration in a rat critical-size calvarial defect model. Two symmetrical full-thickness defects were created (5 mm diameter) and filled with either a rat DPSC-containing dense collagen gel scaffold (n = 15), or an acellular scaffold (n = 15). Animals were imaged in vivo by microcomputer tomography (Micro-CT) once a week during 5 weeks, whereas some animals were sacrificed each week for histology and histomorphometry analysis. Bone mineral density and bone micro-architectural parameters were significantly increased when DPSC-seeded scaffolds were used. Histological and histomorphometrical data also revealed significant increases in fibrous connective and mineralized tissue volume when DPSC-seeded scaffolds were used, associated with expression of type I collagen, osteoblast-associated alkaline phosphatase and osteoclastic-related tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. Results demonstrate the potential of DPSC-loaded-dense collagen gel scaffolds to benefit of bone healing process.

  12. Accelerated craniofacial bone regeneration through dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with dental pulp stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Chamieh; Anne-Margaux Collignon; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Julie Lesieur; Sandy Ribes; Jérémy Sadoine; Annie Llorens; Antonino Nicoletti; Didier Letourneur; Marie-Laure Colombier; Nazhat, Showan N.; Philippe Bouchard; Catherine Chaussain; Rochefort, Gael Y.

    2016-01-01

    Therapies using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeded scaffolds may be applicable to various fields of regenerative medicine, including craniomaxillofacial surgery. Plastic compression of collagen scaffolds seeded with MSC has been shown to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of MSC as it increases the collagen fibrillary density. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the osteogenic effects of dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) on bone re...

  13. Bone Replacement Materials and Techniques Used for Achieving Vertical Alveolar Bone Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar bone augmentation in vertical dimension remains the holy grail of periodontal tissue engineering. Successful dental implant placement for restoration of edentulous sites depends on the quality and quantity of alveolar bone available in all spatial dimensions. There are several surgical techniques used alone or in combination with natural or synthetic graft materials to achieve vertical alveolar bone augmentation. While continuously improving surgical techniques combined with the use of auto- or allografts provide the most predictable clinical outcomes, their success often depends on the status of recipient tissues. The morbidity associated with donor sites for auto-grafts makes these techniques less appealing to both patients and clinicians. New developments in material sciences offer a range of synthetic replacements for natural grafts to address the shortcoming of a second surgical site and relatively high resorption rates. This narrative review focuses on existing techniques, natural tissues and synthetic biomaterials commonly used to achieve vertical bone height gain in order to successfully restore edentulous ridges with implant-supported prostheses.

  14. Multiple exophytic osteomas of craniofacial bones not associated with Gardner’s Syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Nascimento Filho; Seixas, Maria T. [UNIFESP; Alessandra Mazzoni; Weckx,Luc L. M.

    2004-01-01

    Osteomas exofíticos são protuberâncias de osso maduro que necessitam ser cuidadosamente diferenciados de outras lesões. Os autores apresentam relato de paciente do sexo masculino, com 44 anos de idade, apresentando osteomas exofíticos múltiplos localizados na região vestíbulo-maxilar em ambos os lados, região de pré-molares e molares não associados à Síndrome de Gardner.Exophytic osteomas are mature bone protuberances required to be carefully differentiated from other lesions. The authors pre...

  15. ''Black Bone'' MRI: a potential alternative to CT with three-dimensional reconstruction of the craniofacial skeleton in the diagnosis of craniosynostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, Karen A. [University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Watt-Smith, Stephen R. [University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); University College London, Eastman Dental Institute, London (United Kingdom); Sheerin, Fintan [University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford (United Kingdom); Golding, Stephen J. [University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    To determine the potential of novel gradient echo parameters, ''Black Bone'' MRI as an alternative to CT in the identification of normal and prematurely fused cranial sutures both in 2D and 3D imaging. Thirteen children with a clinical diagnosis of craniosynostosis underwent ''Black Bone'' MRI in addition to routine cranial CT. ''Black Bone'' datasets were compared to CT and clinical findings. ''Black Bone'' imaging was subsequently used to develop 3D reformats of the craniofacial skeleton to enhance further visualisation of the cranial sutures. Patent cranial sutures were consistently identified on ''Black Bone'' MRI as areas of increased signal intensity. In children with craniosynostosis the affected suture was absent, whilst the remaining patent sutures could be visualised, consistent with CT and clinical findings. Segmentation of the ''Black Bone'' MRI datasets was successful with both threshold and volume rendering techniques. The cranial sutures, where patent, could be visualised throughout their path. Patent cranial sutures appear as areas of increased signal intensity on ''Black Bone'' MRI distinct from the cranial bone, demonstrating considerable clinical potential as a non-ionising alternative to CT in the diagnosis of craniosynostosis. (orig.)

  16. Osteomas of the craniofacial region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to present the clinical features of a case series of osteomas in the craniofacial region and to compare them with those described in the dental literatures. A retrospective study of 18 patients diagnosed with osteomas in the craniofacial region was performed. The age, gender, location, symptoms, and the radiological findings were recorded. There were 13 women and 5 men from 18 years to 69 years of age (mean age, 42{+-}27 years). Fourteen osteomas were found in the mandible (78%), two in frontal sinus, one in sphenoid bone, and one in maxilla. Osteomas are benign tumors composed of mature compact bone or cancellous bone. They are essentially restricted to the craniofacial skeleton and rarely, if ever, are diagnosed in other bones.

  17. Effects of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 on Vertical Bone Augmentation in a Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Ting; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; O'Valle, Francisco; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2017-09-01

    Vertical bone augmentation (VBA) remains unpredictable and challenging for most clinicians. This study aims to compare hard tissue outcomes of VBA, with and without recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2, under space-making titanium mesh in a canine model. Eleven male beagle dogs were used in the study. Experimental ridge defects were created to form atrophic ridges. VBA was performed via guided bone regeneration using titanium mesh and allografts. In experimental hemimandibles, rhBMP-2/absorbable collagen sponge was well mixed with allografts prior to procedures, whereas a control buffer was applied within controls. Dogs were euthanized after a 4-month healing period. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed to assess ridge dimensional changes. In addition, specimens were used for microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) assessment and histologic analysis. Membrane exposure was found on five of 11 (45.5%) rhBMP-2-treated sites, whereas it was found on nine of 11 (81.8%) non-rhBMP-2-treated sites. Within 4 months of healing, rhBMP-2-treated sites showed better radiographic bone density, greater defect fill, and significantly more bone gain in ridge height (P 0.05). Under light microscope, predominant lamellar patterns were found in the specimen obtained from rhBMP-2 sites. With inherent limitations of the canine model and the concern of such a demanding surgical technique, current findings suggest that the presence of rhBMP-2 in a composite graft allows an increase of vertical gain, with formation of ectopic bone over the titanium mesh in comparison with non-rhBMP-2 sites.

  18. Histomorhological and clinical evaluation of maxillary alveolar ridge reconstruction after craniofacial trauma by applying combination of allogeneic and autogenous bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Saverio De Ponte

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A variety of techniques and materials for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of traumatized maxillary ridges prior to dental implants placement have been described in literature. Autogenous bone grafting is considered ideal by many researchers and it still remains the most predictable and documented method. The aim of this report is to underline the effectiveness of using allogeneic bone graft for managing maxillofacial trauma. A case of a 30-year-old male with severely atrophic maxillary ridge as a consequence of complex craniofacial injury is presented here. Augmentation procedure in two stages was performed using allogeneic and autogenous bone grafts in different areas of the osseous defect. Four months after grafting, during the implants placement surgery, samples of both sectors were withdrawn and submitted to histological evaluation. On the examination of the specimens, treated by hematoxylin and eosin staining, the morphology of integrated allogeneic bone grafts was revealed to be similar to the autologous bone. Our clinical experience shows how the allogeneic bone graft presented normal bone tissue architecture and is highly vascularized, and it can be used for reconstruction of severe trauma of the maxilla.

  19. Histomorhological and clinical evaluation of maxillary alveolar ridge reconstruction after craniofacial trauma by applying combination of allogeneic and autogenous bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ponte, Francesco Saverio; Falzea, Roberto; Runci, Michele; Siniscalchi, Enrico Nastro; Lauritano, Floriana; Bramanti, Ennio; Cervino, Gabriele; Cicciu, Marco

    2017-02-01

    A variety of techniques and materials for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of traumatized maxillary ridges prior to dental implants placement have been described in literature. Autogenous bone grafting is considered ideal by many researchers and it still remains the most predictable and documented method. The aim of this report is to underline the effectiveness of using allogeneic bone graft for managing maxillofacial trauma. A case of a 30-year-old male with severely atrophic maxillary ridge as a consequence of complex craniofacial injury is presented here. Augmentation procedure in two stages was performed using allogeneic and autogenous bone grafts in different areas of the osseous defect. Four months after grafting, during the implants placement surgery, samples of both sectors were withdrawn and submitted to histological evaluation. On the examination of the specimens, treated by hematoxylin and eosin staining, the morphology of integrated allogeneic bone grafts was revealed to be similar to the autologous bone. Our clinical experience shows how the allogeneic bone graft presented normal bone tissue architecture and is highly vascularized, and it can be used for reconstruction of severe trauma of the maxilla. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Vertical crestal bone changes around implants placed into fresh extraction sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covani, Ugo; Cornelini, Roberto; Barone, Antonio

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze bone healing and vertical bone remodeling for implants placed immediately after tooth removal without guided bone regeneration techniques. Twenty patients received 20 implants immediately after the removal of 20 teeth. All implants were placed within the undamaged alveoli confines, and the cervical portion of each implant was positioned at coronal bone level. The distance from implant shoulder and bone crest was measured for each implant at four sites (mesial, buccal, distal, and palatal/lingual). No membranes or filling materials were used. Primary flap closure was performed in all clinical cases. All peri-implant bone defects had healed completely 6 months after implant placement. The pattern of bone healing around the neck of the implants showed an absence of peri-implant defects. The vertical distance between the implant shoulder and bone crest ranged from 0 to 2 mm. The bone remodeling of implants placed in fresh extraction sockets showed a healing pattern with new bone apposition around the implant's neck and horizontal and vertical bone reabsorption. The vertical bone reabsorption, which has been observed at buccal sites, was not associated with any negative esthetic implications.

  1. Effect of bone-borne rapid maxillary expanders with and without surgical assistance on the craniofacial structures using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Cheon; Park, Jae Hyun; Bayome, Mohamed; Kim, Ki Beom; Araujo, Eustaquio A; Kook, Yoon-Ah

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze stress distribution and displacement of the craniofacial structures resulting from bone-borne rapid maxillary expanders with and without surgical assistance using finite element analysis. Five designs of rapid maxillary expanders were made: a tooth-borne hyrax expander (type A); a bone-borne expander (type B); and 3 bone-borne surgically assisted modalities: separation of the midpalatal suture (type C), added separation of the pterygomaxillary sutures (type D), and added LeFort I corticotomy (type E). The geometric nonlinear theory was applied to evaluate the Von Mises stress distribution and displacement. The surgical types C, D, and E demonstrated more transverse movement than did the nonsurgical types A and B. The amounts of expansion were greater in the posterior teeth in types A and B, but in types C, D, and E, the amounts of expansion were greater in the anterior teeth. At the midpalatal suture, the nonsurgical types showed more anterior expansion than did the posterior region, and higher stresses than with the surgical types. Type B showed the highest stresses at the infraorbital margin, anterior and posterior nasal spines, maxillary tuberosity, and pterygoid plate and hamulus. The 3 surgical models showed similar amounts of stress and displacement along the teeth, midpalatal sutures, and craniofacial sutures. Therefore, when using a bone-borne rapid maxillary expander in an adult, it is recommended to assist it with midpalatal suture separation, which requires minimal surgical intervention. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mandible vertical height correction using lingual bone-split pedicle onlay graft technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Pramono D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available As edentulous mandible become atrophic, a denture bearing area will also be reduced. Difficulty in the removable prosthesis rehabilitation will be present as well. The purpose of this paper reports an innovative surgical technique to cope a problem of unstable complete lower denture due to bone atrophy and resulted of vertical height reduction of the anterior region of the mandible necessary for denture retention. Vertical advancement of the lower jaw using lingual bone split pedicle onlay graft technique in the anterior region of the mandible and followed by secondary epithelization vestibuloplasty in achieving the vertical height dimension. The surgery was achieved satisfactorily as the vertical dimension of the mandible anterior region had increased and the denture seated more stable comparing with the previous denture worn by the patient. It concluded that the surgery was achieved with a great result as the vertical height of the anterior region of the mandible had increased positively therefore lead the denture seated more stable.

  3. Long-term effects of vertical bone augmentation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Anton Jochum Keestra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Extraction, periodontitis, or trauma can cause a reduction on the alveolar ridge. This could result in an insufficient alveolar bone width and height. Different techniques of vertical bone augmentation are described in literature. However, nowadays there is not enough evidence against lateral augmentation procedures to verify if these techniques are stable over a long period of time. Objective This review analyses the different techniques that are used to vertically augment the bone and evaluate if these techniques are stable over a long period of time. Material and Methods The MEDLINE-PubMed database was searched from its earliest records until December 22, 2014. The following search term was used: Alveolar Ridge augmentation [MESH]. Several journals were hand searched and some authors were contacted for additional information. The primary outcome measure that was analyzed was marginal bone level change around dental implants in the augmented sites, and the secondary outcomes were survival and success rates of dental implants placed in the augmented sites. Results The search yielded 203 abstracts. Ultimately, 90 articles were selected, describing 51 studies meeting the eligibility criteria. The marginal bone level change for the inlay technique and vertical guided bone regeneration are in agreement with the success criteria. Alveolar distraction showed more marginal bone level change after the first year of loading, and for the inlay technique very few studies were available. Conclusions Based on the available data in the current existing studies with a follow-up period of at least 4 to 5 years, one can summarize that there seems to be a trend that the onlay technique, alveolar distraction, and vertical guided bone regeneration are stable for at least 4 to 5 years.

  4. [Craniofacial prostheses for facial defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, P A

    2010-06-01

    Craniofacial prostheses (or epitheses) are artificial substitutes for facial defects. Today, prostheses made of silicone are state-of-the-art. They may be fixed anatomically (to already existing structures), mechanically (to spectacle frames), chemically (using adhesives), or surgically (to osseointegrated titanium implants). With the existing extraoral implant systems, prostheses may be securely anchored to the bone regardless of size and location of the defect. The classic atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation by avoidance of any heat trauma to the bone. This review outlines the indications and contra-indications as well as advantages and disadvantages of craniofacial prostheses and their retention methods in various facial regions. It summarizes the basic principles of extraoral implantology in respect to implant positioning and the management of children and radiated patients.

  5. Craniofacial features in Goldenhar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, C; Reddy, R Sudhakara; Uloopi, K S; Madhuri, V; Sekhar, R Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome also known as oculo-auriculo-vertebral syndrome was first reported by Dr Maurice Goldenhar in 1952. It is a rare disease entity characterized by craniofacial anomalies such as hypoplasia of the mandible and malar bones, microtia, and vertebral anomalies. The etiology of this disease still remains unclear and occurs as sporadic. This report presents goldenhar syndrome in a 12-year-old male patient.

  6. Craniofacial features in Goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome also known as oculo-auriculo-vertebral syndrome was first reported by Dr Maurice Goldenhar in 1952. It is a rare disease entity characterized by craniofacial anomalies such as hypoplasia of the mandible and malar bones, microtia, and vertebral anomalies. The etiology of this disease still remains unclear and occurs as sporadic. This report presents goldenhar syndrome in a 12-year-old male patient.

  7. Botulinum toxin in masticatory muscles: short- and long-term effects on muscle, bone, and craniofacial function in adult rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Katherine L; Liu, Zi Jun; Ye, Wenmin; Navarrete, Alfonso L; Nguyen, Thao Tuong; Salamati, Atriya; Herring, Susan W

    2012-03-01

    Paralysis of the masticatory muscles using botulinum toxin (BTX) is a common treatment for cosmetic reduction of the masseters as well as for conditions involving muscle spasm and pain. The effects of this treatment on mastication have not been evaluated, and claims that the treatment unloads the jaw joint and mandible have not been validated. If BTX treatment does decrease mandibular loading, osteopenia might ensue as an adverse result. Rabbits received a single dose of BTX or saline into one randomly chosen masseter muscle and were followed for 4 or 12 weeks. Masticatory muscle activity was assessed weekly, and incisor bite force elicited by stimulation of each masseter was measured periodically. At the endpoint, strain gages were installed on the neck of the mandibular condyle and on the molar area of the mandible for in vivo bone strain recording during mastication and muscle stimulation. After termination, muscles were weighed and mandibular segments were scanned with micro CT. BTX paralysis of one masseter did not alter chewing side or rate, in part because of compensation by the medial pterygoid muscle. Masseter-induced bite force was dramatically decreased. Analysis of bone strain data suggested that at 4 weeks, the mandibular condyle of the BTX-injected side was underloaded, as were both sides of the molar area. Bone quantity and quality were severely decreased specifically at these underloaded locations, especially the injection-side condylar head. At 12 weeks, most functional parameters were near their pre-injection levels, but the injected masseter still exhibited atrophy and percent bone area was still low in the condylar head. In conclusion, although the performance of mastication was only minimally harmed by BTX paralysis of the masseter, the resulting underloading was sufficient to cause notable and persistent bone loss, particularly at the temporomandibular joint. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control the activity of other genes and cannot regulate the differentiation of neural crest cells. A lack of specialization of neural crest cells leads to the impaired growth of craniofacial bones, nerve tissue, and muscles seen in craniofacial-deafness-hand ...

  9. Conditioned media from differentiating craniofacial bone marrow stromal cells influence mineralization and proliferation in periodontal ligament stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhenyu; Feng, Yuan; Liu, Hongwei

    2016-10-01

    Previous reports have mainly focused on the behavioral responses of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) in interaction with tibia bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). However, there is little study on the biologic features of hPDLSCs under the induction of maxilla BMSCs (M-BMSCs) at different phases of osteogenic differentiation. We hypothesized that M-BMSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation acted on the proliferation, differentiation, and bone-forming capacity of hPDLSCs. In this paper, primary hPDLSCs and human M-BMSCs (hM-BMSCs) were expanded in vitro. After screening of surface markers for characterization, hPDLSCs were cocultured with different phases of differentiating hM-BMSCs. Cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were examined, and mineralization-associated markers such as osteocalcin and runt-related transcription factor 2 of hPDLSCs in coculture with uninduced/osteoinduced hM-BMSCs were evaluated. hPDLSCs in hM-BMSCs-conditioned medium (hM-BMSCs-CM) group showed a reduction in proliferation compared with untreated hPDLSCs, while osteoinduced hM-BMSCs for 10 day-conditioned medium (hM-BMSCs-CM-10ds) and osteoinduced hM-BMSCs for 15 day-conditioned medium (hM-BMSCs-CM-15ds) enhance the proliferation of hPDLSCs. hM-BMSCs of separate differentiation stages temporarily inhibited osteogenesis of hPDLSCs in the early days. Upon extending time periods, uninduced/osteoinduced hM-BMSCs markedly enhanced osteogenesis of hPDLSCs to different degrees. The transplantation results showed hM-BMSCs-CM-15ds treatment promoted tissue regeneration to generate cementum/periodontal ligament-like structure characterized by hard-tissue formation. This research supported the notion that hM-BMSCs triggered osteogenesis of hPDLSCs suggesting important implications for periodontal engineering.

  10. Hyoid bone position and vertical skeletal pattern--open bite/deep bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzal, V; Braga, A C; Ferreira, A P

    2014-06-01

    The Hyoid Bone (HB) is a singular bone with no articulation, but is associated with some vital functions. The purpose of this study was to test the null hypotheses that there is no change in HB position in individuals with vertical jaw dysplasia. Eleven factors were used to determine the position of the HB. In this paper the ANOVA (two way analysis of variance) method was used to analyze the variability of the mean of each HB position according the factors facial type and gender. Comparisons with these procedures define which measurements were associated with facial type, gender; and the interactive associations between them. The HB is related with vertical facial skeletal pattern being farther from mandible and a line joining it to the third cervical vertebra in deep bite, and from posterior nasal spine and sella turcica in open bite. There is sexual dimorphism in HB position. Men have a significant lower distance to the mandible and to the vertical pterigoidea; and higher values to the third cervical vertebra, to a line joining this vertebra to mandible, to the posterior nasal spine and to the sella turcica. Also, there is an association between HB position related group and gender. In this research there is a relation between the position of HB and vertical skeletal pattern. The position of the HB is more related with deep bite. There is a possibility of including the HB in the differential diagnosis of this dysplasia.

  11. A novel classification of frontal bone fractures: The prognostic significance of vertical fracture trajectory and skull base extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravi K; Afifi, Ahmed M; Gassner, Jennifer; Hartman, Michael J; Leverson, Glen; King, Timothy W; Bentz, Michael L; Gentry, Lindell R

    2015-05-01

    The broad spectrum of frontal bone fractures, including those with orbital and skull base extension, is poorly understood. We propose a novel classification scheme for frontal bone fractures. Maxillofacial CT scans of trauma patients were reviewed over a five year period, and frontal bone fractures were classified: Type 1: Frontal sinus fracture without vertical extension. Type 2: Vertical fracture through the orbit without frontal sinus involvement. Type 3: Vertical fracture through the frontal sinus without orbit involvement. Type 4: Vertical fracture through the frontal sinus and ipsilateral orbit. Type 5: Vertical fracture through the frontal sinus and contralateral or bilateral orbits. We also identified the depth of skull base extension, and performed a chart review to identify associated complications. 149 frontal bone fractures, including 51 non-vertical frontal sinus (Type 1, 34.2%) and 98 vertical (Types 2-5, 65.8%) fractures were identified. Vertical fractures penetrated the middle or posterior cranial fossa significantly more often than non-vertical fractures (62.2 v. 15.7%, p = 0.0001) and had a significantly higher mortality rate (18.4 v. 0%, p fractures with frontal sinus and orbital extension, and fractures that penetrated the middle or posterior cranial fossa had the strongest association with intracranial injuries, optic neuropathy, disability, and death (p bone fractures carry a worse prognosis than frontal bone fractures without a vertical pattern. In addition, vertical fractures with extension into the frontal sinus and orbit, or with extension into the middle or posterior cranial fossa have the highest complication rate and mortality. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Agarwal, Divyansh; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    Applicants for craniofacial surgery fellowships utilize Internet-based resources like the San Francisco (SF) Match to manage applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility and content of craniofacial surgery fellowship websites (CSFWs). A list of available craniofacial surgery fellowships was compiled from directories of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery (ACSFS) and SF Match. Accessibility of CSFWs was assessed via links from these directories and a Google search. Craniofacial surgery fellowship websites were evaluated on education and recruitment content and compared via program characteristics. Twenty-four of the 28 US-based craniofacial surgery fellowship programs had a CSFW (86%). The ACSFS and SF Match databases had limited CSFW accessibility, but a Google search revealed most CSFWs had the top search result (76%). In total, CSFWs provided an average of 39% of education and recruitment variables. While most programs provided fellowship program descriptions (96%), application links (96%), and faculty listings (83%), relatively few provided rotation schedules (13%), fellow selection process information (13%), or interview dates (8%). CSFW content did not vary by program location, faculty size, accreditation status, or institutional affiliations (P > 0.05). Craniofacial surgery fellowships often lack readily accessible websites from national program lists and have limited information for interested applicants. The consistent lack of online information across programs suggests future opportunities exist to improve these educational resources.

  13. Vertical palatal bone dimensions on lateral cephalometry and cone-beam computed tomography: implications for palatal implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Britta A; Wehrbein, Heinrich; Heuser, Lothar; Kunkel, Martin

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the necessity of three-dimensional imaging (computed tomography [CT]/cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for paramedian insertion of palatal implants. Lateral radiographs and CBCT scans were performed from 18 human skulls. For lateral cephalometry, the nasal floor (right/left) and the oral hard palate of all skulls were lined with a tin foil for contrast enhancement. The quantity of vertical bone as measured on lateral radiographs was compared with CBCT measurements obtained in median and parasagittal planes and at minimum bone height. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were determined for bivariate correlation analysis. The median palatal bone height on CBCT (mean 8.98 mm; standard deviation [SD] 3.4) was markedly higher than the vertical height seen on lateral radiographs (mean 6.6 mm; SD 3.2). Comparing lateral cephalometry with CBCT, the strongest association was observed at the minimum palatal bone height (r=0.926; Ppalatal implants. The vertical bone dimension as displayed on lateral cephalometry reflects the minimum bone height rather than maximum bone in the median plane. Therefore, a preoperative CT or CBCT is only indicated when the lateral cephalometry reveals a marginal quantity of bone. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Evaluation of complication rates and vertical bone gain after guided bone regeneration with non-resorbable membranes versus titanium meshes and resorbable membranes. A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchi, Alessandro; Vignudelli, Elisabetta; Napolitano, Aldo; Marchetti, Claudio; Corinaldesi, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    The partial edentulous posterior mandible is often a challenge area that requires a bone reconstructive surgery for implants placement. This RCT was aimed to evaluate complications rate and vertical bone gain after Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) with dense non-resorbable d-PTFE titanium-reinforced membranes (Group A) versus titanium meshes covered by cross-linked collagen membranes (Group B). 40 partially edentulous patients with atrophic posterior mandible, were randomly divided into two study group: 20 patients were treated with one stage GBR by means of non-resorbable d-PTFE titanium-reinforced membranes (Group A); and 20 patients, by means of titanium mesh covered by cross-linked collagen membranes (Group B). All complications were recorded, distinguishing between "surgical" and "healing" and between "minor" or "major.". Primary implants stability and vertical bone gain were also evaluated. In the group A, surgical and healing complication rates were 5.0% and 15.0%, respectively. In the group B, surgical and healing complication rates were 15.8% and 21.1%, respectively. No significant differences between two study group were observed regarding complications rate implant stability and vertical bone gain. Both GBR approaches for the restoration of atrophic posterior mandible achieved similar results regarding complications, vertical bone gain and implant stability. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Complications with allogeneic, cancellous bone blocks in vertical alveolar ridge augmentation: prospective clinical case study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draenert, Florian G; Kämmerer, Peer W; Berthold, Michael; Neff, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Vertical bone augmentation in dental implantology is an indication for cancellous allogeneic bone blocks (ABB). However, these materials may lead to adverse reactions, which are known well in orthopedics but rarely published. Therefore, in this study, we performed an evaluation of the use of ABB in vertical bone augmentation in clinical dental implantology. The prospective clinical study included 20 cases with vertical augmentation using ABB and subsequent or simultaneous placement of implants in the lateral maxilla and mandible. Follow-up included panoramic radiography, tissue healing, and peri-implantitis. Because of the limited number of patients, the report was planned to be descriptive only. Loss of ABB or peri-implantitis of more than 30% of the intraosseous implant length was deemed to indicate failure. The study was cancelled after six cases because of an unexpectedly high number of complications (5 of 6; 83%). The average surveillance time was 1460 days. Three types of unsatisfying outcome were observed: type I, early complete loss of the augmentation with soft tissue defects after 3 to 8 weeks (n = 2); type II, early soft tissue maceration (up to 8 weeks) without loss of coverage and complete early bone healing with later peri-implantitis and bone loss after prosthetic loading (6 months or later; n = 2); and type III, complication-free bone healing with subsequent peri-implantitis after prosthetic loading (6 months or later; n = 1). Complications were observed in vertical augmentation with ABB and implant placement. After careful consideration, literature data were found to support these results and also suggest that tissue level implants may be advantageous in vertical bone augmentation with ABB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Craniofacial CT findings of Gorham-Stout disease and generalized lymphatic anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki; Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Ozeki, Michio; Fukao, Toshiyuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Gifu (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    The present study aimed to assess the craniofacial CT imaging features for differentiating between Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) and generalized lymphatic anomaly (GLA). Seven patients with GSD and four patients with GLA were included in this study. All patients underwent CT examinations that encompassed the craniofacial bones. The presence, distribution, and type of craniofacial osteolysis were assessed. The clinical symptoms that were associated with craniofacial osteolysis were also reviewed. Craniofacial osteolysis including cranial osteolysis was seen in four of seven (57 %) patients with GSD and in three of four (75 %) patients with GLA. Facial osteolysis was seen in two (29 %) patients with GSD, but this was not observed in patients with GLA. Among patients with craniofacial osteolysis, those with GSD showed diffuse involvement, whereas those with GLA showed multifocal involvement. The craniofacial osteolysis of GSD could be classified into three patterns: medullary involvement, thinning bone, and disappearing bone. The clinical symptoms of craniofacial osteolysis were observed in all patients with GSD but were not present in patients with GLA. Craniofacial involvement was observed in both groups. The craniofacial osteolysis of GSD showed diffuse involvement with clinical symptoms, whereas that of GLA showed multifocal involvement without clinical symptoms. (orig.)

  17. THE OLD AND NEW FACE OF CRANIOFACIAL RESEARCH: How animal models inform human craniofacial genetic and clinical data

    OpenAIRE

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Williams, Trevor; Artinger, Kristin B.

    2016-01-01

    The craniofacial skeletal structures that comprise the human head develop from multiple tissues that converge to form the bones and cartilage of the face. Because of their complex development and morphogenesis, many human birth defects arise due to disruptions in these cellular populations. Thus, determining how these structures normally develop is vital if we are to gain a deeper understanding of craniofacial birth defects and devise treatment and prevention options. In this review, we will ...

  18. Breathing mode influence on craniofacial development and head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambi-Rocha, Annel; Cabrera-Domínguez, Mª Eugenia; Domínguez-Reyes, Antonia

    2017-08-14

    The incidence of abnormal breathing and its consequences on craniofacial development is increasing, and is not limited to children with adenoid faces. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cephalometric differences in craniofacial structures and head posture between nasal breathing and oral breathing children and teenagers with a normal facial growth pattern. Ninety-eight 7-16 year-old patients with a normal facial growth pattern were clinically and radiographically evaluated. They were classified as either nasal breathing or oral breathing patients according to the predominant mode of breathing through clinical and historical evaluation, and breathing respiratory rate predomination as quantified by an airflow sensor. They were divided in two age groups (G1: 7-9) (G2: 10-16) to account for normal age-related facial growth. Oral breathing children (8.0±0.7 years) showed less nasopharyngeal cross-sectional dimension (MPP) (p=0.030), whereas other structures were similar to their nasal breathing counterparts (7.6±0.9 years). However, oral breathing teenagers (12.3±2.0 years) exhibited a greater palate length (ANS-PNS) (p=0.049), a higher vertical dimension in the lower anterior face (Xi-ANS-Pm) (p=0.015), and a lower position of the hyoid bone with respect to the mandibular plane (H-MP) (p=0.017) than their nasal breathing counterparts (12.5±1.9 years). No statistically significant differences were found in head posture. Even in individuals with a normal facial growth pattern, when compared with nasal breathing individuals, oral breathing children present differences in airway dimensions. Among adolescents, these dissimilarities include structures in the facial development and hyoid bone position. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Vertical ridge augmentation using guided bone regeneration (GBR) in three clinical scenarios prior to implant placement: a retrospective study of 35 patients 12 to 72 months after loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Istvan A; Jovanovic, Sascha A; Lozada, Jaime L

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to: (1) evaluate the results of vertical guided bone regeneration (GBR) with particulate autogenous bone grafts, (2) determine clinically and radiographically the success and survival rates of 82 implants placed in such surgical sites after prosthetic loading for 12 to 72 months, and (3) compare defects that were treated simultaneously with sinus augmentation and vertical GBR to other areas of the jaw treated with vertical GBR only. Eighty-two implants were inserted in 35 patients with 36 three-dimensional vertical bone defects. The patients were divided into three groups: single missing teeth (group A), multiple missing teeth (group B), and vertical defects in the posterior maxilla only (group C). All group C subjects were treated simultaneously with sinus and vertical augmentations. All patients were treated with vertical ridge augmentation utilizing titanium-reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) membranes and particulated autografts. After removal of the e-PTFE membrane, all sites received a collagen membrane. At membrane removal, mean vertical augmentation was 5.5 mm (+/-2.29 mm). Mean combined crestal remodeling was 1.01 mm (+/-0.57 mm) at 12 months, which remained stable through the 6-year follow-up period. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups in mean marginal bone remodeling. One defect had a bone graft complication (2.78%, 95% CI: 0.00%, 8.15%). The overall implant survival rate was 100% with a cumulative success rate of 94.7%. (1) Vertical augmentation with e-PTFE membranes and particulated autografts is a safe and predictable treatment; (2) success and survival rates of implants placed in vertically augmented bone with the GBR technique appear similar to implants placed in native bone under loading conditions; (3) success and failure rates of implants placed into bone regenerated simultaneously with sinus and vertical augmentation techniques compare favorably to those

  20. Circulatory CNP Rescues Craniofacial Hypoplasia in Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, S; Nakao, Kazumasa; Koyama, N; Isobe, Y; Ueda, Y; Kanai, Y; Kondo, E; Fujii, T; Miura, M; Yasoda, A; Nakao, Kazuwa; Bessho, K

    2017-12-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common genetic form of human dwarfism, characterized by midfacial hypoplasia resulting in occlusal abnormality and foramen magnum stenosis, leading to serious neurologic complications and hydrocephalus. Currently, surgery is the only way to manage jaw deformity, neurologic complications, and hydrocephalus in patients with achondroplasia. We previously showed that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a potent stimulator of endochondral bone growth of long bones and vertebrae and is also a potent stimulator in the craniofacial region, which is crucial for midfacial skeletogenesis. In this study, we analyzed craniofacial morphology in a mouse model of achondroplasia, in which fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is specifically activated in cartilage ( Fgfr3ach mice), and investigated the mechanisms of jaw deformities caused by this mutation. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of CNP on the maxillofacial area in these animals. Fgfr3ach mice exhibited midfacial hypoplasia, especially in the sagittal direction, caused by impaired endochondral ossification in craniofacial cartilage and by premature closure of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis, an important growth center in craniomaxillofacial skeletogenesis. We crossed Fgfr3ach mice with transgenic mice in which CNP is expressed in the liver under the control of the human serum amyloid-P component promoter, resulting in elevated levels of circulatory CNP ( Fgfr3ach/SAP-Nppc-Tg mice). In the progeny, midfacial hypoplasia in the sagittal direction observed in Fgfr3ach mice was improved significantly by restoring the thickness of synchondrosis and promoting proliferation of chondrocytes in the craniofacial cartilage. In addition, the foramen magnum stenosis observed in Fgfr3ach mice was significantly ameliorated in Fgfr3ach/SAP-Nppc-Tg mice due to enhanced endochondral bone growth of the anterior intraoccipital synchondrosis. These results clearly demonstrate the therapeutic potential of

  1. Craniofacial reconstruction - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Craniofacial reconstruction - series—Normal anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/ ...

  2. Nanomaterials for Craniofacial and Dental Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Lin, S; Shi, S; Lin, Y

    2017-07-01

    Tissue engineering shows great potential as a future treatment for the craniofacial and dental defects caused by trauma, tumor, and other diseases. Due to the biomimetic features and excellent physiochemical properties, nanomaterials are of vital importance in promoting cell growth and stimulating tissue regeneration in tissue engineering. For craniofacial and dental tissue engineering, the frequently used nanomaterials include nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanotubes, and nanosheets. Nanofibers are attractive for cell invasion and proliferation because of their resemblance to extracellular matrix and the presence of large pores, and they have been used as scaffolds in bone, cartilage, and tooth regeneration. Nanotubes and nanoparticles improve the mechanical and chemical properties of scaffold, increase cell attachment and migration, and facilitate tissue regeneration. In addition, nanofibers and nanoparticles are also used as a delivery system to carry the bioactive agent in bone and tooth regeneration, have better control of the release speed of agent upon degradation of the matrix, and promote tissue regeneration. Although applications of nanomaterials in tissue engineering remain in their infancy with numerous challenges to face, the current results indicate that nanomaterials have massive potential in craniofacial and dental tissue engineering.

  3. Peak Vertical Jump Power as a Marker of Bone Health in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, F; Mil-Homens, P; Carita, A I; Janz, K; Sardinha, L B

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the accuracy of peak vertical jump power (VJP) to identify children with bone mineral density (BMD) below average, defined as BMD measured by DXA and adjusted for body height at the whole body less head≤- 1.0 standard deviation (SD). The sample included 114 boys and girls aged 8.5±0.4 years old. VJP was estimated from a countermovement jump performed on a contact mat using the measured flight time to calculate the height of rise of the center of gravity. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio of having BMD≤1.0 SD decreased 1.2% per watt of power and the probability of BMD below average was 75.6% higher in boys than in girls with the same peak power jump. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the best trade-off between sensitivity and specificity to identify children with BMDvertical jump of 19.9 cm and 20.5 cm in 8-year-old boys and girls, respectively. The VJP showed a reasonable sensitivity and specificity as well good discriminant ability to identify children with BMD below average. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Three-dimensional spiral CT of craniofacial malformations in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binaghi, S. [Payerne Hopital, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology; Service de Radiodiagnostic et Radiologie Interventionnelle, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gudinchet, F. [Payerne Hopital, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology; Rilliet, B. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To assess the value of three-dimensional CT (3D CT) in the diagnosis and management of suspected paediatric craniofacial malformations. Materials and methods. Twenty-eight children (12 girls, 16 boys) with a mean age of 4 years, suffering from craniofacial or cervical malformations, underwent craniofacial spiral CT. 3D reformatting was performed using an independent workstation. Results. 3D CT allowed the preoperative evaluation of 16 patients with craniosynostosis and the post-surgical management of 2 patients. 3D CT clearly depicted malformations of the skull base involving the petrous bone in seven patients (four cases of Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome, one case of Treacher-Collins syndrome and two cases of Crouzon's disease). Four patients with craniofacial clefts were also evaluated. Radiological findings were confirmed by the clinical and intraoperative findings in all patients that underwent surgical treatment. Movement artefacts and ''Lego effect'' related to abrupt change of cranial vault border were encountered and are discussed. Conclusions. 3D CT of the skull can safely and reliably identify paediatric craniofacial malformations involving bone, and it should be used as morphological mapping to help the surgeon in planning surgical treatment. (orig.)

  5. CRANIOFACIAL MORPHOLOGY AND DENTAL OCCLUSION IN ADULTS WITH OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Hald, Jannie Dahl; Harsløf, Torben

    AIMS: To compare craniofacial characteristics and variation in dental occlusion according to severity of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a rare inherited disease with fragility of bone and teeth because of abnormalities in the formation of collagen. METHODS: A total of 73 patients...

  6. Pre-clinical in vivo models for the screening of bone biomaterials for oral/craniofacial indications: focus on small-animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Andreas; Sculean, Anton; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Buser, Daniel; Klinge, Björn

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical in vivo experimental studies are performed for evaluating proof-of-principle concepts, safety and possible unwanted reactions of candidate bone biomaterials before proceeding to clinical testing. Specifically, models involving small animals have been developed for screening bone biomaterials for their potential to enhance bone formation. No single model can completely recreate the anatomic, physiologic, biomechanic and functional environment of the human mouth and jaws. Relevant aspects regarding physiology, anatomy, dimensions and handling are discussed in this paper to elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of small-animal models. Model selection should be based not on the 'expertise' or capacities of the team, but rather on a scientifically solid rationale, and the animal model selected should reflect the question for which an answer is sought. The rationale for using heterotopic or orthotopic testing sites, and intraosseous, periosseous or extraskeletal defect models, is discussed. The paper also discusses the relevance of critical size defect modeling, with focus on calvarial defects in rodents. In addition, the rabbit sinus model and the capsule model in the rat mandible are presented and discussed in detail. All animal experiments should be designed with care and include sample-size and study-power calculations, thus allowing generation of meaningful data. Moreover, animal experiments are subject to ethical approval by the relevant authority. All procedures and the postoperative handling and care, including postoperative analgesics, should follow best practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Vertical bone growth following autotransplantation of the developing maxillary third molar to replace a retained mandibular permanent molar: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakwicz, Paweł; Czochrowska, Ewa Monika; Milczarek, Anna; Zadurska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    A retained permanent mandibular first molar caused arrested development and a defect of the alveolar bone in a 16-year-old girl. Extraction of the ankylosed tooth was immediately followed by autotransplantation of the developing maxillary third molar. At the 3-year follow-up examination the interproximal bone level at the autotransplanted molar was equal to that of the neighboring teeth. Cone beam computed tomography showed bone at the labial aspect of the transplant. The eruption of the autotransplanted tooth stimulated vertical alveolar bone development and repaired the bone defect. Additionally, there was closure of the posterior open bite that was initially present at the ankylosed molar site.

  8. Tissue response to composite hydrogels for vertical bone augmentation in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinard, L.A.; Dahlin, R.L.; Henslee, A.M.; Spicer, P.P.; Chu, C.Y.; Tabata, Y.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.A.; Young, S.; Wong, M.E.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a preclinical animal model for evaluating bone augmentation and to examine the level of bone augmentation induced by hydrogel composites. Design criteria outlined for the development of the animal model included rigid immobilization of bilateral

  9. Comparison of Dental Implant Performance Following Vertical Alveolar Bone Augmentation With Alveolar Distraction Osteogenesis or Autogenous Onlay Bone Grafts: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Wang, Feng; Huang, Wei; Wang, XuDong; Wu, Yiqun

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the performance of implants placed after alveolar distraction osteogenesis (ADO) or autogenous onlay bone grafting (AOBG) based on implant survival, peri-implant bone resorption, and clinical parameters. From February 2008 to July 2012, 17 patients (6 women and 11 men) with implant placement after ADO (group 1, n = 8) or AOBG (group 2, n = 9) were included in this retrospective study. In all, 37 implants were placed in group 1 and 22 implants were placed in group 2. Implant survival rate, peri-implant bone resorption, probe depth (PD), modified plaque index (mPI), and modified sulcus bleeding index (mSBI) were analyzed to evaluate implant prognosis. Successful reconstruction of vertical alveolar defects and uneventful implant placement were achieved in all patients in the 2 groups. After a mean follow-up of 47.9 ± 13.3 months, implant survival was 97.3% (36 of 37) in group 1 and 95.5% (21 of 22) in group 2. No statistically relevant differences were observed. Peri-implant bone resorption was 1.29 ± 0.59 mm in group 1, which was slightly higher than 1.24 ± 0.87 mm in group 2 at last follow-up. The difference was not statistically relevant. Favorable peri-implant conditions were indicated by PD, mPI, and mSBI in the 2 groups. ADO and AOBG can be used for correction of vertical alveolar defects with a reliable implant prognosis. Comparably high implant survival rates and favorable peri-implant conditions were attained. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of snoring and craniofacial features in Malaysian children from hospital-based medical clinic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banabilh, Saeed M; Asha'ari, Zamzil Amin; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Ab

    2008-08-01

    Snoring is considered as the most common clinical symptom of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. However, many snoring studies were done in western population, and data from around Asia is scarce. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of snoring among Malaysian children from hospital-based medical clinic population setting and to compare the craniofacial features of children with and without snoring using cephalometric analysis. A cross-sectional study among children aged 7-15 years were carried out in Hospital Kuala Terengganu. Sleep behavior questionnaire (Berlin questionnaire) was given to 500 children. The respondents were divided into snoring and non-snoring groups. Thirty children from each group were randomly selected to undergo a cephalometric X-ray. For each lateral cephalometric radiograph, 17 parameters consisting bony, soft tissue, and angular measurements were recorded using computer software VixWin2000. Independent t test was used to analyze the data. The results indicated that the whole questionnaire respondents were 317 (46 snoring and 271 non-snoring), hence, the prevalence of snoring in our survey population was 14.51%. The cephalometric X-ray showed that the snoring children manifested a significant different craniofacial features, such as narrow airway at the level of the soft palate and oropharynx (p < 0.05), more inferiorly positioned hyoid bone (p < 0.05), longer vertical airway length from posterior nasal spine to the base of epiglottis (p < 0.05), more protruding maxilla, and anterior-posterior discrepancy of maxilla and mandible (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our snorer children exhibit significant craniofacial differences compared to non-snorer groups.

  11. Ultralow-dose CT of the craniofacial bone for navigated surgery using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction: 2D and 3D image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter; Gassner, Eva-Maria; Hoermann, Romed; Bale, Reto; Puelacher, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to evaluate 2D and 3D image quality of high-resolution ultralow-dose CT images of the craniofacial bone for navigated surgery using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in comparison with standard filtered backprojection (FBP). MATERIALS AND METHODS. A formalin-fixed human cadaver head was scanned using a clinical reference protocol at a CT dose index volume of 30.48 mGy and a series of five ultralow-dose protocols at 3.48, 2.19, 0.82, 0.44, and 0.22 mGy using FBP and ASIR at 50% (ASIR-50), ASIR at 100% (ASIR-100), and MBIR. Blinded 2D axial and 3D volume-rendered images were compared with each other by three readers using top-down scoring. Scores were analyzed per protocol or dose and reconstruction. All images were compared with the FBP reference at 30.48 mGy. A nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test was used. Statistical significance was set at p reconstructions at 3.48 mGy; FBP and ASIR-100 at 2.19 mGy; FBP, ASIR-100, and MBIR at 0.82 mGy; MBIR at 0.44 mGy; and MBIR at 0.22 mGy. CONCLUSION. MBIR (2D and 3D) and ASIR-100 (2D) may significantly improve subjective image quality of ultralow-dose images and may allow more than 90% dose reductions.

  12. Comparison of molar intrusion efficiency and bone density by CT in patients with different vertical facial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, W H; Li, W; Chen, F; Zhang, J F; Lv, Y; Chen, X Y; Lin, W W; Fu, Z; Shi, J J

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between molar intrusion efficiency and bone density in patients with different vertical facial morphology. Thirty-six female patients, with overerupted upper first molars, were divided into two groups according to mandiblular plane angle (FH-MP): hyperdivergent, FH-MP>30° (G1), hypodivergent, FH-MPintrusion degree of upper first molar and bone density, and molar intrusion efficiency was calculated as amount/duration (mm month(-1) ). In addition, each tooth was divided into three portions (cervical, furcation and apical) to measure the bone density. It was found in this study that treatment duration was 3·13 and 4·71 months in G1 and G2 and that the intrusion efficiency was 1·57 and 0·81 in G1 and G2 with significant difference (P intrusion. In addition, the bone density change was greater in G1 than in G2 (P intrusion may account for the variation of molar intrusion efficiency. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cranio-facial clefts in pre-hispanic America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marius-Nunez, A L; Wasiak, D T

    2015-10-01

    Among the representations of congenital malformations in Moche ceramic art, cranio-facial clefts have been portrayed in pottery found in Moche burials. These pottery vessels were used as domestic items during lifetime and funerary offerings upon death. The aim of this study was to examine archeological evidence for representations of cranio-facial cleft malformations in Moche vessels. Pottery depicting malformations of the midface in Moche collections in Lima-Peru were studied. The malformations portrayed on pottery were analyzed using the Tessier classification. Photographs were authorized by the Larco Museo.Three vessels were observed to have median cranio-facial dysraphia in association with midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible. ML001489 portrays a median cranio-facial dysraphia with an orbital cleft and a midline cleft of the lower lip extending to the mandible. ML001514 represents a median facial dysraphia in association with an orbital facial cleft and a vertical orbital dystopia. ML001491 illustrates a median facial cleft with a soft tissue cleft. Three cases of midline, orbital and lateral facial clefts have been portrayed in Moche full-figure portrait vessels. They represent the earliest registries of congenital cranio-facial malformations in ancient Peru. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia - A review of current management techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadavalli Guruprasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous dysplasia is a pathologic condition of bone of unknown etiology with no apparent familial, hereditary or congenital basis. Lichtenstein first coined the term in 1938 and in 1942 he and Jaffe separated it from other fibro-osseous lesions. It is a bone tumor that, although benign, has the potential to cause significant cosmetic and functional disturbance, particularly in the craniofacial skeleton. Its management poses significant challenges to the surgeon. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia is 1 of 3 types of fibrous dysplasia that can affect the bones of the craniofacial complex, including the mandible and maxilla. Fibrous dysplasia is a skeletal developmental disorder of the bone-forming mesenchyme that manifests as a defect in osteoblastic differentiation and maturation. It is a lesion of unknown etiology, uncertain pathogenesis, and diverse histopathology. Fibrous dysplasia represents about 2, 5% of all bone tumors and over 7% of all benign tumours. Over the years, we have gained a better understanding of its etiology, clinical behavior, and both surgical and non-surgical treatments.

  15. Effect of slow forced eruption on the vertical levels of the interproximal bone and papilla and the width of the alveolar ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eun-Young; Lee, Ju-Youn; Choi, Jeomil

    2016-11-01

    Forced eruption has been proposed for the reconstruction of deficient bone and soft tissue. The aim of this study was to examine the changes in the alveolar ridge width and the vertical levels of the interproximal bone and papilla following forced eruption. Patients whose hopeless maxillary anterior teeth were expected to undergo severe bone resorption and soft tissue recession upon extraction were recruited. In addition, patients whose maxillary anterior teeth required forced eruption for restoration due to tooth fracture or dental caries were included. Before and after forced eruption, the interproximal bone height was measured by radiographic analysis, and changes in the alveolar ridge width and the interproximal papilla height were measured with an acrylic stent. This prospective study demonstrated that the levels of the interproximal alveolar bone and papilla were significantly increased by 1.36 mm and 1.09 mm, respectively, in the vertical direction. However, the alveolar ridge width was significantly reduced by an average of 0.67 mm in the buccolingual direction. The changes in the level of the interproximal alveolar bone and papilla were positively correlated. Although the levels of the interproximal bone and papilla were significantly increased, the alveolar ridge width was significantly decreased following forced eruption. There was a modest positive and significant correlation between the changes in the height of the interproximal alveolar bone and the papilla. Based on our findings, modification of vertical forced eruption should be considered when augmentation of the alveolar ridge width is required.

  16. Horizontal and vertical maxillary osteotomy stability, in cleft lip and palate patients, using allogeneic bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelston Ulbricht Gomes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was carried out to evaluate maxillary stability after orthodontic-surgical treatment of patients with cleft lip and palate. Cephalometric analysis was applied to two different groups, with and without allogeneic bone graft. METHODS: The sample comprised 48 patients with cleft lip and palate. The test group comprised 25 patients who, after correction of maxillary position, received allogeneic bone graft at the gap created by Le Fort I osteotomy. The control group comprised 23 patients and its surgical procedures were similar to those applied to the test group, except for the use of bone graft. Manual cephalometric analysis and comparison between lateral teleradiographs, obtained at the preoperative phase, immediate postoperative phase and after a minimum period of six months, were carried out. RESULTS: An higher horizontal relapse was observed in the control group (p0.05. CONCLUSION: The use of allogeneic bone graft in cleft lip and palate patients submitted to Le Fort I osteotomy contributed to increase postoperative stability when compared to surgeries without bone graft.

