WorldWideScience

Sample records for cranial nerves ix

  1. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Cranial Nerves IX and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Martins, Melina P; Moreira, Ana Lucila; Martins, Carlos R; Kimaid, Paulo A T; França, Marcondes C

    2018-01-01

    The cranial nerves IX and X emerge from medulla oblongata and have motor, sensory, and parasympathetic functions. Some of these are amenable to neurophysiological assessment. It is often hard to separate the individual contribution of each nerve; in fact, some of the techniques are indeed a composite functional measure of both nerves. The main methods are the evaluation of the swallowing function (combined IX and X), laryngeal electromyogram (predominant motor vagal function), and heart rate variability (predominant parasympathetic vagal function). This review describes, therefore, the techniques that best evaluate the major symptoms presented in IX and X cranial nerve disturbance: dysphagia, dysphonia, and autonomic parasympathetic dysfunction.

  2. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities. Copyright © 2013 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  4. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-01-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented

  5. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  6. Exophytic pilocytic astrocytoma of the brain stem in an adult with encasement of the caudal cranial nerve complex (IX-XII): presurgical anatomical neuroimaging using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousry, Indra; Yousry, Tarek A. [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); Muacevic, Alexander; Olteanu-Nerbe, Vlad [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Naidich, Thomas P. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York (United States)

    2004-07-01

    We describe a rare case of adult pilocytic astrocytoma in which exophytic growth from the brain stem presented as a right cerebellopontine angle mass. An initial MRI examination using T2- and T1-weighted images without and with contrast suggested the diagnosis of schwannoma. Subsequent use of 3D CISS (three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state) and T1-weighted contrast-enhanced 3D MP-RAGE (three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo) sequences led to the diagnosis of an exophytic brain stem tumor, documented the precise relationships of the tumor to cranial nerve VIII, revealed encasement of cranial nerves IX-XII (later confirmed intraoperatively), and provided the proper basis for planning surgical management. (orig.)

  7. Exophytic pilocytic astrocytoma of the brain stem in an adult with encasement of the caudal cranial nerve complex (IX-XII): presurgical anatomical neuroimaging using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousry, Indra; Yousry, Tarek A.; Muacevic, Alexander; Olteanu-Nerbe, Vlad; Naidich, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a rare case of adult pilocytic astrocytoma in which exophytic growth from the brain stem presented as a right cerebellopontine angle mass. An initial MRI examination using T2- and T1-weighted images without and with contrast suggested the diagnosis of schwannoma. Subsequent use of 3D CISS (three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state) and T1-weighted contrast-enhanced 3D MP-RAGE (three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo) sequences led to the diagnosis of an exophytic brain stem tumor, documented the precise relationships of the tumor to cranial nerve VIII, revealed encasement of cranial nerves IX-XII (later confirmed intraoperatively), and provided the proper basis for planning surgical management. (orig.)

  8. Intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C Michel

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of intraoperative monitoring is to preserve function and prevent injury to the nervous system at a time when clinical examination is not possible. Cranial nerves are delicate structures and are susceptible to damage by mechanical trauma or ischemia during intracranial and extracranial surgery. A number of reliable electrodiagnostic techniques, including nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and the recording of evoked potentials have been adapted to the study of cranial nerve function during surgery. A growing body of evidence supports the utility of intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerve nerves during selected surgical procedures.

  9. Lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cranial nerve involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezyar, E.; Atahan, I.L.; Akyol, F.H.; Guerkaynak, M.; Zorlu, A.F.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1989, 23 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients presenting with cranial nerve involvement (CNI) of one or more nerves at the time of diagnosis were treated and followed-up in our department. All patients were irradiated with curative intent, and total doses of 50 to 70 Gy (median 65 Gy) were delivered to the nasopharynx. Cranial nerves VI, III, V, IV, IX, and XII were the most commonly involved nerves. The total response rate of cranial nerves was 74% in a median follow-up time of 2 years, with the highest rate observed in the third and sixth cranial nerves. All complete responses except two were observed in the first month after radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  12. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  13. Forces necessary for the disruption of the cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-04-01

    Manipulation of the cisternal segment of cranial nerves is often performed by the neurosurgeon. To date, attempts at quantifying the forces necessary to disrupt these nerves in situ, to our knowledge, has not been performed. The present study seeks to further elucidate the forces necessary to disrupt the cranial nerves while within the subarachnoid space. The cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII were exposed in six unfixed cadavers, all less than 6 hr postmortem. Forces to failure were then measured. Mean forces necessary to disrupt nerves for left sides in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, III, VIII, XI, VI, V, and II, respectively. Mean forces for right-sided cranial nerves in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, VIII, V, VI, XI, III, and II, respectively. Overall, cranial nerves requiring the least amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV, VII, and IX. Those requiring the highest amount of force included cranial nerves II, V, VI, and XI. There was an approximately ten-fold difference between the least and greatest forces required to failure. Cranial nerve III was found to require significantly (P cranial nerves II through XII. We found that cranial nerve IX consistently took the least amount of force until its failure and cranial nerve II took the greatest. Other cranial nerves that took relatively small amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV and VII. Although in vivo damage can occur prior to failure of a cranial nerve, our data may serve to provide a rough estimation for the maximal amount of tension that can be applied to a cranial nerve that is manipulated while within its cistern.

  14. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  15. Ophthalmoplegic and lower cranial nerve variants merge into each other and into classical Guillain-Barre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Bruggen, JP; van der Meche, FGA; de Jager, AEJ; Polman, CH

    We delineated the place of cranial nerve variants within the concept of clinically defined Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), In the ophthalmoplegic variant (n = 7) the oculomotor nerves were early involved, In a lower cranial nerve variant (n = 9) the cranial nerves IX, X, and XI were early involved.

  16. Literature review of cranial nerve injuries during carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, M S; Vijaynagar, B; Singh, P; Hamilton, G

    2007-01-01

    In the recent prospective randomised trials on carotid endarterectomy (CEA), the incidence of cranial nerve injuries (CNI) are reported to be higher than in previously published studies. The objective of this study is to review the incidence of post CEA cranial nerve injury and to discover whether it has changed in the last 25 years after many innovations in vascular surgery. Generic terms including carotid endarterectomy, cranial nerve injuries, post CEA complications and cranial nerve deficit after neck surgery were used to search a variety of electronic databases. Based on selection criteria, decisions regarding inclusion and exclusion of primary studies were made. The incidence of CNI before and after 1995 was compared. We found 31 eligible studies from the literature. Patients who underwent CEA through any approach were included in the study. All patients had cranial nerves examined both before and after surgery. The total number of patients who had CEA before 1995 was 3521 with 10.6% CNI (352 patients) and after 1995, 7324 patients underwent CEA with 8.3% CNI (614 patients). Cranial nerves XII, X and VII were most commonly involved (rarely IX and XI). Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of CNI has decreased (X(2) = 5.89 + 0.74 = 6.63 => p-value = 0.0100). CNI is still a significant postoperative complication of carotid endarterectomy. Despite increasing use of CEA, the incidence of CNI has decreased probably because of increased awareness of the possibility of cranial nerve damage.

  17. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of cranial nerve involvement in cryptococcal meningitis.

  18. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan A; Kumar A; Santosh V; Satishchandra P; Shankar S.K

    2000-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of...

  19. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  20. Cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Introduction. Cranial nerve palsy is a common clinical problem ... Methodology ... The two cases with three-nerve involvement were re- lated to viral encephalitis and cerebral contusion from ... RTA = road traffic accident.

  1. Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, U D; Adhikari, S

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve is most commonly due to its damage by trauma. A ten-month old child presented with the history of a fall from a four-storey building. She developed traumatic third nerve palsy and eventually the clinical features of aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. The adduction of the eye improved over time. She was advised for patching for the strabismic amblyopia as well. Traumatic third nerve palsy may result in aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. In younger patients, motility of the eye in different gazes may improve over time. © NEPjOPH.

  2. Multiple cranial nerve palsies complicating tympanomastoiditis: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otitis media either acute or chronic, is not uncommon in childhood. Multiple cranial nerve palsies occuring as a complication of either form of otitis media is unusual. A case of a nine year old boy with chronic suppurative otitis media with associated mastoiditis complicated with ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve palsies is ...

  3. Cranial nerves III, IV and VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, I.J.; Smoker, W.R.; Kuta, A.J.; Felton, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    Because of advances in CT and MR imaging, accurate identification and evaluation of cranial nerve lesions is now possible. Cranial nerves III, IV, and VI, providing motor and sensory control of the eye, can be evaluated as a unit. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the anatomy and pathology of these cranial nerves. We first illustrate their normal anatomic pathways from the brain stem to the orbit. This is followed by clinical examples of patients with a variety of isolated and complex palsies of these three cranial nerves. This is accomplished by inclusion of ocular photographs, correlative imaging studies, and the use of diagrams. Knowledge of the gross and imaging anatomy and the ophthalmologic manifestations of pathology affecting these three cranial nerves permits a tailored approach to their evaluation

  4. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy and its causative factors in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Lin; Zhang Youwang; Wu Yongru; Guo Xiaomao; Li Longgen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the incidence and causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 512 NPC patients who underwent radiotherapy from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1990 and from January 1, 1994 to December 31, 1995 were retrospectively analyzed. According to Fuzhou' 92 NPC Staging Classification, there are 31 patients in stage I, 212 in stage II, 198 in stage III and 71 in stage IV. All patients were treated by 60 Co or 6 MV X-ray with faciocervical fields or pre-auricular fields to primary area. Some patients were boosted by post-auricular fields or cranial fields. The median dose to the nasopharyngeal region was 7130 cGy by external beam radiotherapy. Thirty-four patients were boosted by brachytherapy. The medial dose to cervical lymph nodes was 6410 cGy as definitive treatment and 5480 cGy as prophylactic treatment. 101 patients were treated with combined chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 6.7 years . Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsies occurred in 81 among the 512 patients. The 5- and 10-year cumulative incidences were 10.3%, 25.4%, respectively. The most common affected nerve was XII. On multivariates analysis, cranial nerve invasion before radiation, chemotherapy, dose to the nasopharyngeal region and age were the independent factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy on nerve I-VII, while the N stage and the radiation fields were independent factors on nerve IX-XII. The cumulative incidence of cranial nerve I-VII palsies increased in patients with cranial nerve invasion, chemotherapy and the dose to the nasopharyngeal region (>7000 cGy). The cumulative incidence of cranial nerve IX- XII palsies increased in patients with advanced N stage. Patients in the first group of treatment field had the highest risk to progress cranial nerve IX-XII palsies, followed by the second group, and the third group had the lowest risk. Only 1 in 34 patients with brachytherapy

  5. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Spinal Accessory and Hypoglossal Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E

    2018-01-01

    Multiple techniques have been developed for the electrodiagnostic evaluation of cranial nerves XI and XII. Each of these carries both benefits and limitations, with more techniques and data being available in the literature for spinal accessory than hypoglossal nerve evaluation. Spinal accessory and hypoglossal neuropathy are relatively uncommon cranial mononeuropathies that may be evaluated in the outpatient electrodiagnostic laboratory setting. A review of available literature using PubMed was conducted regarding electrodiagnostic technique in the evaluation of spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves searching for both routine nerve conduction studies and repetitive nerve conduction studies. The review provided herein provides a resource by which clinical neurophysiologists may develop and implement clinical and research protocols for the evaluation of both of these lower cranial nerves in the outpatient setting.

  6. Electrophysiology of Extraocular Cranial Nerves: Oculomotor, Trochlear, and Abducens Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Praveen; Balzer, Jeffery R; Anetakis, Katherine; Crammond, Donald J; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2018-01-01

    The utility of extraocular cranial nerve electrophysiologic recordings lies primarily in the operating room during skull base surgeries. Surgical manipulation during skull base surgeries poses a risk of injury to multiple cranial nerves, including those innervating extraocular muscles. Because tumors distort normal anatomic relationships, it becomes particularly challenging to identify cranial nerve structures. Studies have reported the benefits of using intraoperative spontaneous electromyographic recordings and compound muscle action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation in preventing postoperative neurologic deficits. Apart from surgical applications, electromyography of extraocular muscles has also been used to guide botulinum toxin injections in patients with strabismus and as an adjuvant diagnostic test in myasthenia gravis. In this article, we briefly review the rationale, current available techniques to monitor extraocular cranial nerves, technical difficulties, clinical and surgical applications, as well as future directions for research.

  7. [Acute palsy of twelfth cranial nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz del Castillo, F; Molina Nieto, T; De la Riva Aguilar, A; Triviño Tarradas, F; Bravo-Rodríguez, F; Ramos Jurado, A

    2005-01-01

    The hypoglossal nerve or Twelfth-nerve palsy is a rare damage with different causes: tumors or metastases in skull base, cervicals tumors, schwannoma, dissection or aneurysm carotid arteries, stroke, trauma, idiopathic cause, radiation, infections (mononucleosis) or multiple cranial neuropathy. Tumors were responsible for nearly half of the cases in different studies. We studied a female with hypoglossal nerve acute palsy. We made a differential diagnostic with others causes and a review of the literature.

  8. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk [Dept. of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  9. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Hye; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  10. [From anatomy to image: the cranial nerves at MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Renata; Marrone, Valeria; Sardaro, Angela; Faella, Pierluigi; Grassi, Roberta; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the expected course of each of the 12 cranial nerves. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging depicts only the larger cranial nerves but SSFP sequences of magnetic resonance imaging are capable of depicting the cisternal segments of 12 cranial nerves and also provide submillimetric spatial resolution.

  11. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunction caused by neurosarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loor, Rivkah G. J.; van Tongeren, Joost; Derks, Wynia

    2012-01-01

    Neurosarcoidosis is a rare identity and occurs in only 5% to 15% of patients with sarcoidosis. It can manifest in many different ways, and therefore, diagnosis may be complicated. We report a case presented in a very unusual manner with involvement of 3 cranial nerves; anosmia (NI), facial palsy

  12. MR imaging of cranial nerve schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, M.; Peyster, R.; Cross, R.R.; Charles, J.; Murtagh, R.; Shapiro, R.; Chyatte, D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the major advantages of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over other imaging modalities is direct visualization of the cranial nerves. This is best accomplished with thin-section, contiguous T1-weighted images. They report a series of 75 cranial nerve neuromas, including 47 of the eighth nerve and a mixture of schwannomas involving all other cranial nerves (excluding the fourth). All tumors demonstrated at least some area of increased signal (equal to or greater than that of cerebrospinal fluid) on T2-weighted images. This fact enabled them to differentiate schwannomas from neoplasms (lymphoma, meningioma, sarcoma) that may be isointense on T2-weighted pulse sequences. Many of the lesions had areas of low signal intermixed with predominantly high signal (on T2-weighted images). The pathologic evaluation of these areas of decreased signal revealed predominant fibrosis. In addition, some of the neuromas had a cystic component. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging may permit detection when the nerve is still normal in size

  13. Cranial nerves in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil relatives (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, A

    2017-02-01

    Three systems, two sensory and one protective, are present in the skin of the living Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil lungfish, and the arrangement and innervation of the sense organs is peculiar to lungfish. Peripheral branches of nerves that innervate the sense organs are slender and unprotected, and form before any skeletal structures appear. When the olfactory capsule develops, it traps some of the anterior branches of cranial nerve V, which emerged from the chondrocranium from the lateral sphenotic foramen. Cranial nerve I innervates the olfactory organ enclosed within the olfactory capsule and cranial nerve II innervates the eye. Cranial nerve V innervates the sense organs of the snout and upper lip, and, in conjunction with nerve IX and X, the sense organs of the posterior and lateral head. Cranial nerve VII is primarily a motor nerve, and a single branch innervates sense organs in the mandible. There are no connections between nerves V and VII, although both emerge from the brain close to each other. The third associated system consists of lymphatic vessels covered by an extracellular matrix of collagen, mineralised as tubules in fossils. Innervation of the sensory organs is separate from the lymphatic system and from the tubule system of fossil lungfish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A case of bilateral lower cranial nerve palsies after base of skull trauma with complex management issues: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Alexander Christoph; Lettieri, Jennie; Grimley, Rohan

    2012-05-01

    Fractures of the skull base can cause lower cranial nerve palsies because of involvement of the nerves as they traverse the skull. A variety of syndromes have been described, often involving multiple nerves. These are most commonly unilateral, and only a handful of cases of bilateral cranial nerve involvement have been reported. We describe a 64-year-old man with occipital condylar fracture complicated by bilateral palsies of IX and X nerves associated with dramatic physiological derangement causing severe management challenges. Apart from debilitating postural hypotension, he developed dysphagia, severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, issues with airway protection as well as airway obstruction, increased oropharyngeal secretions and variable respiratory control. This is the first report of a patient with traumatic bilateral cranial nerve IX and X nerve palsies. This detailed report and the summary of all 6 previous case reports of traumatic bilateral lower cranial nerve palsies illustrate clinical features, treatment strategies, and outcomes of these rare events.

  15. Preventing lower cranial nerve injuries during fourth ventricle tumor resection by utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Faisal R; Minhas, Mazhar; Jane, John

    2012-12-01

    We present two cases illustrating the benefit of utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for prevention of injuries to the lower cranial nerves during fourth ventricle tumor resection surgeries. Multiple cranial nerve nuclei are located on the floor of the fourth ventricle with a high risk of permanent damage. Two male patients (ages 8 and 10 years) presented to the emergency department and had brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showing brainstem/fourth ventricle tumors. During surgery, bilateral posterior tibial and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs); four-limb and cranial nerves transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (TCeMEPs); brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs); and spontaneous electromyography (s-EMG) were recorded. Electromyography (EMG) was monitored bilaterally from cranial nerves V VII, IX, X, XI, and XII. Total intravenous anesthesia was used. Neuromuscular blockade was used only for initial intubation. Pre-incision baselines were obtained with good morphology of waveforms. After exposure the floor of the fourth ventricle was mapped by triggered-EMG (t-EMG) using 0.4 to 1.0 mA. In both patients the tumor was entangled with cranial nerves VII to XII on the floor of the fourth ventricle. The surgeon made the decision not to resect the tumor in one case and limited the resection to 70% of the tumor in the second case on the basis of neurophysiological monitoring. This decision was made to minimize any post-operative neurological deficits due to surgical manipulation of the tumor involving the lower cranial nerves. Intraoperative spontaneous and triggered EMG was effectively utilized in preventing injuries to cranial nerves during surgical procedures. All signals remained stable during the surgical procedure. Postoperatively both patients were well with no additional cranial nerve weakness. At three months follow-up, the patients continued to have no deficits.

  16. Potential Involvement of Draxin in the Axonal Projection of Cranial Nerves, Especially Cranial Nerve X, in the Chick Hindbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sanbing; Cui, Huixian; Wang, Lei; Kang, Lin; Huang, Guannan; Du, Juan; Li, Sha; Tanaka, Hideaki; Su, Yuhong

    2016-07-01

    The appropriate projection of axons within the nervous system is a crucial component of the establishment of neural circuitry. Draxin is a repulsive axon guidance protein. Draxin has important functions in the guidance of three commissures in the central nervous system and in the migration of neural crest cells and dI3 interneurons in the chick spinal cord. Here, we report that the distribution of the draxin protein and the location of 23C10-positive areas have a strong temporal and spatial correlation. The overexpression of draxin, especially transmembrane draxin, caused 23C10-positive axon bundles to misproject in the dorsal hindbrain. In addition, the overexpression of transmembrane draxin caused abnormal formation of the ganglion crest of the IX and X cranial nerves, misprojection of some anti-human natural killer-1 (HNK-1)-stained structures in the dorsal roof of the hindbrain, and a simultaneous reduction in the efferent nerves of some motoneuron axons inside the hindbrain. Our data reveal that draxin might be involved in the fascicular projection of cranial nerves in the hindbrain. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  17. Arterial supply of the lower cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Loukas, Marios; Fisher, Winfield S; Rizk, Elias; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    The lower cranial nerves receive their arterial supply from an intricate network of tributaries derived from the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories. A contemporary, comprehensive literature review of the vascular supply of the lower cranial nerves was performed. The vascular supply to the trigeminal, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, spinal accessory, and hypoglossal nerves are illustrated with a special emphasis on clinical issues. Frequently the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories all contribute to the vascular supply of an individual cranial nerve along its course. Understanding of the vasculature of the lower cranial nerves is of great relevance for skull base surgery. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-11-01

    The arterial supply to the upper cranial nerves is derived from a complex network of branches derived from the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. We performed a comprehensive literature review of the arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves with an emphasis on clinical considerations. Arteries coursing in close proximity to the cranial nerves regularly give rise to small vessels that supply the nerve. Knowledge of the arteries supplying the cranial nerves is of particular importance during surgical approaches to the skull base. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, P.S.; Bataini, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with 35 cranial nerve palsies were seen at the Fondation Curie during follow-up after radical radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. The twelfth nerve was involved in 19 cases, the tenth in nine, and the eleventh in five; the fifth and second nerves were involved once each and in the same patient. The twelfth nerve was involved alone in 16 patients and the tenth nerve alone in three, with multiple nerves involved in the remaining six patients. The palsy was noted from 12 to 145 months after diagnosis of the tumor. The latency period could be correlated with dose so that the least square fit equation representing NSD vs delay is NSD = 2598--Delay (in months) x 4.6, with a correlation coefficient of -0.58. The distinction between tumor recurrence and radiation-induced nerve palsy is critical. It can often be inferred from the latency period but must be confirmed by observation over a period of time

  20. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Trigeminal and Facial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Iryna M; Estephan, Bachir

    2018-01-01

    The clinical examination of the trigeminal and facial nerves provides significant diagnostic value, especially in the localization of lesions in disorders affecting the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The electrodiagnostic evaluation of these nerves and their pathways adds further accuracy and reliability to the diagnostic investigation and the localization process, especially when different testing methods are combined based on the clinical presentation and the electrophysiological findings. The diagnostic uniqueness of the trigeminal and facial nerves is their connectivity and their coparticipation in reflexes commonly used in clinical practice, namely the blink and corneal reflexes. The other reflexes used in the diagnostic process and lesion localization are very nerve specific and add more diagnostic yield to the workup of certain disorders of the nervous system. This article provides a review of commonly used electrodiagnostic studies and techniques in the evaluation and lesion localization of cranial nerves V and VII.

  1. Ramsay Hunt syndrome with unilateral polyneuropathy involving cranial nerves V, VII, VIII, and XII in a diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Lian; Yan, Jian-Liang; Chen, Li-Li

    2011-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare complication of the varicella zoster virus, defined as a peripheral facial palsy that typically results from involvement of the facial and auditory nerves. Ramsay Hunt syndrome can be associated with cranial nerves V, VI, IX, and X but rarely with XII. We describe an atypical case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with multiple cranial nerve involvement of nerves V, VII, VIII, and XII. Antiviral drugs, antibiotics, insulin, and traditional Chinese drugs were administered immediately after admission. After 3 months of combination therapy, the patient had recovered satisfactorily. Herpes zoster can cause severe infections in diabetic patients and should be treated as soon after detection as possible. Ramsay Hunt syndrome should be recognized as a polycranial neuritis characterized by damage to sensory and motor nerves. In addition to facial and vestibular nerve paralysis, Ramsay Hunt syndrome may also involve cranial nerves V and XII.

  2. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Ruikar, Devashish; Surath, Mohandas

    2013-07-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  3. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Subrat Kumar Nanda; Sita Jayalakshmi; Devashish Ruikar; Mohandas Surath

    2013-01-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is...

  4. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrat Kumar Nanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth. Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  5. Cranial nerves - spectrum of inflammatory and tumorous changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, S.F.; Kasprian, G.; Nemec, U.; Czerny, C.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory processes as well as primary and secondary tumorous changes may involve cranial nerves causing neurological deficits. In addition to neurologists, ENT physicians, ophthalmologists and maxillofacial surgeons, radiologists play an important role in the investigation of patients with cranial nerve symptoms. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and particularly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow the depiction of the cranial nerve anatomy and pathological neural changes. This article briefly describes the imaging techniques in MDCT and MRI and is dedicated to the radiological presentation of inflammatory and tumorous cranial nerve pathologies. (orig.) [de

  6. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Chaudhary, N.; Fareedi, S.; Woo, E.K.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality

  7. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sejconnor@tiscali.co.uk; Chaudhary, N. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Fareedi, S. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Woo, E.K. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality.

  8. Imaging of Cranial Nerves III, IV, VI in Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong Min

    2017-06-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders are a group of diseases caused by abnormal development of cranial nerve nuclei or their axonal connections, resulting in aberrant innervation of the ocular and facial musculature. Its diagnosis could be facilitated by the development of high resolution thin-section magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this review is to describe the method to visualize cranial nerves III, IV, and VI and to present the imaging findings of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders including congenital oculomotor nerve palsy, congenital trochlear nerve palsy, Duane retraction syndrome, Möbius syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, synergistic divergence, and synergistic convergence. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society.

  9. The naming of the cranial nerves: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew C; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Bosmia, Anand N; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-01-01

    The giants of medicine and anatomy have each left their mark on the history of the cranial nerves, and much of the history of anatomic study can be viewed through the lens of how the cranial nerves were identified and named. A comprehensive literature review on the classification of the cranial names was performed. The identification of the cranial nerves began with Galen in the 2nd century AD and evolved up through the mid-20th century. In 1778, Samuel Sömmerring, a German anatomist, classified the 12 cranial nerves as we recognize them today. This review expands on the excellent investigations of Flamm, Shaw, and Simon et al., with discussion of the historical identification as well as the process of naming the human cranial nerves. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evaluation of the Predictive Value of Intraoperative Changes in Motor-Evoked Potentials of Caudal Cranial Nerves for the Postoperative Functional Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Marcel; Tatagiba, Marcos; Liebsch, Marina; Feigl, Guenther C

    2016-11-01

    The predictive value of changes in intraoperatively acquired motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) IX-X (glossopharyngeal-vagus nerve) and CN XII (hypoglossal nerve) on operative outcomes was investigated. MEPs of CN IX-X and CN XII were recorded intraoperatively in 63 patients undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. We correlated the changes of the MEPs with postoperative nerve function. For CN IX-X, we found a correlation between the amplitude of the MEP ratio and uvula deviation (P = 0.028) and the amplitude duration of the MEP and gag reflex function (P = 0.027). Patients with an MEP ratio of the glossopharyngeal-vagus amplitude ≤1.47 μV had a 3.4 times increased risk of developing a uvula deviation. Patients with a final MEP duration of the CN IX-X ≤11.6 milliseconds had a 3.6 times increased risk for their gag reflex to become extinct. Our study greatly contributes to the current knowledge of intraoperative MEPs as a predictor for postoperative cranial nerve function. We were able to extent previous findings on MEP values of the facial nerve on postoperative nerve function to 3 additional cranial nerves. Finding reliable predictors for postoperative nerve function is of great importance to the overall quality of life for a patient undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  12. Imaging assessment of isolated lesions affecting cranial nerve III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Martins, Jose Carlos Tadeu

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the anatomy and main pathologic conditions affecting cranial nerve III using imaging studies, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging methods are essential in the evaluation of patients with suspected lesions of the oculomotor nerve once signs and symptoms are unspecific and a large number of diseases can affect cranial nerve III. A brief review of the literature is also presented. (author)

  13. Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Due to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare clinical condition between cerebrovasculer diases. The most common findings are headache, seizure and focal neurological deficit. Multiple cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is rarely seen and it is not clear pathology. A pathology that could explain the lack of cranial nerve imaging is carrying suspected diagnosis but the disease is known to provide early diagnosis and treatment. We want to emphasize with this case multipl cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is seen rarely and good response to treatment.

  14. Preoperative percutaneous cranial nerve mapping in head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung I

    2003-01-01

    To identify and map the course of the peripheral branches of the cranial nerve preoperatively and percutaneously. Prospective study. Preoperative percutaneous nerve mapping performed prior to the operation under deep sedation or general anesthesia without muscle paralysis. Private office surgery suite, freestanding surgery center, and regional medical centers. A total of 142 patients undergoing head and neck surgery and facial plastic surgery between August 1994 and July 1999. Monopolar probe was used for nerve stimulation. Electromyographic reading was done through intramuscular bipolar recording electrodes. The equipment used was a nerve monitor. The mandibular divisions were tested in 142 cases, the frontal division in 60 cases, the accessory nerve in 12 cases, and the hypoglossal nerve in 3 cases. Satisfactory mappings were obtained in 115 cases of the mandibular division, 49 cases of the frontal division, 8 cases of the accessory division, and 1 case of the hypoglossal nerve. Preoperative percutaneous nerve mapping is a new method of identifying the location of the peripheral branches of the cranial nerves. Identifying and mapping the course of peripheral branches of the cranial nerves safely assists the head and neck surgeon in the placement of incisions in a favorable location and in the dissection of the area involving the nerves. Mapping alerts the surgeon to an area containing a nerve and allows the surgeon to avoid just the specific area where a nerve is present, preventing large-scale abandonment of unmapped areas for fear of potential nerve damage.

  15. Cranial nerve injury after Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-W; Chin, B-R; Park, H-S; Lee, S-H; Kwon, T-G

    2011-03-01

    A Le Fort I osteotomy is widely used to correct dentofacial deformity because it is a safe and reliable surgical method. Although rare, various complications have been reported in relation to pterygomaxillary separation. Cranial nerve damage is one of the serious complications that can occur after Le Fort I osteotomy. In this report, a 19-year-old man with unilateral cleft lip and palate underwent surgery to correct maxillary hypoplasia, asymmetry and mandibular prognathism. After the Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy, the patient showed multiple cranial nerve damage; an impairment of outward movement of the eye (abducens nerve), decreased vision (optic nerve), and paraesthesia of the frontal and upper cheek area (ophthalmic and maxillary nerve). The damage to the cranial nerve was related to an unexpected sphenoid bone fracture and subsequent trauma in the cavernous sinus during the pterygomaxillary osteotomy. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alexandra P; Grant, Ronald; Gupta, Abha A; Hodgson, David C; Nathan, Paul C

    2012-12-15

    Children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM RMS) and cranial nerve palsy (CNP) are at risk for permanent neurologic dysfunction. Clinicians often consider the use of emergent therapies such as expedited radiation and/or corticosteroids; however, there is a paucity of information describing the natural history of CNP in PM RMS. We sought to describe the clinical features of patients with PM RMS plus associated CNP and to evaluate the patient, disease, and treatment-related factors that impacted neurologic recovery. We conducted a retrospective review of PM RMS cases treated at the Hospital for Sick Children between 1985 and 2010. Thirty-five children were treated for PM RMS, 19 (54%) of whom presented with CNP. Children with CNP were nine times more likely to have other high-risk features (cranial base bony erosion and/or intracranial extension) at the time of presentation than children without CNP (OR 9.6, 95% CI 1.69, 54.79, P = 0.013). In addition to commencing chemotherapy, 13 patients (68%) received expedited RT and corticosteroids, four (21%) corticosteroids alone, and two (11%) received only standard chemotherapy and RT. At last follow up of the 11 survivors, neurologic recovery was complete in five (45%), partial in five (45%), and absent in one (9%). In our cohort, recovery of PM RMS associated CNP was often incomplete despite multi-modal therapy. A larger cohort of patients is required to determine the utility of emergent initiation of radiation or corticosteroids. This study will facilitate the counseling of future families on the long-term neurologic recovery CNP in PM RMS. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Neurovascular compression of cranial nerves: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Llanos, Julio; Sinner, Ricardo; Nagel, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The compression of a nervous structure by an aberrant vessel may be asymptomatic or produce an important symptoms, in these cases CT and MRI show relevant information. Materials and Methods: Between January 1998 and March 2001, we studied 27 patients: 8 with trigeminal neuralgia, 7 with hemi facial spasm, 4 vertigo and tinnitus, 2 hemianopsia, 1 with neuralgia of the amygdalin fossa, 1 with bitonal voice, 1 with tongue deviation with fascicular movements, 2 essential hypertension and 1 with severe headache. All of them had a neurologic evaluation from 2 specialists and 2 neuro radiologists interpreted the results. Results: The CT and RMI images with special sequences allowed to prove the compression of the entry segments of the V, VII, IX, X and XII cranial nerves, of the optic chiasma and the ventrolateral aspect of the medulla oblongata in close relation with the vasopressor centre. Also they demonstrate a rare vessel in the Silvio aqueduct avoiding the normal flow of the CSF. Of the total of patients that were studied, 37% had surgical confirmation. Conclusion: CT and RMI are sensitive and specific methods for the detection of vascular compressions of nervous structures. (author)

  18. Carotid artery and lower cranial nerve exposure with increasing surgical complexity to the parapharyngeal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos-Rodriguez, Ana M; Sreenath, Satyan B; Rawal, Rounak B; Overton, Lewis J; Farzal, Zainab; Zanation, Adam M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the extent of carotid artery exposure attained, including the identification of the external carotid branches and lower cranial nerves in five sequential external approaches to the parapharyngeal space, and to provide an anatomical algorithm. Anatomical study. Six latex-injected adult cadaver heads were dissected in five consecutive approaches: transcervical approach with submandibular gland removal, posterior extension of the transcervical approach, transcervical approach with parotidectomy, parotidectomy with lateral mandibulotomy, and parotidectomy with mandibulectomy. The degree of carotid artery exposure attained, external carotid branches, and lower cranial nerves visualized was documented. The transcervical approach exposed 1.5 cm (Standard Deviation (SD) 0.5) of internal carotid artery (ICA) and 1.25 cm (SD 0.25) of external carotid artery (ECA). The superior thyroid and facial arteries and cranial nerve XII and XI were identified. The posterior extension exposed 2.9 cm (SD 0.7) of ICA and 2.7 cm (SD 1.0) of ECA. Occipital and ascending pharyngeal arteries were visualized. The transparotid approach exposed 4.0 cm (SD 1.1) of ICA and 3.98 cm (SD 1.8) of ECA. Lateral mandibulotomy exposed the internal maxillary artery, cranial nerve X, the sympathetic trunk, and 4.6 cm (SD 2.4) of ICA. Mandibulectomy allowed for complete ECA exposure, cranial nerve IX, lingual nerve, and 6.9 cm (SD 1.3) of ICA. Approaches for the parapharyngeal space must be based on anatomic and biological patient factors. This study provides a guide for the skull base surgeon for an extended approach based on the desired anatomic exposure. N/A. Laryngoscope, 127:585-591, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Schwannoma originating from lower cranial nerves: report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Noda, Tomoyuki; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular tumor was enucleated, facial palsy, hoarseness, dysphagia and paresis of the deltoid muscle occurred transiently after the operation. The patient's hearing had also slightly deteriorated. Case 3 is a dumbbell-typed schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal canal was markedly enlarged by the tumor. As the hypoglossal nerves were embedded in the tumor, the tumor around the hypoglossal nerves was not resected. The tumor was significantly enlarged for a while after stereotactic irradiation. Case 4 is an intracranial cystic schwannoma originating from the IXth or Xth cranial nerves. The tumor was resected through the cerebello-medullary fissure. The tumor capsule attached to the brain stem was not removed. Hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Cranial nerve palsy readily occurs after the removal of the schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves. Mechanical injury caused by retraction, extension and compression of the nerve and heat injury during the drilling of the petrous bone should be cautiously avoided.

  20. A STUDY OF TUMOURS OF THE CRANIAL NERVE AND PARASPINAL NERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION One of the frequent sites of tumour formation is the cranial nerves and paraspinal nerves. The cranial nerves perform a plethora of functions and so the signs and symptoms caused may be different. They are mainly classified into four different types. The aim of the study is: 1. To study the tumours arising from the cranial nerves in an epidemiological point of view. 2. To study the tumours histopathologically. 3. To classify the tumours according to WHO classification. Thirty-eight brain tumor cases were studied in the Department of Medicine, A. J. Shetty Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore. Cranial nerve tumours accounts for 4(10% among the intracranial tumours. Schwannomas makes up 3(7.39% among the Intracranial tumours. and constituted 3(75% among cranial nerve tumours. All the 3 schwannomas were located in CP angle. The geographic distribution of cases was found to be 28 cases from Mangalore and 10 cases from Kerala.

  1. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenak, Kamil, E-mail: zelenak@unm.sk [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia); Zelenakova, Jana [University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Slovakia); DeRiggo, Julius [University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery (Slovakia); Kurca, Egon; Kantorova, Ema [University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Slovakia); Polacek, Hubert [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-08-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet-Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX-XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits.

  2. Bony exostosis of the atlas with resultant cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavotinek, J.P.; Sage, M.R.; Brophy, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    A case of tenth and twelfth nerve compression secondary to a bony exostosis of the first cervical vertebra is described. This uncommon phenomenon serves to outline the importance of imaging the course of a cranial nerve when no intracranial abnormality is demonstrable on CT or MRI. The radiologic features of spinal osteochondromas are reviewed. (orig.)

  3. Development and Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves in Lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombal, Manuel A; Megías, Manuel

    2018-04-16

    Lampreys, together with hagfishes, are the only extant representatives of the oldest branch of vertebrates, the agnathans, which are the sister group of gnathostomes; therefore, studies on these animals are of great evolutionary significance. Lampreys exhibit a particular life cycle with remarkable changes in their behavior, concomitant, in part, with important modifications in the head and its musculature, which might influence the development of the cranial nerves. In this context, some cranial nerves such as the optic nerve and the ocular motor nerves, which develop slowly during an extremely long larval period lasting more than five years, have been more thoroughly investigated; however, much less experimental information is available about others, such as the facial or the hypoglossal nerves. In addition, the possible existence of a "true" accessory nerve in these animals is still a matter of conjecture. Although growing in last decades, investigations on the physiology of the lamprey cranial nerves is scanty. This review focuses on past and recent findings that have contributed to characterize the anatomical organization of the cranial nerves in lampreys, including their components and nuclei, and their relations in the brain; in addition, comments on their development and functional role are also included. Anat Rec, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. ANATOMICAL STUDY OF CRANIAL NERVE EMERGENCE AND SKULL FORAMINA IN THE HORSE USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rita; Malalana, Fernando; McConnell, James Fraser; Maddox, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    For accurate interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the equine brain, knowledge of the normal cross-sectional anatomy of the brain and associated structures (such as the cranial nerves) is essential. The purpose of this prospective cadaver study was to describe and compare MRI and computed tomography (CT) anatomy of cranial nerves' origins and associated skull foramina in a sample of five horses. All horses were presented for euthanasia for reasons unrelated to the head. Heads were collected posteuthanasia and T2-weighted MR images were obtained in the transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes. Thin-slice MR sequences were also acquired using transverse 3D-CISS sequences that allowed mutliplanar reformatting. Transverse thin-slice CT images were acquired and multiplanar reformatting was used to create comparative images. Magnetic resonance imaging consistently allowed visualization of cranial nerves II, V, VII, VIII, and XII in all horses. The cranial nerves III, IV, and VI were identifiable as a group despite difficulties in identification of individual nerves. The group of cranial nerves IX, X, and XI were identified in 4/5 horses although the region where they exited the skull was identified in all cases. The course of nerves II and V could be followed on several slices and the main divisions of cranial nerve V could be distinguished in all cases. In conclusion, CT allowed clear visualization of the skull foramina and occasionally the nerves themselves, facilitating identification of the nerves for comparison with MRI images. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  5. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  6. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Akinori [Saitama Medical Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Moroyama, Saitama (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  7. MR of acoustic neuromas; Relationship to cranial nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kadoya, Masumi; Takahashi, Shiroh; Miyayama, Shiroh; Taira, Sakae; Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Itoh, Haruhide [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1989-08-01

    In this report, the relationship of acoustic neuromas to the adjacent cranial nerves is discussed. On T{sub 1}-weighted images, the trigeminal nerve was detected in all 13 cases. Mild to marked compression of these nerves by the tumors was observed in eight cases. The extent of compression did not always correspond to the clinical symptoms. In four cases with a maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm or less, the 7th and 8th cranial nerves were identified. There was no facial palsy in these patients. Two patients with a tumor diameter of more than 2 cm also had no facial palsy. All patients, including those with small tumors, complained of hearing loss and/or tinnitus. While MR imaging has some limitations, it is an effective imaging modality for showing the relationship between tumors and nerves. (author).

  8. Ocular cranial nerve palsies secondary to sphenoid sinusitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiman El Mograbi; Ethan Soudry

    2017-01-01

    Objective:The clinical presentation of sphenoid sinusitis can be highly variable.Rarely,sphenoid sinusitis may present with cranial nerve complications due to the proximity of these structures to the sphenoid sinus.Method:A case series from Rabin Medical Center and all cases of cranial nerves palsies secondary to sphenoid sinusitis that have been reported in the literature were reviewed.Results:Seventeen patients were identified.The abducent nerve was the most common cranial nerve affected (76%),followed by the oculomotor nerve (18%).One patient had combined oculomotor,trochlear and abducent palsies.The most common pathology was isolated purulent sphenoid sinusitis in 64% followed by allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) in 18%,and fungal infection in 18%.94% had an acute presentation.The majority (85%) received a combined intravenous antibiotics and surgical treatment.The remainder received conservative treatment alone.Complete recovery of cranial nerve palsy was noted in 82% during follow up.Conclusion:Sphenoid sinusitis presenting as diplopia and headaches is rare.A neoplastic process must be ruled out and early surgical intervention with intravenous antimicrobial therapy carry an excellent outcome with complete resolution of symptoms.

  9. MRI of enlarged dorsal ganglia, lumbar nerve roots, and cranial nerves in polyradiculoneuropathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, M.; Mukherji, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the MRI findings in four patients with a clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic polyradiculoneuropathies. In two examination of the lumbar spine showed enlarged nerve roots and dorsal ganglia, and similar findings were present in the cervical spine in a third. The cisternal portions of the cranial nerves were enlarged in another patient. MRI allows identification of enlarged nerves in hypertrophic polyradiculopathies. (orig.)

  10. [Cranial nerve damage after neuroaxial methods of anesthesia in puerperas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floka, S E; Shifman, E M

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes cranial nerve damage, a rare complication of neuroaxial anesthesia in obstetric care. In the literature, there are summarized data on 17 cases of neurological deficit developing after subarachnoidal or epidural anesthesia in puerperas. The etiological and pathogenetic factors of the above complications may be suggested to be the high disposition of a local anesthetic, arterial hypotension due to neuroaxial anesthetics, the outflow of cerebrospinal fluid after pachymeningeal puncture (including after unintended puncture during epidural anesthesia), and ischemic injury after the blood packing performed to relieve postpuncture headache. Closer consideration of these risk factors seems to reduce the incidence of cranial nerve damage in puerperas.