  17. Craniofacial ontogeny in Centrosaurus apertus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Frederickson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Centrosaurus apertus, a large bodied ceratopsid from the Late Cretaceous of North America, is one of the most common fossils recovered from the Belly River Group. This fossil record shows a wide diversity in morphology and size, with specimens ranging from putative juveniles to fully-grown individuals. The goal of this study was to reconstruct the ontogenetic changes that occur in the craniofacial skeleton of C. apertus through a quantitative cladistic analysis. Forty-seven cranial specimens were independently coded in separate data matrices for 80 hypothetical multistate growth characters and 130 hypothetical binary growth characters. Both analyses yielded the max-limit of 100,000 most parsimonious saved trees and the strict consensus collapsed into large polytomies. In order to reduce conflict resulting from missing data, fragmentary individuals were removed and the analyses were rerun. Among both the complete and the reduced data sets the multistate analyses recovered a shorter tree with a higher consistency index (CI than the additive binary data sets. The arrangement within the trees shows a progression of specimens with a recurved nasal horn in the least mature individuals, followed by specimens with straight nasal horns in relatively more mature individuals, and finally specimens with procurved nasal horns in the most mature individuals. The most mature individuals are further characterized by the reduction of the cranial horn ornamentations in late growth stages, a trait that similarly occurs in the growth of other dinosaurs. Bone textural changes were found to be sufficient proxies for relative maturity in individuals that have not reached adult size. Additionally, frill length is congruent with relative maturity status and makes an acceptable proxy for ontogenetic status, especially in smaller individuals. In adult-sized individuals, the fusion of the epiparietals and episquamosals and the orientation of the nasal horn are the best

  18. Craniofacial ontogeny in Centrosaurus apertus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, Joseph A; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R

    2014-01-01

    Centrosaurus apertus, a large bodied ceratopsid from the Late Cretaceous of North America, is one of the most common fossils recovered from the Belly River Group. This fossil record shows a wide diversity in morphology and size, with specimens ranging from putative juveniles to fully-grown individuals. The goal of this study was to reconstruct the ontogenetic changes that occur in the craniofacial skeleton of C. apertus through a quantitative cladistic analysis. Forty-seven cranial specimens were independently coded in separate data matrices for 80 hypothetical multistate growth characters and 130 hypothetical binary growth characters. Both analyses yielded the max-limit of 100,000 most parsimonious saved trees and the strict consensus collapsed into large polytomies. In order to reduce conflict resulting from missing data, fragmentary individuals were removed and the analyses were rerun. Among both the complete and the reduced data sets the multistate analyses recovered a shorter tree with a higher consistency index (CI) than the additive binary data sets. The arrangement within the trees shows a progression of specimens with a recurved nasal horn in the least mature individuals, followed by specimens with straight nasal horns in relatively more mature individuals, and finally specimens with procurved nasal horns in the most mature individuals. The most mature individuals are further characterized by the reduction of the cranial horn ornamentations in late growth stages, a trait that similarly occurs in the growth of other dinosaurs. Bone textural changes were found to be sufficient proxies for relative maturity in individuals that have not reached adult size. Additionally, frill length is congruent with relative maturity status and makes an acceptable proxy for ontogenetic status, especially in smaller individuals. In adult-sized individuals, the fusion of the epiparietals and episquamosals and the orientation of the nasal horn are the best indicators of relative

  19. Reconstruction of mandibular vertical defects for dental implants with autogenous bone block grafts using a tunnel approach: clinical study of 50 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restoy-Lozano, A; Dominguez-Mompell, J L; Infante-Cossio, P; Lara-Chao, J; Espin-Galvez, F; Lopez-Pizarro, V

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of mandibular vertical defect reconstruction with autologous bone and the use of a sub-periosteal tunnel approach in preparation for dental implant insertion. Forty-three consecutive patients with an atrophic posterior mandible were reconstructed using this method. Two thin laminae of cortical bone, obtained by splitting blocks harvested from the retromolar area, were fixed in a box-like framework containing cancellous and particulate bone. The goal was to achieve an alveolar ridge width of ≥5.5mm and an effective bone height (EBH) of ≥10.5mm for dental implant insertion (≥3.4mm diameter, ≥9.5mm length). Fifty reconstruction procedures were performed. The mean EBH was 7.1±1.3mm pre-treatment and 12.3±1.1mm post-treatment (mean increase 5.2±1.4mm). Complete graft loss was recorded in two cases; the remaining complications were minor. After a mean consolidation period of 3.5 months, 96 dental implants were placed. No failure of osseointegration was observed at follow-up (mean 32.9 months). The average bone height reduction was 0.9mm (graft vertical resorption 17.4%). Reconstruction of posterior mandibular vertical defects using two autogenous cortical bone blocks with particulate bone between them, combined with a tunnelling technique, provided good healing with no wound dehiscence and minimum resorption of the grafted bone, favouring a substantial vertical bone gain. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Implants in reconstructed bone: a comparative study on the outcome of Straumann® tissue level and bone level implants placed in vertically deficient alveolar ridges treated by means of autogenous onlay bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapasco, Matteo; Casentini, Paolo; Zaniboni, Marco

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate: (1) the survival rate of Straumann® Tissue Level and Bone Level implants placed in atrophic edentulous jaws previously reconstructed by means of autogenous onlay bone grafts; (2) to compare peri-implant bone resorption values over time. From 2005 to 2010, 50 patients presenting with vertical or tridimensional defects of the edentulous ridges were treated with autogenous bone grafts. Three to 7 months afterward, 192 implants were placed (Group A: 97 Tissue Level implants; Group B: 95 Bone Level implants) in the reconstructed areas. After a further waiting period of 2 to 3 months, patients were rehabilitated with implant-supported fixed prostheses. The follow-up ranged from 12 to 68 months after the start of prosthetic loading (mean: 33 months). No implants were removed (survival rate: 100%), but in Group B 13 implants (8 placed in iliac grafts, 2 placed in ramus grafts, and 3 placed in calvarial grafts) presented peri-implant bone resorption values higher than those proposed by Albrektsson and colleagues. for successful implants: the overall implant success rate was then 100% for Group A and 86.8% for Group B. No prosthetic failures were recorded, thus leading to a 100% prostheses success rate. No significant differences were found between the two types of implants as far as implant survival rate is concerned, but results from this study seem to demonstrate that Tissue Level implants may present better long-term results in terms of peri-implant bone maintenance, as compared with Bone Level implants, when placed in reconstructed areas. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. ADAM10 is essential for cranial neural crest-derived maxillofacial bone development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yu, E-mail: tanyu2048@163.com; Fu, Runqing, E-mail: furunqing@sjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Jiaqiang, E-mail: liujqmj@163.com; Wu, Yong, E-mail: wyonger@gmail.com; Wang, Bo, E-mail: wb228@126.com; Jiang, Ning, E-mail: 179639060@qq.com; Nie, Ping, E-mail: nieping1011@sina.com; Cao, Haifeng, E-mail: 0412chf@163.com; Yang, Zhi, E-mail: wcums1981@163.com; Fang, Bing, E-mail: fangbing@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-07-08

    Growth disorders of the craniofacial bones may lead to craniofacial deformities. The majority of maxillofacial bones are derived from cranial neural crest cells via intramembranous bone formation. Any interruption of the craniofacial skeleton development process might lead to craniofacial malformation. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 plays an essential role in organ development and tissue integrity in different organs. However, little is known about its function in craniofacial bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of ADAM10 in the developing craniofacial skeleton, particularly during typical mandibular bone development. First, we showed that ADAM10 was expressed in a specific area of the craniofacial bone and that the expression pattern dynamically changed during normal mouse craniofacial development. Then, we crossed wnt1-cre transgenic mice with adam10-flox mice to generate ADAM10 conditional knockout mice. The stereomicroscopic, radiographic, and von Kossa staining results showed that conditional knockout of ADAM10 in cranial neural crest cells led to embryonic death, craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that impaired mineralization could be triggered by decreased osteoblast differentiation, increased cell death. Overall, these findings show that ADAM10 plays an essential role in craniofacial bone development. -- Highlights: •We firstly reported that ADAM10 was essentially involved in maxillofacial bone development. •ADAM10 cKO mice present craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. •Impaired osteoblast differentiation,proliferation and apoptosis underlie the bone deformity.

  2. Exceptional Rare Giant Craniofacial Chondroid Tumor in Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si; Jia, Bangsheng; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2017-02-01

    We present a rare case of giant soap bubble-shaped cystic lesion in the craniofacial region in an adult female. Histopathologic examination revealed the tumor consisted of 3 components including chondroblastoma, chondromyxoid fibroma, and hemorrhagic aneurysmal bone cyst. The present case is rare in terms of size, location, and histopathologic diagnosis, which is probably the result of underdeveloped health care in the remote place. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Biomechanical Analysis Of Craniofacial Form And Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyen, Ordean J.

    1989-04-01

    In vivo measures of bite force and bone strain obtained in growing African green monkeys (Cercopeithecus aethiops) are being used to study skull biology and geometry. Strain values and distributional patterns seen in association with forceful jaw elevation are inconsistent with conventional explanations linking upper facial morphology with masticatory function and/or using beam models of craniofacial architecture. These results mandate careful use of notions about skeletal geometry based on static analyses that have not been experimentally verified using in vivo procedures.

  4. Vertical bone measurements from cone beam computed tomography images using different software packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Moraes, Livia Almeida Bueno; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz, E-mail: tataventorini@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia

    2015-03-01

    This article aimed at comparing the accuracy of linear measurement tools of different commercial software packages. Eight fully edentulous dry mandibles were selected for this study. Incisor, canine, premolar, first molar and second molar regions were selected. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained with i-CAT Next Generation. Linear bone measurements were performed by one observer on the cross-sectional images using three different software packages: XoranCat®, OnDemand3D® and KDIS3D®, all able to assess DICOM images. In addition, 25% of the sample was reevaluated for the purpose of reproducibility. The mandibles were sectioned to obtain the gold standard for each region. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to examine the agreement between the two periods of evaluation; the one-way analysis of variance performed with the post-hoc Dunnett test was used to compare each of the software-derived measurements with the gold standard. The ICC values were excellent for all software packages. The least difference between the software-derived measurements and the gold standard was obtained with the OnDemand3D and KDIS3D (‑0.11 and ‑0.14 mm, respectively), and the greatest, with the XoranCAT (+0.25 mm). However, there was no statistical significant difference between the measurements obtained with the different software packages and the gold standard (p > 0.05). In conclusion, linear bone measurements were not influenced by the software package used to reconstruct the image from CBCT DICOM data. (author)

  5. Magnesium alloys as a biomaterial for degradable craniofacial screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2014-05-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as potential biomaterials for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available pure Mg and alloy AZ31 in vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg and AZ31 screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (∼40N). A finite-element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and this model can be used for future Mg alloy screw design. Then, Mg and AZ31 screws were implanted for 4, 8 and 12weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12weeks. Microcomputed tomography was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg/AZ31 degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histological analysis was also completed for the Mg and AZ31 at 12weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg and AZ31 screws. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31; however, bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg and AZ31 screws in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg alloys for craniofacial applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Medium-Term Function of a 3D Printed TCP/HA Structure as a New Osteoconductive Scaffold for Vertical Bone Augmentation: A Simulation by BMP-2 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Moussa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A 3D-printed construct made of orthogonally layered strands of tricalcium phosphate (TCP and hydroxyapatite has recently become available. The material provides excellent osteoconductivity. We simulated a medium-term experiment in a sheep calvarial model by priming the blocks with BMP-2. Vertical bone growth/maturation and material resorption were evaluated. Materials and methods: Titanium hemispherical caps were filled with either bare- or BMP-2 primed constructs and placed onto the calvaria of adult sheep (n = 8. Histomorphometry was performed after 8 and 16 weeks. Results: After 8 weeks, relative to bare constructs, BMP-2 stimulation led to a two-fold increase in bone volume (Bare: 22% ± 2.1%; BMP-2 primed: 50% ± 3% and a 3-fold decrease in substitute volume (Bare: 47% ± 5%; BMP-2 primed: 18% ± 2%. These rates were still observed at 16 weeks. The new bone grew and matured to a haversian-like structure while the substitute material resorbed via cell- and chemical-mediation. Conclusion: By priming the 3D construct with BMP-2, bone metabolism was physiologically accelerated, that is, enhancing vertical bone growth and maturation as well as material bioresorption. The scaffolding function of the block was maintained, leaving time for the bone to grow and mature to a haversian-like structure. In parallel, the material resorbed via cell-mediated and chemical processes. These promising results must be confirmed in clinical tests.

  7. Dental approach to craniofacial syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2012-01-01

    The paper consists of three parts. Part 1: Definition of Syndromes. Focus is given to craniofacial syndromes in which abnormal traits in the dentition are associated symptoms. In the last decade, research has concentrated on phenotype, genotype, growth, development, function, and treatment. Part ...

  8. An unusual complication after craniofacial surgery for Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay A Lune

    2014-01-01

    A case of Apert syndrome who had undergone craniofacial surgery elsewhere 4 years back presented to us with purulent discharge near the lateral orbital margin of right orbit, watering and redness of the right eye. He had telltale signs of this syndrome in the form of skull deformities such as brachycephaly, frontal bony prominence, mid-face hypoplasia, proptosis and syndactyly of both hands and feet. There was a surgical scar of previous craniofacial surgery over the bi-coronal region. He had a discharging granuloma over the lateral orbital margin and the adjacent lower eyelid had developed cicatricial ectropion. X-ray and computed tomography scan orbit confirmed the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis of the underlying zygomatic bone at the site of miniplate and screw fixation of the earlier surgery. He was treated with excision of granuloma and extraction of loose screw and infected miniplate while ectropion was corrected by rotation advancement of temporal skin flap.

  9. Customized Polymethyl Methacrylate Implants for the Reconstruction of Craniofacial Osseous Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Fernandes da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial defects represent alterations in the anatomy and morphology of the cranial vault and the facial bones that potentially affect an individual’s psychological and social well-being. Although a variety of techniques and restorative procedures have been described for the reconstruction of the affected area, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, a biocompatible and nondegradable acrylic resin-based implant, is the most widely used alloplastic material for such craniomaxillofacial reconstruction. The aim of this study was to describe a technique for aesthetic and functional preoperative customized reconstruction of craniofacial bone defects from a small series of patients offered by the Brazilian public health system. Three adult male patients attended consultation with chief complaints directly related to their individual craniofacial bone defects. With the aid of multislice computed tomography scans and subsequent fabrication of the three-dimensional craniofacial prototype, custom-made PMMA implants were fabricated preoperatively. Under general anesthesia, with access to the craniofacial defects with a coronal approach, the PMMA implants were adapted and fixated to the facial skeleton with titanium plates and screws. Postoperative evaluation demonstrated uneventful recovery and an excellent aesthetic result. Customized prefabricated PMMA implants manufactured over the rapid prototyping models proved to be effective and feasible.

  10. Craniofacial morphology in unilateral hemifacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongkosuwito, E M; van Neck, J W; Wattel, E; van Adrichem, L N; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M

    2013-12-01

    Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a complex three-dimensional congenital condition that is characterized by mandibular hypoplasia and unilateral or bilateral microtia; although, other facial structures may be affected. Little is known about craniofacial growth and morphology in patients with HFM; therefore, we examined 75 HFM patients by means of a cephalometric analysis in a longitudinal study on serial lateral cephalograms. We hypothesized that the growth of several facial structures on both sides of HFM patients would be different compared to Dutch controls. We determined patients with HFM had more retruded mandibles and maxillae and a more vertical morphology compared to the reference population. In addition, there was a more retruded and vertical pattern on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and in patients with a severe condition compared to those with a mild condition. 'Mild' HFM patients were more similar to the Dutch reference population than the 'severe' HFM patients. Individual HFM growth curves showed very high inter-variability, further strengthening the need for individualized treatment plans that consider all three dimensions and the severity of the condition. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Craniofacial reconstruction following oncologic resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasono, Matthew M; Hofstede, Theresa M

    2013-01-01

    The ability to reliably reconstruct complex and sizable wounds has decreased the morbidity of skull base surgery substantially, preventing major complications and allowing treatment of tumors previously considered inoperable. Addressing facial nerve function with static and dynamic procedures as well as fabrication of craniofacial prostheses to replace delicate facial landmarks has further increased surgeons' ability to restore the appearance and function of the face. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. First molar health status in different craniofacial relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjawi AI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Amal I Linjawi Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Objective: To investigate the association between the health status of permanent first molars and different craniofacial relationships among adolescents. Study design: This is a retrospective study on patients’ records aged 11–15 years. Sex, skeletal relationship, vertical growth pattern, malocclusion, overjet, and overbite were assessed. The health status of permanent first molars was recorded from the orthopantomograms and intraoral photographs as “sound” and “not sound”. Chi-square, Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis tests, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were used to analyze and correlate the assessed variables. Significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: A total of 210 records were evaluated; 81 were male, 68 had Class I and 91 had Class II skeletal relationships. More than half of the subjects had normal (n=67 to moderate deep bite (n=72; normal (n=91, moderately increased (n=54, to severely increased (n=50 overjet; and Class I (n=106 and Class II division 1 (n=75 malocclusion. Significant differences were found in the health status of the permanent first molars with respect to sex (P=0.034, vertical growth pattern (P=0.01, and overbite (P=0.047. Strong correlations were only found between the health status of the permanent first molars and the following variables: sex (P=0.036 and vertical growth pattern (P=0.004. Significant correlation was further found between the upper left first molar health status and sex (P=0.019 and the lower right first molar health status and the vertical growth pattern (P=0.001. No significant association was found with the anteroposterior craniofacial relationships (P>0.05. Conclusion: Sex difference and vertical growth patterns were found to be potential predictors of the health status of the permanent first molars. No significant association was found with the

  13. All-Trans Retinoic Acid-Induced Craniofacial Malformation Model: A Prenatal and Postnatal Morphological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weicai; Jian, Yutao; Cai, Bin; Wang, Miao; Chen, Mu; Huang, Hongzhang

    2017-07-01

    To characterize the prenatal and postnatal craniofacial bone development in mouse model of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) exposure at different ages by a quantitative and morphological analysis of skull morphology. Pregnant mice were exposed to ATRA at embryonic day 10 (E10) and 13 (E13) by oral gavage. Skulls of mice embryos at E19.5 and adult mice at postnatal day 35 (P35) were collected for high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) imaging scanning and section HE staining. Reconstruction and measurement of mouse skulls were performed for prenatal and postnatal analysis of the control and ATRA-exposed mice. Craniofacial malformations in mouse models caused by ATRA exposure were age dependent. ATRA exposure at E10 induced cleft palate in 81.8% of the fetuses, whereas the palatine bone of E13-exposed mice was intact. Inhibitions of maxilla and mandible development with craniofacial asymmetry induced were observed at E19.5 and P35. Compared with control and E13-exposed mice, the palatine bones of E10-exposed mice were not elevated and were smaller in dimension. Some E10-exposed mice exhibited other craniofacial abnormalities, including premature fusion of mandibular symphysis with a missing mandibular incisor and a smaller mandible. Severe deviated snouts and amorphous craniofacial suture were detected in E13-exposed mice at P35. These morphological variations in E10- and E13-exposed mice suggested that ATRA was teratogenic in craniofacial bone development in mice and the effect was age dependent.

  14. Craniofacial morphological characteristics of Chinese adults with normal occlusion and different skeletal divergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Danna; Gao, Hui; Ren, Yijin

    The aim of the present study was to examine the craniofacial morphologic characteristics of different vertical dysplasias in a population of Chinese adults with normal occlusion. Sixty-nine subjects (39 males and 30 females) were selected from 800 healthy students between 18 and 24 years of age.

  15. Early Airway Intervention for Craniofacial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Lauren A; Sidman, James D; Roby, Brianne

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews the presentation of children with craniofacial anomalies by the most common sites of airway obstruction. Major craniofacial anomalies may be categorized into those with midface hypoplasia, mandible hypoplasia, combined midface and mandible hypoplasia, and midline deformities. Algorithms of airway interventions are provided to guide the initial management of these complex patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Craniofacial proportions and anthropometric measurements among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Untreated children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) have typical somatic features, including short stature, acromicria and distinctive craniofacial features including small head circumference. Patients and Methods: By using a cross sectional study design, we investigated the effect of GHD on craniofacial ...

  17. Biograft-HT ® as a bone graft material in the treatment of periodontal vertical defects and its clinical and radiological evaluation: Clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the efficacy of Biograft-HT® as a bone graft material in the treatment of vertical defects in generalized chronic periodontitis patients and their clinical and radiological evaluation. Patients and Methods: Twenty patients diagnosed with generalized chronic periodontitis having two or more vertical defects were selected for this study. Clinical parameters like plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment levels were recorded at different points of time over six months. Radiographic evaluation included the depth of the bone defect and the percentage of bone defect fill and was carried out for both the groups at baseline, three months and six months. After recording clinical parameters and administering phase -1 therapy, the sites were randomly treated either with Biograft- HT® or open flap debridement only. Results: At the end of six months there was a significant reduction in the plaque and gingival scores in both test and control groups. There was 64% decrease in probing pocket depth for the test site as compared to 54.52% decrease seen for the control group. Similarly there was an 84.82% gain in clinical attachment level from the baseline to six months post operatively for the experimental group in comparison to 68.83% gain for the control group. Furthermore, 43.57% bone fill was observed for the experimental site whereas only 17.98% of bone fill was evident in the control site. Conclusion: Biograft -HT improves healing outcomes, leads to a reduction of probing depth, a resolution of osseous defects and a gain in clinical attachment, compared with open flap debridement by itself.

  18. New approach for vertical bone regeneration using in situ gelling and sustained BMP-2 releasing poly(phosphazene) hydrogel system on peri-implant site with critical defect in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Bo-Bae; Chang, Hae-Im; Choi, Hyuck; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Lee, Jae-Yeol; Song, Soo-Chang

    2017-03-23

    An injectable hydrogel system with sustained bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) release ability was developed for vertical bone regeneration at peri-implant sites and enhanced osseointegration of dental implants. In three young male beagle dogs, a pair of defects was created on both sides of the mandibular bone. Next, two implants were transplanted into each defect. In situ gelling polymer solutions with or without BMP-2 were applied to cover the implants and mandibular defects. The effects of the in situ gelling and sustained BMP-2 releasing (IGSR) hydrogel system on peri-implant bone regeneration were evaluated by radiologic examination, micro-computed tomography, and histomorphometric analysis. Twelve weeks after the treatment, significant bone generation at the peri-implant site occurred following BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel treatment. Bone volume and mineral density were increased by 1.7- and 1.3-fold, respectively (p < 0.01 and 0.05 vs. control, respectively) for the BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel system. And, 0.57-0.31 mm vertical bone generation was observed at the peri-implant site for the BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel system, while rare vertical bone generation occurred in the control group. The BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel system significantly increased bone to implant contact % between induced bone and existing bone (p < 0.05 and 0.01 vs. control). These vertical bone regeneration and higher osseointegration levels demonstrated the effectiveness of the BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel system. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Stress distribution in fixed-partial prosthesis and peri-implant bone tissue with different framework materials and vertical misfit levels: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Consani, Rafael L X; Mesquita, Marcelo F; dos Santos, Mateus B F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of superstructure material and vertical misfits on the stresses created in an implant-supported partial prosthesis. A three-dimensional (3-D) finite element model was prepared based on common clinical data. The posterior part of a severely resorbed jaw with two osseointegrated implants at the second premolar and second molar regions was modeled using specific modeling software (SolidWorks 2010). Finite element models were created by importing the solid model into mechanical simulation software (ANSYS Workbench 11). The models were divided into groups according to the prosthesis framework material (type IV gold alloy, silver-palladium alloy, commercially pure titanium, cobalt-chromium alloy, or zirconia) and vertical misfit level (10 µm, 50 µm, and 100 µm) created at one implant-prosthesis interface. The gap of the vertical misfit was set to be closed and the stress values were measured in the framework, porcelain veneer, retention screw, and bone tissue. Stiffer materials led to higher stress concentration in the framework and increased stress values in the retention screw, while in the same circumstances, the porcelain veneer showed lower stress values, and there was no significant difference in stress in the peri-implant bone tissue. A considerable increase in stress concentration was observed in all the structures evaluated within the misfit amplification. The framework material influenced the stress concentration in the prosthetic structures and retention screw, but not that in bone tissue. All the structures were significantly influenced by the increase in the misfit levels.

  20. Comparative analysis of dental implant treatment outcomes following mandibular reconstruction with double-barrel fibula bone grafting or vertical distraction osteogenesis fibula: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Chenping; Sun, Jian; Kaigler, Darnell; Wu, Yiqun

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (i) to compare vertical bone height (VBH) after tumor resection through grafting with either a double-barrel fibula (DBF) technique or vertical distraction osteogenesis of the fibula (VDOF); (ii) to compare the performance of loaded dental implants following either DBF or VDOF with special focus on implant survival, implant success, and bone resorption. This retrospective clinical study involved 19 patients who underwent implant placement following DBF (group A, n = 9) or VDOF (group B, n = 10) for mandibular reconstruction from March 2006 to May 2008. Clinical and radiographic assessments, including VBH, modified Plaque Index (mPI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mSBI), and marginal bone level (MBL), were taken for both groups after delivery of the final prostheses and annually thereafter. Nine patients underwent DBF with 24 implants placed and 10 patients underwent VDOF with 27 implants placed for mandibular reconstruction after tumor resection. Overall, all DBF and VDOF procedures were successful for group A and group B. VBH for group A and group B were 20 and 17 mm. There was no statistically significant difference of mSBI scores between group A and group B in the 3-year follow-up (P = 0.40). In four cases with eight implants of group A and two cases with three implants of group B, granulomatous soft tissue grew. There was no statistically significant differences of MBL between group A and group B in the 3-year follow-up (p = 0.736). The cumulative survival and success rates of implants for group A were 100% and 87.5%, and for group B were 100% and 85.2% in 3-year follow-up, respectively. On the basis of the study of 19 patients who received a total of 51 implants, reconstruction of the mandible with DBF flap or VDOF flap, combined with dental implant therapy, was considered a predictable option. Compared with implants placed in VDOF bone, implants placed in DBF bone had a relative higher incidence of associated gingival

  1. The use of different methods of augmentation horizontally and vertically on the atrophy of the alveolar bone of the upper and alveolar part of the mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анатолий Георгиевич Гулюк

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The main problem, which is increasingly faced professionals in planning restoration of the integrity of the dentition with the help of dental implants is not enough bone in the area of the supposed implantation. Given the availability of a variety of techniques osteoplasty alveolar defects and a variety of osteoplastic materials, unambiguous solution to the problem does not exist. Planning method and the osteoplasty graft depends on the exact determination of the degree of bone atrophy, nature and extent of the defect.This article on clinical examples demonstrates methods of volume restoration bones of the upper and lower jaws using grafts of different origin.Materials and Methods. In our study we use bone block, taken from the chin of the mandible and the greater wing of the ilium. Also we use bone substitutes, the membranes, the clips (the cortical screw, powder Bio Oss®. For the isolation of the area augmentation applies collagen membrane Bio Gide® (Geistlich Pharma AG, Wolhusen, Switzerland. All surgeries were performed a standard set of surgical instruments and apparatus piezo surgery.Findings and discussion. Through the use of block the autogenous graft and auxiliary materials was successful augmentation of the alveolar bone of the upper and lower jaws with a strong vertical and horizontal atrophy. It was possible to achieve the goals set in the planning phase of treatment. The increase in the cost of therapy is justified for preserving intact adjacent teeth, optimal recovery of the dentition and high functionality and aesthetics prosthetic. It is achieved one of the main goals of dental rehabilitation - improving the quality of life of patients

  2. Short implants (6mm) vs. vertical bone augmentation and standard-length implants (≥9mm) in atrophic posterior mandibles: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, F; Forlivesi, C; Caselli, E; Corinaldesi, G

    2017-12-01

    This retrospective study compared the 5-year clinical and radiographic outcomes of short implants (6 mm) (short group), and standard-length implants (≥9mm) placed after a vertical augmentation with autologous bone blocks (augmentation group), supporting partial fixed prostheses in the posterior mandible. Forty-five partially edentulous patients were enrolled in the study and evaluated after 5 years: 22 (51 implants) in the augmentation group and 23 (46 implants) in the short group. Eight surgical complications occurred in the augmentation group versus none in the short group (P=0.003). One short implant failed before loading and one standard-length implant failed after 4 years because of peri-implantitis (P=1.0). Eight biological and two prosthetic complications occurred in the augmentation group vs. three biological and three prosthetic complications in the short group (P=0.09 and P=1.0, respectively). A mean marginal bone loss of 1.61±1.12mm in the augmentation group and 0.68±0.68mm in the short group was found (P=0.002). Within the limitations of this study, both techniques resulted in successful clinical results after 5 years, but short implants exhibited less surgical complications and marginal bone loss than standard-length implants placed in augmented bone. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Craniofacial morphology of orthodontically untreated patients living in Saxony, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, U; Dannhauer, K H

    1996-08-01

    The subject of this study is an analysis of the possible specific ethnic characteristics of the craniofacial morphology within the Saxon population. For this purpose we analyzed, in a cephalometric cross-sectional study, lateral cephalometric radiographs taken between 1992 and 1994 of 10,047 orthodontically untreated native Saxon patients. The cephalometric analysis used was a synthesis of several classic procedures as applied at Leipzig University. Among the sagittal parameters there was a relatively high prevalence of mandibular retrognathism and skeletal distal jaw relationship. The vertical parameters displayed a relatively good balance between vertical and horizontal growth patterns. With respect to sexual dimorphism, the differences in the angular parameters and in the indices of relationship were only moderate and so almost irrelevant in clinical terms. Among the age-related changes, the focus is on the increase in the degree of prognathism of both jaws and the anterior rotation of the mandible.

  4. Biocompatibility of adhesive complex coacervates modeled after the Sandcastle glue of P. californica for craniofacial reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Brent D.; Shao, Hui; Stewart, Russell J.; Tresco, Patrick A.

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial reconstruction would benefit from a degradable adhesive capable of holding bone fragments in three-dimensional alignment and gradually being replaced by new bone without loss of alignment or volume changes. Modeled after a natural adhesive secreted by the sandcastle worm, we studied the biocompatibility of adhesive complex coacervates in vitro and in vivo with two different rat calvarial models. We found that the adhesive was non-cytotoxic and supported the attachment, spreading, and migration of a commonly used osteoblastic cell line over the course of several days. In animal studies we found that the adhesive was capable of maintaining three-dimensional bone alignment in freely moving rats over a 12 week indwelling period. Histological evidence indicated that the adhesive was gradually resorbed and replaced by new bone that became lamellar across the defect without loss of alignment, changes in volume, or changes in the adjacent uninjured bone. The presence of inflammatory cells was consistent with what has been reported with other craniofacial fixation methods including metal plates, screws, tacks, calcium phosphate cements and cyanoacrylate adhesives. Collectively, the results suggest that the new bioadhesive formulation is degradable, osteoconductive and appears suitable for use in the reconstruction of craniofacial fractures. PMID:20950851

  5. Craniofacial morphology in Muenke syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Mette Kirstine; Hermann, Nuno V; Darvann, Tron A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether the severity of the cranial phenotype in Muenke syndrome infants with unicoronal synostosis is greater than in infants with nonsyndromic unicoronal synostosis. A total of 23 infants were included in the study. All infants included in the study had......-Muenke patients. The study indicates differences with regard to severity of increased digital markings and craniofacial asymmetry between the infants with Muenke syndrome and the infants with nonsyndromic unilateral coronal synostosis....... of the calvaria, cranial base, and maxillary complex. Increased digital markings were more severe posteriorly in Muenke patients than in non-Muenke patients. The Muenke patients with unilateral coronal synostosis showed a somewhat more severe asymmetry in the anterior part of the skull than the non...

  6. Working with DICOM craniofacial images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Dan; Cevidanes, Lucia S H; Proffit, William R

    2009-09-01

    The increasing use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) requires changes in our diagnosis and treatment planning methods as well as additional training. The standard for digital computed tomography images is called digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM). In this article we discuss the following concepts: visualization of CBCT images in orthodontics, measurement in CBCT images, creation of 2-dimensional radiographs from DICOM files, segmentation engines and multimodal images, registration and superimposition of 3-dimensional (3D) images, special applications for quantitative analysis, and 3D surgical prediction. CBCT manufacturers and software companies are continually working to improve their products to help clinicians diagnose and plan treatment using 3D craniofacial images.

  7. Implant-retained craniofacial prostheses for facial defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, Philipp A.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial prostheses, also known as epistheses, are artificial substitutes for facial defects. The breakthrough for rehabilitation of facial defects with implant-retained prostheses came with the development of the modern silicones and bone anchorage. Following the discovery of the osseointegration of titanium in the 1950s, dental implants have been made of titanium in the 1960s. In 1977, the first extraoral titanium implant was inserted in a patient. Later, various solitary extraoral implant systems were developed. Grouped implant systems have also been developed which may be placed more reliably in areas with low bone presentation, as in the nasal and orbital region, or the ideally pneumatised mastoid process. Today, even large facial prostheses may be securely retained. The classical atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation of any system. This review outlines the basic principles of osseointegration as well as the main features of extraoral implantology. PMID:22073096

  8. Orthognathic Surgery in Craniofacial Microsomia: Treatment Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fariña, DDS, Med

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Craniofacial microsomia is a broad term that covers a variety of craniofacial malformation conditions that are caused by alterations in the derivatives of the first and second pharyngeal arches. In general terms, diverse therapeutic alternatives are proposed according to the growth stage and the severity of the alteration. When craniofacial growth has concluded, conventional orthognathic surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, and genioplasty provides good alternatives for MI and MIIA type cases. Reconstruction of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint before orthognathic surgery is the indicated treatment for cases MIIB and MIII. The goal of this article is to establish a surgical treatment algorithm for orthognathic surgery on patients with craniofacial microsomia, analyzing the points that allow the ideal treatment for each patient to be chosen.

  9. Head development. Craniofacial genetics makes headway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, J M

    1995-04-01

    Studies of neural crest migration in animal models, and of human syndromes in which craniofacial development is abnormal, are helping us to understand both prenatal and postnatal development of the head.

  10. Orthognathic Surgery in Craniofacial Microsomia: Treatment Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Salvador; Torrealba, Ramón; Nuñez, Marcelo; Uribe, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Craniofacial microsomia is a broad term that covers a variety of craniofacial malformation conditions that are caused by alterations in the derivatives of the first and second pharyngeal arches. In general terms, diverse therapeutic alternatives are proposed according to the growth stage and the severity of the alteration. When craniofacial growth has concluded, conventional orthognathic surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, and genioplasty) provides good alternatives for MI and MIIA type cases. Reconstruction of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint before orthognathic surgery is the indicated treatment for cases MIIB and MIII. The goal of this article is to establish a surgical treatment algorithm for orthognathic surgery on patients with craniofacial microsomia, analyzing the points that allow the ideal treatment for each patient to be chosen. PMID:25674375

  11. Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Skeletal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Morikawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial skeletal tissues are composed of tooth and bone, together with nerves and blood vessels. This composite material is mainly derived from neural crest cells (NCCs. The neural crest is transient embryonic tissue present during neural tube formation whose cells have high potential for migration and differentiation. Thus, NCCs are promising candidates for craniofacial tissue regeneration; however, the clinical application of NCCs is hindered by their limited accessibility. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are easily accessible in adults, have similar potential for self-renewal, and can differentiate into skeletal tissues, including bones and cartilage. Therefore, MSCs may represent good sources of stem cells for clinical use. MSCs are classically identified under adherent culture conditions, leading to contamination with other cell lineages. Previous studies have identified mouse- and human-specific MSC subsets using cell surface markers. Additionally, some studies have shown that a subset of MSCs is closely related to neural crest derivatives and endothelial cells. These MSCs may be promising candidates for regeneration of craniofacial tissues from the perspective of developmental fate. Here, we review the fundamental biology of MSCs in craniofacial research.

  12. Craniofacial skeletal pattern: is it really correlated with the degree of adenoid obstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feres, Murilo Fernando Neuppmann; Muniz, Tomas Salomão; de Andrade, Saulo Henrique; Lemos, Maurilo de Mello; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue Nagata

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cephalometric pattern of children with and without adenoid obstruction. The sample comprised 100 children aged between four and 14 years old, both males and females, subjected to cephalometric examination for sagittal and vertical skeletal analysis. The sample also underwent nasofiberendoscopic examination intended to objectively assess the degree of adenoid obstruction. The individuals presented tendencies towards vertical craniofacial growth, convex profile and mandibular retrusion. However, there were no differences between obstructive and non-obstructive patients concerning all cephalometric variables. Correlations between skeletal parameters and the percentage of adenoid obstruction were either low or not significant. Results suggest that specific craniofacial patterns, such as Class II and hyperdivergency, might not be associated with adenoid hypertrophy.

  13. Evaluation of HTR polymer (Bioplant® HTR® as a bone graft material in the treatment of interproximal vertical bony defects: A clinical and radiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Shobha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Bone grafting is the most common form of regenerative therapy. Several bone substitutes have been used in clinical periodontal therapy to encourage bone formation. The present study has been undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of hard tissue replacement polymer (Bioplant® HTR® as a bone graft material in the treatment of interproximal vertical bony defects in human beings, both clinically and radiologically. Materials and Methods : Five chronic periodontitis patients were selected with 16 sites assigned randomly into control (open debridement alone and experimental (open flap debridement plus Bioplant® HTR® groups. Clinical measurements like plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, gingival margin position (GMP assessment was done at 0, 3 and 6 months and radiographic assessment at 0 and 6 month. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon′s signed Rank test and Mann-whitney U-test. Results : There were statistically no significant (P=1.00 changes in Plaque index and Gingival Index scores in both the groups from baseline to six months post surgery. Statistically significant (P< 0.05 reduction in Probing Pocket Depth was seen on comparison between the groups. In relation to the hard tissue changes, significant results were seen with respect to change in alveolar crest and percentage of original defect resolved. Comparison of results from six to 12 months following similar treatments showed no significant differences or advantages to having a clinical evaluation period longer than 6 months post surgically (Yukna 1999. Interpretation and Conclusion : Bioplant® HTR® material is a biocompatible, easy to handle and a beneficial grafting material for the treatment of periodontal osseous defects.

  14. Hearing Loss in Children With Craniofacial Microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ryan M; Saltzman, Babette S; Norton, Susan J; Harrison, Robert G; Heike, Carrie L; Luquetti, Daniela V; Sie, Kathleen C Y

    2017-11-01

      To evaluate the association between craniofacial phenotype and hearing loss in children with craniofacial microsomia.   Retrospective cohort study.   Tertiary care children's hospital.   Individuals with craniofacial microsomia.   Ear-specific audiograms and standardized phenotypic classification of facial characteristics.   A total of 79 participants were included in the study. The mean age was 9 years (range, 1 to 23 years) and approximately 60% were boys. Facial anomalies were bilateral in 39 participants and unilateral in 40 participants (24 right, 16 left). Microtia (hypoplasia of the ear) was the most common feature (94%), followed by mandibular hypoplasia (76%), soft tissue deficiency (60%), orbital hypoplasia or displacement (53%), and facial nerve palsy (32%). Sixty-five individuals had hearing loss (12 bilateral and 53 unilateral). Hearing loss was conductive in 73% of affected ears, mixed in 10%, sensorineural in 1%, and indeterminate in 16%. Hypoplasia of the ear or mandible was frequently associated with ipsilateral hearing loss, although contralateral hearing loss occurred in 8% of hemifaces.   Hearing loss is strongly associated with malformations of the ipsilateral ear in craniofacial microsomia and is most commonly conductive. Hearing loss can occur contralaterally to the side with malformations in children with apparent hemifacial involvement. Children with craniofacial microsomia should receive early diagnostic hearing assessments.

  15. Craniofacial neurofibromatosis: treatment of the midface deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Dhruv; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Tsai, Yueh-Ju; Yu, Chung-Chih; Chen, Hung Chang; Chen, Yu-Ray; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting

    2014-07-01

    Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis is a benign but devastating disease. While the most common location of facial involvement is the orbito-temporal region, patients often present with significant mid-face deformities. We reviewed our experience with Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis from June 1981 to June 2011 and included patients with midface soft tissue deformities defined as gross alteration of nasal or upper lip symmetry. Data reviewed included the medical records and photobank. Over 30 years, 52 patients presented to and underwent surgical management for Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis at the Chang Gung Craniofacial Center. 23 patients (43%) demonstrated gross mid-facial deformities at initial evaluation. 55% of patients with lip deformities and 28% of patients with nasal deformities demonstrated no direct tumour involvement. The respective deformity was solely due to secondary gravitational effects from neurofibromas of the cheek subunit. Primary tumour infiltration of the nasal and/or labial subunits was treated with excision followed by various methods of reconstruction including lower lateral cartilage repositioning, forehead flaps, free flaps, and/or oral commissure suspension. Soft tissue deformities of the midface are very common in patients with Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis and profoundly affect overall aesthetic outcomes. Distinguishing primary from secondary involvement of the midface assists in surgical decision making. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Craniofacial morphology and obstructive sleep apnoea : a cephalometric analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A; Hovinga, B; Stegenga, B; De Bont, LGM

    The craniofacial morphology of 31 male patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) and 37 healthy male subjects were compared using cephalometric evaluation of lateral skull radiographs. The aim was to evaluate which cephalometric variables related to craniofacial morphology

  17. Does a trochanteric lag screw improve fixation of vertically oriented femoral neck fractures? A biomechanical analysis in cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Michael A; Kim, Hyunchul; Strauss, Joseph E; Oliphant, Bryant W; Golden, Robert D; Hsieh, Adam H; Nascone, Jason W; O'Toole, Robert V

    2013-10-01

    We assessed the biomechanical performances of a trochanteric lag screw construct and a traditional inverted triangle construct in the treatment of simulated Pauwels type 3 femoral neck fractures. An inverted triangle construct (three 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed in inverted triangle orientation) and a trochanteric lag screw construct (two 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed across the superior portion of the femoral neck and one 4.5-mm lag screw placed perpendicular to the fracture in superolateral to inferomedial orientation) were tested in nine matched pairs of non-osteoporotic human cadaveric femora. We used a previously described vertically oriented femoral neck fracture model and testing protocol that incrementally loaded the constructs along the mechanical axis of the femur to 1400 N. Specimens that survived incremental loading underwent cyclic loading. Apparent construct stiffness, force at 3mm of displacement, and survival of incremental loading were recorded. The trochanteric lag screw group had a 70% increase in stiffness (261 N/mm [29 standard deviation] versus 153 N/mm [16 standard deviation]; P=0.026) and a 43% increase in force required for displacement (620 N versus 435 N; P=0.018) compared with the inverted triangle group. One trochanteric lag screw and no inverted triangle specimen survived incremental loading. A trochanteric lag screw construct applied to vertically oriented femoral neck fractures provides marked improvement in mechanical performance compared with the inverted triangle construct. © 2013.

  18. Finite element growth analysis for the craniofacial skeleton in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Akiko; Takeshita, Satoshi; Publico, Andre S; Moss, Melvin L; Tanaka, Eiji; Ishino, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Mineo; Tanne, Kazuo

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the differences in the nature of craniofacial growth between subjects with normal occlusion and patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP) in terms of the size, shape and principal growth direction of craniofacial skeleton using finite element method (FEM). Lateral cephalograms were taken of 40 subjects as normal group and 178 patients as CLP group. These subjects were divided into seven developmental ages of 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, 12-, 14- and 18-year-old. For the finite element analysis, the craniofacial complex was discretized into seven structures or elements with three nodal points in each after tracing each lateral cephalogram on acetate paper. For each stage, the growth parameters in CLP group were compared to those in normal group. The growth of upper facial skeleton and maxillary complex was more remarkably inhibited in CLP than in normal group. Especially, the growth inhibition of posterior maxillary complex in a vertical direction was remarkable in CLP group at any ages. Difference in the size and shape of entire mandibular skeleton between CLP and normal groups was not apparent. It is suggested that grow timing and peak velocity, an essential and key determinant to the success in orthodontic treatment, have been clarified in this study more clearly than in previous studies. It is hopefully anticipated to explore some key determinants to predict individual growth of the craniofacial skeleton near future.

  19. Craniofacial dysostosis. Staging of reconstruction and management of the midface deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnick, J C

    1991-07-01

    Crouzon's and Apert's syndromes are the most common of the craniofacial dysostosis syndromes. A team approach is required to achieve effective patient management. The team evaluation begins shortly after birth and follows the patient through infancy, childhood, and adolescence into early adulthood. The role of each team member varies according to the patient's age and individual circumstances. For example, in infancy and early childhood, constant combined reassessment by the pediatrician, neurosurgeon, ophthalmologist, neuroradiologist, and craniofacial surgeon is essential. Later in adolescence, the role of the ophthalmologist, neuroradiologist, and neurosurgeon becomes less important, whereas that of the orthodontist, speech pathologist, maxillofacial surgeon, and psychosocial team becomes more dominant. Major craniofacial centers should be encouraged to develop protocols for patient management and to follow a consistent prospective process of collecting data. Meeting these objectives allows us to learn from the past. During the past decade since the introduction of the modern era of craniofacial surgery by Tessier in 1967, craniomaxillofacial surgery has advanced in many ways: through the use of autogenous cranial bone grafts for onlay or interpositional use; refinements in bone stabilization techniques that include miniplate and microplate and screw fixation rather than direct wires; the reintroduction of creative osteotomies for the management of midface deficiency (monobloc and monobloc bipartition); the development of CT scanning techniques applied to the craniofacial skeleton for both qualitative and quantitative measurement; and the presence of the dedicated craniofacial anesthetist whose meticulous monitoring, airway management, and fluid replacement allows for the safe execution of complex total midface osteotomies. The recognition of the need for a staged surgical approach to the correction of the deformities caused by Apert's and Crouzon's syndromes

  20. Customized "In-Office" Three-Dimensional Printing for Virtual Surgical Planning in Craniofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Bernardino M; Chiodo, Michael V; Patel, Parit A

    2015-07-01

    Virtual surgical planning using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has improved surgical efficiency and precision. A limitation to this technology is that production of 3D surgical models requires a third-party source, leading to increased costs (up to $4000) and prolonged assembly times (averaging 2-3 weeks). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, cost, and production time of customized skull models created by an "in-office" 3D printer for craniofacial reconstruction. Two patients underwent craniofacial reconstruction with the assistance of "in-office" 3D printing technology. Three-dimensional skull models were created from a bioplastic filament with a 3D printer using computed tomography (CT) image data. The cost and production time for each model were measured. For both patients, a customized 3D surgical model was used preoperatively to plan split calvarial bone grafting and intraoperatively to more efficiently and precisely perform the craniofacial reconstruction. The average cost for surgical model production with the "in-office" 3D printer was $25 (cost of bioplastic materials used to create surgical model) and the average production time was 14  hours. Virtual surgical planning using "in office" 3D printing is feasible and allows for a more cost-effective and less time consuming method for creating surgical models and guides. By bringing 3D printing to the office setting, we hope to improve intraoperative efficiency, surgical precision, and overall cost for various types of craniofacial and reconstructive surgery.

  1. Unfavourable results with distraction in craniofacial skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis has revolutionised the management of craniofacial abnormalities. The technique however requires precise planning, patient selection, execution and follow-up to achieve consistent and positive results and to avoid unfavourable results. The unfavourable results with craniofacial distraction stem from many factors ranging from improper patient selection, planning and use of inappropriate distraction device and vector. The present study analyses the current standards and techniques of distraction and details in depth the various errors and complications that may occur due to this technique. The commonly observed complications of distraction have been detailed along with measures and suggestions to avoid them in clinical practice.

  2. A PCA-Based method for determining craniofacial relationship and sexual dimorphism of facial shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Mingquan; Maddock, Steve; He, Taiping; Wang, Xingce; Deng, Qingqiong

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have used principal component analysis (PCA) to investigate the craniofacial relationship, as well as sex determination using facial factors. However, few studies have investigated the extent to which the choice of principal components (PCs) affects the analysis of craniofacial relationship and sexual dimorphism. In this paper, we propose a PCA-based method for visual and quantitative analysis, using 140 samples of 3D heads (70 male and 70 female), produced from computed tomography (CT) images. There are two parts to the method. First, skull and facial landmarks are manually marked to guide the model's registration so that dense corresponding vertices occupy the same relative position in every sample. Statistical shape spaces of the skull and face in dense corresponding vertices are constructed using PCA. Variations in these vertices, captured in every principal component (PC), are visualized to observe shape variability. The correlations of skull- and face-based PC scores are analysed, and linear regression is used to fit the craniofacial relationship. We compute the PC coefficients of a face based on this craniofacial relationship and the PC scores of a skull, and apply the coefficients to estimate a 3D face for the skull. To evaluate the accuracy of the computed craniofacial relationship, the mean and standard deviation of every vertex between the two models are computed, where these models are reconstructed using real PC scores and coefficients. Second, each PC in facial space is analysed for sex determination, for which support vector machines (SVMs) are used. We examined the correlation between PCs and sex, and explored the extent to which the choice of PCs affects the expression of sexual dimorphism. Our results suggest that skull- and face-based PCs can be used to describe the craniofacial relationship and that the accuracy of the method can be improved by using an increased number of face-based PCs. The results show that the accuracy of

  3. Craniofacial displacement in response to varying headgear forces evaluated biomechanically with finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Pawan; Valiathan, Ashima; Adhikari, Raviraj

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biomechanically the displacement patterns of the facial bones in response to different headgear loading by using a higher-resolution finite element method model than used in previous studies. An analytical model was developed from sequential computed tomography scan images taken at 2.5-mm intervals of a dry skull of a 7-year-old. Different headgear forces were simulated by applying 1 kg of posteriorly directed force in the first molar region to simulate cervical-pull, straight-pull, and high-pull headgear. Displacements (in mm) of various craniofacial structures were evaluated along the x, y, and z coordinates with different headgear loading. All 3 headgears demonstrated posterior displacement of the maxilla with clockwise rotation of the palatal plane. The distal displacement of the maxilla was the greatest with the straight-pull headgear followed by the cervical-pull headgear. The high-pull headgear had better control in the vertical dimensions. The midpalatal suture opening was evident and was more pronounced in the anterior region. The articular fossa and the articular eminence were displaced laterally and postero-superiorly with each headgear type. The high-pull headgear was most effective in restricting the antero-inferior maxillary growth vector. Midpalatal suture opening similar to rapid maxillary expansion was observed with all 3 headgear types. The center of rotation varied with the direction of headgear forces for both the maxilla and the zygomatic complex. A potential for chondrogenic and osteogenic modeling exists for the articular fossa and the articular eminence with headgear loading.

  4. Characteristics of associated craniofacial trauma in patients with head injuries: An experience with 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Facial fractures and concomitant cranial injuries carry the significant potential for mortality and neurological morbidity mainly in young adults. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of head injuries and associated facial injuries, the management options and outcome following cranio-facial trauma. Methods: This retrospective review was performed at Justice K. S. Hegde Charitable Hospital, and associated A. B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore. Following Ethical Committee approval, hospital charts and radiographs of 100 consecutive patients of cranio-facial trauma managed at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Neurosurgery between January 2004 and December 2004 were reviewed. Results: Majority of the patients were in the 2nd to 4th decade (79% with a male to female ratio of -8.09:1. Road traffic accidents were the common cause of craniofacial trauma in present study (54% followed by fall from height (30%. Loss of consciousness was the most common clinical symptom (62% followed by headache (33%. Zygoma was the most commonly fractured facial bone 48.2% (alone 21.2%, in combination 27.2%. Majority of patients had mild head injury and managed conservatively in present series. Causes of surgical intervention for intracranial lesions were compound depressed fracture, contusion and intracranial hematoma. Operative indications for facial fractures were displaced facial bone fractures. Major causes of mortality were associated systemic injuries. Conclusion: Adult males are the most common victims in craniofacial trauma, and road traffic accidents were responsible for the majority. Most of the patients sustained mild head injuries and were managed conservatively. Open reduction and internal fixation with miniplates was used for displaced facial bone fractures.

  5. Study Of 50 Cases With Craniofacial Trauma Who Experienced Head Injuries

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    Ali Mesgarzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that cranial injuries associated with facial fractures may cause a great risk of mortality and neurological morbidity, which mainly occurs in young adults. Aims and objectives: Study of the features of facial injuries associated with head injuries, discussing the management options and detecting the outcomes following craniofacial trauma. Methods: This is a retrospective study carried out at Imam reza and Shohada Hospitals. Radiographs and hospital data of 50 patients with craniofacial trauma between January 2013 and December 2014, managed at the Oral and Maxillofacial surgery department were gathered and analyzed. Results: The greatest number of the patients had 20 to 50 years old (68% and most of them were male. (M/F ratio was 6.09:1. The most prevalent causes of the trauma in this study were the motor vehicle accidents (44% and falling from height (36%, respectively. The most common bone fracture among the patients was the zygomatic bone fx (38.2%. Among the symptoms which the patients presented, Loss of the consciousness (52% and headache (43% showed the highest prevalence. Compound depressed fractures, contusions and intracranial hematoma were the leading causes of the surgical intervention for intracranial lesions. A high number of patients who have died in this study had associated systemic injuries. Displaced facial bone fracture were the indications for operation in facial fractures. Conclusions: The majority of the patients with craniofacial trauma were the adult males and the leading cause of trauma were road traffic accidents. A high number of the patients had mild head injuries and required only a conservational therapy.     Keywords:  head injury; craniofacial trauma; facial fracture

  6. Craniofacial characteristics of children with mild hypodontia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vucic, S.; Dhamo, B.; Kuijpers, M.A.R.; Jaddoe, V.W.; Hofman, A.; Wolvius, E.B.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of our study was to evaluate the craniofacial characteristics of children with mild hypodontia using conventional and principal component (PC) analysis. METHODS: We used radiographic images of 124 children (8-12 years old) with up to 4 missing teeth (55 boys, 69 girls) and of

  7. A mathematical model applied to craniofacial growth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, Robert de

    1993-01-01

    Decisions are made by orthodontists on the basis of diagnostic and prognostic considerations. An intervention is made if the craniofacial complex displays atypicalities and the future development is expected to be more desirable with tiran without an intervention. The specification of the

  8. Discrimination among adults with craniofacial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to establish the level of perceived discrimination experienced by adults with congenital craniofacial conditions in Australia and to examine predictors of discrimination. Specifically, this study tested whether social support mediates the relationship between discrimination and health. Adults (n = 93) who had been treated at the Australian Craniofacial Unit, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide for congenital craniofacial conditions (not including cleft lip and/or palate) completed questionnaires examining satisfaction with life, quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, satisfaction with social support, and satisfaction with appearance. A substantial minority of adults with congenital craniofacial conditions reported that they experience discrimination almost every day in a range of areas. Higher reports of discrimination were related to older age, being male, and less education. Other factors related to higher discrimination included lower levels of satisfaction with life, self-esteem, satisfaction with appearance and mental quality of life, as well as higher levels of anxiety and depression. Social support partially mediated the relationship between discrimination and mental health outcomes. The current study shows that discrimination experiences continue into adulthood confirming the importance of ensuring patients are well supported both by psychosocial services as well as within their own social support networks.

  9. Immigrants into society. Children with craniofacial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, S H; Bernstein, N R; Kapp, K A

    1981-01-01

    Some of the adaptive coping styles of children with craniofacial anomalies are discussed. Three cases of children with microtia are described to illustrate developmental pathways used in adapting to their deformities. The complexity of the chronic medical and psychological challenges these children face is illustrated and discussed. In contrast to previous frameworks dealing with the problems of deviance and stigmatization, we use a psychological historical framework, drawing an analogy to Handlin's work on immigration. These children are born into a world that considers them strange and abhorent. They can be considered aliens entering a society of normal, non-disfigured people. The craniofacial center is conceptualized as a "naturalization" office where highly valued health care professionals are counted upon to reconstruct facial appearance and function. An enduring attachment and bonding process to the staff takes place, and the center becomes of considerable importance to the craniofacial patient's identity. The craniofacial patient often has to carry the pain of social isolation and stigma. Physicians caring for these children should be cognizant of their coping styles; so that development can be directed to move away from deviance to successful "immigration into the country of normals" and adaptation to life.

  10. Prevention of craniofacial injuries in ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldi, C R

    1991-10-01

    Prior to 1975, craniofacial injuries were the most frequent of all ice hockey injuries. Through the cooperative efforts of hockey administrators, health professionals, sports standards organizations, and the introduction of mandatory protective equipment playing rules craniofacial injuries in youth, high school, and college hockey players in the United States have been almost eliminated. Blind eye injuries, once a major problem, no longer occur in players wearing certified full face protectors. The saving in health care costs for treating eye injuries alone is estimated to be upwards of $10 million annually. Despite the phenomenal success of amateur hockey organizations in eliminating most craniofacial injuries, such injuries continue to occur in recreational, "Old Timers," major junior, and professional hockey players because of failure to use the most effective types of protective equipment. The system established in the United States for preventing craniofacial injuries in the sports of ice hockey that involves youth, high school, and college hockey associations along with standards setting and certification procedures can serve as a model for all amateur sports throughout the world.

  11. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  12. Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis: a case report | Onyenyirionwu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a 21 year old boy with Neurofibromatosis (NF 1-GROUP 1) affecting the craniofacial region and hoe he was subsequently managed to emphasize that the condition is a complicated one and should be dealt with by those experienced with this condition. Jnl of Med Investigation & Practice Vol.3 2001: 12-14 ...

  13. Influence of masseter muscle thickness on buccal corridor space and craniofacial morphology: A correlative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harneet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of masseter muscle thickness on buccal corridor space and underlying craniofacial morphology. Materials and Methods: Forty-six young adults (23 males and 23 females in the age group of 18–23 years having intact dentitions and Class I molar relationship were included in the study. Masseter muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonography in relaxed, smiling, and contracted states. Posed smile photographs were taken to measure the buccal corridor space. Standardized frontal and lateral cephalograms were taken to determine craniofacial morphology in all three dimensions. Results: The mean masseter muscle thickness was 10.54 (±1.92 mm, 12.00 (±2.06 mm, and 14.04 (±1.99 mm in relaxed, smiling, and contracted states, respectively. Statistically significant correlation also was noted between masseter muscle thickness, during contracted state and buccal corridor width ratio. There was a strong association of masseter muscle thickness on both vertical as well as transverse craniofacial morphologies. Conclusions: Masseter muscle thickness is positively correlated with the buccal corridor width and influences both vertical as well as transverse facial dimensions.

  14. Injertos óseos: Una alternativa efectiva y actual para la reconstrucción del complejo cráneo-facial BONE GRAFTS: AN EFFECTIVE AND CURRENT ALTERNATIVE FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE CRANIOFACIAL COMPLEX

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    Sergio Soto Góngora

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available El empleo de injertos óseos como alternativa de reconstrucción de defectos óseos, ya sean congénitos u ocasionados como traumatismos, secuelas oncológicas e infecciosas, tienen como finalidad restablecer la integridad anatómica y funcional de una estructura alterada. Durante décadas, los investigadores se han dado a la tarea de encontrar en los injertos ciertas características que respondan a cada una de las necesidades de reconstrucción; este hecho a llevado a estudiar y comparar los beneficios de algunas estructuras óseas potencialmente donadoras, que incrementen las probabilidades de éxito del tratamiento y disminuyan considerablemente los posibles riesgos y complicaciones durante la toma del injerto. De igual manera, se han estudiado diversos materiales implantológicos, sin embargo, estos no poseen la capacidad natural de inducir el proceso de regeneración ósea, haciendo de ellos materiales inertes biocompatibles de "relleno", que no sustituyen las características de los injertos, pero utilizados conjuntamente si así se requiere, pueden mejorar los resultados. El presente trabajo plantea la utilización de injertos óseos como una alternativa viable, efectiva y actual en materia de reconstrucción.The use of bone grafts as an alternative to reconstruct osteal congenital or caused defects, such as traumatisms, oncological and infectious sequelae, is aimed at restoring the anatomical and functional integrity of an altered structure. During decades, investigators have tried to find in grafts certain characteristics that response to each of the reconstruction needs. This fact has led to the study and comparison of the benefits of some osteal structures that are potential donors and may increase the chances of success and considerably reduce the possible risks and complications during the graft taking. Likewise, diverse implantation materials have been studied, but they do not have the natural capacity to induce the osteal

  15. Comparison of strain generated in bone by "platform-switched" and "non-platform-switched" implants with straight and angulated abutments under vertical and angulated load: A finite element analysis study

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    Susan Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstrain exhibited by bone around immediately loaded, platform-switched, and non-platform-switched implants under vertical and angled loading using a finite element analysis (FEA and also to evaluate whether platform-switched implants evoke a better response than non-platform-switched implants on a mechanical basis. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional finite element study was undertaken to model and analyze an immediate loaded situation. FEA was chosen for this study since it is useful in determining the stress and strain around the dental implant. Bone responses to vertical and angulated loads on straight and angulated abutments (platform-switched and non-platform-switched abutments were evaluated. Results: Non-platform-switched abutments tend to exhibit a lower tensile stress and compressive stress but higher microstrain value (conducive to higher chance of bone resorption than platform-switched abutments. Ideal bone remodeling values of microstrain (50-3000 μϵ were exhibited by platform-switched straight abutments under vertical load and angled load (with an abutment-implant diameter difference of 1 mm. Conclusion: In spite of the obvious advantages, the practice of immediate loading is limited due to apprehension associated with compromised bone response and a higher rate of bone loss around an immediately loaded implant. The mechanical basis for the concept of "platform switching" in immediately loaded situation is analyzed in this context. The results of this limited investigation indicated that the ideal values of microstrain (50-3000 microstrain can be exhibited by platform switching of dental implants (with an abutment-implant diameter difference of 1 mm and can be considered as a better alternative for prevention of crestal bone loss when compared to non-platform-switched implants.

  16. CAD-CAM construction of an auricular template for craniofacial implant positioning: A novel approach to diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciocca, L. [Section of Prosthodontics, Department of Oral Science, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Via S. Vitale 59, 40125 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: lciocca@alma.unibo.it; Mingucci, R. [Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna (Italy); Bacci, G. [SILAB Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna (Italy); Scotti, R. [Section of Prosthodontics, Department of Oral Science, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Via S. Vitale 59, 40125 Bologna (Italy)

    2009-08-15

    A novel approach to the diagnosis of bone available for craniofacial implant positioning is discussed in a case that required ear ablation for tumor removal. A mirrored volume of the healthy ear was rapidly prototyped for a clinical trial in an appropriate position relative to the patient's face. Three ideal positions for the implant were chosen in the inner of the volume of the mirrored ear. The same positions were transferred to a diagnostic template that was rapidly prototyped with a positioning arm extending to the zygomatic arch. Computed tomography (CT) revealed errors in the planning of the implant position and, as a clinical consequence, an implant site was excluded from surgical planning. A virtual elaboration for maxillofacial implant positioning was used to define the correct implant site in relation to the available bone, and two craniofacial implants were correctly positioned in the temporal bone.

  17. Hereditary intraosseous vascular malformation of the craniofacial region: an apparently novel disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargel, Ibrahim; Cil, Barbaros E; Er, Nuray; Ruacan, Sevket; Akarsu, A Nurten; Erk, Yucel

    2002-04-15

    Primary intraosseous vascular anomaly, previously called intraosseous hemangioma, is a very rare malformation that is usually seen in the vertebral column and in the skull. It is exclusively described in sporadic cases and no hereditary component has yet been reported. The most commonly affected bones in the skull are the mandible and the maxilla, and life-threatening bleeding after a simple tooth extraction is frequently observed. Here, we report two consanguineous families containing a total of four affected patients manifesting primary intraosseous vascular malformation (VMOS (vascular malformation osseous)) of the craniofacial region. The phenotypic expression is remarkably similar in both families. The characteristic findings include severe blood vessel expansions within the craniofacial bones and midline abnormalities such as diastasis recti, supraumbilical raphe, and hiatus hernia. Malformation is restricted to the mandibular and maxillary area in the prepubertal age, and rapid expansion starts after age 12 or 13. A 15-year follow-up of one of the patients demonstrated that the vascular malformation did not extend beyond the craniofacial region despite severe involvement of almost all bones in the skull. Detailed clinical and radiological evaluation provided neither evidence of soft-tissue involvement nor any sign of gross arterial, venous, or combined malformations, indicating that bone changes are a primary rather than a secondary effect due to any other vascular anomaly in the craniofacial region. An antibody against a universal proliferation marker, Ki-67, detected nonproliferative, single-layered endothelial cells, suggesting that this abnormality is a vascular malformation rather than a hemangioma. alpha-actin staining (antibody against perivascular tissue such as smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and/or pericytes) demonstrated that pathologic vessels lost their surrounding supportive tissues, as was previously seen in other types of vascular anomaly

  18. Sella turcica-Its importance in orthodontics and craniofacial morphology

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    Haritha Pottipalli Sathyanarayana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The sella turcica is a structure which can be readily seen on lateral cephalometric radiographs and sella point is routinely traced for various cephalometric analyses. The search was carried out using the following key words (sella turcica, bridging of sella, size, shape of sella turcica and with the following search engine (Pubmed, Cochrane, Google scholar. The morphology is very important for the cephalometric position of the reference point sella, not only for evaluating craniofacial morphology, but also when growth changes and orthodontic treatment results are to be evaluated. This makes it a good source of additional diagnostic information related to pathology of the pituitary gland, or to various syndromes that affect the craniofacial region. Clinicians should be familiar with the normal radiographic anatomy and morphologic variability of this area, in order to recognize and investigate deviations that may reflect pathological situations, even before these become clinically apparent. During embryological development, the sella turcica area is the key point for the migration of the neural crest cells to the frontonasal and maxillary developmental fields. The neural crest cells are involved in the formation and development of sella turcica and teeth. The size of sella turcica ranges from 4 to 12 mm for the vertical and 5 to 16 mm for the anteroposterior dimension. There are many classification systems regarding the shape of sella turcica. Majority of the studies show that about 67% of the subjects had normal appearance and about 33% showed variations. The prevalence of sella turcica bridging is high in class III malocclusions and dental anomalies.

  19. Reconstruction of Craniomaxillofacial Bone Defects Using Tissue-Engineering Strategies with Injectable and Non-Injectable Scaffolds

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    Bipin Gaihre

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Engineering craniofacial bone tissues is challenging due to their complex structures. Current standard autografts and allografts have many drawbacks for craniofacial bone tissue reconstruction; including donor site morbidity and the ability to reinstate the aesthetic characteristics of the host tissue. To overcome these problems; tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies have been developed as a potential way to reconstruct damaged bone tissue. Different types of new biomaterials; including natural polymers; synthetic polymers and bioceramics; have emerged to treat these damaged craniofacial bone tissues in the form of injectable and non-injectable scaffolds; which are examined in this review. Injectable scaffolds can be considered a better approach to craniofacial tissue engineering as they can be inserted with minimally invasive surgery; thus protecting the aesthetic characteristics. In this review; we also focus on recent research innovations with different types of stem-cell sources harvested from oral tissue and growth factors used to develop craniofacial bone tissue-engineering strategies.

  20. Ciliopathy Protein Tmem107 Plays Multiple Roles in Craniofacial Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, P; Hampl, M; Shylo, N A; Christopher, K J; Kavkova, M; Landova, M; Zikmund, T; Weatherbee, S D; Kaiser, J; Buchtova, M

    2018-01-01

    A broad spectrum of human diseases called ciliopathies is caused by defective primary cilia morphology or signal transduction. The primary cilium is a solitary organelle that responds to mechanical and chemical stimuli from extracellular and intracellular environments. Transmembrane protein 107 (TMEM107) is localized in the primary cilium and is enriched at the transition zone where it acts to regulate protein content of the cilium. Mutations in TMEM107 were previously connected with oral-facial-digital syndrome, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, and Joubert syndrome exhibiting a range of ciliopathic defects. Here, we analyze a role of Tmem107 in craniofacial development with special focus on palate formation, using mouse embryos with a complete knockout of Tmem107. Tmem107-/- mice were affected by a broad spectrum of craniofacial defects, including shorter snout, expansion of the facial midline, cleft lip, extensive exencephaly, and microphthalmia or anophthalmia. External abnormalities were accompanied by defects in skeletal structures, including ossification delay in several membranous bones and enlargement of the nasal septum or defects in vomeronasal cartilage. Alteration in palatal shelves growth resulted in clefting of the secondary palate. Palatal defects were caused by increased mesenchymal proliferation leading to early overgrowth of palatal shelves followed by defects in their horizontalization. Moreover, the expression of epithelial stemness marker SOX2 was altered in the palatal shelves of Tmem107-/- animals, and differences in mesenchymal SOX9 expression demonstrated the enhancement of neural crest migration. Detailed analysis of primary cilia revealed region-specific changes in ciliary morphology accompanied by alteration of acetylated tubulin and IFT88 expression. Moreover, Shh and Gli1 expression was increased in Tmem107-/- animals as shown by in situ hybridization. Thus, TMEM107 is essential for proper head development, and defective TMEM107 function leads

  1. Mapping of Craniofacial Traits in Outbred Mice Identifies Major Developmental Genes Involved in Shape Determination.

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    Luisa F Pallares

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate cranium is a prime example of the high evolvability of complex traits. While evidence of genes and developmental pathways underlying craniofacial shape determination is accumulating, we are still far from understanding how such variation at the genetic level is translated into craniofacial shape variation. Here we used 3D geometric morphometrics to map genes involved in shape determination in a population of outbred mice (Carworth Farms White, or CFW. We defined shape traits via principal component analysis of 3D skull and mandible measurements. We mapped genetic loci associated with shape traits at ~80,000 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in ~700 male mice. We found that craniofacial shape and size are highly heritable, polygenic traits. Despite the polygenic nature of the traits, we identified 17 loci that explain variation in skull shape, and 8 loci associated with variation in mandible shape. Together, the associated variants account for 11.4% of skull and 4.4% of mandible shape variation, however, the total additive genetic variance associated with phenotypic variation was estimated in ~45%. Candidate genes within the associated loci have known roles in craniofacial development; this includes 6 transcription factors and several regulators of bone developmental pathways. One gene, Mn1, has an unusually large effect on shape variation in our study. A knockout of this gene was previously shown to affect negatively the development of membranous bones of the cranial skeleton, and evolutionary analysis shows that the gene has arisen at the base of the bony vertebrates (Eutelostomi, where the ossified head first appeared. Therefore, Mn1 emerges as a key gene for both skull formation and within-population shape variation. Our study shows that it is possible to identify important developmental genes through genome-wide mapping of high-dimensional shape features in an outbred population.

  2. Mapping of Craniofacial Traits in Outbred Mice Identifies Major Developmental Genes Involved in Shape Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallares, Luisa F; Carbonetto, Peter; Gopalakrishnan, Shyam; Parker, Clarissa C; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Palmer, Abraham A; Tautz, Diethard

    2015-11-01

    The vertebrate cranium is a prime example of the high evolvability of complex traits. While evidence of genes and developmental pathways underlying craniofacial shape determination is accumulating, we are still far from understanding how such variation at the genetic level is translated into craniofacial shape variation. Here we used 3D geometric morphometrics to map genes involved in shape determination in a population of outbred mice (Carworth Farms White, or CFW). We defined shape traits via principal component analysis of 3D skull and mandible measurements. We mapped genetic loci associated with shape traits at ~80,000 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in ~700 male mice. We found that craniofacial shape and size are highly heritable, polygenic traits. Despite the polygenic nature of the traits, we identified 17 loci that explain variation in skull shape, and 8 loci associated with variation in mandible shape. Together, the associated variants account for 11.4% of skull and 4.4% of mandible shape variation, however, the total additive genetic variance associated with phenotypic variation was estimated in ~45%. Candidate genes within the associated loci have known roles in craniofacial development; this includes 6 transcription factors and several regulators of bone developmental pathways. One gene, Mn1, has an unusually large effect on shape variation in our study. A knockout of this gene was previously shown to affect negatively the development of membranous bones of the cranial skeleton, and evolutionary analysis shows that the gene has arisen at the base of the bony vertebrates (Eutelostomi), where the ossified head first appeared. Therefore, Mn1 emerges as a key gene for both skull formation and within-population shape variation. Our study shows that it is possible to identify important developmental genes through genome-wide mapping of high-dimensional shape features in an outbred population.

  3. Craniofacial morphology, dentition, and skeletal maturity in four siblings with Seckel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, I; Hansen, N; Becktor, K B

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the craniofacial morphology, dentition, and hand maturity in four siblings with Seckel syndrome. PATIENTS: Two boys and two girls, with Seckel syndrome. The children studied showed extreme growth retardation, severe microcephaly, bird-headed profile with receding chin...... malformations were observed. Taurodontic root morphology was observed only in the girls. The approximate skeletal maturity showed retardation from 4 years 3 months to 4 years 11 months. Malformations of the hand-wrist skeleton occurred in the epiphyseal ossification centers of the middle phalangeal bone...... in the second, third, and fourth finger and in the distal phalangeal bone in the fifth finger. The epiphyseal ossification centers were lacking in the middle and distal phalangeal bones of the fifth finger. CONCLUSION: The underlying gene defect in the affected children seemingly affects bone development...

  4. Craniofacial features of cleidocranial dysplasia

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    Chin-Yun Pan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD is an autosomal-dominant malformation syndrome affecting bones and teeth. The most common skeletal and dental abnormalities in affected individuals are hypoplastic/aplastic clavicles, open fontanelles, short stature, retention of primary teeth, delayed eruption of permanent teeth, supernumerary teeth, and multiple impacted teeth. Treatment of CCD requires a multidisciplinary approach that may include dental corrections, orthognathic surgery and cranioplasty along with management of any complications of CCD. Early diagnosis of this condition enables application of the treatment strategy that provides the best quality of life to such patients. Notably, Runx2 gene mutations have been identified in CCD patients. Therefore, further elucidation of the molecular mechanism of supernumerary teeth formation related to Runx2 mutations may improve understanding of dental development in CCD. The insights into CCD pathogenesis may assist in the development of new treatments for CCD. Keywords: cleidocranial dysplasia, mutation, Runx2, supernumerary teeth

  5. Vertical Guided Bone Regeneration for a Single Missing Tooth Span with Titanium-Reinforced d-PTFE Membranes: Clinical Considerations and Observations of 10 Consecutive Cases with up to 36 Months Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Ran

    Vertical guided bone regeneration (GBR) using titanium-reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes is a well-established technique and is considered technique sensitive. When using PTFE membranes, complications usually arise in the crestal incision or next to the neighboring tooth of the treated span. Most studies available describe either distal free end or multiple missing teeth span situations. Treating a single missing tooth span combines the challenge of two neighboring teeth and a smaller flap, which is more difficult to adapt to the augmented environment. This article describes 10 single span cases treated with vertical GBR using high-density PTFE membranes, highlighting clinical guidelines for preoperative care, flap design, and suturing.

  6. Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial clefts

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    Ewings Ember

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The master plan of all vertebrate embryos is based on neuroanatomy. The embryo can be anatomically divided into discrete units called neuromeres so that each carries unique genetic traits. Embryonic neural crest cells arising from each neuromere induce development of nerves and concomitant arteries and support the development of specific craniofacial tissues or developmental fields. Fields are assembled upon each other in a programmed spatiotemporal order. Abnormalities in one field can affect the shape and position of developing adjacent fields. Craniofacial clefts represent states of excess or deficiency within and between specific developmental fields. The neuromeric organization of the embryo is the common denominator for understanding normal anatomy and pathology of the head and neck. Tessier′s observational cleft classification system can be redefined using neuroanatomic embryology. Reassessment of Tessier′s empiric observations demonstrates a more rational rearrangement of cleft zones, particularly near the midline. Neuromeric theory is also a means to understand and define other common craniofacial problems. Cleft palate, encephaloceles, craniosynostosis and cranial base defects may be analyzed in the same way.

  7. Craniofacial and Dental Findings in Cystinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassim, CW; Gautam, P; Domingo, DL; Balog, JZ; Guadagnini, JP; Gahl, WA; Hart, TC

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder with developmental and mineralization anomalies as part of its clinical presentation. The objective of this study was to provide the first systematic assessment of the craniofacial and dental characteristics associated with cystinosis. Study Design Oral and radiographic evaluations were performed on 73 patients with cystinosis. Analyses of cephalometry (n=20), taurodontism (n=47), caries (n=47), enamel defects (n=48), soft tissue anomalies (n=48), and dental age (n=41) were performed on the cystinosis group, and compared with age- and sex- comparable controls or standards. Results Cystinosis patients manifested relative mandibular deficiency, an increased facial height, and a reduced airway space. Taurodontism and enamel defects were significantly more prevalent in cystinosis patients compared with controls (p<0.0001 and p=0.027, respectively). Children (aged < 15 years) with cystinosis also demonstrated a significant delay, of almost 9 months, of their dental development (p<0.001). Conclusion Novel craniofacial and dental features are associated with cystinosis. Craniofacial deficiencies may influence the swallowing and respiratory complications seen in cystinosis. Renal pathology and associated mineral imbalance may explain the dental root and enamel anomalies found in cystinosis patients; the developmental delays in cystinosis include delayed dental formation. PMID:20233313

  8. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES. METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%. Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%, abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%, prominent occiput (52%, posteriorly rotated (46% and low set ears (44%, and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%. Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%, orofacial clefts (12%, preauricular tags (10%, facial palsy (4%, encephalocele (4%, absence of external auditory canal (2% and asymmetric face (2%. One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature.

  9. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  10. Analysis of Craniofacial Images using Computational Atlases and Deformation Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Larsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is automatic analysis of craniofacial images. The methods proposed and applied contribute to the scientific knowledge about different craniofacial anomalies, in addition to providing tools for detailed and robust analysis of craniofacial images for clinical and research purposes. The basis for most of the applications is non-rigid image registration. This approach brings one image into the coordinate system of another resulting in a deformation field describing the an...

  11. Craniofacial similarity analysis through sparse principal component analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junli Zhao

    Full Text Available The computer-aided craniofacial reconstruction (CFR technique has been widely used in the fields of criminal investigation, archaeology, anthropology and cosmetic surgery. The evaluation of craniofacial reconstruction results is important for improving the effect of craniofacial reconstruction. Here, we used the sparse principal component analysis (SPCA method to evaluate the similarity between two sets of craniofacial data. Compared with principal component analysis (PCA, SPCA can effectively reduce the dimensionality and simultaneously produce sparse principal components with sparse loadings, thus making it easy to explain the results. The experimental results indicated that the evaluation results of PCA and SPCA are consistent to a large extent. To compare the inconsistent results, we performed a subjective test, which indicated that the result of SPCA is superior to that of PCA. Most importantly, SPCA can not only compare the similarity of two craniofacial datasets but also locate regions of high similarity, which is important for improving the craniofacial reconstruction effect. In addition, the areas or features that are important for craniofacial similarity measurements can be determined from a large amount of data. We conclude that the craniofacial contour is the most important factor in craniofacial similarity evaluation. This conclusion is consistent with the conclusions of psychological experiments on face recognition and our subjective test. The results may provide important guidance for three- or two-dimensional face similarity evaluation, analysis and face recognition.

  12. Stature estimation from craniofacial anthropometry in Bangladeshi Garo adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Z; Banu, L A; Alam, M M; Rahman, M F

    2012-07-01

    Estimation of stature is an important tool in forensic examination especially in unknown, highly decomposed, fragmentary and mutilated human remains. When the evidences are skeletal remains; forensic anthropology has put forward means to estimate the stature from the skeletal and even from fragmentary bones. Sometimes, craniofacial remains are brought in for forensic and postmortem examination. In such a situation, estimation of stature becomes equally important along with other parameters like age, sex, race, etc. Today, anthropometry plays an important role in industrial design, clothing design, ergonomics and architecture where statistical data about the distribution of body dimensions in the population are used to optimize products. It is well established that a single standard of craniofacial aesthetics is not appropriate for application to diverse racial and ethnic groups. Bangladesh is a country not only for the Bengalis; the country harbours many cultures and people of different races because of the colonial rules of the past regimes. Like other ethnic groups, the Garos (study subjects) have their own set of language, social structure, cultures and economic activities and religious values. In the above context, the present study was attempted to establish ethnic specific anthropometric data for the Bangladeshi Garo adult females. The study also attempted to find out the correlation of the craniofacial dimensions with stature and to determine multiplication factors. The study was an observational, cross-sectional and primarily descriptive in nature with some analytical components. The study was carried out with a total number of one hundred Garo adult females, aged between 25-45 years. Craniofacial dimension such as head circumference, head length, facial height from 'nasion' to 'gnathion', bizygomatic breadth and stature were measured using a measuring tape, spreading caliper, steel plate and steel tape and sliding caliper. The data were then statistically

  13. Craniofacial characteristics in unilateral complete cleft lip and palate patients with congenitally missing teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Huang, Chiung-Shing

    2013-09-01

    Congenitally missing permanent teeth are common in patients with clefts. This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the craniofacial characteristics in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate with congenitally missing permanent teeth. A series of 73 consecutive patients with nonsyndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate were enrolled. Evaluation of congenitally missing permanent teeth was based on the panoramic films taken from 7 to 11 years of age. The cephalometric films taken around 9 years of age were used to compare the craniofacial morphology in patients with no congenitally missing permanent teeth (n = 20) and 1 (n = 25), 2 (n = 18), and 3 (n = 10) congenitally missing permanent teeth. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to assess the association of increased numbers of congenitally missing permanent teeth with each cephalometric parameter. Anterior facial height, distance from the maxillary incisor and first molar to the palatal plane, and overjet decreased as the number of congenitally missing permanent teeth increased in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with congenitally missing permanent teeth have a unique craniofacial morphology with a reduced vertical dimension. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The comparative study of craniofacial structural characteristic of individuals with different types of cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Da-wei; Shi, Bing; Wang, Heng-jian; Zheng, Qian

    2007-10-01

    To compare craniofacial structural characteristic of individuals with different types of cleft palate and to lay a foundation for better treatment protocol for patients with cleft palate, we chose a sample consisting of 12 patients with Treacher Collin syndrome, 15 patients with Pierre Robin sequence, 40 patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate, and 40 patients with isolated cleft palate who met certain criteria. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were obtained from each subject. A total of 22 variables, comprising 11 angular, 9 linear, and 2 ratio measurements, were studied. The z-scores were analyzed during paired Student t test. The data showed us that there seems to be no difference in craniofacial structures between patients with isolated cleft palate and normal persons. Patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate who had only cleft lip repaired exhibit such characteristics as midface retrusion, relatively excessive lower facial height, and more obtuse gonial angle. The cranial base areas of individuals with Treacher Collin syndrome and Pierre Robin sequence are similar to those of normal persons. Mandibular hypoplasia in both vertical and horizontal dimensions and maxillary retrusion can be found in patients with Treacher Collin syndrome, while only mandibular hypoplasia in the horizontal dimension can be found in patients with Pierre Robin sequence. The developmental deficiency of craniofacial structures seems to be a separate deformity, not the direct outcome of cleft palate defect.

  15. Associations between craniofacial morphology, head posture, and cervical vertebral body fusions in men with sleep apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanholt, Palle; Petri, Niels; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to analyze craniofacial profiles and head posture in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) subgrouped according to cervical column morphology. METHODS: Seventy-four white men aged 27 to 65 years (mean, 49.0 years) diagnosed with OSA in sleep studies...... by using overnight polysomnography were included. Only patients with apnea-hypopnea index scores between 5.1 and 92.7 (mean, 36.4) were included. Lateral profile radiographs in standardized head posture were taken, and cephalometric analyses of sagittal and vertical jaw relationships were made...

  16. The Molecular and Cellular Events That Take Place during Craniofacial Distraction Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Rachmiel, DMD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Gradual bone lengthening using distraction osteogenesis principles is the gold standard for the treatment of hypoplastic facial bones. However, the long treatment time is a major disadvantage of the lengthening procedures. The aim of this study is to review the current literature and summarize the cellular and molecular events occurring during membranous craniofacial distraction osteogenesis. Mechanical stimulation by distraction induces biological responses of skeletal regeneration that is accomplished by a cascade of biological processes that may include differentiation of pluripotential tissue, angiogenesis, osteogenesis, mineralization, and remodeling. There are complex interactions between bone-forming osteoblasts and other cells present within the bone microenvironment, particularly vascular endothelial cells that may be pivotal members of a complex interactive communication network in bone. Studies have implicated number of cytokines that are intimately involved in the regulation of bone synthesis and turnover. The gene regulation of numerous cytokines (transforming growth factor-β, bone morphogenetic proteins, insulin-like growth factor-1, and fibroblast growth factor-2 and extracellular matrix proteins (osteonectin, osteopontin during distraction osteogenesis has been best characterized and discussed. Understanding the biomolecular mechanisms that mediate membranous distraction osteogenesis may guide the development of targeted strategies designed to improve distraction osteogenesis and accelerate bone regeneration that may lead to shorten the treatment duration.

  17. Original Solution for Middle Ear Implant and Anesthetic/Surgical Management in a Child with Severe Craniofacial Dysmorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchin, Giovanni; Tribi, Lorenzo; Reverzani, Aronne; Formigoni, Patrizia; Polizzi, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    We describe the novel solution adopted in positioning middle ear implant in a child with bilateral congenital aural atresia and craniofacial dysmorphism that have posed a significant challenge for the safe and correct management of deafness. A five-year-old child, affected by a rare congenital disease (Van Maldergem Syndrome), suffered from conductive hearing loss. Conventional skin-drive bone-conduction device, attached with a steel spring headband, has been applied but auditory restoration ...

  18. Craniofacial arteriovenous metameric syndrome (CAMS) 3 - a transitional pattern between CAM 1 and 2 and spinal arteriovenous metameric syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, I.Y.C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuen Mun Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Batista, L.L.; Alvarez, H.; Lasjaunias, P.L. [Service de Neuroradiologie Diagnostique et Therapeutique, Hopital de Bicetre, 94275, Le Kremlin Bicetre (France)

    2003-09-01

    We report a rare case of craniofacial arteriovenous metameric syndrome (CAMS) 3 arteriovenous malformations of the mandible, left VIII nerve and petrous bone. The patient, a 19-year-old girl, presented with profuse gingival bleeding during a dental procedure and we diagnosed CAMS 3 during a pre-embolisation angiogram. The distribution of the vascular lesions suggests that CAMS 3 is intermediate CAMS 1 and 2 and spinal arteriovenous metameric syndrome (SAMS). (orig.)

  19. Prevention of Cutaneous Tissue Contracture During Removal of Craniofacial Implant Superstructures for CT and MRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Sullivan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Head and neck cancer patients who have lost facial parts following surgical intervention frequently require craniofacial implant retained facial prostheses for restoration. Many craniofacial implant patients require computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans as part of their long-term follow-up care. Consequently removal of implant superstructures and peri-abutment tissue management is required for those studies. The purpose of the present paper was to describe a method for eliminating cranial imaging artifacts in patients with craniofacial implants.Material and Methods: Three patients wearing extraoral implant retained facial prostheses needing either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies were discussed. Peri-implant soft tissues contracture after removal of percutaneous craniofacial implant abutments during computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies was prevented using a method proposed by authors. The procedure involves temporary removal of the supra-implant components prior to imaging and filling of the tissue openings with polyvinyl siloxane dental impression material.Results: Immediately after filling of the tissue openings with polyvinyl siloxane dental impression material patients were sent for the imaging studies, and were asked to return for removal of the silicone plugs and reconnection of all superstructure hardware after imaging procedures were complete. The silicone plugs were easily removed with a dental explorer. The percutaneous abutments were immediately replaced and screwed into the implants which were at the bone level.Conclusions: Presented herein method eliminates the source of artifacts and prevents contracture of percutaneous tissues upon removal of the implant abutments during imaging.

  20. Expression of in vivo mechanical strain upon different wave forms of exogenous forces in rabbit craniofacial sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopher, Ross A; Nudera, James A; Wang, Xin; O'Grady, Kevin; Mao, Jeremy J

    2003-10-01

    Sutures are fibrous joints between craniofacial bones, providing an interesting model for studying the biomechanics of the interface between soft and mineralized tissues. To explore whether different wave forms of exogenous forces induce corresponding sutural strain wave forms, sutural strain of the premaxillomaxillary suture (PMS) and nasofrontal suture (NFS) of New Zealand White rabbits (N = 8) was recorded upon application of static, sine- and square-wave forces against the maxilla from 1 N to 5 N in 1 N increments. The PMS demonstrated compressive strain, whereas the NFS tensile strain. Despite a tenfold difference in peak PMS strain (- 1451 +/- 512 micro(epsilon)) and NFS strain (141 +/- 39 micro(epsilon)) in response to 5 N cyclic forces, wave forms of exogenous forces were expressed as corresponding wave forms of sutural strain in both the PMS and NFS. Peak sutural strain was similar upon static and sine-wave cyclic loading. Thus, cells and matrix components of fibrous sutural tissue experience different wave forms of exogenous forces as corresponding wave forms of tissue-borne mechanical strain. Current craniofacial orthopedic therapies exclusively utilize static forces to change the shape of craniofacial bones via mechanically induced bone apposition and resorption. The present data provide room for exploring whether cyclic forces capable of inducing different sutural strain wave forms may accelerate sutural anabolic or catabolic responses.

  1. Orthodontics and foetal pathology: a personal view on craniofacial patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the essentials of studies on the craniofacial skeleton performed over 17 years. It presents data from research into foetal pathology resulting in new views on craniofacial patterning and/or fields for further discussion. The fields described cover all areas seen on profile...

  2. Craniofacial dysmorphology: Studies in honor of Samuel Pruzansky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.M.; Rollnick, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 31 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Regional Specification of Cell-Specific Gene Expression During Craniofacial Development; Timing Cleft Palate Closure - Age Should Not Be the Sole Determinant; Excess of Parental Non-Righthandedness in Children with Right-Sided Cleft Lip: A Preliminary Report; and The Application of Roentgencephalometry to the Study of Craniofacial Anomalies.

  3. Achondroplasia: Craniofacial manifestations and considerations in dental management

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Saleem, Afnan; Al-Jobair, Asma

    2010-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia dwarfism that manifests with stunted stature and disproportionate limb shortening. Achondroplasia is of dental interest because of its characteristic craniofacial features which include relative macrocephaly, depressed nasal bridge and maxillary hypoplasia. Presence of large head, implanted shunt, airway obstruction and difficulty in head control require special precautions during dental management. Craniofacial manifestations and c...

  4. Photographic protocol for image acquisition in craniofacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heike, Carrie L; Stueckle, Laura P; Stuhaug, Erik T; Pimenta, Luiz A; Drake, Amelia F; Vivaldi, Daniela; Sie, Kathleen C Y; Birgfeld, Craig B

    2011-12-30

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a congenital condition associated with orbital, mandibular, ear, nerve, and soft tissue anomalies. We present a standardized, two-dimensional, digital photographic protocol designed to capture the common craniofacial features associated with CFM. © 2011 Heike et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  5. Craniofacial and Dental Features in Six Children With Cherubism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoor, Patricia; Suomalainen, Anni; Kemola, W; Arte, Sirpa

    2017-10-01

    Cherubism is an autosomal-dominant benign bone disorder, characterized by fibro-osseous lesions in the mandible and maxilla commonly caused by mutations in the SH3-binding protein 2-gene. The purpose of the authors' study was to analyze craniofacial and dental features of children diagnosed with cherubism, describe their treatment, and assess their dental age compared with norms for Finnish children. Six children were diagnosed, followed up and treated due to dental and skeletal disorders caused by cherubsim. The patients were followed up for an average of 91.5 months with emphasis on the skeletal changes and development of dentition. The treatment consisted of minor orthodontic treatment, dental extractions, and exposures. One patient underwent cosmetic mandibular surgery. All patients had lesions in the lower jaw and 5 of 6 patients had lesions in the maxilla as well. The patients were characterized by varying swelling of the jaws, premature loss of deciduous teeth in the affected area and widely spaced, displaced, un-erupted, or absent permanent teeth. The dental age was delayed at younger age but near to normal or even a little ahead at older age. Even though cherubism affects the jaws, jaw positions, and malocclusion, no common dentofacial proportions associated with the disease could be confirmed by cephalometric analysis. The surgical interventions did not provoke adverse reactions or local growth of the lesions.

  6. Disturbances in dental development and craniofacial growth in children treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterbacka, M; Ringdén, O; Remberger, M; Huggare, J; Dahllöf, G

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the correlation between age, degree of disturbances in dental development, and vertical growth of the face in children treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). 39 long-term survivors of HSCT performed in childhood and transplanted before the age of 12, at a mean age of 6.8±3.3 years. Panoramic and cephalometric radiographs were taken at a mean age of 16.2 years. For each patient two age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. The area of three mandibular teeth was measured and a cephalometric analysis was performed. The mean area of the mandibular central incisor, first and second molar was significantly smaller in the HSCT group, and the vertical growth of the face was significantly reduced, especially in the lower third, compared to healthy controls. A statistically significant correlation between age at HSCT, degree of disturbances in dental development, and vertical growth of the face was found. Children subjected to pre-HSCT chemotherapy protocols had significantly more growth reduction in vertical craniofacial variables compared to children without pre-HSCT chemotherapy. Conditioning regimens including busulfan or total body irradiation had similar deleterious effects on tooth area reduction and craniofacial parameters. The younger the child is at HSCT, the greater the impairment in dental and vertical facial development. This supports the suggestion that the reduction in lower facial height found in SCT children mainly is a result of impaired dental development and that young age is a risk factor for more severe disturbances. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Importance of deubiquitinases in zebrafish craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, William Ka Fai

    2017-06-10

    Deconjugation of ubiquitin and/or ubiqutin-like modified substrates is essential to maintain a sufficient free ubiquitin within the cell. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) play a key role in the process. Besides, DUBs also play several important regulatory roles in cellular processes. However, our knowledge of their developmental roles are limited. The report here aims to study their potential roles in craniofacial development. Based on the previous genome-wide study in 2009, we selected 36 DUBs to perform the morpholino (MO) knockdown in this study, followed by the Alcian blue cartilage staining at 5 days post-fertilization (dpf) larvae to investigate the facial development. Results classified the tested DUBs into three groups, in which 28% showed unchanged phenotype (Class 1); 22% showed mild changes on the branchial arches (Class 2A); 31% had malformation on branchial arches and ethmoid plate (Class 2B); and 19% had severe changes in most of the facial structures (Class 3). Lastly, we used uchl3 morphant as an example to show that our screening data could be useful for further functional studies. To summarize, we identified new craniofacial developmental role of 26 DUBs in the zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Age-related differences between thinning of horizontal and vertical trabeculae in human lumbar bone as assessed by a new computerized method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J.S.; Ebbesen, E.N.; Mosekilde, Li.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate whether vertical trabeculae undergo compensatory thickening with age in the human vertebral body, a new computerized method was developed that is able to distinguish between horizontal and vertical trabeculae on normal histological sections. Study subjects included 48 individuals (24...

  9. Craniofacial morphology in unoperated infants with isolated cleft palate. A cephalometric analysis in three projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, N.V.; Kreiborg, S.; Jensen, B.L.

    58th Annual Meeting of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association, Minneapolis, Craniofacial morphology, unoperated infants, isolated cleft palate, cephalometric analysis, three projections......58th Annual Meeting of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association, Minneapolis, Craniofacial morphology, unoperated infants, isolated cleft palate, cephalometric analysis, three projections...

  10. Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolarová, Marie M; Poulton, Donald; Aubert, Maryse M; Oh, HeeSoo; Ellerhorst, Thomas; Mosby, Terezie; Tolar, Miroslav; Boyd, Robert L

    2006-10-01

    There is no doubt modern genetics have greatly influenced our professional and personal lives during the last decade. Uncovering genetic causes of many medical and dental pathologies is helping to narrow the diagnosis and select a treatment plan that would provide the best outcome. Importantly, having an understanding of multifactorial etiology helps direct our attention toward prevention. We now understand much better our own health problems. In some cases, we can modify our lifestyle and diet in order to prevent "environmental factors" from triggering the mutated genes inherited from our parents. Good examples are diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. If we realize we might have inherited genes for cardiovascular problems from several ancestors who had heart attacks, we already know that these genes will make us only "susceptible" for disease. Those who exercise, watch one's weight, diet, and carefully monitor one's lifestyle will very likely--though possessing "susceptibility genes"--stay healthier and, maybe, will never experience any cardiovascular problems. In principle, the same applies for craniofacial anomalies, especially for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate. One needs to understand genetic and environmental causes of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts in order to prevent them. With all this in mind, the Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program have been established at the Department of Orthodontics, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. A partnership with Rotaplast International, Inc., has made it possible for the faculty, orthodontic residents, and students to participate in 27 multidisciplinary cleft medical missions in underdeveloped and developing countries by donating professional and educational services, and, last but not least, by collecting valuable data and specimens to further research. A significant number of research studies, including 15 master of science theses, have been accomplished in

  11. Effects on craniofacial growth and development of unilateral botulinum neurotoxin injection into the masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Yang; Chiu, Wan Chi; Liao, Yi-Hsuan; Tsai, Chih-Mong

    2009-02-01

    The effects of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) on masseter muscles, when injected for cosmetic purposes (volumetric reduction) or treatment of excessive muscle activity (bruxism), have been investigated. However, the full anatomic effects of treatment are not known, particularly with respect to the mandible and relevant anthropometric measurements. The intent of this study was to use unilaterial BoNT/A injections to induce localized masseter atrophy and paresis and then to measure the effects of muscle influence on craniofacial growth and development. Growing male Wistar rats, 30 days old, were studied. The experimental group consisted of 8 rats. One side of the masseter muscle was injected with BoNT/A and the other side of the masseter muscle was injected with saline. The side with BoNT/A belonged to 1 group and the side with saline was the sham group. Three rats without injections was the control. After 45 days, the masseter muscles were dissected and weighed. Dry skulls were prepared, and anthropometric measurements determined. One-way ANOVA showed that the animals maintained their weight in both groups; however, the muscles injected with BoNT/A were smaller than the sham or control muscles. Anthropometric measurements of the bony structures attached to the masseter muscle showed a significant treatment effect. After localized masseter muscle atrophy induced by BoNT/A injection, alterations of craniofacial bone growth and development were seen. The results agree with the functional matrix theory that soft tissues regulate bone growth.

  12. The chromatin remodeling protein CHD7, mutated in CHARGE syndrome, is necessary for proper craniofacial and tracheal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Ethan D; Hurd, Elizabeth A; Durham, Mark A; Reamer, Elyse N; Stein, Adam B; Martin, Donna M

    2014-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the chromatin remodeling gene CHD7 cause CHARGE syndrome, a developmental disorder with variable craniofacial dysmorphisms and respiratory difficulties. The molecular etiologies of these malformations are not well understood. Homozygous Chd7 null mice die by E11, whereas Chd7(Gt/+) heterozygous null mice are a viable and excellent model of CHARGE. We explored skeletal phenotypes in Chd7(Gt/+) and Chd7 conditional knockout mice, using Foxg1-Cre to delete Chd7 (Foxg1-CKO) in the developing eye, ear, nose, pharyngeal pouch, forebrain, and gut and Wnt1-Cre (Wnt1-CKO) to delete Chd7 in migrating neural crest cells. Foxg1-CKO mice exhibited postnatal respiratory distress and death, dysplasia of the eye, concha, and frontal bone, hypoplastic maxillary shelves and nasal epithelia, and reduced tracheal rings. Wnt1-CKO mice exhibited frontal and occipital bone dysplasia, hypoplasia of the maxillary shelves and mandible, and cleft palate. In contrast, heterozygous Chd7(Gt/+) mice had apparently normal skeletal development. Conditional deletion of Chd7 in ectodermal and endodermal derivatives (Foxg1-Cre) or migrating neural crest cells (Wnt1-Cre) results in varied and more severe craniofacial defects than in Chd7(Gt/+) mice. These studies indicate that CHD7 has an important, dosage-dependent role in development of several different craniofacial tissues. © 2014 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists.

  13. Third molar agenesis and craniofacial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, María José; Vicente, Ascensión; Bravo, Luis Alberto

    2009-05-01

    To test the null hypothesis that agenesis of wisdom teeth is not related with any particular craniofacial morphology. Ninety-seven patients (aged 13-19 years) were selected and divided into three groups: (1) bilateral agenesis of maxillary third molars, (2) bilateral agenesis of mandibular third molars, and (3) control group without agenesis. Presence or absence of third molars was determined using ortopantomographs. Cephalometric analysis was carried out from lateral teleradiographs, which included linear, angular, and proportional measurements. When data obtained were distributed normally it was analyzed by means of single-factor variance analysis and the Scheffé test (P classification in 58.8% of cases. The hypothesis is rejected. Agenesis of the maxillary third molars was related to a reduced mandibular plane angle. Patients with agenesis of the mandibular third molars showed a diminished lower third and a mandibular morphology characteristic of the brachyfacial pattern.

  14. Original Solution for Middle Ear Implant and Anesthetic/Surgical Management in a Child with Severe Craniofacial Dysmorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bianchin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the novel solution adopted in positioning middle ear implant in a child with bilateral congenital aural atresia and craniofacial dysmorphism that have posed a significant challenge for the safe and correct management of deafness. A five-year-old child, affected by a rare congenital disease (Van Maldergem Syndrome, suffered from conductive hearing loss. Conventional skin-drive bone-conduction device, attached with a steel spring headband, has been applied but auditory restoration was not optimal. The decision made was to position Vibrant Soundbridge, a middle ear implant, with an original surgical application due to hypoplasia of the tympanic cavity. Intubation procedure was complicated due to child craniofacial deformities. Postoperative hearing rehabilitation involved a multidisciplinary team, showing improved social skills and language development.

  15. Associations between the Cervical Vertebral Column and Craniofacial Morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Ane Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To summarize recent studies on morphological deviations of the cervical vertebral column and associations with craniofacial morphology and head posture in nonsyndromic patients and in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Design. In these recent studies, visual assessment of the cerv......Aim. To summarize recent studies on morphological deviations of the cervical vertebral column and associations with craniofacial morphology and head posture in nonsyndromic patients and in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Design. In these recent studies, visual assessment...... of the cervical vertebral column and cephalometric analysis of the craniofacial skeleton were performed on profile radiographs of subjects with neutral occlusion, patients with severe skeletal malocclusions and patients with OSA. Material from human triploid foetuses and mouse embryos was analysed histologically....... Results. Recent studies have documented associations between fusion of the cervical vertebral column and craniofacial morphology, including head posture in patients with severe skeletal malocclusions. Histological studies on prenatal material supported these findings. Conclusion. It is suggested...

  16. Craniofacial morphological differences between Down syndrome and maxillary deficiency children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silva Jesuino, Flávia Aline; Valladares-Neto, José

    2013-01-01

    Maxillary deficiency is one of the facial features of Down syndrome (DS). Differences in craniofacial morphology between DS and nonsyndromic skeletal Class III malocclusion with maxillary deficiency remain unclear...

  17. The influence of craniofacial morphology on mandibular border movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Tomoki; Kawanabe, Noriaki; Shiraga, Noriko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Deguchi, Toru; Miyawaki, Shouichi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Although they are widely used as diagnostic signs of temporomandibular disorders, mandibular border movements reflect not only condylar movement, but also other factors. In the present study, the authors investigated the effect of craniofacial morphology on three different mandibular border movements: maximum jaw opening, maximum jaw protrusion, and maximum jaw laterotrusion. One hundred female subjects were selected from outpatients visiting the orthodontic clinic of Okayama University Hospital. The mandibular border movements were measured using an optical recording system in three dimensions as six degrees of freedom. The craniofacial morphology was evaluated using lateral cephalograms. The results suggest that craniofacial morphology had different influences on each mandibular border movement. In particular, during maximum jaw laterotrusion, lower incisor movement strongly reflected condylar movement, and the influence of craniofacial morphology on mandibular border movement was minimal. Therefore, lower incisor movement during maximum jaw laterotrusion appears suitable to evaluate condylar movement.

  18. Stem cells: Update and impact on craniofacial surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Levi, Benjamin; Glotzbach, Jason; Wong, Victor; Nelson, Emily; Hyun, Jeong; Wan, Derrick C.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding field of tissue engineering, surgeons have been eager to apply these principles to craniofacial surgery. Tissue engineering strategies combine the use of a cell type placed on a scaffold and subsequently implanted in vivo to address a tissue defect or tissue dysfunction. In this review we will discuss the current clinical need for skeletal and soft tissue engineering faced by craniofacial surgeons and subsequently we will explore cell types and scaffold designs bein...

  19. The aponeurotic tension model of craniofacial growth in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standerwick, Richard G; Roberts, W Eugene

    2009-05-22

    Craniofacial growth is a scientific crossroad for the fundamental mechanisms of musculoskeletal physiology. Better understanding of growth and development will provide new insights into repair, regeneration and adaptation to applied loads. Traditional craniofacial growth concepts are insufficient to explain the dynamics of airway/vocal tract development, cranial rotation, basicranial flexion and the role of the cranial base in expression of facial proportions. A testable hypothesis is needed to explore the physiological pressure propelling midface growth and the role of neural factors in expression of musculoskeletal adaptation after the cessation of anterior cranial base growth. A novel model for craniofacial growth is proposed for: 1. brain growth and craniofacial adaptation up to the age of 20; 2. explaining growth force vectors; 3. defining the role of muscle plasticity as a conduit for craniofacial growth forces; and 4. describing the effect of cranial rotation in the expression of facial form.Growth of the viscerocranium is believed to be influenced by the superficial musculoaponeurotic systems (SMAS) of the head through residual tension in the occipitofrontalis muscle as a result of cephalad brain growth and cranial rotation. The coordinated effects of the regional SMAS develop a craniofacial musculoaponeurotic system (CFMAS), which is believed to affect maxillary and mandibular development.

  20. Gender and Satisfaction with Appearance in Children with Craniofacial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Danielle N; Waljee, Jennifer; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Buchman, Steven; Warschausky, Seth

    2015-12-01

    Although children with craniofacial anomalies appear to have relatively high self-esteem, research has identified gender differences in psychosocial outcomes, including self-concept, suggesting that girls with craniofacial anomalies may be at an increased risk. In addition, though parents make important medical and aesthetic decisions for their children, it is unclear whether they are attuned to their children's perceptions of their appearance. The current study assessed self-ratings and parent proxy ratings of child satisfaction with the appearance of both the face and the body among 74 children with craniofacial anomalies (50 percent boys). Data were collected in a multidisciplinary clinic setting. The authors identified that ratings provided by parents and children, and particularly parents and daughters, were uncorrelated. Furthermore, whereas girls' dissatisfaction with the appearance of their faces was associated with negative psychosocial outcomes, these associations were not significant among boys. Finally, results obtained for satisfaction with the appearance of the face were largely replicated for satisfaction with appearance of the body, suggesting that children with craniofacial anomalies and their parents may apply more holistic criteria to evaluating their appearance. Considered together, the findings of this study highlight the importance of engaging both parents and children in discussions about craniofacial anomalies and possible reconstruction and suggest the need for future research on the intersection of gender and craniofacial anomalies in child psychosocial functioning.

  1. Opinion leaders and evidence-based medicine in craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumit, Gaby D; Papay, Frank A; Moores, Neal; Meisler, Eileen; Zins, James E

    2014-01-01

    In health care, it is widely known that evidence-based medicine (EBM) has a significant impact on clinical practice, and opinion leaders can enhance the clinician's application of EBM in various disciplines. In this article, we examine the existence and impact of opinion leaders in craniofacial surgery as well as barriers to evidence-based practice. We compiled the answers of an Internet questionnaire, which was sent to 102 craniofacial surgeons. Our results demonstrate that opinion leaders most definitely can be identified in craniofacial surgery. They are tightly connected to their field's social network and promote EBM. In this survey, 44% of craniofacial surgeons reported that their greatest obstacle to clinical decision making in the management of nonsyndromic synostosis was lack of surgical consensus. In addition, craniofacial surgeons stated that EBM and opinion leaders are the most influential factors that caused them to change their management of craniosynostosis. We expect that the use of opinion leaders can further enhance the uptake of EBM in craniofacial surgery.

  2. A new lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingston, H.M. (Saint Mary' s Hospital, Manchester (UK). Regional Genetics Centre); Freeman, J.S. (Tameside General Hospital, Ashton-under-Lyne (UK). Dept. of Paediatrics); Hall, C.M. (Hospital for Sick Children, London (UK). Dept. of Paediatric Radiology)

    1991-02-01

    A neonate is described with a lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia associated with prenatal fractures and craniofacial abnormalities including microcephaly, exophthalmos, hypoplastic nose and mid-face, small jaw and nodular hyperplasia of the gums. Parental consanguinity suggests that an autosomal recessive mutation is the likely aetiology. (orig.).

  3. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the occipital bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Briz, A.; Ricoy, J.R.; Martinez-Tello, F.J. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Lobato, R.D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Ramos, A.; Millan, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Departamento de Anatomia Patologica, Avda. de Andalucia s/n, Madrid 28041 (Spain)

    2003-03-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a non-neoplastic fibrous lesion with unevenly distributed multinucleated giant cells, areas of osseous metaplasia and hemorrhage. The small bones of the hands and feet are the most common sites, followed by the vertebral bodies and craniofacial bones. In the craniofacial bones GCRG has been reported in the temporal bone, in the frontal bone and paranasal sinus. However, to the best of our knowledge no case has been reported in the occipital bone. We report on the imaging findings and pathological features of a GCRG of the occipital bone and discuss the differential diagnosis of this entity in this particular location, especially with giant cell tumor because of the therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  4. Disruption of bone development and homeostasis by trisomy in Ts65Dn Down syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Joshua D; Gaddy, Anna; Meyer, Rachel; Roper, Randall J; Li, Jiliang

    2011-02-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder resulting from trisomy 21 that causes cognitive impairment, low muscle tone and craniofacial alterations. Morphometric studies of the craniofacial and appendicular skeleton in individuals with DS suggest that bone development and homeostasis are affected by trisomy. The Ts65Dn mouse model has three copies of approximately half the genes found on human chromosome 21 and exhibits craniofacial skeletal and size differences similar to those observed in humans with DS. We hypothesized that Ts65Dn and euploid mice have distinct differences in bone development and homeostasis influencing both the craniofacial and appendicular skeletal phenotypes. Quantitative assessment of structural and mechanical properties of the femur in Ts65Dn and control mice at 6 and 16 weeks of age revealed significant deficiencies in trabecular and cortical bone architecture, bone mineral density, bone formation, and bone strength in trisomic bone. Furthermore, bone mineral density and dynamic dentin formation rate of the skull and incisor, respectively, were also reduced in Ts65Dn mice, demonstrating that trisomy significantly affects both the craniofacial and appendicular skeleton. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Distinguishing Goldenhar Syndrome from Craniofacial Microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuin, Jorien; Tahiri, Youssef; Paliga, James T; Taylor, Jesse A; Bartlett, Scott P

    2015-09-01

    Goldenhar syndrome is characterized by the typical features of craniofacial microsomia (CFM) with the addition of epibulbar dermoids and vertebral anomalies. The aim of this study is to examine the objective differences between patients carrying a diagnosis of Goldenhar syndrome to those diagnosed with CFM. Thus, we performed an Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective chart review on all patients who presented with a diagnosis of CFM or Goldenhar syndrome from January 1990 to December 2012. Demographic, diagnosis, OMENS+ classification, accompanying diagnoses, and radiographic data were collected. For subjective analysis, subgroups were designed based on the diagnosis Goldenhar syndrome or CFM per history. For objective analysis, subgroups were designed based on the presence of epibulbar dermoids and/or vertebral anomalies. The cohorts were compared with respect to associated medical abnormalities and severity of CFM features. One hundred thirty eight patients met inclusion criteria. Epibulbar dermoids and vertebral anomalies were seen in 17% and 34% of the patients, respectively. Only 10 patients (7.2%) had both epibulbar dermoids and vertebral anomalies. The subjective "Goldenhar" group (N = 44, 32%) was found to have a higher percentage of bilaterally affected patients (P = 0.001), a more severe mandibular deformity (P = Goldenhar syndrome remain unclear, thereby making clinical use of the term "Goldenhar" inconsequential. Goldenhar syndrome is over diagnosed subjectively in patients who show more severe CFM features.