  11. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M.; Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs

  12. Normal computed tomographic anatomy of the cisterns and cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manelfe, C.; Bonafe, A.

    1980-01-01

    This study, based on the normal CT anatomy of the cisterns investigated with Metrizamide, aims at attempting to find out with accuracy which plane of section is the most suitable for the investigation of each group of cisterns (posterior fossa, mesencephalon, suprasellar). Moreover we felt it necessary to include our study the normal appearance of the cranial nerves as their normal CT anatymy - optic nerves expected - is not well known yet. (orig./AJ) [de

  13. Dexamethasone minimizes the risk of cranial nerve injury during CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Guido; Angiletta, Domenico; Impedovo, Giovanni; De Robertis, Giovanni; Fiorella, Marialuisa; Carratu', Maria Rosaria

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cranial and cervical nerve injury during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) ranges from less than 7.6% to more than 50%. Lesions are mainly due to surgical maneuvers such as traction, compression, tissue electrocoagulation, clamping, and extensive dissections. The use of dexamethasone (DEX) and its beneficial effects in spinal cord injuries have already been described. We investigated whether DEX could also be beneficial to minimize the incidence of cranial and cervical nerve injury during CEA. To evaluate whether dexamethasone is able to reduce the incidence of cranial nerve injuries. From March 1999 through April 2006, 1126 patients undergoing CEA because of high-grade carotid stenosis were enrolled and randomized by predetermined randomization tables into two groups. The first group, "A", included 586 patients that all received an intravenous administration of dexamethasone following a therapeutic scheme. The second group, "B", included 540 control subjects that received the standard pre- and postoperative therapy. All patients were submitted to a deep cervical plexus block, eversion carotid endarterectomy, and selective shunting. Three days after the operation, an independent neurologist and otorhinolaryngologist evaluated the presence of cranial nerve deficits. All patients (group A and group B) showing nerve injuries continued the treatment (8 mg of dexamethasone once in the morning) for 7 days and were re-evaluated after 2 weeks, 30 days, and every 3 months for 1 year. Recovery time took from 2 weeks to 12 months, with a mean time of 3.6 months. The chi(2) test was used to compare the two groups and to check for statistical significance. The incidence of cranial nerve dysfunction was higher in group B and the statistical analysis showed a significant effect of dexamethasone in preventing the neurological damage (P = .0081). The incidence of temporary lesions was lower in group A and the chi(2) test yielded a P value of .006. No statistically

  14. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy: hypoglossal nerve and vocal cord palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Toru; Saito, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masayuki; Nishimura, Toshirou

    1991-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsies are an unexpected complication of radiotherapy for head and neck tumours. We present a case of this radiation-induced cranial palsy. An 18-year-old female with nasopharyngeal carcinoma developed a right hypoglossal nerve palsy 42 months after cancericidal doses of radiotherapy. In addition, she developed a bilateral vocal cord palsy 62 months after the therapy. Follow-up over four years has demonstrated no evidence of tumour recurrence and no sign of neurological improvement. (author)

  15. Cranial nerve functional neurosurgery : Evaluation of surgical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Guerinel, C.; Sindou, M.; Auque, J.; Blondet, E.; Brassier, G.; Chazal, J.; Cuny, E.; Devaux, B.; Fontaine, D.; Finiels, P. -J.; Fuentes, J. -M.; D'Haens, J.; Massager, N.; Mercier, Ph.; Mooij, J.; Nuti, C.; Rousseaux, P.; Serrie, A.; Stecken, J.; de Waele, L.; Keravel, Y.

    We report the results of an investigation carried out on the activity of functional neurosurgery of the cranial nerves in the French-speaking countries, based on the analysis of a questionnaire addressed to all the members of the SNCLF Eighteen centers responded to this questionnaire., which showed

  16. Dangerous extracranial-intracranial anastomoses and supply to the cranial nerves: vessels the neurointerventionalist needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geibprasert, S; Pongpech, S; Armstrong, D; Krings, T

    2009-09-01

    Transarterial embolization in the external carotid artery (ECA) territory has a major role in the endovascular management of epistaxis, skull base tumors, and dural arteriovenous fistulas. Knowledge of the potential anastomotic routes, identification of the cranial nerve supply from the ECA, and the proper choice of embolic material are crucial to help the interventionalist avoid neurologic complications during the procedure. Three regions along the skull base constitute potential anastomotic routes between the extracranial and intracranial arteries: the orbital, the petrocavernous, and the upper cervical regions. Branches of the internal maxillary artery have anastomoses with the ophthalmic artery and petrocavernous internal carotid artery (ICA), whereas the branches of the ascending pharyngeal artery are connected to the petrocavernous ICA. Branches of both the ascending pharyngeal artery and the occipital artery have anastomoses with the vertebral artery. To avoid cranial nerve palsy, one must have knowledge of the supply to the lower cranial nerves: The petrous branch of the middle meningeal artery and the stylomastoid branch of the posterior auricular artery form the facial arcade as the major supply to the facial nerve, and the neuromeningeal trunk of the ascending pharyngeal artery supplies the lower cranial nerves (CN IX-XII).

  17. Probabilistic Tractography of the Cranial Nerves in Vestibular Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolal, Amir; Juratli, Tareq A; Podlesek, Dino; Rieger, Bernhard; Kitzler, Hagen H; Linn, Jennifer; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan B

    2017-11-01

    Multiple recent studies have reported on diffusion tensor-based fiber tracking of cranial nerves in vestibular schwannoma, with conflicting results as to the accuracy of the method and the occurrence of cochlear nerve depiction. Probabilistic nontensor-based tractography might offer advantages in terms of better extraction of directional information from the underlying data in cranial nerves, which are of subvoxel size. Twenty-one patients with large vestibular schwannomas were recruited. The probabilistic tracking was run preoperatively and the position of the potential depictions of the facial and cochlear nerves was estimated postoperatively by 3 independent observers in a blinded fashion. The true position of the nerve was determined intraoperatively by the surgeon. Thereafter, the imaging-based estimated position was compared with the intraoperatively determined position. Tumor size, cystic appearance, and postoperative House-Brackmann score were analyzed with regard to the accuracy of the depiction of the nerves. The probabilistic tracking showed a connection that correlated to the position of the facial nerve in 81% of the cases and to the position of the cochlear nerve in 33% of the cases. Altogether, the resulting depiction did not correspond to the intraoperative position of any of the nerves in 3 cases. In a majority of cases, the position of the facial nerve, but not of the cochlear nerve, could be estimated by evaluation of the probabilistic tracking results. However, false depictions not corresponding to any nerve do occur and cannot be discerned as such from the image only. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Retrospective comparison of three-dimensional imaging sequences in the visualization of posterior fossa cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ors, Suna; Inci, Ercan; Turkay, Rustu; Kokurcan, Atilla; Hocaoglu, Elif

    2017-12-01

    To compare efficancy of three-dimentional SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions) and CISS (constructive interference in steady state) sequences in the imaging of the cisternal segments of cranial nerves V-XII. Temporal MRI scans from 50 patients (F:M ratio, 27:23; mean age, 44.5±15.9 years) admitted to our hospital with vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had both CISS and SPACE sequences. Quantitative analysis of SPACE and CISS sequences was performed by measuring the ventricle-to-parenchyma contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Qualitative analysis of differences in visualization capability, image quality, and severity of artifacts was also conducted. A score ranging 'no artefact' to 'severe artefacts and unreadable' was used for the assessment of artifacts and from 'not visualized' to 'completely visualized' for the assesment of image quality, respectively. The distribution of variables was controlled by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Samples t-test and McNemar's test were used to determine statistical significance. Rates of visualization of posterior fossa cranial nerves in cases of complete visualization were as follows: nerve V (100% for both sequences), nerve VI (94% in SPACE, 86% in CISS sequences), nerves VII-VIII (100% for both sequences), IX-XI nerve complex (96%, 88%); nerve XII (58%, 46%) (p<0.05). SPACE sequences showed fewer artifacts than CISS sequences (p<0.002). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring vocal recovery after cranial nerve injury in Bengalese finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Catherine M; Peterson, Jennifer R; Cooper, Brenton G

    2013-02-08

    Songbirds and humans use auditory feedback to acquire and maintain their vocalizations. The Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata domestica) is a songbird species that rapidly modifies its vocal output to adhere to an internal song memory. In this species, the left side of the bipartite vocal organ is specialized for producing louder, higher frequencies (≥2.2kHz) and denervation of the left vocal muscles eliminates these notes. Thus, the return of higher frequency notes after cranial nerve injury can be used as a measure of vocal recovery. Either the left or right side of the syrinx was denervated by resection of the tracheosyringeal portion of the hypoglossal nerve. Histologic analyses of syringeal muscle tissue showed significant muscle atrophy in the denervated side. After left nerve resection, songs were mainly composed of lower frequency syllables, but three out of five birds recovered higher frequency syllables. Right nerve resection minimally affected phonology, but it did change song syntax; syllable sequence became abnormally stereotyped after right nerve resection. Therefore, damage to the neuromuscular control of sound production resulted in reduced motor variability, and Bengalese finches are a potential model for functional vocal recovery following cranial nerve injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleňák, Kamil; Zeleňáková, Jana; DeRiggo, Július; Kurča, Egon; Kantorová, Ema; Poláček, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet–Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX–XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits

  1. Radiation injury to peripheral and cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giese, W.L.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the results of laboratory and clinical investigations regarding the radiosensitivity of peripheral nerve are presented. Before outlining this research the authors briefly review peripheral neuroanatomy and physiology and then discuss variables associated with injury. It is important to remember that radiation injury is multifactorial in nature, and that the relative importance of individual factors is not well understood. Reports up through the middle of this century were fraught with rudimentary dosimetry, primitive investigative methods, and arbitrary endpoints that resulted in widely conflicting conclusions that continue to date

  2. Traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome: assessment of cranial nerve recovery in 33 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Tzung; Wang, Theresa Y; Tsay, Pei-Kwei; Huang, Faye; Lai, Jui-Pin; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2010-07-01

    Superior orbital fissure syndrome is a rare complication that occurs in association with craniofacial trauma. The characteristics of superior orbital fissure syndrome are attributable to a constellation of cranial nerve III, IV, and VI palsies. This is the largest series describing traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome that assesses the recovery of individual cranial nerve function after treatment. In a review from 1988 to 2002, 33 patients with superior orbital fissure syndrome were identified from 11,284 patients (0.3 percent) with skull and facial fractures. Severity of cranial nerve injury and functional recovery were evaluated by extraocular muscle movement. Patients were evaluated on average 6 days after initial injury, and average follow-up was 11.8 months. There were 23 male patients. The average age was 31 years. The major mechanism of injury was motorcycle accident (67 percent). Twenty-two received conservative treatment, five were treated with steroids, and six patients underwent surgical decompression of the superior orbital fissure. After initial injury, cranial nerve VI suffered the most damage, whereas cranial nerve IV sustained the least. In the first 3 months, recovery was greatest in cranial nerve VI. At 9 months, function was lowest in cranial nerve VI and highest in cranial nerve IV. Eight patients (24 percent) had complete recovery of all cranial nerves. Functional recovery of all cranial nerves reached a plateau at 6 months after trauma. Cranial nerve IV suffered the least injury, whereas cranial nerve VI experienced the most neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve palsies improved to their final recovery endpoints by 6 months. Surgical decompression is considered when there is evidence of bony compression of the superior orbital fissure.

  3. Cranial nerve monitoring during subpial dissection in temporomesial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortler, Martin; Fiegele, Thomas; Walser, Gerald; Trinka, Eugen; Eisner, Wilhelm

    2011-06-01

    Cranial nerves (CNs) crossing between the brainstem and skull base at the level of the tentorial hiatus may be at risk in temporomesial surgery involving subpial dissection and/or tumorous growth leading to distorted anatomy. We aimed to identify the surgical steps most likely to result in CN damage in this type of surgery. Electromyographic responses obtained with standard neuromonitoring techniques and a continuous free-running EMG were graded as either contact activity or pathological spontaneous activity (PSA) during subpial resection of temporomesial structures in 16 selective amygdalohippocampectomy cases. Integrity of peripheral motor axons was tested by transpial/transarachnoidal electrical stimulation while recording compound muscle action potentials from distal muscle(s). Continuous EMG showed pathological activity in five (31.2%) patients. Nine events with PSA (slight activity, n = 8; strong temporary activity, n = 1) were recorded. The oculomotor nerve was involved three times, the trochlear nerve twice, the facial nerve once, and all monitored nerves on three occasions. Surgical maneuvers associated with PSA were the resection of deep parts of the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus (CN IV, twice; CN III, once), lining with or removing cotton patties from the resection cavity (III, twice; all channels, once) and indirect exertion of tension on the intact pia/arachnoid of the uncal region while mobilizing the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus en bloc (all channels, once; III, once). CMAPs were observed at 0.3 mA in two patients and at 0.6 mA in one patient, and without registering the exact amount of intensity in three patients. The most dangerous steps leading to cranial nerve damage during mesial temporal lobe surgery are the final stages of the intervention while the resection is being completed in the deep posterior part and the resection cavity is being lined with patties. Distant traction may act on nerves crossing the tentorial

  4. Anatomic study of cranial nerve emergence and associated skull foramina in cats using CT and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Eymeric; Degueurce, Christophe; Ruel, Yannick; Dennis, Ruth; Begon, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain of four normal cats were reviewed retrospectively to assess the emergence and course of the cranial nerves (CNs). Two-millimeter-thick images were obtained in transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes using a 1.5 T unit. CN skull foramina, as anatomic landmarks for MR imaging, were identified by computed tomography performed on an isolated cat skull using thin wire within each skull foramen. Thin slice (1 mm slice thickness) images were obtained with a high-resolution bone filter scan protocol. The origins of CNs II, V, VII, and VIII and the group of IX, X, XI, and XII could be identified. The pathway and proximal divisions of CNs V were described. CNs III, IV, and VI were not distinguished from each other but could be seen together in the orbital fissure. CN V was characterized by slight contrast enhancement.

  5. Clinical treatment of traumatic brain injury complicated by cranial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hai; Wang, Sumin; Hou, Lijun; Pan, Chengguang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hui; Yu, Mingkun; Lu, Yicheng

    2010-09-01

    To discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis and surgical treatment of cranial nerve injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI) for the sake of raising the clinical treatment of this special category of TBI. A retrospective analysis was made of 312 patients with cranial nerve injury among 3417 TBI patients, who were admitted for treatment in this hospital. A total of 312 patients (9.1%) involving either a single nerve or multiple nerves among the 12 pairs of cranial nerves were observed. The extent of nerve injury varied and involved the olfactory nerve (66 cases), optic nerve (78 cases), oculomotor nerve (56 cases), trochlear nerve (8 cases), trigeminal nerve (4 cases), abducent nerve (12 cases), facial nerve (48 cases), acoustic nerve (10 cases), glossopharyngeal nerve (8 cases), vagus nerve (6 cases), accessory nerve (10 cases) and hypoglossal nerve (6 cases). Imaging examination revealed skull fracture in 217 cases, complicated brain contusion in 232 cases, epidural haematoma in 194 cases, subarachnoid haemorrhage in 32 cases, nasal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in 76 cases and ear CSF leakage in 8 cases. Of the 312 patients, 46 patients died; the mortality rate associated with low cranial nerve injury was as high as 73.3%. Among the 266 surviving patients, 199 patients received conservative therapy and 67 patients received surgical therapy; the curative rates among these two groups were 61.3% (122 patients) and 86.6% (58 patients), respectively. TBI-complicated cranial nerve injury is subject to a high incidence rate, a high mortality rate and a high disability rate. Our findings suggest that the chance of recovery may be increased in cases where injuries are amenable to surgical decompression. It is necessary to study all 12 pairs of cranial nerves systematically. Clinically, it is necessary to standardise surgical indications, operation timing, surgical approaches and methods for the treatment of TBI-complicated cranial nerve injury. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All

  6. An unusual case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Sanjeev; Borde, Priyanka

    2012-08-15

    Cranial nerve involvement is not common in leprosy. The fifth and seventh cranial nerves are the most commonly affected in leprosy. Herein we present a patient with Hansen disease (BL) with type I reaction who developed isolated involvement of the sixth cranial nerve leading to lateral rectus muscle palsy. He responded to timely anti-reactional therapy and it produced a good response. Careful observation of patients with lepra reaction is needed to avoid damage to important organs.

  7. Comparison of probabilistic and deterministic fiber tracking of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolal, Amir; Sobottka, Stephan B; Podlesek, Dino; Linn, Jennifer; Rieger, Bernhard; Juratli, Tareq A; Schackert, Gabriele; Kitzler, Hagen H

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The depiction of cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is of great interest in skull base tumor surgery and DTI used with deterministic tracking methods has been reported previously. However, there are still no good methods usable for the elimination of noise from the resulting depictions. The authors have hypothesized that probabilistic tracking could lead to more accurate results, because it more efficiently extracts information from the underlying data. Moreover, the authors have adapted a previously described technique for noise elimination using gradual threshold increases to probabilistic tracking. To evaluate the utility of this new approach, a comparison is provided with this work between the gradual threshold increase method in probabilistic and deterministic tracking of CNs. METHODS Both tracking methods were used to depict CNs II, III, V, and the VII+VIII bundle. Depiction of 240 CNs was attempted with each of the above methods in 30 healthy subjects, which were obtained from 2 public databases: the Kirby repository (KR) and Human Connectome Project (HCP). Elimination of erroneous fibers was attempted by gradually increasing the respective thresholds (fractional anisotropy [FA] and probabilistic index of connectivity [PICo]). The results were compared with predefined ground truth images based on corresponding anatomical scans. Two label overlap measures (false-positive error and Dice similarity coefficient) were used to evaluate the success of both methods in depicting the CN. Moreover, the differences between these parameters obtained from the KR and HCP (with higher angular resolution) databases were evaluated. Additionally, visualization of 10 CNs in 5 clinical cases was attempted with both methods and evaluated by comparing the depictions with intraoperative findings. RESULTS Maximum Dice similarity coefficients were significantly higher with probabilistic tracking (p cranial nerves. Probabilistic tracking with a gradual

  8. Cranial nerves neuropraxia after shoulder arthroscopy in beach chair position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, A; Boyer, P; Soubeyrand, M; Hamida, F Ben; Vannier, J-L; Massin, P

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of neuropraxia of the 9th, 10th and 12th cranial nerve pairs after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the beach chair position. The elements in the medical file seem to exclude an intracranial cause of the lesions and support a mechanical, extracranial cause due to intubation and/or the beach chair position. This clinical case report shows the neurological risks of the beach chair position during arthroscopic shoulder surgery and presents the essential safety measures to prevent these risks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Morphometric characteristics of caudal cranial nerves at petroclival region in fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdogmus, Omer; Saban, Enis; Ozkan, Mazhar; Yildiz, Sercan Dogukan; Verimli, Ural; Cakmak, Ozgur; Arifoglu, Yasin; Sehirli, Umit

    2016-06-01

    Morphometric measurements of cranial nerves in posterior cranial fossa of fetus cadavers were carried out in an attempt to identify any asymmetry in their openings into the cranium. Twenty-two fetus cadavers (8 females, 14 males) with gestational age ranging between 22 and 38 weeks (mean 30 weeks) were included in this study. The calvaria were removed, the brains were lifted, and the cranial nerves were identified. The distance of each cranial nerve opening to midline and the distances between different cranial nerve openings were measured on the left and right side and compared. The mean clivus length and width were 21.2 ± 4.4 and 13.2 ± 1.5 mm, respectively. The distance of the twelfth cranial nerve opening from midline was shorter on the right side when compared with the left side (6.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 0.8 mm, p = 0.038). Openings of other cranial nerves did not show such asymmetry with regard to their distance from midline, and the distances between different cranial nerves were similar on the left and right side. Cranial nerves at petroclival region seem to show minimal asymmetry in fetuses.

  10. Anatomic and pathologic features of third cranial nerve disorders according to magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Y.; Torres, J.; Ramos, M.; Caniego, J.L.; Manzanares, R.; Fresno, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of disorders involving the third cranial nerves. We have selected MR studies corresponding to patients with an anomaly affecting the third cranial nerves, whether alone or in combination with other cranial nerves. In order to better study the pathology of these cranial nerves, we considered four different segments of the nerves: mesencephalic, cisternal, cavernous and orbital. We present the MR features of the anatomy of the third cranial nerves and the most representative lesions affecting the different intracranial segments: infraction, multiple sclerosis, glioma and cavernoma in the mesencephalon; posterior communicating artery aneurysm, neuritis, neurinomas and meningioma in the cisternal segment; aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, cavernous carotid fistula, metastasis and meningioma in the cavernous sinus and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in the orbital apex. (Author) 11 refs

  11. Evaluation of paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th) with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuha, Mitsuru; Okamura, Tomomi; Abiko, Seisho; Aoki, Hideo

    1984-01-01

    We have now used CT to evaluate the cavernous sinuses, especially the 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th cranial nerves. adjacent to them. Twenty cases, presumably all having sellar or parasellar lesions, were examined by means of thin-slice (2-4 mm) axial and coronal (including both direct and reconstructed methods) CT studies. Moreover, three blocks of the sellar region obtained from adult cadavers were examined beforehand by CT scan, and the courses of the respective paracavernous cranial nerves were confirmed by microsurgical dissection. As a result, the following conclusions were obtained. 1. It was valuable to perform a post-enhanced direct coronal study for the definite identification of the paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th cranial nerves). 2. Also valuable was a magnified CT film of the parasellar regions, which made the identification of the parasellar cranial nerves clearer. 3. In the clinical cases showing a normal shape of the cavernous sinuses on CT, each cranial nerve was evaluated. In the axial studies (almost 10 to 15 degrees anterior to Reid's basal line), the frequencies of the identification of the 3rd, 5th, and 6th cranial nerves were 76%, 97% (as to the Gasserian ganglion), and 21% respectively. None of the 4th cranial nerve was visualized in the cases examined. On the other hand, the frequencies of the identification of the 3rd, 5th, and 6th cranial nerves were 83%, 86%, and 21% respectively in the direct coronal studies and 62%, 57%, and 4% in those of the reconstructed films. The visualization of each cranial nerve in the direct coronal study was better than when the reconstructed method was used. Finally, a schematic presentation of the cranial nerves adjacent to the cavernous sinuses was made in the axial and coronal projections. (J.P.N.)

  12. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  13. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; VIth nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy; Sixth nerve palsy; Neuropathy - sixth nerve ... Cranial mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial nerve. This nerve is also called the abducens nerve. ...

  14. [Cranial nerve palsy caused by tumours of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delsing, C.P.; Verbist, B.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2013-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsy is a diagnostic guiding symptom, but often goes unrecognized. The differential diagnosis includes a variety of diseases, including malignant tumours of the head and neck. Here we describe three cases of cranial nerve palsy. In two of the cases the palsy was recognized following

  15. Multi cranial nerve palsies as the presenting features of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.M.; Wynne, C.J.; Cowan, I.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cranial nerve palsies have previously been reported in metastatic prostate carcinoma, usually occurring late in the course of the disease. We describe the case of a 55-year-old man whose diagnosis of prostate cancer was made following investigation of multiple cranial nerve palsies.

  16. Schwannoma of the facial nerve involving the middle cranial fossa:case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SAI Ke; CHEN Zhong-ping

    2007-01-01

    @@ Facial nerve schwannoma involving the middle cranial fossa is quite rare,and its accurate diagnosis is very difficult before SUrgery.Here we present a case of schwannoma of the facial nerve at the middle cranial fossa that was misdiagnosed previously at a local hospital and then cured in our hospital.

  17. Significcance of cranial nerve involvement shown by the prognosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui Zhouguang; Gao Li; Yi Junlin; Li Suyan; Jin Jing; Huang Xiaodong; Luo Jingwei; Xu Guozhen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the cranial nerve involvement in nasophryngeal carcinoma and its relationship with the prognosis with the optimal treatment for such patients studied also. Methods: 935 untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients, admitted into our hospital from January 1990 to June 1999, were analyzed retrospectively. These patients were divided into cranial nerve involved group and cranial nerve un- involved group by patients symptoms signs and/or images before the treatment. SPSS10.0 soft package was used to analyze the effect of cranial nerve involvement on the prognosis. Results: The overall percentage of cranial nerve involvement was 20.0%, of which the trigeminal nerve was most common . The 5-year local recurrence rate was 20.1% and 16.8% (P=0.465) in cranial nerve involved group and un-involved group, respectively. In the patients with cranial nerve involved, the 5-year local recurrence rates of patients who received boost skull base irradiation dose <70, 70-79 and ≥80 Gy was 38.1%, 24.5% and 16.0% (P =0.082), respectively. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 31.6% and 19.5% (P=0.020) in cranial nerve involved group and un-involved group. The corresponding overall survival rates and disease-free survival rate was 62.2% and 78.1% (P=O.000) and 43.2%, 62.4% (P=0.000), respectively. By multivariate analysis, cranial nerve involvement was an independent factor both in overall survival (RR 1.62, P=0.001 ) and disease-free survival (RR=1.40, P=0.020). Conclusions: There are more distant metastasis, worse overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with cranial nerve involved. Boost irradiation to the involved skull base may improve the local control. Radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for these patients may also have brighter future. (authors)

  18. Enhancement of multiple cranial and spinal nerves in vanishing white matter: expanding the differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluvathingal Muttikkal, Thomas Jose; Montealegre, Denia Ramirez; Matsumoto, Julie Ann

    2018-03-01

    Abnormal cranial or spinal nerve contrast enhancement on MRI in cases of suspected pediatric leukodystrophy is recognized as an important clue to the diagnosis of either metachromatic leukodystrophy or globoid cell leukodystrophy (Krabbe disease). We report a case of genetically confirmed childhood vanishing white matter with enhancement of multiple cranial and spinal nerves in addition to the more typical intracranial findings. This case expands the limited differential diagnosis of cranial nerve or spinal nerve enhancement in cases of suspected leukodystrophy and may aid in more efficient work-up and earlier diagnosis of vanishing white matter.

  19. Arterial relationships to the nerves and some rigid structures in the posterior cranial fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surchev, N

    2008-09-01

    The close relationships between the cranial nerves and the arterial vessels in the posterior cranial fossa are one of the predisposing factors for artery-nerve compression. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to some skull and dural structures and the nerves in the posterior cranial fossa. For this purpose, the skull bases and brains of 70 cadavers were studied. The topographic relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to the cranial nerves in the posterior cranial fossa were studied and the distances between the arteries and some osseous formations were measured. The most significant variations in arterial position were registered in the lower half of the basilar artery. Direct contact with an artery was established for the hypoglossal canal, jugular tubercle, and jugular foramen. The results reveal additional information about the relationships of the nerves and arteries to the skull and dural formations in the posterior cranial fossa. New quantitative information is given to illustrate them. The conditions for possible artery-nerve compression due to arterial dislocation are discussed and two groups (lines) of compression points are suggested. The medial line comprises of the brain stem points, usually the nerve root entry/exit zone. The lateral line includes the skull eminences, on which the nerves lie, or skull and dural foramina through which they exit the cranial cavity. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Bilateral involvement of a single cranial nerve: analysis of 578 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, James R

    2005-09-27

    The author reviewed 34 years of personal experience with inpatients in a large municipal hospital to analyze the seats and causes of involvement of single pairs of cranial nerves. Among 578 cases, the sixth (n = 234) and second (211) nerves predominated, followed by the fourth (48), seventh (30), third (27), and eighth (18) cranial nerves. Trauma (99), infection (94), tumor (92), increased intracranial pressure (85), vascular disease (74), and demyelination (66) were common causes.

  1. MR imaging of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves: Neurovascular relationships and abnormal changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Changhu, E-mail: tigerlch@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Du Yinglin, E-mail: duyinglinzhuo@sohu.co [Shandong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Institute, 72, Jingshi Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xu Jinfa, E-mail: xuke5598@icom.c [Liao Cheng City People' s Hospital, Dongchang Road, Liaocheng, Shandong (China); Wu Lebin, E-mail: Lebinwu518@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Cheng, E-mail: cacab2a@126.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang Ximing, E-mail: wxming369@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang Haiyan, E-mail: whyott@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yu Fuhua, E-mail: changhu1970@163.co [Weifang Medical College, 7166, West Road Baotong Weifang, Shandong (China)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate the detailed anatomic features, neurovascular relationships of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves (PGCN: IX, X, XI, XII); to evaluate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in demonstrating the PGCN with disorders caused by abnormal compression related to artery or tumor. Methods: A total of 59 volunteers, 12 patients with abnormal symptom in the PGCN underwent three-dimensional (3D) Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) MR imaging, and 22 of these volunteers and 12 patients also underwent MR angiography in which a time-of-flight (TOF) sequence was used to further distinguish the PGCN from the adjacent blood vessels. Anatomical features, neurovascular relationships of the PGCN in 59 volunteers and abnormal changes in 12 patients caused by neurovascular compression or tumor were observed from multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images, cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver were used to testify the PGCN displayed in 59 volunteers. Results: 3D-CISS MR imaging depicted the proximal cisternal segment of the cranial nerves complex (CN IX, X, XI) at the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 100% (118/118), 99% (117/118) of 118 sides; CNXII in the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 90% (106/118), 91% (107/118) of 118 sides. At the sagittal planes, the CN IX, X, XI were found parallel to each other in the cisternal segment in 45.2% (53/117) of 117 sides, gathering into a bundle of nerves complex before entering the jugular foramen (JF) in 54.7% (64/117) of 117sides. VAs were blood vessels more often identified, they were found to be in contact with the PGCN in 28.0% (33/118) of 118 sides, and not in contact in 72.0% (85/118) of 118 sides. 3D-CISS MR imaging of volunteers revealed the similar result corresponding to cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver. Twelve patients with abnormal changes in the PGCN were all displayed well, among them 8 were

  2. MR imaging of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves: Neurovascular relationships and abnormal changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Changhu; Du Yinglin; Xu Jinfa; Wu Lebin; Liu Cheng; Wang Ximing; Wang Haiyan; Yu Fuhua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the detailed anatomic features, neurovascular relationships of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves (PGCN: IX, X, XI, XII); to evaluate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in demonstrating the PGCN with disorders caused by abnormal compression related to artery or tumor. Methods: A total of 59 volunteers, 12 patients with abnormal symptom in the PGCN underwent three-dimensional (3D) Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) MR imaging, and 22 of these volunteers and 12 patients also underwent MR angiography in which a time-of-flight (TOF) sequence was used to further distinguish the PGCN from the adjacent blood vessels. Anatomical features, neurovascular relationships of the PGCN in 59 volunteers and abnormal changes in 12 patients caused by neurovascular compression or tumor were observed from multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images, cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver were used to testify the PGCN displayed in 59 volunteers. Results: 3D-CISS MR imaging depicted the proximal cisternal segment of the cranial nerves complex (CN IX, X, XI) at the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 100% (118/118), 99% (117/118) of 118 sides; CNXII in the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 90% (106/118), 91% (107/118) of 118 sides. At the sagittal planes, the CN IX, X, XI were found parallel to each other in the cisternal segment in 45.2% (53/117) of 117 sides, gathering into a bundle of nerves complex before entering the jugular foramen (JF) in 54.7% (64/117) of 117sides. VAs were blood vessels more often identified, they were found to be in contact with the PGCN in 28.0% (33/118) of 118 sides, and not in contact in 72.0% (85/118) of 118 sides. 3D-CISS MR imaging of volunteers revealed the similar result corresponding to cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver. Twelve patients with abnormal changes in the PGCN were all displayed well, among them 8 were

  3. An Isolated Bee Sting Involving Multiple Cranial Nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Motamed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera stings are self-limiting events or due to allergic reactions. Sometimes envenomation with Hymenoptera can cause rare complications such as acute encephalopathy, peripheral neuritis, acute renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, silent myocardial infarction, rhabdomyolysis, conjunctivitis, corneal infiltration, lens subluxation, and optic neuropathy. The mechanism of peripheral nervous system damage is not clearly known. In our studied case after bee sting on face between the eyebrows with little erythema and  cm in size, bilateral blindness developed and gradually improved. Lateral movement of eyes was restricted with no pain. Involvement of cranial nerves including II, V, and VI was found. With conservative therapy after a year significant improvement has been achieved.

  4. [Neurophysiological identification of the cranial nerves in endoscopic endonasal surgery of skull base tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkarubo, A N; Ogurtsova, A A; Moshchev, D A; Lubnin, A Yu; Andreev, D N; Koval', K V; Chernov, I V

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative identification of the cranial nerves is a useful technique in removal of skull base tumors through the endoscopic endonasal approach. Searching through the scientific literature found one pilot study on the use of triggered electromyography (t-EMG) for identification of the VIth nerve in endonasal endoscopic surgery of skull base tumors (D. San-Juan, et al, 2014). The study objective was to prevent iatrogenic injuries to the cranial nerves without reducing the completeness of tumor tissue resection. In 2014, 5 patients were operated on using the endoscopic endonasal approach. Surgeries were performed for large skull base chordomas (2 cases) and trigeminal nerve neurinomas located in the cavernous sinus (3). Intraoperatively, identification of the cranial nerves was performed by triggered electromyography using a bipolar electrode (except 1 case of chordoma where a monopolar electrode was used). Evaluation of the functional activity of the cranial nerves was carried out both preoperatively and postoperatively. Tumor resection was total in 4 out of 5 cases and subtotal (chordoma) in 1 case. Intraoperatively, the IIIrd (2 patients), Vth (2), and VIth (4) cranial nerves were identified. No deterioration in the function of the intraoperatively identified nerves was observed in the postoperative period. In one case, no responses from the VIth nerve on the right (in the cavernous sinus region) were intraoperatively obtained, and deep paresis (up to plegia) of the nerve-innervated muscles developed in the postoperative period. The nerve function was not impaired before surgery. The t-EMG technique is promising and requires further research.

  5. Calculation of cranial nerve complication probability for acoustic neuroma radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M.; Foote, Kelly D.; Friedman, William A.; Bova, Francis J.

    2000-01-01

    cranial nerve complications, and the average NTCP for was 66% for patients who sustained a cranial neuropathy. For the entire patient population, the actual percentage of patients suffering either facial or trigeminal neuropathy was 14.7%, whereas the calculated average NTCP was 14.8%. Discussion: NTCP calculations using brainstem dose-volume histograms can be used to estimate the rate of cranial neuropathies from acoustic neuroma radiosurgery. More clinical data and further study will lead to refinement of the model with time

  6. Visualization of cranial nerves by MR cisternography using 3D FASE. Comparison with 2D FSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakura, Hirofumi; Nakano, Satoru; Togami, Taro [Kagawa Medical School, Miki (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-03-01

    MR cisternography using 3D FASE was compared with that of 2D FSE in regard to visualization of normal cranial nerves. In a phantom study, contrast-to-noise ratio (C/N) of fine structures was better in 3D FASE images than in 2D FSE. In clinical cases, visualization of trigeminal nerve, abducent nerve, and facial/vestibulo-cochlear nerve were evaluated. Each cranial nerve was visualized better in 3D FASE images than in 2D FSE, with a significant difference (p<0.05). (author)

  7. Visualization of cranial nerves by MR cisternography using 3D FASE. Comparison with 2D FSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Hirofumi; Nakano, Satoru; Togami, Taro

    2001-01-01

    MR cisternography using 3D FASE was compared with that of 2D FSE in regard to visualization of normal cranial nerves. In a phantom study, contrast-to-noise ratio (C/N) of fine structures was better in 3D FASE images than in 2D FSE. In clinical cases, visualization of trigeminal nerve, abducent nerve, and facial/vestibulo-cochlear nerve were evaluated. Each cranial nerve was visualized better in 3D FASE images than in 2D FSE, with a significant difference (p<0.05). (author)

  8. Evaluation of an animation tool developed to supplement dental student study of the cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, M; McKenna, J P; Cryan, J F; Vagg, T; Toulouse, A; Downer, E J

    2017-12-30

    The structure/function of the cranial nerves is a core topic for dental students. However, due to the perceived complexity of the subject, it is often difficult for students to develop a comprehensive understanding of key concepts using textbooks and models. It is accepted that the acquisition of anatomical knowledge can be facilitated by visualisation of structures. This study aimed to develop and assess a novel cranial nerve animation as a supplemental learning aid for dental students. A multidisciplinary team of anatomists, neuroscientists and a computer scientist developed a novel animation depicting the cranial nerves. The animation was viewed by newly enrolled first-year dental students, graduate entry dental students (year 1) and dental hygiene students (year 1). A simple life scenario employing the use of the cranial nerves was developed using a cartoon-type animation with a viewing time of 3.58 minutes. The animation was developed with emphasis on a life scenario. The animation was placed online for 2 weeks with open access or viewed once in a controlled laboratory setting. Questionnaires were designed to assess the participants' attitude towards the animation and their knowledge of the cranial nerves before and after visualisation. This study was performed before the delivery of core lectures on the cranial nerves. Our findings indicate that the use of the animation can act as a supplemental tool to improve student knowledge of the cranial nerves. Indeed, data indicate that a single viewing of the animation, in addition to 2-week access to the animation, can act as a supplemental learning tool to assist student understanding of the structure and function of cranial nerves. The animation significantly enhanced the student's opinion that their cranial nerve knowledge had improved. From a qualitative point of view, the students described the animation as an enjoyable and useful supplement to reading material/lectures and indicated that the animation was a

  9. Cavernous malformations isolated from cranial nerves: Unexpected diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, Michele; Natale, Massimo; D'Avanzo, Raffaele; Pascale, Michela; Scuotto, Assunta

    2014-11-01

    Cranial nerves (CN) cavernous malformations (CMs) are lesions that are isolated from the CNs. The authors present three cases of CN CMs, for which MR was demonstrated to be critical for management, and surgical resection produced good outcomes for the patients. Surgical removal is the recommended course of action to restore or preserve neurological function and to eliminate the risk of future haemorrhage. However, the anatomical location and the complexity of nearby neural structures can make these lesions difficult to access and remove. In this study, the authors review the literature of reported cases of CN CMs to analyse the clinical and radiographic presentations, surgical approaches and neurological outcomes. A MEDLINE/Pub Med search was performed and revealed 86 cases of CN CMs. The authors report three additional cases in this study for a total of 89 cases. CMs affecting the optic nerve (CN II), oculomotor nerve (CN III), facial/vestibule-cochlear nerves (CN VII, CN VIII) have been described. The records of three patients were reviewed with respect to the lesion locations, symptoms, surgical approaches and therapeutic considerations. Clinical and radiological follow-up results are reported. Three patients (2 females, 1 male; age range 21-37 year) presented with three CN lesions. One lesion involved CN III, one lesion involved CN VII-CN VIII, and one involved CN II. The patient with the CN III lesion had a one-month history of mild right ptosis and diplopia. The patient with the CN VII-CN VIII lesion exhibited acute hearing loss and on the left and left facial paresis. The patient with the opticchiasmatic lesion presented with acute visual deterioration on the right and a left temporal field deficit in the left eye. Pterional and orbitozygomatic craniotomies were performed for the CN III lesion and the CN II lesion, and retrosigmoid craniotomy was performed for the cerebello-pontine angle lesion. All patients experienced symptom improvement after surgery. On

  10. Clinical validation and applications for CT-based atlas for contouring the lower cranial nerves for head and neck cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Waleed F; Young, Brett M; Young, Rebekah; Blakaj, Dukagjin M; Ohri, Nitin; Shourbaji, Rania A; Manolidis, Spiros; Gámez, Mauricio; Kumar, Mahesh; Khorsandi, Azita; Khan, Majid A; Shasha, Daniel; Blakaj, Adriana; Glanzman, Jonathan; Garg, Madhur K; Hu, Kenneth S; Kalnicki, Shalom; Harrison, Louis B

    2013-09-01

    Radiation induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) involving the lower cranial nerves (CNs) is a serious complication of head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Recommendations for delineating the lower CNs on RT planning studies do not exist. The aim of the current study is to develop a standardized methodology for contouring CNs IX-XII, which would help in establishing RT limiting doses for organs at risk (OAR). Using anatomic texts, radiologic data, and guidance from experts in head and neck anatomy, we developed step-by-step instructions for delineating CNs IX-XII on computed tomography (CT) imaging. These structures were then contoured on five consecutive patients who underwent definitive RT for locally-advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). RT doses delivered to the lower CNs were calculated. We successfully developed a contouring atlas for CNs IX-XII. The median total dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was 70Gy (range: 66-70Gy). The median CN (IX-XI) and (XII) volumes were 10c.c (range: 8-12c.c) and 8c.c (range: 7-10c.c), respectively. The median V50, V60, V66, and V70 of the CN (IX-XI) and (XII) volumes were (85, 77, 71, 65) and (88, 80, 74, 64) respectively. The median maximal dose to the CN (IX-XI) and (XII) were 72Gy (range: 66-77) and 71Gy (range: 64-78), respectively. We have generated simple instructions for delineating the lower CNs on RT planning imaging. Further analyses to explore the relationship between lower CN dosing and the risk of RICNP are recommended in order to establish limiting doses for these OARs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Imaging the cranial nerves: Part I: Methodology, infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil- Centro de Lisboa, Department of Radiology, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Casselman, Jan [A.Z. St. Jan Brugge Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brugge (Belgium); A.Z. St. Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2007-08-15

    Many disease processes manifest either primarily or secondarily by cranial nerve deficits. Neurologists, ENT surgeons, ophthalmologists and maxillo-facial surgeons are often confronted with patients with symptoms and signs of cranial nerve dysfunction. Seeking the cause of this dysfunction is a common indication for imaging. In recent decades we have witnessed an unprecedented improvement in imaging techniques, allowing direct visualization of increasingly small anatomic structures. The emergence of volumetric CT scanners, higher field MR scanners in clinical practice and higher resolution MR sequences has made a tremendous contribution to the development of cranial nerve imaging. The use of surface coils and parallel imaging allows sub-millimetric visualization of nerve branches and volumetric 3D imaging. Both with CT and MR, multiplanar and curved reconstructions can follow the entire course of a cranial nerve or branch, improving tremendously our diagnostic yield of neural pathology. This review article will focus on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of normal anatomy and on infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital pathology affecting the cranial nerves. A detailed discussion of individual cranial nerves lesions is beyond the scope of this article. (orig.)