  6. The preliminary results of the differences in craniofacial and airway morphology between preterm and full-term children with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Chia Lian

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: During prepuberty, the preterm children had a significantly shorter effective maxillary and mandibular length but the catch up growth resulted during the pubertal period in reduction in facial profile convexity and more important mandibular vertical growth toward a dolichocephalic profile. Due to preterm birth, OSA children have a different craniofacial morphology compared to the full-term. When using an oral device for passive myofunctional therapy, the treatment outcome maybe different.

  7. In quest of optimal drug-supported and targeted bone regeneration in the cranio facial area: a review of techniques and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucaciu, Ondine; Crisan, Bogdan; Crisan, Liana; Baciut, Mihaela; Soritau, Olga; Bran, Simion; Biris, Alexandru Radu; Hurubeanu, Lucia; Hedesiu, Mihaela; Vacaras, Sergiu; Kretschmer, Winfried; Dirzu, Noemi; Campian, Radu Septimiu; Baciut, Grigore

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial bone structures are frequently and extensively affected by trauma, tumors, bone infections and diseases, age-related degeneration and atrophy, as well as congenital malformations and developmental anomalies. Consequently, severe encumbrances are imposed on both patients and healthcare systems due to the complex and lengthy treatment duration. The search for alternative methods to bone transplantation, grafting and the use of homologous or heterologous bone thus responds to one of the most significant problems in human medicine. This review focuses on the current consensus of bone-tissue engineering in the craniofacial area with emphasis on drug-induced stem cell differentiation and induced bone regeneration.

  8. Stress and displacement patterns in the craniofacial skeleton with rapid maxillary expansion-a finite element method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, J; Mahesh, C M; Chandrashekar, B S; Sundara, Abhishek; Arun, A V; Reddy, Vinay P

    2017-12-01

    Rapid maxillary expansion (RME), indicated in the treatment of maxillary deficiency directs high forces to maxillary basal bone and to other adjacent skeletal bones. The aim of this study is to (i) evaluate stress distribution along craniofacial sutures and (ii) study the displacement of various craniofacial structures with rapid maxillary expansion therapy by using a Finite Element model. An analytical model was developed from a dried human skull of a 12 year old male. CT scan images of the skull were taken in axial direction parallel to the F-H plane at 1 mm interval, processed using Mimics software, required portion of the skull was exported into stereo-lithography model. ANSYS software was used to solve the mathematical equation. Contour plots of the displacement and stresses were obtained from the results of the analysis performed. At Node 47005, maximum X-displacement was 5.073 mm corresponding to the incisal edge of the upper central incisor. At Node 3971, maximum negative Y-displacement was -0.86 mm which corresponds to the anterior zygomatic arch, indicating posterior movement of craniofacial complex. At Node 32324, maximum negative Z-displacement was -0.92 mm representing the anterior and deepest convex portion of the nasal septum; indicating downward displacement of structures medial to the area of force application. Pyramidal displacement of maxilla was evident. Apex of pyramid faced the nasal bone and base was located on the oral side. Posterosuperior part of nasal cavity moved minimally in lateral direction and width of nasal cavity at the floor of the nose increased, there was downward and forward movement of maxilla with a tendency toward posterior rotation. Maximum von Mises stresses were found along midpalatal, pterygomaxillary, nasomaxillary and frontomaxillary sutures.

  9. Stress and displacement patterns in the craniofacial skeleton with rapid maxillary expansion—a finite element method study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Priyadarshini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid maxillary expansion (RME, indicated in the treatment of maxillary deficiency directs high forces to maxillary basal bone and to other adjacent skeletal bones. The aim of this study is to (i evaluate stress distribution along craniofacial sutures and (ii study the displacement of various craniofacial structures with rapid maxillary expansion therapy by using a Finite Element model. Methods An analytical model was developed from a dried human skull of a 12 year old male. CT scan images of the skull were taken in axial direction parallel to the F-H plane at 1 mm interval, processed using Mimics software, required portion of the skull was exported into stereo-lithography model. ANSYS software was used to solve the mathematical equation. Contour plots of the displacement and stresses were obtained from the results of the analysis performed. Results At Node 47005, maximum X-displacement was 5.073 mm corresponding to the incisal edge of the upper central incisor. At Node 3971, maximum negative Y-displacement was -0.86 mm which corresponds to the anterior zygomatic arch, indicating posterior movement of craniofacial complex. At Node 32324, maximum negative Z-displacement was -0.92 mm representing the anterior and deepest convex portion of the nasal septum; indicating downward displacement of structures medial to the area of force application. Conclusions Pyramidal displacement of maxilla was evident. Apex of pyramid faced the nasal bone and base was located on the oral side. Posterosuperior part of nasal cavity moved minimally in lateral direction and width of nasal cavity at the floor of the nose increased, there was downward and forward movement of maxilla with a tendency toward posterior rotation. Maximum von Mises stresses were found along midpalatal, pterygomaxillary, nasomaxillary and frontomaxillary sutures.

  10. 76 FR 1444 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  11. 78 FR 36556 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  12. 78 FR 39740 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  13. 75 FR 7485 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  14. 78 FR 67178 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-11-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  15. 76 FR 28996 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-05-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  16. 77 FR 40369 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-07-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  17. 77 FR 6812 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  18. 76 FR 78013 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-12-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  19. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-02-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  20. 77 FR 74676 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  1. 75 FR 8976 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.121, Oral Diseases and Disorders Research, National Institutes of...

  2. 77 FR 10540 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Diseases and Disorders Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 14, 2012. Jennifer S...

  3. 75 FR 28031 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Teleconference Review of R03 Applications for Mechanisms, Models, Measurements, and...

  4. Computed tomography assessment of peripubertal craniofacial morphology in a sheep model of binge alcohol drinking in the first trimester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Sharla M; Lenox, Mark W; Kornegay, Joe N; Shen, Li; Ai, Huisi; Ren, Xiaowei; Goodlett, Charles R; Cudd, Tim A; Washburn, Shannon E

    2015-11-01

    Identification of facial dysmorphology is essential for the diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS); however, most children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) do not meet the dysmorphology criterion. Additional objective indicators are needed to help identify the broader spectrum of children affected by prenatal alcohol exposure. Computed tomography (CT) was used in a sheep model of prenatal binge alcohol exposure to test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of craniofacial bone volumes and linear distances could identify alcohol-exposed lambs. Pregnant sheep were randomly assigned to four groups: heavy binge alcohol, 2.5 g/kg/day (HBA); binge alcohol, 1.75 g/kg/day (BA); saline control (SC); and normal control (NC). Intravenous alcohol (BA; HBA) or saline (SC) infusions were given three consecutive days per week from gestation day 4-41, and a CT scan was performed on postnatal day 182. The volumes of eight skull bones, cranial circumference, and 19 linear measures of the face and skull were compared among treatment groups. Lambs from both alcohol groups showed significant reduction in seven of the eight skull bones and total skull bone volume, as well as cranial circumference. Alcohol exposure also decreased four of the 19 craniofacial measures. Discriminant analysis showed that alcohol-exposed and control lambs could be classified with high accuracy based on total skull bone volume, frontal, parietal, or mandibular bone volumes, cranial circumference, or interorbital distance. Total skull volume was significantly more sensitive than cranial circumference in identifying the alcohol-exposed lambs when alcohol-exposed lambs were classified using the typical FAS diagnostic cutoff of ≤10th percentile. This first demonstration of the usefulness of CT-derived craniofacial measures in a sheep model of FASD following binge-like alcohol exposure during the first trimester suggests that volumetric measurement of cranial bones may be a novel biomarker

  5. Craniofacial characteristics in cri-du-chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Vico, Rosa-María; Rodríguez-Caballero, Angela; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Guerra-López, Noelia; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo; Solano-Reina, Enrique; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze craniofacial characteristics from lateral head profile radiographs of patients with cri-du-chat (CdC) syndrome. The craniofacial morphology of 10 CdC patients was evaluated using standard cephalometric methods, measuring 39 craniofacial variables on cephalometric x-ray images. The principal characteristics were skeletal class II malocclusion, caused by mandibular retrognathism, dental biprotrusion, and a small upper airway. Additionally, 70% of patients had a steep palatal plane angle; the cranial base angle was flattened, also in 70% of patients. Results indicated that the deletion of 5p had an impact on the cranial base, maxilla, mandible, and upper airway, causing distinctive features to become apparent through irregular growth. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Psychosocial adaptation in children and adolescents with craniofacial malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauceda-García, J M; Ortíz-de la Rosa, L T; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, A; Cardenas-Zetina, J A

    1997-01-01

    To determine children's perception of their own psychosocial functioning, to compare it with their parents' perception, and determine the type and rate of their psychopathological syndromes and family functioning, and to investigate correlation among these data. Nineteen children with craniofacial deformities and their parents responded to the Columbia Impairment Scale, the Child Behavior Checklist and the McMaster General Functioning Subscale. Psychosocial impairment is a trend in children with craniofacial deformities. There is a correlation between children's and parents' perception of the patient's psychosocial adaptation, global psychopathology and externalizing and aggressive syndromes. A less strong correlation was found with internalizing, somatization and attention deficit syndromes, and with family functioning. Craniofacial deformities in childhood pose special risks for psychosocial adjustment due to type of illness and environmental and family factors.

  7. Residents' Perceptions of Plastic Surgeons as Craniofacial Surgery Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Muraro, Carlos Alberto Salomão; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    To assess residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists in Brazil. Brazilian residents were asked to choose 1 or 2 specialists that they perceived to be an expert for 14 craniofacial surgery-related scenarios. Both an overall analysis (all 14 scenarios) and subanalysis (each scenario separately) were performed. Response patterns were distributed as "plastic surgeons alone," "plastic surgeons combined with other specialists," or "without plastic surgeons." Overall, plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P surgery-related scenarios and also demonstrated that "plastic surgeons alone" and "without plastic surgeons" were selected more (all P surgery residents and male residents chose more (all P plastic surgeons as experts than their peers. Residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists are limited in Brazil.

  8. Squash(ed: Craniofacial and vertebral injury from collision on squash court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alp Atik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Squash is a popular racquet sport not usually associated with severe head or spinal injury. The incidence of squash-related injury ranges from 35.5 to 80.9 per 100,000 players, with the most common sites being the lower-limbs and eyes. We present a case of extensive traumatic craniomaxillofacial and vertebral injury resulting from collision on a squash court, without use of protective gear. The patient sustained fractures of the frontal bone, orbits, maxillae, zygomas, the first and second cervical vertebrae and the spinous process of the seventh cervical vertrebra. This is the first case of squash-related injury with such extensive craniofacial and vertebral involvement. This unique case required multiple surgical procedures as well as an extensive admission to the intensive care unit and highlights the risk of significant craniomaxillofacial trauma in sports not usually associated with such injuries.

  9. Automated analysis of craniofacial morphology using magnetic resonance images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mallar Chakravarty

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of craniofacial morphology is of interest to scholars working in a wide variety of disciplines, such as anthropology, developmental biology, and medicine. T1-weighted (anatomical magnetic resonance images (MRI provide excellent contrast between soft tissues. Given its three-dimensional nature, MRI represents an ideal imaging modality for the analysis of craniofacial structure in living individuals. Here we describe how T1-weighted MR images, acquired to examine brain anatomy, can also be used to analyze facial features. Using a sample of typically developing adolescents from the Saguenay Youth Study (N = 597; 292 male, 305 female, ages: 12 to 18 years, we quantified inter-individual variations in craniofacial structure in two ways. First, we adapted existing nonlinear registration-based morphological techniques to generate iteratively a group-wise population average of craniofacial features. The nonlinear transformations were used to map the craniofacial structure of each individual to the population average. Using voxel-wise measures of expansion and contraction, we then examined the effects of sex and age on inter-individual variations in facial features. Second, we employed a landmark-based approach to quantify variations in face surfaces. This approach involves: (a placing 56 landmarks (forehead, nose, lips, jaw-line, cheekbones, and eyes on a surface representation of the MRI-based group average; (b warping the landmarks to the individual faces using the inverse nonlinear transformation estimated for each person; and (3 using a principal components analysis (PCA of the warped landmarks to identify facial features (i.e. clusters of landmarks that vary in our sample in a correlated fashion. As with the voxel-wise analysis of the deformation fields, we examined the effects of sex and age on the PCA-derived spatial relationships between facial features. Both methods demonstrated significant sexual dimorphism in

  10. Automated Analysis of Craniofacial Morphology Using Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Aleong, Rosanne; Leonard, Gabriel; Perron, Michel; Pike, G. Bruce; Richer, Louis; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of craniofacial morphology is of interest to scholars working in a wide variety of disciplines, such as anthropology, developmental biology, and medicine. T1-weighted (anatomical) magnetic resonance images (MRI) provide excellent contrast between soft tissues. Given its three-dimensional nature, MRI represents an ideal imaging modality for the analysis of craniofacial structure in living individuals. Here we describe how T1-weighted MR images, acquired to examine brain anatomy, can also be used to analyze facial features. Using a sample of typically developing adolescents from the Saguenay Youth Study (N = 597; 292 male, 305 female, ages: 12 to 18 years), we quantified inter-individual variations in craniofacial structure in two ways. First, we adapted existing nonlinear registration-based morphological techniques to generate iteratively a group-wise population average of craniofacial features. The nonlinear transformations were used to map the craniofacial structure of each individual to the population average. Using voxel-wise measures of expansion and contraction, we then examined the effects of sex and age on inter-individual variations in facial features. Second, we employed a landmark-based approach to quantify variations in face surfaces. This approach involves: (a) placing 56 landmarks (forehead, nose, lips, jaw-line, cheekbones, and eyes) on a surface representation of the MRI-based group average; (b) warping the landmarks to the individual faces using the inverse nonlinear transformation estimated for each person; and (3) using a principal components analysis (PCA) of the warped landmarks to identify facial features (i.e. clusters of landmarks) that vary in our sample in a correlated fashion. As with the voxel-wise analysis of the deformation fields, we examined the effects of sex and age on the PCA-derived spatial relationships between facial features. Both methods demonstrated significant sexual dimorphism in craniofacial

  11. Grainyhead-like Transcription Factors in Craniofacial Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinelli, M R; de Vries, M E; Jane, S M; Dworkin, S

    2017-10-01

    Craniofacial development in vertebrates involves the coordinated growth, migration, and fusion of several facial prominences during embryogenesis, processes governed by strict genetic and molecular controls. A failure in any of the precise spatiotemporal sequences of events leading to prominence fusion often leads to anomalous facial, skull, and jaw formation-conditions termed craniofacial defects (CFDs). Affecting approximately 0.1% to 0.3% of live births, CFDs are a highly heterogeneous class of developmental anomalies, which are often underpinned by genetic mutations. Therefore, identifying novel disease-causing mutations in genes that regulate craniofacial development is a critical prerequisite to develop new preventive or therapeutic measures. The Grainyhead-like ( GRHL) transcription factors are one such gene family, performing evolutionarily conserved roles in craniofacial patterning. The antecedent member of this family, Drosophila grainyhead ( grh), is required for head skeleton development in fruit flies, loss or mutation of Grhl family members in mouse and zebrafish models leads to defects of both maxilla and mandible, and recently, mutations in human GRHL3 have been shown to cause or contribute to both syndromic (Van Der Woude syndrome) and nonsyndromic palatal clefts. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the craniofacial-specific function of the Grainyhead-like family in multiple model species, identify some of the major target genes regulated by the Grhl transcription factors in craniofacial patterning, and, by examining animal models, draw inferences as to how these data will inform the likely roles of GRHL factors in human CFDs comprising palatal clefting. By understanding the molecular networks regulated by Grhl2 and Grhl3 target genes in other systems, we can propose likely pathways that mediate the effects of these transcription factors in human palatogenesis.

  12. 78 FR 45934 - The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Strategic Plan Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... lead Federal agency for research and research training on oral, dental and craniofacial diseases and... revolutionizing how we understand, prevent, diagnose and manage dental, oral, and craniofacial diseases and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research...

  13. Piezoelectric osteotomies in craniofacial procedures: a series of 15 pediatric patients. Technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Franz-Josef; Ludwig, Hans Christoph; Materna, Thomas; Gruber, Rudolf; Merten, Hans Albert; Schliephake, Henning

    2006-01-01

    Frontoorbital advancement has become a standard method both to increase intracranial volume and to improve facial appearance in patients with syndromal or nonsyndromal craniosynostosis. Relevant complications of this procedure include severe hemorrhage and trauma to intracranial, orbital, or facial soft tissues, which mostly arise during the process of bone exposure or osteotomy. To minimize the risk of soft tissue injury and to increase the precision of the osteotomy, the authors applied a piezoelectric osteotome for frontoorbital advancement in 15 patients with craniosynostosis seen consecutively (mean age 11.3 months). They demonstrated that this new device can cut cranial bones using ultrasonic microvibrations created by piezoelectric effects. In all patients, this instrument allowed an easy and precise handling during osteotomy with a reduced amount of trauma to adjacent soft tissues and with no complications. Although the time required for piezoelectric osteotomy was longer compared with conventional techniques, the total operation time remained approximately the same because the preparation requirements are less extensive. Postoperatively, bone regeneration was uneventful. The authors conclude that this new technique of piezoelectric osteotomy is a valuable tool for craniofacial reconstructive surgery in pediatric patients.

  14. Designing patient-specific 3D printed craniofacial implants using a novel topology optimization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Alok; Park, Jaejong; Carrau, Diana; Nguyen, Tam H; Miller, Michael J; Paulino, Glaucio H

    2016-07-01

    Large craniofacial defects require efficient bone replacements which should not only provide good aesthetics but also possess stable structural function. The proposed work uses a novel multiresolution topology optimization method to achieve the task. Using a compliance minimization objective, patient-specific bone replacement shapes can be designed for different clinical cases that ensure revival of efficient load transfer mechanisms in the mid-face. In this work, four clinical cases are introduced and their respective patient-specific designs are obtained using the proposed method. The optimized designs are then virtually inserted into the defect to visually inspect the viability of the design . Further, once the design is verified by the reconstructive surgeon, prototypes are fabricated using a 3D printer for validation. The robustness of the designs are mechanically tested by subjecting them to a physiological loading condition which mimics the masticatory activity. The full-field strain result through 3D image correlation and the finite element analysis implies that the solution can survive the maximum mastication of 120 lb. Also, the designs have the potential to restore the buttress system and provide the structural integrity. Using the topology optimization framework in designing the bone replacement shapes would deliver surgeons new alternatives for rather complicated mid-face reconstruction.

  15. Patient-Specific Implant in Prosthetic Craniofacial Reconstruction: First Report of a Novel Technique With Far-Reaching Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, Sabine Maria; Menzel, Kerstin; Motzkus, Yvonne; Adolphs, Nicolai; Hoffmeister, Bodo; Raguse, Jan-Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Application of endosseous implants in prosthetic craniofacial reconstruction represents a secure and reliable method and is a well-established surgical procedure. In areas of low bone presentation, standardized plate-like titanium implants are available. For allowing a congruent fitting to the recipient site, these contemporary implants have to be manually adapted--implicating drawbacks in terms of time consumption, technical complexity, and insufficient functional outcome. Owing to these limitations, a custom-made patient-specific implant is introduced based on Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data and designed for optimal prosthetic reconstruction. For the first time, the application of a prefabricated patient-specific implant for retaining a craniofacial prosthesis is described. In a 64-year-old man with partial nasal defect standardized plate-like implants failed because of compromised bone quality due to Osler disease. To realize an implant-retained prosthetic reconstruction, a patient-specific implant was fabricated based on computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. This technique allows for considering the implant's ideal geometry as well as its correct placement of the required magnetic abutments. Furthermore, the surface of the implant can be designed for optimal hygienic conditions. The patient-specific implant was successfully inserted in a time effective operating procedure. Follow-up at 6 months showed an excellent functional and aesthetic outcome. Application of prefabricated patient-specific implants offers prospectively an ideal tool for retaining craniofacial prostheses and should be considered a viable option in standard cases, but obligatory in anatomically demanding defects.

  16. Analysis of the 50 most cited papers in craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Youssef; Fleming, Tara M; Greathouse, Travis; Tholpady, Sunil S

    2015-12-01

    The intent of this study is to discuss the most prominent literature in craniofacial surgery. To do so, using the ISI Web of Science, a ranking by average number of citations per year of the top 50 craniofacial surgery articles was compiled. All plastic surgery journals listed in the "Surgery" category in the ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports 2013 Science Edition were considered. Journal of publication, country of origin, collaborating institutions, topic of interest, and level of evidence were analyzed. The total number of citations ranged from 47 to 1017. Average number of citations per year ranged from 46.2 to 8.6. The oldest article in the top 50 was published in 1988 and the most recent in 2009. The majority of the articles came from Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery with 28 of the 50. The majority of the articles, originated from the United States (56%). Reconstruction of acquired defects was the most commonly examined topic at 46.2%; followed by articles discussing reconstruction of congenital defects (23.1%). The most common level of evidence was level 3. This extensive examination of the craniofacial literature highlights the important part that craniofacial surgery takes in the field of plastic surgery. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and craniofacial form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibbets, JMH; vanderWeele, LT

    Signs and symptoms attributed to temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were registered in 170 persons at an average age of 12.5 years. One hundred and ten were reexamined at an average age of 26.4 years. Craniofacial form was defined on standardized lateral cephalograms, taken at the time points

  18. Surgical treatment of craniofacial haemangioma in children | Aly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/purpose Infantile haemangiomas are the most common tumours of infancy, with an incidence of up to 12%. The craniofacial area is affected in 60% of cases, which represents a therapeutic challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the indications, results and complications of early surgical ...

  19. Growth hormone positive effects on craniofacial complex in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juloski, Jovana; Dumančić, Jelena; Šćepan, Ivana; Lauc, Tomislav; Milašin, Jelena; Kaić, Zvonimir; Dumić, Miroslav; Babić, Marko

    2016-11-01

    Turner syndrome occurs in phenotypic females with complete or partial absence of X chromosome. The leading symptom is short stature, while numerous but mild stigmata manifest in the craniofacial region. These patients are commonly treated with growth hormone to improve their final height. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of long-term growth hormone therapy on craniofacial morphology in Turner syndrome patients. In this cross-sectional study cephalometric analysis was performed on 13 lateral cephalograms of patients with 45,X karyotype and the average age of 17.3 years, who have received growth hormone for at least two years. The control group consisted of 13 Turner syndrome patients naive to growth hormone treatment, matched to study group by age and karyotype. Sixteen linear and angular measurements were obtained from standard lateral cephalograms. Standard deviation scores were calculated in order to evaluate influence of growth hormone therapy on craniofacial components. In Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone most of linear measurements were significantly larger compared to untreated patients. Growth hormone therapy mainly influenced posterior face height, mandibular ramus height, total mandibular length, anterior face height and maxillary length. While the increase in linear measurements was evident, angular measurements and facial height ratio did not show statistically significant difference. Acromegalic features were not found. Long-term growth hormone therapy has positive influence on craniofacial development in Turner syndrome patients, with the greatest impact on posterior facial height and mandibular ramus. However, it could not compensate X chromosome deficiency and normalize craniofacial features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mandibular Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Associated with Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma – A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    S.N, Bhavani; A Rajesh; P, Narendranatha Reddy; Kamal, Firoz

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is an uncommon bone lesion which rarely occurs in craniofacial region. Among all the cystic lesions occurring in the jaws, aneurysmal bone cyst is infrequent and it more commonly occurs in the mandible. Most of the cases occur in the first two decades of life, with no gender predilection. Here, we are presenting a case of an aneurysmal bone cyst which occurred in the mandible of a twelve year old female patient.

  1. Mandibular Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Associated with Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma – A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.N, Bhavani; Rajesh, A; P, Narendranatha Reddy; Kamal, Firoz

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is an uncommon bone lesion which rarely occurs in craniofacial region. Among all the cystic lesions occurring in the jaws, aneurysmal bone cyst is infrequent and it more commonly occurs in the mandible. Most of the cases occur in the first two decades of life, with no gender predilection. Here, we are presenting a case of an aneurysmal bone cyst which occurred in the mandible of a twelve year old female patient. PMID:24551739

  2. Mandibular aneurysmal bone cyst associated with cemento-ossifying fibroma - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S N, Bhavani; Rajesh, A; P, Narendranatha Reddy; Kamal, Firoz

    2013-12-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is an uncommon bone lesion which rarely occurs in craniofacial region. Among all the cystic lesions occurring in the jaws, aneurysmal bone cyst is infrequent and it more commonly occurs in the mandible. Most of the cases occur in the first two decades of life, with no gender predilection. Here, we are presenting a case of an aneurysmal bone cyst which occurred in the mandible of a twelve year old female patient.

  3. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: Resection and reconstruction using vertical sliding osteotomy of the mandibular ramus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Otero, Sergio; Navarro-Cuéllar, Carlos; Escrig-de Teigeiro, Margarita; Fernández-Alba-Luengo, Javier; Navarro-Vila, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Osteochondroma is one of the most common benign bone tumours, although not in the craniofacial region. More than half of these appear in the coronoid process. It can appear on the mandibular condyle, especially in its medial half, and mainly affects women aged around forty years. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman with pain of several months' duration in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and no other symptoms. Panoramic radiography showed an enlarged condyle with no subchondral cysts. Computed tomography showed a bony proliferation with benign signs and a scintigraphy revealed an increased uptake in the condyle. Due to the painful clinical symptoms, a surgical procedure using preauricular and retromandibular approaches was performed to excise the condyle. The resulting defect, which was 9 mm high, was reconstructed by means of a vertical sliding osteotomy of the mandibular ramus and two miniplates for osteosynthesis. Almost two years later, the patient is symptom-free and has a normal opening with no malocclusion or deviation in the opening pattern. We present and discuss different reconstruction options after condylectomy.

  4. Evaluation of hydroxyapatite (Periobone-G) as a bone graft material and calcium sulfate barrier (Capset) in treatment of interproximal vertical defects: A clinical and radiologic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjay; Vandana, K. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study has been undertaken to assess treatment response of interproximal vertical defects using an alloplast (Periobone-G) and calcium sulfate (Capset) as a barrier both clinically and radiographically. Materials and Methods: Eight patients were selected with 16 sites that were divided into control and experimental sites based on split mouth study design. Plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival margin position were recorded at baseline and 9 months and radiographic assessment was done at baseline and 9 months after recording clinical parameters, the sites were randomly treated either with hydroxyapatite granules Periobone-G or hydroxyapatite granules (control group) was used to fill the osseous defect and calcium sulfate (Capset) (experiment group) barrier was placed. Result: The plaque score reduction was statistically highly significant within control and experimental groups. The gingival score reduction was significant within control and experimental groups, although there were no significant difference between the 2 groups. The pocket depth reduction was significant within control and experimental group, however, the hydroxyapatite + capset group showed significant reduction as compared with hydroxyapatite alone group. The clinical attachment gain and gingival margin position was significant within control and experimental groups, although there was no significant difference between the 2 groups. The amount of defect fill was significant in both control and experimental groups but the difference between the 2 groups was not significant. The mean change in alveolar crest level between control and experimental groups was significant (P=0.02). The percentage of original defect resolved was not significant. Conclusion: The use of calcium sulfate as a barrier proved its role in the treatment of interproximal defects. The application of calcium sulfate (Capset) barrier is easy and simple. The multifaceted

  5. The relationship between craniofacial development and hypodontia in patients with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marrewijk, D J F; van Stiphout, M A E; Reuland-Bosma, W; Bronkhorst, E M; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2016-04-01

    Hypodontia is often seen in people with Down syndrome (DS). In the normal population, persons with hypodontia have a shorter cranial base and a hypoplastic maxilla, leading to a skeletal Class III tendency and a reduced face height. The purpose of this study was to examine craniofacial morphology in patients with DS at different ages and the influence of hypodontia on their craniofacial morphology. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in 63 children with DS (6-19 years old; 28 males and 35 females) at a Centre for Special Care Dentistry in Rotterdam, the Netherlands (CBT Rijnmond). Digital lateral cephalograms were obtained from all subjects and a cephalometric analysis was performed. The subjects were divided into a group with hypodontia (13 males and 25 females) and a group without hypodontia (15 males and 10 females). Significant results included a decrease in antero-posterior relationship of upper and lower jaw (ANB angle -0.331° per year, P = 0.044) and a decrease in vertical dimension (S-N_Go-Gn angle -0.72° per year, P = 0.039) over the years in subjects with hypodontia compared to subjects without hypodontia. The process of growth in DS patients is towards a reversed overjet. Hypodontia seems to have an additional effect on this development. The management of hypodontia as part of the complete treatment of dental development in DS children is important because it strongly influences the jaw relationship. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Wdr68 Mediates Dorsal and Ventral Patterning Events for Craniofacial Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estibaliz Alvarado

    Full Text Available Birth defects are among the leading causes of infant mortality and contribute substantially to illness and long-term disability. Defects in Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP signaling are associated with cleft lip/palate. Many craniofacial syndromes are caused by defects in signaling pathways that pattern the cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs along the dorsal-ventral axis. For example, auriculocondylar syndrome is caused by impaired Endothelin-1 (Edn1 signaling, and Alagille syndrome is caused by defects in Jagged-Notch signaling. The BMP, Edn1, and Jag1b pathways intersect because BMP signaling is required for ventral edn1 expression that, in turn, restricts jag1b to dorsal CNCC territory. In zebrafish, the scaffolding protein Wdr68 is required for edn1 expression and subsequent formation of the ventral Meckel's cartilage as well as the dorsal Palatoquadrate. Here we report that wdr68 activity is required between the 17-somites and prim-5 stages, that edn1 functions downstream of wdr68, and that wdr68 activity restricts jag1b, hey1, and grem2 expression from ventral CNCC territory. Expression of dlx1a and dlx2a was also severely reduced in anterior dorsal and ventral 1st arch CNCC territory in wdr68 mutants. We also found that the BMP agonist isoliquiritigenin (ISL can partially rescue lower jaw formation and edn1 expression in wdr68 mutants. However, we found no significant defects in BMP reporter induction or pSmad1/5 accumulation in wdr68 mutant cells or zebrafish. The Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-β signaling pathway is also known to be important for craniofacial development and can interfere with BMP signaling. Here we further report that TGF-β interference with BMP signaling was greater in wdr68 mutant cells relative to control cells. To determine whether interference might also act in vivo, we treated wdr68 mutant zebrafish embryos with the TGF-β signaling inhibitor SB431542 and found partial rescue of edn1 expression and

  7. Bilateral aneurysmal bone cyst of maxilla | Shubi | Tanzania Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an uncommon benign lesion originating in the craniofacial region and has seldomly been reported in Tanzania and other parts of the world. Between 2-12% of ABC are located in the head and neck region and 90% are found in the posterior mandible while less than 1% of the cysts are ...

  8. Role of Adrenomedullin in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis and Chemoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    calvarial osteoblast proliferation and cranial suture fusion. Cleft Palate Craniofacial Journal, 39, 487–496. 86. Chikazu, D., Katagiri, M., Ogasawara, T...and lung cancer models. These observations identify AM as a significant target for therapeutic intervention in bone metastasis. Small molecules

  9. Degradable, antibiotic releasing poly(propylene fumarate)-based constructs for craniofacial space maintenance applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henslee, Allan M; Shah, Sarita R; Wong, Mark E; Mikos, Antonios G; Kasper, F Kurtis

    2015-04-01

    Space maintainers (SMs) used for craniofacial reconstruction function to preserve the void space created upon bone loss and promote soft tissue healing over the defect. Polymethylmethacrylate-based SMs present several drawbacks including implant exposure, secondary removal surgeries, and potential bacterial contamination during implantation. To address these issues, a novel composite material comprising poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) with N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP) as the crosslinking agent, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrogel as a porogen, and antibiotic loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles as antibiotic carriers and porogen was fabricated. CMC was incorporated at 40 wt % to impart rapid porosity while PLGA microparticles were incorporated at 30 or 40 wt % to release either clindamycin or colistin. This study was designed to examine the effects of PPF:NVP ratio, PLGA wt %, and the drug dose on the mass loss, temporal porosity change and drug release kinetics of the composite construct. Mass loss decreased significantly in constructs containing 3:2 PPF:NVP ratio with 30 wt % PLGA (63.2 ± 0.8%) compared to the 2:3 PPF:NVP ratio (80.3 ± 1.0% and 85.3 ± 1.3% for 30 and 40 wt % PLGA content, respectively) at 8 weeks. In formulations with 3:2 PPF:NVP ratio, incorporation of 40 versus 30 wt % PLGA significantly increased the porosity at 8 weeks under accelerated degradation conditions. Constructs released clindamycin or colistin at concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration for target pathogens for 45 and 77 days, respectively. This study demonstrates that the composition of PPF/CMC/PLGA constructs can be modulated to achieve properties suitable for craniofacial degradable space maintenance applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Severe macroglossia after posterior fossa and craniofacial surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaoud, J; Joly, A; Picard, A; Thierry, B; Arnaud, E; James, S; Hennessy, I; McGarvey, B; Cairet, P; Vecchione, A; Vergnaud, E; Duracher, C; Khonsari, R H

    2018-01-01

    Massive swelling of the tongue can occur after posterior fossa and craniofacial surgery. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the occurrence of such severe postoperative macroglossia, but this phenomenon is still poorly understood. Severe postoperative macroglossia can be a life-threatening condition due to upper airway obstruction. Three cases of severe postoperative macroglossia that occurred after cervical spine, craniofacial, and posterior fossa surgical procedures are reported here. These cases required specialized maxillofacial management and a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. Causal factors involved in this condition are reported, in order to highlight appropriate prevention and treatment options adapted to the management of paediatric patients. An overview of the current literature on severe postoperative macroglossia in paediatric populations is also provided. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Car sunshade-induced craniofacial injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report the case of a man who sustained a craniofacial injury after spontaneous lateral airbag deployment resulting in his face being struck by a car sunshade. This highlights the potential damage that can be caused by any object placed between a lateral airbag and a car occupant. Case presentation We report the case of a 33-year-old Caucasian man who was the driver in a frontal collision. He had opened the car sunshade and turned it 90° towards the left. As he was driving, he struck a bus, causing the driver's lateral airbag to spontaneously deploy. The airbag pushed the sunshade against his face and injured him. Conclusions Car sunshades can cause significant craniofacial injury. We suggest that sunshade design must be improved to reduce the risk of potential injuries to car occupants. We recommend a new, safer sunshade design.

  12. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects passed down ...

  13. RSK2 Is a Modulator of Craniofacial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Marangoni, Pauline; Pilgram, Coralie; Langer, Arnaud; Kuntz, Thibaut; Demassue, Julie; Morkmued, Supawich; Choquet, Philippe; Constantinesco, André; Bornert, Fabien; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Pannetier, Solange; Viriot, Laurent; Hanauer, André; Dollé, Pascal; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Background The RSK2 gene is responsible for Coffin-Lowry syndrome, an X-linked dominant genetic disorder causing mental retardation, skeletal growth delays, with craniofacial and digital abnormalities typically associated with this syndrome. Craniofacial and dental anomalies encountered in this rare disease have been poorly characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined, using X-Ray microtomographic analysis, the variable craniofacial dysmorphism and dental anomalies present in Rsk2 knockout mice, a model of Coffin-Lowry syndrome, as well as in triple Rsk1,2,3 knockout mutants. We report Rsk mutation produces surpernumerary teeth midline/mesial to the first molar. This highly penetrant phenotype recapitulates more ancestral tooth structures lost with evolution. Most likely this leads to a reduction of the maxillary diastema. Abnormalities of molar shape were generally restricted to the mesial part of both upper and lower first molars (M1). Expression analysis of the four Rsk genes (Rsk1, 2, 3 and 4) was performed at various stages of odontogenesis in wild-type (WT) mice. Rsk2 is expressed in the mesenchymal, neural crest-derived compartment, correlating with proliferative areas of the developing teeth. This is consistent with RSK2 functioning in cell cycle control and growth regulation, functions potentially responsible for severe dental phenotypes. To uncover molecular pathways involved in the etiology of these defects, we performed a comparative transcriptomic (DNA microarray) analysis of mandibular wild-type versus Rsk2-/Y molars. We further demonstrated a misregulation of several critical genes, using a Rsk2 shRNA knock-down strategy in molar tooth germs cultured in vitro. Conclusions This study reveals RSK2 regulates craniofacial development including tooth development and patterning via novel transcriptional targets. PMID:24416220

  14. RSK2 is a modulator of craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Laugel-Haushalter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The RSK2 gene is responsible for Coffin-Lowry syndrome, an X-linked dominant genetic disorder causing mental retardation, skeletal growth delays, with craniofacial and digital abnormalities typically associated with this syndrome. Craniofacial and dental anomalies encountered in this rare disease have been poorly characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined, using X-Ray microtomographic analysis, the variable craniofacial dysmorphism and dental anomalies present in Rsk2 knockout mice, a model of Coffin-Lowry syndrome, as well as in triple Rsk1,2,3 knockout mutants. We report Rsk mutation produces surpernumerary teeth midline/mesial to the first molar. This highly penetrant phenotype recapitulates more ancestral tooth structures lost with evolution. Most likely this leads to a reduction of the maxillary diastema. Abnormalities of molar shape were generally restricted to the mesial part of both upper and lower first molars (M1. Expression analysis of the four Rsk genes (Rsk1, 2, 3 and 4 was performed at various stages of odontogenesis in wild-type (WT mice. Rsk2 is expressed in the mesenchymal, neural crest-derived compartment, correlating with proliferative areas of the developing teeth. This is consistent with RSK2 functioning in cell cycle control and growth regulation, functions potentially responsible for severe dental phenotypes. To uncover molecular pathways involved in the etiology of these defects, we performed a comparative transcriptomic (DNA microarray analysis of mandibular wild-type versus Rsk2-/Y molars. We further demonstrated a misregulation of several critical genes, using a Rsk2 shRNA knock-down strategy in molar tooth germs cultured in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals RSK2 regulates craniofacial development including tooth development and patterning via novel transcriptional targets.

  15. Ciliopathy Protein Tmem107 Plays Multiple Roles in Craniofacial Development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Celá, Petra; Hampl, Marek; Shylo, N.; Christopher, K. J.; Kavková, M.; Landová, Marie; Zikmund, T.; Weatherbee, S. D.; Kaiser, J.; Buchtová, Marcela

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 1 (2018), s. 108-117 ISSN 0022-0345 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-37368G; GA MŠk EF15_003/0000460 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : craniofacial anomalies * growth/development * mineralized tissue/development * orofacial clefts * cell signaling Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 4.755, year: 2016

  16. Craniofacial and dental anomalies among mentally challenged children

    OpenAIRE

    Megha Jain; Sudheendra U Shridhar; Sandeep Gupta; Raju Ragavendra, T; Sowmya Kasetty

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of craniofacial and dental anomalies among different developmental disorders in mentally challenged subjects of various special schools. Material and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted in four rehabilitation centers for mentally disabled subjects in Bhopal City. Atotal o f296 subjects with age range of 5-15 years were screened and findings were recorded in specially prepared proforma. Results: Among 296 subjects, 73 were of Down′s syndrome (DS), 16...

  17. Antibacterial coating on biocomposites for cranio-facial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Madalina Anca; Vodnar, Dan; Prodan, Doina; Rotaru, Horatiu; Roman, Calin Rares; Sorcoi, Lidia Adriana; Baciut, Grigore; Campian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that implants are sterilized, antiseptic techniques are applied and systemic antibiotics are routinely administered prior to and after craniofacial surgery, infection rates between 3% and 40% are still reported for alloplastic implants, urging for implant removal. The present study focuses on the development of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implant for craniofacial reconstruction with antimicrobial properties. A new fiber-reinforced composite coated with gentamicin was developed and tested for bacterial adherence and antibacterial efficiency, using two of the most involved bacterial strains in the postoperative infections: Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacteria were efficiently inactivated in direct contact with gentamicin coatings (p0.05 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: β = -0.921; p=0.255>0.05), a negative relation was observed, indicating the reversed relation between the antibiotic dosage and the bacterial adherence. The results of the two applied microbiological protocols used in the study suggested that gentamicin eluting coating inhibited not only the bacterial growth, but also led to a lower initial bacterial adhesion to the surface of the implant. Thus, antibiotic coating of craniofacial implants may reduce the infection rate related to reconstructive surgery.

  18. Penetrating craniofacial injuries in children with wooden and metal chopsticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se-Hyuck; Cho, Ki Hong; Shin, Yong Sam; Kim, Se Hyuck; Ahn, Young Hwan; Cho, Kyung Gi; Yoon, Soo Han

    2006-01-01

    Penetrating craniofacial injuries with chopsticks in children are peculiar accidents in the Oriental culture. All 10 cases previously reported were caused by wooden chopsticks that required surgical operations. However, there are no reported injuries with metal chopsticks in the past literature which should have been as common as that of wooden chopstick injuries in Asia. We evaluated the difference of injury patterns and clinical observations between wooden and metal chopstick injuries. We reviewed 6 treated children with penetrating craniofacial injuries from chopsticks: one wooden and five metal chopsticks. One child who had penetration through the nasal cavity presented with temporary rhinorrhea, another with mild hemiparesis, and one child with temporary upward gaze limitation of the left eye. Radiological examination revealed 1 patient with epidural hemorrhage, 1 patient with minimal subdural hemorrhage, and 4 with intracerebral hemorrhage that were fortunately too small to receive surgery. We performed surgical procedure only for a child who had a wooden chopstick that had impacted into the temporal cortex. We followed up all 6 children for more than 1 year, and found that all had fully recovered to near-normal neurological status. We observed that penetrating craniofacial injuries with metal chopsticks rarely require surgical intervention and usually results in good outcome because the resultant wound is usually small without broken fragments compared to injuries with wooden chopsticks. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. The Drivers of Academic Success in Cleft and Craniofacial Centers: A 10-Year Analysis of over 2000 Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plana, Natalie M; Massie, Jonathan P; Stern, Marleigh J; Alperovich, Michael; Runyan, Christopher M; Staffenberg, David A; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Grayson, Barry H; Diaz-Siso, J Rodrigo; Flores, Roberto L

    2017-02-01

    Cleft and craniofacial centers require significant investment by medical institutions, yet variables contributing to their academic productivity remain unknown. This study characterizes the elements associated with high academic productivity in these centers. The authors analyzed cleft and craniofacial centers accredited by the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Variables such as university affiliation; resident training; number of plastic surgery, oral-maxillofacial, and dental faculty; and investment in a craniofacial surgery, craniofacial orthodontics fellowship program, or both, were obtained. Craniofacial and cleft-related research published between July of 2005 and June of 2015 was identified. A stepwise multivariable linear regression analysis was performed to measure outcomes of total publications, summative impact factor, basic science publications, total journals, and National Institutes of Health funding. One hundred sixty centers were identified, comprising 920 active faculty, 34 craniofacial surgery fellowships, and eight craniofacial orthodontic fellowships; 2356 articles were published in 191 journals. Variables most positively associated with a high number of publications were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.608), craniofacial surgery fellowships (β = 0.231), number of plastic surgery faculty (β = 0.213), and university affiliation (β = 0.165). Variables most positively associated with high a number of journals were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.550), university affiliation (β = 0.251), number of plastic surgery faculty (β = 0.230), and craniofacial surgery fellowship (β = 0.218). Variables most positively associated with a high summative impact factor were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.648), craniofacial surgery fellowship (β = 0.208), number of plastic surgery faculty (β = 0.207), and university affiliation

  20. Craniofacial features of children with spinal deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Végh András

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this epidemiological study is to map the dentofacial anomalies that can be correlated to the two most frequent spinal diseases responsible for postural abnormalities and that can be clinically identified by the orthodontic examination. Methods Twenty-three children with Scheuermann's disease participated in the study (mean age: 14Y8M; SD: 1Y8M, 28 with Scoliosis (mean age: 14Y7M; SD: 2Y3M and a control group of 68 orthopedically healthy children (mean age: 14Y8M; SD: 0Y11M. Standardized orthodontic screening protocols were used to map the occlusal relations in the sagittal, vertical, and transversal dimensions, space relations of the maxillary and mandibular frontal segment, and the TMJ status and function. The examinations for the children with orthopedic disorders were supplemented by the evaluation of routine orthodontic radiograms – lateral cephalograms and panoramic X-rays. Results The majority of the dentofacial features examined revealed more and greater abnormalities among patients in the Scheuermann's disease group than in the scoliosis group. In the latter group the proportion of the TMJ symptoms and the consecutive functional deviations were greater. When comparing the values of the two spinal-disorder groups and the control group, statistically significant differences (p p Conclusion The more extended treatment of the malocclusions closely correlated to postural disorders draws attention to the indicators of a higher frequency and severity occurring in the case of the dentofacial deviations in the patients of the MSCH group who had previously been less examined.

  1. 3D printed TCP-based scaffold incorporating VEGF-loaded PLGA microspheres for craniofacial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimipour, F; Rasoulianboroujeni, M; Dashtimoghadam, E; Khoshroo, K; Tahriri, M; Bastami, F; Lobner, D; Tayebi, L

    2017-11-01

    Vascularization is a critical process during bone regeneration/repair and the lack of tissue vascularization is recognized as a major challenge in applying bone tissue engineering methods for cranial and maxillofacial surgeries. The aim of our study is to fabricate a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-loaded gelatin/alginate/β-TCP composite scaffold by 3D printing method using a computer-assisted design (CAD) model. The paste, composed of (VEGF-loaded PLGA)-containing gelatin/alginate/β-TCP in water, was loaded into standard Nordson cartridges and promptly employed for printing the scaffolds. Rheological characterization of various gelatin/alginate/β-TCP formulations led to an optimized paste as a printable bioink at room temperature. The in vitro release kinetics of the loaded VEGF revealed that the designed scaffolds fulfill the bioavailability of VEGF required for vascularization in the early stages of tissue regeneration. The results were confirmed by two times increment of proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) seeded on the scaffolds after 10 days. The compressive modulus of the scaffolds, 98±11MPa, was found to be in the range of cancellous bone suggesting their potential application for craniofacial tissue engineering. Osteoblast culture on the scaffolds showed that the construct supports cell viability, adhesion and proliferation. It was found that the ALP activity increased over 50% using VEGF-loaded scaffolds after 2 weeks of culture. The 3D printed gelatin/alginate/β-TCP scaffold with slow releasing of VEGF can be considered as a potential candidate for regeneration of craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Wdr68 requires nuclear access for craniofacial development.

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    Bingyan Wang

    Full Text Available Wdr68 is a highly conserved scaffolding protein required for craniofacial development and left-right asymmetry. A Ras-Map3k-Wdr68-Dyrk1 signaling relay may mediate these and other diverse signaling events important in development and disease. While the sub-cellular localization of Wdr68 has been shown to be dependent on that of its interaction partners, it is not clear where Wdr68 activity is required during development. Here we show that while a GFP-Wdr68 fusion functionally substituted for craniofacial development in the zebrafish, that a Nuclear Export Signal (NES fusion protein (GFPNESWdr68 failed to support craniofacial development. As control for NES activity, we show that while GFP-Wdr68 exhibited a pan-cellular distribution in C2C12 cells, the GFPNESWdr68 fusion predominantly localized to the cell cytoplasm, as expected. Interestingly, while GFP-Wdr68 and RFP-Dyrk1a co-localized to the cell nucleus as expected based on the known sub-cellular localization for Dyrk1a, we found that the GFPNESWdr68 fusion redistributed RFP-Dyrk1a to the cell cytoplasm potentially disconnecting the Ras/Dyrk1 signal relay from further downstream targets. Consistent with a nuclear role in gene regulation, we also found that while a transcriptional activation domain fusion, CebpFlagWdr68, functionally substituted for endogenous Wdr68 for craniofacial development, that a transcriptional repression domain fusion, MadFlagWdr68, failed to support craniofacial development. Dyrk1b is required for myogenin (myog expression in differentiating mouse C2C12 cells and here we report that wdr68 is also important for myog expression in differentiating C2C12 cells. Using a C2C12 cell myog promoter-reporter system, we found that Wdr68 overexpression increased reporter activity while moderate expression levels of MadFlagWdr68 interfered with reporter activity. Taken together, these findings support a nuclear role for Wdr68-containing complexes.

  3. 3D craniofacial registration using thin-plate spline transform and cylindrical surface projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yucong; Zhao, Junli; Deng, Qingqiong; Duan, Fuqing

    2017-01-01

    Craniofacial registration is used to establish the point-to-point correspondence in a unified coordinate system among human craniofacial models. It is the foundation of craniofacial reconstruction and other craniofacial statistical analysis research. In this paper, a non-rigid 3D craniofacial registration method using thin-plate spline transform and cylindrical surface projection is proposed. First, the gradient descent optimization is utilized to improve a cylindrical surface fitting (CSF) for the reference craniofacial model. Second, the thin-plate spline transform (TPST) is applied to deform a target craniofacial model to the reference model. Finally, the cylindrical surface projection (CSP) is used to derive the point correspondence between the reference and deformed target models. To accelerate the procedure, the iterative closest point ICP algorithm is used to obtain a rough correspondence, which can provide a possible intersection area of the CSP. Finally, the inverse TPST is used to map the obtained corresponding points from the deformed target craniofacial model to the original model, and it can be realized directly by the correspondence between the original target model and the deformed target model. Three types of registration, namely, reflexive, involutive and transitive registration, are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed craniofacial registration algorithm. Comparison with the methods in the literature shows that the proposed method is more accurate.

  4. [Establishment of the craniofacial three-dimensional finite element models with the sutures defined alone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-ying; Dong, Fu-sheng; Lu, Hai-yan; Ma, Wen-sheng; Yuan, Shuo

    2013-10-01

    To develop a child craniofacial three-dimensional (3D) finite element model (FEM) with sutures defined alone. The CT data for this study was developed from sequential computed tomography scan images taken at 0.625 mm intervals of an 8 years children skull. Data set was imported into Mimics 10.0 and processed with Geomagic 9.0, and exported as initial graphics exchange specification(IGES) files. The IGES files were then imported into Ansys 13.0 to set up two FEM with or without the median palatine suture being opened. The FEM contained nine craniofacial sutures and eight teeth which were defined alone.For simulating orthopedic maxillary protraction, three forces (F1-F2) were loaded on FEM.F1(1 N) was loaded at 1 cm above the geison. F2(1 N) was loaded at articular fossa of temporal bone. F3(2 N) was directed anteriorly and paralleled with occlusal plane near the canine. The stress distribution and the values distributed in each point gained in the two models were compared. Two craniofacial 3D FEM of the child were developed with the median palatine suture opened or not .With median palatine suture being opened or not, the two models showed the similar von Mises stresses (VMS). The distribution of the VMS was in the bridge of the nose and dextro-ala nasi.When the median palatine suture was opened, the max VMS value was 18916.00×10(-4) MPa which appeared in the nose point and the min VMS value was 1.61×10(-4) MPa which appeared in the maxillary central incisor point. At the same time, the max stress value at the direction Y was -3985.30×10(-4) MPa and appeared in the frontomaxillary suture point, and the min Y value was 0.08×10(-4) MPa which appeared in the maxillary central incisor point. When the median palatine suture was not opened, the max VMS value was 19 244.00×10(-4) MPa and appeared in the nose point. The min VMS value was 1.62×10(-4) MPa and appeared in the maxillary central incisor point. At the same time, the max stress value at the direction Y was

  5. A population level atlas of Mus musculus craniofacial skeleton and automated image-based shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, A Murat; Tustison, Nicholas J; Avants, Brian B

    2017-09-01

    few cervical vertebrae. We have been using this template in our lab to segment and isolate cranial structures in an automated fashion from a mixed population of mice, including craniofacial mutants, aged 4-12.5 weeks. As a secondary contribution, we demonstrate an application of nearly automated shape analysis, using symmetric diffeomorphic image registration. This approach, which we call diGPA, closely approximates the popular generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) but negates the collection of anatomical landmarks. We achieve our goals by using the open-source advanced normalization tools (ANT) image quantification library, as well as its associated R library (ANTsR) for statistical image analysis. Finally, we make a plea to investigators to commit to using open imaging standards and software in their labs to the extent possible to increase the potential for data exchange and improve the reproducibility of findings. Future work will incorporate more anatomical detail (such as individual cranial bones, turbinals, dentition, middle ear ossicles) and more diversity into the template. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  6. A novel approach for craniofacial symmetry evaluation: Using the midsagittal Reference line drawn from “Crista Gali” with NHP technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ordobazari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Ordobazari M, Naqavi Al-Hosseini AA, Zafarmand H. A novel approach for craniofacial symmetry evaluation: Using the midsagittal Reference line drawn from “Crista Gali” with NHP technique. Novel Biomed 2013;1(2:48-53.Background and objective: The purpose of this study was the determination of midsagittal reference line (MSL for craniofacial asymmetry assessment by drawing a line from Crista gali parallel to the true vertical line in PA cephalometry, using Natural Head Position (NHP technique.Method and Materials: 60 Iranian subjects within the age range of 9-13 years old were selected for this prospective study. Patients referred for orthodontic treatment and ghad no supernumerary or missing teeth, no skeletal anomaly, or any history of orthodontic and jaw surgery with normal occlusion. Posteroanterior cephalometric radiographs (PA Ceph were taken of all subjects with NHP technique. The midsagittal line was also traced parallel to the hanging chain from Crista gali. True horizontal line (THL and true vertical line (TVL were also traced from Crista gali (Cg. Using Cartesian system based upon Cg point (0~0, the craniofacial symmetry was assessed with linear, angular and proportional measurements in PA cephalogam, related to TVL and THL lines, for 10 bilateral (R&L anatomical landmarks. The mean differences of the above measurements in left and right sides were analyzed by T- test.Results: The proportional ratios for all left and right measurements were not statistically significant. This was true for both vertical and horizontal distances. The significant level for MSL drawn from Cg as referred to ANS (0±0.255 and Me points (0.007±0.527 was 0.002 and 0.004, respectively.Conclusion: In posteroanterior cephalometry radiographs taken with NHP method, the MSL drawn from Crista gali is reproducible and reliable up to 96% of the times for facial symmetry diagnosis.

  7. The skull development of parrots with special reference to the emergence of a morphologically unique cranio-facial hinge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Masayoshi

    2003-06-01

    The order Psittaciformes (parrots) has unique morphological features in the head that are evolutionarily novel. To better understand the unique evolution of the head in parrots, the developmental pattern of the skull of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) was initially described on the basis of transparent skeletal specimens. Although the fundamental pattern of the skull development of birds is conserved in parrots, some differences were observed between parrots and other groups of birds. In parrots, the vacuity in the interorbital septum did not emerge throughout ontogeny, in contrast to other lineages of birds, for example Galliformes and Coliiformes. This feature seems to be concerned with the attachment of the unique jaw muscle of parrots, M. ethmomandibularis, to the interorbital septum. In spite of a prokinetic skull, the cranio-facial hinge of parrots was brought about by secondary transformation of dermal bones unlike that of birds with a standard prokinetic skull (e.g. Corvus) in which the nasal-frontal suture directly becomes a hinge of bending. To further understand the evolution of "pseudoprokinesis" in parrots, the construction of a robust avian phylogeny is desired. The parrot-specific suborbital arch and cranio-facial hinge are not seen until birds leave the nest and can feed themselves. In conclusion, these structures are considered to be essential for eating hard and/or large meals.

  8. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, C; Byl, F M

    1993-12-01

    The aneurysmal bone cyst is a nonmalignant lesion that by expanding disrupts the architecture of the affected bone and destroys surrounding tissue. Developing rarely in the craniofacial region, and more commonly affecting the long bones and the spine, the lesion has characteristic radiographic features but is definitively diagnosed only by pathologic characteristics. Complete surgical excision is used to treat aneurysmal bone cyst, with either curettage or composite resection. Recurrence is common in incompletely excised lesions. Adjunctive cryotherapy reduces the risk of recurrence, and radiotherapy is reserved for nonresectable lesions. The case we report of a young man seen for a large mandibular aneurysmal bone cyst demonstrates the complexity of diagnosing and treating this condition.

  9. Blepharocheilodontic (BCD) syndrome: New insights on craniofacial and dental features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadh, Wael; Kiukkonen, Anu; Nieminen, Pekka; Arte, Sirpa; Hurmerinta, Kirsti; Rice, David P

    2017-04-01

    Blepharocheilodontic (BCD) syndrome is a rare condition characterized by bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), eyelid abnormalities, and oligodontia. Despite orofacial clefting and oligodontia being central features of the condition, detailed reports of dental and craniofacial characteristics are scarce. The aim of this study was to analyze the dental and craniofacial features in a group of patients with BCD syndrome (three of which were related). Cephalometric radiographic analyses were performed on BCD syndrome patients (all radiographs taken at age 8 years) and compared to 40 randomly selected age-matched controls (20 non-syndromic BCLP, 20 non-cleft). Also, we assessed clinical records, photographs, dental study casts, and dental radiographs to determine the extent and pattern of tooth agenesis, dental morphology and malocclusion. BCD syndrome patients showed a very severe skeletal III malocclusion (maxillary-mandibular sagittal discrepancy) and reduced anterior lower face measurement compared to non-syndromic BCLP and non-cleft controls (P = 0.001, P = 0.027). All patients exhibited oligodontia (mean number of missing permanent teeth 13.7, range 7-17). All patients exhibited missing upper central and lateral incisor, upper canine and premolar teeth. Variations in dental morphology included taurodontism, conical-shaped teeth, and notching of the incisal edges. All patients had a short and narrow maxilla which translated into anterior and posterior cross bites. We conclude that, in our BCD syndrome group, the craniofacial skeletal defects are more severe than patients with BCLP. The pattern of tooth agenesis is unusual as it included teeth that are normally highly resistant to agenesis, namely upper central incisor and canine teeth. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 77 FR 74674 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal...

  11. 76 FR 38193 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, Review of PAR-11-144 NIDCR U01...

  12. 75 FR 26762 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; RFA (DE-10-003). Date: June 7, 2010...

  13. 78 FR 50066 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is ] hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal...

  14. 75 FR 65495 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Interagency Pain Research Coordinating...

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    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... Federal agencies relevant to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of pain and diseases and disorders... resume. Dated: October 18, 2010. Amy Adams, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research...

  15. 78 FR 59708 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.121, Oral Diseases and Disorders Research, National Institutes of...

  16. 77 FR 64815 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.121, Oral Diseases and Disorders Research, National...

  17. 78 FR 28234 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Microbiome's Role in Health and Disease (U54). Date: June 11-12, 2013. Time: 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda...

  18. 77 FR 10539 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Review of RFA DE 12-006 and -007 Oral Diseases in Medically Compromised Patients (R21, R01...

  19. Cephalometric analysis of craniofacial morphology and growth in unrepaired isolated cleft palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Y.; Yang, C.; Schreuder, W.H.; Shi, J.; Bing, S.; Zheng, Q.; Wang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to analyze the craniofacial morphology in patients with unrepaired isolated cleft palate (UICP) at childhood, adolescence and adulthood, in order to assess the influence of nonsurgical factors on the craniofacial growth in these patients. Material and methods

  20. 75 FR 7486 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel Review of R01 Application for RFA- DE-10-001, Oral Mucosal Vaccination against HIV Infection...

  1. Cervical spine curvature and craniofacial morphology in an adult Caucasian group: a multiple regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecco, Simona; Festa, Felice

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cervical curvature and skeletal facial morphology. Pre-treatment lateral cephalograms in natural head position were obtained from 98 orthodontic adult subjects (56 males and 42 females; mean age = 31.5 years, standard deviation +/-5.8 years). The amount of concavity of the cervical curvature was calculated by a second-order quadratic interpolation of the most infero-posterior points of the bodies of the seven cervical vertebrae on the radiographs. Linear regression with stepwise elimination was carried out to evaluate the sagittal and vertical craniofacial dimensions. The results revealed that the amount of curvature was related to (1) the horizontal position of the upper incisors with respect to the maxillary and mandibular skeletal bases and (2) the sagittal millimetric dimension of the maxillary base. These cephalometric variables explained 51 per cent of the total variance of cervical curvature. There was no significant correlation between cervical curvature and any other cephalometric variable. Cervical curvature was not influenced by age or gender.

  2. The Future in Craniofacial Surgery: Computer-Assisted Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Schendel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in computers, prototyping, and imaging, especially over the last 10 years, have permitted the adoption of three-dimensional imaging protocols in the health care field. In this article, the authors present an integrated simulation system for craniofacial surgical planning and treatment. Image fusion technology, which involves combining different imaging modalities, was utilized to create a realistic prototype and virtual image that can be manipulated in real time. The resultant data can then be shared over the Internet with distantly located practitioners.

  3. The Future in Craniofacial Surgery: Computer-Assisted Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Stephen A.; Hazan-Molina, Hagai; Rachmiel, Adi; Aizenbud, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in computers, prototyping, and imaging, especially over the last 10 years, have permitted the adoption of three-dimensional imaging protocols in the health care field. In this article, the authors present an integrated simulation system for craniofacial surgical planning and treatment. Image fusion technology, which involves combining different imaging modalities, was utilized to create a realistic prototype and virtual image that can be manipulated in real time. The resultant data can then be shared over the Internet with distantly located practitioners. PMID:23908836

  4. Craniofacial abnormalities in animal models of mucopolysaccharidoses I, VI, and VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, O; Wortman, J; Harvey, C; Hayden, J; Haskins, M

    1994-01-01

    The genetic mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are a family of lysosomal storage diseases resulting from the partial catabolism of several glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Depending on the particular enzyme deficient in activity, the MPS syndromes are defined into groups MPS I through VII, with several subgroups for a total of 10 disorders. In humans, clinical features include dysostosis multiplex, hepatosplenomegaly, hypertelorism, macroglossia, hypoplastic and irregularly shaped teeth, hyperplastic lips and gingiva, facial dysmorphia, corneal clouding, and mental retardation. MPS I (alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency) and VI (arylsulfatase B deficiency) have been described in cats, MPS VII (beta-glucuronidase deficiency) in dogs. Biochemically, these syndromes appear the same as their human counterparts and have similar clinical characteristics. All are inherited as autosomal recessive traits. The purpose of this study was to analyze the craniofacial aspects of these diseases in the animal models and compare these data with descriptions of the human syndromes. A total of 28 live animals were examined. Thirty-one skulls prepared from postmortem specimens were measured directly and radiographed. Controls were closely related family members of the same sex and similar age without the disease, clinically or biochemically. The data indicated that, as in the human syndromes, each is distinct, and the skull bones most severely affected are those of endochondral origin.

  5. Craniofacial morphology in Chinese and Swedish children with Angle Class I and Class II occlusal relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X L; Forsberg, C M; Linder-Aronson, S

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the craniofacial morphology of a group of Chinese children from northern China with a group of Swedish children. Each ethnic group comprised 20 boys and 20 girls with Class I occlusion, and 20 boys and 20 girls with Class II occlusion. The ages of the children ranged from eight to ten years. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were used for the recording of a number of skeletal, dental, nasopharyngeal airway, and hyoid bone variables. The results of the comparisons of the two ethnic groups showed that the antero-posterior dimensions of the anterior cranial base and the maxilla in the Chinese children were significantly smaller than the corresponding dimensions in the Swedish children. The mean values of anterior and posterior face heights, inclination of the upper incisors, and protrusion of the lower incisors, were significantly greater in the Chinese than in the Swedish samples. In the median plane, the size of the nasopharyngeal airway was significantly greater in the Chinese than in the Swedes. This difference was due to the fact that the soft tissues covering the posterior nasopharyngeal wall were thinner in the Chinese children than in the Swedish children. In general, the ethnic differences were the same in the Class I and the Class II groups. The differences in some of the dental and skeletal characteristics found between northern Chinese and Caucasian-children are similar to previously described differences between southern Chinese and Caucasian children.

  6. Antibiotic-releasing porous polymethylmethacrylate/gelatin/antibiotic constructs for craniofacial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meng; Kretlow, James D; Spicer, Patrick P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Demian, Nagi; Wong, Mark E; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2011-05-30

    An antibiotic-releasing porous polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) construct was developed to maintain the bony space and prime the wound site in the initial step of a two-stage regenerative medicine approach toward reconstructing significant bony or composite craniofacial tissue defects. Porous PMMA constructs incorporating gelatin microparticles (GMPs) were fabricated by the sequential assembly of GMPs, the antibiotic colistin, and a clinically used bone cement formulation of PMMA powder and methylmethacrylate liquid. PMMA/gelatin/antibiotic constructs with varying gelatin incorporation and drug content were investigated to elucidate the relationship between material composition and construct properties (porosity and drug release kinetics). The porosity of PMMA/gelatin/antibiotic constructs ranged between 7.6±1.8% and 38.4±1.4% depending on the amount of gelatin incorporated and the drug solution added for gelatin swelling. The constructs released colistin over 10 or 14 days with an average release rate per day above 10 μg/ml. The porosity and in vitro colistin release kinetics of PMMA/gelatin/antibiotic constructs were tuned by varying the material composition and fabrication parameters. This study demonstrates the potential of gelatin-incorporating PMMA constructs as a functional space maintainer for both promoting tissue healing/coverage and addressing local infections, enabling better long-term success of the definitive regenerated tissue construct. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Craniofacial Skeletal Dysplasia of Opposite-sex Dizygotic Twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ting Chou

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial skeletal dysplasia can lead to different skeletal malocclusions. Both environmental factors and heredity contribute to the formation of malocclusions. There are strong familial tendencies in the development of Angle's Class II and III malocclusions. Cases such as opposite-typed (Class II and III malocclusions with skeletal and dentoalveolar discordance in siblings or dizygotic (DZ twins have seldom been reported. We describe the rare case of a pair of opposite-sex DZ twins with completely different skeletal malocclusions, and discuss the clinical considerations for treatment. The patients were twins aged 13 years and 4 months. The girl had mandibular prognathism and a Class III dentoskeletal relationship, whereas the boy had skeletal Class II with mandibular retrusion. Several morphological traits have been implicated with hormonal effect. However, there was no evidence of whether the masculinization effect had any impact on jaw size in the female fetus or whether this effect lasted into adolescence. We suggest that, although DZ twins share the same growth environment, genetic or other unknown extrinsic factors can result in discordance of characteristics of the craniofacial skeleton, dentition, and occlusion.

  8. Craniofacial Surgery and Adverse Outcomes: An Inquiry Into Medical Negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svider, Peter F; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Folbe, Adam J; Carron, Michael A; Zuliani, Giancarlo F; Shkoukani, Mahdi A

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate factors contributing to medical negligence relevant to craniofacial surgery. Retrospective analysis of verdict and settlement reports on the Westlaw legal database for outcome, awards, physician defendants, and other specific factors raised in malpractice litigation. Of 42 verdicts and settlement reports included, 52.4% were resolved with either an out-of-court settlement or plaintiff verdict, with aggregate payments totaling $50.1M (in 2013 dollars). Median settlements and jury-awarded damages were $988,000 and $555,000, respectively. Payments in pediatric cases ($1.2M) were significantly higher. Plastic surgeons, oral surgeons, and otolaryngologists were the most commonly named defendants. The most common alleged factors included intraoperative negligence (69.0%), permanent deficits (54.8%), requiring additional surgery (52.4%), missed/delayed diagnosis of a complication (42.9%), disfigurement/scarring (28.6%), postoperative negligence (28.6%), and inadequate informed consent (20.6% of surgical cases). Failure to diagnose a fracture (19.0%) and cleft-reparative procedures (14.3%) were the most frequently litigated entities. Medical negligence related to craniofacial surgery involves plaintiffs in a wide age range as well as physician defendants in numerous specialties, and proceedings resolved with settlement and plaintiff verdict involve substantial payments. Cases with death, allegedly permanent injuries, and pediatric plaintiffs had significantly higher payments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Craniofacial and dental anomalies among mentally challenged children

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    Megha Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of craniofacial and dental anomalies among different developmental disorders in mentally challenged subjects of various special schools. Material and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted in four rehabilitation centers for mentally disabled subjects in Bhopal City. Atotal o f296 subjects with age range of 5-15 years were screened and findings were recorded in specially prepared proforma. Results: Among 296 subjects, 73 were of Down′s syndrome (DS, 168 of mental retardation (MR, 31 of autism (AT and 24 of cerebral Palsy (CP. The anomalies were found to be predominant in syndromic mental disability compared to non-syndromic disorders. High vault palate was the most common developmental anomaly amongst all the four disabilities. Gingivitis & hypersalivation was noted as an additional finding in all the subgroups. Conclusion: Craniofacial and dental anomalies usually supplement mentally challenged children, leading to poor performance of stomatognathic complex. Therefore critical appraisal of oral health status of such subjects is imperative.

  10. A Comparison Between Craniofacial Templates of Iranian and Western Populations

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    Tahereh Hosseinzadeh Nik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Templates are very useful tools for diagnosis of malocclusions. A number of templates have been provided for some populations in previous years. Since craniofacial characteristics of different ethnic groups are not the same, each population needs its own norms. The aim of this study was to provide orthodontic craniofacial templates for 8-16 year old Iranian boys and compare dentoskeletal features between Iranian and western populations. 3330 boys with the age range of 8-16 years were examined in Tehran, and 107 cases were finally chosen for the study and their lateral cephalograms were traced. Since there is no universal, consensus about the selection of one specific point or line for cephalometric superimposition, both the sella nasion (SN and basion nasion (Ba-N lines were chosen for this purpose. Based on both SN and Ba-N lines, a template was prepared for each age. Simple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the angles and the multivariant regression analysis for evaluation of landmark vectors. Posterior cranial base, maxillary and mandibular lengths, upper and lower anterior facial heights (N-ANS and ANS-Me and posterior facial height (S-Go are greater in Iranian population. But anterior cranial base, height and inclination of the incisors and molar height are similar in two populations.

  11. Morphological integration of the skull in craniofacial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtsmeier, J T; Deleon, V B

    2009-08-01

    OBJECTIVES - To understand how surgical interventions impact the organization and internal integration of the major components of the skull, we address the functional and developmental relationships during perinatal development. METHODS - A number of methods for quantifying modularity and integration of morphological data are available. Here, measures derived from three-dimensional computed tomographic (CT) images are used to investigate the statistical relationships among measures of the cranial vault, face and cranial base. First, we establish the pattern of associations among quantitative measures in a sample of children unaffected by a craniofacial anomaly. We statistically compare these normative patterns of cranial integration to those of a sample of children with a facial anomaly (complete unilateral complete cleft lip and palate), and to children with a neurocranial anomaly (isolated sagittal synostosis). Finally, we test whether surgery affects the strength and pattern of associations among measures within the cranial base in the affected children. RESULTS - Our analyses reveal strong internal integration of the cranial base in unaffected children and in our samples of unoperated cleft lip and palate, and sagittal synostosis. Post-operatively, the magnitude of integration of the cranial base is reduced relative to the pre-operative condition in both samples of children with craniofacial anomalies. CONCLUSION - Our results show how the cranial base adjusts to its broader structural context, and provides added support for the developmental and structural integration of cranial base with both cranial vault and face.

  12. The use of craniofacial superimposition for disaster victim identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Caroline; Lofthouse, Amy

    2015-07-01

    Skull-to-face comparison is utilised for human identification where there is a suspected identity and the usual methods of identification, such as DNA or dental comparison, are not possible or practical. This research aimed to compare the reliability of manual and computerised craniofacial superimposition techniques and to establish the application of these techniques for disaster victim identification, where there may be a large database of passport-style images, such as the MPUB Interpol database. Twenty skulls (10 females; 10 males) were utilised from the William Bass Skeletal Collection at the University of Tennessee and compared to face pools of 20 face photographs of similar sex, age and ethnic group. A traditional manual photographic method and a new 3D computer-based method were used. The results suggested that profile and three-quarter views of the ante-mortem face were the most valuable for craniofacial superimposition. However, the poor identification rate achieved using images in frontal view suggests that the MPUB Interpol database would not be optimal for disaster victim identification, and passport-style images do not provide enough distinguishing facial detail. This suggests that multiple ante-mortem images with a variety of facial expression should be utilised for identification purposes. There was no significant difference in success between the manual and computer methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hippo Pathway: An Emerging Regulator of Craniofacial and Dental Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Martin, J F

    2017-10-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Hippo signaling pathway is a vital regulator of organ size that fine-tunes cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. A number of important studies have revealed critical roles of Hippo signaling and its effectors Yap (Yes-associated protein) and Taz (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif) in tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration, as well as in tumorigenesis. In addition, recent studies have shown evidence of crosstalk between the Hippo pathway and other key signaling pathways, such as Wnt signaling, that not only regulates developmental processes but also contributes to disease pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the major discoveries in the field of Hippo signaling and what has been learned about its regulation and crosstalk with other signaling pathways, with a particular focus on recent findings involving the Hippo-Yap pathway in craniofacial and tooth development. New and exciting studies of the Hippo pathway are anticipated that will significantly improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of human craniofacial and tooth development and disease and will ultimately lead to the development of new therapies.

  14. Cranial Osteogenesis and Suture Morphology in Xenopus laevis: A Unique Model System for Studying Craniofacial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Bethany J.; Liu, Karen J.; Kwan, Matthew D.; Quarto, Natalina; Longaker, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Background The tremendous diversity in vertebrate skull formation illustrates the range of forms and functions generated by varying genetic programs. Understanding the molecular basis for this variety may provide us with insights into mechanisms underlying human craniofacial anomalies. In this study, we provide evidence that the anuran Xenopus laevis can be developed as a simplified model system for the study of cranial ossification and suture patterning. The head structures of Xenopus undergo dramatic remodelling during metamorphosis; as a result, tadpole morphology differs greatly from the adult bony skull. Because of the extended larval period in Xenopus, the molecular basis of these alterations has not been well studied. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined late larval, metamorphosing, and post-metamorphosis froglet stages in intact and sectioned animals. Using micro-computed tomography (μCT) and tissue staining of the frontoparietal bone and surrounding cartilage, we observed that bone formation initiates from lateral ossification centers, proceeding from posterior-to-anterior. Histological analyses revealed midline abutting and posterior overlapping sutures. To determine the mechanisms underlying the large-scale cranial changes, we examined proliferation, apoptosis, and proteinase activity during remodelling of the skull roof. We found that tissue turnover during metamorphosis could be accounted for by abundant matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, at least in part by MMP-1 and -13. Conclusion A better understanding of the dramatic transformation from cartilaginous head structures to bony skull during Xenopus metamorphosis may provide insights into tissue remodelling and regeneration in other systems. Our studies provide some new molecular insights into this process. PMID:19156194

  15. Review of In Vivo Bone Strain Studies and Finite Element Models of the Zygomatic Complex in Humans and Nonhuman Primates: Implications for Clinical Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Felippe Bevilacqua; Freire, Alexandre Rodrigues; Cláudia Rossi, Ana; Ledogar, Justin A; Smith, Amanda L; Dechow, Paul C; Strait, David S; Voigt, Tilman; Ross, Callum F

    2016-12-01

    The craniofacial skeleton is often described in the clinical literature as being comprised of vertical bony pillars, which transmit forces from the toothrow to the neurocranium as axial compressive stresses, reinforced transversely by buttresses. Here, we review the literature on bony microarchitecture, in vivo bone strain, and finite-element modeling of the facial skeleton of humans and nonhuman primates to address questions regarding the structural and functional existence of facial pillars and buttresses. Available bone material properties data do not support the existence of pillars and buttresses in humans or Sapajus apella. Deformation regimes in the zygomatic complex emphasize bending and shear, therefore conceptualizing the zygomatic complex of humans or nonhuman primates as a pillar obscures its patterns of stress, strain, and deformation. Human fossil relatives and chimpanzees exhibit strain regimes corroborating the existence of a canine-frontal pillar, but the notion of a zygomatic pillar has no support. The emerging consensus on patterns of strain and deformation in finite element models (FEMs) of the human facial skeleton corroborates hypotheses in the clinical literature regarding zygomatic complex function, and provide new insights into patterns of failure of titanium and resorbable plates in experimental studies. It is suggested that the "pillar and buttress" model of human craniofacial skeleton function be replaced with FEMs that more accurately and precisely represent in vivo function, and which can serve as the basis for future research into implants used in restoration of occlusal function and fracture repair. Anat Rec, 299:1753-1778, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging guidance ... limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided procedure ...

  17. Influence of maxillary posterior discrepancy on upper molar vertical position and facial vertical dimensions in subjects with or without skeletal open bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliaga-Del Castillo, Aron; Pérez-Vargas, Luis Fernando; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives: To determine the influence of maxillary posterior discrepancy on upper molar vertical position and dentofacial vertical dimensions in individuals with or without skeletal open bite (SOB). Materials and methods: Pre-treatment lateral cephalograms of 139 young adults were examined. The sample was divided into eight groups categorized according to their sagittal and vertical skeletal facial growth pattern and maxillary posterior discrepancy (present or absent). Upper molar vertical position, overbite, lower anterior facial height and facial height ratio were measured. Independent t-test was performed to determine differences between the groups considering maxillary posterior discrepancy. Principal component analysis and MANCOVA test were also used. Results: No statistically significant differences were found comparing the molar vertical position according to maxillary posterior discrepancy for the SOB Class I group or the group with adequate overbite. Significant differences were found in SOB Class II and Class III groups. In addition, an increased molar vertical position was found in the group without posterior discrepancy. Limitations: Some variables closely related with the individual’s intrinsic craniofacial development that could influence the evaluated vertical measurements were not considered. Conclusions and implications: Overall maxillary posterior discrepancy does not appear to have a clear impact on upper molar vertical position or facial vertical dimensions. Only the SOB Class III group without posterior discrepancy had a significant increased upper molar vertical position. PMID:26385786

  18. Influence of maxillary posterior discrepancy on upper molar vertical position and facial vertical dimensions in subjects with or without skeletal open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola-Guillén, Luis Ernesto; Aliaga-Del Castillo, Aron; Pérez-Vargas, Luis Fernando; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    To determine the influence of maxillary posterior discrepancy on upper molar vertical position and dentofacial vertical dimensions in individuals with or without skeletal open bite (SOB). Pre-treatment lateral cephalograms of 139 young adults were examined. The sample was divided into eight groups categorized according to their sagittal and vertical skeletal facial growth pattern and maxillary posterior discrepancy (present or absent). Upper molar vertical position, overbite, lower anterior facial height and facial height ratio were measured. Independent t-test was performed to determine differences between the groups considering maxillary posterior discrepancy. Principal component analysis and MANCOVA test were also used. No statistically significant differences were found comparing the molar vertical position according to maxillary posterior discrepancy for the SOB Class I group or the group with adequate overbite. Significant differences were found in SOB Class II and Class III groups. In addition, an increased molar vertical position was found in the group without posterior discrepancy. Some variables closely related with the individual's intrinsic craniofacial development that could influence the evaluated vertical measurements were not considered. Overall maxillary posterior discrepancy does not appear to have a clear impact on upper molar vertical position or facial vertical dimensions. Only the SOB Class III group without posterior discrepancy had a significant increased upper molar vertical position. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. 30-year International Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery Partnership: Evolution from the "Third World" Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jordan W; Skirpan, Jan; Stanek, Beata; Kowalczyk, Maciej; Bartlett, Scott P

    2016-04-01

    Craniofacial diseases constitute an important component of the surgical disease burden in low- and middle-income countries. The consideration to introduce craniofacial surgery into such settings poses different questions, risks, and challenges compared with cleft or other forms of plastic surgery. We report the evolution, innovations, and challenges of a 30-year international craniofacial surgery partnership. We retrospectively report a partnership between surgeons at the Uniwersytecki Szpital Dzieciecy in Krakow, Poland, and a North American craniofacial surgeon. We studied patient conditions, treatment patterns, and associated complications, as well as program advancements and limitations as perceived by surgeons, patient families, and hospital administrators. Since partnership inception in 1986, the complexity of cases performed increased gradually, with the first intracranial case performed in 1995. In the most recent 10-year period (2006-2015), 85 patients have been evaluated, with most common diagnoses of Apert syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and single-suture craniosynostosis. In the same period, 55 major surgical procedures have been undertaken, with LeFort III midface distraction, posterior vault distraction, and frontoorbital advancement performed most frequently. Key innovations have been the employment of craniofacial distraction osteogenesis, the use of Internet communication and digital photography, and increased understanding of how craniofacial morphology may improve in the absence of surgical intervention. Ongoing challenges include prohibitive training pathways for pediatric plastic surgeons, difficulty in coordinating care with surgeons in other institutions, and limited medical and material resources. Safe craniofacial surgery can be introduced and sustained in a resource-limited setting through an international partnership.

  20. Stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from the iliac crest or intraoral jaw bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Min; Byun, June-Ho; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Sung, Iel-Yong; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Park, Bong-Wook

    2015-12-30

    Jaw bone and iliac bone are the most frequently used autologous bone sources for dental implant placement in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges. However, the comparative long-term stability of these two autologous bone grafts have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from either the iliac crest or the intraoral jaw bone for severely atrophic alveolar ridges. In total, 36 patients (21 men and 15 women) were selected and a retrospective medical record review was performed. We compared the residual increased bone height of the grafted bone, peri-implantitis incidence, radiological density in newly generated bones (HU values), and implant stability using resonance frequency analysis (ISQ values) between the two autologous bone graft groups. Both autologous bone graft groups (iliac bone and jaw bone) showed favorable clinical results, with similar long-term implant stability and overall implant survival rates. However, the grafted iliac bone exhibited more prompt vertical loss than the jaw bone, in particular, the largest vertical bone reduction was observed within 6 months after the bone graft. In contrast, the jaw bone graft group exhibited a slower vertical bone resorption rate and a lower incidence of peri-implantitis during long-term follow-up than the iliac bone graft group. These findings demonstrate that simultaneous dental implantation with the autologous intraoral jaw bone graft method may be reliable for the reconstruction of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges.

  1. Fibulin-5 deficiency causes developmental defect of premaxillary bone in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kazuo, E-mail: knoda@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Nakamura, Tomoyuki [Department of Pharmacology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Komatsu, Yoshihiro [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate Program in Genes and Development, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-10-23

    Craniofacial sutures govern the shape of the craniofacial skeleton during postnatal development. The differentiation of suture mesenchymal cells to osteoblasts is precisely regulated in part by signaling through cell surface receptors that interact with extracellular proteins. Here we report that fibulin-5, a key extracellular matrix protein, is important for craniofacial skeletal development in mice. Fibulin-5 is deposited as a fibrous matrix in cranial neural crest-derived mesenchymal tissues, including craniofacial sutures. Fibulin-5-null mice show decreased premaxillary bone outgrowth during postnatal stages. While premaxillo-maxillary suture mesenchymal cells in fibulin-5-null mice were capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, suture cells in mutant mice were less proliferative. Our study provides the first evidence that fibulin-5 is indispensable for the regulation of facial suture mesenchymal cell proliferation required for craniofacial skeletal morphogenesis. - Highlights: • Fibulin-5 is deposited in cranial neural crest-derived mesenchymal tissues. • Fibulin-5-null mice show decreased premaxillary bone growth during postnatal stage. • Fibulin-5 is indispensable for facial suture mesenchymal cell proliferation.

  2. [Aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandible. Apropos of a case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiri, F; Janah, A; Chekkouri, I A; Benchekroun, Y

    1995-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign lesion, rarely found in the craniofacial region and exceptionally in the mandible. One previously unreported case originally in the mandible is presented with a review of the literature. The authors insist on pathological diagnostic and therapeutic characteristics.

  3. Functional coupling constrains craniofacial diversification in Lake Tanganyika cichlids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masahito; Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-01-01

    Functional coupling, where a single morphological trait performs multiple functions, is a universal feature of organismal design. Theory suggests that functional coupling may constrain the rate of phenotypic evolution, yet empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. In fish, the evolutionary transition from guarding the eggs on a sandy/rocky substrate (i.e. substrate guarding) to mouthbrooding introduces a novel function to the craniofacial system and offers an ideal opportunity to test the functional coupling hypothesis. Using a combination of geometric morphometrics and a recently developed phylogenetic comparative method, we found that head morphology evolution was 43% faster in substrate guarding species than in mouthbrooding species. Furthermore, for species in which females were solely responsible for mouthbrooding the males had a higher rate of head morphology evolution than in those with bi-parental mouthbrooding. Our results support the hypothesis that adaptations resulting in functional coupling constrain phenotypic evolution. PMID:25948565

  4. The emerging roles of ribosome biogenesis in craniofacial development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam P Ross

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are a transient, migratory cell population, which originates during neurulation at the neural folds and contributes to the majority of tissues, including the mesenchymal structures of the craniofacial skeleton. The deregulation of the complex developmental processes that guide migration, proliferation, and differentiation of neural crest cells may result in a wide range of pathological conditions grouped together as neurocristopathies. Recently, due to their multipotent properties neural crest stem cells have received considerable attention as a possible source for stem cell based regenerative therapies. This exciting prospect underlines the need to further explore the developmental programs that guide neural crest cell differentiation. This review explores the particular importance of ribosome biogenesis defects in this context since a specific interface between ribosomopathies and neurocristopathies exists as evidenced by disorders such as Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome and Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

  5. Craniofacial Microsomia: Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Bilateral Congenital Cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, U D; Adhikari, S

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Patients with hemifacial microsomia and epibulbar dermoids are said to have Goldenhar syndrome (GHS). Four-month-old boy with whitish pupillary reflex presented with the features of GHS in pediatric ophthalmology clinic. The child had ocular and auricular manifestations. There were no vertebral anomalies, but he had bilateral congenital cataract. The peculiarity of this case is the presence of the bilateral total congenital cataract, in association with CFM. There is absence of epibulbar dermoid or lipodermoid in the eyes, although the child had features of GHS. In addition to it, anesthetic intubation was smooth in this case. Any case diagnosed with CFM and/or GHS needs treatment through multidisciplinary approach, consultation in ophthalmology department is one of them.

  6. Craniofacial Microsomia: Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Bilateral Congenital Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. D. Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial microsomia (CFM includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Patients with hemifacial microsomia and epibulbar dermoids are said to have Goldenhar syndrome (GHS. Four-month-old boy with whitish pupillary reflex presented with the features of GHS in pediatric ophthalmology clinic. The child had ocular and auricular manifestations. There were no vertebral anomalies, but he had bilateral congenital cataract. The peculiarity of this case is the presence of the bilateral total congenital cataract, in association with CFM. There is absence of epibulbar dermoid or lipodermoid in the eyes, although the child had features of GHS. In addition to it, anesthetic intubation was smooth in this case. Any case diagnosed with CFM and/or GHS needs treatment through multidisciplinary approach, consultation in ophthalmology department is one of them.

  7. Brain, Craniofacial, and Dental Lesions of a Free-ranging Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Implicated in a Human Attack in Minnesota, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabenlander, Marc; Stepaniuk, Kevin; Carstensen, Michelle; Armién, Aníbal G

    2016-01-01

    We describe significant brain, craniofacial, and dental lesions in a free-ranging wolf (Canis lupus) involved in a human attack. On postmortem examination, the wolf presented asymmetric atrophy and bone remodeling affecting the mandible, incisive, maxilla, lacrimal, palatine, frontal, and ethmoid bones. There was an asymmetrical skeletal malocclusion and dental abnormalities including rotated, malpositioned, partially erupted teeth, and an odontogenic cyst associated with an unerupted canine tooth. Brain changes were bilateral loss and atrophy of extensive cortex regions including olfactory bulb, peduncles, and tract, and the frontal lobe. We highlight the relevance of a thorough postmortem examination of wildlife to elucidate disease-based abnormal behavior as the reason for human-animal conflict.

  8. Biomedical discovery acceleration, with applications to craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Sonia M; Tipney, Hannah; Feng, Weiguo; Baumgartner, William A; Kasliwal, Priyanka; Schuyler, Ronald P; Williams, Trevor; Spritz, Richard A; Hunter, Lawrence

    2009-03-01

    The profusion of high-throughput instruments and the explosion of new results in the scientific literature, particularly in molecular biomedicine, is both a blessing and a curse to the bench researcher. Even knowledgeable and experienced scientists can benefit from computational tools that help navigate this vast and rapidly evolving terrain. In this paper, we describe a novel computational approach to this challenge, a knowledge-based system that combines reading, reasoning, and reporting methods to facilitate analysis of experimental data. Reading methods extract information from external resources, either by parsing structured data or using biomedical language processing to extract information from unstructured data, and track knowledge provenance. Reasoning methods enrich the knowledge that results from reading by, for example, noting two genes that are annotated to the same ontology term or database entry. Reasoning is also used to combine all sources into a knowledge network that represents the integration of all sorts of relationships between a pair of genes, and to calculate a combined reliability score. Reporting methods combine the knowledge network with a congruent network constructed from experimental data and visualize the combined network in a tool that facilitates the knowledge-based analysis of that data. An implementation of this approach, called the Hanalyzer, is demonstrated on a large-scale gene expression array dataset relevant to craniofacial development. The use of the tool was critical in the creation of hypotheses regarding the roles of four genes never previously characterized as involved in craniofacial development; each of these hypotheses was validated by further experimental work.

  9. Biomedical discovery acceleration, with applications to craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M Leach

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The profusion of high-throughput instruments and the explosion of new results in the scientific literature, particularly in molecular biomedicine, is both a blessing and a curse to the bench researcher. Even knowledgeable and experienced scientists can benefit from computational tools that help navigate this vast and rapidly evolving terrain. In this paper, we describe a novel computational approach to this challenge, a knowledge-based system that combines reading, reasoning, and reporting methods to facilitate analysis of experimental data. Reading methods extract information from external resources, either by parsing structured data or using biomedical language processing to extract information from unstructured data, and track knowledge provenance. Reasoning methods enrich the knowledge that results from reading by, for example, noting two genes that are annotated to the same ontology term or database entry. Reasoning is also used to combine all sources into a knowledge network that represents the integration of all sorts of relationships between a pair of genes, and to calculate a combined reliability score. Reporting methods combine the knowledge network with a congruent network constructed from experimental data and visualize the combined network in a tool that facilitates the knowledge-based analysis of that data. An implementation of this approach, called the Hanalyzer, is demonstrated on a large-scale gene expression array dataset relevant to craniofacial development. The use of the tool was critical in the creation of hypotheses regarding the roles of four genes never previously characterized as involved in craniofacial development; each of these hypotheses was validated by further experimental work.

  10. Systematic Reviews in Craniofacial Trauma-Strengths and Weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Cedric; Januszyk, Michael; Wan, Derrick C; Momeni, Arash

    2016-09-01

    Despite substantial advances in the management of craniofacial trauma, numerous clinical questions remain. These are increasingly being answered using systematic reviews (SRs). However, caution is warranted as their validity and role in influencing clinical practice has been called into question. A PubMed search was performed in October 2014 to identify SRs published up to and including September 2014 in 35 scientific journals. Two authors independently reviewed the literature and extracted data from included studies. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Assessment of multiple systematic reviews (AMSTAR) was used to determine the quality of SRs. The initial search retrieved 3080 articles of which 3051 articles were excluded after screening title and abstract. After full-text review of the remaining 29 articles, 3 additional articles were excluded, thus, leaving 26 SRs for final analysis. Regression analysis demonstrated that the overall number of published SRs increased significantly throughout the period analyzed (P = 0.022). The median AMSTAR score of all SRs was 4.5, consistent with a "poor-to-fair" quality. The interobserver agreement was high, as evidenced by a mean κ of 0.91. Although there appeared to be a trend toward an increase in AMSTAR score by year over the period analyzed, this failed to reach statistical significance in terms of median (P = 0.36) or absolute (P = 0.26) counts. A tremendous opportunity exists for improvements in the quality of SRs focusing on craniofacial trauma. In addition to familiarizing authors with quality criteria for SRs, adoption of strict reporting criteria by scientific journals may result in long-term improvements in the quality of reporting.

  11. Postnatal craniofacial ontogeny in neandertals and modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frank L'Engle; Cofran, Zachary

    2016-03-01

    Neandertals and humans are closely related but differ noticeably in adult morphology. Previous work has been equivocal as to the contribution of postnatal growth and development to these differences. Due to disparate preservation, most analyses focus on specific anatomies, reconstructed fossils, or limited sample sizes. The objective of this research is to highlight the importance of postnatal growth in expressing Neandertal-human distinctions in the craniofacial skeleton, using a large and unreconstructed Neandertal sample. A resampling approach is utilized to compare relative size change in 20 craniofacial dimensions between Neandertals (n = 42) and humans (n = 262). The large number of immature Neandertal samples within and between dental stages provides the necessary variation to test for growth differences. Nested resampling using human-human comparisons assesses the likelihood of observing human-Neandertal growth differences under the null hypothesis of similar ontogenetic variation. Humans and Neandertals undergo comparable levels of overall size change. However, we identify growth differences for a number of traits, helping explain some of the unique features of this fossil taxon. Nested resampling shows it is unlikely that a Neandertal-like maturation would be observed in a random ontogenetic sample of humans. Growth during adolescence appears to be fundamental in the expression of some Neandertal anatomies. Neandertal upper facial and nasal breadths appear to have expanded rapidly after puberty to account for differences between preadolescents and adults, and Neandertals and humans. Mandibular growth differences may relate to anterior tooth use to process foods and paramastication during Neandertal maturation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of ICD-9-CM codes for craniofacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquetti, Daniela V; Saltzman, Babette S; Vivaldi, Daniela; Pimenta, Luiz A; Hing, Anne V; Cassell, Cynthia H; Starr, Jacqueline R; Heike, Carrie L

    2012-12-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a congenital condition characterized by microtia and mandibular underdevelopment. Healthcare databases and birth defects surveillance programs could be used to improve knowledge of CFM. However, no specific International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code exists for this condition, which makes standardized data collection challenging. Our aim was to evaluate the validity of existing ICD-9-CM codes to identify individuals with CFM. Study sample eligibility criteria were developed by an expert panel and matched to 11 ICD-9-CM codes. We queried hospital discharge data from two craniofacial centers and identified a total of 12,254 individuals who had ≥1 potentially CFM-related code(s). We reviewed all (n = 799) medical records identified at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and 500 randomly selected records at Seattle Children's Hospital (SCH). Individuals were classified as a CFM case or non-case. Thirty-two individuals (6%) at SCH and 93 (12%) at UNC met the CFM eligibility criteria. At both centers, 59% of cases and 95% of non-cases had only one code assigned. At both centers, the most frequent codes were 744.23 (microtia), 754.0 and 756.0 (nonspecific codes), and the code 744.23 had a positive predictive value (PPV) >80% and sensitivity >70%. The code 754.0 had a sensitivity of 3% (PPV <1%) at SCH and 36% (PPV = 5%) at UNC, whereas 756.0 had a sensitivity of 38% (PPV = 5%) at SCH and 18% (PPV = 26%) at UNC. These findings suggest the need for a specific CFM code to facilitate CFM surveillance and research. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effect of growth hormone treatment on craniofacial growth in children: Idiopathic short stature versus growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Hwan; Fan, Dong; Hwang, Mi-Soo; Lee, Hee-Kyung; Hwang, Chung-Ju

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have evaluated craniofacial growth in boys and girls with idiopathic short stature (ISS) during growth hormone (GH) treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GH treatment on craniofacial growth in children with ISS, compared with those with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). This study included 36 children (mean age, 11.3 ± 1.8 years) who were treated with GH consecutively. Lateral cephalograms were analyzed before and 2 years after start of GH treatment. There were no significant differences in age and sex between ISS and GHD groups and the reference group from semilongitudinal study (10 boys and 8 girls from each group). Before treatment, girls with ISS showed a skeletal Class II facial profile compared with the GHD and reference groups (p = 0.003). During GH treatment, the amount of maxillary length increased beyond norm in the ISS and GHD groups in boys (p = 0.035) > 3 standard deviation score (SDS). Meanwhile, mandibular ramus height (p = 0.001), corpus length, and total mandibular length (p = 0.007 for both) increased more in girls with ISS than in girls with GHD. Lower and total anterior facial heights increased more in girls with ISS than in girls with GHD (p = 0.021 and p = 0.007, respectively), > 7-11 SDS. GH should be administered carefully when treating girls with ISS, because GH treatment has great effects on vertical overgrowth of the mandible and can result in longer face. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A comparative study of the pharyngeal airway space, measured with cone beam computed tomography, between patients with different craniofacial morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, Eva; Zamora, Natalia; Tarazona, Beatriz; Gandia, Jose L; Paredes, Vanessa

    2015-10-01

    The present study aims to determine any existing association between airway dimensions, measured with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and the different patient craniofacial morphologies. Sixty CBCT (Dental Picasso Master 3D) images, from patients treated at the Orthodontics Master at Valencia University were selected. The program InVivoDental 5.1 was used to visualize sections, analyze three-dimensional images, and perform airway measurements in the three planes of the space. Intra- and interobserver error methods were recorded. After that, measurements at three different levels of the airway (upper, medium, lower) were taken, in both the anteroposterior and transversal directions of the airway space. The area (mm(2)) of the airway space at the three levels was also measured. In the anteroposterior airway measurements, there were differences between the measurements by level. The magnitude of these differences depended on the skeletal pattern of the individual. In the transversal airway measurements and in the area airway measurements, there were no differences according to the skeletal pattern. However, in the transversal direction, measurements in the lower level were significantly higher than in the superior level in all cases. When measuring the area, significantly higher measurements in the upper level were recorded. The homogeneity between medium and lower levels decreased gradually from class I to class III subjects. No statistically significant results were observed that related the anteroposterior and vertical skeletal craniofacial morphology with airway dimensions, although some specific associations have been detected for certain airway levels or for pattern combinations. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Acquired vertical accommodative vergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Scharff, Ulrike; Kommerell, Guntram; Lagrèze, Wolf A

    2008-03-08

    Vertical accommodative vergence is an unusual synkinesis in which vertical vergence is modulated together with accommodation. It results from a supranuclear miswiring of the network normally conveying accommodative convergence. So far, it is unknown whether this condition is congenital or acquired. We identified an otherwise healthy girl who gradually developed vertical accommodative vergence between five to 13 years of age. Change of accommodation by 3 diopters induced a vertical vergence of 10 degrees. This observation proves that the miswiring responsible for vertical accommodative vergence must not necessarily be congenital, but can be acquired. The cause and the mechanism leading to vertical accommodative vergence are yet unknown.

  16. PATHOGENESIS OF METHANOL-INDUCED CRANIOFACIAL DEFECTS IN C57BL/6J MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Methanol administered to C57BL/6J mice during gastrulation causes severe craniofacial dysmorphology. We describe dysmorphogenesis, cell death, cell cycle assessment, and effects on development of cranial ganglia and nerves observed following administration of methanol...

  17. 76 FR 20693 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Emphasis Panel; Review RFA-DE-12-001, NIDCR Behavioral or Social Intervention Planning and Pilot Data Grant..., National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, One Democracy Plaza, Room 670, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  18. 77 FR 29673 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal..., [email protected] . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.121, Oral Diseases and...

  19. Identifying craniofacial features associated with prenatal exposure to androgens and testing their relationship with brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marečková, Klára; Chakravarty, Mallar M; Lawrence, Claire; Leonard, Gabriel; Perusse, Daniel; Perron, Michel; Pike, Bruce G; Richer, Louis; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš

    2015-11-01

    We used magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained in same-sex and opposite-sex dizygotic twins (n = 119, 8 years of age) to study possible effects of prenatal androgens on craniofacial features. Using a principal component analysis of 19 craniofacial landmarks placed on the MR images, we identified a principal component capturing craniofacial features that distinguished females with a presumed differential exposure to prenatal androgens by virtue of having a male (vs. a female) co-twin (Cohen's d = 0.76). Subsequently, we tested the possibility that this craniofacial "signature" of prenatal exposure to androgens predicts brain size, a known sexually dimorphic trait. In an independent sample of female adolescents (singletons; n = 462), we found that the facial signature predicts up to 8% of variance in brain size. These findings are consistent with the organizational effects of androgens on brain development and suggest that the facial signature derived in this study could complement other indirect measures of prenatal exposure to androgens.

  20. Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensman, H.; Goransson, H.; Leuchowius, K.J.; Stromberg, S.; Ponten, F.; Isaksson, A.; Rutteman, G.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074076663; Heldin, N.; Pejler, G.; Hellmen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas Journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment Publisher Springer Netherlands ISSN 0167-6806 (Print) 1573-7217 (Online) Issue Volume 118, Number 2 / November, 2009 Category Preclinical Study DOI

  1. Airway Management of Patients With Craniofacial Abnormalities: 10-year Experience at a Teaching Hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lun Chen

    2009-09-01

    Conclusion: Managing the airway of patients with craniofacial abnormalities can potentially be difficult. It should be carried out by experienced anesthesiologists, with assistance from an otolaryngologist when necessary. A variety of different airway devices should be available if needed.

  2. The FaceBase Consortium: A comprehensive program to facilitate craniofacial research

    OpenAIRE

    Hochheiser, Harry; Aronow, Bruce J.; Artinger, Kristin; Beaty, Terri H; Brinkley, James F.; Chai, Yang; Clouthier, David; Cunningham, Michael L.; Dixon, Michael; Donahue, Leah Rae; Scott E Fraser; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Iwata, Junichi; Klein, Ophir; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    The FaceBase Consortium consists of ten interlinked research and technology projects whose goal is to generate craniofacial research data and technology for use by the research community through a central data management and integrated bioinformatics hub. Funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and currently focused on studying the development of the middle region of the face, the Consortium will produce comprehensive datasets of global gene expression pat...

  3. 3-Dimensional Morphologic Analysis of the Craniofacial Skeletal Complex Using Geometry-Based Superimposition and Normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Jay Hyuck

    2013-01-01

    Introduction : Cephalometrics is a radiographic technique used to analyze craniofacial structures for diagnostic or analytic purposes. However, conventional cephalometrics has many limitations, including the fact that it is entirely landmark-dependent and based on a 2-dimensional image. In previous studies, Fourier descriptors have been used to describe part of the craniofacial structure. However, these studies are insufficient providing a complete set of information to fully analyze craniof...

  4. Sagittal craniofacial growth evaluated on children dry skulls using V2 and V3 canal openings as references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnet, J-Cl; Lombardi, T; Lutz, J-Ch; Meyer, P; Kahn, J-L

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between standard cephalometric landmarks and lines and those using ovale, rotundum, greater palatine and infra-orbital foramina as references. Thirty-four children dry skulls, 19 males and 15 females aged 0-6 years, were examined by computed tomography scanning. The classical cephalometric dimensions of skull base were measured from middle sagittal plane crossing over basion, nasion and sella turcica. Those of hard palate (maxilla and palatine bone) were measured from axial plane intersecting posterior nasal spine and anterior nasal spine. The dimensions between ovale and rotundum foramina, rotundum and infra-orbital foramina, greater palatine and infra-orbital foramina were determined by using constructed tomographic planes enclosing these different foramina. Biostatistical analysis using partial correlations showed that the linear variables with nerve canal openings as references are strongly related to length of both the skull base and of the hard palate. The results highlight the importance of the nerve canal openings of skull base and bone facial components in normal or pathologic craniofacial growth investigations.

  5. Body Image and Quality of Life in Adolescents With Craniofacial Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crerand, Canice E; Sarwer, David B; Kazak, Anne E; Clarke, Alexandra; Rumsey, Nichola

    2017-01-01

      To evaluate body image in adolescents with and without craniofacial conditions and to examine relationships between body image and quality of life.   Case-control design.   A pediatric hospital's craniofacial center and primary care practices.   Seventy adolescents with visible craniofacial conditions and a demographically matched sample of 42 adolescents without craniofacial conditions.   Adolescents completed measures of quality of life and body image including satisfaction with weight, facial and overall appearance, investment in appearance (importance of appearance to self-worth), and body image disturbance (appearance-related distress and impairment in functioning).   Adolescents with craniofacial conditions reported lower appearance investment (P appearance, greater body image disturbance, and lower weight satisfaction compared with males (P body image disturbance was associated with lower quality of life (P body image disturbance, or satisfaction with appearance.   Body image and quality of life in adolescents with craniofacial conditions are similar to nonaffected youth. Relationships between body image and quality of life emphasize that appearance perceptions are important to adolescents' well-being regardless of whether they have a facial disfigurement. Investment in one's appearance may explain variations in body image satisfaction and serve as an intervention target, particularly for females.

  6. A novel skull registration based on global and local deformations for craniofacial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qingqiong; Zhou, Mingquan; Shui, Wuyang; Wu, Zhongke; Ji, Yuan; Bai, Ruyi

    2011-05-20

    Craniofacial reconstruction is important in forensic identification. It aims to estimate a facial appearance for human skeletal remains using the relationship between the soft tissue and the underlying bone structure. Various computerized methods have been developed in recent decades. An effective way is to deform a reference skull to the discovered skull, and then apply the same deformation to the skin associated with the reference skull to provide an approximate face for the discovered skull. For this method, the better the two skulls match each other, the more face-like the reconstructed skin surface will be. In this paper, we present a novel skull registration method that can match the two skulls closely, so as to improve the accuracy of the reconstruction. It combines both global and local deformations. A generic thin-plate spline (TPS)-based deformation, which is global, is applied first to roughly align the two skulls based on two groups of manually defined landmarks. Afterwards, the two skulls are largely matched, except some regions, on which some new landmarks are automatically marked. A compact support radial basis functions (CSRBF)-based deformation, which is local, will then be performed on these regions to adjust the initial alignment of the two skulls. Such adjustment can be repeatedly implemented until the two skulls have optimal alignment. In addition, all the skulls and face involved in the registration are represented by their single outer surfaces to facilitate the reconstruction procedure. The experiments demonstrate that our method can create a plausible face even when the reference skull is very different from the discovered skull. As a result, we can make full use of our database to provide multiple estimates for a principle components analysis (PCA) for the final reconstruction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Image fusion in craniofacial virtual reality modeling based on CT and 3dMD photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Pengfei; Yu, Hongbo; Cheng, Huanchong; Shen, Shunyao; Shen, Steve G F

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of building a craniofacial virtual reality model by image fusion of 3-dimensional (3D) CT models and 3 dMD stereophotogrammetric facial surface. A CT scan and stereophotography were performed. The 3D CT models were reconstructed by Materialise Mimics software, and the stereophotogrammetric facial surface was reconstructed by 3 dMD patient software. All 3D CT models were exported as Stereo Lithography file format, and the 3 dMD model was exported as Virtual Reality Modeling Language file format. Image registration and fusion were performed in Mimics software. Genetic algorithm was used for precise image fusion alignment with minimum error. The 3D CT models and the 3 dMD stereophotogrammetric facial surface were finally merged into a single file and displayed using Deep Exploration software. Errors between the CT soft tissue model and 3 dMD facial surface were also analyzed. Virtual model based on CT-3 dMD image fusion clearly showed the photorealistic face and bone structures. Image registration errors in virtual face are mainly located in bilateral cheeks and eyeballs, and the errors are more than 1.5 mm. However, the image fusion of whole point cloud sets of CT and 3 dMD is acceptable with a minimum error that is less than 1 mm. The ease of use and high reliability of CT-3 dMD image fusion allows the 3D virtual head to be an accurate, realistic, and widespread tool, and has a great benefit to virtual face model.