  12. Imaging the cranial nerves: Part I: Methodology, infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Many disease processes manifest either primarily or secondarily by cranial nerve deficits. Neurologists, ENT surgeons, ophthalmologists and maxillo-facial surgeons are often confronted with patients with symptoms and signs of cranial nerve dysfunction. Seeking the cause of this dysfunction is a common indication for imaging. In recent decades we have witnessed an unprecedented improvement in imaging techniques, allowing direct visualization of increasingly small anatomic structures. The emergence of volumetric CT scanners, higher field MR scanners in clinical practice and higher resolution MR sequences has made a tremendous contribution to the development of cranial nerve imaging. The use of surface coils and parallel imaging allows sub-millimetric visualization of nerve branches and volumetric 3D imaging. Both with CT and MR, multiplanar and curved reconstructions can follow the entire course of a cranial nerve or branch, improving tremendously our diagnostic yield of neural pathology. This review article will focus on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of normal anatomy and on infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital pathology affecting the cranial nerves. A detailed discussion of individual cranial nerves lesions is beyond the scope of this article. (orig.)

  13. Value of free-run electromyographic monitoring of lower cranial nerves in endoscopic endonasal approach to skull base surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2012-08-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of cranial nerves (CNs) VII, IX, X, XI, and XII in skull base surgeries performed using endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) to reduce iatrogenic CN deficits. Design We retrospectively identified 73 patients out of 990 patients who had EEA in our institution who had at least one CN monitored. In each CN group, we classified patients who had significant (SG) f-EMG activity as group I and those who did not as group II. Results We monitored a total of 342 CNs. A total of 62 nerves had SG f-EMG activity including CN VII = 18, CN IX = 16, CN X = 13, CN XI = 5, and CN XII = 10. No nerve deficit was found in the nerves that had significant activity during procedure. A total of five nerve deficits including (CN IX = 1, CN X = 2, CN XII = 2) were observed in the group that did not display SG f-EMG activity during surgery. Conclusions f-EMG seems highly sensitive to surgical manipulations and in locating CNs. It seems to have limited value in predicting postoperative neurological deficits. Future studies to evaluate the EMG of lower CNs during EEA procedures need to be done with both f-EMG and triggered EMG.

  14. An overview of the third, fourth and sixth cranial nerve palsies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Palsies of the third, fourth and sixth cranial nerves have ophthalmological consequences. W Marais, MB .... dorsal aspect of the brain (Fig. 4). • crossed ... right hypertropia in left gaze and left .... Clinical Science Course, section 5. American.

  15. CT and MRI of the skull base, including the cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    Some considerations about nuclear magnetic resonance and computerized tomography, essential for examining skull base lesions are treated here, including the cranial nerves. Neoplasms such as meningiomas, adenomas, chordomas, chondrosarcomas and others tumors are also cited, mentioning some commentaries. (author)

  16. Facial Nerve Schwannoma Involving Middle Cranial Fossa: When the Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Guide to the Correct Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    De Stefano, Alessandro; Dispenza, Francesco; Kulamarva, Gautham

    2011-01-01

    The Facial Nerve Schwannoma is a rare tumor and it seldom involved the middle cranial fossa. Facial nerve schwannoma has various manifestations, including facial palsy but unfortunately facial nerve is very resistant to compression and often facial nerve paralysis or a facial weakness are not present. We present a case of giant facial nerve schwannoma involved the middle cranial fossa without facial nerve paralysis. In these cases the unilateral hearing loss (if present) guide to a correct di...

  17. Wisdom tooth extraction causing lingual nerve and styloglossus muscle damage: a mimic of multiple cranial nerve palsies

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, A. S.; Evans, M.; Shah, S.; Catania, S.; Warren, J. D.; Gleeson, M. J.; Reilly, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of tongue hemianaesthesia, dysgeusia, dysarthria and dysphagia suggests the involvement of multiple cranial nerves. We present a case with sudden onset of these symptoms immediately following wisdom tooth extraction and highlight the clinical features that allowed localisation of the lesion to a focal, iatrogenic injury of the lingual nerve and adjacent styloglossus muscle.

  18. Cranial nerve involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: response to radiotherapy and its clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Cheng; Mayr, Nina A; Yuh, William T C; Wang, Jian Z; Jiang, Guo-Liang

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate the cranial nerve (CN) palsy associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), we studied factors that influenced the neurologic outcome of radiotherapy (RT), and the patterns and time course of neurologic recovery of CN palsy. Between July 1987 and July 1989, 93 patients who presented with CN palsy at the time of diagnosis of NPC were studied. All patients underwent external-beam RT with either cobalt-60 or 6-MV photon beams to a dose of 69 to 84 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. The time course and pattern of neurologic recovery (complete, partial, or none) from CN palsy were evaluated. Age, sex, stage, histology, incidence and distribution of types of CNs involved, duration of CN palsy, and time course of tumor response during RT were correlated with the patterns and the time course of neurologic CN recovery by univariate and multivariate analyses. The cases of CN palsy most commonly involved CN V (38%), CN VI (26%), and CN XII (11%), which accounted for the majority of the cases (75%). The time course of CN recovery was variable and protracted. Most patients showed significant improvement upon completion of RT (51%, 19%, and 30% complete, partial, and no recovery, respectively) and further improvement 6 months after RT (58%, 17%, and 25%, respectively). Cranial nerves V, VI, and XII accounted for 75% of cases with no recovery. Recovery was best for CNs II, IX, and XI and the sympathetic nerve (100%, 87%, 100%, and 100%, respectively) and worst for CNs IV, VII, and XII (67%, 60%, and 40%, respectively, with no recovery). Neurologic CN recovery correlated significantly with the pretherapy duration ( or =3 months) of CN palsy (88% versus 62%; p = .002, multivariate analysis), the time course of clinical tumor regression, and neurologic symptom improvement during RT. Age, sex, T stage, N stage, histology, anterior versus posterior CN palsies, and base of skull involvement were not significant. According to our limited data, most patients with CN palsy respond well

  19. Intracranial schwannomas arising from cranial nerves: Case series and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmeet Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors arising from the cranial nerve sheath are common intracranial neoplasms, with only few articles describing their imaging characteristics. In this present study of four cases of schwannomas originating from the cranial nerves in the head region, we are discussing the radiological features on imaging with the clinical presentation and contrasting them with other differentials in their respective locations. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were done in these cases and correlated with clinical and biopsy findings.

  20. Imaging the cranial nerves: part II: primary and secondary neoplastic conditions and neurovascular conflicts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil- Centro de Lisboa, Radiology Department, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Casselman, Jan [A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    There have been unprecedented improvements in cross-sectional imaging in the last decades. The emergence of volumetric CT, higher field MR scanners and higher resolution MR sequences is largely responsible for the increasing diagnostic yield of imaging in patients presenting with cranial nerve deficits. The introduction of parallel MR imaging in combination with small surface coils allows the depiction of submillimetric nerves and nerve branches, and volumetric CT and MR imaging is able to provide high quality multiplanar and curved reconstructions that can follow the often complex course of cranial nerves. Seeking the cause of a cranial nerve deficit is a common indication for imaging, and it is not uncommon that radiologists are the first specialists to see a patient with a cranial neuropathy. To increase the diagnostic yield of imaging, high-resolution studies with smaller fields of view are required. To keep imaging studies within a reasonable time frame, it is mandatory to tailor the study according to neuro-topographic testing. This review article focuses on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of primary and secondary neoplastic conditions affecting the cranial nerves as well as on neurovascular conflicts, an increasingly recognized cause of cranial neuralgias. (orig.)

  1. Imaging the cranial nerves: part II: primary and secondary neoplastic conditions and neurovascular conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2007-01-01

    There have been unprecedented improvements in cross-sectional imaging in the last decades. The emergence of volumetric CT, higher field MR scanners and higher resolution MR sequences is largely responsible for the increasing diagnostic yield of imaging in patients presenting with cranial nerve deficits. The introduction of parallel MR imaging in combination with small surface coils allows the depiction of submillimetric nerves and nerve branches, and volumetric CT and MR imaging is able to provide high quality multiplanar and curved reconstructions that can follow the often complex course of cranial nerves. Seeking the cause of a cranial nerve deficit is a common indication for imaging, and it is not uncommon that radiologists are the first specialists to see a patient with a cranial neuropathy. To increase the diagnostic yield of imaging, high-resolution studies with smaller fields of view are required. To keep imaging studies within a reasonable time frame, it is mandatory to tailor the study according to neuro-topographic testing. This review article focuses on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of primary and secondary neoplastic conditions affecting the cranial nerves as well as on neurovascular conflicts, an increasingly recognized cause of cranial neuralgias. (orig.)

  2. Roentgenological investigation of cavernous sinus structure with special reference to paracavernous cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuha, M.; Aoki, H.; Okamura, T.

    1987-01-01

    We have evaluated the anatomical structure of cavernous sinuses in parasellar blocks obtained from adult cadavers to gain clinically useful information. Ten microdissectional studies of parasellar blocks (20 sides of cavernous sinus) were carried out with special emphasis on the course of paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th). These were also examined on plain radiographs. Secondly, CT investigations of the cavernous sinuses (notably as to paracavernous cranial nerves) were undertaken in twenty clinical cases having presumed parasellar lesions and in three parasellar blocks from cadavers. The results from microdisectional studies and plain radiographs were as follows. It was found that the 3rd cranial nerve entered the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus close to the antero-inferior part of the posterior clinoid on lateral projection. The 4th cranial nerve, on the other hand, entered near the postero-inferior portion of the posterior clinoid on the same view. Variations in Parkinson's triangle were fairly often noted, although marked asymmetry was not seen in individual cases. From CT findings, it was found that a postenhanced, magnified direct coronal study was essential for identifying paracavernous cranial nerves more clearly. The 3rd and 5th cranial nerves were fairly well identified on axial and coronal projections. Careful radiological investigation including plain skull radiographs and CT seems to be of value for those who diagnose or treat parasellar lesions. (orig.)

  3. MR imaging of the cranial nerves and the intracranial vessels using 3D-SPGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Sato, Nami; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Sugai, Yukio; Ogushi, Masatoshi; Kubota, Hisashi

    1992-01-01

    MR angiography (MRA) has developed rapidly, but it is still insufficient to demonstrate the detail of the intracranial vascular anatomy. We found that original images of MRA render more information than MRA images about not only intracranial vessels but also cranial nerves. We have tried to demonstrate cranial nerves and intracranial vessels on 26 patients and evaluated using real time reformation of original images of MRA. MR images were obtained by SPGR (3DFT) after injection of Gd-DTPA. The optic nerve, the oculomotor nerve, the trigeminal nerve, the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve were visualized clearly on almost patients and detectabilities of these nerves were 100%, 98%, 100%, 94% and 100%, respectively. The abducent nerve was also detectable in 76%. The trochlear nerve, which could not be observed by any modality, was detected at prepontine cistern in 10%. Arteries around brain stem such as the superior cerebellar artery (SCA), the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and the posterior communicating artery (PcomA) were clearly visible, and branching of these arteries and anatomical detail were completely coincide with angiogram on 12 patients. The basal vein of Rosenthal and the petrosal vein were confirmed in 100% and their anastomose were demonstrated obviously. We concluded that this method was extremely useful to observe cranial nerves and intracranial small vessels. (author)

  4. Isolated unilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy: A rare presentation of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liang Boo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a common mosquito-borne viral infection endemic in tropical and subtropical countries. Neurological manifestations in dengue infection are relatively uncommon, and include encephalitis, encephalopathy, neuromuscular disorders and neuro-ocular disorders. Cranial mononeuropathy is a rare manifestation of dengue infection. A 40-year-old man was diagnosed with isolated, unilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy complicating dengue infection. The patient was managed accordingly, and full ocular recovery was observed. This was the first reported case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy associated with dengue fever in Malaysia. It is important for clinicians to consider dengue as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with fever and sixth cranial nerve palsy.

  5. Glioneuronal Heterotopia Presenting As a Cerebellopontine angle Tumor of the cranial Nerve VIII, Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris-Celda, M; Giannini, C; Diehn, F E; Eckel, L J; Neff, B A; Van Gompel, J J

    2018-04-03

    Vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas account for the great majority of lesions arising in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA). In this report, we present a case of glioneuronal heterotopia, also known as glioneuronal hamartoma, arising from the VIII cranial nerve, which is an extremely uncommon lesion. Important radiologic and surgical aspects are reviewed, which may help in early recognition and intraoperative decision making when these lesions are encountered. A healthy 29-year-old female presented with intermittent right facial numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an incidental minimally enhancing cerebellopontine angle lesion on the right VII-VIII cranial nerve complex. The patient declined serial observation and opted for operative intervention for resection. Intraoperatively, the lesion resembled neural tissue and was continuous with the VIII cranial nerve. Pathological analysis demonstrated mature glioneuronal tissue consistent with hamartomatous brain tissue. The patient maintained normal hearing and facial nerve function after surgery. Radiologic, surgical and pathological characteristics are described. Ectopic glioneuronal tissue of the VIII cranial nerve is a rare non-neoplastic lesion, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unusual appearing intracanalicular and cerebellopontine angle lesions. The congenital and benign nature of this entity makes observation a valid option for these cases, although they are so infrequent that they are often presumptively managed as vestibular schwannomas. Attempts to radically resect these lesions may result in higher rates of hearing loss or facial palsy due to their continuity with the cranial nerves. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cranial nerve clock. Part II: functional MR imaging of brain activation during a declarative memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, K L; Welsh, R C; Eldevik, P; Bieliauskas, L A; Steinberg, B A

    2001-12-01

    The authors performed this study to assess brain activation during encoding and successful recall with a declarative memory paradigm that has previously been demonstrated to be effective for teaching students about the cranial nerves. Twenty-four students underwent functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during encoding and recall of the name, number, and function of the 12 cranial nerves. The students viewed mnemonic graphic and text slides related to individual nerves, as well as their respective control slides. For the recall paradigm, students were prompted with the numbers 1-12 (test condition) intermixed with the number 14 (control condition). Subjects were tested about their knowledge of cranial nerves outside the MR unit before and after functional MR imaging. Students learned about the cranial nerves while undergoing functional MR imaging (mean post- vs preparadigm score, 8.1 +/- 3.4 [of a possible 12] vs 0.75 +/- 0.94, bilateral prefrontal cortex, left greater than right; P brain activation. Encoding revealed statistically significant activation in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, left greater than right [corrected]; bilateral occipital and parietal associative cortices, parahippocampus region, fusiform gyri, and cerebellum. Successful recall activated the left much more than the right prefrontal, parietal associative, and anterior cingulate cortices; bilateral precuneus and cerebellum; and right more than the left posterior cingulate. A predictable pattern of brain activation at functional MR imaging accompanies the encoding and successful recall of the cranial nerves with this declarative memory paradigm.

  7. Radiation-induced ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in patients with pituitary tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaphiades, Michael S; Spencer, Sharon A; Riley, Kristen; Francis, Courtney; Deitz, Luke; Kline, Lanning B

    2011-09-01

    Radiation therapy is often used in the treatment of pituitary tumor. Diplopia due to radiation damage to the ocular motor cranial nerves has been infrequently reported as a complication in this clinical setting. Retrospective case series of 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) with pituitary adenoma, all of whom developed diplopia following transsphenoidal resection of pituitary adenoma with subsequent radiation therapy. None had evidence of tumor involvement of the cavernous sinus. Five patients developed sixth nerve palsies, 3 unilateral and 2 bilateral, and in 1 patient, a sixth nerve palsy was preceded by a fourth cranial nerve palsy. One patient developed third nerve palsy. Five of the 6 patients had a growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumor with acromegaly. Following transsphenoidal surgery in all 6 patients (2 had 2 surgeries), 4 had 2 radiation treatments consisting of either radiosurgery (2 patients) or external beam radiation followed by radiosurgery (2 patients). Patients with pituitary tumors treated multiple times with various forms of radiation therapy are at risk to sustain ocular motor cranial nerve injury. The prevalence of acromegalic patients in this study reflects an aggressive attempt to salvage patients with recalcitrant growth hormone elevation and may place the patient at a greater risk for ocular motor cranial nerve damage.

  8. Visualization of the lower cranial nerves by 3D-FIESTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masayuki; Takemura, Akihiro; Tsujii, Hideo; Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Takada, Tadanori

    2005-01-01

    MR cisternography has been introduced for use in neuroradiology. This method is capable of visualizing tiny structures such as blood vessels and cranial nerves in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space because of its superior contrast resolution. The cranial nerves and small vessels are shown as structures of low intensity surrounded by marked hyperintensity of the CSF. In the present study, we evaluated visualization of the lower cranial nerves (glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory) by the three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) sequence and multiplanar reformation (MPR) technique. The subjects were 8 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 21 to 76 years (average, 54 yeas). We examined the visualization of a total of 66 nerves in 11 subjects by 3D-FIESTA. The results were classified into four categories ranging from good visualization to non-visualization. In all cases, all glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were identified to some extent, while accessory nerves were visualized either partially or entirely in only 16 cases. The total visualization rate was about 91%. In conclusion, 3D-FIESTA may be a useful method for visualization of the lower cranial nerves. (author)

  9. [Damage to cranial and peripheral nerves following patency restoration of the internal carotid artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrcha, P; Ciostek, P; Szopiński, P; Noszczyk, W

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was an assessment of the incidence of injury to cranial and peripheral nerves as complication of patency restoration of the internal carotid artery, and analysis of the effect of peripheral nerve injury on the results of carotid patency restoration. From Oct 1987 to Sept 1999 543 procedures were carried out for restoration of patency of the internal carotid artery. After the operation hypoglossus nerve injury was found in 7 cases (1.4%), vagus injury in 9 (1.8%). Signs of exclusively recurrent laryngeal nerve damage were found in 6 cases (1.2%). Glossopharyngeus nerve was damaged in 2 cases (0.4%), transient phrenic nerve palsy as a result of conduction anaesthesia was noted in 2 cases (0.4%). Damage to the transverse cervical nerve was found in 96 cases (60%). In 2 patients (1.2%) lower position of mouth angle was due to section of the mandibular ramus of the facial nerve. In another 2 cases skin sensation disturbances were a consequence of lesion of the auricularis magnus nerve and always they coexisted with signs of transverse cervical nerve damage. damage to the cranial nerves during operation for carotid patency restoration are frequent but mostly they are not connected with any health risks and often they regress spontaneously.

  10. Motor palsies of cranial nerves (excluding VII) after vaccination: reports to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Emily Jane; Winiecki, Scott K; Ou, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed cranial nerve palsies, other than VII, that have been reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We examined patterns for differences in vaccine types, seriousness, age, and clinical characteristics. We identified 68 reports of cranial nerve palsies, most commonly involving the oculomotor (III), trochlear (IV), and abducens (VI) nerves. Isolated cranial nerve palsies, as well as palsies occurring as part of a broader clinical entity, were reported. Forty reports (59%) were classified as serious, suggesting that a cranial nerve palsy may sometimes be the harbinger of a broader and more ominous clinical entity, such as a stroke or encephalomyelitis. There was no conspicuous clustering of live vs. inactivated vaccines. The patient age range spanned the spectrum from infants to the elderly. Independent data may help to clarify whether, when, and to what extent the rates of cranial nerve palsies following particular vaccines may exceed background levels.

  11. Neurophysiological Identification of Cranial Nerves During Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors: Pilot Study Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkarubo, Alexey Nikolaevich; Chernov, Ilia Valerievich; Ogurtsova, Anna Anatolievna; Moshchev, Dmitry Aleksandrovich; Lubnin, Andrew Jurievich; Andreev, Dmitry Nicolaevich; Koval, Konstantin Vladimirovich

    2017-02-01

    Intraoperative identification of cranial nerves is crucial for safe surgery of skull base tumors. Currently, only a small number of published papers describe the technique of trigger electromyography (t-EMG) in endoscopic endonasal removal of such tumors. To assess the effectiveness of t-EMG in preventing intraoperative cranial nerve damage in endoscopic endonasal surgery of skull base tumors. Nine patients were operated on using the endoscopic endonasal approach within a 1-year period. The tumors included large skull base chordomas and trigeminal neurinomas localized in the cavernous sinus. During the surgical process, cranial nerve identification was carried out using monopolar and bipolar t-EMG methods. Assessment of cranial nerve functional activity was conducted both before and after tumor removal. We mapped 17 nerves in 9 patients. Third, fifth, and sixth cranial nerves were identified intraoperatively. There were no cases of postoperative functional impairment of the mapped cranial nerves. In one case we were unable to get an intraoperative response from the fourth cranial nerve and observed its postoperative transient plegia (the function was normal before surgery). t-EMG allows surgeons to control the safety of cranial nerves both during and after skull base tumor removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lower cranial nerves function after surgical treatment of Fisch Class C and D tympanojugular paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacciu, Andrea; Medina, Marimar; Ait Mimoune, Hassen; D'Orazio, Flavia; Pasanisi, Enrico; Peretti, Giorgio; Sanna, Mario

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to report the postoperative lower cranial nerves (LCNs) function in patients undergoing surgery for tympanojugular paraganglioma (TJP) and to evaluate risk factors for postoperative LCN dysfunction. A retrospective case review of 122 patients having Fisch class C or D TJP, surgically treated from 1988 to 2012, was performed. The follow-up of the series ranged from 12 to 156 months (mean, 39.4 ± 32.6 months). The infratemporal type A approach was the most common surgical procedure. Gross total tumor removal was achieved in 86% of cases. Seventy-two percent of the 54 patients with preoperative LCN deficit had intracranial tumor extension. Intraoperatively, LCNs had to be sacrificed in 63 cases (51.6%) due to tumor infiltration. Sixty-six patients (54.09%) developed a new deficit of one or more of the LCNs. Of those patients who developed new LCN deficits, 23 of them had intradural extension. Postoperative follow-up of at least 1 year showed that the LCN most commonly affected was the CN IX (50%). Logistic regression analysis showed that intracranial transdural tumor extension was correlated with the higher risk of LCN sacrifice (p < 0.05). Despite the advances in skull base surgery, new postoperative LCN deficits still represent a challenge. The morbidity associated with resection of the LCNs is dependent on the tumor's size and intradural tumor extension. Though no recovery of LCN deficits may be expected, on long-term follow-up, patients usually compensate well for their LCNs loss.

  13. [Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, A; Berkefeld, J; Zanella, F

    2009-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples.

  14. Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bink, A.; Berkefeld, J.; Zanella, F.

    2009-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples. (orig.) [de

  15. Primary neurolymphomatosis of the lower cranial nerves presenting as Dysphagia and hoarseness: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Naoto; Ito-Yamashita, Tae; Takahashi, Goro; Baba, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2014-08-01

    Primary neurolymphomatosis is an extremely rare tumor. We report the case of a 74-year-old patient presenting with dysphagia and hoarseness. Initial contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the head, neck, and chest did not reveal any lesions. His symptoms improved with short-term administration of prednisone but recurred and deteriorated. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a tumor along the ninth and tenth cranial nerves across the jugular foramen. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography indicated this was a primary tumor. Repeated MR imaging after 2 months revealed considerable tumor enlargement. A left suboccipital craniotomy was performed to remove the tumor that infiltrated the ninth and tenth cranial nerves. The histopathologic diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Although focal radiation therapy was administered to ensure complete eradication of the tumor, the patient died of aspiration pneumonia with systemic metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary neurolymphomatosis in the lower cranial nerves.

  16. Internal carotid artery aneurysms, cranial nerve dysfunction and headache: the role of deformation and pulsation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Catarino, M.; Wikholm, G.; Svendsen, P. [Interventional Neuroradiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Frisen, L. [Ophthalmology Dept., Sahlgrenska Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Elfverson, J. [Neurosurgery Dept., Sahlgrenska Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Quiding, L. [Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering Dept., Sahlgrenska Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    Cranial nerve dysfunction and headache may occur with unruptured aneurysms of the cavernous and supraclinoid portions of the internal carotid artery. Nerve deformation (mass effect) and transmitted pulsations have been suggested as pathogenetic mechanisms. Differentiation may be possible by studying effects of endovascular treatment with Guglielmi detachable coils. Symptoms and signs of cranial neuropathy were retrospectively contrasted with angiographic aneurysm volumes before and after treatment in 10 patients. Mean follow-up was 36 months. Symptoms improved in three of four patients with cranial nerve dysfunction and in all patients with headache: None of the other patients, one with cranial nerve dysfunction, and three who were asymptomatic, developed any new symptoms after treatment. Aneurysm volume ranged from 0.1 to 2.7 cm{sup 3} before and 0.2 to 5.7 cm{sup 3} after treatment; the size thus increased by 15 to 110%, a change which was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The consistent increase in aneurysm volume with treatment is not associated with clinical deterioration, suggesting that deformation and displacement play a minor role in cranial neuropathy and that transmitted pulsations may be more important. (orig.)

  17. Internal carotid artery aneurysms, cranial nerve dysfunction and headache: the role of deformation and pulsation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Catarino, M.; Wikholm, G.; Svendsen, P.; Frisen, L.; Elfverson, J.; Quiding, L.

    2003-01-01

    Cranial nerve dysfunction and headache may occur with unruptured aneurysms of the cavernous and supraclinoid portions of the internal carotid artery. Nerve deformation (mass effect) and transmitted pulsations have been suggested as pathogenetic mechanisms. Differentiation may be possible by studying effects of endovascular treatment with Guglielmi detachable coils. Symptoms and signs of cranial neuropathy were retrospectively contrasted with angiographic aneurysm volumes before and after treatment in 10 patients. Mean follow-up was 36 months. Symptoms improved in three of four patients with cranial nerve dysfunction and in all patients with headache: None of the other patients, one with cranial nerve dysfunction, and three who were asymptomatic, developed any new symptoms after treatment. Aneurysm volume ranged from 0.1 to 2.7 cm 3 before and 0.2 to 5.7 cm 3 after treatment; the size thus increased by 15 to 110%, a change which was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The consistent increase in aneurysm volume with treatment is not associated with clinical deterioration, suggesting that deformation and displacement play a minor role in cranial neuropathy and that transmitted pulsations may be more important. (orig.)

  18. Subtotal resection for management of large jugular paragangliomas with functional lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanna, George B; Sweeney, Alex D; Carlson, Matthew L; Latuska, Richard F; Rivas, Alejandro; Bennett, Marc L; Netterville, James L; Haynes, David S

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate tumor control following subtotal resection of advanced jugular paragangliomas in patients with functional lower cranial nerves and to investigate the utility of salvage radiotherapy for residual progressive disease. Case series with planned chart review. Tertiary academic referral center. Patients who presented with advanced jugular paragangliomas and functional lower cranial nerves were analyzed. Primary outcome measures included extent of resection, long-term tumor control, need for additional treatment, and postoperative lower cranial nerve function. Twelve patients (mean age, 46.2 years; 7 women, 58.3%) who met inclusion criteria were evaluated between 1999 and 2013. The mean postoperative residual tumor volume was 27.7% (range, 3.5%-75.0%) of the preoperative volume. When the residual tumor volume was less than 20% of the preoperative volume, no tumor growth occurred over an average of 44.6 months of follow-up (P cranial neuropathy as a result of surgery. Subtotal resection of jugular paragangliomas with preservation of the lower cranial nerves is a viable management strategy. If more than 80% of the preoperative tumor volume is resected, the residual tumor seems less likely to grow. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  19. α-Synuclein pathology in the cranial and spinal nerves in Lewy body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keiko; Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Miki, Yasuo; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Yamada, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of phosphorylated α-synuclein in neurons and glial cells is a histological hallmark of Lewy body disease (LBD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Recently, filamentous aggregations of phosphorylated α-synuclein have been reported in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells, but not in axons, in the peripheral nervous system in MSA, mainly in the cranial and spinal nerve roots. Here we conducted an immunohistochemical investigation of the cranial and spinal nerves and dorsal root ganglia of patients with LBD. Lewy axons were found in the oculomotor, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves, but not in the hypoglossal nerve. The glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves were most frequently affected, with involvement in all of 20 subjects. In the spinal nerve roots, Lewy axons were found in all of the cases examined. Lewy axons in the anterior nerves were more frequent and numerous in the thoracic and sacral segments than in the cervical and lumbar segments. On the other hand, axonal lesions in the posterior spinal nerve roots appeared to increase along a cervical-to-sacral gradient. Although Schwann cell cytoplasmic inclusions were found in the spinal nerves, they were only minimal. In the dorsal root ganglia, axonal lesions were seldom evident. These findings indicate that α-synuclein pathology in the peripheral nerves is axonal-predominant in LBD, whereas it is restricted to glial cells in MSA. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  20. Glufosinate herbicide intoxication causing unconsciousness, convulsion, and 6th cranial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-seok; Kwak, Soo-Jung; Gil, Hyo-wook; Kim, So-Young; Hong, Sae-yong

    2013-11-01

    Although glufosinate ammonium herbicides are considered safe when used properly, ingestion of the undiluted form can cause grave outcomes. Recently, we treated a 34-yr-old man who ingested glufosinate ammonium herbicide. In the course of treatment, the patient developed apnea, mental deterioration, and sixth cranial nerve palsy; he has since been discharged with full recovery after intensive care. This case report describes the clinical features of glufosinate intoxication with a focus on sixth cranial nerve palsy. Our observation suggests that neurologic manifestations after ingestion of a "low-grade toxicity herbicide" are variable and more complex than that was previously considered.

  1. Cranial nerve palsy in Wegener's granulomatosis--lessons from clinical cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowack, Rainer; Wachtler, Paul; Kunz, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    The problem of diagnosing vasculitic neuropathy is discussed based on case reports of two patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. One patient developed de novo 6(th) nerve palsy as an isolated relapse manifestation and the second patient a sequence of multiple cranial nerve palsies. Brain imaging...... by the overall clinical presentations. Cranial neuropathy may be the first obvious vasculitic manifestation preceding other organ disease, and since single reliable tests for its diagnosis are lacking, a multidisciplinary approach is advocated here to detect vasculitic manifestations in other organs....

  2. Cranial nerve damage in patients after alpha (heavy)-particle radiation to the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.; Wei, W.C.; Chong, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The records of 161 patients were reviewed to determine if radiation damage had occurred following cranial irradiation. All of these patients had received alpha-particle radiation to their pituitary glands for diabetic retinopathy. Extraocular muscle palsy developed in 11 of these patients, iridoplegia in six, and fifth nerve damage in six. All of the palsies developed within a short period following their irradiation, and a definite dose relationship was present. The estimated doses to the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cranial nerves was calculated at a saggital plane 13 to 15 mm from the pituitary by using computer-drawn dosimetry charts for the respective aperture size

  3. Clinical anatomy and imaging of the cranial nerves and skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ruchira M; Klein, Joshua P

    2012-09-01

    Evaluation of patients with cranial neuropathies requires an understanding of brainstem anatomy and nerve pathways. Advances in neuroimaging, particularly high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have enabled visualization of these tiny structures and their related pathology. This review provides an approach toward using imaging in the evaluation of cranial nerve (CN) and skull base anatomy and pathology. Because brainstem nuclei are inextricably linked to the information contained within CNs, they are briefly mentioned whenever relevant; however, a comprehensive discussion of brainstem syndromes is beyond the scope of this review. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Post-traumatic Unilateral Avulsion of the Abducens Nerve with Damage to Cranial Nerves VII and VIII: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Akiyama, Yuji; Tsumura, Ryu; Kolakshyapati, Manish; Adhikari, Rupendra Bahadur; Takayasu, Takeshi; Nosaka, Ryo; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic injuries of the abducens nerve as a consequence of facial and/or head trauma occur with or without associated cervical or skull base fracture. This is the first report on unilateral avulsion of the abducens nerve in a 29-year-old man with severe right facial trauma. In addition, he exhibited mild left facial palsy, and moderate left hearing disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) revealed avulsion of left sixth cranial nerve. We recommend thin-slice MR examination in patients with abducens palsy after severe facial and/or head trauma.

  5. Simultaneous involvement of third and sixth cranial nerve in a patient with Lyme disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, M.; Schmid, A.; Tomandl, B.F. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Stemper, B.; Maihoefner, C.; Heckmann, J.G. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054, Erlangen (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    We report a 57-year-old woman with neuroborreliosis presenting with headache, shoulder muscle pain and double vision. MRI demonstrated enhancement of the right third and sixth cranial nerves. A 3D MP-RAGE sequence was used to perform multiplanar reformations to show this more graphically. The patient was free of symptoms 1 month after completion of therapy, when thickening and contrast enhancement of the nerves were less pronounced. (orig.)

  6. Simultaneous involvement of third and sixth cranial nerve in a patient with Lyme disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, M.; Schmid, A.; Tomandl, B.F.; Stemper, B.; Maihoefner, C.; Heckmann, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    We report a 57-year-old woman with neuroborreliosis presenting with headache, shoulder muscle pain and double vision. MRI demonstrated enhancement of the right third and sixth cranial nerves. A 3D MP-RAGE sequence was used to perform multiplanar reformations to show this more graphically. The patient was free of symptoms 1 month after completion of therapy, when thickening and contrast enhancement of the nerves were less pronounced. (orig.)

  7. Neurinomas of the facial nerve extending to the middle cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Akimichi; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Matsumura, Kenichiro; Takeda, Norio; Ishii, Ryoji; Ito, Jusuke.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases with neurinomas of the facial nerve are reported, especially with regard to the computerized tomographic (CT) findings. All of them had a long history of facial-nerve dysfunction, associated with hearing loss over periods from several to twenty-five years. Intraoperative findings demonstrated that these tumors arose from the intrapetrous portion, the horizontal portion, or the geniculate portion of the facial nerve and that they were located in the middle cranial fossa. The histological diagnoses were neurinomas. CT scans of three cases demonstrated round and low-density masses with marginal high-density areas in the middle cranial fossa, in one associated with diffuse low-density areas in the left temporal and parietal lobes. The low-density areas on CT were thought to be cysts; this was confirmed by surgery. Enhanced CT scans showed irregular enhancement in one case and ring-like enhancement in two cases. High-resolution CT scans of the temporal bone in two cases revealed a soft tissue mass in the middle ear, a well-circumscribed irregular destruction of the anterior aspect of the petrous bone, and calcifications. These findings seemed to be significant features of the neurinomas of the facial nerve extending to the middle cranial fossa. We emphasize that bone-window CT of the temporal bone is most useful in detecting a neurinoma of the facial nerve in its early stage in order to preserve the facial- and acoustic-nerve functions. (author)

  8. Intraoperative monitoring of lower cranial nerves in skull base surgery: technical report and review of 123 monitored cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topsakal, Cahide; Al-Mefty, Ossama; Bulsara, Ketan R; Williford, Veronica S

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental goal of skull base surgery is tumor removal with preservation of neurological function. Injury to the lower cranial nerves (LCN; CN 9-12) profoundly affects a patient's quality of life. Although intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring (IOM) is widely practiced for other cranial nerves, literature addressing the LCN is scant. We examined the utility of IOM of the LCN in a large patient series. One hundred twelve patients underwent 123 skull base operations with IOM between January 1994 to December 1999. The vagus nerve (n=37), spinal accessory nerve (n=118), and the hypoglossal nerve (n=83) were monitored intraoperatively. Electromyography (EMG) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) were recorded from the relevant muscles after electrical stimulation. This data was evaluated retrospectively. Patients who underwent IOM tended to have larger tumors with more intricate involvement of the lower cranial nerves. Worsening of preoperative lower cranial nerve function was seen in the monitored and unmonitored groups. With the use of IOM in the high risk group, LCN injury was reduced to a rate equivalent to that of the lower risk group (p>0.05). The immediate feedback obtained with IOM may prevent injury to the LCN due to surgical manipulation. It can also help identify the course of a nerve in patients with severely distorted anatomy. These factors may facilitate gross total tumor resection with cranial nerve preservation. The incidence of high false positive and negative CMAP and the variability in CMAP amplitude and threshold can vary depending on individual and technical factors.

  9. Cranial nerves - spectrum of inflammatory and tumorous changes; Hirnnerven - Spektrum entzuendlicher und tumoroeser Veraenderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, S.F.; Kasprian, G.; Nemec, U.; Czerny, C. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Klinische Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie und muskuloskelettale Radiologie, Wien (Austria)

    2009-07-15

    Inflammatory processes as well as primary and secondary tumorous changes may involve cranial nerves causing neurological deficits. In addition to neurologists, ENT physicians, ophthalmologists and maxillofacial surgeons, radiologists play an important role in the investigation of patients with cranial nerve symptoms. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and particularly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow the depiction of the cranial nerve anatomy and pathological neural changes. This article briefly describes the imaging techniques in MDCT and MRI and is dedicated to the radiological presentation of inflammatory and tumorous cranial nerve pathologies. (orig.) [German] Entzuendliche Prozesse sowie primaere und sekundaere tumoroese Veraenderungen koennen Hirnnerven mitbeteiligen und so zu neurologischen Defiziten fuehren. Neben dem Neurologen, HNO-Arzt, Augenarzt und Kiefer-Gesichts-Chirurgen kommt dem Radiologen eine besondere Bedeutung bei der Abklaerung von Patienten mit Hirnnervensymptomatik zu. Die Multidetektorcomputertomographie (MDCT) und insbesondere die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) ermoeglichen die Darstellung der Hirnnervenanatomie sowie der nervalen pathologischen Veraenderungen. Der vorliegende Artikel beschreibt kurz gefasst die bildgebenden Techniken von MDCT und MRT und widmet sich der radiologischen Bildgebung entzuendlicher und tumoroeser Hirnnervenveraenderungen. (orig.)

  10. It's All in the Mime: Actions Speak Louder than Words When Teaching the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kerry Ann; Stephens, Bruce Warren

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerve (CN) knowledge is essential for students in health professions. Gestures and body movements (e.g., mime) have been shown to improve cognition and satisfaction with anatomy teaching. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of didactic lecturing with that of miming lecturing for student learning of the CNs. The…

  11. Cranial nerve palsies in metastatic prostate cancer--results of base of skull radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Norman, Andrew R.; McNair, Helen; Dearnaley, David P.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the rate of response to palliative external beam radiation therapy (20 Gy/5 or 30 Gy/10 fractions) to the base of skull in 32 prostate cancer patients with cranial nerve dysfunction. Sixteen patients (50%; 95% CI, 34-66%) had a useful response to therapy. The median survival post-therapy was 3 months

  12. Understanding the Cranial Nerves: Evaluation of a Self-Paced Online Module in Optometric Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel Arnett

    2016-01-01

    Among the faculty of Southern College of Optometry in Memphis, Tennessee, it is perceived that optometry students often enter their clinical assignments with poor clinical judgment. To address this, "Understanding the Cranial Nerves"--an online-self paced instructional intervention of approximately two hours' duration--was developed. In…

  13. Imaging assessment of isolated lesions affecting cranial nerve III; Avaliacao por imagem das lesoes isoladas do III par craniano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos [Colegio Brasileiro de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem (CBR), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: cidbh@cidbh.com.br; Martins, Jose Carlos Tadeu [Sociedade Brasileira de Neuroradiologia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-05-15

    The aim of this study is to review the anatomy and main pathologic conditions affecting cranial nerve III using imaging studies, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging methods are essential in the evaluation of patients with suspected lesions of the oculomotor nerve once signs and symptoms are unspecific and a large number of diseases can affect cranial nerve III. A brief review of the literature is also presented. (author)

  14. Nerves of Steel: a Low-Cost Method for 3D Printing the Cranial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan, Ramin; Davidson, Duncan; Javan, Afshin

    2017-10-01

    Steady-state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can demonstrate details down to the cranial nerve (CN) level. High-resolution three-dimensional (3D) visualization can now quickly be performed at the workstation. However, we are still limited by visualization on flat screens. The emerging technologies in rapid prototyping or 3D printing overcome this limitation. It comprises a variety of automated manufacturing techniques, which use virtual 3D data sets to fabricate solid forms in a layer-by-layer technique. The complex neuroanatomy of the CNs may be better understood and depicted by the use of highly customizable advanced 3D printed models. In this technical note, after manually perfecting the segmentation of each CN and brain stem on each SSFP-MRI image, initial 3D reconstruction was performed. The bony skull base was also reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) data. Autodesk 3D Studio Max, available through freeware student/educator license, was used to three-dimensionally trace the 3D reconstructed CNs in order to create smooth graphically designed CNs and to assure proper fitting of the CNs into their respective neural foramina and fissures. This model was then 3D printed with polyamide through a commercial online service. Two different methods are discussed for the key segmentation and 3D reconstruction steps, by either using professional commercial software, i.e., Materialise Mimics, or utilizing a combination of the widely available software Adobe Photoshop, as well as a freeware software, OsiriX Lite.

  15. Imaging of cranial nerves with three-dimensional high resolution diffusion-weighted MR sequence based on SSFP technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongwei; Chen Yingming; Meng Quanfei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To depict the normal anatomy of cranial nerves in detail and define the exact relationships between cranial nerves and adjacent structures with three-dimensional high resolution diffusion-weighted MR sequence based on SSFP technique (3D DW-SSFP). Methods: 3D DW- SSFP sequence was performed and axial images were obtained in 12 healthy volunteers Post-processing techniques were used to generate images of cranial nerves, and the images acquired were compared with anatomical sections and diagrams of textbook. Results: In all subjects, 3D DW-SSFP sequence could produce homogeneous images and high contrast between the cranial nerves and other solid structures. The intracranial portions of all cranial nerves except olfactory nerve were identified; the extracranial portions of nerve Ⅱ-Ⅻ were identified in all subjects bilaterally. Conclusion: The 3D DW-SSFP sequence can characterize the normal MR appearance of cranial nerves and its branches and the ability to define the nerves may provide greater sensitivity and specificity in detecting abnormalities of craniofacial structure. (authors)

  16. Bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy in infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, J.; Bone, I.