  8. an apparently aggressive craniofacial osteo-dysplastic lesion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-30

    Jul 30, 2013 ... contrast media.Exophytically, there was extensive destruction and obliteration of the frontal bone. Expansile growth of the osseous mass was beyond the cortical confines of the frontal bone (Figure. 3).Inferiorly, it extended to the right orbital roof causing compression and inferior displacement of the orbital.

  9. Vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Krivospitski, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Maksimov, Vasili [Miass, RU; Halstead, Richard [Rohnert Park, CA; Grahov, Jurij [Miass, RU

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  10. Restoration of a Critical Mandibular Bone Defect Using Human Alveolar Bone-Derived Stem Cells and Porous Nano-HA/Collagen/PLA Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal bone defects occur in a wide variety of clinical situations. Adult stem cell- and biomaterial-based bone tissue regeneration are a promising alternative to natural bone grafts. Recent evidence has demonstrated that two populations of adult bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs can be distinguished based on their embryonic origins. These BMSCs are not interchangeable, as bones preferentially heal using cells that share the same embryonic origin. However, the feasibility of tissue engineering using human craniofacial BMSCs was unclear. The goal of this study was to explore human craniofacial BMSC-based therapy for the treatment of localized mandibular defects using a standardized, minimally invasive procedure. The BMSCs’ identity was confirmed. Scanning electron microscopy, a cell proliferation assay, and supernatant detection indicated that the nHAC/PLA provided a suitable environment for aBMSCs. Real-time PCR and electrochemiluminescence immunoassays demonstrated that osteogenic markers were upregulated by osteogenic preinduction. Moreover, in a rabbit critical-size mandibular bone defect model, total bone formation in the nHAC/PLA + aBMSCs group was significantly higher than in the nHAC/PLA group but significantly lower than in the nHAC/PLA + preinduced aBMSCs. These findings demonstrate that this engineered bone is a valid alternative for the correction of mandibular bone defects.

  11. A multidisciplinary treatment of patients with craniofacial disorders. Own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtyńska, Elżbieta; Bączkowski, Bohdan; Przybyłowska, Dorota; Cierech, Mariusz; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta; Zadurska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Oral rehabilitation of patients with craniofacial disorders is a great challenge and needs a multidisciplinary approach. This is due to the diverse etiology of the disease and severity of changes in tissues and organs. Congenital absence of tooth germs manifested in the form of oligodontia or anodontia, the presence of persistent deciduous teeth in ectodermal dysplasia (ED), cleft lip and hard palate or cancer-induced changes in the tissues of the stomatognathic system are the most common causes of these disorders. The observed abnormalities are responsible for functional disorders of musculo-articular system, speech and chewing. In addition, noticeable adverse changes in the appearance have a huge psychological impact on patients and their well-being. Therefore, the treatment of these medical conditions should begin in childhood and comprise interdisciplinary rehabilitation, involving prosthetics and orthodontics supported by surgery, as well as speech or laryngological therapy. In this paper the interdisciplinary treatment of patients with oral hard and soft tissues disorders during ectodermal dysplasia is discussed. Early oral rehabilitation can restore lost or abnormally shaped tissues and proper functions of the masticatory system. It can also have a positive impact on further physical and psychological development of patients.

  12. Central nervous system anomalies in craniofacial microsomia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkema, R W; Caron, C J J M; Wolvius, E B; Dunaway, D J; Forrest, C R; Padwa, B L; Koudstaal, M J

    2018-01-01

    Extracraniofacial anomalies, including central nervous system (CNS) anomalies, may occur in craniofacial microsomia (CFM). This systematic review was performed to provide an overview of the literature on the prevalence and types of CNS anomalies and developmental disorders in CFM, in order to improve the recognition and possible treatment of these anomalies. A systematic search was conducted and data on the number of patients, patient characteristics, type and prevalence of CNS anomalies or developmental delay, and correlations between CFM and CNS anomalies were extracted. Sixteen papers were included; 11 of these described developmental disorders. The most common reported anomalies were neural tube defects, corpus callosum agenesis or hypoplasia, intracranial lipoma, Arnold-Chiari malformations, hydrocephaly, ventriculomegaly, and cerebral hypoplasia. The prevalence of CNS anomalies in CFM varied from 2% to 69%. The prevalence of developmental disorders, such as intellectual disability, language or speech developmental delay, and neuropsychomotor delay, varied from 8% to 73%. This study suggests that CNS anomalies and developmental disorders are seen in a substantial proportion of patients with CFM. Further research should focus on determining which features of CFM are correlated with CNS anomalies to allow adequate screening and timely care. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  13. The nervous system orchestrates and integrates craniofacial development: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaj eFried

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Development of a head is a dazzlingly complex process: a number of distinct cellular sources including cranial ecto- and endoderm, mesoderm and neural crest contribute to facial and other structures. In the head, an extremely fine-tuned developmental coordination of CNS, peripheral neural components, sensory organs and a musculo-skeletal apparatus occurs, which provides protection and functional integration. The face can to a large extent be considered as an assembly of sensory systems encased and functionally fused with appendages represented by jaws. Here we review how the developing brain, neurogenic placodes and peripheral nerves influence the morphogenesis of surrounding tissues as a part of various general integrative processes in the head. The mechanisms of this impact, as we understand it now, span from the targeted release of the morphogens necessary for shaping to providing a niche for cellular sources required in later development. In this review we also discuss the most recent findings and ideas related to how peripheral nerves and nerve-associated cells contribute to craniofacial development, including teeth, during the post- neural crest period and potentially in regeneration.

  14. Horizontal alveolar bone loss: A periodontal orphan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, A.; Rohini, S.; Naveen, A.; Haritha, A.; Reddy, Krishnanjeneya

    2010-01-01

    Background: Attempts to successfully regenerate lost alveolar bone have always been a clinician’s dream. Angular defects, at least, have a fairer chance, but the same cannot be said about horizontal bone loss. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of horizontal alveolar bone loss and vertical bone defects in periodontal patients; and later, to correlate it with the treatment modalities available in the literature for horizontal and vertical bone defects. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two parts. Part I was the radiographic evaluation of 150 orthopantomographs (OPGs) (of patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis and seeking periodontal care), which were digitized and read using the AutoCAD 2006 software. All the periodontitis-affected teeth were categorized as teeth with vertical defects (if the defect angle was ≤45° and defect depth was ≥3 mm) or as having horizontal bone loss. Part II of the study comprised search of the literature on treatment modalities for horizontal and vertical bone loss in four selected periodontal journals. Results: Out of the 150 OPGs studied, 54 (36%) OPGs showed one or more vertical defects. Totally, 3,371 teeth were studied, out of which horizontal bone loss was found in 3,107 (92.2%) teeth, and vertical defects were found only in 264 (7.8%) of the teeth, which was statistically significant (P<.001). Search of the selected journals revealed 477 papers have addressed the treatment modalities for vertical and horizontal types of bone loss specifically. Out of the 477 papers, 461 (96.3%) have addressed vertical bone loss, and 18 (3.7%) have addressed treatment options for horizontal bone loss. Two papers have addressed both types of bone loss and are included in both categories. Conclusion: Horizontal bone loss is more prevalent than vertical bone loss but has been sidelined by researchers as very few papers have been published on the subject of regenerative treatment modalities for

  15. Signaling by bone morphogenetic proteins directs formation of an ectodermal signaling center that regulates craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppiano, Silvia; Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S

    2007-12-01

    We previously described a signaling center, the Frontonasal Ectodermal Zone (FEZ) that regulates growth and patterning of the frontonasal process (FNP). The FEZ is comprised of FNP ectoderm flanking a boundary between Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) expression domains. Our objective was to examine BMP signaling during formation of the FEZ. We blocked BMP signaling throughout the FNP prior to FEZ formation by infecting chick embryos at stage 10 (HH10) with a replication-competent avian retrovirus encoding the BMP antagonist Noggin. We assessed gene expression patterns in the FNP 72 h after infection (approximately HH22) and observed that Shh expression was reduced or absent. In the mesenchyme, we observed that Bmp2 transcripts were absent while the Bmp4 expression domain was expanded proximally. In addition to the molecular changes, infected embryos also exhibited facial malformations at 72 and 96 h after infection suggesting that the FEZ did not form. Our data indicate that reduced cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, in the mesenchyme contributed to the phenotype that we observed. Additionally, adding exogenous SHH into the mesenchyme of RCAS-Noggin-infected embryos did not restore Bmp2 and Bmp4 to a normal pattern of expression. These data indicate that BMP signaling mediates interactions between tissues in the FNP that regulate FEZ formation; and that the correct pattern of Bmp2 and Bmp4, but not Bmp7, expression in the FNP mesenchyme requires signaling by the BMP pathway.

  16. Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Eduardo Raposo-Amaral

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate, compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7 defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5 defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5 defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5 defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6 defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2–5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01 and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06 of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30 and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88 of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone.

  17. Rapid Maxillary Expansion After Alveolar Bone Grafting With rhBMP-2 in UCLP Evaluated by Means of CBCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garib, D.; Miranda, F.; Sathler, R.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Aiello, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) after alveolar bone grafting (ABG) in complete unilateral cleft lip, alveolus and palate (UCLP) without damage to the grafted area. SETTING: Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies (HRAC), University of Sao

  18. Autologously generated tissue-engineered bone flaps for reconstruction of large mandibular defects in an ovine model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tatara, A.M.; Kretlow, J.D.; Spicer, P.P.; Lu, S.; Lam, J.; Liu, W.; Cao, Y.; Liu, G.; Jackson, J.D.; Yoo, J.J.; Atala, A.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.A.; Kasper, F.K.; Ho, T.; Demian, N.; Miller, M.J.; Wong, M.E.; Mikos, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of large craniofacial defects remains a significant clinical challenge. The complex geometry of facial bone and the lack of suitable donor tissue often hinders successful repair. One strategy to address both of these difficulties is the development of an in vivo bioreactor, where

  19. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies-USP (HRAC-USP)--part 2: pediatric dentistry and orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, José Alberto de Souza; Garib, Daniela Gamba; Oliveira, Marchini; Lauris, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga de; Neves, Lucimara Teixeira; Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Yaedú, Renato Yassutaka Faria; Soares, Simone; Pinto, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the pediatric dentistry and orthodontic treatment protocol of rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate patients performed at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies-University of São Paulo (HRAC-USP). Pediatric dentistry provides oral health information and should be able to follow the child with cleft lip and palate since the first months of life until establishment of the mixed dentition, craniofacial growth and dentition development. Orthodontic intervention starts in the mixed dentition, at 8-9 years of age, for preparing the maxillary arch for secondary bone graft procedure (SBGP). At this stage, rapid maxillary expansion is performed and a fixed palatal retainer is delivered before SBGP. When the permanent dentition is completed, comprehensive orthodontic treatment is initiated aiming tooth alignment and space closure. Maxillary permanent canines are commonly moved mesially in order to substitute absent maxillary lateral incisors. Patients with complete cleft lip and palate and poor midface growth will require orthognatic surgery for reaching adequate anteroposterior interarch relationship and good facial esthetics.

  20. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - USP (HRAC-USP) - Part 2: Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREITAS, José Alberto de Souza; GARIB, Daniela Gamba; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini; LAURIS, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; de ALMEIDA, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; NEVES, Lucimara Teixeira; TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle; YAEDÚ, Renato Yassutaka Faria; SOARES, Simone; PINTO, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the pediatric dentistry and orthodontic treatment protocol of rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate patients performed at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - University of São Paulo (HRAC-USP). Pediatric dentistry provides oral health information and should be able to follow the child with cleft lip and palate since the first months of life until establishment of the mixed dentition, craniofacial growth and dentition development. Orthodontic intervention starts in the mixed dentition, at 8-9 years of age, for preparing the maxillary arch for secondary bone graft procedure (SBGP). At this stage, rapid maxillary expansion is performed and a fixed palatal retainer is delivered before SBGP. When the permanent dentition is completed, comprehensive orthodontic treatment is initiated aiming tooth alignment and space closure. Maxillary permanent canines are commonly moved mesially in order to substitute absent maxillary lateral incisors. Patients with complete cleft lip and palate and poor midface growth will require orthognatic surgery for reaching adequate anteroposterior interarch relationship and good facial esthetics. PMID:22666849

  1. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - USP (HRAC-USP - Part 2: Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto de Souza Freitas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present the pediatric dentistry and orthodontic treatment protocol of rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate patients performed at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - University of São Paulo (HRAC-USP. Pediatric dentistry provides oral health information and should be able to follow the child with cleft lip and palate since the first months of life until establishment of the mixed dentition, craniofacial growth and dentition development. Orthodontic intervention starts in the mixed dentition, at 8-9 years of age, for preparing the maxillary arch for secondary bone graft procedure (SBGP. At this stage, rapid maxillary expansion is performed and a fixed palatal retainer is delivered before SBGP. When the permanent dentition is completed, comprehensive orthodontic treatment is initiated aiming tooth alignment and space closure. Maxillary permanent canines are commonly moved mesially in order to substitute absent maxillary lateral incisors. Patients with complete cleft lip and palate and poor midface growth will require orthognatic surgery for reaching adequate anteroposterior interarch relationship and good facial esthetics.

  2. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need to get enough calcium, vitamin D, and exercise. You should also avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds of bone problems include Low bone density and osteoporosis, which make your bones weak and ...

  3. A systematic review of the oral and craniofacial manifestations of cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcuera-Flores, José-Ramón; Casttellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Serrera-Figallo, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is an autosomal disorder. Because it affects few people in the population it is considered a rare disease, yet it is one of the most common autosomal chromosomal syndromes in humans. It entails pathognomonic alterations that affect the craniofacial and oral anatomy of patients. The aim of this study is to review these craniofacial and oral abnormalities in patients with Cri du chat syndrome. The PubMed Medline database was searched using two different strategies. First, we used "Dentistry" and "Cri du chat" as keywords; second, we used "Cri du chat" and "craniofacial." Seven articles in which the main orofacial and cranio-skeletal characteristics of patients with Cri du chat syndrome were described were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cri du Chat syndrome entails pathognomonic characteristics in the craniofacial area (epicanthus, short philtrum, and wide nasal bridge), the oral area (mandibular retrognathism and anterior open bite) and the cranial region (alterations at the cranial base angle and a small upper airway). However, more studies on larger samples are needed to specify the orofacial and craniofacial characteristics of patients with Cri du chat syndrome more accurately. Clin. Anat. 29:555-560, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The face, the future, and dental practice: how research in craniofacial biology will influence patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, G C; Brook, A H

    2014-06-01

    It has been a privilege to assemble a group of Australian and international researchers to produce a special issue of the Australian Dental Journal that reflects the cutting edge of research in different aspects of craniofacial biology, and also considers how these advances will influence future education and practice within dentistry. The aim of this special issue is to provide a collection of concept papers and critical reviews on key topics that cover both fundamental and applied research in craniofacial biology and to consider the clinical implications. To do this, four questions have been addressed that lead to the four sections of this issue. These are: How have we come to the present exciting position in craniofacial biology with breakthroughs over the past 50 years? What are current fundamental research topics that are helping us to understand more about craniofacial and general development, possibly leading to future clinical developments? What are the current applied research topics that will influence future clinical practice? Looking forward, what new developments in craniofacial biology may come about that will change the face of dental education and practice? The refereed papers in this special issue are grouped into the four sections that seek to respond to these demanding questions. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Crude oil exposures reveal roles for intracellular calcium cycling in haddock craniofacial and cardiac development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørhus, Elin; Incardona, John P.; Karlsen, Ørjan; Linbo, Tiffany; Sørensen, Lisbet; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Thorbjørnsen, Maja; Jentoft, Sissel; Edvardsen, Rolf B.; Meier, Sonnich

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that crude oil exposure affects cardiac development in fish by disrupting excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. We previously found that eggs of Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) bind dispersed oil droplets, potentially leading to more profound toxic effects from uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using lower concentrations of dispersed crude oil (0.7-7 μg/L ∑PAH), here we exposed a broader range of developmental stages over both short and prolonged durations. We quantified effects on cardiac function and morphogenesis, characterized novel craniofacial defects, and examined the expression of genes encoding potential targets underlying cardiac and craniofacial defects. Because of oil droplet binding, a 24-hr exposure was sufficient to create severe cardiac and craniofacial abnormalities. The specific nature of the craniofacial abnormalities suggests that crude oil may target common craniofacial and cardiac precursor cells either directly or indirectly by affecting ion channels and intracellular calcium in particular. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes encoding specific components of the EC coupling machinery suggests that crude oil disrupts excitation-transcription coupling or normal feedback regulation of ion channels blocked by PAHs. These data support a unifying hypothesis whereby depletion of intracellular calcium pools by crude oil-derived PAHs disrupts several pathways critical for organogenesis in fish.

  6. Clinical Applications of S53P4 Bioactive Glass in Bone Healing and Osteomyelitic Treatment: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. P. van Gestel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, S53P4 bioactive glass is indicated as a bone graft substitute in various clinical applications. This review provides an overview of the current published clinical results on indications such as craniofacial procedures, grafting of benign bone tumour defects, instrumental spondylodesis, and the treatment of osteomyelitis. Given the reported results that are based on examinations, such as clinical examinations by the surgeons, radiographs, CT, and MRI images, S53P4 bioactive glass may be beneficial in the various reported applications. Especially in craniofacial reconstructions like mastoid obliteration and orbital floor reconstructions, in grafting bone tumour defects, and in the treatment of osteomyelitis very promising results are obtained. Randomized clinical trials need to be performed in order to determine whether bioactive glass would be able to replace the current golden standard of autologous bone usage or with the use of antibiotic containing PMMA beads (in the case of osteomyelitis.

  7. [Rational use of distraction osteogenesis in craniofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreschi, P; Wolber, A; Bennis, Y; Vinchon, M; Martinot-Duquennoy, V

    2016-10-01

    Distraction osteogenesis, initially developed by Ilizarov for limb, is the tissular extension caused by the progressive space of the osseous pieces following an osteotomy. Distraction is osteogenesic and histogenic. Twenty-five years ago, at the instigation of McCarthy, this technique was used to handle the craniofacial malformations in the various floors of the face : mandibular, mediofacial and cranial. The most wide-spread protocols respect a latency period from 0 to 7 days, a rhythm of distraction from 1 to 2mm a day in 2 at 4 times and a period of consolidation from 4 to 8 weeks. Distraction is the result of the inventiveness of the pioneers then the work to always adapt to the multiple complex clinical situations. The surgeon has to choose between internal or external materials allowing a mono- or multi-vectorial extension, in osseous and/or dental anchoring. The mandibular distraction is very effective for the treatment of the secondary obstructive syndromes in the unilateral or bilateral severe hypomandibular malformations. She also allows desobstruction of the superior airways within the framework of the mediofacial hypoplasies as well as the secondary treatment of the growth defects in cleft lips and palates. Finally, the distraction osteogenesis enhanced reliability of the fronto-facial advancement in early and secondary treatment of craniofaciosynostosis. This is a real support of the facial growth, which has to be included in a plan of global treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help reduce pain and other symptoms of bone metastases. Symptoms Sometimes, bone metastasis causes no signs and ... cancers most likely to cause bone metastasis include: Breast cancer Kidney cancer Lung cancer Lymphoma Multiple myeloma Prostate ...

  9. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  10. Robotic surgery in oral and maxillofacial, craniofacial and head and neck surgery: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceulaer, J. de; Clercq, C. de; Swennen, G.R.J.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature concerning robotic surgery in oral and maxillofacial (OMF), craniofacial and head and neck surgery was performed. The objective was to give a clear overview of the different anatomical areas of research in the field of OMF, craniofacial and head and neck

  11. Craniofacial changes in patients with Class III malocclusion treated with the RAMPA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Yasushi; Banabilh, Saeed M; Singh, G Dave

    2010-01-01

    The underlying etiology of Class III malocclusion may be associated with cranial base morphology. The aim of this study is to test the efficacy of a Right-Angled Maxillary Protraction Appliance (RAMPA) System in Asian subjects with Class III malocclusions. 27 homologous landmarks were digitized from lateral cephalographs for 10 pre-pubertal Japanese children (mean age 95 months) with skeletal Class III malocclusion prior to and after RAMPA treatment. The mean, pre- and post-treatment craniofacial configurations were computed using Procrustes superimposition, and subjected to principal components analysis (PCA), and finite-element analysis (FEA). The mean treatment time was 22.5 months. All patients showed significant craniofacial change with correction of anterior and/or posterior crossbite. The mean, pre- and post-treatment craniofacial configurations were statistically different when tested using PCA (p Class III malocclusions.

  12. 3D visualisation in craniofacial surgery. 3D-Darstellungen fuer die Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, R.; Hoehne, K.H. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung in der Medizin); Hoeltje, W.J. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Norddeutsches Zentrum fuer Kranio-Faciale Anomalien); Tiede, U.

    1991-10-01

    3D visualisation from tomographic image sequences has turned out to be a useful addition to diagnosis and surgical planning in craniofacial surgery. However, its clinical use still suffers from the very large variety of different methods and parameters from which the surgeon may choose. This is true not only of the data acquisition but also for of documentation of the results. Furthermore, there is no standardisation of procedures according to classes of malformations. This papier presents a systematic investigation of these problems. It proposes a standardisation of craniofacial malformations and describes an optimisation of the procedure of 3D visualisation. The procedure described has become a standard tool for craniofacial surgery in our hospital. (orig.).

  13. Orientation of craniofacial planes and temporomandibular disorder in young adults with normal occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancaglini, R; Colombo-Bolla, G; Gherlone, E F; Radaelli, G

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between orientation of craniofacial planes relative to the true horizontal and temporomandibular disorder (TMD), in normal occlusion. Fourteen university dental students, with full natural dentition and bilateral Angle Class I occlusion, who exhibited signs and symptoms of TMD, were compared with 14 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Frontal and lateral photographs were taken in natural head position with the subject standing up, clenching a Fox plane and having a facial arch positioned. Photographs were examined by a standardized image analysis. Inter-pupillary axis, Frankfurt, occlusal and Camper planes were evaluated. In frontal view, the Frankfurt plane was right rotated relative to the true horizontal both in TMD subjects (P weak association exists between the orientation of craniofacial planes in natural head position and signs and symptoms of TMD. Furthermore, they suggest that, within this population, TMD might be mainly associated with head posture rather than with craniofacial morphology.

  14. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Woo Choi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models.

  15. Clinical application of three-dimensional printing technology in craniofacial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Woo; Kim, Namkug

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models.

  16. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namkug

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models. PMID:26015880

  17. Making headway: the roles of Hox genes and neural crest cells in craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Paul A

    2003-04-14

    Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  18. Loss of PiT-2 results in abnormal bone development and decreased bone mineral density and length in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Wallingford, Mary C; Borgeia, Suhaib; Cox, Timothy C; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2018-01-01

    Normal bone mineralization requires phosphate oversaturation in bone matrix vesicles, as well as normal regulation of phosphate metabolism via the interplay among bone, intestine, and kidney. In turn, derangement of phosphate metabolism greatly affects bone function and structure. The type III sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, PiT-1 and PiT-2, are believed to be important in tissue phosphate metabolism and physiological bone formation, but their requirement and molecular roles in bone remain poorly investigated. In order to decipher the role of PiT-2 in bone, we examined normal bone development, growth, and mineralization in global PiT-2 homozygous knockout mice. PiT-2 deficiency resulted in reduced vertebral column, femur, and tibia length as well as mandibular dimensions. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that bone mineral density in the mandible, femur, and tibia were decreased, indicating that maintenance of bone function and structure is impaired in both craniofacial and long bones of PiT-2 deficient mice. Both cortical and trabecular thickness and mineral density were reduced in PiT-2 homozygous knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that PiT-2 is involved in normal bone development and growth and plays roles in cortical and trabecular bone metabolism feasibly by regulating local phosphate transport and mineralization processes in the bone. Further studies that evaluate bone cell-specific loss of PiT-2 are now warranted and may yield insight into complex mechanisms of bone development and growth, leading to identification of new therapeutic options for patients with bone diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Flood, disaster, and turmoil: social issues in cleft and craniofacial care and crisis relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Ronald P; van Aalst, John A; Fox, Lynn; Stein, Margot; Moses, Michael; Cassell, Cynthia H

    2011-11-01

    To examine social issues in the conduct of cleft and craniofacial care through relief programs in disrupted crisis contexts. Social, health policy, and ethical analyses. At best, craniofacial team care is multidisciplinary, coordinated, and sustained, requiring a long-term relationship between team members, patients, and families. Disasters and societal turmoil interrupt such relationships, causing craniofacial care to become a secondary concern. Providing craniofacial team care in a crisis setting requires rebuilding disrupted coordination and communication. Crisis relief care involves a complex set of expectations and responsibilities and raises issues such as (1) quality assurance, infection control, appropriate standards of care, and follow-up care/continuity; (2) equity of access to services and clinical ethics in the context of war and/or deprivation; (3) training of visitors in the local nation or site; (4) disciplinary composition of teams, interprofessional communication/rivalry, and credentials of clinicians; (5) ownership of the site and local visitor relations; (6) fundraising and marketing strategies; and (7) ethical issues in the doctor-patient relationship. Specific ethical standards for international cleft and craniofacial care delivery also apply to domestic and global crisis relief contexts. Guidance on issues related to professional experience, informed consent, and continuity of care will help care providers address social and ethical issues raised in crisis relief programs. This paper proposes that the Position Paper of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) on International Treatment Programs should be used as a template to develop and disseminate a set of standards that apply to crisis relief.

  20. Inactivation of LAR family phosphatase genes Ptprs and Ptprf causes craniofacial malformations resembling Pierre-Robin sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Katherine; Uetani, Noriko; Hendriks, Wiljan; Tremblay, Michel L; Bouchard, Maxime

    2013-08-01

    Leukocyte antigen related (LAR) family receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) regulate the fine balance between tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation that is crucial for cell signaling during development and tissue homeostasis. Here we show that LAR RPTPs are required for normal development of the mandibular and maxillary regions. Approximately half of the mouse embryos lacking both Ptprs (RPTPσ) and Ptprf (LAR) exhibit micrognathia (small lower jaw), cleft palate and microglossia/glossoptosis (small and deep tongue), a phenotype closely resembling Pierre-Robin sequence in humans. We show that jaw bone and cartilage patterning occurs aberrantly in LAR family phosphatase-deficient embryos and that the mandibular arch harbors a marked decrease in cell proliferation. Analysis of signal transduction in embryonic tissues and mouse embryonic fibroblast cultures identifies an increase in Bmp-Smad signaling and an abrogation of canonical Wnt signaling associated with loss of the LAR family phosphatases. A reactivation of β-catenin signaling by chemical inhibition of GSK3β successfully resensitizes LAR family phosphatase-deficient cells to Wnt induction, indicating that RPTPs are necessary for normal Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. Together these results identify LAR RPTPs as important regulators of craniofacial morphogenesis and provide insight into the etiology of Pierre-Robin sequence.

  1. The society for craniofacial genetics and developmental biology 39th annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Jennifer L; Albertson, Craig; Harris, Matthew P; Lozanoff, Scott; Marcucio, Ralph S; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Trainor, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    The Society for Craniofacial Genetics and Developmental Biology (SCGDB) aims to promote education, research, and communication, about normal and abnormal development of the tissues and organs of the head. Membership of the SCGDB is broad and diverse-including clinicians, orthodontists, scientists, and academics-but with all members sharing an interest in craniofacial biology. Each year, the SCGDB hosts a meeting where members can share their latest research, exchange ideas and resources, and build on or establish new collaborations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Stem cell property of postmigratory cranial neural crest cells and their utility in alveolar bone regeneration and tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Il-Hyuk; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Zhao, Hu; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Shi, Songtao; Chai, Yang

    2009-04-01

    The vertebrate neural crest is a multipotent cell population that gives rise to a variety of different cell types. We have discovered that postmigratory cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) maintain mesenchymal stem cell characteristics and show potential utility for the regeneration of craniofacial structures. We are able to induce the osteogenic differentiation of postmigratory CNCCs, and this differentiation is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathways. After transplantation into a host animal, postmigratory CNCCs form bone matrix. CNCC-formed bones are distinct from bones regenerated by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, CNCCs support tooth germ survival via BMP signaling in our CNCC-tooth germ cotransplantation system. Thus, we conclude that postmigratory CNCCs preserve stem cell features, contribute to craniofacial bone formation, and play a fundamental role in supporting tooth organ development. These findings reveal a novel function for postmigratory CNCCs in organ development, and demonstrate the utility of these CNCCs in regenerating craniofacial structures.

  3. Evolution of the Jugal/Zygomatic Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechow, Paul C; Wang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    This issue of the Anatomical Record is the second of a two-volume set on the zygoma (also called the cheek bone, the zygomatic bone, the malar, or the jugal, the latter term being used in vertebrates other than mammals). The zygoma is an important component of the craniofacial skeleton, in which the zygoma is a connection between the midfacial and the cranial skeletons; has a functional role as the origin of one of the masticatory muscles, the masseter muscle, and several facial muscles; has been considered as an essential buttress of the facial skeleton for resisting masticatory forces; and has importance for determining phylogenetic relationships. In humans, the zygoma is also of aesthetic significance for facial appearance, and its restoration following trauma has resulted in a large clinical literature. In this second half of the special issue on the zygoma, a series of papers discuss studies related to evolution of the zygoma and related parts of the craniofacial skeleton throughout the vertebrates, and in particular in human evolution. There are also a series of articles discussing variation of the zygoma in modern humans. This article is an overview in which we discuss the primary findings of these studies and some of their implications. Anat Rec, 300:12-15, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Craniofacial fibrosarcoma: a case report | Moshy | Tanzania Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiographically the tumour involved both maxillary sinuses and the nose. Histologically, the Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections revealed a poorly differentiated FS from the soft tissue of the maxilla. Surgery, which would entail a wide resection of bones of the region including the floor of the orbit and ...

  5. Three-dimensional Planning and Reconstruction of the Mandible in Children with Craniofacial Microsomia Type III Using Costochondral Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emodi, Omri; Israel, Yair; Almos, Michal Even; Aizenbud, Dror; Van Aalst, John A; Rachmiel, Adi

    2017-01-01

    In craniofacial microsomia (CFM) Type III patients, autogenous costochondral grafts (CCG) are conventionally used for the reconstruction of the ramus and condyle. The aim of this study was to describe the use of CCG in children with CFM in terms of outcomes, growth patterns, and complications. This is a retrospective study of nine, aged 4-12 years, patients with CFM Type III, who underwent reconstruction of the mandibular ramus condyle unit by CCG. Seven patients had right-sided CFM and two had left-sided CFM. The rationale for this choice was to utilize the potential growth of the CCG, providing length to the ramus, and the joint by acting as a growth center; to control the repositioning of the chin center; and to improve child compliance by undergoing only one operation. The surgical treatment plan was determined preoperatively, based on measurements of mandibular vertical and horizontal deficiency and analysis of the mandibular posterior and anterior angulation. The mandibular planes and axis were defined by a three-dimensional simulation software program to perform a "mock surgery", by creating a prototype model. Clinical follow-up included measurements of the maximal opening, observation of the facial symmetry, and recording of complications, such as reankylosis. There were no serious postoperative complications, infections, or graft rejections. Successful postoperative occlusal cants were noted and measured in five patients and acceptable results were obtained in three patients. In one case, the CCG underwent distraction osteogenesis to improve the facial symmetry. In one patient, the graft continued to grow and the chin started to deviate into the opposite side. Measuring and calculating the ratio of the ramus height on the panoramic X-ray revealed a good relation between the healthy contralateral and the reconstructed ipsilateral ramus. Postoperative mean mouth opening was 34.3 mm, with minimal midline deviation of 2.6 mm in occlusion. Mean follow-up was 51

  6. Tissue reaction and material characteristics of four bone substitutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S S; Aaboe, M; Pinholt, E M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the tissue reactions around four different bone substitutes used in orthopedic and craniofacial surgery. Cylinders of two bovine bone substitutes (Endobon and Bio-Oss) and two coral-derived bone substitutes (Pro Osteon 5......-Oss was osseointegrated to a higher degree than the other biomaterials. Material characteristics obtained by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry analysis and energy-dispersive spectrometry did not explain the differences in biologic behavior....... and Interpore 500 HA/CC) were implanted into 5-mm bur holes in rabbit tibiae. There was no difference in the amount of newly formed bone around the four biomaterials. Interpore 500 HA/CC resorbed completely, whereas the other three biomaterials did not undergo any detectable biodegradation. Bio...

  7. Substantial dose reduction in modern multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT)-guided craniofacial and skull base surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, G.; Fasser, M.; Jaschke, W.; Bale, R. [Innsbruck Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Schullian, P.; Zangerl, A.; Puelacher, W. [Innsbruck Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery; Kral, F.; Riechelmann, H. [Innsbruck Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Reduction of the radiation exposure involved in image-guided craniofacial and skull base surgery is an important goal. The purpose was to evaluate the influence of low-dose protocols in modern multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) on target registration errors (TREs). Materials and Methods: An anthropomorphic skull phantom with target markers at the craniofacial bone and the anterior skull base was scanned in Sensation Open (40-slice), LightSpeed VCT (64-slice) and Definition Flash (128-slice). Identical baseline protocols (BP) at 120 kV/100 mAs were compared to the following low-dose protocols (LD) in care dose/dose modulation: (LD-I) 100 kV/35ref. mAs, (LD-II) 80 kV/40 - 41ref. mAs, and (LD-III) 80 kV/15 - 17ref. mAs. CTDIvol and DLP were obtained. TREs using an optical navigation system were calculated for all scanners and protocols. Results were statistically analyzed in SPSS and compared for significant differences (p {<=} 0.05). Results: CTDIvol for the Sensation Open/LightSpeed VCT/Definition Flash showed: (BP) 22.24 /32.48 /14.32 mGy; (LD-I) 4.61 /3.52 /1,62 mGy; (LD-II) 3.15 /2.01 /0.87 mGy; and (LD-III) na/0.76 /0.76 mGy. Differences between the BfS (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz) reference CTDIvol of 9 mGy and the lowest CTDIvol were approximately 3-fold for Sensation Open, and 12-fold for the LightSpeed VCT and Definition Flash. A total of 33 registrations and 297 TRE measurements were performed. In all MSCT scanners, the TREs did not significantly differ between the low-dose and the baseline protocols. Conclusion: Low-dose protocols in modern MSCT provided substantial dose reductions without significant influence on TRE and should be strongly considered in image-guided surgery. (orig.)

  8. Vertical atlantoaxial dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaré, S.; Lazennec, J. Y.; Camelot, C.; Saillant, G.; Hansen, S.; Trabelsi, R.

    1999-01-01

    An unusual case of vertical atlantoaxial dislocation without medulla oblongata or spinal cord injury is reported. The pathogenic process suggested occipito-axial dislocation. The case was treated surgically with excellent results on mobility and pain.

  9. Coordination in vertical jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; van Ingen Schenau, Gerrit Jan

    1988-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate for vertical jumping the relationships between muscle actions, movement pattern and jumping achievement. Ten skilled jumpers performed jumps with preparatory countermovement. Ground reaction forces and cinematographic data were recorded. In addition,

  10. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  11. Composition of vertical gardens

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeva, Vaska; Despot, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Vertical gardens are fully functional gardens in areas where there is less oxygen and space, ideal for residential and urban cities where there is no vegetation; occupy a special place in interiors furniture. The gardens occupy an important aesthetic problem. Aesthetic task in vertical gardens can be achieved by forming sectors of identification in the urban landscape through the choice of a particular plant spatial composition and composition, to create comfort and representation in commu...

  12. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control evoked by tonic craniofacial pain in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sowman, Paul Fredrick; Wang, Kelun; Svensson, P

    2011-01-01

    Tonic pain in one body segment can inhibit the perception of pain in another body segment. This phenomenon is mediated by diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC), and its efficacy in craniofacial regions is investigated in this study. A compressive device that evoked a tonic, moderate...

  13. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run Lei

    Full Text Available The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development.

  14. Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis in 51 cases of holoprosencephaly: craniofacial anatomy, associated malformations, and genetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.; Ettema, A.M.; Sina, F.; Geipel, A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hansmann, H.; Borstlap, W.A.; Berge, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prenatal ultrasound findings of the craniofacial and extracephalic anatomy, the postnatal pathological findings, and the genetic anomalies in 51 cases of holoprosencephaly (HPE). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1990 and 2005, a collective of 51 fetuses with tentative

  15. Radiography, Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Craniofacial Structures in Pig

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyllar, M.; Štembírek, Jan; Putnová, I.; Stehlík, L.; Odehnalová, S.; Buchtová, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 6 (2014), s. 435-452 ISSN 0340-2096 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP304/08/P289 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : craniofacial structures in pig Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.672, year: 2014

  16. Dental and Craniofacial Anomalies Associated with Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome with PITX2 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Dressler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS (OMIM Nr.: 180500 is a rare autosomal dominant disorder (1  :  200000 with genetic and morphologic variability. Glaucoma is associated in 50% of the patients. Craniofacial and dental anomalies are frequently reported with ARS. The present study was designed as a multidisciplinary analysis of orthodontic, ophthalmologic, and genotypical features. A three-generation pedigree was ascertained through a family with ARS. Clinically, radiographic and genetic analyses were performed. Despite an identical genotype in all patients, the phenotype varies in expressivity of craniofacial and dental morphology. Screening for PITX2 and FOXC1 mutations by direct DNA-sequencing revealed a P64L missense mutation in PITX2 in all family members, supporting earlier reports that PITX2 is an essential factor in morphogenesis of teeth and craniofacial skeleton. Despite the fact that the family members had identical mutations, morphologic differences were evident. The concomitant occurrence of rare dental and craniofacial anomalies may be early diagnostic indications of ARS. Early detection of ARS and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP helps to prevent visual field loss.

  17. Intrinsic effects of congenital cleft palate on craniofacial morphology and growth characteristics in puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Kudo, Motonori; Yamamoto, Yuko

    2010-09-01

    Of the 12 children in prepuberty (then aged 9 years) with unoperated submucous cleft palate where we previously found a characteristic morphology of the maxilla, we examined changes in the maxillary morphology in their puberty (until age 14 years), aiming to determine the intrinsic effects of congenital cleft palate on their craniofacial morphology and growth characteristics, which also involve the formation of cranioface, by retrospectively comparing their findings and those of noncleft children with normal occlusion. Twelve Japanese children (7 girls and 5 boys) with unoperated submucous cleft palate at age 14 years were examined cephalometrically. None of them had undergone dentofacial orthopedic treatment of the maxilla. Their craniofacial morphologic characteristics were compared with those of 60 Japanese noncleft children aged 14 years (30 girls and 30 boys) with normal occlusion. The results were nearly identical to the previous findings when they were 9 years old: the maxillary length was short, the anterior part of the maxilla being retruded and the posterior part of the maxilla being in anterior position in the cleft children at age 14 years, compared with the noncleft children. In the craniofacial growth changes between the ages 9 and 14 years, an increase in the posterior upper facial height was markedly small, and the inclination of the palatal plane was promoted in the cleft children, compared with the noncleft children. We confirmed that the intrinsic effects of congenital cleft were influential on the morphology of cranioface and its growth changes, which also involve craniofacial formation.

  18. Undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, M.; Poels, P.J.P.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Hoog, M. de; Berg, S.W. van den; Hoeve, H.J.; Joosten, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis have a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment can relieve symptoms and morbidity. Little is known about the development and natural history of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome through life. The aim of this study

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea prevents the expected difference in craniofacial growth of boys and girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ligia Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It was to compare cephalometric measures of mouth-breather boys and girls and with the cephalometric pattern observed in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients. METHODS: Craniofacial measurements of lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained from 144 children aged 7-14 years were compared between boys and girls, and both were compared to cephalometric pattern of OSAS patients. RESULTS: Mouth-breather boys and girls had no gender differences regarding to craniofacial morphology while nose-breather boys and girls showed those expected differences. Nose-breather boys presented a more retruded mandible and proinclined upper incisor when compared to nose-breather girls, but mouth-breather boys and girls had no differences. The measure NS.GoGn was the only variable with an interaction with gender and breathing. CONCLUSIONS: There were no cephalometric difference in mouth breather-boys and girls related to normal growth, suggesting that oral breathing make the same craniofacial morphology and both have craniofacial morphology close to that of OSAS patients.

  20. Dental and craniofacial findings in 91 individuals with agenesis of permanent maxillary canines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvedsen, K P; Kjær, I

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Agenesis of maxillary permanent canines is a rare form of agenesis (prevalence 0.07-0.13%). The aetiology is still unknown. The purpose was to focus on dentitions and craniofacial profiles in individuals with maxillary canine agenesis. METHOD: From 91 individuals (10-18 years of age) 91 Orth...

  1. Inheritance of craniofacial features in Colombian families with class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Otero

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available L Otero, L Quintero, D Champsaur, E SimancaPontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, ColombiaIntroduction: The inheritance of class III malocclusion has been well documented, but the inheritance of craniofacial structures in Colombian families with this malocclusion has been not yet reported.Patients and methods: The study sample of 25 families comprised 186 untreated orthodontic individuals from 8 to 60 years old. Pedigrees were drawn using Cyrillic software. Complete family histories for each proband were ascertained and the affection status of relatives was confirmed by lateral cephalograms and facial and dental photographs. Analysis of variance and odds ratio test for each parameter was performed to estimate inheritance from parents to offspring and to determine similar phenotypic features in relatives.Results: The analysis of the pedigrees suggests autosomal dominant inheritance. The craniofacial characteristics that showed more resemblance between parents and offspring were middle facial height, shorter anterior cranial base and mandibular prognathism. In contrast the protrusion of upper lip and maxillary retrusion were the phenotypic features that contributed to class III in the majority of families.Conclusion: Knowledge of the inheritance of craniofacial phenotypes in class III malocclusion will enable the design of new therapies to treat this malocclusion.Keywords: inheritance, craniofacial, phenotype, class III malocclusion

  2. A one-year review of craniofacial injuries in amateur soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozoglu, Sinan; Tozoglu, Ummuhan

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the rate of craniofacial injuries in amateur soccer and help us better understand the nature of these injuries. Retrospective study was carried out using records from the patients with craniofacial injuries associated with soccer activities. All data were collected on the basis of sex, age, type and anatomic site of the injury. In the one-year period of this study, 11/53 cases with craniofacial injuries associated with soccer activities have been treated in our clinic. The highest incidence was in the 18 to 24 year age group (mean age 20.7) with male propensity. The majority of the patients suffered from dento-alveolar fractures (36%), followed by temporomandibular joint disorders (27%), mandibular fractures (27%), and nasal fractures (9%). The most common cause of the fractures was impact against another player (63.6%), followed by impact against equipment (18.2%) and impact against the ground (18.2%). These results show that there is a high risk of potential oral and craniofacial injury during soccer activities.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous propacetamol vs rectal paracetamol in children after major craniofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Sandra A.; Van Dijk, Monique; Van Leeuwen, Pim; Searle, Susan; Anderson, Brian J.; Tibboel, Dick; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    Background: The pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous and rectal paracetamol were compared in nonventilated infants after craniofacial surgery in a double-blind placebo controlled study. Methods: During surgery all infants (6 months-2 years) received a rectal loading dose of 40

  4. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous propacetamol vs rectal paracetamol in children after major craniofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Sandra A.; van Dijk, Monique; van Leeuwen, Pim; Searle, Susan; Anderson, Brian J.; Tibboel, Dick; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    2008-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous and rectal paracetamol were compared in nonventilated infants after craniofacial surgery in a double-blind placebo controlled study. During surgery all infants (6 months-2 years) received a rectal loading dose of 40 mg.kg(-1) paracetamol 2 h

  5. Effect of chemotherapy on survival of craniofacial osteosarcoma: a systematic review of 201 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeele, L. E.; Kostense, P. J.; van der Waal, I.; Snow, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the possible value of chemotherapy in the treatment of craniofacial osteosarcoma (CFOS). In a systematic review, data of 201 patients (age, 36.6 +/- 19.0 years [mean +/- SD]) from 20 uncontrolled series on CFOS indexed in Medline and Excerpta Medica between 1974 and 1994 were pooled; 180

  6. Lysyl oxidase-like 3b is Critical for Cartilage Maturation During Zebrafish Craniofacial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Antonius L.; Gansner, John M.; Hakvoort, Henk W.J.; Snell, Heather; Legler, Juliette; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate craniofacial development requires coordinated morphogenetic interactions between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the differentiating chondrocytes essential for cartilage formation. Recent studies reveal a critical role for specific lysyl oxidases in ECM integrity required for embryonic development. We now demonstrate that loxl3b is abundantly expressed within the head mesenchyme of the zebrafish and is critically important for maturation of neural crest derived cartilage elements. Histological and ultrastructural analysis of cartilage elements in loxl3b morphant embryos reveals abnormal maturation of cartilage and altered chondrocyte morphology. Spatiotemporal analysis of craniofacial markers in loxl3b morphant embryos shows that cranial neural crest cells migrate normally into the developing pharyngeal arches but that differentiation and condensation markers are aberrantly expressed. We further show that the loxl3b morphant phenotype is not due to P53 mediated cell death but likely to be due to reduced chondrogenic progenitor cell proliferation within the pharyngeal arches. Taken together, these data demonstrate a novel role for loxl3b in the maturation of craniofacial cartilage and can provide new insight into the specific genetic factors important in the pathogenesis of craniofacial birth defects. PMID:21244857

  7. Speech characteristics in a Ugandan child with a rare paramedian craniofacial cleft: a case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anke Luyten; K. Bettens; D. Balumukad; K. van Lierde; H. Vermeersch; A. Hodges; M. Tungotyo; W. Bauters; G. Galiwango; S. de Ley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the speech characteristics in an English-speaking Ugandan boy of 4.5 years who has a rare paramedian craniofacial cleft (unilateral lip, alveolar, palatal, nasal and maxillary cleft, and associated hypertelorism). Closure of the lip together with the closure

  8. Effectiveness of the cervical vertebral maturation method to predict postpeak circumpubertal growth of craniofacial structures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fudalej, P.S.; Bollen, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our aim was to assess effectiveness of the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method to predict circumpubertal craniofacial growth in the postpeak period. METHODS: The CVM stage was determined in 176 subjects (51 adolescent boys and 125 adolescent girls) on cephalograms taken at the

  9. Using Zebrafish to Test the Genetic Basis of Human Craniofacial Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, R Grecco; Eames, B Frank

    2017-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) opened an innovative and productive avenue to investigate the molecular basis of human craniofacial disease. However, GWASs identify candidate genes only; they do not prove that any particular one is the functional villain underlying disease or just an unlucky genomic bystander. Genetic manipulation of animal models is the best approach to reveal which genetic loci identified from human GWASs are functionally related to specific diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential of zebrafish to resolve which candidate genetic loci are mechanistic drivers of craniofacial diseases. Many anatomic, embryonic, and genetic features of craniofacial development are conserved among zebrafish and mammals, making zebrafish a good model of craniofacial diseases. Also, the ability to manipulate gene function in zebrafish was greatly expanded over the past 20 y, enabling systems such as Gateway Tol2 and CRISPR-Cas9 to test gain- and loss-of-function alleles identified from human GWASs in coding and noncoding regions of DNA. With the optimization of genetic editing methods, large numbers of candidate genes can be efficiently interrogated. Finding the functional villains that underlie diseases will permit new treatments and prevention strategies and will increase understanding of how gene pathways operate during normal development.

  10. The FaceBase Consortium: A comprehensive program to facilitate craniofacial research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheiser, Harry; Aronow, Bruce J.; Artinger, Kristin; Beaty, Terri H.; Brinkley, James F.; Chai, Yang; Clouthier, David; Cunningham, Michael L.; Dixon, Michael; Donahue, Leah Rae; Fraser, Scott E.; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Iwata, Junichi; Klein, Ophir; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Murray, Stephen; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Postlethwait, John; Potter, Steven; Shapiro, Linda; Spritz, Richard; Visel, Axel; Weinberg, Seth M.; Trainor, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The FaceBase Consortium consists of ten interlinked research and technology projects whose goal is to generate craniofacial research data and technology for use by the research community through a central data management and integrated bioinformatics hub. Funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and currently focused on studying the development of the middle region of the face, the Consortium will produce comprehensive datasets of global gene expression patterns, regulatory elements and sequencing; will generate anatomical and molecular atlases; will provide human normative facial data and other phenotypes; conduct follow up studies of a completed genome-wide association study; generate independent data on the genetics of craniofacial development, build repositories of animal models and of human samples and data for community access and analysis; and will develop software tools and animal models for analyzing and functionally testing and integrating these data. The FaceBase website (http://www.facebase.org) will serve as a web home for these efforts, providing interactive tools for exploring these datasets, together with discussion forums and other services to support and foster collaboration within the craniofacial research community. PMID:21458441

  11. Increased levels of apoptosis in the prefusion neural folds underlie the craniofacial disorder, Treacher Collins syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixon, J; Brakebusch, C; Fässler, R

    2000-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of human craniofacial development that results from loss-of-function mutations in the gene TCOF1. Although this gene has been demonstrated to encode the nucleolar phosphoprotein treacle, the developmental mechanism underlying TCS...

  12. A tissue-specific role for intraflagellar transport genes during craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N Schock

    Full Text Available Primary cilia are nearly ubiquitous, cellular projections that function to transduce molecular signals during development. Loss of functional primary cilia has a particularly profound effect on the developing craniofacial complex, causing several anomalies including craniosynostosis, micrognathia, midfacial dysplasia, cleft lip/palate and oral/dental defects. Development of the craniofacial complex is an intricate process that requires interactions between several different tissues including neural crest cells, neuroectoderm and surface ectoderm. To understand the tissue-specific requirements for primary cilia during craniofacial development we conditionally deleted three separate intraflagellar transport genes, Kif3a, Ift88 and Ttc21b with three distinct drivers, Wnt1-Cre, Crect and AP2-Cre which drive recombination in neural crest, surface ectoderm alone, and neural crest, surface ectoderm and neuroectoderm, respectively. We found that tissue-specific conditional loss of ciliary genes with different functions produces profoundly different facial phenotypes. Furthermore, analysis of basic cellular behaviors in these mutants suggests that loss of primary cilia in a distinct tissue has unique effects on development of adjacent tissues. Together, these data suggest specific spatiotemporal roles for intraflagellar transport genes and the primary cilium during craniofacial development.

  13. Cranio-facial and Ocular Morphometrics of the Male Greater Cane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Linear measurements were determined on each eyeball using digital vernier calliper, measuring rule and a piece of twine. Cranio-facial parameters assessed included distance between medial canthi, height of the incisor, extent of oral commissures, width and length of the pinnae. All measured parameters were correlated ...

  14. The healing of fractured bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, G.E. [Central Electricity Generating Board, Cheltenham (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    A method utilising neutron beams of width 1 mm, used on D1B (2.4 A) and D20 (1.3 A) to study the healing of fractured bones is presented. It is found that the callus bone uniting the fractured tibia of a sheep, whose healing had been encouraged by daily mechanical vibration over a period of three months, showed no trace of the large preferential vertical orientation of the apatite crystals which is characteristic of the normal bone. Nevertheless the bone had regained about 60% of its mechanical strength and the callus bone, although not oriented, was well crystallized. It is considered that the new monochromator for D20, expected to give increased intensity at 2.5 A, will be of considerable advantage. (author). 2 refs.