    1979-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with a bilateral sixth nerve palsy caused by infectious mononucleosis is described. The neurological presentation of infectious mononucleosis is discussed. PMID:225738

  17. Neuroprotective effect of lurasidone via antagonist activities on histamine in a rat model of cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Baoming; Yu, Liang; Li, Suping; Xu, Fei; Yang, Lili; Ma, Shuai; Guo, Yi

    2018-04-01

    Cranial nerve involvement frequently involves neuron damage and often leads to psychiatric disorder caused by multiple inducements. Lurasidone is a novel antipsychotic agent approved for the treatment of cranial nerve involvement and a number of mental health conditions in several countries. In the present study, the neuroprotective effect of lurasidone by antagonist activities on histamine was investigated in a rat model of cranial nerve involvement. The antagonist activities of lurasidone on serotonin 5‑HT7, serotonin 5‑HT2A, serotonin 5‑HT1A and serotonin 5‑HT6 were analyzed, and the preclinical therapeutic effects of lurasidone were examined in a rat model of cranial nerve involvement. The safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and preliminary antitumor activity of lurasidone were also assessed in the cranial nerve involvement model. The therapeutic dose of lurasidone was 0.32 mg once daily, administered continuously in 14‑day cycles. The results of the present study found that the preclinical prescriptions induced positive behavioral responses following treatment with lurasidone. The MTD was identified as a once daily administration of 0.32 mg lurasidone. Long‑term treatment with lurasidone for cranial nerve involvement was shown to improve the therapeutic effects and reduce anxiety in the experimental rats. In addition, treatment with lurasidone did not affect body weight. The expression of the language competence protein, Forkhead‑BOX P2, was increased, and the levels of neuroprotective SxIP motif and microtubule end‑binding protein were increased in the hippocampal cells of rats with cranial nerve involvement treated with lurasidone. Lurasidone therapy reinforced memory capability and decreased anxiety. Taken together, lurasidone treatment appeared to protect against language disturbances associated with negative and cognitive impairment in the rat model of cranial nerve involvement, providing a basis for its use in the clinical treatment of

  18. Wisdom tooth extraction causing lingual nerve and styloglossus muscle damage: a mimic of multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Aisling S; Evans, Matthew; Shah, Sachit; Catania, Santi; Warren, Jason D; Gleeson, Michael J; Reilly, Mary M

    2017-06-01

    The combination of tongue hemianaesthesia, dysgeusia, dysarthria and dysphagia suggests the involvement of multiple cranial nerves. We present a case with sudden onset of these symptoms immediately following wisdom tooth extraction and highlight the clinical features that allowed localisation of the lesion to a focal, iatrogenic injury of the lingual nerve and adjacent styloglossus muscle. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Sensory-motor axonal polyneuropathy involving cranial nerves: An uncommon manifestation of disulfiram toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Telma; Martins Campos, António; Morais, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Disulfiram (tetraethylthiuram disulfide) has been used for the treatment of alcohol dependence. An axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy with involvement of cranial pairs due to disulfiram is exceedingly rare. The authors report a unique case of an extremely severe axonal polyneuropathy involving cranial nerves that developed within weeks after a regular dosage of 500mg/day disulfiram. To the authors best knowledge, such a severe and rapidly-progressive course has never been described with disulfiram dosages of only 500mg/day. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A clear map of the lower cranial nerves at the superior carotid triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Garcia-Gonzalez, Ulises; Agrawal, Abhishek; Tavares, Paulo L M S; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2010-07-01

    The lower cranial nerves must be identified to avoid iatrogenic injury during skull base and high cervical approaches. Prompt recognition of these structures using basic landmarks could reduce surgical time and morbidity. The anterior triangle of the neck was dissected in 30 cadaveric head sides. The most superficial segments of the glossopharyngeal, vagus and its superior laryngeal nerves, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves were exposed and designated into smaller anatomic triangles. The midpoint of each nerve segment inside the triangles was correlated to the angle of the mandible (AM), mastoid tip (MT), and bifurcation of the common carotid artery. A triangle bounded by the styloglossus muscle, external carotid artery, and facial artery housed the glossopharyngeal nerve. This nerve segment was 0.06 ± 0.71 cm posterior to the AM and 2.50 ± 0.59 cm inferior to the MT. The vagus nerve ran inside the carotid sheath posterior to internal carotid artery and common carotid artery bifurcation in 48.3% of specimens. A triangle formed by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, sternocleidomastoid muscle, and internal jugular vein housed the accessory nerve, 1.90 ± 0.60 cm posterior to the AM and 2.30 ± 0.57 cm inferior to the MT. A triangle outlined by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, internal jugular vein, and common facial vein housed the hypoglossal nerve, which was 0.82 ± 0.84 cm posterior to the AM and 3.64 ± 0.70 cm inferior to the MT. Comprehensible landmarks can be defined to help expose the lower cranial nerves to avoid injury to this complex region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Malformation of the eighth cranial nerve in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula-Vernetta, Carlos; Muñoz-Fernández, Noelia; Mas-Estellés, Fernando; Guzmán-Calvete, Abel; Cavallé-Garrido, Laura; Morera-Pérez, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is approximately 1.5-6 in every 1,000 newborns. Dysfunction of the auditory nerve (auditory neuropathy) may be involved in up to 1%-10% of cases; hearing losses because of vestibulocochlear nerve (VCN) aplasia are less frequent. The objectives of this study were to describe clinical manifestations, hearing thresholds and aetiology of children with SNHL and VCN aplasia. We present 34 children (mean age 20 months) with auditory nerve malformation and profound HL taken from a sample of 385 children implanted in a 10-year period. We studied demographic characteristics, hearing, genetics, risk factors and associated malformations (Casselman's and Sennaroglu's classifications). Data were processed using a bivariate descriptive statistical analysis (P<.05). Of all the cases, 58.8% were bilateral (IIa/IIa and I/I were the most common). Of the unilateral cases, IIb was the most frequent. Auditory screening showed a sensitivity of 77.4%. A relationship among bilateral cases and systemic pathology was observed. We found a statistically significant difference when comparing hearing loss impairment and patients with different types of aplasia as defined by Casselman's classification. Computed tomography (CT) scan yielded a sensitivity of 46.3% and a specificity of 85.7%. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was the most sensitive imaging test. Ten percent of the children in a cochlear implant study had aplasia or hypoplasia of the auditory nerve. The degree of auditory loss was directly related to the different types of aplasia (Casselman's classification) Although CT scan and MRI are complementary, the MRI is the test of choice for detecting auditory nerve malformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  2. Morbid obesity increases risk of morbidity and reoperation in resection of benign cranial nerve neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Porter, Amanda; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Shepherd, Daniel; Rayan, Tarek; Maloney, Patrick R; Carter, Bob S; Bydon, Mohamad; Gompel, Jamie J Van; Link, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased risk for postoperative CSF leak in patients with benign cranial nerve tumors. Other measures of postoperative morbidity associated with obesity have not been well characterized. Patients enrolled in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) from 2007 to 2013 with a diagnosis code of a benign neoplasm of a cranial nerve were included. The primary outcome of postoperative morbidity was analyzed as well as secondary outcomes of readmission and reoperation. The main covariate of interest was body mass index (BMI). A total of 561 patients underwent surgery for a benign cranial nerve neoplasm between 2007 and 2013. Readmission data, available for 2012-2013(n=353), revealed hydrocephalus, facial nerve injury, or CSF leak requiring readmission or reoperation occurred in 0.85%, 1.42%, and 3.12%, respectively. Composite morbidity included wound complications, infection, respiratory insufficiency, transfusion requirement, stroke, venous thromboembolism, coma and cardiac arrest. On multivariable analysis patients with class I (BMI 30-34.9) and II (BMI 35-39.9) obesity showed trends towards increasing return to operating room, though not significant, but there was no trend for composite complications in class I and II obesity patients. However, class III obesity, BMI≥40, was associated with increased odds of composite morbidity (OR 4.40, 95% CI 1.24-15.88) and return to the operating room (OR 5.97, 95% CI 1.20-29.6) relative to patients with a normal BMI, 18.5-25. Obesity is an independent and important risk factor for composite morbidity in resection of benign cranial nerve neoplasms, and as such, merits discussion during preoperative counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly A. Karpinski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V, glossopharyngeal (IX or vagus (X cranial nerves (CNs that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS.

  4. Preservation of cranial nerves during removal of the brain for an enhanced student experience in neuroanatomy classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jennifer; Roberts, David J H; Pickering, James D

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanatomy teaching at the University of Leeds includes the examination of isolated brains by students working in small groups. This requires the prosected brains to exhibit all 12 pairs of cranial nerves. Traditional methods of removing the brain from the skull involve elevating the frontal lobes and cutting each cranial nerve as the brain is reflected posteriorly. This can leave a substantial length of each nerve attached to the skull base rather than to the removed brain. We have found a posterior approach more successful. In this study, five adult heads were disarticulated at the level of the thyroid cartilage and placed, prone, in a head stand. A wedge of bone from the occipital region was removed before the cerebellum and brainstem were elevated to visualize the cranial nerves associated with the medulla oblongata, cerebellopontine angle and mesencephalic-pontine junction prior to cutting them as close to the skull as possible. Five brains were successfully removed from the skull, each having a full complement of cranial nerves of good length attached to them. This approach significantly increases the length and number of cranial nerves remaining attached to the brain, which supports student education. For integration into head and neck dissection courses, careful consideration will be required to ensure the necks are suitably dissected and to decide whether the cranial nerves are best left attached to the skull base or brain. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Skull Base Meningiomas and Cranial Nerves Contrast Using Sodium Fluorescein: A New Application of an Old Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2014-08-01

    Objective The identification of cranial nerves is one of the most challenging goals in the dissection of skull base meningiomas. The authors present an application of sodium fluorescein (SF) in skull base meningiomas with the purpose of improving the identification of cranial nerves. Design A prospective study within-subjects design. Setting Hospital Ernesto Dornelles, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Participants Patients with skull base meningiomas. Main Outcomes Measures Cranial nerve identification. Results The group of nine meningiomas was composed of one cavernous sinus, three petroclival, one tuberculum sellae, two sphenoid wing, one olfactory groove, and one temporal floor meningioma. The SF enhancement in all tumors was strong, and the contrast with cranial nerves clearly evident. There were one definite olfactory nerve deficit, one transient abducens deficit, and one definite hemiparesis. All lesions were resected (Simpson grades 1 and 2). The analysis of the difference of the delta SF wavelength between the meningiomas and cranial nerve contrast was performed by the Wilcoxon signed rank test and showed p = 0.011. Conclusions The contrast between the enhanced meningiomas and cranial nerves was evident and assisted in the visualization and microsurgical dissection of these structures. The anatomical preservation of these structures was improved using the contrast.

  6. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the cranial and anterior spinal nerves in early tadpoles of Xenopus laevis (Pipidae, Anura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Benjamin; Olsson, Lennart

    2018-04-01

    Xenopus laevis is one of the most widely used model organism in neurobiology. It is therefore surprising, that no detailed and complete description of the cranial nerves exists for this species. Using classical histological sectioning in combination with fluorescent whole mount antibody staining and micro-computed tomography we prepared a detailed innervation map and a freely-rotatable three-dimensional (3D) model of the cranial nerves and anterior-most spinal nerves of early X. laevis tadpoles. Our results confirm earlier descriptions of the pre-otic cranial nerves and present the first detailed description of the post-otic cranial nerves. Tracing the innervation, we found two previously undescribed head muscles (the processo-articularis and diaphragmatico-branchialis muscles) in X. laevis. Data on the cranial nerve morphology of tadpoles are scarce, and only one other species (Discoglossus pictus) has been described in great detail. A comparison of Xenopus and Discoglossus reveals a relatively conserved pattern of the post-otic and a more variable morphology of the pre-otic cranial nerves. Furthermore, the innervation map and the 3D models presented here can serve as an easily accessible basis to identify alterations of the innervation produced by experimental studies such as genetic gain- and loss of function experiments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Neurovascular compression of cranial nerves: CT and MRI findings; Evaluacion de las compresiones neurovasculares intracraneales: hallazgos en TC y RM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Llanos, Julio; Sinner, Ricardo; Nagel, Jorge [Instituto Gamma, Rosario (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    Purpose: The compression of a nervous structure by an aberrant vessel may be asymptomatic or produce an important symptoms, in these cases CT and MRI show relevant information. Materials and Methods: Between January 1998 and March 2001, we studied 27 patients: 8 with trigeminal neuralgia, 7 with hemi facial spasm, 4 vertigo and tinnitus, 2 hemianopsia, 1 with neuralgia of the amygdalin fossa, 1 with bitonal voice, 1 with tongue deviation with fascicular movements, 2 essential hypertension and 1 with severe headache. All of them had a neurologic evaluation from 2 specialists and 2 neuro radiologists interpreted the results. Results: The CT and RMI images with special sequences allowed to prove the compression of the entry segments of the V, VII, IX, X and XII cranial nerves, of the optic chiasma and the ventrolateral aspect of the medulla oblongata in close relation with the vasopressor centre. Also they demonstrate a rare vessel in the Silvio aqueduct avoiding the normal flow of the CSF. Of the total of patients that were studied, 37% had surgical confirmation. Conclusion: CT and RMI are sensitive and specific methods for the detection of vascular compressions of nervous structures. (author)

  8. [Localized invasive intracranial aspergillosis with multiple cranial nerve failure -- case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, F; Seelos, K; Hempel, J M; Pfister, H-W

    2002-12-01

    Contrary to the more frequent hematogenously spread cerebral aspergillosis, localized invasive intracranial aspergillosis is a fungal infection that can also occur in patients who are not severely immunosuppressed. This illness can be effectively treated in some of these patients by early and rigorous therapy. Localized invasion of the fungus, generally from one of the nasal sinuses, causes intracranial growth mainly along the base of the skull and larger vessels,where fibrous, granulomatous tissue develops. This generally leads to damage of the cranial nerves (primarily I-VI) as well as localized pain syndromes. We report on the clinical course documented by MRI of a patient with localized invasive intracranial aspergillosis who had multiple failure of cranial nerves following surgery for an aspergilloma of the maxillary sinus. Clinical course, imaging findings, and treatment of the illness are discussed with a review of the relevant literature.

  9. Isolated Bilateral Fourth Cranial Nerve Palsies as the Presenting Sign of Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimosthenis Mantopoulos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain lesions leading to bilateral fourth nerve palsies are typically accompanied by other brainstem symptomatology. Here we report a case of a 29-year-old man with hydrocephalus and significant third ventricle dilation applying pressure on the dorsal midbrain and having as the only manifestation isolated, bilateral fourth cranial nerve palsies. This finding, reported here for the first time, could be attributed to a partially working ventriculoperitoneal shunt previously placed in this patient, which was able to sporadically relieve the increases of the intraventricular pressure on the midbrain that would normally lead to other manifestations.

  10. Glufosinate Herbicide Intoxication Causing Unconsciousness, Convulsion, and 6th Cranial Nerve Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jae-seok; Kwak, Soo-Jung; Gil, Hyo-wook; Kim, So-Young; Hong, Sae-yong

    2013-01-01

    Although glufosinate ammonium herbicides are considered safe when used properly, ingestion of the undiluted form can cause grave outcomes. Recently, we treated a 34-yr-old man who ingested glufosinate ammonium herbicide. In the course of treatment, the patient developed apnea, mental deterioration, and sixth cranial nerve palsy; he has since been discharged with full recovery after intensive care. This case report describes the clinical features of glufosinate intoxication with a focus on six...

  11. Samuel Thomas Soemmerring (1755-1830): The Naming of Cranial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John M S

    2017-01-01

    Samuel Thomas Soemmerring was a Prussian polymathic doctor with remarkable achievements in anatomy, draftsmanship and inventions. His naming of 12 pairs of cranial nerves in his graduation thesis is of particular importance. He also gave original descriptions of the macula, sensory pathways and of the substantia nigra. His non-medical contributions were diverse and included criticism of the guillotine, invention of a telegraphic system, and discoveries in palaeontology. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. A rare case of quadrigeminal plate lipoma presenting with the sixth cranial nerve palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bipin Kumar Chaurasia; Tolga Dundar; Narendra Shalike; Silak Ram Chaudhary; Shamsul Alam; Dhiman Chowdhory; Kanak Kanti Barua; Ranjit Kumar Chaurasiya; Raushan Kumar Chaurasia; Ramesh Kumar Chaurasia

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas are rare benign tumour that is slow growing, generally asymptomatic, most frequently located in the midline areas and are usually an incidental finding on imaging and therefore cases are not frequently reported. This study reports a case of a patient with quadrigeminal plate lipoma presenting with obstructive hydrocephalous and the 6th cranial nerve palsy that was successfully treated with ventriculo-peritoneal shunting without addressing the lesion.

  13. Preoperative Visualization of Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Tumor Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Su, Shaobo; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaochen; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To visualize cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with special parameters. This study also involved the evaluation of preoperative estimates and intraoperative confirmation of the relationship between nerves and tumor by verifying the accuracy of visualization. 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans including 3D-FSPGR, FIESTA, and DTI were used to collect information from 18 patients with skull base tumor. DTI data were integrated into the 3D slicer for fiber tracking and overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves. 3D reconstruction of tumors was achieved to perform neighboring, encasing, and invading relationship between lesion and nerves. Optic pathway including the optic chiasm could be traced in cases of tuberculum sellae meningioma and hypophysoma (pituitary tumor). The oculomotor nerve, from the interpeduncular fossa out of the brain stem to supraorbital fissure, was clearly visible in parasellar meningioma cases. Meanwhile, cisternal parts of trigeminal nerve and abducens nerve, facial nerve were also imaged well in vestibular schwannomas and petroclival meningioma cases. The 3D-spatial relationship between CNs and skull base tumor estimated preoperatively by tumor modeling and tractography corresponded to the results determined during surgery. Supported by DTI and 3D slicer, preoperative 3D reconstruction of most CNs related to skull base tumor is feasible in pathological circumstances. We consider DTI Technology to be a useful tool for predicting the course and location of most CNs, and syntopy between them and skull base tumor.

  14. Pontine extension of a tentorial schwannoma without cranial nerve involvement: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Urso Pietro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intracranial schwannomas unrelated to the cranial nerves are uncommon. We report a new case of tentorial schwannoma unrelated to the cranial nerves, with extension into the pons. A literature review with discussion of the most relevant pathogenetic aspects is also performed. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian man was admitted with right-sided paresthesias and weakness of his upper and lower extremities. The neurological examination revealed right hemiparesis and hemi-hypoesthesia. A brain magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a cerebellopontine lesion, arising from the left free edge of the tentorium, and extending into his pons. A piecemeal removal was performed through a retrosigmoid approach. The lesion was not found to be associated with any cranial nerves. The histological examination revealed a schwannoma Antoni type A. His postoperative course was uneventful. At one year follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact and the magnetic resonance imaging of his brain performed at that time showed complete removal without signs of recurrence. Conclusion Tentorial schwannomas are rare clinical entities. Knowledge of their clinical, radiological and anatomical characteristics is very important for the correct diagnosis and management.

  15. Intraoperative Mapping and Monitoring for Rootlets of the Lower Cranial Nerves Related to Vocal Cord Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Akiyama, Yukinori; Mikami, Takeshi; Komatsu, Katsuya; Sugino, Toshiya; Suzuki, Kengo; Kanno, Aya; Ohtaki, Shunya; Noshiro, Shouhei; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Damage to the motor division of the lower cranial nerves that run into the jugular foramen leads to hoarseness, dysphagia, and the risk of aspiration pneumonia; therefore, its functional preservation during surgical procedures is important. Intraoperative mapping and monitoring of the motor rootlets at the cerebellomedullary cistern using endotracheal tube electrodes is a safe and effective procedure to prevent its injury. To study the location of the somatic and autonomic motor fibers of the lower cranial nerves related to vocal cord movement. Twenty-four patients with pathologies at the cerebellopontine lesion were studied. General anesthesia was maintained with fentanyl and propofol. A monopolar stimulator was used at amplitudes of 0.05 to 0.1 mA. Both acoustic and visual signals were displayed as vocalis muscle electromyographic activity using endotracheal tube surface electrodes. The average number of rootlets was 7.4 (range, 5-10); 75% of patients had 7 or 8 rootlets. As many as 6 rootlets (2-4 in most cases) were responsive in each patient. In 23 of the 24 patients, the responding rootlets congregated on the caudal side. The maximum electromyographic response was predominantly in the most caudal or second most caudal rootlet in 79%. The majority of motor fibers of the lower cranial nerves run through the caudal part of the rootlets at the cerebellomedullary cistern, and the maximal electromyographic response was elicited at the most caudal or second most caudal rootlet. EMG, electromyographic.

  16. The imaging manifestation of intracranial schwannomas not arising from cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Boning; Sun Gengxi; Liang Kangfu

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To report 4 cases of operation-confirmed intracranial schwannomas not arising from cranial nerves, and to discuss the histogenesis and CT and MRI manifestation combining with the literature. Methods: CT and MRI findings of these 4 intracranial schwannomas were analyzed retrospectively and their pathologic characteristics were reviewed. Results: The tumors demonstrated low-iso mixed density with necrotic and cystic areas. Large degeneration even became the prominent characteristics on CT scan. Low-signal to iso-signal intensity on T 1 -weighted images and heterogeneous high-signal intensity on T 2 -weighted images were revealed. The solid portion and the wall of the tumors were moderately enhanced on enhanced CT and MRI scans. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections showed two corresponding histological patterns: Antoni Type A and Antoni Type B pattern. The tumor cells exhibited a strong positive staining pattern for s-100 protein. Conclusion: The imaging manifestations of these tumors were similar to that of cranial nerve schwannomas except that the former had higher cystic degeneration rate. We should take that diagnosis into consideration when the mass is not located on cranial nerve but its image feature resembles schwannomas

  17. Progressive multiple cranial neuropathies presenting as a delayed complication of radiotherapy in infancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Pall, H. S.; Nightingale, S.; Clough, C. G.; Spooner, D.

    1988-01-01

    A 38 year old woman who had undergone irradiation during infancy for a left facial cutaneous arteriovenous malformation sequentially developed complete palsies of the ipsilateral VII, V, XI, IX, X, XII and VI cranial nerves. Apart from optic and olfactory nerve damage there are few reports of radiotherapy causing cranial nerve injury. We link the unusually extensive and progressive neural damage and the prolonged latency to the patient's age at time of irradiation.

  18. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Objectives  Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method  A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV-VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results  In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion  The pattern of cranial nerves IV-VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV-VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV-VI intraoperatively.

  19. Currant imaging of the 3rd, 4th and 6th cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerty, Emilia; Bakke, Soeren Jacob

    2001-01-01

    The ocular motor cranial nerves (III, IV, VI) control the eye movements in a near association with the higher cortical areas. Clinically, the most common presentation of abnormal ocular motility is double vision. Identifying the cause of ocular nerve pulsy can be difficult and a large percentage of such cases still remains undiagnosed, even in a new era of neuroradiological techniques. Close co-operation between the clinician and the radiologist is necessary for the selection of the best imaging methods for the specific clinical problem, in order to see the aetiological and topological diagnosis. The article provides a practical review of advances in neuroimaging of the ocular motor nerves. 4 figs., 2 tabs., 15 refs

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Ryang; Kanda, Fumio; Kobessho, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Koji; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kudo, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2006-11-07

    We describe a rare case of HCV-related recurrent multiple hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves in a 50-year-old woman. The patient presented with symptoms of ptosis, fixation of the right eyeball, and left abducens palsy, indicating disturbances of the right oculomotor and trochlear nerves and bilateral abducens nerves. Brain contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed an ill-defined mass with abnormal enhancement around the sella turcica. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed that the mass involved the clivus, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex. On contrast-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-chelated contrast medium, the mass showed inhomogeneous intermediate enhancement. The diagnosis of metastatic HCC to the skull base was made on the basis of neurological findings and imaging studies including CT and MRI, without histological examinations. Further studies may provide insights into various methods for diagnosing HCC metastasizing to the craniospinal area.

  1. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo Ryang Kim; Fumio Kanda; Hiroshi Kobessho; Koji Sugimoto; Toshiyuki Matsuoka; Masatoshi Kudo; Yoshitake Hayashi

    2006-01-01

    We describe a rare case of HCV-related recurrent multiple hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves in a 50-yearold woman. The patient presented with symptoms of ptosis, fixation of the right eyeball, and left abducens palsy, indicating disturbances of the right oculomotor and trochlear nerves and bilateral abducens nerves. Brain contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed an ill-defined mass with abnormal enhancement around the sella turcica. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)disclosed that the mass involved the clivus, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex. On contrast-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-chelated contrast medium, the mass showed inhomogeneous intermediate enhancement.The diagnosis of metastatic HCC to the skull base was made on the basis of neurological findings and imaging studies including CT and MRI, without histological examinations. Further studies may provide insights into various methods for diagnosing HCC metastasizing to the craniospinal area.

  2. Idiopathic Ninth, Tenth, and Twelfth Cranial Nerve Palsy with Ipsilateral Headache: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Seung-Ho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This case report is to report the effect of Korean traditional treatment for idiopathic ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy with ipsilateral headache. Methods: The medical history and imaging and laboratory test of a 39-year-old man with cranial palsy were tested to identify the cause of disease. A 0.2-mL dosage of Hwangyeonhaedoktang pharmacopuncture was administered at CV23 and CV17, respectively. Acupuncture was applied at P06, Li05, TE05, and G37 on the right side of the body. Zhuapiandutongbang (左偏頭痛方 was administered at 30 minutes to 1 hour after mealtime three times a day. The symptoms were investigated using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results: The results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT, and laboratory tests were normal. The medical history showed no trauma, other illnesses, family history of diseases, medications, smoking, drinking and so on. All symptoms disappeared at the 10th day of treatment. Conclusion: Korean traditional treatment such as acupuncture, pharmcopuncture, and herbal medicine for the treatment of ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy of unknown origin is suggested to be effective even though this conclusion is based on a single.

  3. High-Resolution Isotropic Three-Dimensional MR Imaging of the Extraforaminal Segments of the Cranial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jessica; Desai, Naman S; Jeffery, Dean; Aygun, Nafi; Blitz, Ari

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution isotropic 3-dimensional (D) MR imaging with and without contrast is now routinely used for imaging evaluation of cranial nerve anatomy and pathologic conditions. The anatomic details of the extraforaminal segments are well-visualized on these techniques. A wide range of pathologic entities may cause enhancement or displacement of the nerve, which is now visible to an extent not available on standard 2D imaging. This article highlights the anatomy of extraforaminal segments of the cranial nerves and uses select cases to illustrate the utility and power of these sequences, with a focus on constructive interference in steady-state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging for anatomical localization of cranial nerves and cranial nerve nuclei in pontine lesions: initial experiences with 3T-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Nils H; Ahmadli, Uzeyir; Woernle, Christoph M; Alzarhani, Yahea A; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Kollias, Spyros S

    2014-11-01

    With continuous refinement of neurosurgical techniques and higher resolution in neuroimaging, the management of pontine lesions is constantly improving. Among pontine structures with vital functions that are at risk of being damaged by surgical manipulation, cranial nerves (CN) and cranial nerve nuclei (CNN) such as CN V, VI, and VII are critical. Pre-operative localization of the intrapontine course of CN and CNN should be beneficial for surgical outcomes. Our objective was to accurately localize CN and CNN in patients with intra-axial lesions in the pons using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and estimate its input in surgical planning for avoiding unintended loss of their function during surgery. DTI of the pons obtained pre-operatively on a 3Tesla MR scanner was analyzed prospectively for the accurate localization of CN and CNN V, VI and VII in seven patients with intra-axial lesions in the pons. Anatomical sections in the pons were used to estimate abnormalities on color-coded fractional anisotropy maps. Imaging abnormalities were correlated with CN symptoms before and after surgery. The course of CN and the area of CNN were identified using DTI pre- and post-operatively. Clinical associations between post-operative improvements and the corresponding CN area of the pons were demonstrated. Our results suggest that pre- and post-operative DTI allows identification of key anatomical structures in the pons and enables estimation of their involvement by pathology. It may predict clinical outcome and help us to better understand the involvement of the intrinsic anatomy by pathological processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: The importance of MRI for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, T.-M.; Kang, C.-J.; Ng, S.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Cheng, A.-J.; Liao, C.-T.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate various prognostic factors and the impact of imaging modalities on tumor control in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) with cranial nerve (China) palsy. Material and Methods: Between September 1979 and December 2000, 330 NPC patients with CN palsy received radical radiotherapy (RT) by the conventional opposing technique at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou. Imaging methods used varied over that period, and included conventional tomography (Tm) for 47 patients, computerized tomography (CT) for 195 patients, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) for 88 patients. Upper CN (II-VI) palsy was found in 268 patients, lower CN (IX-XII) in 13, and 49 patients had both. The most commonly involved CN were V or VI or both (23%, 12%, and 16%, respectively). All patients had good performance status (World Health Organization <2). The median external RT dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-77.5 Gy). Brachytherapy was also given to 156 patients in addition to external RT, delivered by the remote after-loading, high-dose-rate technique. A total of 139 patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, in 115 received as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and in 24 concomitant with RT. Recovery from CN palsy occurred in 171 patients during or after radiotherapy. Patients who died without a specific cause identified were regarded as having died with persistent disease. Results: The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year overall survival was 47.1%, 34.4%, and 22.2%. The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 50.4%, 37.8%, and 25.9%. The 5-year DSS for patients staged with MRI, CT, and Tm were 46.9%, 36.7%, and 21.9%, respectively (p = 0.016). The difference between MRI and CT was significant (p = 0.015). The 3-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year local control was 68.2% if excluding patients who died without a specific cause. Patients who had an MRI had a significantly better tumor control rate than those

  6. Anastomoses between lower cranial and upper cervical nerves: a comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, part I: trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Radcliff, Virginia; Loukas, Marios; Chern, Joshua J; Benninger, Brion; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of the anatomy of the neural communications among the cranial nerves and their branches is lacking in the literature. Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found among these nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate in these regions to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections among the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized in two parts. Part I concerns the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches with any other nerve trunk or branch in the vicinity. Part II concerns the anastomoses among the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or among these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part I is presented in this article. An extensive anastomotic network exists among the lower cranial nerves. Knowledge of such neural intercommunications is important in diagnosing and treating patients with pathology of the skull base. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Three-dimensional-fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition and T2-weighted fast spin-echo magnetic resonance sequences on visualization of cranial nerves Ⅲ-Ⅻ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Because of the small diameter and complex anatomic course of the cranial nerves except for the optic nerve,mgeminal nerve,facial nerve,and cochlear and vestibular nerve,other cranial nerves are difficult to be visualized in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning with conventional thickness (5-10 mm).

  8. Three-dimensional interactive atlas of cranial nerve-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-06-01

    Anatomical knowledge of the cranial nerves (CN) is fundamental in education, research and clinical practice. Moreover, understanding CN-related pathology with underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance. To facilitate CN knowledge anatomy and pathology understanding, we created an atlas of CN-related disorders, which is a three-dimensional (3D) interactive tool correlating CN pathology with the underlying surface and sectional neuroanatomy as well as the resulting neurological deficits. A computer platform was developed with: 1) anatomy browser along with the normal brain atlas (built earlier); 2) simulator of CN lesions; 3) tools to label CN-related pathology; and 4) CN pathology database with lesions and disorders, and the resulting signs, symptoms and/or syndromes. The normal neuroanatomy comprises about 2,300 3D components subdivided into modules. Cranial nerves contain more than 600 components: all 12 pairs of cranial nerves (CN I - CN XII) and the brainstem CN nuclei. The CN pathology database was populated with 36 lesions compiled from clinical textbooks. The initial view of each disorder was preset in terms of lesion location and size, surrounding surface and sectional neuroanatomy, and disorder and neuroanatomy labeling. Moreover, path selection from a CN nucleus to a targeted organ further enhances pathology-anatomy relationships. This atlas of CN-related disorders is potentially useful to a wide variety of users ranging from medical students and residents to general practitioners, neuroradiologists and neurologists, as it contains both normal brain anatomy and CN-related pathology correlated with neurological disorders presented in a visual and interactive way.

  9. Macrovascular Decompression of the Brainstem and Cranial Nerves: Evolution of an Anteromedial Vertebrobasilar Artery Transposition Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhri, Omar; Connolly, Ian D; Lawton, Michael T

    2017-08-01

    Tortuous and dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar arteries can impinge on the brainstem and cranial nerves to cause compression syndromes. Transposition techniques are often required to decompress the brainstem with dolichoectatic pathology. We describe our evolution of an anteromedial transposition technique and its efficacy in decompressing the brainstem and relieving symptoms. To present the anteromedial vertebrobasilar artery transposition technique for macrovascular decompression of the brainstem and cranial nerves. All patients who underwent vertebrobasilar artery transposition were identified from the prospectively maintained database of the Vascular Neurosurgery service, and their medical records were reviewed retrospectively. The extent of arterial displacement was measured pre- and postoperatively on imaging. Vertebrobasilar arterial transposition and macrovascular decompression was performed in 12 patients. Evolution in technique was characterized by gradual preference for the far-lateral approach, use of a sling technique with muslin wrap, and an anteromedial direction of pull on the vertebrobasilar artery with clip-assisted tethering to the clival dura. With this technique, mean lateral displacement decreased from 6.6 mm in the first half of the series to 3.8 mm in the last half of the series, and mean anterior displacement increased from 0.8 to 2.5 mm, with corresponding increases in satisfaction and relief of symptoms. Compressive dolichoectatic pathology directed laterally into cranial nerves and posteriorly into the brainstem can be corrected with anteromedial transposition towards the clivus. Our technique accomplishes this anteromedial transposition from an inferolateral surgical approach through the vagoaccessory triangle, with sling fixation to clival dura using aneurysm clips. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  10. Unilateral hypoglossal nerve atrophy as a late complication of radiation therapy of head and neck carcinoma: a report of four cases and a review of the literature on peripheral and cranial nerve damages after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Schulz, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    The case histories of four patients who developed hemiatrophy of the tongue from 3 to 9 years after a course of curative radiation therapy for carcinomas of the head and neck are presented. These patients were subsequently followed from 1 1 / 2 to 6 years without local recurrence of the tumor, distant metastasis, or involvement of other cranial nerves, indicative of only a unilateral hypoglossal nerve atrophy. A review of the literature showed that peripheral and cranial nerve damages after radiation therapy have been reported for the optic nerve, hypoglossal nerve, oculomotor nerve, abducens nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, brachial plexus nerves, and peripheral nerves of the extremities. Review of clinical and experimental data indicated that in most cases, the damages were probably caused by extensive connective tissue fibrosis around and infiltrating the nerve trunks. Three possible types of peripheral and cranial nerve damages after radiation therapy are identified. (U.S.)

  11. Extramedullary hematopoiesis within the clivus: an unusual cause of lower cranial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Davis L; Lindstrom, Katherine; Raghavan, Prashant; Jane, John

    2010-12-01

    We report one year follow up of a case of extramedullary hematopoiesis within the clivus. The imaging findings, brief clinical course, and endoscopic transphenoidal approach are described. A 29-year-old female with thalassemia developed worsening cranial nerve signs. After imaging studies discovered a large clival mass, she underwent endoscopic transphenoidal biopsy of the lesion. Neural compression from exuberant erythrogenesis within tissue normally quiescent of red blood cell production was found to be the etiology of her neural deficit. Treatment for this condition is generally non-operative unless significant neural compression is present. Radiotherapy and anti-neoplastic agents have been used with success.

  12. Cranial nerve damage in patients after alpha (heavy)-particle radiation to the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.; Wei, W.C.; Chong, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The records of 161 patients were reviewed to determine if radiation damage had occurred following cranial irradiation. All of these patients had received alpha-particle radiation to their pituitary glands during the period when this form of therapy was given for diabetic retinopathy. Extraocular muscle palsy developed in 11 of these patients, iridoplegia in six, and fifth nerve damage in six. All of the palsies developed within a short period following their irradiation, and a definite dose relationship was present. The dose rate was approximately 100 rads/min for all cases. Fractionation varied but it is known for all cases

  13. Unusual Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Clivus with Cranial Nerve Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Okudo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC has unusual presentation affecting elderly males with a smoking history. The incidence of RCC varies while the incidence of spread of RCC to the clivus is rare. The typicality of RCC presentation includes hematuria, flank pain, and a palpable flank mass; however, RCC can also present with clival metastasis. The unique path of the abducens nerve in the clivus makes it susceptible to damage in metastasis. We report a case of a 54-year-old African American female that was evaluated for back pain, weakness, numbness, and tingling of bilateral lower extremities and subsequently disconjugate gaze and diplopia. Brain MRI confirmed metastasis to the clivus. She was started on radiotherapy and was planned for chemotherapy and transfer to a nursing home. When a patient presents with sudden unusual cranial nerve pathology, the possibility of metastatic RCC should be sought.

  14. Unusual Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Clivus with Cranial Nerve Deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okudo, Jerome; Anusim, Nwabundo

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has unusual presentation affecting elderly males with a smoking history. The incidence of RCC varies while the incidence of spread of RCC to the clivus is rare. The typicality of RCC presentation includes hematuria, flank pain, and a palpable flank mass; however, RCC can also present with clival metastasis. The unique path of the abducens nerve in the clivus makes it susceptible to damage in metastasis. We report a case of a 54-year-old African American female that was evaluated for back pain, weakness, numbness, and tingling of bilateral lower extremities and subsequently disconjugate gaze and diplopia. Brain MRI confirmed metastasis to the clivus. She was started on radiotherapy and was planned for chemotherapy and transfer to a nursing home. When a patient presents with sudden unusual cranial nerve pathology, the possibility of metastatic RCC should be sought.

  15. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, M. [University of Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Alt-Epping, B. [University of Goettingen, Department of Palliative Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  16. [A case of leptomeningeal melanomatosis with acute paraplegia and multiple cranial nerve palsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Kasumi; Matsuda, Nozomu; Murakami, Takenobu; Ito, Eiichi; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2017-12-27

    A 62-year-old man with acute paraplegia was transferred to our hospital. He had flaccid paraplegia and multiple cranial nerve palsies, such as mydriasis of the left pupil, abduction palsy of the left eye, hoarseness and dysphagia, but no meningeal irritation signs. MRI of the spinal canal showed swellings of the conus medullaris and the cauda equine, and also contrast enhancement of the spinal meninges. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis and protein increment. The lymph node was swollen in his right axilla. The biopsy specimen from the right axillary lymph node revealed metastasis of malignant melanoma histologically. Careful check-up of his whole body found a malignant melanoma in the subungual region of the right ring finger. Repeated cytological examination revealed melanoma cells in the CSF, confirming the diagnosis of leptomeningeal melanomatosis. His consciousness was gradually deteriorated. His family members chose supportive care instead of chemotherapy or surgical therapy after full information about his conditions. Finally, he died 60 days after transfer to our hospital. This is a rare case of leptomenigeal melanomatosis presenting with acute paraplegia and multiple cranial nerve palsies. Careful follow-up and repeated studies are vital for the early diagnosis of leptomenigeal melanomatosis in spite of atypical clinical presentation.

  17. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A.; Canis, M.; Alt-Epping, B.

    2014-01-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  18. New approach to neurorehabilitation: cranial nerve noninvasive neuromodulation (CN-NINM) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Yuri P.; Tyler, Mitchel E.; Kaczmarek, Kurt A.; Skinner, Kimberley L.

    2014-06-01

    Cranial Nerve NonInvasive NeuroModulation (CN-NINM) is a primary and complementary multi-targeted rehabilitation therapy that appears to initiate the recovery of multiple damaged or suppressed brain functions affected by neurological disorders. It is deployable as a simple, home-based device (portable neuromodulation stimulator, or PoNSTM) and training regimen following initial patient training in an outpatient clinic. It may be easily combined with many existing rehabilitation therapies, and may reduce or eliminate the need for more aggressive invasive procedures or possibly decrease total medication intake. CN-NINM uses sequenced patterns of electrical stimulation on the tongue. Our hypothesis is that CN-NINM induces neuroplasticity by noninvasive stimulation of two major cranial nerves: trigeminal (CN-V), and facial (CN-VII). This stimulation excites a natural flow of neural impulses to the brainstem (pons varolli and medulla), and cerebellum, to effect changes in the function of these targeted brain structures, extending to corresponding nuclei of the brainstem. CN-NINM represents a synthesis of a new noninvasive brain stimulation technique with applications in physical medicine, cognitive, and affective neurosciences. Our new stimulation method appears promising for treatment of a full spectrum of movement disorders, and for both attention and memory dysfunction associated with traumatic brain injury.

  19. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Spataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation in the four limbs appeared, with these symptoms showing a progressive course. The diagnostic workup included EMG/ENG which demonstrated reduced conduction velocity with bilateral and symmetrical sensory and motor involvement. Cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed a cytoalbuminologic dissociation. A prolonged treatment with corticosteroids allowed a significant improvement of the limb weakness. Diplopia and ptosis remained unchanged. This unusual form of CIDP presented as a long-lasting isolated cranial nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes.

  20. Unilateral severe chronic periodontitis associated with ipsilateral surgical resection of cranial nerves V, VI, and VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarella, Matthew M; Leblebicioglu, Binnaz; Claman, Lewis J; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2006-01-01

    The central and peripheral nervous systems participate in several local physiological and pathological processes. There is experimental evidence that the inflammatory, local immune, and wound healing responses of a tissue can be modulated by its innervation. The aim of this clinical report is to present a case of unilateral severe periodontitis associated with ipsilateral surgical resection of the fifth, sixth, and seventh cranial nerves and to discuss the possible contribution of the nervous system to periodontal pathogenesis. A 39-year-old female patient with a history of a cerebrovascular accident caused by a right pontine arteriovenous malformation and destruction of the right fifth, sixth, and seventh cranial nerves was diagnosed with severe chronic periodontitis affecting only the right maxillary and mandibular quadrants. The patient's oral hygiene was similar for right and left sides of the mouth. Percentages of tooth surfaces carrying dental plaque were 41% and 36% for right and left sides, respectively. Non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy was performed, and the patient was placed on a regular periodontal maintenance schedule. Healing following initial periodontal therapy and osseous periodontal surgery occurred without complications. Follow-up clinical findings at 1 year revealed stable periodontal health. This case report suggests that periodontal innervation may contribute to the regulation of local processes involved in periodontitis pathogenesis. It also suggests that periodontal therapy can be performed successfully at sites and in patients affected by paralysis.

  1. Complete 3rd cranial nerve dysfunction postdeflation/ excision of an encasing pituitary macroadenoma intrasellular cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng C. S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system injury in particular cranial nerve palsy has been reported to be as high as 2%. Such prevalence of palsy generally attributed to surgical manipulation at the cavernous sinus, especially incurring the abducens nerve. We report the first case of acute oculomotor nerve sequel to the release of cystic fluid wrapping the nerve following a transsphenoidal excision of pituitary macroadenoma in a 57-year-old woman. She attended with the presentation of acute excruciating headache associated with partial drooping of right eye. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were consistent with pituitary apoplexy of an underlying pituitary macroadenoma. Urgent transsphenoidal hypophysectomy was done. Intra-operatively, cystic fluid was aspirated during pituitary tumour dissection. At the same time, curettage was employed to removal residual tumour after the tumour biopsy. Immediate post-operative assessment noted complete right eye ptosis, with clinical evidence of complete right third and fourth nerve palsies. MRI was repeated a week later in view of such palsy non-resolution. However, no local compression or edema noted. Observation and monitoring were opted versus surgical revision. Propitiously the aforementioned cranial nerve palsies persist for a month and subsequently subsided. In this case, we highlight the potential deleterious impact of aspirating cystic component and curettaging during pituitary surgery. Likely postulated accounts for such occurrence include sudden release of fluid pressure with resultant cystic traction on its enfolding cranial nerves and subsequent neuropraxia. We aim to invite comments that could enlighten us on this gray area.