  15. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  16. Craniofacial analysis of the Tweed Foundation in Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion Análise craniofacial da Fundação Tweed na maloclusão Classe II, divisão 1 de Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Tukasan

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study has defined the cephalometric values of the Craniofacial Analysis of the Tweed Foundation for a sample of Brazilian subjects. The sample consisted of 211 cephalometric radiographs from subjects aged 12-15, which were divided into two groups: Class II group, with 168 lateral teleradiographs (cephalograms of white Brazilian subjects, with Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion, of both genders (82 males and 86 females; and the Control Group, with 43 lateral teleradiographs (cephalograms of subjects whose occlusion was clinically excellent, and also of both genders (21 males and 22 females. The teleradiographs were selected from the files of the Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry of Piracicaba, State University of Campinas, previously to the orthodontic treatment. The results demonstrated no sexual dimorphism for each group, as attested by the Student's t-test. The exploratory analysis (± 0.5 standard deviation enabled the tolerance limits to be determined and a Craniofacial Analysis Table to be constructed using the respective cephalometric intervals. In addition, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant according to the maxilla position. The maxilla was in a good position in relation to the cranial base. On the other hand, the mandible was retruded in relation to the cranial base in the Class II cases. The skeletal pattern was not defined because only the Facial Height Index (FHI showed a vertical pattern in Class II subjects, while the Y Axis, SN.PlO, SN.GoMe and FMA values did not show any statistically significant difference between the groups. The Class II division 1 subjects showed lower incisors more labially tipped and a convex facial profile.A pesquisa definiu os valores cefalométricos da Análise Craniofacial da Fundação Tweed em amostra de brasileiros. O estudo constava de 211 telerradiografias tomadas previamente ao tratamento ortodôntico de indivíduos na faixa etária de 12

  17. Craniofacial anomalies associated with hypospadias. Description of a hospital based population in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Escobar, Rebeca; Zarante, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Hypospadias is a congenital abnormality of the penis, in which there is incomplete development of the distal urethra. There are numerous reports showing na increase of prevalence of hypospadias. Association of craniofacial malformations in patients diagnosed with hypospadias is rare. The aim of this study is to describe the association between hypospadias and craniofacial congenital anomalies. A retrospective review of the Latin-American collaborative study of congenital malformations (ECLAMC) data was performed between January 1982 and December 2011. We included children diagnosed with associated hypospadias and among them we selected those that were associated with any craniofacial congenital anomaly. Global prevalence was 11.3 per 10.000 newborns. In this population a total of 809 patients with 1117 associated anomalies were identified. On average there were 1.7 anomalies per patient. Facial anomalies were present in 13.2%. The most commonly major facial anomaly associated to hypospadias was cleft lip/palate with 52 cases. We identified that 18% have an association with other anomalies, and found an association between craniofacial anomalies and hypospadias in 0.59 cases/10.000 newborns. Hypospadias is the most common congenital anomaly affecting the genitals. Its association with other anomalies is rare. It has been reported that other malformations occur in 29.3% of the cases with hypospadias. The more proximal the meatus, the higher the risk for having another associated anomaly. Associated hypospadias are rare, and it is important to identify the concurrent occurrence of craniofacial anomalies to better treat patients that might need a multidisciplinary approach. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  18. Computer vision and soft computing for automatic skull-face overlay in craniofacial superimposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campomanes-Álvarez, B Rosario; Ibáñez, O; Navarro, F; Alemán, I; Botella, M; Damas, S; Cordón, O

    2014-12-01

    Craniofacial superimposition can provide evidence to support that some human skeletal remains belong or not to a missing person. It involves the process of overlaying a skull with a number of ante mortem images of an individual and the analysis of their morphological correspondence. Within the craniofacial superimposition process, the skull-face overlay stage just focuses on achieving the best possible overlay of the skull and a single ante mortem image of the suspect. Although craniofacial superimposition has been in use for over a century, skull-face overlay is still applied by means of a trial-and-error approach without an automatic method. Practitioners finish the process once they consider that a good enough overlay has been attained. Hence, skull-face overlay is a very challenging, subjective, error prone, and time consuming part of the whole process. Though the numerical assessment of the method quality has not been achieved yet, computer vision and soft computing arise as powerful tools to automate it, dramatically reducing the time taken by the expert and obtaining an unbiased overlay result. In this manuscript, we justify and analyze the use of these techniques to properly model the skull-face overlay problem. We also present the automatic technical procedure we have developed using these computational methods and show the four overlays obtained in two craniofacial superimposition cases. This automatic procedure can be thus considered as a tool to aid forensic anthropologists to develop the skull-face overlay, automating and avoiding subjectivity of the most tedious task within craniofacial superimposition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  20. "Black Bone" MRI: a novel imaging technique for 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Karen A; Watt-Smith, Stephen R; Golding, Stephen J

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensionally printed anatomical models are rapidly becoming an integral part of pre-operative planning of complex surgical cases. We have previously reported the "Black Bone" MRI technique as a non-ionizing alternative to CT. Segmentation of bone becomes possible by minimizing soft tissue contrast to enhance the bone-soft tissue boundary. The objectives of this study were to ascertain the potential of utilizing this technique to produce three-dimensional (3D) printed models. "Black Bone" MRI acquired from adult volunteers and infants with craniosynostosis were 3D rendered and 3D printed. A custom phantom provided a surrogate marker of accuracy permitting comparison between direct measurements and 3D printed models created by segmenting both CT and "Black Bone" MRI data sets using two different software packages. "Black Bone" MRI was successfully utilized to produce 3D models of the craniofacial skeleton in both adults and an infant. Measurements of the cube phantom and 3D printed models demonstrated submillimetre discrepancy. In this novel preliminary study exploring the potential of 3D printing from "Black Bone" MRI data, the feasibility of producing anatomical 3D models has been demonstrated, thus offering a potential non-ionizing alterative to CT for the craniofacial skeleton.

  1. Virtual Surgery Planning and Three-Dimensional Printing Template to Customize Bone Graft Toward Implant Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Dang, Nathalie; Lafarge, Agathe; Depeyre, Arnaud; Devoize, Laurent; Barthélémy, Isabelle

    2017-03-01

    Premaxillary tooth loss and bone deficiency or atrophy often occur in facial trauma. Onlay bone graft and implants have so far been the best means of restoring function and esthetic appearance. Void space between the graft and the jaw bone, over projection and mucosal trauma can cause mucosal dehiscence, bone exposure, or resorption and can compromise implant survival. Virtual surgical planning using 3-dimensional printing technology has improved the efficiency of craniofacial surgery. The drawbacks of this technology are its cost and time-consuming preparation. However, the democratization of high-performance 3-dimensional printing and open-source software have enabled surgeons to master the procedure. The authors applied this innovative technology to customize bone graft for insertion of a premaxillary implant. It enabled us to custom-make the bone graft on the template and to perfectly embed the graft in the gap with a reduce operating time and a good osteointegration.

  2. Injectable Reactive Biocomposites For Bone Healing In Critical-Size Rabbit Calvarial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    anterior lumbar interbody fusion and periodontal ridge augmentation (INFUSE R© bone graft) [21, 22]. When implanted in a rabbit calvarial CSD, rhBMP-2...inability to provide space maintenance [5, 23, 24]. To address the challenges of craniofacial repair, an ideal material should have the ability to fit...site when used alone [24]. Mixed success was reported for the use of the ACS carrier without space maintenance to repair larger mandibular non-unions

  3. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes Diarrhea Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) Down Syndrome Ebola Virus Infection Endocrine System and Syndromes Epilepsy Excessive ... to keep bones alive and sturdy. During early childhood and in the teenage years, new bone is ...

  4. Orthopedic treatment of Class III malocclusion with rapid maxillary expansion combined with a face mask: a cephalometric assessment of craniofacial growth patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Torres Tagawa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to assess potential changes in the cephalometric craniofacial growth pattern of 17 children presenting Angle Class III malocclusion treated with a Haas-type expander combined with a face mask. METHODS: Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken at beginning (T1 and immediately after removal of the appliances (T2, average of 11 months of treatment. Linear and angular measurements were used to evaluate the cranial base, dentoskeletal changes and facial growth pattern. RESULTS: The length of the anterior cranial base experienced a reduction while the posterior cranial base assumed a more vertical position at T1. Some maxillary movement occurred, there was no rotation of the palatal plane, there was a slight clockwise rotation of the mandible, although not significant. The ANB angle increased, thereby improving the relationship between the jaws; dentoalveolar compensation was more evident in the lower incisors. Five out of 12 cases (29.41% showed the following changes: In one case the pattern became more horizontal and in four cases more vertical. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded after a short-term assessment that treatment with rapid maxillary expansion (RME associated with a face mask was effective in the correction of Class III malocclusion despite the changes in facial growth pattern observed in a few cases.

  5. Vertical changes in patients with complete unilateral and bilateral cleft lip, alveolus and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisson, Jörg A; Hanke, Ilka; Tränkmann, Joachim

    2004-05-01

    Twelve UCLP and eleven BCLP patients who had been treated according to the Hanover treatment protocol were evaluated by means of cephalometric analysis and cast measurements. The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate changes in the vertical plane and in incisor position in the course of craniofacial growth compared to age-matched non-cleft controls. Lateral cephalograms and casts were analyzed for each cleft patient at age 10 and 15 and compared with corresponding data of a non-cleft control group (n = 20). A vertical growth impairment of the maxilla was registered in patients with cleft lip, alveolus and palate. The maxilla of the cleft patients showed a significant clockwise rotation while the inclination of the mandible remained virtually unchanged. Both upper and lower incisors, which were significantly retruded at the beginning of the late mixed dentition, could be protruded in the course of craniofacial growth, development of the dentition and treatment, but remained retruded in comparison with the non-cleft controls. The posterior midfacial height was highly significantly shorter in both UCLP and BCLP patients at both evaluation timepoints, whereas the anterior lower jaw height was greater than in the control group

  6. Long-term oral-appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnea : A cephalometric study of craniofacial changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, M. H. J.; Hoekema, A.; Pruim, G. J.; Slater, J. J. R. Huddleston; Stegenga, B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this randomized controlled study was to cephalometrically assess possible changes in craniofacial morphology associated with long term use of an adjustable oral appliance compared with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with the obstructive sleep

  7. Craniofacial resection for nonmelanoma skin cancer of the head and neck. Laryngoscope 2005;115:931-937

    OpenAIRE

    Backous, D D.; DeMonte, F.; El-Naggar, A; Wolf, P; Weber, R S.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: We reviewed our experience with craniofacial resection for advanced, nonmelanoma skin cancer of the head and neck to determine prognostic factors, local control rate, disease free survival, morbidity, and mortality.

  8. Lysyl oxidase-like 3b is critical for proliferation of chondrogenic progenitor cells during Zebrafish craniofacial development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, A.L.; Gansner, J.M.; Hakvoort, H.; Snell, H.; Legler, J.; Gitlin, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate craniofacial development requires coordinated morphogenetic interactions between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the differentiating chondrocytes essential for cartilage formation. Recent studies reveal a critical role for specific lysyl oxidases in ECM integrity required for embryonic

  9. Defining Population-Specific Craniofacial Fracture Patterns and Resource Use in Geriatric Patients: A Comparative Study of Blunt Craniofacial Fractures in Geriatric versus Nongeriatric Adult Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundinger, Gerhard S; Bellamy, Justin L; Miller, Devin T; Christy, Michael R; Bojovic, Branko; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that mechanisms of injury, fracture patterns, and burden to the health care system differ between geriatric and nongeriatric populations sustaining blunt-force craniofacial trauma. A 5-year retrospective chart review of patient records and computed tomographic imaging was performed. Demographic and outcome data were extracted for equally numbered samples of blunt-mechanism facial fracture patients aged 60 years or older (geriatric), and adult patients aged 18 to 59 years (adult nongeriatric). Comparisons were made between these two populations using t tests and multivariable logistic regression. One thousand eighty-seven geriatric and 1087 nongeriatric patients were included. Geriatric patients were significantly more likely to be Caucasian, female, and have sustained fractures as the result of falling. They also had significantly longer hospital stays, were more likely to die, and were more likely to be discharged to home with services. Mandible fractures and panfacial fractures were significantly more common in the nongeriatric population. Geriatric age was associated with doubled length of hospitalization for patients with midface fractures. Logistic regression revealed that significantly higher incidences of orbital floor, maxillary, and condylar fractures in geriatric patients were dependent on geriatric age status, rather than mechanism of injury alone. Resource allocation for geriatric patients with craniofacial trauma should differ from that of their nongeriatric adult counterparts, with more resources allocated to supportive care during hospitalization and assistive care after discharge. The authors' data indicate that structural and biological changes in the craniofacial skeleton contribute to differences in fracture location independent of mechanism of injury. Risk, II.

  10. Diel vertical migrat..

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-01-24

    Jan 24, 2002 ... crustacean zooplankton but also in a Wide array of different marine zooplankton groups. (Russell 1927, McLaren 1963). Thus there is no doubt that ..... cooperation during field work and for their fruitful discussion on the draft manuscript. REFERENCES. Bayly lAE 1986 Aspects of diel vertical migration in ...

  11. Vertical market participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrader, Alexander; Martin, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Firms that operate at both levels of vertically related Cournot oligopolies will purchase some input supplies from independent rivals, even though they can produce the good at a lower cost, driving up input price for nonintegrated firms at the final good level. Foreclosure, which avoids this stra...... this strategic behavior, yields better market performance than Cournot beliefs...

  12. Hunting Voronoi vertices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrucci, V.; Overmars, Mark; Rao, A.; Vleugels, J.

    1994-01-01

    Given three objects in the plane, a Voronoi vertex is a point that is equidistant simultaneously from each. In this paper, we consider the problem of computing Voronoi vertices for planar objects of xed but possibly unknown shape; we only require the ability to query the closest point on an object

  13. Vertical shaft windmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  14. [Aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandible: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Ender; Cansiz, Harun; Güçlü, Ender; Hizli, Cem

    2006-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign lesion that is more commonly seen in long bones and the vertebra. Its occurrence in the craniofacial region is rare. A nine-year-old boy presented with a well-demarcated, painless, fixed mass, 3 x 3 cm in size, in the left preauricular region, with no fluctuation or crepitation. Computed tomography showed a lesion in the left mandibular ramus with a fluid-fluid level, extending to the mandibular condyle, with erosion to the adjacent cortex. Total curettage was performed via a transoral approach under general anesthesia. Histopathologic diagnosis was made as an aneurysmal bone cyst. No recurrence or complication were seen during a follow-up period of four years.

  15. Helical CT in the evaluation of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia; Scanner spirale et bilan diagnostique de dysplasie fibreuse cranio-faciale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupescu, I.; Georgescu, S.A. [Hopital Fundeni, Service de Radiologie, Bucarest, (Romania); Hermier, M.; Froment, J.C. [Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical P. Wertheimer, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2001-02-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the role of helical CT in the evaluation of skull abnormalities seen in fibrous dysplasia. Materials and Methods. Prospective study on 6 cases with cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia (3 males and 3 females) aged 8 to 59 years old, evaluated with plain radiographs, helical CT and, in 1 case, MRI. Helical CT was performed in 3 cases on a CT Twin scan (Elscint), in 3 cases on a Somatom Plus scan (Siemens). Multiplanar reconstructions and 3-D reconstructions were done in all cases. 4 cases had a histopathological confirmation of fibrous dysplasia lesions by bone-biopsy (3 cases) or surgical biopsy (1 case). Results. The 6 cases included sclerotic form in 3 cases, cystic variety in 1 case, poly-ostosis variety in 1 case, mixed form in 1 case. Topographic localizations of fibrous dysplasia were skull base involvement in 1 case, multi-zonal skull involvement in 4 cases, maxillo-mandibulary involvement (cherubism) in 1 case. Conclusion. Helical CT is an optimal method to evaluate the skull lesions of fibrous dysplasia. The review of source images must always be done. 3-dimensional bone reconstructions are better to visualize the anterior cranial vault and skull base dysmorphy. Helical acquisition is a compromise in case by case between the dose of irradiation and the quality of source images. (authors)

  16. The ribosome biogenesis factor Nol11 is required for optimal rDNA transcription and craniofacial development in Xenopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N Griffin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival.

  17. Vertical gastroplasty: evolution of vertical banded gastroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, E E; Doherty, C; Cullen, J J; Scott, D; Rodriguez, E M; Maher, J W

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to summarize the goals, technical requirements, advantages, and potential risks of gastroplasty for treatment of severe obesity. Gastroplasty is preferred to more complex operations, as it preserves normal digestion and absorption and avoids complications that are peculiar to exclusion operations. The medical literature and a 30-year experience at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC) provides an overview of vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) evolution. Preliminary 10-year results with the VBG technique currently used at UIHC are included. At UIHC the VBG is preferred to other gastroplasties because it provides weight control that extends for at least 10 years and the required objective, intraoperative quality control required for a low rate of reoperation. It is recommended that modifications of the operative technique not be attempted until a surgeon has had experience with the standardized operation--and then only under a carefully designed protocol. Realistic goals for surgery and criteria of success influence the choice of operation and the optimum, lifelong risk/benefit ratio. In conclusion, VBG is a safe, long-term effective operation for severe obesity with advantages over complex operations and more restrictive simple operations.

  18. Beyond the functional matrix hypothesis: a network null model of human skull growth for the formation of bone articulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2014-09-01

    Craniofacial sutures and synchondroses form the boundaries among bones in the human skull, providing functional, developmental and evolutionary information. Bone articulations in the skull arise due to interactions between genetic regulatory mechanisms and epigenetic factors such as functional matrices (soft tissues and cranial cavities), which mediate bone growth. These matrices are largely acknowledged for their influence on shaping the bones of the skull; however, it is not fully understood to what extent functional matrices mediate the formation of bone articulations. Aiming to identify whether or not functional matrices are key developmental factors guiding the formation of bone articulations, we have built a network null model of the skull that simulates unconstrained bone growth. This null model predicts bone articulations that arise due to a process of bone growth that is uniform in rate, direction and timing. By comparing predicted articulations with the actual bone articulations of the human skull, we have identified which boundaries specifically need the presence of functional matrices for their formation. We show that functional matrices are necessary to connect facial bones, whereas an unconstrained bone growth is sufficient to connect non-facial bones. This finding challenges the role of the brain in the formation of boundaries between bones in the braincase without neglecting its effect on skull shape. Ultimately, our null model suggests where to look for modified developmental mechanisms promoting changes in bone growth patterns that could affect the development and evolution of the head skeleton. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  19. Early Craniofacial Morphology and Growth in Children With Nonsyndromic Robin Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, N. V.; Kreiborg, S.; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Craniofacial morphology and growth comparisons in children with untreated nonsyndromic Robin Sequence (RS) and a control group with unilateral incomplete cleft lip (UICL) in which the lip was surgically closed at 2 months of age. Material: The 52 children (7 RS and 45 UICL) included...... in the study were drawn from a group representing all Danish cleft children born 1976 through 1981. The ages of the children were 2 and 22 months at the time of examination 1 and 2, respectively. Method: The method of investigation was three-projection cephalometry. Craniofacial morphology was analyzed...... by means of linear, angular, and area variables. Growth at a specific anatomical location in a patient was defined as the displacement vector from the coordinate of the corresponding landmark at examination I to its coordinate at examination 2. Results: The most striking findings in the RS group were...

  20. The ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP modulates protein phosphatase 2A activity in craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Hoffmeister

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly is a common developmental disorder in humans characterised by incomplete brain hemisphere separation and midface anomalies. The etiology of holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous with environmental and genetic causes, but for a majority of holoprosencephaly cases the genes associated with the pathogenesis could not be identified so far. Here we report the generation of knockout mice for the ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP. The loss of NOSIP in mice causes holoprosencephaly and facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate, cyclopia and facial midline clefting. By a mass spectrometry based protein interaction screen we identified NOSIP as a novel interaction partner of protein phosphatase PP2A. NOSIP mediates the monoubiquitination of the PP2A catalytic subunit and the loss of NOSIP results in an increase in PP2A activity in craniofacial tissue in NOSIP knockout mice. We conclude, that NOSIP is a critical modulator of brain and craniofacial development in mice and a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly in humans.

  1. The Contributions of the Ribosome Biogenesis Protein Utp5/WDR43 to Craniofacial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondalle, S.B.; Baserga, S.J.; Yelick, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Fairly recently, it was recognized that human ribosomopathies—developmental defects caused by mutations in ribosome biogenesis proteins—can exhibit tissue-specific defects rather than the expected global defects. This apparent anomaly—that seemingly ubiquitously expressed and required ribosomal proteins can have distinct functions in cell and tissue differentiation—has spurred new areas of research focused on better understanding translational mechanisms, biogenesis, and function in diverse cell types. This renewed appreciation for, and need to better understand, roles for ribosomal proteins in human development and disease has identified surprising similarities and differences in a variety of human ribosomopathies. Here, we discuss ribosomal protein functions in health and disease, focusing on the ribosome biogenesis protein Utp5/WDR43. New and exciting research in this field is anticipated to provide insight into a variety of previously understudied craniofacial dysostoses and result in significantly improved knowledge and understanding of roles for translational machinery in human craniofacial development and disease. PMID:27221611

  2. Dry needling for management of pain in the upper quarter and craniofacial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietrys, David M; Palombaro, Kerstin M; Mannheimer, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Dry needling is a therapeutic intervention that has been growing in popularity. It is primarily used with patients that have pain of myofascial origin. This review provides background about dry needling, myofascial pain, and craniofacial pain. We summarize the evidence regarding the effectiveness of dry needling. For patients with upper quarter myofascial pain, a 2013 systematic review and meta-analysis of 12 randomized controlled studies reported that dry needling is effective in reducing pain (especially immediately after treatment) in patients with upper quarter pain. There have been fewer studies of patients with craniofacial pain and myofascial pain in other regions, but most of these studies report findings to suggest the dry needling may be helpful in reducing pain and improving other pain related variables such as the pain pressure threshold. More rigorous randomized controlled trials are clearly needed to more fully elucidate the effectiveness of dry needling.

  3. Pdgfra protects against ethanol-induced craniofacial defects in a zebrafish model of FASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Neil; Wetherill, Leah; Lovely, C. Ben; Swartz, Mary E.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Eberhart, Johann K.

    2013-01-01

    Human birth defects are highly variable and this phenotypic variability can be influenced by both the environment and genetics. However, the synergistic interactions between these two variables are not well understood. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is the umbrella term used to describe the wide range of deleterious outcomes following prenatal alcohol exposure. Although FASD are caused by prenatal ethanol exposure, FASD are thought to be genetically modulated, although the genes regulating sensitivity to ethanol teratogenesis are largely unknown. To identify potential ethanol-sensitive genes, we tested five known craniofacial mutants for ethanol sensitivity: cyp26b1, gata3, pdgfra, smad5 and smoothened. We found that only platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (pdgfra) interacted with ethanol during zebrafish craniofacial development. Analysis of the PDGF family in a human FASD genome-wide dataset links PDGFRA to craniofacial phenotypes in FASD, prompting a mechanistic understanding of this interaction. In zebrafish, untreated pdgfra mutants have cleft palate due to defective neural crest cell migration, whereas pdgfra heterozygotes develop normally. Ethanol-exposed pdgfra mutants have profound craniofacial defects that include the loss of the palatal skeleton and hypoplasia of the pharyngeal skeleton. Furthermore, ethanol treatment revealed latent haploinsufficiency, causing palatal defects in ∼62% of pdgfra heterozygotes. Neural crest apoptosis partially underlies these ethanol-induced defects in pdgfra mutants, demonstrating a protective role for Pdgfra. This protective role is mediated by the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Collectively, our results suggest a model where combined genetic and environmental inhibition of PI3K/mTOR signaling leads to variability within FASD. PMID:23861062

  4. Low-amplitude craniofacial EMG power spectral density and 3D muscle reconstruction from MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Wiedemann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Improving EEG signal interpretation, specificity, and sensitivity is a primary focus of many current investigations, and the successful application of EEG signal processing methods requires a detailed knowledge of both the topography and frequency spectra of low-amplitude, high-frequency craniofacial EMG. This information remains limited in clinical research, and as such, there is no known reliable technique for the removal of these artifacts from EEG data. The results presented herein outline a preliminary investigation of craniofacial EMG high-frequency spectra and 3D MRI segmentation that offers insight into the development of an anatomically-realistic model for characterizing these effects. The data presented highlights the potential for confounding signal contribution from around 60 to 200 Hz, when observed in frequency space, from both low and high-amplitude EMG signals. This range directly overlaps that of both low γ (30-50 Hz and high γ (50-80 Hz waves, as defined traditionally in standatrd EEG measurements, and mainly with waves presented in dense-array EEG recordings. Likewise, average EMG amplitude comparisons from each condition highlights the similarities in signal contribution of low-activity muscular movements and resting, control conditions. In addition to the FFT analysis performed, 3D segmentation and reconstruction of the craniofacial muscles whose EMG signals were measured was successful. This recapitulation of the relevant EMG morphology is a crucial first step in developing an anatomical model for the isolation and removal of confounding low-amplitude craniofacial EMG signals from EEG data. Such a model may be eventually applied in a clinical setting to ultimately help to extend the use of EEG in various clinical roles.

  5. Craniofacial morphology in ancient and modern Greeks through 4,000 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagrigorakis, Manolis J; Kousoulis, Antonis A; Synodinos, Philippos N

    2014-01-01

    Multiple 20th century studies have speculated on the anthropological similarities of the modern inhabitants of Greece with their ancient predecessors. The present investigation attempts to add to this knowledge by comparing the craniofacial configuration of 141 ancient (dating around 2,000-500 BC) and 240 modern Greek skulls (the largest material among relevant national studies). Skulls were grouped in age at death, sex, era and geographical categories; lateral cephalograms were taken and 53 variables were measured and correlated statistically. The craniofacial measurements and measurements of the basic quadrilateral and cranial polygon were compared in various groups using basic statistical methods, one-way ANOVA and assessment of the correlation matrices. Most of the measurements for both sexes combined followed an akin pattern in ancient and modern Greek skulls. Moreover, sketching and comparing the outline of the skull and upper face, we observed a clock-wise movement. The present study confirms that the morphological pattern of Greek skulls, as it changed during thousands of years, kept some characteristics unchanged, with others undergoing logical modifications. The analysis of our results allows us to believe that the influence upon the craniofacial complex of the various known factors, including genetic or environmental alterations, is apt to alter its form to adapt to new conditions. Even though 4,000 years seems too narrow a span to provoke evolutionary insights using conventional geometric morphometrics, the full presentation of our results makes up a useful atlas of solid data. Interpreted with caution, the craniofacial morphology in modern and ancient Greeks indicates elements of ethnic group continuation within the unavoidable multicultural mixtures.

  6. The Effects Of Snoring On Craniofacial Morphology, Head Posture And Sagittal Curvature Of Vertebrae

    OpenAIRE

    Benkli, Dr. Yasin Atakan; OKTAY, Prof. Dr. Hüsamettin

    2013-01-01

    The effect of function on structure has long been known in orthodontic literature and still been discussed on. It is accepted that our vital function, namely respiration, and associated disorders as snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome( OSAS) have effects on dentofacial anatomic regions as well as on medical and social well being. The effects of snoring on craniofacial structures and posture have been investigated by several researchers. This literature review aims to give knowledge a...

  7. Genomic factors that shape craniofacial outcome and neural crest vulnerability in FASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Smith

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE causes distinctive facial characteristics in some pregnancies and not others; genetic factors may contribute to this differential vulnerability. Ethanol disrupts multiple events of neural crest development including induction, survival, migration, and differentiation. Animal models and genomic approaches have substantially advanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these facial changes. PAE during gastrulation produces craniofacial changes corresponding with human fetal alcohol syndrome. These result because PAE reduces prechordal plate extension and suppresses sonic hedgehog, leading to holoprosencephaly and malpositioned facial primordia. Haploinsufficiency in sonic hedgehog signaling increases vulnerability to facial deficits and may influence some PAE pregnancies. In contrast, PAE during early neurogenesis produces facial hypoplasia, preceded by neural crest reductions due to significant apoptosis. Factors mediating this apoptosis include intracellular calcium mobilization, elevated reactive oxygen species, and loss of trophic support from β-catenin/calcium, sonic hedgehog, and mTOR signaling. Genomewide SNP analysis links PDGF receptor genes with facial outcomes in human PAE. Multiple genomic-level comparisons of ethanol-sensitive and –resistant early embryos, in both mouse and chick, independently identify common candidate genes that may potentially modify craniofacial vulnerability, including ribosomal proteins, proteosome, RNA splicing, and focal adhesion. In summary, research using animal models with genome-level differences in ethanol vulnerability, as well as targeted loss- and gain-of-function mutants, has clarified the mechanisms mediating craniofacial change in PAE. The findings additionally suggest that craniofacial deficits may represent a gene-ethanol interaction for some affected individuals. Genetic-level changes may prime individuals toward greater sensitivity or resistance to

  8. Reliable classification of facial phenotypic variation in craniofacial microsomia: a comparison of physical exam and photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgfeld, Craig B; Heike, Carrie L; Saltzman, Babette S; Leroux, Brian G; Evans, Kelly N; Luquetti, Daniela V

    2016-03-31

    Craniofacial microsomia is a common congenital condition for which children receive longitudinal, multidisciplinary team care. However, little is known about the etiology of craniofacial microsomia and few outcome studies have been published. In order to facilitate large, multicenter studies in craniofacial microsomia, we assessed the reliability of phenotypic classification based on photographs by comparison with direct physical examination. Thirty-nine children with craniofacial microsomia underwent a physical examination and photographs according to a standardized protocol. Three clinicians completed ratings during the physical examination and, at least a month later, using respective photographs for each participant. We used descriptive statistics for participant characteristics and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to assess reliability. The agreement between ratings on photographs and physical exam was greater than 80 % for all 15 categories included in the analysis. The ICC estimates were higher than 0.6 for most features. Features with the highest ICC included: presence of epibulbar dermoids, ear abnormalities, and colobomas (ICC 0.85, 0.81, and 0.80, respectively). Orbital size, presence of pits, tongue abnormalities, and strabismus had the lowest ICC, values (0.17 or less). There was not a strong tendency for either type of rating, physical exam or photograph, to be more likely to designate a feature as abnormal. The agreement between photographs and physical exam regarding the presence of a prior surgery was greater than 90 % for most features. Our results suggest that categorization of facial phenotype in children with CFM based on photographs is reliable relative to physical examination for most facial features.

  9. Impact of a Cleft and Craniofacial Center on an Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtaheri, Navid; Kearney, Aaron; Wan, Derrick C; Lakin, Gregory

    2017-10-01

    The contributions of all physician specialties and ancillary services involved in cleft and craniofacial center care must be evaluated to fairly assess the financial impact of a cleft and craniofacial center. The authors hypothesized that the cleft and craniofacial center generates profitable downstream productivity for the academic health system. This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who presented to a cleft and craniofacial center in the first quarter of 2011. Analysis included all health system encounters for each patient over a 2-year period using the electronic medical record and health system financial database. Sixty-two patients were seen (mean age, 11.4 years; 38 boys and 24 girls; 18 new and 44 established patients). Over 2 years, there were 618 health system encounters (599 outpatient and 19 inpatient encounters), 68 hospital days, and 110 procedures. The most common physician specialty was plastic surgery [312 encounters (50.5 percent)] and the most common ancillary service was speech therapy [256 encounters (41.4 percent)]. The overall reimbursement rate was 39.9 percent, with a majority payor-mix of government payors (62.1 percent). The total profit margin percentage from all encounters was 13.7 percent, which was greater for managed care compared with government payor (38.9 percent versus -10.8 percent; p = 0.022), inpatient compared to outpatient (24.5 percent versus -2.8 percent; p center generated profitable downstream productivity for the academic health system with referrals to 39 different physician and nonphysician specialties. Health system providers and the business team should align to analyze the center, enhance patient outcomes, and improve specialty care access for patients.

  10. An overview of recent advances in designing orthopedic and craniofacial implants

    OpenAIRE

    Mantripragada, Venkata P.; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2013-01-01

    Great deal of research is still going on in the field of orthopedic and craniofacial implant development to resolve various issues being faced by the industry today. Despite several disadvantages of the metallic implants, they continue to be used, primarily because of their superior mechanical properties. In order to minimize the harmful effects of the metallic implants and its by-products, several modifications are being made to these materials, for instance nickel-free stainless steel, coba...

  11. Aminocaproic acid administration is associated with reduced perioperative blood loss and transfusion in pediatric craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, G; Taylor, J A; Fiadjoe, J E; Vincent, A M; Pruitt, E Y; Bartlett, S P; Stricker, P A

    2016-02-01

    Severe blood loss is a common complication of craniofacial reconstruction surgery. The antifibrinolytic ε-aminocaproic acid (EACA) reduces transfusion requirements in children undergoing cardiac surgery and in older children undergoing spine surgery. Tranexamic acid (TXA), another antifibrinolytic with a similar mechanism of action, has been shown to reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements in children undergoing craniofacial surgery. However, TXA has been associated with an increase in post-operative seizures and is more expensive than EACA. There is currently little published data evaluating the efficacy of EACA in children undergoing craniofacial surgery. This is a retrospective study of prospectively collected data from our craniofacial perioperative registries for children under 6 years of age who underwent anterior or posterior cranial vault reconstruction. We compared calculated blood loss, blood donor exposures, and post-operative drain output between subjects who received EACA and those who did not. The registry queries returned data from 152 subjects. Eighty-six did not receive EACA and 66 received EACA. The EACA group had significantly lower calculated blood loss (82 ± 43 vs. 106 ± 63 ml/kg, P = 0.01), fewer intraoperative blood donor exposures (median 2, interquartile range 1-2 vs. median 2, interquartile range 1-3; P = 0.02) and lower surgical drain output in the first post-operative 24 h (28 ml/kg vs. 37 ml/kg, P = 0.001) than the non-EACA group. In this analysis of prospectively captured observational data, EACA administration was associated with less calculated blood loss, intraoperative blood donor exposures, and post-operative surgical drain output. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of Craniofacial Morphology of Children with Dental Fluorosis in Early Permanent Dentition Period

    OpenAIRE

    Dogan, Alev Aksoy; Bolpaca, Pinar

    2009-01-01

    Objectives High intake of fluoride (>1.5 mg/L) for a prolonged period may lead to skeletal fluorosis as well as dental fluorosis. The aim of this study was to compare the craniofacial characteristics of children with dental fluorosis in early permanent dentition period to those without fluorosis. Methods Two hundred and sixteen children in early permanent dentition (girls:121, boys:95) were included in the study. Study group was composed of 124 children with dental fluorosis who was born and ...

  13. A web-based instruction module for interpretation of craniofacial cone beam CT anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, B A; Jacobs, R; Scarfe, W C; Al-Rawi, W T

    2007-09-01

    To develop a web-based module for learner instruction in the interpretation and recognition of osseous anatomy on craniofacial cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Volumetric datasets from three CBCT systems were acquired (i-CAT, NewTom 3G and AccuiTomo FPD) for various subjects using equipment-specific scanning protocols. The datasets were processed using multiple software to provide two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reformatted (MPR) images (e.g. sagittal, coronal and axial) and three-dimensional (3D) visual representations (e.g. maximum intensity projection, minimum intensity projection, ray sum, surface and volume rendering). Distinct didactic modules which illustrate the principles of CBCT systems, guided navigation of the volumetric dataset, and anatomic correlation of 3D models and 2D MPR graphics were developed using a hybrid combination of web authoring and image analysis techniques. Interactive web multimedia instruction was facilitated by the use of dynamic highlighting and labelling, and rendered video illustrations, supplemented with didactic textual material. HTML coding and Java scripting were heavily implemented for the blending of the educational modules. An interactive, multimedia educational tool for visualizing the morphology and interrelationships of osseous craniofacial anatomy, as depicted on CBCT MPR and 3D images, was designed and implemented. The present design of a web-based instruction module may assist radiologists and clinicians in learning how to recognize and interpret the craniofacial anatomy of CBCT based images more efficiently.

  14. [Relationship between Body Height and Craniofacial Lines Measured by CT in Southwest Han Males].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Meng; Luo, Ying-zhen; Fan, Fei; Yun, Li-bing; Deng, Zhen-hua

    2016-04-01

    To establish regression model between craniofacial lines and body height by measuring craniofacial lines in Southwest Han males using CT and to accumulate data for the study of forensic anthropology. Head CT data of 273 Han males in Southwest were collected and 7 craniofacial lines were determined. Multiplanar reconstruction and volume rendering were performed by image post-processing software and the selected lines were measured. The relationship between each measuring indicator and body height was analyzed using SPSS 21.0 software. The regression equation of body height estimation was established and 50 samples were selected again and put into the mathematics models to verify its accuracy. The linear regression equations of 7 lines were established (P estimate (SEE) were 4.597-5.023 cm. The correlation coefficients of the multiple linear regression equation were 0.494-0.524 and the SEE were 4.418-4.458 cm. The return tests showed that the highest ± 1SEE accuracy of the multiple regression equation: y = 83.959+3.589 x6+2.573 x2, were 30%; and the highest ± 2SEE accuracy of the multiple regression equation: y = 72.646+3.316 x6+1.586 x2+1.553 x4+2.211 x3, were 92%. There is significant linear correlation between 7 selected lines and the stature in this study, and the plural linear regression equation established could be applied for estimating the stature of Southwest Han males.

  15. Influences of palatoplasty by the push-back procedure on craniofacial morphology and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Kudo, Motonori; Yamamoto, Yuko

    2012-12-01

    For patients with a cleft palate, the push-back procedure which accompanies posterior shifting of palatal flap is thought to be most effective way of. achieving adequate velopharyngeal function. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the influences of the push-back procedure on the craniofacial morphology and its growth. Using cephalometry we compared the craniofacial morphology and growth of three groups of Japanese children, living in the same region (Hokkaido, Japan). 1) 28 children (13 girls and 15 boys) with operated submucous cleft palates at the ages of 9 and 14 respectively. 2) 12 age-matched children (7 girls and 5 boys) with unoperated submucous cleft palates. 3) 60 age-matched non-cleft children (30 girls and 30 boys) with normal occlusion. None of them received dentofacial orthopaedic treatment. While the patients who had been operated on had significant differences in posterior upper facial height and inclination of the palatal plane when compared with non-cleft children or unoperated cleft children, they showed no statistically significant difference in anteroposterior positioning of anterior part of the maxilla, compared with the unoperated. The influences of palatoplasty by the push-back procedure with posterior positioning of the palatal flaps on craniofacial morphology are additional to the cleft palate, and of minor concern. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 3D-Printing Technologies for Craniofacial Rehabilitation, Reconstruction, and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Ethan L; Farris, Ashley L; Hung, Ben P; Dias, Miguel; Garcia, Juan R; Dorafshar, Amir H; Grayson, Warren L

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of craniofacial defects can present many challenges due to the variety of tissue-specific requirements and the complexity of anatomical structures in that region. 3D-printing technologies provide clinicians, engineers and scientists with the ability to create patient-specific solutions for craniofacial defects. Currently, there are three key strategies that utilize these technologies to restore both appearance and function to patients: rehabilitation, reconstruction and regeneration. In rehabilitation, 3D-printing can be used to create prostheses to replace or cover damaged tissues. Reconstruction, through plastic surgery, can also leverage 3D-printing technologies to create custom cutting guides, fixation devices, practice models and implanted medical devices to improve patient outcomes. Regeneration of tissue attempts to replace defects with biological materials. 3D-printing can be used to create either scaffolds or living, cellular constructs to signal tissue-forming cells to regenerate defect regions. By integrating these three approaches, 3D-printing technologies afford the opportunity to develop personalized treatment plans and design-driven manufacturing solutions to improve aesthetic and functional outcomes for patients with craniofacial defects.

  17. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: Case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Elif Bahar; Koruyucu, Mine; Kürklü, Esma; Çifter, Muhsin; Gençay, Koray; Seymen, Figen; Tüysüz, Beyhan

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this case series was to determine the oral, dental and craniofacial features of patients with EvC syndrome. Eight patients with EvC syndrome were enrolled. A complete family history, pedigree analysis, detailed medical history were collected. Findings of clinical examination, including craniofacial and orodental manifestations, and radiological investigations were thoroughly studied. All eight patients had characteristic face, hypertrophic frenulum, conical and peg-shaped teeth, hypodontia of deciduous and/or permanent teeth and also skeletal dysplasia, small chest, short stature and hypoplastic nails. Additionally dysmorphic filtrum, serrated appearance of gingiva, diastema, enamel hypoplasia, microdontia, taurodontism, single rooted permanent molar, delayed eruption and high caries rate were observed with varying degrees. Cephalometric evaluation revealed skeletal Class III growth pattern in four subjects and Class II growth pattern in one subject. Evaluation of craniofacial and orodental anomalies of EvC syndrome is required for accurate differential diagnosis from other congenital syndromes. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Visual pathway-related horizontal reference plane for three-dimensional craniofacial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Y H; Kim, B C; Park, K R; Yon, J Y; Kim, H J; Tak, H J; Piao, Z; Kim, M K; Lee, S H

    2012-11-01

    To construct three-dimensional (3D) horizontal reference planes based on visual pathway and to determine their stability and reliability by analyzing the structural patterns of normal and dysmorphology for 3D craniofacial analysis. Thirty-six subjects with maxillofacial dysmorphology and malocclusion, and eight normal controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS POPULATION: On the 3D computed tomographic images of the subjects, the visual pathway-based planes, including the orbital axis plane (OAP), visual axis plane (VAP), and the optical axis plane (OpAP), were constructed and evaluated. The OAP, but not the VAP and OpAP, showed the ideal relationship between the midsagittal and posterior maxillary plane, and properly described the different patterns of maxillofacial dysmorphology with craniofacial plane 1 of Delaire's analysis and the occlusal plane. The proposed visual pathway-related horizontal reference planes, and in particular the OAP, seem to correctly express the visual axis and the position of the head in natural head position and can be used as a horizontal reference plane for the 3D analysis of craniofacial dysmorphology and anthropology. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Ethnical evaluation of Bangladeshi young adults in terms of morphometrically-analyzed craniofacial skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Md. Rizvi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphometric study for the craniofacial relations and variations in humans have long been used to differentiate various racial groups in physical anthropology. The objective of this study was to describe the morphological features of craniofacial skeleton in Bangladeshi young adults and to compare it with already reported standards for the Caucasian population as well as cephalometric values of other Indian races using Steiner′s reference norms. The study was conducted for 52 Bangladeshi young adults (27 male and 25 females, aged 21-27 years, having balanced and harmonious facial profiles, clinically acceptable occlusion with permanent dentition and no history of orthodontic treatment. Lateral cephalograms taken of these subjects were used for a series of morphometric analyses. Bangladeshi subjects were more protrusive skeletally and dentally than Caucasians. Furthermore, the mandibular plane angle was smaller in Bangladeshi subjects than in the Caucasians. Present results also suggest that the Astrics, Dravidians, and Armenoid who penetrated into Bengal in the early ages may have contributed substantially to the morphogenesis of craniofacial skeleton in the present Bengalis. The results of this study support the idea that a single standard of facial esthetics should not be applied to all racial and ethnic groups.

  20. Craniofacial Reconstruction by a Cost-Efficient Template-Based Process Using 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Msallem, MD, DMD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Craniofacial defects often result in aesthetic and functional deficits, which affect the patient’s psyche and wellbeing. Patient-specific implants remain the optimal solution, but their use is limited or impractical due to their high costs. This article describes a fast and cost-efficient workflow of in-house manufactured patient-specific implants for craniofacial reconstruction and cranioplasty. As a proof of concept, we present a case of reconstruction of a craniofacial defect with involvement of the supraorbital rim. The following hybrid manufacturing process combines additive manufacturing with silicone molding and an intraoperative, manual fabrication process. A computer-aided design template is 3D printed from thermoplastics by a fused deposition modeling 3D printer and then silicone molded manually. After sterilization of the patient-specific mold, it is used intraoperatively to produce an implant from polymethylmethacrylate. Due to the combination of these 2 straightforward processes, the procedure can be kept very simple, and no advanced equipment is needed, resulting in minimal financial expenses. The whole fabrication of the mold is performed within approximately 2 hours depending on the template’s size and volume. This reliable technique is easy to adopt and suitable for every health facility, especially those with limited financial resources in less privileged countries, enabling many more patients to profit from patient-specific treatment.

  1. Cephalometric analysis of craniofacial morphology and growth in unrepaired isolated cleft palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Yang, Chao; Schreuder, Willem Hans; Shi, Jiayu; Shi, Bing; Zheng, Qian; Wang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the craniofacial morphology in patients with unrepaired isolated cleft palate (UICP) at childhood, adolescence and adulthood, in order to assess the influence of nonsurgical factors on the craniofacial growth in these patients. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms of 106 non-syndromic UICP patients and 102 normal matched controls were obtained and analyzed. Patients and controls were divided into three subgroups: children (5-7 years), adolescents (12-14 years), and adults (>18 years). UICP patients in childhood showed a shortened cranial basal length; reduced bony nasopharyngeal height; short maxillary depth and height with a posterior positioned maxilla and an increased width of the nasal cavity, maxilla and orbit; and a shortened mandibular length and height. UICP patients in adulthood showed a normal nasopharyngeal and mandibular morphology. However, the patients in this subgroup still showed a shortened cranial basal length, and short maxillary depth and anterior height with increased width of the nasal cavity, maxilla and orbit. Craniofacial morphology and growth in patients with UICP were significantly affected by nonsurgical factors. Growth of the cranial base and upper face were absolutely reduced, while growth of the bony nasopharynx and mandible were only postponed. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Partnership of Medical Genetics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery When Evaluating Craniofacial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Angela E

    2015-12-01

    A medical geneticist who has an interest in craniofacial anomalies forms a natural partnership with an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, which facilitates patient care. Using complementary diagnostic and therapeutic skills, the search for a recognizable pattern can lead to a syndrome diagnosis. After the initial examination, there is usually genetic testing to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Once established, care coordination and genetic counseling can be provided for the parents and the patient. Enrolling the patient into a research study could be helpful to understand the diagnosis but, in some circumstances, might not have immediate clinical relevance. A multidisciplinary craniofacial team is generally necessary for long-term management. This article discusses illustrative patients evaluated from 2007 through 2011 with the senior oral and maxillofacial surgeon at the Massachusetts General Hospital (Leonard B. Kaban, DMD, MD). These include single patients with the Nablus mask-like facies syndrome and auriculo-condylar syndrome and a series of 20 patients with Gorlin syndrome followed by a multispecialty team. A successful collaboration between a medical geneticist and an oral and maxillofacial surgeon optimizes the treatment of patients with craniofacial anomalies. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. UTX-guided neural crest function underlies craniofacial features of Kabuki syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpargel, Karl B; Starmer, Joshua; Wang, Chaochen; Ge, Kai; Magnuson, Terry

    2017-10-24

    Kabuki syndrome, a congenital craniofacial disorder, manifests from mutations in an X-linked histone H3 lysine 27 demethylase (UTX/KDM6A) or a H3 lysine 4 methylase (KMT2D). However, the cellular and molecular etiology of histone-modifying enzymes in craniofacial disorders is unknown. We now establish Kabuki syndrome as a neurocristopathy, whereby the majority of clinical features are modeled in mice carrying neural crest (NC) deletion of UTX, including craniofacial dysmorphism, cardiac defects, and postnatal growth retardation. Female UTX NC knockout (FKO) demonstrates enhanced phenotypic severity over males (MKOs), due to partial redundancy with UTY, a Y-chromosome demethylase-dead homolog. Thus, NC cells may require demethylase-independent UTX activity. Consistently, Kabuki causative point mutations upstream of the JmjC domain do not disrupt UTX demethylation. We have isolated primary NC cells at a phenocritical postmigratory timepoint in both FKO and MKO mice, and genome-wide expression and histone profiling have revealed UTX molecular function in establishing appropriate chromatin structure to regulate crucial NC stem-cell signaling pathways. However, the majority of UTX regulated genes do not experience aberrations in H3K27me3 or H3K4me3, implicating alternative roles for UTX in transcriptional control. These findings are substantiated through demethylase-dead knockin mutation of UTX, which supports appropriate facial development. Published under the PNAS license.

  4. Making Headway: The Roles of Hox Genes and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Trainor

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  5. Isotretinoin-induced craniofacial malformations in humans and hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, C C; Hill, R M; Irving, D W

    1986-01-01

    Oral administration of 40-80 mg/d of isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid, Ro 4-3780, Accutane) during the first month of human pregnancy can induce severe congenital malformation. The human Accutane dysmorphic syndrome includes rudimentary external ears, absent or imperforate auditory canals, a triangular microcephalic skull, cleft palate, depressed midface, and anomalies of the brain, jaw, and heart. Children who suffer from this syndrome have large occiputs with narrowing of the frontal bone. Microphthalmia is reported in two cases; notations are made about the orbits in three cases; and the fact that infants could not follow with their eyes is noted in three cases. A decrease in muscle tone is noted in six, cleft palate is present in four, and limb reduction defects are described in two. The cardiac malformations usually include overriding aorta, interrupted or hypoplastic aortic arch, and septation defects of atria and ventricles. There are at least two cases of abnormal origin of the subclavian arteries. Oral isotretinoin in the pregnant hamster also induces similar congenital malformations. A human case of isotretinoin-induced dysmorphia is presented and compared with other affected infants and affected hamsters. The metabolic fate and pharmacokinetic parameters of isotretinoin in humans and rodents are discussed in relation to the teratogenic response. The results suggest that humans are approximately 16 times more sensitive to the teratogenic effects of oral isotretinoin than are hamsters.

  6. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandible: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Parvathi; Thimmarasa, Vb; Mehrotra, Vishal; Agarwal, Mayuri

    2011-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is rare benign lesions of bone which are infrequent in craniofacial skeleton. ABC's are characterized by rapid growth pattern with resultant bony expansion and facial asymmetry. We describe a case of ABC in a 25 year old male patient affecting the body of the mandible with expansion and thinning of the buccal and lingual cortical plates. Treatment consisted of surgical curettage of the lesion. A one year follow- up showed restoration of facial symmetry and complete healing of the involved site.

  7. Cervical vertebral column morphology related to craniofacial morphology and head posture in preorthodontic children with Class II malocclusion and horizontal maxillary overjet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arntsen, Torill; Sonnesen, Ane Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    In preorthodontic children with Class II malocclusion and horizontal maxillary overjet, cervical column morphology was examined and related to craniofacial morphology and head posture for the first time....

  8. Relationships between craniocervical posture and pain-related disability in patients with cervico-craniofacial pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-de-Uralde-Villanueva I

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ibai López-de-Uralde-Villanueva,1–4 Hector Beltran-Alacreu,1–3 Alba Paris-Alemany,1–4 Santiago Angulo-Díaz-Parreño,2,3,5 Roy La Touche1–4 1Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Science, 2Research Group on Movement and Behavioral Science and Study of Pain, The Center for Advanced Studies University La Salle, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Aravaca, Madrid, Spain; 3Institute of Neuroscience and Craniofacial Pain (INDCRAN, Madrid, Spain; 4Hospital La Paz Institute for Health Research, IdiPAZ, Madrid, Spain; 5Faculty of Medicine, Universidad San Pablo CEU, Madrid, Spain Objectives: This cross-sectional correlation study explored the relationships between craniocervical posture and pain-related disability in patients with chronic cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP. Moreover, we investigated the test–retest intrarater reliability of two craniocervical posture measurements: head posture (HP and the sternomental distance (SMD. Methods: Fifty-three asymptomatic subjects and 60 CCFP patients were recruited. One rater measured HP and the SMD using a cervical range of motion device and a digital caliper, respectively. The Spanish versions of the neck disability index and the craniofacial pain and disability inventory were used to assess pain-related disability (neck disability and craniofacial disability, respectively. Results: We found no statistically significant correlations between craniocervical posture and pain-related disability variables (HP and neck disability [r=0.105; P>0.05]; HP and craniofacial disability [r=0.132; P>0.05]; SMD and neck disability [r=0.126; P>0.05]; SMD and craniofacial disability [r=0.195; P>0.05]. A moderate positive correlation was observed between HP and SMD for both groups (asymptomatic subjects, r=0.447; CCFP patients, r=0.52. Neck disability was strongly positively correlated with craniofacial disability (r=0.79; P>0.001. The test–retest intrarater reliability of the HP measurement was high for

  9. Error intraobservador en el análisis paleohistológico de superficies craneofaciales / Intra-observer error in paleohistological analysis of craniofacial surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Brachetta Aporta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available En el análisis histológico de las superficies óseas craneofaciales se registran rasgos microestructurales producidos por la actividad de modelado óseo, así como otros rasgos no vinculados al crecimiento normal (alteraciones tafonómicas. La identificación de las áreas producto de la actividad celular, así como la determinación de su distribución y su extensión total, puede estar sujeta a diversas fuentes de error. En este sentido, el objetivo del presente trabajo es evaluar el error intraobservador en el relevamiento de las microestructuras correspondientes a formación y reabsorción sobre superficies óseas craneofaciales vinculadas al modelado óseo. Para ello se realizó un diseño observacional de bloques completos aleatorios con medidas repetidas a partir de réplicas de alta resolución de la glabela, el malar y el maxilar observadas al microscopio de luz incidente. Los resultados permitieron detectar la existencia de tendencias en las observaciones a través del tiempo, así como diferencias en el reconocimiento según el tipo de superficie ósea y la región analizada. En general, se registró un aumento de la concordancia a través de las repeticiones en la observación del tipo de actividad y en la cuantificación de la extensión de las áreas de formación y reabsorción. Asimismo, se observó que presentan mayor dificultad en su análisis los rasgos asociados a la actividad de reabsorción así como las regiones con topografía abrupta, como la región maxilar. Estos resultados proveen un marco de referencia para evaluar la confiabilidad de las observaciones en futuros estudios paleohistológicos. PALABRAS CLAVE error de observación; diseño experimental; superficies de modelado óseo   Histological analysis of craniofacial bone surfaces reveals microstructural features produced by the activity of bone modeling, as well as other features not related to normal growth (taphonomic alterations. Identifying the areas

  10. Development of a guided bone regeneration device using salicylic acid-poly(anhydride-ester) polymers and osteoconductive scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ashley; Kim, Brian; Cottrell, Jessica; Snyder, Sabrina; Witek, Lukasz; Ricci, John; Uhrich, Kathryn E; O'Connor, J Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Successful repair of craniofacial and periodontal tissue defects ideally involves a combined therapy that includes inflammation modulation, control of soft tissue infiltration, and bone regeneration. In this study, an anti-inflammatory polymer, salicylic acid-based poly(anhydride-ester) (SAPAE) and a three-dimensional osteoconductive ceramic scaffold were evaluated as a combined guided bone regeneration (GBR) system for concurrent control of inflammation, soft tissue ingrowth, and bone repair in a rabbit cranial defect model. At time periods of 1, 3, and 8 weeks, five groups were compared: (1) scaffolds with a solid ceramic cap (as a GBR structure); (2) scaffolds with no cap; (3) scaffolds with a poly(lactide-glycolide) cap; (4) scaffolds with a slow release SAPAE polymer cap; and (5) scaffolds with a fast release SAPAE polymer cap. Cellular infiltration and bone formation in these scaffolds were evaluated to assess inflammation and bone repair capacity of the test groups. The SAPAE polymers suppressed inflammation and displayed no deleterious effect on bone formation. Additional work is warranted to optimize the anti-inflammatory action of the SAPAE, GBR suppression of soft tissue infiltration, and stimulation of bone formation in the scaffolds and create a composite device for successful repair of craniofacial and periodontal tissue defects. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Current trends and future perspectives of bone substitute materials - from space holders to innovative biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, Andreas; Handschel, Jörg; Drescher, Wolf; Rothamel, Daniel; Kloss, Frank; Blessmann, Marco; Heiland, Max; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Smeets, Ralf

    2012-12-01

    An autologous bone graft is still the ideal material for the repair of craniofacial defects, but its availability is limited and harvesting can be associated with complications. Bone replacement materials as an alternative have a long history of success. With increasing technological advances the spectrum of grafting materials has broadened to allografts, xenografts, and synthetic materials, providing material specific advantages. A large number of bone-graft substitutes are available including allograft bone preparations such as demineralized bone matrix and calcium-based materials. More and more replacement materials consist of one or more components: an osteoconductive matrix, which supports the ingrowth of new bone; and osteoinductive proteins, which sustain mitogenesis of undifferentiated cells; and osteogenic cells (osteoblasts or osteoblast precursors), which are capable of forming bone in the proper environment. All substitutes can either replace autologous bone or expand an existing amount of autologous bone graft. Because an understanding of the properties of each material enables individual treatment concepts this review presents an overview of the principles of bone replacement, the types of graft materials available, and considers future perspectives. Bone substitutes are undergoing a change from a simple replacement material to an individually created composite biomaterial with osteoinductive properties to enable enhanced defect bridging. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. GPS, su datum vertical.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Dörries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available La introducción de la metodología GPS en aplicaciones topográficas y geodésicas pone en notoria evidencia la clásica separación de sistemas de referencia en horizontal y vertical. Con GPS el posicionamiento es tridimensional, pero el concepto de altura difiere del clásico. Si se desea utilizar la información altimétrica debe contemplarse la ondulación del geoide.

  13. The Role of Ellis-Van Creveld 2(EVC2) in Mice During Cranial Bone Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Edwin K; Louie, Ke'ale; Kulkarni, Anshul; Yatabe, Marilia; Ruellas, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira; Snider, Taylor N; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Cevidanes, Lucia H S; Mishina, Yuji; Zhang, Honghao

    2017-09-26

    EvC syndrome is a type of autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia. Previous case studies in patients suggest abnormal craniofacial development, in addition to dwarfism and tooth abnormalities. To investigate how craniofacial development is affected in EvC patients, surface models were generated from micro-CT scans of control mice, Evc2 global mutant mice and Evc2 neural crest-specific mutant mice. The anatomic landmarks were placed on the surface model to assess the morphological abnormalities in the Evc2 mutants. Through analyzing the linear and angular measurements between landmarks, we identified a smaller overall skull, shorter nasal bone, shorter frontal bone, and shorter cranial base in the Evc2 global mutants. By comparing neural crest-specific Evc2 mutants with control mice, we demonstrated that the abnormalities within the mid-facial regions are not accounted for by the Evc2 mutation within these regions. Additionally, we also identified disproportionate length to width ratios in the Evc2 mutants at all levels from anterior to posterior of the skull. Overall, this study demonstrates a more comprehensive analysis on the craniofacial morphological abnormalities in EvC syndrome and provides the developmental insight to appreciate the impact of Evc2 mutation within the neural crest cells on multiple aspects of skull deformities. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Facial phenotyping by quantitative photography reflects craniofacial morphology measured on magnetic resonance imaging in Icelandic sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Schwab, Richard J; Maislin, Greg; Lee, Richard W W; Benedikstdsottir, Bryndis; Pack, Allan I; Gislason, Thorarinn; Juliusson, Sigurdur; Cistulli, Peter A

    2014-05-01

    (1) To determine whether facial phenotype, measured by quantitative photography, relates to underlying craniofacial obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk factors, measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); (2) To assess whether these associations are independent of body size and obesity. Cross-sectional cohort. Landspitali, The National University Hospital, Iceland. One hundred forty patients (87.1% male) from the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort who had both calibrated frontal and profile craniofacial photographs and upper airway MRI. Mean ± standard deviation age 56.1 ± 10.4 y, body mass index 33.5 ± 5.05 kg/m(2), with on-average severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index 45.4 ± 19.7 h(-1)). N/A. Relationships between surface facial dimensions (photos) and facial bony dimensions and upper airway soft-tissue volumes (MRI) was assessed using canonical correlation analysis. Photo and MRI craniofacial datasets related in four significant canonical correlations, primarily driven by measurements of (1) maxillary-mandibular relationship (r = 0.8, P weight and neck and waist circumference. However, tongue volume was no longer significant, suggesting facial dimensions relate to tongue volume as a result of obesity. Significant associations were found between craniofacial variable sets from facial photography and MRI. This study confirms that facial photographic phenotype reflects underlying aspects of craniofacial skeletal abnormalities associated with OSA. Therefore, facial photographic phenotyping may be a useful tool to assess intermediate phenotypes for OSA, particularly in large-scale studies.

  15. Cleft and Craniofacial Care During Military Pediatric Plastic Surgery Humanitarian Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Christopher; Lough, Denver; Lim, Alan; Harshbarger, Raymond J; Kumar, Anand R

    2015-06-01

    Military pediatric plastic surgery humanitarian missions in the Western Hemisphere have been initiated and developed since the early 1990 s using the Medical Readiness Education and Training Exercise (MEDRETE) concept. Despite its initial training mission status, the MEDRETE has developed into the most common and advanced low level medical mission platform currently in use. The objective of this study is to report cleft- and craniofacial-related patient outcomes after initiation and evolution of a standardized treatment protocol highlighting lessons learned which apply to civilian plastic surgery missions. A review of the MEDRETE database for pediatric plastic surgery/cleft and craniofacial missions to the Dominican Republic from 2005 to 2009 was performed. A multidisciplinary team including a craniofacial surgeon evaluated all patients with a cleft/craniofacial and/or pediatric plastic condition. A standardized mission time line included predeployment site survey and predeployment checklist, operational brief, and postdeployment after action report. Deployment data collection, remote patient follow-up, and coordination with larger land/amphibious military operations was used to increase patient follow-up data. Data collected included sex, age, diagnosis, date and type of procedure, surgical outcomes including speech scores, surgical morbidity, and mortality. Five hundred ninety-four patients with cleft/craniofacial abnormalities were screened by a multidisciplinary team including craniofacial surgeons over 4 years. Two hundred twenty-three patients underwent 330 surgical procedures (cleft lip, 53; cleft palate, 73; revision cleft lip/nose, 73; rhinoplasty, 15; speech surgery, 24; orthognathic/distraction, 21; general pediatric plastic surgery, 58; fistula repair, 12). Average follow-up was 30 months (range, 1-60). The complication rate was 6% (n = 13) (palate fistula, lip revision, dental/alveolar loss, revision speech surgery rate). The average pre

  16. Determination of craniofacial relation among the subethnic Indian population: A modified approach - (Sagittal relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sumathi Felicita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To measure the linear cephalometric dimensions of anterior and posterior segments of the craniofacial complex sagittally, to establish ratios between different linear dimensions of sagittal segments and check for dimensional balance among the various segments in subjects with normal occlusion, pleasing profile and facial harmony. Setting and Sample Population : Department of Orthodontics, Saveetha University. Lateral cephalograms of 120 subjects of both sexes in the age group of 17-28 years with normal occlusion belonging to Chennai, India Materials and Methods : Linear dimensions of anterior and posterior segments of the craniofacial complex were measured sagittally with the posterior maxillary plane as a key reference plane. Ratios were established between the various parameters in the anterior and posterior region. Results : A ratio of 1:1 was found to exist between the individual and aggregate sagittal segments of the craniofacial complex in both sexes. There was a statistically significant sexual dimorphism in the aggregate lengths(P=0.028,P=0.005.However, the ratio between the anterior cranial floor and effective maxillary length was 2:3 and 5:8 and that between anterior cranial floor to effective mandibular length was 5:8 and 3:5 in females and males respectively. The difference in the above values was not statistically significant. Conclusion : A dimensional balance was found to exist between the maxilla and mandible both at the dentoalveolar and skeletal level with a ratio of 1:1. There was also a dimensional balance between the posterior cranial floor and ramus width. However, there was no architectural balance between the anterior cranial floor and maxilla and mandible.

  17. Investigation of an outbreak of craniofacial deformity in yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, K N; Young, M J; Alley, M R

    2014-09-01

    To investigate an outbreak of severe craniofacial deformity in yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes, hōiho) chicks at a single breeding site on the Otago Peninsula in the South Island of New Zealand. Morbidity and mortality of yellow-eyed penguins breeding on the coastal regions of Otago was monitored from November 2008 to March 2009. Dead chicks and unhatched eggs were recovered and examined. Between October and December 2008 32 eggs were recorded at 17 nests in the Okia Reserve. Eleven chicks survived to about 90 days of age, of which eight were found to have moderate to severe craniofacial deformity. The six most severe chicks were subject to euthanasia and examined in detail at necropsy, and the remaining two affected chicks were released to the wild after a period of care in a rehabilitation centre. Post-mortem samples were analysed for inorganic and organic toxins. The six deformed chicks all had severe shortening of the mandible and maxilla by 20-50 mm. The rostral and caudal regions of the skull were approximately 40 and 80% of normal length, respectively. Other, more variable lesions included cross bill deformity, malformed bill keratin, microphthalmia with misshapen scleral ossicles and oral soft tissue excess thought to be secondary to bony malformations. During the same year, mild sporadic bill deformities were also reported in 10 unrelated chicks from >167 chicks at other breeding sites on the southern Otago coast. Concentrations of organic toxins and heavy metals in body tissues from affected chicks were apparently similar to those in unaffected chicks on other beaches. No cause of this outbreak of craniofacial deformity could be established although the high prevalence at a single site suggests that it was due to an unidentified local teratogen.

  18. Psychometric evaluation of a motor control test battery of the craniofacial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, H; Stotz, E; Both, A; Bahn, G; Armijo-Olivo, S; Ballenberger, N

    2017-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the structural and known-group validity as well as the inter-rater reliability of a test battery to evaluate the motor control of the craniofacial region. Seventy volunteers without TMD and 25 subjects with TMD (Axes I) per the DC/TMD were asked to execute a test battery consisting of eight tests. The tests were video-taped in the same sequence in a standardised manner. Two experienced physical therapists participated in this study as blinded assessors. We used exploratory factor analysis to identify the underlying component structure of the eight tests. Internal consistency (Cronbach's α), inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient) and construct validity (ie, hypothesis testing-known-group validity) (receiver operating curves) were also explored for the test battery. The structural validity showed the presence of one factor underlying the construct of the test battery. The internal consistency was excellent (0.90) as well as the inter-rater reliability. All values of reliability were close to 0.9 or above indicating very high inter-rater reliability. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.93 for rater 1 and 0.94 for rater two, respectively, indicating excellent discrimination between subjects with TMD and healthy controls. The results of the present study support the psychometric properties of test battery to measure motor control of the craniofacial region when evaluated through videotaping. This test battery could be used to differentiate between healthy subjects and subjects with musculoskeletal impairments in the cervical and oro-facial regions. In addition, this test battery could be used to assess the effectiveness of management strategies in the craniofacial region. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Comparative gene expression analysis of avian embryonic facial structures reveals new candidates for human craniofacial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugmann, S A; Powder, K E; Young, N M; Goodnough, L H; Hahn, S M; James, A W; Helms, J A; Lovett, M

    2010-03-01

    Mammals and birds have common embryological facial structures, and appear to employ the same molecular genetic developmental toolkit. We utilized natural variation found in bird beaks to investigate what genes drive vertebrate facial morphogenesis. We employed cross-species microarrays to describe the molecular genetic signatures, developmental signaling pathways and the spectrum of transcription factor (TF) gene expression changes that differ between cranial neural crest cells in the developing beaks of ducks, quails and chickens. Surprisingly, we observed that the neural crest cells established a species-specific TF gene expression profile that predates morphological differences between the species. A total of 232 genes were differentially expressed between the three species. Twenty-two of these genes, including Fgfr2, Jagged2, Msx2, Satb2 and Tgfb3, have been previously implicated in a variety of mammalian craniofacial defects. Seventy-two of the differentially expressed genes overlap with un-cloned loci for human craniofacial disorders, suggesting that our data will provide a valuable candidate gene resource for human craniofacial genetics. The most dramatic changes between species were in the Wnt signaling pathway, including a 20-fold up-regulation of Dkk2, Fzd1 and Wnt1 in the duck compared with the other two species. We functionally validated these changes by demonstrating that spatial domains of Wnt activity differ in avian beaks, and that Wnt signals regulate Bmp pathway activity and promote regional growth in facial prominences. This study is the first of its kind, extending on previous work in Darwin's finches and provides the first large-scale insights into cross-species facial morphogenesis.

  20. Serotonin 2B receptor signaling is required for craniofacial morphogenesis and jaw joint formation in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisoli, Elisa; De Lucchini, Stefania; Nardi, Irma; Ori, Michela

    2010-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator that plays many different roles in adult and embryonic life. Among the 5-HT receptors, 5-HT2B is one of the key mediators of 5-HT functions during development. We used Xenopus laevis as a model system to further investigate the role of 5-HT2B in embryogenesis, focusing on craniofacial development. By means of gene gain- and loss-of-function approaches and tissue transplantation assays, we demonstrated that 5-HT2B modulates, in a cell-autonomous manner, postmigratory skeletogenic cranial neural crest cell (NCC) behavior without altering early steps of cranial NCC development and migration. 5-HT2B overexpression induced the formation of an ectopic visceral skeletal element and altered the dorsoventral patterning of the branchial arches. Loss-of-function experiments revealed that 5-HT2B signaling is necessary for jaw joint formation and for shaping the mandibular arch skeletal elements. In particular, 5-HT2B signaling is required to define and sustain the Xbap expression necessary for jaw joint formation. To shed light on the molecular identity of the transduction pathway acting downstream of 5-HT2B, we analyzed the function of phospholipase C beta 3 (PLC) in Xenopus development and showed that PLC is the effector of 5-HT2B during craniofacial development. Our results unveiled an unsuspected role of 5-HT2B in craniofacial development and contribute to our understanding of the interactive network of patterning signals that is involved in the development and evolution of the vertebrate mandibular arch.

  1. Craniofacial reconstruction using patient-specific implants polyether ether ketone with computer-assisted planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Oscar J; Lalezarzadeh, Frank; Dayan, Erez; Shin, Joseph; Buchbinder, Daniel; Smith, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Reconstruction of bony craniofacial defects requires precise understanding of the anatomic relationships. The ideal reconstructive technique should be fast as well as economical, with minimal donor-site morbidity, and provide a lasting and aesthetically pleasing result. There are some circumstances in which a patient's own tissue is not sufficient to reconstruct defects. The development of sophisticated software has facilitated the manufacturing of patient-specific implants (PSIs). The aim of this study was to analyze the utility of polyether ether ketone (PEEK) PSIs for craniofacial reconstruction. We performed a retrospective chart review from July 2009 to July 2013 in patients who underwent craniofacial reconstruction using PEEK-PSIs using a virtual process based on computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing. A total of 6 patients were identified. The mean age was 46 years (16-68 y). Operative indications included cancer (n = 4), congenital deformities (n = 1), and infection (n = 1). The mean surgical time was 3.7 hours and the mean hospital stay was 1.5 days. The mean surface area of the defect was 93.4 ± 43.26 cm(2), the mean implant cost was $8493 ± $837.95, and the mean time required to manufacture the implants was 2 weeks. No major or minor complications were seen during the 4-year follow-up. We found PEEK implants to be useful in the reconstruction of complex calvarial defects, demonstrating a low complication rate, good outcomes, and high patient satisfaction in this small series of patients. Polyether ether ketone implants show promising potential and warrant further study to better establish the role of this technology in cranial reconstruction.

  2. Speech characteristics in a Ugandan child with a rare paramedian craniofacial cleft: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lierde, K M; Bettens, K; Luyten, A; De Ley, S; Tungotyo, M; Balumukad, D; Galiwango, G; Bauters, W; Vermeersch, H; Hodges, A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the speech characteristics in an English-speaking Ugandan boy of 4.5 years who has a rare paramedian craniofacial cleft (unilateral lip, alveolar, palatal, nasal and maxillary cleft, and associated hypertelorism). Closure of the lip together with the closure of the hard and soft palate (one-stage palatal closure) was performed at the age of 5 months. Objective as well as subjective speech assessment techniques were used. The speech samples were perceptually judged for articulation, intelligibility and nasality. The Nasometer was used for the objective measurement of the nasalance values. The most striking communication problems in this child with the rare craniofacial cleft are an incomplete phonetic inventory, a severely impaired speech intelligibility with the presence of very severe hypernasality, mild nasal emission, phonetic disorders (omission of several consonants, decreased intraoral pressure in explosives, insufficient frication of fricatives and the use of a middorsum palatal stop) and phonological disorders (deletion of initial and final consonants and consonant clusters). The increased objective nasalance values are in agreement with the presence of the audible nasality disorders. The results revealed that several phonetic and phonological articulation disorders together with a decreased speech intelligibility and resonance disorders are present in the child with a rare craniofacial cleft. To what extent a secondary surgery for velopharyngeal insufficiency, combined with speech therapy, will improve speech intelligibility, articulation and resonance characteristics is a subject for further research. The results of such analyses may ultimately serve as a starting point for specific surgical and logopedic treatment that addresses the specific needs of children with rare facial clefts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of a child with a craniofacial anomaly on stability of the parental relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Dane; Pai, Lori; Belfer, Myron L; Mulliken, John B

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine rates of divorce in parents of children with various types of craniofacial anomalies and to analyze possible confounding factors. A 29-question survey was sent to parents of all children evaluated in the Craniofacial Centre between 1992 and 1997. Parents were questioned regarding pre- and postnatal marital stability, whether the child's facial anomaly contributed to divorce, and involvement in the child's welfare. Using deformational posterior plagiocephaly as a control group, rates of divorce vs. non-divorce were compared for craniofacial anomalies, categorized as asymmetric (hemifacial microsomia, unilateral coronal synostosis, cleft lip, cleft lip/palate) or symmetric (syndromic-craniosynostosis, orbital hypertelorism, Treacher Collins syndrome). Major anomalies (hemifacial microsomia, craniosynostosis, orbital hypertelorism, Treacher Collins syndrome) were also compared to minor anomalies (cleft lip, cleft lip/palate). Surveys were sent to both parents in 412 families; 403 surveys were returned; and the results were evaluated in 275 families (67%). Frequency analysis demonstrated an overall divorce rate of 6.8% and 4.9% separation. Anomalies associated with the highest rate of divorce were hemifacial microsomia (24.0%), syndromic craniosynostosis (12.2%), and cleft lip/palate (6.8%). 79% of non-divorced couples reported a strong prenatal relationship, whereas 59% of divorced couples reported a problematic relationship. Following birth of the affected child, 47% of non-divorced couples responded that the bonds became stronger and 41% of divorced couples thought the relationship worsened. Two-sided Fisher exact test comparing control vs. all other anomalies showed significance (p=.030) for rates of divorce. Separation of anomalies into asymmetric vs. symmetric and major vs. minor categories demonstrated no significant difference in divorce rate (p>.05). The mother was more likely to become a child's primary caregiver

  4. Registries and evidence-based medicine in craniofacial and plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Brian C; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is a vital process for maintaining and improving quality and value in health care. However, evidence-based practice is most limited by the availability of research and outcomes data. Although randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been identified by numerous research organizations as the criterion standard for research methodology (eg, "level I evidence"), the execution of well-designed RCTs has proved either challenging or impossible in many surgical fields and with rare disease conditions. In particular, craniofacial and plastic surgery has been noted to be lacking in both the number and quality of RCTs. Many reasons are discussed for this dearth of research including inadequate sample size and challenges in randomization, blinding, and clinical equipoise. Yet, data for outcomes assessment are highly valued by surgeons and by consumers and payers. Therefore, alternative and more practical means for research and data collection must be sought. Observational studies of clinical practice are particularly useful for outcomes assessment despite relegation to a lower tier of evidence (eg, "level II evidence"). Functional databases with well-defined processes for data collection, called medical data registries, are an essential informatics tool to collect and store outcomes data and produce high-quality observational, practice-based research studies. A properly designed and implemented registry can provide surgeons with an abundance of data to perform research and quality improvement projects. In fact, registries may be superior in many ways to RCTs for craniofacial and plastic surgeons both pragmatically and functionally. In this commentary, we discuss the production of such registries in the framework of evidence-based practice and the relevant studies in craniofacial surgery.

  5. Exclusion of the PAX2 gene as a candidate gene for Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R.A.; Gorry, M.C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Warman, M. [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis (CFD, MIM 123500) is an abnormality of craniofacial development characterized by premature craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, and shallow orbits. We have mapped the CFD gene locus using a candidate gene approach to a 7 centiMorgan region on chromosome 10q in three CFD families. A maximal multipoint LOD score of 12.33 was achieved for a locus 2 cM distal to the microsatellite marker D10S209. A comparison of several physical, cytogenetic, and linkage maps revealed that the cytogenetic bands, 10q25-q26, most likely contain this CFD locus. The PAX2 gene, which has been mapped near another marker which in turn has been mapped to 10q25, was analyzed as a candidate gene. PAX2 was chosen for analysis because mutations in other members of the PAX gene family have been identified with human craniofacial abnormalities (e.g. Waardenburg syndrome). A YAC contig, consisting of 5 overlapping groups and composed of 11 YACs that spans the entire 7 cM region, was assembled for PAX2 analyses. None of these YACs supported PAX2-specific amplification using primer sets for both the second and third PAX2 exons. Control amplifications for YAC vector sequences produced robust amplifications in all cases. In addition, SSCP analyses of amplification products generated from the second and third PAX2 exons and the 3{prime} untranslated region of the PAX2 gene from both affected and unaffected family members in two of the kindreds failed to reveal any polymorphisms. Although it remains theoretically possible, due to artifacts in the YAC contigs, it is unlikely that PAX2 is the CFD gene.

  6. Calvarial Suture-Derived Stem Cells and Their Contribution to Cranial Bone Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Doro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the natural turnover during life, the bones in the skeleton possess the ability to self-repair in response to injury or disease-related bone loss. Based on studies of bone defect models, both processes are largely supported by resident stem cells. In the long bones, the source of skeletal stem cells has been widely investigated over the years, where the major stem cell population is thought to reside in the perivascular niche of the bone marrow. In contrast, we have very limited knowledge about the stem cells contributing to the repair of calvarial bones. In fact, until recently, the presence of specific stem cells in adult craniofacial bones was uncertain. These flat bones are mainly formed via intramembranous rather than endochondral ossification and thus contain minimal bone marrow space. It has been previously proposed that the overlying periosteum and underlying dura mater provide osteoprogenitors for calvarial bone repair. Nonetheless, recent studies have identified a major stem cell population within the suture mesenchyme with multiple differentiation abilities and intrinsic reparative potential. Here we provide an updated review of calvarial stem cells and potential mechanisms of regulation in the context of skull injury repair.

  7. Vertical Protocol Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groß, Thomas; Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander

    2011-01-01

    composition, and it is truly commonplace in today’s communication with the diversity of VPNs and secure browser sessions. In fact, it is normal that we have several layers of secure channels: For instance, on top of a VPN-connection, a browser may establish another secure channel (possibly with a different...... end point). Even using the same protocol several times in such a stack of channels is not unusual: An application may very well establish another TLS channel over an established one. We call this selfcomposition. In fact, there is nothing that tells us that all these compositions are sound, i.......e., that the combination cannot introduce attacks that the individual protocols in isolation do not have. In this work, we prove a composability result in the symbolic model that allows for arbitrary vertical composition (including self-composition). It holds for protocols from any suite of channel and application...

  8. Vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides a vertical cavity laser comprising a grating layer comprising an in-plane grating, the grating layer having a first side and having a second side opposite the first side and comprising a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index......, an index of refraction of the second low-index layer or air being less than 2; and a thickness of the cap layer and a thickness of the grating layer, and a pitch and a duty cycle of the grating structure are selected to obtain a resonance having a free-space resonance wavelength in the interval 300 nm to 3...... microns, the cap layer comprises an active region configured to generate or absorb photons at the free-space resonance wavelength by stimulated emission or absorption when a sufficient forward or reverse bias voltage is applied across the active region, a thickness of the first low-index layer is less...

  9. Assessment of the dental and skeletal effects of fan-type rapid maxillary expansion screw and Hyrax screw on craniofacial structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umarevathi Gopalakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the skeletal and dental effects of fan-type rapid maxillary expansion (RME appliance and Hyrax RME appliance on the craniofacial structures. Materials and Methods: The sample of the study included 12 patients with constricted maxillary arches. Acrylic bonded type of attachment was used for both groups. Changes in sagittal, vertical, and transverse relationship were assessed with lateral and frontal cephalograms, respectively. Intercanine and intermolar widths were measured with stone models. Pre- and immediate post-treatment records were statistically analyzed with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences between the groups were evaluated using Mann–Whitney U-test. Since the data pertaining to intercanine width and intermolar width were normally distributed, parametric test of signifi cance (unpaired t-test was used to compare them. Results: Results showed that Hyrax presented with signifi cantly greater increments for both nasal cavity width and maxillary width when compared to fan-type RME. Both groups had retroclination of incisors. The increase in the intercanine width was almost similar in both groups. Conclusion: Fan-type RME caused only minimal expansion of the intermolar width when compared to the Hyrax. The ratio between the intercanine and intermolar width expansion was nearly 4:1 in the fan-type RME and 0.75:1 in Hyrax.

  10. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Jong Woo Choi; Namkug Kim

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to m...

  11. 3-D analysis of tooth formation and eruption in patients with craniofacial anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiborg, Sven; Larsen, Per; Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1996-01-01

    -dimensional analysis from orthopantomograms, intra-oral X-rays or cephalometric radiographs. A method for visualization of the developing tooth crowns in three dimensions based on CT-scans of the jaws has been developed (Bro-Nielsen et al., 1996). The purpose of the present study was to apply this new visualization......A number of craniofacial anomalies or syndromes involve severe disturbances of tooth formation and eruption (e.g. Apert syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, tricho-dento-osseous syndrome, cleidocranial dysplasia, and cleft lip and palate). So far, studies of these dental problems have been limited to two...

  12. Clinical evaluation of a newly designed single-stage craniofacial implant: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Mohamed Moataz; Medra, Ahmed; Gauld, John

    2008-11-01

    Placing craniofacial implants in a 2-stage procedure requires an additional second-stage surgery that is tedious for patients and clinicians and results in additional cost. The purpose of this study was to clinically evaluate the use of a newly designed craniofacial implant for retaining facial prostheses, placed in a single-stage surgical procedure. Twenty-one newly designed craniofacial implants (OsteoCare Implant System) were placed in 7 patients, all seeking implant-retained auricular prostheses, using a single-stage surgical procedure. Modified O-ring abutments were directly screwed onto the implants at the time of surgery. Plastic washers were attached to the O-ring heads of the exposed abutments to avoid skin overgrowth to allow a single-stage surgical procedure. After a delayed loading period of 4 months, a silicone prosthetic ear was fabricated and retained using clips over the O-ring abutments. Implants and surrounding tissues were clinically evaluated at 1, 6, and 12 months following prosthesis insertion. The following were evaluated: periimplant abutment sebaceous crusting, periimplant abutment exudate, skin thickness, periimplant abutment tissue reaction, and implant mobility. Data was collected and statistically analyzed using the nonparametric Friedman's test for overall comparisons and Wilcoxon signed rank test for post hoc assessment of significance between follow-up periods. None of the implants failed to osseointegrate, providing a survival rate of 100%. Periimplant abutment sebaceous crusting values were significantly reduced at the 12-month test session (P<.05). Periimplant abutment skin thickness was also significantly reduced (P<.05) between the 6- and 12-month, and 1- and 12-month, follow-up visits. No significant difference was found throughout the follow-up period for periimplant abutment exudates and tissue reactions. None of the implants showed any signs of mobility throughout the study period. The use of the single-stage surgical

  13. Type III Klippel-Feil syndrome: case report and review of associated craniofacial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Sattur, Atul P; Kirty, R N; Thakur, Arpita Rai

    2011-07-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a complex syndrome of osseous and visceral anomalies that include the classical clinical triad of short neck, limitation of head and neck movements and low posterior hairline. It may also be associated with anomalies of the genitourinary, musculoskeletal, neurologic and cardiac systems. We report a case of type III KFS with associated rib anomalies such as cervical rib, fusion and bifid ribs, scoliosis and fused crossed renal ectopia. The aim of this paper was to summarize all craniofacial anomalies that occur in association with KFS, so that clinicians would be aware of them during diagnosis and treatment planning.

  14. Craniofacial abnormalities in goldenhar syndrome: a case report with review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumaresan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum is a rare congenital anomaly of unclear etiology and characterized by craniofacial anomalies such as hemifacial microsomia, auricular, ocular and vertebral anomalies. In many cases, this syndrome goes unnoticed due to a lack of knowledge about its features and because of its associated wide range of overlapping anomalies. Herewith, we present a case of Goldenhar syndrome in a 21-year-old male, who presented all the classical signs of this rare condition. This article also summarizes the characteristic features of patients with Goldenhar syndrome

  15. Craniofacial and dental characteristics of Goldenhar syndrome: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Elif B; Orino, Daisuke; Ogawa, Kei; Yildirim, Mine; Seymen, Figen; Gencay, Koray; Maeda, Takahide

    2011-03-01

    We describe the dental and craniofacial anomalies of 2 ethnically distinct patients with Goldenhar syndrome, which is characterized by hemifacial microsomia, facial asymmetry, and ear and dental abnormalities. A 7-year-old Japanese girl and 12-year-old Turkish boy with Goldenhar syndrome were examined clinically and radiographically; both had symptoms of hemifacial microsomia. Multiple organ involvement can limit surgical correction of deformities and affect patient management. Therefore, long-term regular follow-up by a multidisciplinary team is important to monitor the growth and development of patients.

  16. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 ± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  17. Your Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the top are called the cervical (say: SIR-vih-kul) vertebrae. These bones are in the back ... purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  18. Bone Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... posts Join Mayo Clinic Connect Bone scan About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  19. Bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology...... of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease...... modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities....

  20. A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68 as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression

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    Amsterdam Adam

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Craniofacial birth defects result from defects in cranial neural crest (NC patterning and morphogenesis. The vertebrate craniofacial skeleton is derived from cranial NC cells and the patterning of these cells occurs within the pharyngeal arches. Substantial efforts have led to the identification of several genes required for craniofacial skeletal development such as the endothelin-1 (edn1 signaling pathway that is required for lower jaw formation. However, many essential genes required for craniofacial development remain to be identified. Results Through screening a collection of insertional zebrafish mutants containing approximately 25% of the genes essential for embryonic development, we present the identification of 15 essential genes that are required for craniofacial development. We identified 3 genes required for hyomandibular development. We also identified zebrafish models for Campomelic Dysplasia and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. To further demonstrate the utility of this method, we include a characterization of the wdr68 gene. We show that wdr68 acts upstream of the edn1 pathway and is also required for formation of the upper jaw equivalent, the palatoquadrate. We also present evidence that the level of wdr68 activity required for edn1 pathway function differs between the 1st and 2nd arches. Wdr68 interacts with two minibrain-related kinases, Dyrk1a and Dyrk1b, required for embryonic growth and myotube differentiation, respectively. We show that a GFP-Wdr68 fusion protein localizes to the nucleus with Dyrk1a in contrast to an engineered loss of function mutation Wdr68-T284F that no longer accumulated in the cell nucleus and failed to rescue wdr68 mutant animals. Wdr68 homologs appear to exist in all eukaryotic genomes. Notably, we found that the Drosophila wdr68 homolog CG14614 could substitute for the vertebrate wdr68 gene even though insects lack the NC cell lineage. Conclusion This work represents a systematic

  1. Tooth agenesis and craniofacial morphology in pre-orthodontic children with and without morphological deviations in the upper cervical spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemi, Ashkan; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze differences in prevalence and pattern of tooth agenesis and craniofacial morphology between non syndromic children with tooth agenesis with and without upper cervical spine morphological deviations and to analyze associations between craniofacial morphology and tooth agenesis...... in the two groups together. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-six pre-orthodontic children with tooth agenesis were divided into two groups with (19 children, mean age 11.9) and without (107 children, mean age 11.4) upper spine morphological deviations. Visual assessment of upper spine morphology...... morphological deviations was discussed. The results may be valuable for the early diagnosis and treatment planning of non syndromic children with tooth agenesis....

  2. Craniofacial Morphology and Growth Comparisons in Children With Robin Sequence, Isolated Cleft Palate, and Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip and Palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, N. V.; Kreiborg, S.; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Comparison of early craniofacial morphology and growth in children with nonsyndromic Robin Sequence (RS), isolated cleft palate (ICP), and unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCCLP). Subjects: One hundred eight children with cleft: 7 with RS, 53 with ICP, and 48 with UCCLP were...... included in the study. The children were drawn from the group of all Danish children with cleft born 1976 through 1981. Method: Three-projection infant cephalometry. Results: The craniofacial morphology in the RS, ICP, and UCCLP groups had some common characteristics: a wide maxilla with decreased length...

  3. Vertical allometry: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Iftekhar; Boxenbaum, Harold

    2014-04-01

    In pharmacokinetics, vertical allometry is referred to the clearance of a drug when the predicted human clearance is substantially higher than the observed human clearance. Vertical allometry was initially reported for diazepam based on a 33-fold higher human predicted clearance than the observed human clearance. In recent years, it has been found that many other drugs besides diazepam, can be classified as drugs which exhibit vertical allometry. Over the years, many questions regarding vertical allometry have been raised. For example, (1) How to define and identify the vertical allometry? (2) How much difference should be between predicted and observed human clearance values before a drug could be declared 'a drug which follows vertical allometry'? (3) If somehow one can identify vertical allometry from animal data, how this information can be used for reasonably accurate prediction of clearance in humans? This report attempts to answer the aforementioned questions. The concept of vertical allometry at this time remains complex and obscure but with more extensive works one can have better understanding of 'vertical allometry'. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Mandibular aneurysmal bone cyst in a child misdiagnosed as acute osteomyelitis: a case report and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Christian; Paul, Hanna; Zimmermann, André; Braunstein, Stefan; Schaper, Jörg; Mayatepek, Ertan; Oh, Jun

    2010-08-01

    The aneurysmal bone cyst is a very infrequent, benign bone lesion in children which rarely can be found at the craniofacial skeleton. Here, we describe a case presenting in the mandible as an acute swelling of the cheek, which was initially misdiagnosed as osteomyelitis resulting in a delay to definitive surgical treatment. The cause of misleading diagnosis is often owing to the rapid growth of the lesion, sometimes associated with painful soft tissue swelling indicating an infectious origin or a malignant tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the classic characteristics of aneurysmal bone cyst with severe destruction of the mandible. Therefore, curative tumor embolization and complete surgical excision was successfully performed. The aneurysmal bone cyst is a curable condition by radical excision, although relapse may occur when only incomplete excision is obtained. Therefore, aneurysmal bone cyst should be considered early when children present with unusual, rapid-growing neoformations of the extremities or the facial region.

  5. pitx2 Deficiency results in abnormal ocular and craniofacial development in zebrafish.

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    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available Human PITX2 mutations are associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, an autosomal-dominant developmental disorder that involves ocular anterior segment defects, dental hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphism and umbilical abnormalities. Characterization of the PITX2 pathway and identification of the mechanisms underlying the anomalies associated with PITX2 deficiency is important for better understanding of normal development and disease; studies of pitx2 function in animal models can facilitate these analyses. A knockdown of pitx2 in zebrafish was generated using a morpholino that targeted all known alternative transcripts of the pitx2 gene; morphant embryos generated with the pitx2(ex4/5 splicing-blocking oligomer produced abnormal transcripts predicted to encode truncated pitx2 proteins lacking the third (recognition helix of the DNA-binding homeodomain. The morphological phenotype of pitx2(ex4/5 morphants included small head and eyes, jaw abnormalities and pericardial edema; lethality was observed at ∼6-8-dpf. Cartilage staining revealed a reduction in size and an abnormal shape/position of the elements of the mandibular and hyoid pharyngeal arches; the ceratobranchial arches were also decreased in size. Histological and marker analyses of the misshapen eyes of the pitx2(ex4/5 morphants identified anterior segment dysgenesis and disordered hyaloid vasculature. In summary, we demonstrate that pitx2 is essential for proper eye and craniofacial development in zebrafish and, therefore, that PITX2/pitx2 function is conserved in vertebrates.

  6. pitx2 Deficiency results in abnormal ocular and craniofacial development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Semina, Elena V

    2012-01-01

    Human PITX2 mutations are associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, an autosomal-dominant developmental disorder that involves ocular anterior segment defects, dental hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphism and umbilical abnormalities. Characterization of the PITX2 pathway and identification of the mechanisms underlying the anomalies associated with PITX2 deficiency is important for better understanding of normal development and disease; studies of pitx2 function in animal models can facilitate these analyses. A knockdown of pitx2 in zebrafish was generated using a morpholino that targeted all known alternative transcripts of the pitx2 gene; morphant embryos generated with the pitx2(ex4/5) splicing-blocking oligomer produced abnormal transcripts predicted to encode truncated pitx2 proteins lacking the third (recognition) helix of the DNA-binding homeodomain. The morphological phenotype of pitx2(ex4/5) morphants included small head and eyes, jaw abnormalities and pericardial edema; lethality was observed at ∼6-8-dpf. Cartilage staining revealed a reduction in size and an abnormal shape/position of the elements of the mandibular and hyoid pharyngeal arches; the ceratobranchial arches were also decreased in size. Histological and marker analyses of the misshapen eyes of the pitx2(ex4/5) morphants identified anterior segment dysgenesis and disordered hyaloid vasculature. In summary, we demonstrate that pitx2 is essential for proper eye and craniofacial development in zebrafish and, therefore, that PITX2/pitx2 function is conserved in vertebrates.

  7. Orthognathic Surgeries in Patients With Congenital Craniofacial Anomalies: Profile and Hospitalization Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2015-11-01

    To examine the occurrence of complications in patients with congenital facial anomalies who underwent orthognathic surgeries and to identify the role of patient-related factors in occurrence of complications. Retrospective analysis of hospital discharge database. Nationwide inpatient sample for the years 2004 to 2010. All patients with a diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate or congenital craniofacial anomalies and who had an orthognathic surgery were selected. Orthognathic surgery. Occurrence of complications. During the study period, a total of 8340 patients with congenital craniofacial anomalies underwent orthognathic surgeries. The overall complication rate was 9.1%. Six different complications (bacterial infections, hemorrhage, postoperative pneumonia, iatrogenic-induced complications such as accidental punctures/lacerations or pneumothorax, other infections, and respiratory complications) occurred in at least 1% of all patients having orthognathic surgeries. Ninety-five percent of patients were discharged routinely after surgery. Patients with high comorbid burden are at a higher risk for developing complications (P country and could serve as benchmarks for future well-designed prospective controlled studies to examine risk factors associated with complications for not only orthognathic surgeries but also for a wider range of surgical procedures.

  8. Dental and craniofacial characteristics in a patient with Dubowitz syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballini, Andrea; Cantore, Stefania; Tullo, Domenica; Desiate, Apollonia

    2011-01-27

    Dubowitz syndrome is a very rare, autosomal recessive disease characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, a high sloping forehead, facial asymmetry, blepharophimosis, sparse hair and eyebrows, low-set ears and mental retardation. Symptoms vary between patients, but other characteristics include a soft high-pitched voice, dental and craniofacial abnormalities, partial webbing of the fingers and toes, palate deformations, genital abnormalities, eczema, hyperactivity, preference for concrete over abstract thinking, language difficulties and an aversion to crowds. We describe the craniofacial and dental characteristics of a 12-year-old Caucasian Italian boy with both the typical and less common findings of Dubowitz syndrome. Diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome is mainly based on the facial phenotype. Possible conditions for differential diagnosis include Bloom syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, and fetal alcohol syndrome. As there are few reports of this syndrome in the literature, we hope this case report will enable health professionals to recognize the phenotypic alterations of this syndrome, and allow early referral for the necessary multidisciplinary treatments.

  9. Evaluation of Swallow Function in Patients with Craniofacial Microsomia: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Lande, Lara S; Caron, Cornelia J J M; Pluijmers, Britt I; Joosten, Koen F M; Streppel, Marloes; Dunaway, David J; Koudstaal, Maarten J; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2017-11-04

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is characterized by underdevelopment of the structures derived from the first and second pharyngeal arches resulting in aesthetic, psychological, and functional problems including feeding and swallowing difficulties. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into swallowing difficulties in patients with CFM. A retrospective study was conducted in the population of patients diagnosed with CFM at three major craniofacial units. Patients with feeding difficulties and those who underwent video fluoroscopic swallow (VFS) studies were included for further analyses. The outcome of the VFS-studies was reviewed with regard to the four phases of swallowing. In our cohort, 13.5% of the 755 patients were diagnosed with swallowing difficulties. The outcome of the VFS-studies of 42 patients showed difficulties in the oral and pharyngeal phases with both thin and thick liquids. Patients with more severe mandibular hypoplasia showed more difficulties to form an appropriate bolus compared to patients who were less severely affected. This is the first study to document swallowing problems in patients with CFM. Difficulties were seen in both the oral and pharyngeal phases. We recommend routine screening for swallowing issues by a speech and language therapist in all patients with CFM and to obtain a VFS-study in patients with a type III mandible.

  10. Mandibular reconstruction in the growing patient with unilateral craniofacial microsomia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluijmers, B I; Caron, C J J M; Dunaway, D J; Wolvius, E B; Koudstaal, M J

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the surgical correction of the mandible in unilateral craniofacial microsomia (UCM) performed in the growing patient, and its long-term outcome and stability. The following databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, and Web of Science. Articles reporting prospective and retrospective studies of patients not older than 16 years (N ≥ 4) who had undergone surgical correction of a craniofacial microsomia spectrum condition using grafts, osteotomies, distraction, or combinations of these, were reviewed. The period of follow-up was selected to be ≥1 year. After inclusion, the articles were evaluated on short- and long-term outcomes, relapse, and any increase in asymmetry following treatment. Thirty of 1611 articles were included in the qualitative synthesis. Analysis of the surgical mandibular correction of UCM showed that the outcome is not so much treatment-dependent, but patient-dependent, i.e. deformity gradation-dependent. The type I-IIa Pruzansky-Kaban patient had the best results with regard to minimal relapse and/or minimal increase in asymmetry. Single-stage correction of the asymmetry should be postponed until the permanent dentition stage. It can be concluded that in the treatment of the severely hypoplastic mandible, the patient will benefit from a multi-stage treatment protocol if indicated for functional or psychological problems. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  11. Dental and craniofacial characteristics in a patient with Dubowitz syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullo Domenica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dubowitz syndrome is a very rare, autosomal recessive disease characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, a high sloping forehead, facial asymmetry, blepharophimosis, sparse hair and eyebrows, low-set ears and mental retardation. Symptoms vary between patients, but other characteristics include a soft high-pitched voice, dental and craniofacial abnormalities, partial webbing of the fingers and toes, palate deformations, genital abnormalities, eczema, hyperactivity, preference for concrete over abstract thinking, language difficulties and an aversion to crowds. Case presentation We describe the craniofacial and dental characteristics of a 12-year-old Caucasian Italian boy with both the typical and less common findings of Dubowitz syndrome. Conclusion Diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome is mainly based on the facial phenotype. Possible conditions for differential diagnosis include Bloom syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, and fetal alcohol syndrome. As there are few reports of this syndrome in the literature, we hope this case report will enable health professionals to recognize the phenotypic alterations of this syndrome, and allow early referral for the necessary multidisciplinary treatments.

  12. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Three-Dimensional Craniofacial Models for Midfacial Distraction: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers-Vizena, Carolyn R; Sporn, Susan Flath; Daniels, Kimberly M; Padwa, Bonnie L; Weinstock, Peter

    2017-09-01

      Patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) models are increasingly used to virtually plan rare surgical procedures, providing opportunity for preoperative preparation, better understanding of individual anatomy, and implant prefabrication. The purpose of this study was to assess the benefit of 3D models related to patient safety, operative time, and cost.   Retrospective review.   Academic, tertiary care hospital.   Midfacial distraction was studied as a representative craniofacial operation. A consecutive series of 29 patients who underwent a single type of midfacial distraction was included.   For a subset of patients, computed tomography-derived 3D models were used to study patient-specific anatomy and precontour hardware.   Complications, operative time, blood loss, and estimated cost.   Twenty patients underwent midfacial distraction without and nine with preoperative use of a 3D model. Seven complications occurred in six patients without model use, including premature consolidation (3), cerebrospinal fluid leak (2), and hardware malfunction (2). No complications were reported in the model group. Controlling for surgeon variation, model use resulted in a 31.3-minute (7.8%) reduction in operative time. Time-based cost savings were estimated to be $1036.   Three-dimensional models are valuable for preoperative planning and hardware precontouring in craniofacial surgery, with potential positive effects on complications and operative time. Savings related to operative time and complications may offset much of the cost of the model.

  13. Mandibular movement and frontal craniofacial morphology in orthognathic surgery patients with mandibular deviation and protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Y; Yamada, K; Fukui, T; Hanada, K; Kohno, S

    2003-04-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the relationship between mandibular movement (lateral excursion and masticatory movements) and craniofacial morphology in 16 patients with mandibular deviation, using a six degrees-of-freedom measuring device. (i) Mandibular deviation was found to be significantly related to frontal maxillary and occlusal plane angles. (ii) Three-dimensional non-working condylar and incisal path lengths were longer during the lateral excursion to the non-deviated side than to the deviated side, and the incisal path moved antero-inferior. (iii) The lateral motion range of the incisal path was wider during masticatory movement on the non-deviated side than on the deviated side, and the molar and non-working condylar path lengths corresponding to the lateral range of the incisal path were also longer on the non-deviated side. The group with posterior crossbite showed a significantly smaller horizontal range of incisal path, and also significantly smaller frontal projected incisal and molar path angles during masticatory movement on the deviated side than on the non-deviated side. These results suggest that lateral excursion and masticatory movements could be related to craniofacial morphology and posterior crossbite.

  14. In vitro antimicrobial effects of grape seed extract on peri-implantitis microflora in craniofacial implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Binit; Theerathavaj, M L Srithavaj; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit

    2012-10-01

    To determine the antimicrobial effects of grape seed on peri-implantitis microflora. The grape seed extract was tested against peri-implantitis microflora most commonly found in craniofacial implants including reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Escherichia coli (E. coli), Candida albicans (C. albicans) and clinical strains of S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia (K. pneumonia) and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis) by disk diffusion test. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum cidal concentrations (MCC) were determined using modified agar dilution millpore method. The extract was further combined with polyethylene glycol and propylene glycol, and was tested for antimicrobial effects. Grape seed extract showed positive inhibitory effects with S. aureus at MIC of 0.625 mg/mL and MCC of 1.25 mg/mL respectively. However the extracts showed minimal or no reactivity against strains of E. coli, K. pneumonia, C. parapsilosis and C. albicans. The use of grape seed extract in combination with polyethylene glycol and propylene glycol also showed dose dependent inhibitory effect on S. aureus. The results of the study showed that grape seed has potential antimicrobial effects which can be further studied and developed to be used in the treatment of infected skin-abutment interface of craniofacial implants.

  15. A comparative study of craniofacial morphology of cleft lip children with or without palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Su Beom; Kim, Young Ju; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether any difference existed in craniofacial morphology between cleft children and normal subjects. Thirty three measurements of the various regions of cranium and face were obtained from lateral cephalometric radiograms in 40 cleft children (27 males, 13 females) and 40 normal subjects (23 males, 17 females) in our dental hospital from Jan. 1988 to Dec. 1995. The measurements were compared with those in control subjects who had no history of craniofacial abnormalities.. The obtained results were as follows; l. In the cranium, the cleft children had significantly shorter posterior cranial base length (S-Ba) and total antero-posterior cranial base length (N-Ba) (P<0.05). 2. In the upper face, the cleft children had significantly shorter upper anterior facial height (N-ANS) and upper posterior facial height (Ptm'-SNL) (P<0.05). 3. In the lower face, the cleft children had significantly shorter antero-posterior mandibular length (Pog-Ar) and antero-posterior mandibular body length (Pog-Go) (P<0.05). 4. In the facial profile, the cleft children had significantly shorter total facial height (N-Me) and posterior facial height (S-Go) (P<0.05).

  16. Geometric morphometrics in primatology: craniofacial variation in Homo sapiens and Pan troglodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J M; Wood, C G; Luboga, S A

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, morphometric studies have relied on statistical analysis of distances, angles or ratios to investigate morphometric variation among taxa. Recently, geometric techniques have been developed for the direct analysis of landmark data. In this paper, we offer a summary (with examples) of three of these newer techniques, namely shape coordinate, thin-plate spline and relative warp analyses. Shape coordinate analysis detected significant craniofacial variation between 4 modern human populations, with African and Australian Aboriginal specimens being relatively prognathous compared with their Eurasian counterparts. In addition, the Australian specimens exhibited greater basicranial flexion than all other samples. The observed relationships between size and craniofacial shape were weak. The decomposition of shape variation into affine and non-affine components is illustrated via a thin-plate spline analysis of Homo and Pan cranial landmarks. We note differences between Homo and Pan in the degree of prognathism and basicranial flexion and the position and orientation of the foramen magnum. We compare these results with previous studies of these features in higher primates and discuss the utility of geometric morphometrics as a tool in primatology and physical anthropology. We conclude that many studies of morphological variation, both within and between taxa, would benefit from the graphical nature of these techniques.

  17. Medicines and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Medici a ne n s d Bone Loss Some types of medicines can cause bone loss, making your bones weak, if used for a long time. Use over a short time ... old bone and replaces it with new bone. Bone loss occurs when old bone breaks down faster than ...

  18. Oxy133, a novel osteogenic agent, promotes bone regeneration in an intramembranous bone-healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Andrew; Hokugo, Akishige; Segovia, Luis Andres; Yalom, Anisa; Rezzadeh, Kameron; Zhou, Situo; Zhang, Zheyu; Parhami, Farhad; Stappenbeck, Frank; Jarrahy, Reza

    2017-05-01

    Current reconstructive techniques for complex craniofacial osseous defects are challenging and are associated with significant morbidity. Oxysterols are naturally occurring cholesterol oxidation products with osteogenic potential. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel semi-synthetic oxysterol, Oxy133, on in vitro osteogenesis and an in vivo intramembranous bone-healing model. Rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were treated with either Oxy133 or BMP-2. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, expression of osteogenic gene markers and in vitro mineralization were all examined. Next, collagen sponges carrying either Oxy133 or BMP-2 were used to reconstruct critical-sized cranial defects in mature rabbits and bone regeneration was assessed. To determine the mechanism of action of Oxy133 both in vitro and in vivo, rabbit BMSCs cultures and collagen sponge/Oxy133 implants were treated with the Hedgehog signalling pathway inhibitor, cyclopamine, and similar outcomes were measured. ALP activity in rabbit BMSCs treated with 1 μm Oxy133 was induced and was significantly higher than in control cells. These results were mitigated in cultures treated with cyclopamine. Expression of osteogenic gene markers and mineralization in BMSCs treated with 1 μm Oxy133 was significantly higher than in control groups. Complete bone regeneration was noted in vivo when cranial defects were treated with Oxy133; healing was incomplete, however, when cyclopamine was added. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Oxy133 has the ability to induce osteogenic differentiation in vitro in rabbit BMSCs and to promote robust bone regeneration in vivo in an animal model of intramembranous bone healing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. El polimetilmetacrilato en la reconstrucción craneofacial The polymethylmethacrylate in the craniofacial repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ángel Peñón Vivas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La reconstrucción de defectos craneofaciales constituye un reto para el cirujano maxilofacial. Si bien existe una amplia gama de materiales para la reconstrucción, cada cual tiene ventajas y desventajas además de indicaciones para su utilización. Por lo que nos hemos dado a la tarea de emplear el polimetilmetacrilato como una opción económica y efectiva en la reconstrucción de defectos craneofaciales. Con este objetivo se realizó un estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo, no comparativo, en el Servicio de Cirugía Maxilofacial del Hospital Universitario "Miguel Enríquez" en el periodo comprendido desde enero de 2006 a diciembre de 2008. Se incluyeron un total de 14 pacientes, los cuales recibieron tratamiento quirúrgico para la reconstrucción craneofacial mediante el empleo del polimetilmetacrilato. El mayor número de pacientes que recibieron tratamiento quirúrgico para la reconstrucción craneofacial con polimetilmetacrilato se encontró en el grupo de 16 a 25 años de edad, con un predominio del sexo masculino y mayor afectación de los pacientes de color de piel blanca. En todos los casos estudiados la etiología de la deformidad fue traumática; dentro de ellos el mayor por ciento le correspondió a los accidentes viales, seguido de los causados por violencia. El diagnóstico que predominó fue el de las fracturas orbitomalares de grado IV. El piso de órbita fue la localización o estructura más reconstruida. Se presentaron únicamente como complicaciones, la infección y la colección subcutánea. El polimetilmetacrilato es un material económico y efectivo que permite obtener excelentes resultados estéticos y funcionales en la reconstrucción de defectos craneofaciales adquiridos.The repair of craniofacial defects is a challenge for the maxillofacial surgeon. There are a great range of materials for reconstruction, where each has advantages and disadvantages as well as indications for its use. Polymethylmethacrylate is an

  20. Protected Vertices in Motzkin trees

    OpenAIRE

    Van Duzer, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we find recurrence relations for the asymptotic probability a vertex is $k$ protected in all Motzkin trees. We use a similar technique to calculate the probabilities for balanced vertices of rank $k$. From this we calculate upper and lower bounds for the probability a vertex is balanced and upper and lower bounds for the expected rank of balanced vertices.