  2. Multiple Cranial Neuropathies Without Limb Involvements: Guillain-Barre Syndrome Variant?

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Ju Young; Jung, Han Young; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyo Sang; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2013-01-01

    Acute multiple cranial neuropathies are considered as variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, which are immune-mediated diseases triggered by various cases. It is a rare disease which is related to infectious, inflammatory or systemic diseases. According to previous case reports, those affected can exhibit almost bilateral facial nerve palsy, then followed by bulbar dysfunctions (cranial nerves IX and X) accompanied by limb weakness and walking difficulties due to motor and/or sensory dysfunction...

  3. Visualization of cranial nerves I-XII: value of 3D CISS and T2-weighted FSE sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousry, I.; Camelio, S.; Wiesmann, M.; Brueckmann, H.; Yousry, T.A. [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Marchioninistrasse 15, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Schmid, U.D. [Neurosurgical Unit, Klinik im Park, 8000 Zurich (Switzerland); Horsfield, M.A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 5WW (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the three-dimensional constructive interference of steady state (3D CISS) sequence (slice thickness 0.7 mm) and that of the T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2-weighted FSE) sequence (slice thickness 3 mm) for the visualization of all cranial nerves in their cisternal course. Twenty healthy volunteers were examined using the T2-weighted FSE and the 3D CISS sequences. Three observers evaluated independently the cranial nerves NI-NXII in their cisternal course. The rates for successful visualization of each nerve for 3D CISS (and for T2-weighted FSE in parentheses) were as follows: NI, NII, NV, NVII, NVIII 40 of 40 (40 of 40), NIII 40 of 40 (18 of 40), NIV 19 of 40 (3 of 40), NVI 39 of 40 (5 of 40), NIX, X, XI 40 of 40 (29 of 40), and NXII 40 of 40 (4 of 40). Most of the cranial nerves can be reliably assessed when using the 3D CISS and the T2-weighted FSE sequences. Increasing the spatial resolution when using the 3D CISS sequence increases the reliability of the identification of the cranial nerves NIII-NXII. (orig.)

  4. Visualization of cranial nerves I-XII: value of 3D CISS and T2-weighted FSE sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousry, I.; Camelio, S.; Wiesmann, M.; Brueckmann, H.; Yousry, T.A.; Schmid, U.D.; Horsfield, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the three-dimensional constructive interference of steady state (3D CISS) sequence (slice thickness 0.7 mm) and that of the T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2-weighted FSE) sequence (slice thickness 3 mm) for the visualization of all cranial nerves in their cisternal course. Twenty healthy volunteers were examined using the T2-weighted FSE and the 3D CISS sequences. Three observers evaluated independently the cranial nerves NI-NXII in their cisternal course. The rates for successful visualization of each nerve for 3D CISS (and for T2-weighted FSE in parentheses) were as follows: NI, NII, NV, NVII, NVIII 40 of 40 (40 of 40), NIII 40 of 40 (18 of 40), NIV 19 of 40 (3 of 40), NVI 39 of 40 (5 of 40), NIX, X, XI 40 of 40 (29 of 40), and NXII 40 of 40 (4 of 40). Most of the cranial nerves can be reliably assessed when using the 3D CISS and the T2-weighted FSE sequences. Increasing the spatial resolution when using the 3D CISS sequence increases the reliability of the identification of the cranial nerves NIII-NXII. (orig.)

  5. The effect of fibrosis in the upper neck on radiation-related cranial nerve palsy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Lin; Zhang Youwang; Hu Chaosu; Wu Yongru; Guo Xiaomao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the effect of fibrosis in the upper neck on the development of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients after radiation treatment. Methods: Between Feb. 2000 and Feb. 2002, 317 consecutive patients with NPC who survival at least 5 years came to our radiotherapy center for follow-up, who were analyzed in this study. Patients who received re-irradiation were excluded. All patients received definitive external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with either Cobalt-60 or megavoltage linear accelerators. The median radiotherapy dose was 71 Gy (range 55-86 Gy) to the primary disease, 61 Gy (range 34-72 Gy) to the upper neck. High-dose-rate brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was used in 24 patients either as part of definitive treatment or as a boost for residual disease in the nasopharynx. Forty-five patients also received chemotherapy with various regimens. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range 5.1-38.0 years). A total of 81 patients (25.5%) developed radiation-induced posterior CN group (CN IX-XII) palsy with an average annual rate of 1.8%. The cumulative incidence of CNP was 5.7%, 17.4% and 37.3% at 5-, 10- and 20-year respectively. Fifty-four (17%) patients showed severe fibrosis (G3-4) in the upper neck. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that the total dose of radiation to the nasopharynx and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing CNP after RT for NPC. Neck severe fibrosis was associated with approximately two-fold risk of developing CNP (RR=1.936, 95% CI: 1.521-2.466, P 70 Gy to the nasopharynx were associated with increased risk of developing CNP. Other factors, including gender, age, N classifications, chemotherapy, unconventional fractionation radiation, total radiation dose to the upper neck, and brachytherapy did not influence the risk of CNP. Conclusions: Patients who had severe fibrosis in the upper neck may be at increased risk of radiation

  6. Effective intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for Churg-Strauss syndrome (allergic granulomatous angiitis complicated by neuropathy of the eighth cranial nerve: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozaki Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report the case of a patient with Churg-Strauss syndrome with eighth cranial nerve palsy. Vestibulocochlear nerve palsy is extremely rare in Churg-Strauss syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, only one case of complicated neuropathy of the eighth cranial nerve has been described in a previous report presenting an aggregate calculation, but no differentiation between polyarteritis nodosa and Churg-Strauss syndrome was made. High-dose immunoglobulin was administered to our patient, and her neuropathy of the eighth cranial nerve showed improvement. Case presentation At the age of 46, a Japanese woman developed Churg-Strauss syndrome that later became stable with low-dose prednisolone treatment. At the age of 52, she developed sudden difficulty of hearing in her left ear, persistent severe rotary vertigo, and mononeuritis multiplex. At admission, bilateral perceptive deafness of about 80dB and eosinophilia of 4123/μL in peripheral blood were found. A diagnosis of cranial neuropathy of the eighth cranial nerve associated with exacerbated Churg-Strauss syndrome was made. Although high doses of steroid therapy alleviated the inflammatory symptoms and markers, the vertigo and bilateral hearing loss remained. Addition of a high-dose immunoglobulin finally resulted in marked alleviation of the symptoms associated with neuropathy of the eighth cranial nerve. Conclusions A high dose of immunoglobulin therapy shows favorable effects in neuropathy of the eighth cranial nerve, but no reports regarding its efficacy in cranial neuropathy have been published.

  7. Intraoperative biopsy of the major cranial nerves in the surgical strategy for adenoid cystic carcinoma close to the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarsitano, Achille; Pizzigallo, Angelo; Gessaroli, Manlio; Sturiale, Carmelo; Marchetti, Claudio

    2012-02-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands has a propensity for perineural invasion, which could favor spread along the major cranial nerves, sometimes to the skull base and through the foramina to the brain parenchyma. This study evaluated the relationship between neural spread and relapse in the skull base. During surgery, we performed multiple biopsies with extemporaneous examination of the major nerves close to the tumor to guide the surgical resection. The percentage of actuarial local control at 5 years for patients with a positive named nerve and skull base infiltration was 12.5%, compared with 90.0% in patients who were named nerve-negative and without infiltration of the skull base (P = .001). Our study shows that local control of disease for patients who are named nerve-positive with skull base infiltration is significantly more complex compared with patients who are named nerve-negative without infiltration of the skull base. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  8. Recurrent malignant otitis externa with multiple cranial nerve involvement: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đerić Dragoslava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing otitis externa is a rare but conditionally fatal infection of external auditory canal with extension to deep soft tissue and bones, resulting in necrosis and osteomyelitis of the temporal bone and scull base. This condition is also known as malignant otitis due to an aggressive behavior and poor treatment response. Early diagnosis of malignant otitis is a difficult challenge. We present an illustrative case of necrotizing otitis externa and suggest some strategies to avoid diagnostic and treatment pitfalls. Case Outline. A 70-year-old patient presented with signs of malignant otitis externa, complicated by peripheral facial palsy. Adequate diagnostic and treatment procedures were performed with clinical signs of resolution. The recurrence of malignant infection had presented three months after previous infection with multiple cranial nerve neuropathies and signs of jugular vein and lateral sinus thrombosis. An aggressive antibiotic treatment and surgery were carried out, followed by substantial recovery of the patient and complete restoration of cranial nerves’ functions. Conclusion. Necrotizing otitis externa is a serious condition with uncertain prognosis. The suspicion of malignant external otitis should be raised in cases of resistance to topical treatment, especially in patient with predisposing factors. Evidence-based guideline for necrotizing otitis externa still doesn’t exist and treatment protocol should be adjusted to individual presentation of each patient.

  9. Does Peripheral Neuropathy Associate with Cranial Nerves Neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Fadhil Jalal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN is the most common complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cranial neuropathies is usually presenting as mononeuropathies coexist with DPN either presented clinically or in subclinical form. The aim of this study is to detect cranial neuropathy in diabetic patients. Eighty three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with an age range of 30-69 years were included in the study. The study also involved normal healthy persons whose age and gender are harmonized with that of our patients that were deliberated as control group (60 persons. Diabetic patients with DPN had significant difference in age, highly significant difference in the duration of the disease and highly significance difference in BMI had poor glycemic control reflected by high FBS and HbA1c, while lipid profile picture showed insignificant difference when compared with diabetic patients without DPN. Nerve conduction study (sensory and motor showed a significant difference regarding latency, amplitude, and conduction velocity between diabetic patients with DPN and those without DPN. The results of blink reflex showed highly significant difference between diabetic patients and controls.

  10. Depiction of the cranial nerves around the cavernous sinus by 3D reversed FISP with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Go; Oishi, Makoto; Jinguji, Shinya; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Fujii, Yukihiko; Sato, Mitsuya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anatomy of cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus, we employed three-dimensional reversed fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI) on 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system. After determining the proper parameters to obtain sufficient resolution of 3D PSIF-DWI, we collected imaging data of 20-side cavernous regions in 10 normal subjects. 3D PSIF-DWI provided high contrast between the cranial nerves and other soft tissues, fluid, and blood in all subjects. We also created volume-rendered images of 3D PSIF-DWI and anatomically evaluated the reliability of visualizing optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, and abducens nerves on 3D PSIF-DWI. All 20 sets of cranial nerves were visualized and 12 trochlear nerves and 6 abducens nerves were partially identified. We also presented preliminary clinical experiences in two cases with pituitary adenomas. The anatomical relationship between the tumor and cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus could be three-dimensionally comprehended by 3D PSIF-DWI and the volume-rendered images. In conclusion, 3D PSIF-DWI has great potential to provide high resolution 'cranial nerve imaging', which visualizes the whole length of the cranial nerves including the parts in the blood flow as in the cavernous sinus region. (author)

  11. [Depiction of the cranial nerves around the cavernous sinus by 3D reversed FISP with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Go; Oishi, Makoto; Jinguji, Shinya; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Sato, Mitsuya; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the anatomy of cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus, we employed three-dimensional reversed fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI) on 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system. After determining the proper parameters to obtain sufficient resolution of 3D PSIF-DWI, we collected imaging data of 20-side cavernous regions in 10 normal subjects. 3D PSIF-DWI provided high contrast between the cranial nerves and other soft tissues, fluid, and blood in all subjects. We also created volume-rendered images of 3D PSIF-DWI and anatomically evaluated the reliability of visualizing optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, and abducens nerves on 3D PSIF-DWI. All 20 sets of cranial nerves were visualized and 12 trochlear nerves and 6 abducens nerves were partially identified. We also presented preliminary clinical experiences in two cases with pituitary adenomas. The anatomical relationship between the tumor and cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus could be three-dimensionally comprehended by 3D PSIF-DWI and the volume-rendered images. In conclusion, 3D PSIF-DWI has great potential to provide high resolution "cranial nerve imaging", which visualizes the whole length of the cranial nerves including the parts in the blood flow as in the cavernous sinus region.

  12. Therapeutic outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: a single institution experience of 104 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang CC

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Chieh Huang,1,2 Fu-Min Fang,1 Hui-Chun Chen,1 Hsuan-Chih Hsu,1 Tai-Lin Huang,3 Yu-Li Su,3 Ya-Chun Chang4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, 3Department of Hematology and Oncology, 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: Cranial nerve (CN palsy is the main symptom in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of NPC with CN palsy and to analyze the prognostic factors.Patients and methods: A total of 104 NPC patients with CN palsy curatively treated by conventional (n=44 or conformal (n=60 radiotherapy (RT were enrolled. Upper CN palsy was present in 81 patients, lower CN palsy in four patients, and both upper and lower CN palsy in 19 patients. Forty-one patients had CN palsy for >2 months before diagnosis.Results: Complete recovery of CN palsy was observed in 74 patients. The actuarial 5-year locoregional control (LRC, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS, and overall survival (OS rates were 58.2%, 62.2%, and 38.4%, respectively. No significant difference was observed in CN recovery, LRC, DMFS, or OS for patients treated by conventional versus conformal technique. However, significant reduction of grade 3 or greater toxicities was found in those treated by the conformal technique (odds ratio =0.28.Conclusion: Patients with CN palsy presenting >2 months before diagnosis were hard to recover from palsy. The LRC, OS, and recovery from CN palsy did not significantly change with the treatment evolution. Patients with complete recovery from CN palsy had longer OS. Keywords: nasopharyngeal carcinoma, cranial nerve palsy, radiotherapy

  13. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröge, L H; Hinsche, T; Canis, M; Alt-Epping, B; Hess, C F; Wolff, H A

    2014-02-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting.

  14. Improved identification of cranial nerves using paired-agent imaging: topical staining protocol optimization through experimentation and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Veronica C.; Wilson, Todd; Staneviciute, Austeja; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2018-03-01

    Skull base tumors are particularly difficult to visualize and access for surgeons because of the crowded environment and close proximity of vital structures, such as cranial nerves. As a result, accidental nerve damage is a significant concern and the likelihood of tumor recurrence is increased because of more conservative resections that attempt to avoid injuring these structures. In this study, a paired-agent imaging method with direct administration of fluorophores is applied to enhance cranial nerve identification. Here, a control imaging agent (ICG) accounts for non-specific uptake of the nerve-targeting agent (Oxazine 4), and ratiometric data analysis is employed to approximate binding potential (BP, a surrogate of targeted biomolecule concentration). For clinical relevance, animal experiments and simulations were conducted to identify parameters for an optimized stain and rinse protocol using the developed paired-agent method. Numerical methods were used to model the diffusive and kinetic behavior of the imaging agents in tissue, and simulation results revealed that there are various combinations of stain time and rinse number that provide improved contrast of cranial nerves, as suggested by optimal measures of BP and contrast-to-noise ratio.

  15. Risk factors and prevention of injuries to the cranial nerves in reconstructive surgery of the carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskanian, Iu E; Kolomeĭtsev, S N; Shniukov, R V

    2005-01-01

    Reconstructive operations on aortic arch branches is the most effective approach to prevention of acute and chronic disorders of cerebral circulation. Iatrogenic injuries to the cranial nerves worsen the early end, particularly, the late postoperative period, decrease the quality of life and the social status of patients who had undergone carotid reconstructions. The aim of the study was to improve the short- and long-term results of reconstructive operations on the carotid arteries by means of minimizing the incidence and severity of iatrogenic injuries to the cranial nerves. The study accrued 149 patients undergoing operations on the carotid arteries for atherosclerosis or pathologic tortuosity. Of these 82 patients forming the control group were examined for the incidence and character of injuries to the cranial nerves. Neuropathy of the cranial nerves (CN) was identified in 16 (19.5%) patients (7 patients had injuries to the hypoglossal nerve, 3 to the facial nerve, 5 to the vagus; one patient presented with coexistent injury to the glossopharyngeal and pharyngeal branches of the vagus). The clinically and statistically significant risk factors of injuries were: minor surgical experience, the high loop of the internal carotid artery (ICA), lengthy atherosclerotic stenosis greater than 2 cm, diabetes mellitus, intraoperative trauma of the area of the cranial nerves, high mobilization of the ICA, the lack of visualization of pairs X and XII of the CN, intraoperative bleeding, intersection of the superior radix of the deep cervical loop, edema and hematoma of the neck in the postoperative period, and early unscheduled reoperations. One month later the cumulative stability of cranial dysfunction accounted for 62.5%, after 3 months it accounted for 43.8%, after 6 months for 31.2 , after 9 months for 18.8%, and after 12 months for 6,2%. In patients with injury to the CN, analysis of the quality of life made in the late postoperative period revealed its lowering with

  16. Outcomes following treatment for patients with cranial nerve involvement from nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, Mei Ling; Choo, Bok Ai; Chan, Yiong Huak; Lu, Jay Jiade; Lee, Khai Mun; Tham, Ivan WK

    2012-01-01

    Patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) commonly present with cranial nerve (CN) involvement, which can cause significant morbidity. We aimed to characterise the pattern of involvement and outcomes of these patients, as well as determine if these differed according to the mode of diagnosis. Patients were included if they had non-distant metastatic NPC, presented with CN involvement and completed radiotherapy treatment between 2002 and 2008. The clinical response was categorised as complete response, partial response, stable or progressive disease. The radiological response was assessed using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria. The loco-regional control and disease-free survival rates were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method. Forty-seven patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CN lesions were diagnosed on clinical examination in 15% of patients, radiologically in 40% and both clinically and radiologically in 45% of patients. A complete or partial response of the CN lesions was seen clinically in 82% and radiologically in 95% of patients. The 3-year local relapse free survival was 64.3%, distant metastasis-free survival was 46.1% and overall survival was 82.8%. There were no differences in outcomes between patients with clinically versus radiologically detected CN lesions. Most of these patients are likely to undergo clinical and/or radiological resolution of the nerve lesions following chemoradiotherapy, but the outcome was not determined by the mode of diagnosis (radiological or clinical).

  17. Thickening and enhancement of multiple cranial nerves in conjunction with cystic white matter lesions in early infantile Krabbe disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beslow, Lauren A.; Boennemann, Carsten G. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Neurology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schwartz, Erin S. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Neuroradiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-06-15

    We present serial MR findings in a child ultimately diagnosed with the early infantile form of Krabbe disease. MR showed typical features of Krabbe disease including cerebellar and brainstem hyperintensity, periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensity, and cerebral atrophy. In addition, the combination of both enlargement and enhancement of multiple cranial nerves in conjunction with unusual cystic lesions adjacent to the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles was previously unreported and expands the spectrum of imaging findings in early Krabbe disease. (orig.)

  18. Primary olfactory projections and the nervus terminalis in the African lungfish: implications for the phylogeny of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bartheld, C S; Claas, B; Münz, H; Meyer, D L

    1988-08-01

    Primary olfactory and central projections of the nervus terminalis were investigated by injections of horseradish peroxidase into the olfactory epithelium in the African lungfish. In addition, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) immunoreactivity of the nervus terminalis system was investigated. The primary olfactory projections are restricted to the olfactory bulb located at the rostral pole of the telencephalon; they do not extend into caudal parts of the telencephalon. A vomeronasal nerve and an accessory olfactory bulb could not be identified. The nervus terminalis courses through the dorsomedial telencephalon. Major targets include the nucleus of the anterior commissure and the nucleus praeopticus pars superior. some fibers cross to the contralateral side. A few fibers reach the diencephalon and mesencephalon. No label is present in the "posterior root of the nervus terminalis" (= "Pinkus's nerve" or "nervus praeopticus"). GnRH immunoreactivity is lacking in the "anterior root of the nervus terminalis," whereas it is abundant in nervus praeopticus (Pinkus's nerve). These findings may suggest that the nervus terminalis system originally consisted of two distinct cranial nerves, which have fused-in evolution-in most vertebrates. Theories of cranial nerve phylogeny are discussed in the light of the assumed "binerval origin" of the nervus terminalis system.

  19. [Amaurosis and contralateral cranial nerve pairs III and VI paralysis after peribulbar block - Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leme, Fábio Caetano Oliveira; Moro, Eduardo Toshiyuki; Ferraz, Alexandre Alberto Fontana

    2016-08-20

    Peribulbar anesthesia (PBA) has emerged as a safer option compared with intraconal retrobulbar block. Still, PBA may not be considered without risk. Numerous complications have been described when performing this technique. This report aims to describe a rare case of amaurosis and contralateral paralysis while attempting to perform a PBA. Male patient, 75-year old, physical status ASA II, undergoing cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation. Sedated with fentanyl and midazolam and subjected to PBA. There were no complications during surgery. After finishing the procedure, the patient reported lack of vision in the contralateral eye. Akinesia of the muscles innervated by the cranial nerve pairs III and VI, ptosis, and medium-sized pupils unresponsive to light stimulus were observed. Four hours after anesthesia, complete recovery of vision and eyelid and eyeball movements was seen in the non-operated eye. During PBA, structures located in the intraconal space can be accidentally hit leading to complications such as described in the above report. Following the technical guidelines and using appropriate size needles may reduce the risk of such complication, but not completely. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  20. Unruptured aneurysms with cranial nerve symptoms: efficacy of endosaccular guglielmi detachable coil treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Si Yeon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of endosaccular Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC) treatment of unruptured aneurysms causing cranial nerve (CN) symptoms. Among a database of 218 patients whose aneurysms were treated using GDC, seven patients met the criteria for unruptured aneurysms presenting with symptoms and signs of CN palsy. Changes in CN symptoms before and after GDC treatment were reviewed. Aneurysms were located in the internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (n=3), the basilar bifurcation (n=1) and the cavernous internal carotid artery (n=3). CN symptoms included ptosis (n=6), mydriasis (n=2), and extraocular muscle (EOM) disorder (CN III: n=4; CN VI: n=3). Overall, improvement or resolution of CN symptoms after treatment was noted in five patients. CN symptoms in cases involving small (10 mm) and intradural aneurysms tended to respond better to GDC treatment. Ptosis was the initial symptom to show improvement, while EOM dysfunction responded least favourably. GDC coil packing appears to be an appropriate treatment method for the relief of CN symptoms associated with intracranial aneurysms.

  1. Unruptured aneurysms with cranial nerve symptoms: efficacy of endosaccular guglielmi detachable coil treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Si Yeon

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of endosaccular Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC) treatment of unruptured aneurysms causing cranial nerve (CN) symptoms. Among a database of 218 patients whose aneurysms were treated using GDC, seven patients met the criteria for unruptured aneurysms presenting with symptoms and signs of CN palsy. Changes in CN symptoms before and after GDC treatment were reviewed. Aneurysms were located in the internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (n=3), the basilar bifurcation (n=1) and the cavernous internal carotid artery (n=3). CN symptoms included ptosis (n=6), mydriasis (n=2), and extraocular muscle (EOM) disorder (CN III: n=4; CN VI: n=3). Overall, improvement or resolution of CN symptoms after treatment was noted in five patients. CN symptoms in cases involving small (10 mm) and intradural aneurysms tended to respond better to GDC treatment. Ptosis was the initial symptom to show improvement, while EOM dysfunction responded least favourably. GDC coil packing appears to be an appropriate treatment method for the relief of CN symptoms associated with intracranial aneurysms

  2. Sellar Chordoma Presenting as Pseudo-macroprolactinoma with Unilateral Third Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-feng Wang; Hong-xi Ma; Cheng-yuan Ma; Yi-nan Luo; Peng-fei Ge

    2012-01-01

    We described a 61-year-old female with a sellar chordoma,which presented as pseudo-macroprolactinoma with unilateral third cranial nerve palsy.Physical examination revealed that her right upper lid could not be raised by itself,right eyeball movement limited to the abduction direction,right pupil dilated to 4.5 mm with negative reaction to light,and hemianopsia in bitemporal sides.CT scanning showed a hyperdense lesion at sellar region without bone destruction.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the tumor was 2.3 cm×1.8 cm×2.6 cm,with iso-intensity on T1WI,hyper-intensity on T2WI and heterogeneous enhancement on contrast imaging.Endocrine examination showed her serum prolactin level increased to 1,031.49 mlU/ml.The tumor was sub-totally resected via pterional craniotomy under microscope and was histologically proven to be a chordoma.Postoperatively,she recovered uneventfully but ptosis and hemianopsia remained at the 6th month.

  3. Morphological abnormalities of embryonic cranial nerves after in utero exposure to valproic acid: implications for the pathogenesis of autism with multiple developmental anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yasura; Oyabu, Akiko; Imura, Yoshio; Uchida, Atsuko; Narita, Naoko; Narita, Masaaki

    2011-06-01

    Autism is often associated with multiple developmental anomalies including asymmetric facial palsy. In order to establish the etiology of autism with facial palsy, research into developmental abnormalities of the peripheral facial nerves is necessary. In the present study, to investigate the development of peripheral cranial nerves for use in an animal model of autism, rat embryos were treated with valproic acid (VPA) in utero and their cranial nerves were visualized by immunostaining. Treatment with VPA after embryonic day 9 had a significant effect on the peripheral fibers of several cranial nerves. Following VPA treatment, immunoreactivity within the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves was significantly reduced. Additionally, abnormal axonal pathways were observed in the peripheral facial nerves. Thus, the morphology of several cranial nerves, including the facial nerve, can be affected by prenatal VPA exposure as early as E13. Our findings indicate that disruption of early facial nerve development is involved in the etiology of asymmetric facial palsy, and may suggest a link to the etiology of autism. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurotology findings in patients with diagnosis of vascular loop of cranial nerves VIII in magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grocoske, Francisco Luiz Busato

    Full Text Available Introduction: The vascular compression by redundant vessels under the VIII cranial nerves has been studied since the 80's, and many authors proposed correlations between the compression and the otoneurological findings (vertigo, tinnitus, hypoacusis, audiometry and electrophysiological findings. Objective: Analyze and correlate the different signs and otoneurological symptoms, the audiological findings and its incidence over individuals with Vascular Loop (VL diagnosis of VIII cranial nerves by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Method: Retrospective study through the analysis of medical records of 47 patients attended in the otoneurology clinic of Clinical Hospital of UFPR. All the patients have MRI exams with compatible pictures of VL of the VIII cranial nerves. Results: The tinnitus was the most frequent symptom, in 83% of the patients, followed by hypoacusis (60% and vertigo (36%. The audiometry presented alterations in 89%, the brainstem evoked auditory potential in 33% and the vecto-electronystagmography in 17% of the patients. Was not found statistically significant relation between the buzz or hypoacusis, and the presence of VL in MRI. Only 36% of patients had complaints of vertigo, the main symptom described in theory of vascular compression of the VIII pair of nerve. As in the audiometry and in brainstem evoked auditory potential was not found a statistically significant relation between the exam and the presence of the VL in the RMI. Conclusion: The results show independence between the findings of the RMI, clinical picture and audiological results (p>0,05 suggesting that there are no exclusive and direct relation between the diagnosis of vascular loop in the MRI and the clinical picture matching.

  5. MR imaging of cranial nerve lesions using six different high-resolution T1- and T2(*)-weighted 3D and 2D sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, J.; Held, P.; Strotzer, M.; Voelk, M.; Nitz, W.R.; Dorenbeck, U.; Feuerbach, S. [Univ. Hospital of Regensburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stamato, S. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-07-01

    Purpose: To find a suitable high-resolution MR protocol for the visualization of lesions of all 12 cranial nerves. Material and Methods: Thirty-eight pathologically changed cranial nerves (17 patients) were studied with MR imaging at 1.5T using 3D T2*-weighted CISS, T1-weighted 3D MP-RAGE (without and with i.v. contrast medium), T2-weighted 3D TSE, T2-weighted 2D TSE and T1-weighted fat saturation 2D TSE sequences. Visibility of the 38 lesions of the 12 cranial nerves in each sequence was evaluated by consensus of two radiologists using an evaluation scale from 1 (excellently visible) to 4 (not visible). Results: The 3D CISS sequence provided the best resolution of the cranial nerves and their lesions when surrounded by CSF. In nerves which were not surrounded by CSF, the 2D T1-weighted contrast-enhanced fat suppression technique was the best sequence. Conclusions: A combination of 3D CISS, the 2D T1-weighted fat suppressed sequence and a 3D contrast-enhanced MP-RAGE proved to be the most useful sequence to visualize all lesions of the cranial nerves. For the determination of enhancement, an additional 3D MP-RAGE sequence without contrast medium is required. This sequence is also very sensitive for the detection of hemorrhage.

  6. MR imaging of cranial nerve lesions using six different high-resolution T1- and T2(*)-weighted 3D and 2D sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, J.; Held, P.; Strotzer, M.; Voelk, M.; Nitz, W.R.; Dorenbeck, U.; Feuerbach, S.; Stamato, S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To find a suitable high-resolution MR protocol for the visualization of lesions of all 12 cranial nerves. Material and Methods: Thirty-eight pathologically changed cranial nerves (17 patients) were studied with MR imaging at 1.5T using 3D T2*-weighted CISS, T1-weighted 3D MP-RAGE (without and with i.v. contrast medium), T2-weighted 3D TSE, T2-weighted 2D TSE and T1-weighted fat saturation 2D TSE sequences. Visibility of the 38 lesions of the 12 cranial nerves in each sequence was evaluated by consensus of two radiologists using an evaluation scale from 1 (excellently visible) to 4 (not visible). Results: The 3D CISS sequence provided the best resolution of the cranial nerves and their lesions when surrounded by CSF. In nerves which were not surrounded by CSF, the 2D T1-weighted contrast-enhanced fat suppression technique was the best sequence. Conclusions: A combination of 3D CISS, the 2D T1-weighted fat suppressed sequence and a 3D contrast-enhanced MP-RAGE proved to be the most useful sequence to visualize all lesions of the cranial nerves. For the determination of enhancement, an additional 3D MP-RAGE sequence without contrast medium is required. This sequence is also very sensitive for the detection of hemorrhage

  7. Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Associated with Cavernous Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas After Transvenous Embolization with Onyx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuanhui; Wang, Yang; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Chuhan; Wu, Zhongxue; Yang, Xinjian, E-mail: yang-xj@163.net [Capital Medical University, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital (China)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeCranial nerve dysfunction (CND) is not uncommon in patients with cavernous dural arteriovenous fistulas (cDAVFs), and may represent an initial manifestation or a complication after endovascular treatment. This study evaluated the outcome of CND associated with cDAVFs after transvenous embolization (TVE) using Onyx.Materials and MethodsForty-one patients with cDAVFs were treated with TVE in our department between April 2009 and October 2013. For each patient, clinical and radiologic records were retrospectively reviewed and evaluated, with an emphasis placed on evaluating the outcomes of the pre-existing cDAVF-induced CND and the TVE-induced CND.ResultsOf the 41 cases, 25 had a history of preoperative CND. Postoperatively, gradual remission to complete recovery (CR) within 8 months was observed in 17 of these cases, transient aggravation in 7, and significant improvement to be better than preoperative function but no CR in 1. All aggravation of CND occurred immediately or within 1 day after TVE and resolved completely within 5 months. Nine patients developed new CND after TVE. New CND occurred during the perioperative period in 8 cases, but all cases resolved completely within 15 days–6 months. Delayed CND was observed in 3 cases with a time lag of 3–25 months after TVE. Two of these completely resolved within 20 days–1 month and the remaining case significantly improved.ConclusionBoth the pre-existing cDAVF-induced CND and the TVE-induced new or aggravated CND completely resolved in almost all cases after embolization with Onyx.

  8. [Imaging anatomy of the cranial nerves using 3.0 Tesla MRI: a practical review for clinicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Barba, Oscar; Martínez-Martínez, Lidieth; Cazares-Arellano, José Luis; Martínez-López, Manuel; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the method of choice to evaluate the cranial nerves (CN). These nerves constitute a group of structures that have acquired during their phylogenetic development a high degree of specialization. There are 12 pairs of CN to which we use their specific name or number. The olfactory (I) and optic (II) pairs are not real nerves but tracts from the encephalon. The spinal nerve (XI) derives from superior cervical segment of the spine. The other 9 pairs of CN are related with the brain stem. Although the skull base foramina can be seen on computed tomography, the nerves themselves can only be visualized in detail on MR. That means, in order to see the different segments of nerves I to XII, the right sequences must be used. It is important to provide detailed clinical information to the radiologist so that a tailored MR study can be performed. In this review, the basic imaging anatomy of the 12 CN is discussed and illustrated briefly with an emphasis on more advanced extra-axial anatomy, illustrated with high-resolution MR images. Clinicians looking for complete anatomic descriptions and/or MR illustrations are advised to consult specialized textbooks considering it is not possible to describe all of the anatomy in one article. This manuscript is intended to be a practical review for clinicians.

  9. Value of Free-Run Electromyographic Monitoring of Extraocular Cranial Nerves during Expanded Endonasal Surgery (EES) of the Skull Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    Objective To evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of extraocular cranial nerves (EOCN) III, IV, and VI during expanded endonasal surgery (EES) of the skull base in reducing iatrogenic cranial nerve (CN) deficits. Design We retrospectively identified 200 patients out of 990 who had at least one EOCN monitored during EES. We further separated patients into groups according to the specific CN monitored. In each CN group, we classified patients who had significant (SG) f-EMG activity as Group I and those who did not as Group II. Results A total of 696 EOCNs were monitored. The number of muscles supplied by EOCNs that had SG f-EMG activity was 88, including CN III = 46, CN IV = 21, and CN VI = 21. There were two deficits involving CN VI in patients who had SG f-EMG activity during surgery. There were 14 deficits observed, including CN III = 3, CN IV = 2, and CN VI = 9 in patients who did not have SG f-EMG activity during surgery. Conclusions f-EMG monitoring of EOCN during EES can be useful in identifying the location of the nerve. It seems to have limited value in predicting postoperative neurological deficits. Future studies to evaluate the EMG of EOCN during EES need to be done with both f-EMG and triggered EMG.

  10. 3.0T MR3D-COSMIC序列结合多平面重建对12对脑神经脑池段的成像价值%Imaging the cisternal segment of cranial nerves with 3.0T MR 3D-COSMIC and multiplanar reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑红伟; 马秀华; 薛鹏; 漆剑频; 胡道予; 吕富荣

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the applying value of 3D-COSMIC MRI sequences for cranial nerves I-M.Methods 3D-COSMIC were used in 20 volunteers and 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves.480 nerves were evaluated.Two radiologists independently divided the imaging findings into 3 grades: 1 (completely visualized) ,2 (partially visualized) ,and 3 (not visualized).The first two grades were defined as visualization and the last grade was no visualization,the relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels were divided into grades;1 (notcontact) ,2(contact) ,3 (compression).Results The rate of visualization of these cranial nerves with 3D-COSMIC sequences were as follows respectively: nerve I (86%);nerve Ⅱ (100%);nerve Ⅲ (97% );nerve Ⅳ(23%);nerve Ⅴ(100%) ;nerve Ⅵ (90%) ;nerve Ⅶ(100%);nerve 1(100%);nerve IX-XI complex(63% ,100% and 53%);nerve Ⅻ(40%)3 of 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves displayed nerve had vascular compression or contact.Conclusion 3D-COSMIC sequence can show detailed anatomy of the cranial nerves and relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels ,especially Ⅱ,Ⅲ,Ⅳ,Ⅴ,Ⅵ,Ⅶ,Ⅷ,Ⅹ cranial nerves?to help clinical treatment.%目的 探讨3.0T MR 3D-COSMIC成像序列对Ⅰ~Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段显示的临床价值.方法 采用3.0T MR扫描仪对20例健康志愿者和10例疑因血管等原因压迫相应颅脑神经产生临床症状的患者进行MR检查,扫描序列包括3D-COSMIC及3D-TOF-SPGR.并由2名神经放射学医师根据20例健康志愿者480支颅神经显示的清晰程度分为清晰、较清晰、不清晰3个等级,清晰和较清晰定义为显示,不清晰定义为未显示,而神经与血管的关系分为无接触、接触、压迫.结果 脑神经在3D-COSMIC序列的显示率分别为:嗅神经(86%),视神经(100%),动眼神经(97%),滑车神经(23%),三叉神经(100%),外展神经(90%),面神经(100%),前庭蜗神经(100%),后组颅神经复合体[舌咽神经(63%)

  11. Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging; Anatomie der Schaedelbasis und Hirnnerven in der Schnittbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bink, A.; Berkefeld, J.; Zanella, F. [Klinikum der Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples. (orig.) [German] Zur Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis sind sowohl die Computertomographie (CT) als auch Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) geeignet. Waehrend mittels CT vorzugsweise die exakte knoecherne Ausbreitung von Pathologien z. B. zur operativen Therapieplanung erfasst werden, dient die MRT sowohl der Darstellung von Pathologien bzgl. ihrer Ausbreitung im Weichteilgewebe als auch dem Nachweis knoecherner Infiltration. Bei der Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis wird eine hochaufloesende Darstellung mit geringer Schichtdicke fuer beide Modalitaeten angestrebt. Die genaue Kenntnis der Anatomie ist bereits bei der Untersuchungsplanung notwendig. Sie ist zudem Voraussetzung fuer das Erkennen und die korrekte Interpretation von Pathologien. Die MRT ist die bildgebende Methode der Wahl zur Abklaerung von Pathologien der Hirnnerven. Dabei ist es durch gezielte Sequenzauswahl, die sich nach den die Hirnnerven umgebenen Strukturen richtet, moeglich, den gesamten Verlauf der Hirnnerven zu beurteilen. Dieser Artikel beschreibt die Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis

  12. Electrophysiologic analysis of injury to cranial nerve XI during neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanisnik, Bostjan; Zargi, Miha; Rodi, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    Despite preservation of the accessory nerve, a considerable number of patients report partial nerve damage after modified radical neck dissection (MRND) and selective neck dissection. Accessory nerve branches for the trapezius muscle were stimulated during neck dissection, and the M wave amplitude was measured during distinct surgical phases. The accessory nerve was mapped in 20 patients. The M wave recordings indicated that major nerve damage occurred during dissection at levels IIa and IIb in the most proximal segment of the nerve. The M waves evoked from this nerve segment decreased significantly during surgery (analysis of variance; p = .001). The most significant intraoperative injury to the accessory nerve during neck dissection occurs at anatomic nerve levels IIa and IIb. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E372-E376, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The impact on post-operative shoulder function of intraoperative nerve monitoring of cranial nerve XI during modified radical neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanišnik, Boštjan; Žitnik, Lidija; Levart, Primož; Žargi, Miha; Rodi, Zoran

    2016-12-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of the cranial nerve XI (CN XI) may decrease shoulder disability following modified radical neck dissection. Prospective study was designed comparing results of Constant Shoulder Score (CSS), Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and EMG score of the trapezius muscle (mT) before and after surgery. One side of the neck was monitored during surgery with intraoperative nerve monitor. EMG scores of the mT 6 months postoperatively were statistically better on monitored as compared to the non-monitored side of the neck (p = 0.041), while the differences of the CSS and SPADI were not statistically significant. Patients with better EMG scores of the mT at 6 weeks recuperated better and with smaller decrease of the CSS. Intraoperative monitoring is beneficial at the beginning of the surgeon's learning curve and in the process of familiarizing with anatomical variation of the CN XI.

  14. Comparative study of 3D TOF-SPGR and 3D FASE on the display of the relationship between cranial nerves and peripheral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wenge; Li Yanliang; Zhang Lina; Qi Xixun; Jin Anyu; Xu Ke; Tong Zhiyong; Liu Jing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To select a better sequence which can supply reliable radiological information for vessel compression on cranial nerves in patients with facial spasm or trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: 3D TOF-SPGR and 3D FASE were used in 40 patients with facial spasm or trigeminal neuralgia to display the relationship between cranial nerves (facial nerve and trigeminal nerve) and peripheral vessels. Results: 38 patients got surgical results. 33 unilateral vessel compression or contact on facial nerves or trigeminal nerves was found on 3D TOF-SPGR, while no contact was found in 5. 26 unilateral vessel compression or contact on facial nerves or trigeminal nerves was found on 3D FASE, while no contact was found in 12. Significant difference between the two sequences on the display of vessel compression on facial nerves or trigeminal nerves was found by statistical analysis (χ 2 =5.14, P=0.016). Conclusion: 3D TOF-SPGR is better than 3D FASE on display of the relationship between nerves and peripheral vessels, and it should be the primary MRI sequence for patients with facial spasm or trigeminal neuralgia clinically. (author)

  15. Cranial nerve assessment in cavernous sinus tumors with contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amemiya, Shiori; Aoki, Shigeki; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to apply contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) imaging to the evaluation of cranial nerves (CN) in patients with cavernous sinus tumors. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA images were acquired from ten patients with cavernous sinus tumors with a 3-T unit. In all cases, the trigeminal nerve with tumor involvement was easily identified in the cavernous portions. Although oculomotor and abducens nerves were clearly visualized against the tumor area with intense contrast enhancement, they were hardly identifiable within the area lacking contrast enhancement. The trochlear nerve was visualized in part, but not delineated as a linear structure outside of the lesion. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA can be useful in the assessment of cranial nerves in and around the cavernous sinus with tumor involvement. (orig.)

  16. Unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy and abnormal enhancement of extraocular muscles on magnetic resonance imaging of orbit after the ingestion of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; Park, Yoo Seok; Park, Incheol

    2010-05-01

    Methanol is generally known to cause visual impairment and various systemic manifestations. There are a few reported specific findings for methanol intoxication on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. A case is reported of unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy oculus sinister (OS) after the ingestion of methanol. Unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve were confirmed by fundoscopy, flourescein angiography, visual evoked potential and electroretinogram. The optic nerve and extraocular muscles (superior rectus, medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscle) were enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA on MRI of the orbit. This is the first case report of permanent monocular blindness with confirmed unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve, combined with third cranial nerve palsy after methanol ingestion.

  17. Cranial nerve assessment in cavernous sinus tumors with contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Shiori; Aoki, Shigeki; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply contrast-enhanced 3D fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) imaging to the evaluation of cranial nerves (CN) in patients with cavernous sinus tumors. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA images were acquired from ten patients with cavernous sinus tumors with a 3-T unit. In all cases, the trigeminal nerve with tumor involvement was easily identified in the cavernous portions. Although oculomotor and abducens nerves were clearly visualized against the tumor area with intense contrast enhancement, they were hardly identifiable within the area lacking contrast enhancement. The trochlear nerve was visualized in part, but not delineated as a linear structure outside of the lesion. Contrast-enhanced 3D-FIESTA can be useful in the assessment of cranial nerves in and around the cavernous sinus with tumor involvement. (orig.)

  18. An unusual presentation of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the minor salivary glands with cranial nerve palsy: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul-Hussein, Amal; Morris, Pierre A; Markova, Tsveti

    2007-01-01

    Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor entity and comprises about 1% of all malignant tumor of the oral and maxillofacial region. It is slow growing but a highly invasive cancer with a high recurrence rate. Intracranial ACC is even more infrequent and could be primary or secondary occurring either by direct invasion, hematogenous spread, or perineural spread. We report the first case of the 5 th and 6 th nerve palsy due to cavernous sinus invasion by adenoid cystic carcinoma. A 49-year-old African American female presented to the emergency room complaining of severe right-sided headache, photophobia, dizziness and nausea, with diplopia. The patient had a 14 year history migraine headaches, hypertension, and mild intermittent asthma. Physical examination revealed right lateral rectus muscle palsy with esotropia. There was numbness in all three divisions of the right trigeminal nerve. Motor and sensory examination of extremities was normal. An MRI of the brain/brain stem was obtained which showed a large mass in the clivus extending to involve the nasopharynx, pterygoid plate, sphenoid and right cavernous sinuses. Biopsy showed an ACC tumor with a cribriform pattern of the minor salivary glands. The patient underwent total gross surgical resection and radiation therapy. This is a case of ACC of the minor salivary glands with intracranial invasion. The patient had long history of headaches which changed in character during the past year, and symptoms of acute 5 th and 6 th cranial nerve involvement. Our unique case demonstrates direct invasion of cavernous sinus and could explain the 5 th and 6 th cranial nerve involvement as histopathology revealed no perineural invasion

  19. Cranial nerve threshold for thermal injury induced by MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU): preliminary results on an optic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnof, Sagi; Zibly, Zion; Cohen, Zvi; Shaw, Andrew; Schlaff, Cody; Kassel, Neal F

    2013-04-01

    Future clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) are moving toward the management of different intracranial pathologies. We sought to validate the production, safety, and efficacy of thermal injury to cranial nerves generated by MRgHIFU. In this study, five female domestic pigs underwent a standard bifrontal craniectomy under general anesthesia. Treatment was then given using an MRgHIFU system to induce hyperthermic ablative sonication (6 to 10 s; 50 to 2000 J.) Histological analyses were done to confirm nerve damage; temperature measured on the optic nerve was approximately 53.4°C (range: 39°C to 70°C.) Histology demonstrated a clear definition between a necrotic, transitional zone, and normal tissue. MRgHIFU induces targeted thermal injury to nervous tissue within a specific threshold of 50°C to 60°C with the tissue near the sonication center yielding the greatest effect; adjacent tissue showed minimal changes. Additional studies utilizing this technology are required to further establish accurate threshold parameters for optic nerve thermo-ablation.

  20. Cranial nerve contrast using nerve-specific fluorophores improved by paired-agent imaging with indocyanine green as a control agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Veronica C.; Vuong, Victoria D.; Wilson, Todd; Wewel, Joshua; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2017-09-01

    Nerve preservation during surgery is critical because damage can result in significant morbidity. This remains a challenge especially for skull base surgeries where cranial nerves (CNs) are involved because visualization and access are particularly poor in that location. We present a paired-agent imaging method to enhance identification of CNs using nerve-specific fluorophores. Two myelin-targeting imaging agents were evaluated, Oxazine 4 and Rhodamine 800, and coadministered with a control agent, indocyanine green, either intravenously or topically in rats. Fluorescence imaging was performed on excised brains ex vivo, and nerve contrast was evaluated via paired-agent ratiometric data analysis. Although contrast was improved among all experimental groups using paired-agent imaging compared to conventional, solely targeted imaging, Oxazine 4 applied directly exhibited the greatest enhancement, with a minimum 3 times improvement in CNs delineation. This work highlights the importance of accounting for nonspecific signal of targeted agents, and demonstrates that paired-agent imaging is one method capable of doing so. Although staining, rinsing, and imaging protocols need to be optimized, these findings serve as a demonstration for the potential use of paired-agent imaging to improve contrast of CNs, and consequently, surgical outcome.

  1. Correlation of MR tomographic findings and microvascular decompression treatment of the neurovascular compressions of the cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zengsheng; Chen Xiangmin; Sun Yiyan; Fang Ming; Wang Ping; Guan Yong; Sun Miao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation of the operation effects of the miorovascular decompression (MVD) and the findings on magnetic resonance tomographie angiography (MRTA) in patients of neurovascular compression of the cranial nerves. Methods: Two hundred and twenty three patients treated with the microvascular decompression were analyzed retrospectively. They were grouped and graded according to the vessel compression on the cranial nerves. The compression were grouped as none, moderate and severe, and the operation effects were graded as I (complete relief), II (partial relief) and III ( no relief). The operation effects grades were correlated according to the compression groups by Kruskal-Wallis test and the operation effects between each two of the groups were compared using Nemenyi test. P 2 =16.84 and P<0.05. The mean rank of the non-compression, the moderate and the severe group was 134.21,102.37 and 110.4, respectively. The difference of the mean ranks between the non-compression group and the moderate group was 31.84, and between the non-compression and the severe group was 24.17, respectively, where P<0.05 both. Conclusions: There was close relationship between the findings on magnetic resonance tomographic angiography and the operation effects of the MVD. The operation effects of patients with moderate and severe vessel compression were much better than the non-compression group. MRTA is helpful for MVD surgical indication and its prognosis. (authors)

  2. Enterovirus 71 can directly infect the brainstem via cranial nerves and infection can be ameliorated by passive immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Soon Hao; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2014-11-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71)-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease may be complicated by encephalomyelitis. We investigated EV71 brainstem infection and whether this infection could be ameliorated by passive immunization in a mouse model. Enterovirus 71 was injected into unilateral jaw/facial muscles of 2-week-old mice, and hyperimmune sera were given before or after infection. Harvested tissues were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and viral titration. In unimmunized mice, viral antigen and RNA were detected within 24 hours after infection only in ipsilateral cranial nerves, motor trigeminal nucleus, reticular formation, and facial nucleus; viral titers were significantly higher in the brainstem than in the spinal cord samples. Mice given preinfection hyperimmune serum showed a marked reduction of ipsilateral viral antigen/RNA and viral titers in the brainstem in a dose-dependent manner. With optimum hyperimmune serum given after infection, brainstem infection was significantly reduced in a time-dependent manner. A delay in disease onset and a reduction of disease severity and mortality were also observed. Thus, EV71 can directly infect the brainstem, including the medulla, via cranial nerves, most likely by retrograde axonal transport. This may explain the sudden cardiorespiratory collapse in human patients with fatal encephalomyelitis. Moreover, our results suggest that passive immunization may still benefit EV71-infected patients who have neurologic complications.

  3. Three-dimensional stereotactic atlas of the adult human skull correlated with the brain, cranial nerves, and intracranial vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Thaung, Thant Shoon Let; Chua, Beng Choon; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Ngai, Vincent; Yang, Yili; Chrzan, Robert; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-05-15

    Although the adult human skull is a complex and multifunctional structure, its 3D, complete, realistic, and stereotactic atlas has not yet been created. This work addresses the construction of a 3D interactive atlas of the adult human skull spatially correlated with the brain, cranial nerves, and intracranial vasculature. The process of atlas construction included computed tomography (CT) high-resolution scan acquisition, skull extraction, skull parcellation, 3D disarticulated bone surface modeling, 3D model simplification, brain-skull registration, 3D surface editing, 3D surface naming and color-coding, integration of the CT-derived 3D bony models with the existing brain atlas, and validation. The virtual skull model created is complete with all 29 bones, including the auditory ossicles (being among the smallest bones). It contains all typical bony features and landmarks. The created skull model is superior to the existing skull models in terms of completeness, realism, and integration with the brain along with blood vessels and cranial nerves. This skull atlas is valuable for medical students and residents to easily get familiarized with the skull and surrounding anatomy with a few clicks. The atlas is also useful for educators to prepare teaching materials. It may potentially serve as a reference aid in the reading and operating rooms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Closure of laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy for intractable aspiration secondary to radiation encephalopathy or radiation damage of cranial nerve after radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shenhong; Su, Zhengzhong; He, Xiaoguang; Li, Min; Li, Tianying

    2006-09-01

    Closure of the laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy is especially suitable for intractable aspiration secondary to radiation encephalopathy or damage of cranial nerve after radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). To investigate the clinical value, technique, indications and contraindications of closure of the laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy for intractable aspiration secondary to radiation encephalopathy (REP) or radiation damage of cranial nerve after radiotherapy of NPC. Thirty patients, suffering from intractable aspiration secondary to radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, were treated with closure of the laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy and were observed for at least 1 year. Intractable aspiration and dyspnea were completely eradicated in all patients. The quality of their life was greatly improved.

  5. Vincristine-induced neuropathy in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Oman: Frequent autonomic and more severe cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Hanan F; AlFutaisi, Amna; Zacharia, Mathew; Elshinawy, Mohamed; Mevada, Surekha T; Alrawas, Abdulhakim; Khater, Doaa; Jaju, Deepali; Wali, Yasser

    2017-12-01

    Vincristine (VCR) induced peripheral neuropathy is a common complication in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A retrospective data analysis over an interval of 10 years (2006-2016) of all children with ALL seen at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital was carried out. Electronic medical records of eligible patients were reviewed. Patients with clinical evidence of neuropathy and abnormal nerve conduction studies (NCSs) were included in the study. Nineteen (nine females and 10 males) out of 103 pediatric patients developed VCR-related neuropathy, and their age ranged between 2.5 and 14 years. Symptoms started after 2-11 doses of VCR. All 19 patients had documented peripheral neuropathy on NCSs. The autonomic nervous system and cranial nerves affection was relatively common in our patients; two presented with bradycardia, two patients with unexplained tachycardia, and five had abdominal pain and constipation, complicated by typhlitis in two patients. One patient developed unilateral hearing loss. Two patients developed severe life-threatening cranial nerve involvement with bilateral ptosis and recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement presented as vocal cord paralysis, hoarseness of voice, frequent chocking, and aspiration episodes. Peripheral neuropathy was the commonest form of VCR-related neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy was relatively common in our patients. Cranial neuropathy is a serious side effect of VCR that can be severe, involving multiple cranial nerves and needs prompt recognition and management. Concomitant administration of pyridoxine and pyridostigmine does not seem to protect against further neurological damage in some patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Post-traumatic Unilateral Avulsion of the Abducens Nerve with Damage to Cranial Nerves VII and VIII: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Akiyama, Yuji; Tsumura, Ryu; Kolakshyapati, Manish; Adhikari, Rupendra Bahadur; Takayasu, Takeshi; Nosaka, Ryo; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of the abducens nerve as a consequence of facial and/or head trauma occur with or without associated cervical or skull base fracture. This is the first report on unilateral avulsion of the abducens nerve in a 29-year-old man with severe right facial trauma. In addition, he exhibited mild left facial palsy, and moderate left hearing disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) revealed avulsion of left sixth cra...

  7. Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Arteries Juxtaposed with the Internal Acoustic Meatus and Their Relationship to the Cranial Nerve VII/VIII Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Fernando; Kassem, Mohammad W; Iwanaga, Joe; Oskouian, Rod J; Loukas, Marios; Demerdash, Amin; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-08-16

    Vascular loops in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and their relationship to cranial nerves have been used to explain neurological symptoms. The anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) has variable branches producing vascular loops that can compress the facial cranial nerve (CN) VII and vestibulocochlear (CN VIII) nerves. AICA compression of the facial-vestibulocochlear nerve complex can lead to various clinical presentations, including hemifacial spasm (HFS), tinnitus, and hemiataxia. The formation of arterial loops inside or outside of the internal auditory meatus (IAM) can cause abutment or compression of CN VII and CN VIII. Twenty-five (50 sides) fresh adult cadavers underwent dissection of the cerebellopontine angle in the supine position. In regard to relationships between the AICA and the nerves of the facial/vestibulocochlear complex, 33 arteries (66%) traveled in a plane between the facial/nervus intermedius nerves and the cochlear and vestibular nerves. Five arteries (10%) traveled below the CN VII/VIII complex, six (12%) traveled posterior to the nerve complex, four (8%) formed a semi-circle around the upper half of the nerve complex, and two (4%) traveled between and partially separated the nervus intermedius and facial nerve proper. Our study found that the majority of AICA will travel in a plane between the facial/nervus intermedius nerves and the cochlear and vestibular nerves. Although the relationship between the AICA and porus acusticus and AICA and the nerves of the CN VII/VIII complex are variable, based on our findings, some themes exist. Surgeons should consider these with approaches to the cerebellopontine angle.

  8. Optimal learning in a virtual patient simulation of cranial nerve palsies: the interaction between social learning context and student aptitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Teresa R; Lyons, Rebecca; Chuah, Joon Hao; Kopper, Regis; Lok, Benjamin C; Cendan, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Simulation in medical education provides students with opportunities to practice interviews, examinations, and diagnosis formulation related to complex conditions without risks to patients. To examine differences between individual and team participation on learning outcomes and student perspectives through use of virtual patients (VPs) for teaching cranial nerve (CN) evaluation. Fifty-seven medical students were randomly assigned to complete simulation exercises either as individuals or as members of three-person teams. Students interviewed, examined, and diagnosed VPs with possible CN damage in the neurological exam rehearsal virtual environment (NERVE). Knowledge of CN abnormalities was assessed pre- and post-simulation. Student perspectives of system usability were evaluated post-simulation. An aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) effect was detected; at pre-test scores ≤ 50%, students in teams scored higher (83%) at post-test than did students as individuals (62%, p = 0.02). Post-simulation, students in teams reported greater confidence in their ability to diagnose CN abnormalities than did students as individuals (p = 0.02; mean rating = 4.0/5.0 and 3.4/5.0, respectively). The ATI effect allows us to begin defining best practices for the integration of VP simulators into the medical curriculum. We are persuaded to implement future NERVE exercises with small teams of medical students.

  9. Optimal learning in a virtual patient simulation of cranial nerve palsies: The interaction between social learning context and student aptitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    JOHNSON, TERESA R.; LYONS, REBECCA; CHUAH, JOON HAO; KOPPER, REGIS; LOK, BENJAMIN C.; CENDAN, JUAN C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulation in medical education provides students with opportunities to practice interviews, examinations, and diagnosis formulation related to complex conditions without risks to patients. Aim To examine differences between individual and team participation on learning outcomes and student perspectives through use of virtual patients (VPs) for teaching cranial nerve (CN) evaluation. Methods Fifty-seven medical students were randomly assigned to complete simulation exercises either as individuals or as members of three-person teams. Students interviewed, examined, and diagnosed VPs with possible CN damage in the Neurological Exam Rehearsal Virtual Environment (NERVE). Knowledge of CN abnormalities was assessed pre- and post-simulation. Student perspectives of system usability were evaluated post-simulation. Results An aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) effect was detected; at pre-test scores ≤50%, students in teams scored higher (83%) at post-test than did students as individuals (62%, p = 0.02). Post-simulation, students in teams reported greater confidence in their ability to diagnose CN abnormalities than did students as individuals (p = 0.02; mean rating = 4.0/5.0 and 3.4/5.0, respectively). Conclusion The ATI effect allows us to begin defining best practices for the integration of VP simulators into the medical curriculum. We are persuaded to implement future NERVE exercises with small teams of medical students. PMID:22938679

  10. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of the cranial nerves and their nuclei correlated with surface neuroanatomy, vasculature and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Johnson, Aleksandra; Chua, Beng Choon; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the cranial nerves and their nuclei is critical in clinical practice, medical research and education. However to our best knowledge, a comprehensive source capturing full three-dimensional (3D) relationships of the cranial nerves along with surrounding neuroanatomy is not yet available. This work addresses the construction and validation of an atlas of the cranial nerves with their nuclei, correlated with surface neuroanatomy, vasculature, and magnetic resonance imaging. The atlas is interactive, stereotactic, 3D, detailed, fully parcellated, completely labeled, consistent in 3D, electronically dissectible, and scalable. A 3D geometrical model of the 12 pairs of cranial nerves with nuclei was created from an in vivo magnetic resonance scan exploiting in-house developed tools and methods, including tubular and iso-surface modeling, interactive editing, and mesh compression. This virtual model contains 439 objects with 121 different names, labeled based on Terminologia Anatomica. The model was integrated with a 3D atlas of structure, vasculature and tracts developed earlier, and correlated with sectional magnetic resonance anatomy. The whole model or its components can be interactively rotated, zoomed, panned, and add or removed with a simple few clicks. The studied material can be adaptively selected in an in-depth manner by using controls available in the user interface. This atlas is potentially useful for anatomy browsing, user self-testing, automatic student assessment, preparing materials, and localization in clinical neurology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, E. E-mail: eciftcis7@hotmail.com; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts.

  12. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftci, E.; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts

  13. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Eichberg, Daniel; Zamani, Amir; Golby, Alexandra; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Skull base tumors frequently encase or invade adjacent normal neurovascular structures. For this reason, optimal tumor resection with incomplete knowledge of patient anatomy remains a challenge. To determine the accuracy and utility of image-based preoperative segmentation in skull base tumor resections, we performed a prospective study. Ten patients with skull base tumors underwent preoperative 3T magnetic resonance imaging, which included thin section three-dimensional (3D) space T2, 3D time of flight, and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in the neuronavigation system for segmentation and preoperative planning. Five different neurovascular landmarks were identified in each case and measured for accuracy using the neuronavigation system. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe, and errors of localization were measured. Strong correspondence between image-based segmentation and microscopic view was found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal brain interfaces in all cases. The accuracy of the measurements was 0.45 ± 0.21 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This information reassured the surgeon and prevented vascular injury intraoperatively. Preoperative segmentation of the related cranial nerves was possible in 80% of cases and helped the surgeon localize involved cranial nerves in all cases. Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients.

  14. Radiation-Induced Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients After Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J.; Liss, Adam L.; Hu Chaosu; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Yongru; Zhang Youwang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To address the characteristics and the causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with an extensive period of followed-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 317 consecutive and nonselected patients treated with definitive external-beam radiotherapy between November 1962 and February 1995 participated in this study. The median doses to the nasopharynx and upper neck were 71 Gy (range, 55-86 Gy) and 61 Gy (range, 34-72 Gy), respectively. Conventional fractionation was used in 287 patients (90.5%). Forty-five patients (14.2%) received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range, 5.1-38.0 years). Ninety-eight patients (30.9%) developed CNP, with a median latent period of 7.6 years (range, 0.3-34 years). Patients had a higher rate of CNP (81 cases, 25.5%) in lower-group cranial nerves compared with upper group (44 cases, 13.9%) (χ 2 = 34.444, p 2 = 4.661, p = 0.031). The cumulative incidences of CNP were 10.4%, 22.4%, 35.5%, and 44.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CNP at diagnosis, chemotherapy, total radiation dose to the nasopharynx, and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing radiation-induced CNP. Conclusion: Radiation-induced fibrosis may play an important role in radiation-induced CNP. The incidence of CNP after definitive radiotherapy for NPC remains high after long-term follow-up and is dose and fractionation dependent.

  15. MRI imaging of cranial nerve involvement after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma%鼻咽癌放疗后脑神经损伤的MRI表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧芳; 李惠明; 彭杰; 胡姣; 魏娜

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨鼻咽癌放疗后脑神经损伤的原因及其MRI表现.方法 选择临床和MRI资料完整的36例患者进行回顾性分析,采用1.5T MR行头颅、鼻咽部横轴位、冠状位和矢状位平扫以及增强扫描成像,对MRI图像进行分析.结果 ①脑神经第Ⅵ、Ⅴ、Ⅹ、Ⅻ对损害占前四位;②鼻咽癌局部复发引起脑神经损伤17例,单纯放射性神经损害12例,复发与放射性脑病并存的7例.结论 鼻咽癌放疗后脑神经损伤有肿瘤复发、放射性脑病和两者共存三方面原因.MRI检查能早期、准确显示脑神经损伤.%Objective To explore cranial nerve involvement after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.Methods 36 cases with whole clinical data and MRI data were selected.We applied 1.5 T MRI scaner and T1WI,T2WI,FS T2WI,GD-DTPA contrast medium enhancement scan to every patients with axial,coronal and sagittal tomography and contrast enhancement of head and nasopharynx.Results ① The damage of Ⅵ,Ⅴ,Ⅹ,Ⅻ cranial nerves was the most common;②17 cases had local recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and injure cranial nerve.12 cases only had radioactive nerve damage.7 cases had both.Conclusion There are three reasons of Cranial nerve involvement after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma:recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and invasion of the cranial nerve,radioactive nerve damage,and or both.MRI can early and accurately diagnose the cranial nerve involvement.

  16. High-resolution MRI of cranial nerves in posterior fossa at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zi-Yi; Chen, Jing; Liang, Qi-Zhou; Liao, Hai-Yan; Cheng, Qiong-Yue; Fu, Shui-Xi; Chen, Cai-Xiang; Yu, Dan

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of high-resolution imaging obtainable with the higher field strength of 3.0 T on the visualization of the brain nerves in the posterior fossa. In total, 20 nerves were investigated on MRI of 12 volunteers each and selected for comparison, respectively, with the FSE sequences with 5 mm and 2 mm section thicknesses and gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences acquired with a 3.0-T scanner. The MR images were evaluated by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast with use of a rating scale. In general, decrease of the slice thickness showed a significant increase in the detection of nerves as well as in the image quality characteristics. Comparing FSE and GRE imaging, the course of brain nerves and brainstem vessels was visualized best with use of the three-dimensional (3D) pulse sequence. The comparison revealed the clear advantage of a thin section. The increased resolution enabled immediate identification of all brainstem nerves. GRE sequence most distinctly and confidently depicted pertinent structures and enables 3D reconstruction to illustrate complex relations of the brainstem. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High-resolution MRI of cranial nerves in posterior fossa at 3.0 T

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Yi Guo; Jing Chen; Qi-Zhou Liang; Hai-Yan Liao; Qiong-Yue Cheng; Shui-Xi Fu; Cai-Xiang Chen; Dan Yu

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the influence of high-resolution imaging obtainable with the higher field strength of3.0T on the visualization of the brain nerves in the posterior fossa.Methods:In total,20 nerves were investigated onMRI of12 volunteers each and selected for comparison, respectively, with theFSE sequences with5 mm and2 mm section thicknesses and gradient recalled echo(GRE) sequences acquired with a3.0-T scanner.TheMR images were evaluated by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast with use of a rating scale.Results:In general, decrease of the slice thickness showed a significant increase in the detection of nerves as well as in the image quality characteristics. ComparingFSE andGRE imaging, the course of brain nerves and brainstem vessels was visualized best with use of the three-dimensional(3D) pulse sequence.Conclusions:The comparison revealed the clear advantage of a thin section.The increased resolution enabled immediate identification of all brainstem nerves.GRE sequence most distinctly and confidently depicted pertinent structures and enables3D reconstruction to illustrate complex relations of the brainstem.

  18. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial energy metabolism changes during aging-mouse cranial nerve cells treated with various doses and forms of Fructus schizandrae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Guo; Jinhe Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the cellular aging process, the number of mitochondria, generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), activity of respiratory chain enzyme complex 1 and 4, and oxidation decrease. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of aqueous and spirituous extract, as well as polysaccharides from Fructus schizandrae (Magnolia Vine) on energy metabolism and mitochondrial anti-oxidation in cranial nerve cells of a D-gal-induccd aging mouse model.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal study. The experiment was conducted at the Department of Biochemistry, Qiqihar Medical College between March and July 2006.MATERIALS: Fifty healthy, Kunming mice of both sexes, aged 2 3 months old and weighing 18-22 g, were used for the present study. Fructus schizandrae was purchased from the Medical College of Jiamusi University. Aqueous extracts, spirituous extracts, and polysaccharides from Fructus schizandrae were prepared. D-galactose (D-gal) is a product of the Second Reagent Factory, Shanghai City, China. Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) kit, malonaldehyde (MDA) kit, protein quantification kit, and inorganic phosphorus testing kit were purchased from Jian Cheng Bioeng. Co., China.METHODS: Fifty mice were randomly divided into five groups, with 10 mice in each group: young control, aging model, aqueous Fructus schizandrae extract, spirituous Fructus schizandrae extract, and Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides. Over a course of 30 days, mice in aging model, aqueous Fructus schizandrae extract, spirituous Fructus schizandrae extract, and Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides groups were injected subcutaneously with D-gal (100 mg/kg) into the nape of the neck daily, and administered intragastrically with an equal volume of sterile, warm water (aging model), aqueous Fructus schizandrae extract (2 g/kg), spirituous Fructus schizandrae extract (2 g/kg), or Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides (0.2 g/kg), respectively. Mice in the young control group were injected into

  20. Transient sixth cranial nerve palsy following orgasm abrogated by treatment with sympathomimetic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H; Katsoff, B

    2014-01-01

    To describe a unique disorder where a transient 6th nerve palsy leading to diploplia following orgasm developed in a 28-year-old woman. This coincided with a weight gain of 100 pounds in a short time without a corresponding change in dietary habits. She was treated with the sympathomimetic amine dextroamphetamine sulfate. Indeed she immediately responded to treatment with dextroamphetamine sulfate sustained release capsules with complete resolution of the episodes of 6th nerve palsy following orgasm. The main importance of this case is that it suggests that orgasm causes a transient generalized decrease in sympathetic nervous system activity and that the achievement of an orgasm may require an increase in the sympathetic nervous system activity.

  1. [Third cranial nerve palsy and Purtscher retinopathy in a child with multiple injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga-Fragoso, P; del-Barrio, Z; Noval, S; Pastora, N; Royo, A

    2015-07-01

    A 4 year-old girl was referred to our hospital after have suffered a severe accident. The patient was diagnosed with complete third nerve palsy in her right eye and Purtscher retinopathy in her left eye. Purtscher retinopathy is a rare condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical ground and its treatment is not well defined although it is believed that systemic steroids could improve the visual outcome. Traumatic third nerve palsy has a poor spontaneous recovery. The use of botulinum toxin might be useful in children to improve the recovery rate, maintaining binocularity, and avoiding amblyopia in other cases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Ophthalmologic outcome after third cranial nerve palsy or paresis in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, A V; Repka, M X

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the causes and ophthalmologic outcome of oculomotor nerve palsy or paresis in children younger than 8 years of age. Patients evaluated between 1985 and 1997 were retrospectively reviewed. Data analyzed included vision, residual strabismus after surgery, aberrant reinnervation, binocular function, and anisometropia. Long-term outcome was assessed in patients followed-up longer than 6 months. Forty-one patients were identified. The most frequent causes were congenital (39%), traumatic (37%), and neoplastic (17%). Visual acuities were reduced in 71% of patients at the time of the initial visit. Long-term outcome could be assessed in 20 of the 41 patients (49%), with a mean follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 0.5 to 13 years). Visual acuities were reduced because of amblyopia in 35% and nonamblyopic factors in 25% of patients in the long-term outcome group at last follow-up. The best response to amblyopia therapy was in the congenital group, in which all patients improved to normal visual acuity. Strabismus surgery was performed on 8 of 20 children (40%) followed-up, none of whom demonstrated measurable stereopsis after operation despite improved alignment. Aberrant reinnervation was present in 9 of 20 patients (45%). Only 3 patients fully recovered from their oculomotor nerve injuries, and these were the only patients to regain measurable stereopsis. The causes in those 3 patients were congenital, traumatic, and neoplastic. Oculomotor nerve palsy/paresis is associated with poor visual and sensorimotor outcome in children younger than 8 years of age. The best ophthalmologic outcome was in the resolved cases (3 of 20; 15%). Amblyopia therapy was most effective with congenital causes, but treatment results were poor with other causes. Young children with posttraumatic and postneoplastic oculomotor nerve injuries demonstrated the worst ophthalmologic outcomes.

  3. Apoplexy of a pituitary macroadenoma with reversible third, fourth and sixth cranial nerve palsies following administration of hypothalamic releasing hormones: MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedl, Michaela; Clodi, Martin; Kotzmann, Harald; Hainfellner, Johann A.; Schima, Wolfgang; Reitner, Andreas; Czech, Thomas; Luger, Anton

    2000-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy in patients with pituitary macroadenomas can occur either spontaneously or following various interventions. We present a case of a 71-year-old woman who developed third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerve palsies following administration of the four hypothalamic releasing hormones for routine preoperative testing of pituitary function. The MR examination showed interval tumor growth with impression of the floor of the third ventricle. There were also changes in signal intensity characteristics of the mass, suggestive of intratumoral bleeding. A transsphenoidal surgery with subtotal resection of the pituitary adenoma was performed. Microscopical examination revealed large areas of necrosis and blood surrounded by adenomatous tissue. Third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerve palsies completely resolved within 4 months. We conclude that MR imaging is useful in the demonstration of pituitary apoplexy following preoperative stimulation tests, but we suggest that these tests should be abandoned in patients with pituitary macroadenomas

  4. Apoplexy of a pituitary macroadenoma with reversible third, fourth and sixth cranial nerve palsies following administration of hypothalamic releasing hormones: MR features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedl, Michaela E-mail: michaela.riedl@akh-wien.ac.at; Clodi, Martin; Kotzmann, Harald; Hainfellner, Johann A.; Schima, Wolfgang; Reitner, Andreas; Czech, Thomas; Luger, Anton

    2000-10-01

    Pituitary apoplexy in patients with pituitary macroadenomas can occur either spontaneously or following various interventions. We present a case of a 71-year-old woman who developed third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerve palsies following administration of the four hypothalamic releasing hormones for routine preoperative testing of pituitary function. The MR examination showed interval tumor growth with impression of the floor of the third ventricle. There were also changes in signal intensity characteristics of the mass, suggestive of intratumoral bleeding. A transsphenoidal surgery with subtotal resection of the pituitary adenoma was performed. Microscopical examination revealed large areas of necrosis and blood surrounded by adenomatous tissue. Third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerve palsies completely resolved within 4 months. We conclude that MR imaging is useful in the demonstration of pituitary apoplexy following preoperative stimulation tests, but we suggest that these tests should be abandoned in patients with pituitary macroadenomas.

  5. Anatomy of the cranial nerves in medieval Persian literature: Esmail Jorjani (AD 1042-1137) and The treasure of the Khwarazm shah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Ardalan, Mohammad R; Loukas, Marios; Eknoyan, Garabed; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-12-01

    Esmail Jorjani was an influential Persian physician and anatomist of the 12th century who did most of his writing after his seventh decade of life. Jorjani's comprehensive textbook of medicine, Zakhirey-e Khwarazmshahi (The Treasure of the Khwarazm Shah) was written in approximately AD 1112 and is considered to be the oldest medical encyclopedia written in Persian. This was an essential textbook for those studying medicine during this time. We describe the life and times of Jorjani and provide a translation and interpretations of his detailed descriptions of the cranial nerves, which were written almost a millennium ago. Medieval Persian and Muslim scholars have contributed to our current knowledge of the cranial nerves. Some of these descriptions, such as the eloquent ones provided by Jorjani, were original and have gone mostly unknown to post-Vesalian European scholars.

  6. Parkinson disease affects peripheral sensory nerves in the pharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Nyirenda, Themba; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Caviness, John N; Samanta, Johan E; Sue, Lucia I; Beach, Thomas G

    2013-07-01

    Dysphagia is very common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and often leads to aspiration pneumonia, the most common cause of death in PD. Current therapies are largely ineffective for dysphagia. Because pharyngeal sensation normally triggers the swallowing reflex, we examined pharyngeal sensory nerves in PD patients for Lewy pathology.Sensory nerves supplying the pharynx were excised from autopsied pharynges obtained from patients with clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed PD (n = 10) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 4). We examined the glossopharyngeal nerve (cranial nerve IX), the pharyngeal sensory branch of the vagus nerve (PSB-X), and the internal superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN) innervating the laryngopharynx. Immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated α-synuclein was used to detect Lewy pathology. Axonal α-synuclein aggregates in the pharyngeal sensory nerves were identified in all of the PD subjects but not in the controls. The density of α-synuclein-positive lesions was greater in PD patients with dysphagia versus those without dysphagia. In addition, α-synuclein-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the ISLN were much more abundant than those in cranial nerve IX and PSB-X. These findings suggest that pharyngeal sensory nerves are directly affected by pathologic processes in PD. These abnormalities may decrease pharyngeal sensation, thereby impairing swallowing and airway protective reflexes and contributing to dysphagia and aspiration.

  7. High-resolution CISS MR imaging with and without contrast for evaluation of the upper cranial nerves: segmental anatomy and selected pathologic conditions of the cisternal through extraforaminal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Ari M; Macedo, Leonardo L; Chonka, Zachary D; Ilica, Ahmet T; Choudhri, Asim F; Gallia, Gary L; Aygun, Nafi

    2014-02-01

    The authors review the course and appearance of the major segments of the upper cranial nerves from their apparent origin at the brainstem through the proximal extraforaminal region, focusing on the imaging and anatomic features of particular relevance to high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging evaluation. Selected pathologic entities are included in the discussion of the corresponding cranial nerve segments for illustrative purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic atlas of head muscles and glands correlated with cranial nerves and surface and sectional neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Chua, Beng Choon; Johnson, Aleksandra; Qian, Guoyu; Poh, Lan Eng; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Bivi, Aminah; Nowinska, Natalia G

    2013-04-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relationships between head muscles and cranial nerves innervating them are complicated. Existing sources present these relationships in illustrations, radiologic scans, or autopsy photographs, which are limited for learning and use. Developed electronic atlases are limited in content, quality, functionality, and/or presentation. We create a truly 3D interactive, stereotactic and high quality atlas, which provides spatial relationships among head muscles, glands and cranial nerves, and correlates them to surface and sectional neuroanatomy. The head muscles and glands were created from a 3T scan by contouring them and generating 3D models. They were named and structured according to Terminologia anatomica. The muscles were divided into: extra-ocular, facial, masticatory and other muscles, and glands into mouth and other glands. The muscles, glands (and also head) were placed in a stereotactic coordinate system. This content was integrated with cranial nerves and neuroanatomy created earlier. To explore this complex content, a scalable user interface was designed with 12 modules including central nervous system (cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord), cranial nerves, muscles, glands, arterial system, venous system, tracts, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, white matter, visual system, head. Anatomy exploration operations include compositing/decompositing, individual/group selection, 3D view-index mapping, 3D labeling, highlighting, distance measuring, 3D brain cutting, and axial/coronal/sagittal triplanar display. To our best knowledge, this is the first truly 3D, stereotactic, interactive, fairly complete atlas of head muscles, and the first attempt to create a 3D stereotactic atlas of glands. Its use ranges from education of students and patients to research to potential clinical applications. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High-resolution STIR for 3-T MRI of the posterior fossa: visualization of the lower cranial nerves and arteriovenous structures related to neurovascular compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yamashita, Koji; Kamano, Hironori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    Preoperative evaluation of small vessels without contrast material is sometimes difficult in patients with neurovascular compression disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether 3D STIR MRI could simultaneously depict the lower cranial nerves--fifth through twelfth--and the blood vessels in the posterior fossa. The posterior fossae of 47 adults (26 women, 21 men) without gross pathologic changes were imaged with 3D STIR and turbo spin-echo heavily T2-weighted MRI sequences and with contrast-enhanced turbo field-echo MR angiography (MRA). Visualization of the cranial nerves on STIR images was graded on a 4-point scale and compared with visualization on T2-weighted images. Visualization of the arteries on STIR images was evaluated according to the segments in each artery and compared with that on MRA images. Visualization of the veins on STIR images was also compared with that on MRA images. Statistical analysis was performed with the Mann-Whitney U test. There were no significant differences between STIR and T2-weighted images with respect to visualization of the cranial nerves (p > 0.05). Identified on STIR and MRA images were 94 superior cerebellar arteries, 81 anteroinferior cerebellar arteries, and 79 posteroinferior cerebellar arteries. All veins evaluated were seen on STIR and MRA images. There were no significant differences between STIR and MRA images with respect to visualization of arteries and veins (p > 0.05). High-resolution STIR is a feasible method for simultaneous evaluation of the lower cranial nerves and the vessels in the posterior fossa without the use of contrast material.

  10. Anatomic facial makeup of the cranial nerves in human%人体十二对脑神经的解剖脸谱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张卫光; 王旭; 李烨; 张艳

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of cranial nerves makeup teaching methods on students' learning of 12 cranial nerves.Methods During the anatomy teaching at Peking University,we had drawn and applied a facial makeup of 12 pairs of cranial nerves in recent three years.Results The teaching method of a facial makeup of 12 pairs of cranial nerves increased the interest,ability of discussion and communication and raised test scores for medical students.Conclusion The ideal teaching effect had been achieved with our teaching method.%目的 探讨12对脑神经的解剖脸谱教学方法在学生学习12对脑神经时的作用.方法 近3年来,我们在北京大学基础医学院的解剖教学中,绘制并应用了12对脑神经的解剖脸谱便于医学生学习记忆.结果 脑神经解剖脸谱对于培养医学生的学习兴趣和医学生的讨论交流能力,增加记忆的牢固性,学习的积极主动性和知识的系统性等方面均有明显提高,医学生的应试成绩也有明显提升.结论 脑神经解剖脸谱取得了理想的教学效果.

  11. Unusual Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Clivus with Cranial Nerve Deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Okudo, Jerome; Anusim, Nwabundo

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has unusual presentation affecting elderly males with a smoking history. The incidence of RCC varies while the incidence of spread of RCC to the clivus is rare. The typicality of RCC presentation includes hematuria, flank pain, and a palpable flank mass; however, RCC can also present with clival metastasis. The unique path of the abducens nerve in the clivus makes it susceptible to damage in metastasis. We report a case of a 54-year-old African American female that ...

  12. Increased Risk of Stroke in Patients with Isolated Third, Fourth, or Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsies: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Chu-Peng; Chen, Yung-Tai; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Yang, Chun-Pai; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this nationwide cohort study was to evaluate whether the occurrence of isolated 3rd, 4th or 6th cranial nerve (CN) palsies is associated with a higher risk of ischemic stroke. This study utilized data from Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database during 1995-2012. Subjects aged 20 years or older who had isolated CN 3/4/6 palsies diagnosed by a neurologist or ophthalmologist between January 2000 and December 2011 were included. A set of propensity score matched, randomly sampled patients who had never been diagnosed with CN 3/4/6 palsies were extracted to constitute the control group (cases and controls = 1:4). All subjects were followed until death, loss due to follow-up or completion of the study. Cox proportional hazard regression model stratified by matched pairs was used to estimate the hazards ratio (HR) of ischemic stroke. A total of 657 patients with isolated CN 3/4/6 palsies (61.1% male, mean age 54.8 years) were identified. Compared with control group, the patients with isolated CN 3/4/6 palsies exhibited an increased risk of ischemic stroke (CN3: adjusted HR 3.69 (95% CI 2.20-6.19); CN4: 2.71 (95% CI 1.11-6.64); CN6: 2.15 (95% CI 1.31-3.52)). The association between CN 3/4/6 palsies and ischemic stroke was detected in both separate subgroup and sensitivity analyses. The patients with CN 3/4/6 palsies exhibited an increased risk of developing ischemic stroke. Therefore, isolated ocular motor nerves palsies appear to represent an unrecognized risk factor for ischemic stroke, and these require further confirmation and exploration. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Construction of a three-dimensional interactive model of the skull base and cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizawa, Yukinari; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Rhoton, Albert L

    2007-05-01

    The goal was to develop an interactive three-dimensional (3-D) computerized anatomic model of the skull base for teaching microneurosurgical anatomy and for operative planning. The 3-D model was constructed using commercially available software (Maya 6.0 Unlimited; Alias Systems Corp., Delaware, MD), a personal computer, four cranial specimens, and six dry bones. Photographs from at least two angles of the superior and lateral views were imported to the 3-D software. Many photographs were needed to produce the model in anatomically complex areas. Careful dissection was needed to expose important structures in the two views. Landmarks, including foramen, bone, and dura mater, were used as reference points. The 3-D model of the skull base and related structures was constructed using more than 300,000 remodeled polygons. The model can be viewed from any angle. It can be rotated 360 degrees in any plane using any structure as the focal point of rotation. The model can be reduced or enlarged using the zoom function. Variable transparencies could be assigned to any structures so that the structures at any level can be seen. Anatomic labels can be attached to the structures in the 3-D model for educational purposes. This computer-generated 3-D model can be observed and studied repeatedly without the time limitations and stresses imposed by surgery. This model may offer the potential to create interactive surgical exercises useful in evaluating multiple surgical routes to specific target areas in the skull base.

  14. Three-dimensional stereotactic atlas of the extracranial vasculature correlated with the intracranial vasculature, cranial nerves, skull and muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Shoon Let Thaung, Thant; Choon Chua, Beng; Hnin Wut Yi, Su; Yang, Yili; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Our objective was to construct a 3D, interactive, and reference atlas of the extracranial vasculature spatially correlated with the intracranial blood vessels, cranial nerves, skull, glands, and head muscles.The atlas has been constructed from multiple 3T and 7T magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) brain scans, and 3T phase contrast and inflow MRA neck scans of the same specimen in the following steps: vessel extraction from the scans, building 3D tubular models of the vessels, spatial registration of the extra- and intracranial vessels, vessel editing, vessel naming and color-coding, vessel simplification, and atlas validation.This new atlas contains 48 names of the extracranial vessels (25 arterial and 23 venous) and it has been integrated with the existing brain atlas.The atlas is valuable for medical students and residents to easily get familiarized with the extracranial vasculature with a few clicks; is useful for educators to prepare teaching materials; and potentially can serve as a reference in the diagnosis of vascular disease and treatment, including craniomaxillofacial surgeries and radiologic interventions of the face and neck. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. MRI diagnosis of neurofibromatosis II involvement of cranial Nerves%神经纤维瘤病Ⅱ型中颅神经病变MR诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骏; 洪桂洵; 饶良俊; 李树荣; 初建平; 杨智云

    2013-01-01

      Objective To investigate cranial nerve involvement of type II neurofibromatosis(NF2).Methods Twenty-three NF2 patients underwent conventional and contrast-enhanced 3D-FLASH MRI.Cranial nerve involvement was diagnosed when thickening or nodule was observed in the cranial nerve.Results Cranial nerve involvement of the 23 patients included unilateral olfactory schwannoma(1/23,4.3%),unilateral(4)or bilateral(3)oculomotor nerve schwannomas(7/23,30.4%),unilateral trochlear schwannoma(1/23,4.3%),unilateral(5)or bilateral(10)trigeminal schwannomas(15/23,65.2%),unilateral abducens schwannoma (1/23,4.3%),unilateral(4)or bilateral(1)facial nerve schwannomas(5/23,21.7%),unilateral(5)or bilateral(18)vestibular schwannomas(23/23,100%),unilateral(3)or bilateral(6)glossopharyngeal ,vagal,or accessory schwannomas(9/23,39.1%),and unilateral(3)or bilateral(3)hypoglossal schwannomas(6/23,26.1%).Conclusions In addition to universal involvement of the auditory nerve,NF2 often involved other cranial nerves except for the optic nerve.The path of the cranial nerves should be carefully inspected on MRI.%  目的探讨神经纤维瘤病Ⅱ型(NF2)中颅神经受累的MR表现。方法23例NF2患者均行头颅常规MR平扫及3D-FLASH增强扫描,MRI上颅神经增粗或形成结节作为颅神经受累标准,按12对颅神经根颅内段解剖路径观察和统计颅神经受累情况。结果23例12对颅神经受累情况如下:Ⅰ(嗅)神经1例(4.3%,单侧)、Ⅱ(视)神经0例,Ⅲ(动眼)神经7例(30.4%,单侧4例,双侧3例)、Ⅳ(滑车神经)1例(4.3%,单侧)、Ⅴ(三叉神经)15例(65.2%,单侧5例,双侧10例)、Ⅵ(外展神经)1例(4.3%,单侧受累)、Ⅶ(面神经)5例(21.7%,单侧4例,双侧1例)、Ⅷ(听神经)23例(100%,单侧5例,双侧18例)、Ⅸ/Ⅹ/Ⅺ(舌咽/迷走/副神经)受累9例(39.1%,单侧3例,双侧6例)、Ⅻ(舌下神经)6例(26.1%

  16. [Three-month rehabilitation of a patient with the III, IV and VI cranial nerve damage caused by a neurosurgery of the left internal carotid artery aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosiński, Eliasz; Kikowski, Łukasz; Irzmański, Robert

    Introduction: Oculomotor nerve palsy is an eye condition resulting from damage to the third cranial nerve or a branch thereof. Third nerve damage weakens the muscles innervated by the nerve . Also adversely affect the fourth and sixth nerve , causing impairment of their activity. Rehabilitation third nerve palsy is rarely described in the available literature . The whole process is very difficult , but the effects of physiotherapy is very beneficial for the patient. The aim:The assessment of the influence of the outpatient rehabilitation on the patient's condition after a three-month treatment and the use of physical therapy. Material and methods:Case studies of the 38-yerar-old patient after having operated a big aneurism of the left ICA, which was clipped. After the procedure, the III, IV and VI cranial nerves were deeply impaired and the amnesic aphasia occurred. The patient started the rehabilitation a month after the incident. To assess the process of rehabilitation, the own movement examination of the eyeball was implemented. Active and passive exercises, Tigger Point therapy, kinesiotaping, laser and electrostimulation were inserted. Results: The significant improvement of the eyeball movement has been proved on the basis of the same own examination. A physiotherapy has had a positive influence on the speech disorder, namely amnesic aphasia, and after the month of the rehabilitation it has been completely removed. The positive influence of the rehabilitation, which has been pointed out, is clinically essential. Conclusions: Obtained results have not been described in literature yet, that is why it is essential to widen further research and emphasise the importance of the rehabilitation, which is rarely implemented in an intense way in such medical conditions.

  17. Currant imaging of the 3rd, 4th and 6th cranial nerves; Nevroradiologisk fremstilling av 3., 4. og 6. hjernenerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerty, Emilia; Bakke, Soeren Jacob

    2001-07-01

    The ocular motor cranial nerves (III, IV, VI) control the eye movements in a near association with the higher cortical areas. Clinically, the most common presentation of abnormal ocular motility is double vision. Identifying the cause of ocular nerve pulsy can be difficult and a large percentage of such cases still remains undiagnosed, even in a new era of neuroradiological techniques. Close co-operation between the clinician and the radiologist is necessary for the selection of the best imaging methods for the specific clinical problem, in order to see the aetiological and topological diagnosis. The article provides a practical review of advances in neuroimaging of the ocular motor nerves. 4 figs., 2 tabs., 15 refs.

  18. Multiple cranial neuropathies without limb involvements: guillain-barre syndrome variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ju Young; Jung, Han Young; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyo Sang; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2013-10-01

    Acute multiple cranial neuropathies are considered as variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, which are immune-mediated diseases triggered by various cases. It is a rare disease which is related to infectious, inflammatory or systemic diseases. According to previous case reports, those affected can exhibit almost bilateral facial nerve palsy, then followed by bulbar dysfunctions (cranial nerves IX and X) accompanied by limb weakness and walking difficulties due to motor and/or sensory dysfunctions. Furthermore, reported cases of the acute multiple cranial neuropathies show electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with the typical Guillain-Barre syndromes (GBS). We recently experienced a patient with a benign infectious disease who subsequently developed symptoms of variant GBS. Here, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male patient who developed multiple symptoms of cranial neuropathy without limb weakness. His laboratory findings showed a positive result for anti-GQ1b IgG antibody. As compared with previously described variants of GBS, the patient exhibited widespread cranial neuropathy, which included neuropathies of cranial nerves III-XII, without limb involvement or ataxia.

  19. Cranial nerve vascular compression syndromes of the trigeminal, facial and vago-glossopharyngeal nerves: comparative anatomical study of the central myelin portion and transitional zone; correlations with incidences of corresponding hyperactive dysfunctional syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu, Bulent; Sindou, Marc; Meyronet, David; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Simon, Emile; Mertens, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomy of the central myelin portion and the central myelin-peripheral myelin transitional zone of the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves from fresh cadavers. The aim was also to investigate the relationship between the length and volume of the central myelin portion of these nerves with the incidences of the corresponding cranial dysfunctional syndromes caused by their compression to provide some more insights for a better understanding of mechanisms. The trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves from six fresh cadavers were examined. The length of these nerves from the brainstem to the foramen that they exit were measured. Longitudinal sections were stained and photographed to make measurements. The diameters of the nerves where they exit/enter from/to brainstem, the diameters where the transitional zone begins, the distances to the most distal part of transitional zone from brainstem and depths of the transitional zones were measured. Most importantly, the volume of the central myelin portion of the nerves was calculated. Correlation between length and volume of the central myelin portion of these nerves and the incidences of the corresponding hyperactive dysfunctional syndromes as reported in the literature were studied. The distance of the most distal part of the transitional zone from the brainstem was 4.19  ±  0.81 mm for the trigeminal nerve, 2.86  ±  1.19 mm for the facial nerve, 1.51  ±  0.39 mm for the glossopharyngeal nerve, and 1.63  ±  1.15 mm for the vagus nerve. The volume of central myelin portion was 24.54  ±  9.82 mm(3) in trigeminal nerve; 4.43  ±  2.55 mm(3) in facial nerve; 1.55  ±  1.08 mm(3) in glossopharyngeal nerve; 2.56  ±  1.32 mm(3) in vagus nerve. Correlations (p  nerves and incidences of the corresponding diseases. At present it is rather well-established that primary trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and vago

  20. MR image analysis of cranial nerve involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma%鼻咽癌脑神经受累的MR影像分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴刚毅; 王仁生; 覃玉桃; 马姗姗; 肖帅; 黄国军; 孙丕云

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨鼻咽癌MR脑神经受累的常见部位和诊断标准.方法:回顾性分析23例有脑神经症状的初治鼻咽癌脑神经受累的MR 表现和部位.结果:20例海绵窦受累(双侧受累13例),Meckel腔受累8例(双侧受累1例),14例圆孔扩大,20例卵圆孔扩大,10例翼腭窝脂肪间隙消失,12例翼内肌和翼外肌之间脂肪间歇受累,6例眶上裂增宽,11例眶下裂增宽,8例舌下神经孔肿块占位,1例颈静脉孔肿块占位.结论:MR可显示鼻咽癌脑神经受累,有助于准确分期、精确勾画靶区.%OBJECTIVE:To evaluate MR of nasopharyngeal carcinoma common site of cranial nerve involvement and diagnostic criteria. METHODS: Retrospective analysis the MR performance and position of cranial nerve involvement in 23 cases with cranial nerve symptoms who were first diagnosed as nasopharyngeal carcinoma was performed. RESULTS: Totally 20 patients with cavernous sinus invasion (13 cases with bilateral invasion), Meckel cavity invasion in 8 cases(1 case with bilateral invasion), foramen rotundum expansion in 14 cases and foramen ovale expansion in 20 cases, 10 cases of disappearance of fat space pterygopalatine fossa, 12 cases of involvement of fat space between musculi pterygoideus internus and musculi pterygoideus, 6 cases of fissurae orbitalis superior widened, 11 cases of fissurae orbitalis inferior widened, 8 cases of mass occupying the hypoglossal nerve, one case of jugular foramen mass occupying. CONCLUSION: MR can show nasopharyngeal cranial nerve involvement, and help us accurate staging and precise outline target.

  1. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the skull. This is one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement. Causes may include: Brain aneurysm Infections Abnormal blood vessels (vascular malformations) Sinus thrombosis Tissue damage from loss of blood flow (infarction) Trauma (from ...

  2. The distribution of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, cranial and spinal nerves of frog, Microhyla ornata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhao, Arun G; Biswas, Saikat P; Bhoyar, Rahul C; Pinelli, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) enzymatic activity has been reported in few amphibian species. In this study, we report its unusual localization in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, cranial nerves, spinal nerves, and ganglions of the frog, Microhyla ornata. In the rhombencephalon, at the level of facial and vagus nerves, the NADPH-d labeling was noted in the nucleus of the abducent and facial nerves, dorsal nucleus of the vestibulocochlear nerve, the nucleus of hypoglossus nerve, dorsal and lateral column nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the dorsal field of spinal grey, the lateral and medial motor fields of spinal grey and radix ventralis and dorsalis (2-10). Many ependymal cells around the lining of the fourth ventricle, both facial and vagus nerves and dorsal root ganglion, were intensely labeled with NADPH-d. Most strikingly the NADPH-d activity was seen in small and large sized motoneurons in both medial and lateral motor neuron columns on the right and left sides of the brain. This is the largest stained group observed from the caudal rhombencephalon up to the level of radix dorsalis 10 in the spinal cord. The neurons were either oval or elongated in shape with long processes and showed significant variation in the nuclear and cellular diameter. A massive NADPH-d activity in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, and spinal nerves implied an important role of this enzyme in the neuronal signaling as well as in the modulation of motor functions in the peripheral nervous systems of the amphibians. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comparative Morphometric Analysis of Three Cranial Nerves in Two Phocids: The Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata) and the Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlert, Dennis; Kröger, Jürgen; Witt, Martin; Schmitt, Oliver; Wree, Andreas; Czech-Damal, Nicole; Siebert, Ursula; Folkow, Lars; Hanke, Frederike D

    2016-03-01

    While our knowledge about the senses of pinnipeds has increased over the last decades almost nothing is known about the organization of the neuroanatomical pathways. In a first approach to this field of research, we assessed the total number of myelinated axons of three cranial nerves (CNs) in the harbor (Phoca vitulina, Pv) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata, Cc). Axons were counted in semithin sections of the nerves embedded in Epon and stained with toluidine blue. In both species, the highest axon number was found within the optic nerve (Pv 187,000 ± 8,000 axons, Cc 481,600 ± 1,300 axons). Generally, considering absolute axon numbers, far more axons were counted within the optic and trigmenial nerve (Pv 136,700 ± 2,500 axons, Cc 179,300 ± 6,900 axons) in hooded in comparison to harbor seals. The axon counts of the vestibulocochlear nerve are nearly identical for both species (Pv 87,100 ± 8,100 axons, Cc 86,600 ± 2,700 axons). However, when comparing cell density, the cell density is almost equal for all nerves for both species except for the optic nerve in which cell density was particularly higher than in the other nerves and higher in hooded in comparison to harbor seals. We here present the first comparative analysis of three CNs in two phocid seals. While the CNs of these closely related species share some general characteristics, pronounced differences in axon numbers/densities are apparent. These differences seem to reflect differences in e.g. size, habitat, and/or functional significance of the innervated sensory systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Analysis of cranial nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy%颈动脉内膜切除术后脑神经损伤的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪韬; 宋刚; 谌燕飞; 王亚冰; 马妍; 焦力群

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析单中心接受颈动脉内膜切除术( CEA)后患者的脑神经损伤发生率,并探讨其与手术经验的相关性。方法回顾性分析2001年1月-2013年12月于首都医科大学宣武医院接受CEA治疗的颈动脉狭窄598例患者的资料,术后7 d根据临床症状评估脑神经损伤的发生情况,并进行1、3、6、12个月的随访,评估永久性脑神经损伤的发生率。将患者进一步按2001年1月-2011年9月和2011年10月-2013年12月两个时间段分析脑神经损伤的发生率。结果(1)连续纳入行CEA治疗患者共598例,共15例(2.5%)发生脑神经损伤,包括2例(0.3%)面神经、7例(1.2%)舌下神经和6例(1.0%)迷走神经损伤,术后6个月仅1例(0.2%)未完全恢复。(2)2001年1月-2011年9月和2011年10月-2013年12月两个时间段,患者脑神经损伤分别为10例(3.2%,10/308)和5例(1.7%,5/290),差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论 CEA后脑神经损伤总发生率较低,大部分患者3个月内可完全恢复。随着手术经验的增长,CEA后脑神经损伤发生率未明显改善。%Objectives To analyze the incidence of cranial nerve injury in patients after receiving carotid endarterectomy ( CEA) in a single-center and to investigate its correlation with surgical experiences. Methods The clinical data of patients underwent CEA at Beijing Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University from January. 2001 to December 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Cranial nerve injury was assessed at day 7 after procedure according to the clinical symptoms,and they were followed up at 1,3,6, and 12 months. The incidence of permanent cranial nerve injury was evaluated. The incidences of permanent cranial nerve injury were further analyzed at two time periods ( from January 2001 to September 2011 and from October 2011 to December 2013 ) . Results ( 1 ) A total of 598 consecutive patients treated with CEA were enrolled,and 15 (2. 5%) of them had cranial nerve injury

  5. 3T MRI and 128-slice dual-source CT cisternography images of the cranial nerves a brief pictorial review for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Martinez-Anda, Jaime J; Corona-Cedillo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    There is a broad community of health sciences professionals interested in the anatomy of the cranial nerves (CNs): specialists in neurology, neurosurgery, radiology, otolaryngology, ophthalmology, maxillofacial surgery, radiation oncology, and emergency medicine, as well as other related fields. Advances in neuroimaging using high-resolution images from computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) have made highly-detailed visualization of brain structures possible, allowing normal findings to be routinely assessed and nervous system pathology to be detected. In this article we present an integrated perspective of the normal anatomy of the CNs established by radiologists and neurosurgeons in order to provide a practical imaging review, which combines 128-slice dual-source multiplanar images from CT cisternography and 3T MR curved reconstructed images. The information about the CNs includes their origin, course (with emphasis on the cisternal segments and location of the orifices at the skull base transmitting them), function, and a brief listing of the most common pathologies affecting them. The scope of the article is clinical anatomy; readers will find specialized texts presenting detailed information about particular topics. Our aim in this article is to provide a helpful reference for understanding the complex anatomy of the cranial nerves. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Microvascular decompression in treating cranial nerve diseases%微血管减压术治疗颅神经疾病疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志强; 黄涛; 罗小川; 谢才军; 谢绍盈; 沈有碧; 隋立森; 韩富

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the efficacy of microvascular decompression in treating cranial nerve diseases. Methods 156 patients were treated with microvaseular decompression,of whom 119 were with trigeminal neuralgia,34 with hemifacial spasm and three with glossopharyngeal neuralgia.Rusults The overall effective rate was 96.8%(151/156) and the corresponding effective rate for the above three conditions were 94.2%,97.1% and 66.7%. Conlusions Mierovaseular decompression iS an effective treatment for cranial nerve diseases.%目的 探讨微血管减压术治疗三叉神经痛、面肌痉挛、舌咽神经痛的疗效. 方法 微血管减压手术治疗颅神经疾病156例(三叉神经痛119例,面肌痉挛34例,舌咽神经痛3例). 结果 总有效151例,有效率96.8%,其中三又神经痛、面肌痉挛和舌咽神经痛患者手术有效率分别为94.2%、97.1%和66.7%. 结论 微血管减压术治疗颅神经疾病疗效确切.

  7. One case report of pharyngeal bursa invasive fungal disease with lower cranial nerve involvement as the first manifestation%以后组脑神经受累为首要表现的咽囊侵袭性真菌病1例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静; 袁虎

    2013-01-01

    To increase the identification of pharyngeal bursa invasive fungal disease with lower cranial nerve involvement,reduce the misdiagnosis and improve the awareness of invasive fungal disease.We report the clinical data of a case with lower cranial nerve involvement as the first manifestation and reviewed the related literature.

  8. Ultrastructure of cranial nerves of rats inoculated with rabies virus Ultraestrutura de nervos cranianos de ratos inoculados com o vírus da raiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilberto Minguetti

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The V and VII cranial nerves of rats inoculated with rabies virus were studied by electron microscopy. The results were compared with the same cranial nerves of rats inoculated with rabies virus but vaccinated against the disease. The findings are those of axonal degeneration and intense demyelination of the nerves of the group of rats not vaccinated. The vaccinated rats showed some ultrastructural irrelevant alterations when compared with the other group. The degree of ultrastructural alterations found in the group of rats not vaccinated suggests that in rabies severe damage of the cranial nerves occurs and that this may be closely related to the clinical picture of the disease (hydrophobia. Furthermore, as far as the authors know, this has not been considered in the classic descriptions of rabies and it is possible that an immunologic process may take part in the demyelination observed in the present study.Os autores estudaram o quinto e o sétimo nervos cranianos de ratos inoculados com o vírus da raiva. Os resultados foram comparados com os mesmos nervos cranianos de ratos inoculados com o vírus da raiva, porém vacinados contra a doença. Os achados no grupo não vacinado foram de degeneração axonal e intensa desmielinização dos nervos examinados. No grupo vacinado foram encontrados apenas discretas alterações da mielina, sem relevância do ponto de vista patológico. As grandes alterações ultraestruturais encontradas no grupo de ratos não vacinados sugerem que na raiva ocorram acentuadas alterações nos nervos cranianos e que tais alterações devem estar intimamente relacionadas ao quadro clínico da doença (hidrofobia. Além disso, é possível que tais alterações estejam associadas a um processo imunológico responsável também por acometimento sistêmico dos nervos periféricos.

  9. Early trigeminal nerve involvement in Listeria monocytogenes rhombencephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, William K; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Roed, Casper

    2017-01-01

    dysfunction on that side. In addition, we identified another 120 cases of Listeria rhombencephalitis following a systematic review. Cranial nerves VII, V, IX, and X, respectively, medulla oblongata, cerebellum and pons, were the most frequently involved brain structures. The present clinical and radiological...... findings corroborate earlier data from animal experiments, indicating that L. monocytogenes may be capable of retrograde intra-axonal migration along the cranial nerves. We suggest that in a subset of patients with rhombencephalitis L. monocytogenes enters the cerebellopontine angle through the trigeminal......Listeria monocytogenes is associated with rhombencephalitis. However, the exact mechanisms of brainstem invasion remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate clinical and radiological data suggesting that Listeria may invade the brainstem via the trigeminal nerve. Three females (41, 64 and 70...

  10. Analysis of cranial nerve growthine improving quality of life in cerebral infarction%脑神经生长素治疗脑梗死患者生存质量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建农; 刘建新

    2002-01-01

    Background: Cranial nerve growthine (CNG) is a kind of new biochemical drug containing many special neuroactive substances which have a good therapeutic effect in cerebrovascular diseases, and can distinctly improve quality of life for patients with cerebral infarction. The quality of life is an improtant factor for rehabilitation,it is life satisfaction, psychological well being,happiness,adaptation and mental health.

  11. Superior and anterior inferior cerebellar arteries and their relationship with cerebello-pontine angle cranial nerves revisited in the light of cranial cephalometric indexes: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Zohreh; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Maleki, Farid; Tabatabai, Seyed

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to clarify the anatomical features of the superior and anterior inferior cerebellar arteries in relation to the trigeminal nerve and acoustic-facial complex and to the bony structures of the skull in a sample of male Iranian cadavers. Bilateral dissections, calvariectomy, and brain evacuation were performed on 31 adult human fresh brains and skull bases to assess the neurovascular associations, and skull base morphometry. Equations were defined to estimate posterior fossa volume and the relationships between bony and neurovascular elements. Eight SCAs were duplicated from origin. There were 9 cases of SCA-trigeminal contacts, which were at the root entry zone in 7. Mean distance from the origin of AICA to the vertebrobasilar junction was 11.80 mm, while 79% of AICAs originated from the lower half of the BA. This was significantly associated with "posterior fossa funneling" and "basilar narrowing" indexes. In most cases AICA crossed the acoustic-facial complex and coursed between neural bundles (48.3%). The AICA reached or entered the internal acoustic canal in 22.6% of cases and was medial to porous in 77.4%. We documented anatomical variations of the superior and anterior inferior cerebellar arteries along with some cephalometric equations with relevant neurovascular anatomy in Iranian cadavers.

  12. Modified three-dimensional skull base model with artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, and venous sinuses for training in skull base surgery: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Oyama, Kazutaka; Ueno, Hideaki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Honma, Keiichirou

    2008-12-01

    Experience with dissection of the cavernous sinus and the temporal bone is essential for training in skull base surgery, but the opportunities for cadaver dissection are very limited. A modification of a commercially available prototype three-dimensional (3D) skull base model, made by a selective laser sintering method and incorporating surface details and inner bony structures such as the inner ear structures and air cells, is proposed to include artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, venous sinuses, and the internal carotid artery for such surgical training. The transpetrosal approach and epidural cavernous sinus surgery (Dolenc's technique) were performed on this modified model using a high speed drill or ultrasonic bone curette under an operating microscope. The model could be dissected in almost the same way as a real cadaver. The modified 3D skull base model provides a good educational tool for training in skull base surgery.

  13. Caring for patientssuffered from cranial nerve damage caused dysphagia%后组颅神经损伤致吞咽障碍的康复护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚莉娟

    2014-01-01

    目的:对后组颅神经损伤导致吞咽障碍的患者早期进行康复护理的效果观察。方法对35例神经外科手术术后,后组颅神经损伤患者进行吞咽功能康复护理,4周后观察患者吞咽功能的改善情况。结果35例患者中基本痊愈15例,明显好转11例,好转5例,无效4例,总有效率88.6%。结论系统、早期康复护理对患者吞咽功能的恢复有促进作用。%Objective To observe the effects of early rehabilitation nursing for patients suffered from dysphagia caused by the injury of lower cranial nerves .Methods The swallowing rehabilitation care were used on 35 cases of patients who suffered from dysphagia caused by the injury of lower cranial nerves .The improvement degrees in swallowing function of patients were observed and analyzed after 4 weeks of care .Results 15 cases in all the 35 patients were recovery , 11 cases were improved obviously , 5 cases were improved , and the remaining 4 cases were invalid.The total effective rate was 88.6%.Conclusions The systematic and early rehabilitation nursing care could promote swallowing recovery significantly on the patients with dysphagia .

  14. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Strabismus Treatment in Third Cranial Nerve Palsy during a 10-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bagheri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgical management of strabismus in patients with third nerve palsy is difficult and challenging, however the majority of patients achieve ideal results with appropriate and stepwise surgical plans.

  15. 鼻咽癌颅神经损伤程度分级与T分期的关系%Correlation of cranial nerve injury severity and the T stage of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文瑾; 周同冲; 席红利; 余宏伟; 王敏; 林晓丹

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between the severity of cranial nerve injury and nasopharyngeal carcinoma prognosis. Methods 165 patients diagnosed as NPC with the cranial nerve injury were admitted into the Cancer Center of Guangzhou Medical University from January 2005 to December 2009. The severity of the cranial nerve injury and the prognosis and T stage of NPC were analyzed. Results 165 patients diagnosed as NPC with the cranial nerve injury. 68 patients had single cranial nerve injury, and 97 patients had multiple cranial nerves injury. In 68 patients had single cranial nerve injury , the abducens nerve involvement was the most common one. Survival rate was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method;the 5-year overall survival rates of the two groups were 69.8%and 54.3%, respectively (P=0.033),and the differences were compared by using the log-rank test. Conclusion Quantity of the cranial nerve involvement was significantly correlated with Prognosis , and it is necessary to establish proper staging criteria of cranial nerve involved.%目的:探讨颅神经损伤程度分级与鼻咽癌患者预后的关系。方法收集2005年1月至2009年12月广州医科大学附属肿瘤医院初治伴颅神经损伤鼻咽癌患者165例,分析颅神经损伤程度与鼻咽癌远期生存的关系及其对T分期的影响。结果165例颅神经损伤患者中,单支颅神经受损患者68例,多支颅神经同时受损患者97例,68例单支颅神经损伤患者中以外展神经损伤最为常见,发生率为47.1%(32/68)。生存率的计算采用Kaplan-Meier法,单支颅神经损伤患者5年总生存率为69.8%,多支颅神经损伤患者5年总生存率为54.3%,通过log-rank法进行生存率的显著性检验,两组差异有统计学意义(P=0.033)。结论鼻咽癌患者颅神经损伤数目与预后显著相关。在鼻咽癌T分期中对颅神经损伤进行适当的程度分级有进一步研究的必要。

  16. Human primitive meninges in and around the mesencephalic flexure and particularly their topographical relation to cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kwang Ho; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Han, Eui Hyeog; Verdugo-López, Samuel; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2010-09-20

    Development of the meninges in and around the plica ventralis encephali has not been well documented. A distinct mesenchymal structure, the so-called plica ventralis encephali, is sandwiched by the fetal mesencephalic flexure. We histologically examined paraffin-embedded sections from 18 human embryos and fetuses at 6-12 weeks of gestation. In the loose tissues of the plica, the first meninx appeared as a narrow membrane along the oculomotor nerve at 7-8 weeks. Subsequently, the plica ventralis evolved into 3 parts: bilateral lateral mesenchymal condensations and a primitive membranous meninx extending between. Notably, the topographical anatomy of the oculomotor, trochlear and trigeminal nerves did not change: the oculomotor nerve ran along the rostral aspect of the membranous meninx, the trigeminal nerve ran along the caudal side of the lateral mesenchymal condensation, and the trochlear nerve remained embedded in the lateral condensation. Up to 9-10 weeks, the lateral mesenchymal condensations became tongue-like folds; i.e., the primitive form of the tentorium cerebelli, while the membranous meninx became the diaphragma sellae. The falx cerebri seemed to develop from the tongue-like folds. Overall, the final tentorium cerebelli corresponded to the regressed plica ventralis, while the parasellar area originated from the base of the plica and other tissues along the ventral aspects of the basisphenoid and basioccipital. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors and prognostic analysis of cranial nerve impairment in 121 patients with tuberculous meningitis%结核性脑膜炎患者颅神经损伤的相关因素及转归

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林仕忠; 张彦亮; 金嘉琳; 陈澍; 翁心华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors associated with cranial nerve impairment in patients with tuberculous meningitis.Methods A total of 121 patients with tuberculous meningitis who were admitted to Huashan Hospital from 2000 to 2011 were reviewed retrospectively.Demographic data (gender,age),course of disease,initial results of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) tests,occurrence of cranial nerve impairment and prognosis of these patients were collected.All the patients were followed up for at least 3 months,and for those with cranial nerve impairment,the minimum follow-up period was 1 year in order to judge the recovery of cranial nerve impairment.Multivariate analysis was performed to study the associated risk factors.Results Out of 121 patients,22 (18.2 %)developed cranial nerve impairment.Nerves involved were abducens nerve,oculomotor nerve,optic nerve and auditory nerve,and impairment of single nerve occurred in 9 (40.9 %),8 (36.4 %),7(31.8%) and 1(4.5%) patient,respectively.Three cases had more than one group of cranial nerves involved,accounting for 13.6% of the 22 patients with cranial nerve impairment.The incidence of conscious disturbance was significantly higher in patients with cranial nerve impairment than those without impairment (77 % vs 45 %,P=0.020).Delay in diagnosis (OR =1.017,95 % CI:1.001-1.033,P=0.040) and occurrence of conscious disturbance (OR =3.242,95 % CI:1.142-9.205,P=0.027) were independent predictive factors of cranial nerve injury.During one-year follow-up,90.9% of patients were fully recovered from cranial nerve impairment,with a median duration of 1 month (range 0.5-6.0 months).Conclusions Cranial nerve impairment is a common complication in patients with tuberculous meningitis.Delay in diagnosis and occurrence of conscious disturbance were independent predictive factors.Most cranial nerve impairment were reversible,and timely diagnosis and treatment are important ways to reduce complications.%目的 了解结

  18. [Positional damage of the sciatic nerve during neurosurgical intervention into the posterior cranial fossa in the sitting position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, A N; Lubnin, A Iu; Shimanskiĭ, V N; Kolycheva, M V; Ogurtsova, A A; Grigorian, A A

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a rare case of severe, but reversible bilateral damage to the sciatic nerve (compression neuropathy) in a patient with Blumenbach's clivus meningioma developing during 12-hour operation removing the tumor in the patient's sitting position on the operating table. The etiology and prevention of this complication are discussed.

  19. ["Left hemicranium, the cranial nerves" by Tramond: An anatomical model in wax from the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière's Museum in Paris: description and tri-dimensional photographic reconstruction (TDPR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravey, S; Le Floch-Prigent, P

    2011-06-01

    An anatomical model in wax made by Tramond (middle of the 19th century) represented the cranial nerves of a left hemicranium. The aim of the study was to verify its anatomical veracity, to realize a tri-dimensional visualization by computer, and finally to numerize and to diffuse it to the general public in the purpose of culture on the internet. The model belonged to the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière Museum (Paris Descartes university). It represented the cranial nerves especially the facial and the trigeminal nerves and their branches. To perform the photographic rotation every 5° along 360°, we used a special device made of two identical superimposed marble disks linked by a ball bearing. A digital camera and the Quick Time Virtual Reality software were used. Seventy-two pictures were shot. This wax was realized with a great morphological accuracy from a true cranium as a support for the cranial nerves. The work of numerization and its free diffusion on the Internet permitted to deliver to everybody the images of this sample of the collection of the Orfila Museum, the pieces of which were evacuated on December 2009 after its closure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [Invasive aspergillosis of sphenoidal sinus in a patient in Djibouti, revealed by palsy of cranial nerves: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crambert, A; Gauthier, J; Vignal, R; Conessa, C; Lombard, B

    2013-05-01

    The authors report a case of invasive aspergillosis of a sphenoid sinus mucocele revealed in a patient with diabetes in Djibouti by homolateral palsy of the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th nerves. This rare condition occurs preferentially in immunodeficient subjects. Because of its clinical polymorphism, its diagnosis is difficult and is often not made until complications develop. Endonasal surgery with anatomopathological and mycological examination is both a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. It must be performed early, to avoid functional or even life-threatening complications.

  1. Added value of contrast-enhanced CISS imaging in relation to conventional MR images for the evaluation of intracavernous cranial nerve lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Akiko; Takahashi, Ayako; Morita, Hideo; Amanuma, Makoto; Endo, Keigo [Gunma University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Sato, Noriko [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Takeuchi, K. [Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, Department of Health and Welfare, Gunma (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The normal cranial nerves (CNs) of the cavernous sinus can be clearly demonstrated using contrast-enhanced constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study used the method to evaluate pathological CNs III, IV, V{sub 1}, V{sub 2}, and VI in cavernous sinuses affected by inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. MR images from 17 patients with diseases involving the cavernous sinuses and/or causing neuropathy in CNs III-VI were retrospectively evaluated. The patients were divided into inflammatory (n = 11) and neoplastic (n = 6) groups. We defined CNs as abnormal when they exhibited enlargement or enhancement. CNs were evaluated using both contrast-enhanced CISS and T1-weighted MRI. In the inflammatory group, abnormal CNs were identified by contrast-enhanced CISS MRI in 13 of 25 symptomatic CNs (52%) in eight patients, but in only two CNs (8%) in two patients by contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In the neoplastic group, both sequences of contrast-enhanced CISS and T1-weighted MRI detected abnormalities in the same three of eight symptomatic CNs (37.5%), i.e., the three CNs were all in the same patient with adenoid cystic carcinoma. Contrast-enhanced CISS MRI is useful for detecting CN abnormalities in inflammatory pathological conditions of the cavernous sinuses. (orig.)

  2. ANCA-Negative Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Presenting with Hypertrophic Cranial Pachymeningitis, Abducens Nerve Palsy, and Stenosis of the Internal Carotid Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Harabuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA presenting with hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP, abducens nerve palsy, and stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA. A 59-year-old Japanese man presented with a year history of nasal obstruction and a 2-month history of slight headache. Histopathological examination of the granulomatous mucosa in the ethmoid sinuses resected by endoscopic sinus surgery revealed necrotizing vasculitis with multinucleated giant cells. The patient was diagnosed with the limited form of GPA as a result of the systemic examination. He declined immunosuppressive treatment. Eighteen months after the diagnosis of GPA, he presented with diplopia and severe headache. Though nasal findings indicating GPA were not observed in the nasal cavity, CT scan revealed a lesion of the right sphenoid sinus eroding the bone of the clivus. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the brain showed thickening of the dura mater around the right cavernous sinus and clivus. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography revealed narrowing at the C5 portion of the ICA. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone and cyclophosphamide resolved headache and dramatically improved HCP and stenosis of the ICA.

  3. Chronological changes in the eighth cranial nerve compound action potential (CAP) in experimental endolymphatic hydrops: the effects of altering the polarity of click sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizono, Tetsuo; Kondo, Tsuyoshi; Yamano, Takafumi; Miyagi, Morimichi; Shiraishi, Kimio

    2009-02-01

    Using a guinea pig model of experimental endolymphatic hydrops, click sounds of altered polarity showed different latencies and amplitudes in hydropic compared with normal cochleae. Latency changes appeared as early as 1 week after endolymphatic obstruction. This method can help diagnose endolymphatic hydrops. The goal of the study was to develop an objective electrophysiological diagnosis of endolymphatic hydrops. Endolymphatic hydrops were created surgically in guinea pigs. The latency and the amplitude of the eighth cranial nerve compound action potential (CAP) for click sounds of altered polarity were measured up to 8 weeks after the surgery. At early stages after surgery, the latency for condensation clicks became longer, and at later stages the latencies for both condensation and rarefaction became longer. The discrepancy in the latencies for rarefaction and condensation click sounds (rarefaction minus condensation) became larger by the first week after surgery, but no further discrepancy occurred thereafter. Compared with latency changes, amplitude changes in the CAP were rapid and progressive following surgery, suggesting ongoing damage to hair cells.

  4. 硬脑膜动静脉瘘Onyx栓塞术后三叉神经与面神经损伤一例%The report of multiple cranial nerve injury of dural arteriovenous fistulas treated with Onyx embolization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊敏; 王晓鹏; 王晓阳; 王林静; 姚园园; 闫妍; 陈蕾

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the cause of multiple cranial nerve injury after dural arteriovenous fistulas treated with Onyx embolization.Methods Communicate with pathogenesis,clinical symptom,arterial anastomosis,analysis of clinical data that multiple cranial nerve injury after dural arteriovenous fistulas(cavernous sinus) treated with Onyx embolization.Results The patient treated with Onyx embolization who developed trigeminal nerve and facial nerve injury.Conclusion The multiple cranial nerve injury after dural arteriovenous fistulas treated with Onyx embolization maybe attributed to some reflux of Onyx interruption of the nutrient vessel and dimethyl sulfoxide which exhibited high local toxicity.%目的:探讨硬脑膜动静脉瘘(DAVFs)Onyx栓塞术后并发三叉神经与面神经损伤的原因。方法分析1例DAVFs(海绵窦区)Onyx栓塞术后多发三叉神经与面神经损伤的临床资料,结合病因、临床表现、相应血管吻合。结果患者Onyx栓塞术后出现三叉神经及面神经损伤。结论硬脑膜动静脉瘘Onyx栓塞术后三叉神经与面神经的损伤与Onyx逆流阻塞相应脑神经的滋养动脉及二甲基亚砜的局部毒性有关。

  5. Ⅲ~Ⅴ对脑神经生物塑化薄片断层解剖与MRI对照研究%A comparative study on sectional anatomy of the cranial nerves between MRI and plastination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟国; 张绍祥; 巫北海; 陈金华; 谭立文

    2001-01-01

    目的:对动眼神经、滑车神经、三叉神经进行塑化切片与MRI对照研究,获得正常影像和断层解剖资料。方法:采用生物塑化技术制作脑神经横断位8例、矢状位和冠状位各1例薄层切片,同时采用FLASH-3D序列完成头颅标本及30例正常人脑干MR扫描,以MPR技术完整显示动眼神经和三叉神经的脑池段全程。结果:塑化薄片断层、标本和活体MR扫描,脑神经行程、解剖形态均有良好的对应关系,滑车神经仅在塑化切片上显示。结论:生物塑化薄层切片能够对脑神经进行准确显示,是脑神经影像学研究的重要对比方法。%Objective: To obtain the normal image and sectional anatomical data of the oculomotor nerve, the trochlear nerve and the trigeminal nerve through the comparative study between MRI and plastination.Methods: The plastination slices of the nerves were made in 10 individuals (8 transversal, 1 sagittal and 1 coronal).Meanwhile, thirty volunteers and ten cadaveric specimens containing the brain-stem were scanned with FLASH-3D sequence, the whole intracisternal segment of the the oculomotor nerve and the trigeminal nerve were reconstructed with MPR.Results: Sectional plastination and MRI images of the nerves revealed the similar result, but the trochlear nerve was only defined on the plastination section. Conclusion: Plastination can demonstrate the cranial nerves accurately, so it is an important comparative studying method of the cranial nerves.

  6. Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MRI to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within dural reflections of posterior fossa cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, David J; Scoffings, Daniel; Ajithkumar, Thankamma; Williams, Michael V; Jefferies, Sarah J

    2016-11-01

    There is no consensus approach to covering skull base meningeal reflections-and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) therein-of the posterior fossa cranial nerves (CNs VII-XII) when planning radiotherapy (RT) for medulloblastoma and ependymoma. We sought to determine whether MRI and specifically fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences can answer this anatomical question and guide RT planning. 96 posterior fossa FIESTA sequences were reviewed. Following exclusions, measurements were made on the following scans for each foramen respectively (left, right); internal acoustic meatus (IAM) (86, 84), jugular foramen (JF) (83, 85) and hypoglossal canal (HC) (42, 45). A protocol describes measurement procedure. Two observers measured distances for five cases and agreement was assessed. One observer measured all the remaining cases. IAM and JF measurement interobserver variability was compared. Mean measurement difference between observers was -0.275 mm (standard deviation 0.557). IAM and JF measurements were normally distributed. Mean IAM distance was 12.2 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.8-15.6]; JF was 7.3 mm (95% CI 4.0-10.6). The HC was difficult to visualize on many images and data followed a bimodal distribution. Dural reflections of posterior fossa CNs are well demonstrated by FIESTA MRI. Measuring CSF extension into these structures is feasible and robust; mean CSF extension into IAM and JF was measured. We plan further work to assess coverage of these structures with photon and proton RT plans. Advances in knowledge: We have described CSF extension beyond the internal table of the skull into the IAM, JF and HC. Oncologists planning RT for patients with medulloblastoma and ependymoma may use these data to guide contouring.

  7. Therapeutic cranial nerve irradiation: results from a multi-center dose response study of radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondziolka, D; Flickinger, J; Lunsford, L D; Young, R; Vermeulen, S; Duma, C; Jacques, D B; Rand, R; Regis, J; Peragut, J C; Epstein, M H; Lindquist, C

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: We performed a multi-institution study to evaluate the technique, dose-selection parameters, and results of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of trigeminal neuralgia. We hypothesized that MRI-stereotactic targeting of the trigeminal nerve and irradiation with a single 4 mm isocenter, 2-4 mm anterior to the brainstem, could be a safe and effective treatment for this disorder. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients at five centers had radiosurgery using a single 4 mm isocenter targeted at the root entry zone. All patients had typical trigeminal neuralgia. The mean patient age was 70 years, (range, 40-87). Thirty-two patients had undergone prior surgery, and the mean number of procedures performed was 2.8 (range, 1-7). Eighteen patients (36%) had not had prior surgery before radiosurgery. Maximum radiosurgery doses included 60 Gy (n=8), 65 Gy (n=3), 70 Gy (n=27), 75 Gy (n=2), 80 Gy (n=6) and 90 Gy (n=4). All patients were discharged within 24 hours and were studied in regard to the degree of pain relief, latency interval to pain relief, sensory loss, and the need for further therapy. Mean follow-up after radiosurgery was 9.2 months (range, 2-26 months). Results: At last follow-up, 25 patients (50%) had excellent control (pain-free), 17 (34%) had good control (50-90% relief), and 8 (16%) had failed (see Figure). The median time to pain relief was one month. We identified an actuarial response rate of 53% for complete pain relief at seven months, and 93% for pain reduction (50-100% relief). At 18 months, these results declined to 48% and 77% respectively. A significantly greater proportion of patients receiving a radiosurgery maximum dose of {>=} 70 Gy achieved complete pain relief (63% vs. 18%) and >50% pain reduction (96% vs. 80%) than those with doses <70 Gy. Patients without prior surgery had significantly better outcomes in univariate testing. Three patients (6%) developed increased facial paresthesiae after radiosurgery

  8. Therapeutic cranial nerve irradiation: results from a multi-center dose response study of radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondziolka, D.; Flickinger, J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Young, R.; Vermeulen, S.; Duma, C.; Jacques, D.B.; Rand, R.; Regis, J.; Peragut, J.C.; Epstein, M.H.; Lindquist, C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: We performed a multi-institution study to evaluate the technique, dose-selection parameters, and results of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of trigeminal neuralgia. We hypothesized that MRI-stereotactic targeting of the trigeminal nerve and irradiation with a single 4 mm isocenter, 2-4 mm anterior to the brainstem, could be a safe and effective treatment for this disorder. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients at five centers had radiosurgery using a single 4 mm isocenter targeted at the root entry zone. All patients had typical trigeminal neuralgia. The mean patient age was 70 years, (range, 40-87). Thirty-two patients had undergone prior surgery, and the mean number of procedures performed was 2.8 (range, 1-7). Eighteen patients (36%) had not had prior surgery before radiosurgery. Maximum radiosurgery doses included 60 Gy (n=8), 65 Gy (n=3), 70 Gy (n=27), 75 Gy (n=2), 80 Gy (n=6) and 90 Gy (n=4). All patients were discharged within 24 hours and were studied in regard to the degree of pain relief, latency interval to pain relief, sensory loss, and the need for further therapy. Mean follow-up after radiosurgery was 9.2 months (range, 2-26 months). Results: At last follow-up, 25 patients (50%) had excellent control (pain-free), 17 (34%) had good control (50-90% relief), and 8 (16%) had failed (see Figure). The median time to pain relief was one month. We identified an actuarial response rate of 53% for complete pain relief at seven months, and 93% for pain reduction (50-100% relief). At 18 months, these results declined to 48% and 77% respectively. A significantly greater proportion of patients receiving a radiosurgery maximum dose of ≥ 70 Gy achieved complete pain relief (63% vs. 18%) and >50% pain reduction (96% vs. 80%) than those with doses <70 Gy. Patients without prior surgery had significantly better outcomes in univariate testing. Three patients (6%) developed increased facial paresthesiae after radiosurgery

  9. Value of cranial nerve involvement found on MRI in staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma%MRI诊断颅神经侵犯在鼻咽癌分期中意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗井凤; 潘建基; 林少俊; 陈韵彬; 张瑜; 徐鹭英; 郑飞; 郭巧娟; 许元基

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the value of cranial nerve involvement found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 816 patients with NPC initially diagnosed by MRI during 2005 -2007.The patients with stage T4 NPC were divided into cranial nerve subgroup,which was defined as patients who had cranial nerve involvement on MRI,but without cranial nerve palsy or other T4-related anatomical structure involvement,and other subgroup,which was defined as other patients with stage T4 NPC ;the patients with stage Ⅳ a NPC were divided into cranial nerve subgroup,which was defined as patients with T4N0-2 NPC who were classified into the cranial nerve subgroup of patients with stage T4 NPC,and other subgroup,which was defined as other patients with stage Ⅳa NPC.The survivals of the subgroups were compared.The Kaplan-Meier method was used for calculating survival rates,and the survival differences were analyzed by the log-rank test.Results The follow-up rate was 94.1%.Cranial nerve involvement was seen in 38.5% of all patients.Local recurrence-free survival,distant metastasis-free survival,and disease-related survival curves of patients with stage T2 and T3 NPC and the cranial nerve subgroup of patients with stage T4 NPC coincided,but they were separated from the curves of the other subgroup of patients with stage T4 NPC.There was no significant difference in 5-year disease-related survival rate between the cranial nerve subgroup of patients with stage Ⅳa NPC and the patients with stage Ⅲ NPC (x2 =0.18,P =0.674),but significant differences were found when this subgroup was compared with patients with stage Ⅱ NPC (x2 =5.86,P =0.015) and the other subgroup of patients with stage Ⅳa NPC (x2 =7.23,P =0.007).Conclusions The patients with stage T4/Ⅳa NPC who have cranial nerve involvement on MRI,but without other T4-related anatomical structure involvement

  10. 微小后组脑神经鞘瘤七例报告%Clinical study of 7 cases of missed diagnosis of micro-tumor of cranial nerve sheath and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵奎明; 杨冬; 袁越; 张哲; 张黎; 于炎冰

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析临床罕见的微小后组脑神经鞘瘤的临床特点,探讨其临床症状、早期诊断、手术方法和疗效.方法 回顾性分析1999年9月至2009年8月我院治疗的7例临床漏诊的微小后组脑神经鞘瘤病例,总结其临床症状、早期诊断、手术方法及疗效,并结合文献进行分析.结果 本组病例中共有舌咽神经鞘瘤5例、迷走神经鞘瘤1例、舌下神经鞘瘤1例.肿瘤均完全切除.术后并发症包括一过性轻度面瘫、声音嘶哑2例、吞咽困难1例.结论 对出现后组脑神经症状的患者应考虑到后组脑神经鞘瘤的可能,尽快明确诊断并积极手术治疗可获得优良疗效,有利于患者的治疗和康复.%Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics of the rare micro-lower cranial nerve sheath tumor,and investigate the clinical symptoms,early treatment options,as well as surgical elements/effectiveness.Methods Seven missed diagnoses of micro-lower cranial nerve sheath tumor admitted to our department from October 1999 to August 2009 were analyzed retrospectively.Diagnosis,clinical characteristics,early treatment options,surgical elements and effectiveness were summarized and analyzed in combined with literature review.Results In this group of patients,there were 5 glossopharyngeal nerve sheath tumors,1 vagus nerve sheath tumor and 1 hypoglossal nerve sheath tumor.Total resections were achieved in all of the patients.Postoperative complications included 1 case of transient mild paralysis,2 cases of hoarseness and 1 case of dysphagia.Conclusions For patient with lower cranial nerve symptoms,nerve sheath tumors should be taken into consideration.Early diagnosis and effective surgery will contribute to patient's treatment and rehabilitation.

  11. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  12. Study of 3D-FIESTA+c in cranial nerves and its disease%采用3D-FIESTA+c影像分析脑神经及其病变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁殿秀; 苗延巍; 徐斌; 孙美玉; 唐乐梅; 吴春明

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the applying value of 3D-FIESTA+c MRI sequences for cranial nervesⅠ-Ⅻ.Methods 3D-FIESTA+c as used in 20 volunteers and 20 patients with complaint of cranial nerves.480 nerves were evaluated. Two radiologists independently divided the imaging findings in to 3 grades:completely visualized,partially visualized,and not visualized. The first two grades were defined as visualization and the last grade was no visualization.The relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels were divided into grades:notcontact, contact, compression.Results The rate of visualization of these cranial nerves with 3D-FIESTA+C sequences were as follows respectively: nerveⅠ(84.3%); nerveⅡ(100%); nerveⅢ(100%); nerveⅣ(43.8%); nerveⅤ(100%); nerveⅥ(100%); nerveⅦ(100%); nerveⅧ(100%); nerveⅨ-Ⅺcomplex(100%); nerveⅫ(47.1%).16 of 20 patients with complaint of cranial nerves displayed nerve had vascular compression or contact. Conclusions 3D-FIESTA+c sequence can show detailed anatomy of the cranial nerves and relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels,to help clinical treatment.%目的:评价高分辨率3D-FIESTA+c成像及图像处理技术显示脑神经及其病变的价值。方法采用3D-FIESTA+c对20例健康志愿者和20例临床疑是因血管等原因压迫相应脑神经具有临床症状的患者进行扫描及图像后处理。由2名神经放射学医师根据20名健康志愿者480支脑神经显示的清晰程度分为清晰、较清晰、不清晰3个等级,清晰和较清晰定义为显示,不清晰定义为未显示;临床病例中,脑神经与血管关系分为无接触、接触、压迫。结果12对脑神经显示率分别为:嗅神经84.3%,视神经100%,动眼神经100%,滑车神经43.8%,三叉神经100%,外展神经100%,面神经100%,前庭蜗神经100%,舌咽神经、迷走神经及副神经复合体100%,舌下神经47.1%。20例脑神经症状患者,16例确诊为脑神经与周围

  13. Leading research report for fiscal 1998 on the research of basic technologies of cranial nerve cell engineering; 1998 nendo noshinkei saibo kogaku kiban gijutsu no chosa kenkyu sendo kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Researches are conducted about the present and future of the research and development of elementary technological details for elucidating, from the viewpoint of the level of molecules or cells, the functions of neurons which are the basic elements of the cranial nerve circuit and for applying the results to cranial nerve cell engineering. It is then concluded that the most important and urgent is to 'develop basic technologies for understanding the functions of neural circuits so that a remedial step may be taken in the presence of a defect in a neural circuit and that electronic devices may be applied to help neural functions.' It is agreed that the most immediate and ripple-effective is to 'establish the technology of intelligent connection between electronic devices and neural circuits for the reconstruction of motor functions.' It is also concluded that, upon achievement of the above two goals, new basic technologies will become available for the moderation of problems in the sensor input and motor output systems by means of electronic circuits, for the improvement on efficiency of rehabilitation with the aid of electronics, for the cure of denatured nerves or a damaged spinal cord, for the study of neural circuits, etc., and that a new industrial series will be created through the utilization of the above-mentioned details. (NEDO)

  14. Leading research report for fiscal 1998 on the research of basic technologies of cranial nerve cell engineering; 1998 nendo noshinkei saibo kogaku kiban gijutsu no chosa kenkyu sendo kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Researches are conducted about the present and future of the research and development of elementary technological details for elucidating, from the viewpoint of the level of molecules or cells, the functions of neurons which are the basic elements of the cranial nerve circuit and for applying the results to cranial nerve cell engineering. It is then concluded that the most important and urgent is to 'develop basic technologies for understanding the functions of neural circuits so that a remedial step may be taken in the presence of a defect in a neural circuit and that electronic devices may be applied to help neural functions.' It is agreed that the most immediate and ripple-effective is to 'establish the technology of intelligent connection between electronic devices and neural circuits for the reconstruction of motor functions.' It is also concluded that, upon achievement of the above two goals, new basic technologies will become available for the moderation of problems in the sensor input and motor output systems by means of electronic circuits, for the improvement on efficiency of rehabilitation with the aid of electronics, for the cure of denatured nerves or a damaged spinal cord, for the study of neural circuits, etc., and that a new industrial series will be created through the utilization of the above-mentioned details. (NEDO)

  15. 后组脑神经和岩下窦的显微解剖学研究%Microsurgical Anatomy of the Lower Cranial Nerves and Inferior Petrosal Sinus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯文仲; 李国峰; 姚兴军

    2014-01-01

    目的:通过对颈静脉孔区后组脑神经及岩下窦的的显微镜下的解剖研究,为手术提供解剖学的依据。方法用10例(20侧)成人尸头在手术显微镜下重点观察了颈静脉孔区后组脑神经和岩下窦解剖结构。结果颈静脉孔分为岩部、乙状部及神经部。岩下窦会在不同水平汇入颈静脉系统。结论颈静脉孔区后组脑神经及岩下窦的结构复杂,详尽的解剖学研究有助于术中保护重要结构,减少术后并发症的发生率。%ObjectiveTo study the normal features of the lower cranial nerves and the IPS, and provide anatomic foundation to surgery.MethodsBy using microscopic skills, ten adult cadavers(20 sides)were used to observe the position of the cranial nerves and inferior petrosal sinus as they entered the jugular foramen.ResultThe jugular foramen is divided into the petrosal portion, the sigmoid portion and the intrajugular compartment. The inferior petrosal sinus may join the jugular venous system at any level.ConclusionsThe anatomic study of lower cranial nerves and the IPS are complex, detailed anatomic study is helpful to protect important structures, and may improve the success of surgery.

  16. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination.

  17. Anatomical details of the brainstem and cranial nerves visualized by high resolution readout-segmented multi-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted images using unidirectional MPG at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Kawai, Hisashi; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu; Isoda, Haruo

    2011-01-01

    We compared diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with readout-segmented multi-shot echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI) and single-shot EPI, both using unidirectional motion-probing gradient, in 10 patients for visualization of the anatomical structures in the brainstem. DWI by rs-EPI was significantly better than DWI by single-shot EPI for visualizing the medial longitudinal fasciculus, lateral lemniscus, corticospinal tract, and seventh/eighth cranial nerves and offered significantly less distortion of the brainstem. (author)

  18. Value of MR cisternography using three-dimensional half-fourier single-shot fast spin-echo sequences in the diagnosis of diseases related to cranial nerves VII and VIII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakami, Norio [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of MR cisternography using three-dimensional half-Fourier single-shot fast spin-echo sequences in the diagnosis of diseasea related to cranial nerves VII and VIII. With a 0.5-T imager, the most appropriate setting of echo time and section thickness was first assessed in five volunteers. This resulted in echo time of 250 msec and section thickness of 2 mm as the most effective parameters. Second, using echo time of 120 msec and section thickness of 1.5 mm that were available from the beginning of this study, the demonstration of four nerves within the audistory canal was assessed in seven volunteers. In all of the volunteers, the facial, cochlear, and vestibular nerves were determined with demonstration of each of superior and inferior vestibular nerves in four of them. Next, MR cisternography using the same echo time and section thickness was applied in 368 patients with suspicion of acoustic neurinoma and 14 with hemifacial spasm. In 28 of the 368 patients, MR cisternograms depicted an acoustic neurinoma that was confirmed on postcontrast T1-weighted images. Meanwhile, in five of the 14 patients with hemifacial spasm, MR cisternograms revealed a vessel compressing the root exit zone of the affected facial nerve. It is concluded that MR cisternography using three-dimensional half-Fourier single-shot fast spin-echo sequences can be a useful means for demonstrating nerves within the auditory nerve as well as for the screening of acoustic neurionoma. (author)

  19. Value of MR cisternography using three-dimensional half-fourier single-shot fast spin-echo sequences in the diagnosis of diseases related to cranial nerves VII and VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakami, Norio

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of MR cisternography using three-dimensional half-Fourier single-shot fast spin-echo sequences in the diagnosis of diseasea related to cranial nerves VII and VIII. With a 0.5-T imager, the most appropriate setting of echo time and section thickness was first assessed in five volunteers. This resulted in echo time of 250 msec and section thickness of 2 mm as the most effective parameters. Second, using echo time of 120 msec and section thickness of 1.5 mm that were available from the beginning of this study, the demonstration of four nerves within the audistory canal was assessed in seven volunteers. In all of the volunteers, the facial, cochlear, and vestibular nerves were determined with demonstration of each of superior and inferior vestibular nerves in four of them. Next, MR cisternography using the same echo time and section thickness was applied in 368 patients with suspicion of acoustic neurinoma and 14 with hemifacial spasm. In 28 of the 368 patients, MR cisternograms depicted an acoustic neurinoma that was confirmed on postcontrast T1-weighted images. Meanwhile, in five of the 14 patients with hemifacial spasm, MR cisternograms revealed a vessel compressing the root exit zone of the affected facial nerve. It is concluded that MR cisternography using three-dimensional half-Fourier single-shot fast spin-echo sequences can be a useful means for demonstrating nerves within the auditory nerve as well as for the screening of acoustic neurionoma. (author)

  20. Detection of third and sixth cranial nerve palsies with a novel method for eye tracking while watching a short film clip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Uzma; Farooq, Sameer; Ritlop, Robert; Warren, Floyd; Reyes, Marleen; Lamm, Elizabeth; Alex, Anastasia; Nehrbass, Elena; Kolecki, Radek; Jureller, Michael; Schneider, Julia; Chen, Agnes; Shi, Chen; Mendhiratta, Neil; Huang, Jason H; Qian, Meng; Kwak, Roy; Mikheev, Artem; Rusinek, Henry; George, Ajax; Fergus, Robert; Kondziolka, Douglas; Huang, Paul P; Smith, R Theodore

    2015-03-01

    Automated eye movement tracking may provide clues to nervous system function at many levels. Spatial calibration of the eye tracking device requires the subject to have relatively intact ocular motility that implies function of cranial nerves (CNs) III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), and VI (abducent) and their associated nuclei, along with the multiple regions of the brain imparting cognition and volition. The authors have developed a technique for eye tracking that uses temporal rather than spatial calibration, enabling detection of impaired ability to move the pupil relative to normal (neurologically healthy) control volunteers. This work was performed to demonstrate that this technique may detect CN palsies related to brain compression and to provide insight into how the technique may be of value for evaluating neuropathological conditions associated with CN palsy, such as hydrocephalus or acute mass effect. The authors recorded subjects' eye movements by using an Eyelink 1000 eye tracker sampling at 500 Hz over 200 seconds while the subject viewed a music video playing inside an aperture on a computer monitor. The aperture moved in a rectangular pattern over a fixed time period. This technique was used to assess ocular motility in 157 neurologically healthy control subjects and 12 patients with either clinical CN III or VI palsy confirmed by neuro-ophthalmological examination, or surgically treatable pathological conditions potentially impacting these nerves. The authors compared the ratio of vertical to horizontal eye movement (height/width defined as aspect ratio) in normal and test subjects. In 157 normal controls, the aspect ratio (height/width) for the left eye had a mean value ± SD of 1.0117 ± 0.0706. For the right eye, the aspect ratio had a mean of 1.0077 ± 0.0679 in these 157 subjects. There was no difference between sexes or ages. A patient with known CN VI palsy had a significantly increased aspect ratio (1.39), whereas 2 patients with known CN III

  1. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... face is tested by asking the person to smile, to open the mouth and show the teeth, ... by asking the person to walk a straight line. 9th Glossopharyngeal Swallowing, the gag reflex, and speech ...

  2. 海绵窦内颅神经血液供应显微外科解剖研究%The blood supply of the intracavernous cranial nerves: a microsurgical anatomy study.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建东; 惠国桢; 夏春林

    2001-01-01

    Objective To minimize injurying of the blood supply of intracavernous cranial nerves during microsurgical operation on cavernous sinus. Methods 50 adult cadaver brains include cavernous sinus were dissected in detail under anatomical microscope. Results (1) The oculomotor nerve received branches from the inferolateral trunk in 90% of the specimens. (2) The proximal trochlear nerver received branches from the inferolateral trunk in 74% of the specimens and from the tentorial artery of the meningohypophyseal trunk in 26%. The distal half was supplied mainly by the branches from the inferolateral trunk. (3) In the region of Dorellos canal, the proximal part of the abducens nerve received branches from the dorsal meningeal artery. The middle and distal parts received branches from the inferolateral trunk. (4) The ophthalmic and proximal maxillary segments of the trigeminal nerve received branches from the inferolateral trunk. The medial part of ganglion received branches from inferolateral trunk and the tentorial artery. The middle part of it received branches from the inferolateral trunk. The lateral part of it received branches from either the inferolateral trunk or the middle meningeal artery. Conclusions The inferolateral trunk play an important role in the blood supply of the intracavernous cranial nerves. We should preserve the blood supply to the cranial nerves during cavernous sinus surgery, thus minimizing postoperative cranial nerve deficits.%目的 为减少海绵窦显微外科手术时损伤海绵窦内颅神经血供而研究这些颅神经的血液供应解剖。方法 50具成人尸体海绵窦标本,在解剖显微镜下解剖和分析。结果 (1)90侧(占90%)的标本示动眼神经由颈内动脉的下外侧动脉分支供血;(2)滑车神经近段有74侧(占74%)的标本示其接受下外侧动脉的分支供血,有26侧(占26%)的标本示其接受脑膜垂体动脉分支天幕动脉的供血,滑车神经远段主要由

  3. 隐球菌性脑膜炎并发颅神经损伤的危险因素及预后因素分析%Cranial nerve impairment in cryptococcal meningitis: predictors and prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林苏; 张彦亮; 邵凌云; 黄玉仙; 张文宏; 翁心华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand the predictors and prognostic significance of cranial nerve impairment in non-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with cryptococcal meningitis.Methods A total of 145 non-AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis admitted to Huashan Hospital,Fudan University from Jan 2000 to Dec 2010 were reviewed retrospectively.Clinical characteristics,initial antifungal therapies and outcome of these patients were analyzed.Continuous variables were analyzed using t test and categorical variables were compared by x2 test or Fisher's exact test.Multivariate analysis was performed by binary Logistic regressions.Results Out of 145 patients,52 (35.9%) patients had cranial nerve impairment at enrollment.Optic (25/52,48.1%) and oculomotor (22/52,42.3%) nerves were the most commonly involved,followed by auditory (12/52,23.1%),abducens (6/52,11.5%),olfactory (4/52,7.7%) and facial (3/52,5.8%) nerves.The best predictive factor of cranial nerve injury was duration of diagnosis (OR =1.056,95% CI:1.002-1.111).The risk of cranial injury would increase by 5.6% with one-week delay of diagnosis.Intracranial hypertension and low cerebrospinal fluid cell count were also the independent predictive factors (both P<0.05).In the follow-up period,73.3% patients who had cranial nerve injuries were fully recovered,with a median time of 3 (0.5-24.0) months.The independent predictors of recovery were numbers of nerve involved (OR =0.230,95 % CI:0.066-0.800,P=0.021) and amphotericin B (AmB) plus 5-fluorocytosine,triazole antifungal agent therapy (OR=10.317,95%CI:2.086-51.025,P=0.004).Conclusions Cranial nerve impairment occurs in one-third of non-AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis.Delay in diagnosis,intracranial hypertension and low cerebrospinal fluid cell count are independent predictive factors.Less cranial nerve involvement and AmB plus triazole therapy predict recovery.%目的 了解非AIDS相关隐球菌性脑膜炎患者并发

  4. Anatomic study of the seventh and eighth cranial nerves complex and vestibular neurectomy%Ⅶ及Ⅷ脑神经复合束与前庭神经切断术的解剖研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡昌枰; 孙济治

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the anatomy of the seventh and eighth cranial nerves complex and select the approach for vestibular neurectomy. Methods Thirty-four fresh and fixed ears with soft tissues were used, the roof and posterior wall of the internal auditory canal being exposed. Results There are nerve anastomoses, fuse and rotation of the seventh and eighth cranial nerves complex from the fundus of the internal auditory canal to the brain stem. Cochleovestibular cleavage also changes in classification. Conclusion For reserving hearing in vestibular neurectomy, it is better to choose the apprach of exposing internal auditory canal.%目的 探讨Ⅶ、Ⅷ脑神经复合束的应用解剖与前庭神经切断术径路的关系。方法 选用新鲜或福尔马林固定的带软组织尸耳34只,采取从上向下和从后向前联合进路暴露内耳道的方式进行解剖学研究。结果 ①Ⅶ、Ⅷ脑神经复合束在由内耳道底向脑干行经过程中,存在着神经吻合、神经融合及神经旋转的独特现象;②耳蜗前庭裂亦存在3类变化。结论 保留听力的前庭神经切断术应尽量选择暴露内耳道的径路进行。

  5. Vasculopathic Cranial Ocular Motor Neuropathy Following Sudden Emotional Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Purvin, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    We describe three patients who experienced onset of a microvascular ocular motor nerve palsy in the setting of sudden emotional stress. Such emotional states are accompanied by a marked increase in sympathetic tone in some individuals. Mechanisms by which these autonomic changes might produce an ischemic cranial nerve palsy include intra-cranial vasoconstriction and transient systemic hypotension due to alterations in cardiac function.

  6. 弥散张量成像的脑神经示踪重建及临床应用研究%Three-dimensional reconstruction of cranial nerves and clinical exploration based on diffusion tensor tractography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马峻; 苏少波; 赵岩; 李勇刚; 岳树源

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨应用弥散张量成像进行脑神经(CNs)纤维束示踪、可视化重建的可行性,并尝试将其应用于颅底肿瘤术前规划.方法 利用3.0T磁共振对10例健康志愿者,10例颅底肿瘤患者进行稳态采集快速成像、弥散张量成像扫描,3D Slicer软件完成脑神经纤维示踪、重建,病变患者重建肿瘤三维影像,通过手术观察及神经电生理监测确认脑神经的位置.结果 CNⅡ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ、Ⅵ、Ⅶ~Ⅷ、Ⅹ、Ⅻ成像良好,肿瘤、水肿与相关脑神经的三维空间关系通过纤维示踪与三维重建得以呈现,经过手术验证准确无误.结论联合应用弥散张量成像及3D Slicer软件是正常及病理状态下脑神经可视化重建切实可行的方案,具有良好的临床应用前景.%Objective To investigate the feasibility of 3-dimensional reconstruction of cranial nerves (CNs) via diffusion imaging tractography,and attempt to apply in the preoperative plan of skull base tumor.Methods 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scans,including 3D-FSPGR,FIESTA and DTI,were used to collect information of 10 healthy subjects and 10 skull base tumor patients.DTI data were integrated into the 3D-Slicer for fiber tracking,overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves.3D reconstructions of tumors were achieved to perform neighbor,encasing,invading relationship between lesion and nerves whose location was then recorded during surgery by surgical observation and neurophysiological monitoring.Results Detailed fibers of the cranialnerves were depicted.Optic pathway showed perfect 3D streamline body,especially the posterior of optic chiasm.Oculomotor nerve coursed from the brainstem to the cavernous sinus distally,which also had high fidelity.Trigeminal nerve allowed visualization of gasserian ganglion as cisternal segment.Cisternal parts of abducent nerve,facial/ vestibulocochlear nerve,vagus nerve,hypoglossal nerve were also imaged well.Moreover,the 3D

  7. Imaging the Cisternal Segment of Cranial Nerves with 3.0TMR 3D-COSMIC and Multiplanar Reconstruction%3.0TMR3D-COSMIC成像序列结合MRP对Ⅰ-Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段的成像研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家才; 郑红伟; 漆剑频; 夏黎明; 胡道予

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the applying value of To compare 3D-COSMIC MRI sequences for cranial nerves I ~XII. Methods 3D-C0SMIC were used in 20 volunteers and 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves. 480 nerves were evaluated. Two radiologists independently divided the imaging findings into 3 grades: 1 (completely visualized), 2 (partially visualized), and 3 (not visualized). The first two grades were defined as visualization and the last grade was no visualization, the relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels were divided into grades: 1 (notcontact),2(contact),3(compression). Results The rate of visualization of these cranial nerves with 3D-COSMIC sequenceswere as follows respectively: nerve I (86%); nerve 11(100%); nerve 111(97%); nerve IV(23%); nerve V (100%); nerve VT(90%); nerve W( 100%); nerve Wl( 100%); nerve K-XI complex (63%, 100% and53%); nerve XE(40%). 3 of 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves displayed nerve had vascular compression or contact. Conclusion 3D-COSM1C sequence can show detailed anatomy of the cranial nerves and relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels, especially II -> UL V-, VI-. VII-. V1IK X cranial nerves, to help clinical treatment.%目的 探讨3.0T MR 3D-COSMIC 成像序列对Ⅰ-Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段显示的临床价值.方法 采用3.0TMR扫描仪对20例健康志愿者和10例疑因血管等原因压迫相应颅脑神经产生临床症状的患者进行MR检查.并由两名神经放射学医师根据20例志愿者480支颅神经显示的清晰程度分为以下3个等级:清晰、较清晰、不清晰,前两者定义为显示,后者定义为未显示,而神经与血管的关系分为无接触、接触、压迫.结果 脑神经在3D-COSMIC序列的显示率分别为:嗅神经(86%),视神经(100%),动眼神经(97%),滑车神经(23%),三叉神经(100%),外展神经(90%),面神经(100%),前庭蜗神经 (100%),后组颅神经复合体(舌咽神经、迷走神经、副神经)(63%、100%、53%),

  8. Title IX Resource Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities in federally funded schools at all levels. If any part of a school district or college receives any Federal funds for any purpose, all of the operations of the district or college are covered by Title IX. The essence…

  9. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  10. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... An infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at the time of delivery. ...

  11. 瞬目反射对糖尿病颅神经亚临床损害的研究%Study on Blink Reflex in Diabtese With Cranial Nerve Subclinical Lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴保凡

    2001-01-01

    目的 探讨瞬目反射对糖尿病患者颅神经亚临床损害的诊断价值。方法对150例糖尿病患者及50名健康志愿者进行瞬目反射检查。结果 检查200人,400侧次,总的阳性率为45.3%,远远高于单纯症状体征的阳性率(6%)。其中R2、R2'潜伏期和R1-R2波间期延长最为明显。结论 目反射检查能够可靠的检测糖尿病患者颅神经和脑干受损的早期及亚临床损害。%Objective To study the diagnostic value of blink reflex indiabetes with cranial nerve subclinical lesion.Methods Divided 150 patients into symptomatic group(A group) and symtomless group(B group)According to neuropathy .Used 50 casehealthy volunteers as the control group(C group).Results 400 sides were tested.The total positive rate was 45.3% .These were obvious higher than the positive rate of symptoms and signs.Prolongation of R2,R2' latency and R2-R2' interwave latency were the most abviously in blink reflex. Conclusions Blink reflex could reliable detection the premature and subclinical lesion of cranial nerve and brainstem in diabetes.

  12. 部分肌松下多组颅神经监护在小脑桥脑角区肿瘤切除术患者中的应用%Intraoperative cranial nerves monitoring under partial neuromuscular relaxation during cerebellopontine angle tumor resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军; 杨程; 顾华华; 梁伟民

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of multiple cranial nerves monitoring under partial neuromuscular relaxation during cerebellopontine angle(CPA)tumor resection.Methods Seventy elective patients undergoing CPA tumor resection via microneurosurgery were randomly allocated to 2 equal groups: Group FN receiving intraoperative facial nerve(NF)monitoring and Group MN receiving monitoring of multiple nerves:trigeminal nerve,glossopharyngeal nerve,accessory nerve or hypoglossal nerve other than the FN which were considered at risk by the neurosurgeon preoperatively.The manipulation procedure were modified according to cranial nerves monitoring and neuromuscular relaxation was maintained at train of four stimulation(TOF)=3 by continuous vencronium infusion during the acoustic neuroma resection.The function of the cranial nerves monitored were evaluated preoperatively and 8 days postoperativelv.Results Discernable and legible images of electromyographic wave complex were obtained during cranial nerve mapping and monitoring under intraoperative partial neuromuscular relaxation form all the patients.The facial nerve function of 4 patients exacerbated(from H-B grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ to gradeⅢ-Ⅳ)in both groups,and one new glossopharyngeal nerve function deficiency was found in Group FN,and one new hypoglossal nerve function deficiency was found in Group MN postoperatively.Conclusion Intraoperative cranial nenves monitoring under partial neuromuscular relaxation is feasible.Multiple cranial nerves combined with facial nerve monitoring seems unable to increase the short-term protective effects of nerve function after CPA tumor resection.%目的 评价全身麻醉下小脑桥脑角区肿瘤切除术患者中,在部分肌松条件下多组颅神经监护的效率.方法 70例择期行小脑桥脑角区肿瘤显微手术患者,随机分为两组,一组术中只进行面神经监护(FN组,n=35),另一组则除了面神经外,尚监护三叉神经、舌咽神经或

  13. The vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoudiba, F; Toulgoat, F; Sarrazin, J-L

    2013-10-01

    The vestibulocochlear nerve (8th cranial nerve) is a sensory nerve. It is made up of two nerves, the cochlear, which transmits sound and the vestibular which controls balance. It is an intracranial nerve which runs from the sensory receptors in the internal ear to the brain stem nuclei and finally to the auditory areas: the post-central gyrus and superior temporal auditory cortex. The most common lesions responsible for damage to VIII are vestibular Schwannomas. This report reviews the anatomy and various investigations of the nerve. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Ophthalmople gic cranial neuropathy: clinical case

    OpenAIRE

    N. S. Dozorova; A. S. Kotov; E. V. Mukhina

    2018-01-01

    Ophthalmoplegic cranial neuropathy (OCN) is a disease with unknown etiology, which manifests itself by episodes of intense headache, accompanied by completely or partially reversible dysfunction of the oculomotor nerve: ptosis, mydriasis and ophthalmoplegia. It is assumed that the pathology is demyelinating in nature, therefore in the International classification of headaches OCN excluded from rubric migraine and related to the painful cranial neuropathies. The question of the prevention and ...

  15. Factor IX assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003679.htm Factor IX assay To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  16. [Rapidly progressive compromise of cranial pairs as neurosyphilis manifestation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaro, Fernando; Moldes, Sofía; Novelli Poisson, Paola; Arduin, Julieta; Valerga, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis remains a common disease throughout the world, being neurosyphilis a relatively common manifestation. A case of a 34 years old male with HIV and neurosyphilis is presented, characterized by a clinical course evidenced by progressive palsy of cranial nerves. This case is unusual and a rare presentation of progressive cranial involvement with swallowing deficit, have found no similar data in the literature.

  17. Carcinoma de células escamosas no olho de bovino com invasão cerebral através dos nervos cranianos Ocular squamous cell carcinoma in a cow with cerebral invasion through cranial nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rocha de Barros

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Um carcinoma de células escamosas foi removido do olho de uma vaca de 7 anos de idade que apresentava ptose da orelha esquerda, salivação e perda de peso progressiva. Devido ao mau prognóstico, a vaca foi submetida à eutanásia 9 meses após a cirurgia. Na necropsia e no exame histopatológico, foi observado que o tumor havia invadido o tronco encefálico através dos nervos cranianos. Outros achados de necropsia significativos incluíam pneumonia de aspiração e atrofia por desnervação do músculo temporal esquerdo.A squamous cell carcinoma of the eye was removed from a 7-year-old cow which presented drooping of left ear, drooling and progressive loss of weight. Due to poor prognosis it was euthanatized 9 months after surgery. At necropsy and histopathological examination it was found that the tumor had invaded the brain stem through the cranial nerves. Additional necropsy significant findings included aspiration pneumonia and denervation atrophy of the left temporal muscle.

  18. Multimodal Navigation in Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumors Using Image-Based Vascular and Cranial Nerve Segmentation: A Prospective Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Eichberg, Daniel; Golby, Alexandra; Zamani, Amir; Laws, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the most common approach for the treatment of pituitary tumors. However, misdirection, vascular damage, intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and optic nerve injuries are all well-known complications, and the risk of adverse events is more likely in less-experienced hands. This prospective study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based segmentation coupled with neuronavigation in localizing neurovascular structures during TSS. Twenty-five patients with a pituitary tumor underwent preoperative 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRI images loaded into the navigation platform were used for segmentation and preoperative planning. After patient registration and subsequent surgical exposure, each segmented neural or vascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe or Doppler probe on or as close as possible to the target. Preoperative segmentation of the internal carotid artery and cavernous sinus matched with the intraoperative endoscopic and micro-Doppler findings in all cases. Excellent correspondence between image-based segmentation and the endoscopic view was also evident at the surface of the tumor and at the tumor-normal gland interfaces. Image guidance assisted the surgeons in localizing the optic nerve and chiasm in 64% of cases. The mean accuracy of the measurements was 1.20 ± 0.21 mm. Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation, especially with 3-dimensional reconstruction, is highly informative preoperatively and potentially could assist less-experienced neurosurgeons in preventing vascular and neural injury during TSS. In addition, the accuracy found in this study is comparable to previously reported neuronavigation measurements. This preliminary study is encouraging for future prospective intraoperative validation with larger numbers of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 3.0T MR3D FIESTA+C成像序列结合多平面重建对Ⅰ~Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段的成像研究%Study on the cisternal segment of cranial nerves with 3.0T MR 3D- FIESTA+C and multiplanar reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑红伟; 祁佩红; 薛鹏; 陈勇; 张道培; 漆剑频; 夏黎明; 胡道予

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨3.0T MR 3D FIESTA+C成像序列对Ⅰ~Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段显示的临床价值.方法 对20例健康志愿者和20例相应颅脑神经症状患者进行3.0T MR检查,扫描序列为3D FIESTA+C及3D FIESTA.根据20例志愿者480支颅神经显示的清晰程度分为3个等级:清晰、较清晰、不清晰,前两者定义为显示,后者定义为未显示,而神经与血管的关系分为无接触、接触、压迫.结果 3D FIESTA+C及3D FIESTA 2种序列脑神经的显示率分别为:嗅神经(36/40、29/40 ),视神经(40/40、40/40),动眼神经(39/40、37/40),滑车神经(7/40、7/40),三叉神经(40/40、40/40),外展神经(38/40、37/40 ),面神经(40/40、40/40),前庭蜗神经(40/40、40/40),后组脑神经复合体(舌咽神经、迷走神经、副神经) (36/40、30/40;40/40、40/40;32/40、25/40),舌下神经(23/40、21/40).20例神经症状患者中4例显示血管与神经接触或压迫,3例显示神经本身肿瘤或肿瘤压迫神经,其中5例为手术或病理证实.结论 3D-FIESTA+C成像序列较为清晰显示除滑车神经之外其余11对脑神经脑池段形态及其与血管的关系,尤其对I、Ⅱ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ、Ⅵ、Ⅶ、Ⅷ、Ⅹ8对脑神经脑池段的显示效果较好.%Objective To investigate the applied value of MR 3D-FIESTA + C sequences for showing cranial nerves Ⅰ -Ⅶ. Methods 20 volunteers and 20 patients with complaint of cranial nerves underwent MR imaging at 3. 0T MR scanner using 3D-FIESTA + C and 3D)-FIESTA sequences. According to showing condition of the cranial nerves by MR imaging in 20 volunteers, which were divided into three grades: 1 ( completely visualized) , 2 (partially visualized) , and 3 ( not visualized). The first two grades were defined as visualization and the last grade was no visualization. The relationships between nerves and surrounding vessels were divided into three grades: 1 (not contact) ,2(contact) and 3( compression). Results The rates of visualization of these cranial

  20. Multimodal Navigation in Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumors using Image-based Vascular and Cranial Nerve Segmentation: A Prospective Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Eichberg, Daniel; Golby, Alexandra; Zamani, Amir; Laws, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is a well-known approach for the treatment of pituitary tumors. However, lateral misdirection and vascular damage, intraoperative CSF leakage, and optic nerve and vascular injuries are all well-known complications, and the risk of adverse events is more likely in less experienced hands. This prospective study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based segmentation in localization of neurovascular structures during TSS. Methods Twenty-five patients with pituitary tumors underwent preoperative 3TMRI, which included thin-sectioned 3D space T2, 3D Time of Flight and MPRAGE sequences. Images were reviewed by an expert independent neuroradiologist. Imaging sequences were loaded in BrainLab iPlanNet (16/25 cases) or Stryker (9/25 cases) image guidance platforms for segmentation and pre-operative planning. After patient registration into the neuronavigation system and subsequent surgical exposure, each segmented neural or vascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe on or as close as possible to the target. The audible pulsations of the bilateral ICA were confirmed using a micro-Doppler probe. Results Pre-operative segmentation of the ICA and cavernous sinus matched with the intra-operative endoscopic and micro-Doppler findings in all cases (Dice Similarity Coefficient =1). This information reassured the surgeons with regard to the lateral extent of bone removal at the sellar floor and the limits of lateral exploration. Excellent correspondence between image-based segmentation and the endoscopic view was also evident at the surface of the tumor and at the tumor-normal gland interfaces. This assisted in preventing unnecessary removal of the normal pituitary gland. Image-guidance assisted the surgeons in localizing the optic nerve and chiasm in 64% of the cases and the diaphragma sella in 52% of cases, which helped to determine the limits of upward exploration and to decrease the risk of CSF

  1. Magnegtic Resonance Imaging of Cranial Nerve Ⅴ~Ⅷ:Comparison of 3D-CISS and 3D-SPACE Sequences%磁共振3D-SPACE序列与3D-CISS序列对Ⅴ~Ⅷ颅神经成像的对照性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜春华; 吴飞云; 祝因苏; 张伟; 刘波; 杨正强

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过MR可变翻转角的三维快速自旋回波(3D sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions,3 D-SPACE)序列与三维稳态进动结构相干(3D constructive interference in steady state,3D-CISS)序列对Ⅴ~Ⅷ颅神经成像质量进行比较,优化颅神经MRI序列.方法 对40例受检者用3D-SPACE序列与3D-CISS序列对Ⅴ~Ⅷ颅神经行MRI,同时行多平面重组(MPR),并对两种序列的图像显示情况进行比较.结果 3D-SPACE序列和3D-CISS序列均能显示三叉神经脑池段、外展神经脑池段、面神经脑池段、内听道段、前庭神经以及蜗神经脑池段;对Ⅴ~Ⅷ颅神经细微结构的显示,除三叉神经脑池段两种序列差异无统计学意义外,其余颅神经3 D-SPACE序列均优于3D-CISS序列,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);3D-SPACE序列扫描时间比3D-CISS序列扫描时间短.结论 3D-SPACE序列对Ⅴ~Ⅷ颅神经成像质量优于3D-CISS,且扫描时间更短,因此3D-SPACE序列是目前显示Ⅴ~Ⅷ颅神经的较好方法.%Objective We compared the imaging quality of 3D sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions (SPACE) and 3D constructive interference in steady state (CISS) ,to optimize the Ⅴ ~ Ⅷ cranial nerve magnetic resonance ( MR) imaging. Methods Forty persons performed continuous 0. 5mm thick MRI of cranial nerve Ⅴ ~ Ⅷ with 3D SPACE , 3D CISS, and MPR reconstruction. The imaging quality of 3D SPACE and 3D CISS were compared. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the 3D SPACE and 3D CISS sequences in identification of the cistemal segment of trigeminal nerve, abducens nerve, the cisternal segment and canalicular segment of facial nerve, vestibular and cochlear nerve. Except trigeminal nerve, 3D SPACE has significantly higher quality than 3D-CISS in display details of other cranial nerves. Conclusion Continuous thin-slice MR

  2. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  3. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  4. To wait for a spontaneous recovery of the third cranial nerve palsy occurring after the coiling of a PcomA aneurysm or to implement surgical treatment? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peulić Miodrag

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the last two decades a method of endovascular embolization has been imposed as a method of choice in the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Therefore, the problem of treating posterior communicating artery (PComA aneurysms presenting with the third cranial nerve (TCN palsy has become even more complex. The case of a patient reported in the paper itself has presented a dilemma of whether to wait for spontaneous resolution of ophthalmoplegia developed after the coiling of a PComA aneurysm or whether to implement an early surgical treatment. Case report. An unruptured saccular aneurysm, directed inferolaterally in the right internal carotid artery (ICA segment in the position of the PcomA origin, was diagnosed in a 58-year-old male patient. The aneurysm was measuring 9 mm in diameter while the neck was measuring 5 mm. The day before the planned embolization, the patient developed ipsilateral ophthalmoparesis, whereas the first day after the endovascular procedure was completed, the patient developed right-sided complete ophthalmoplegia. Ten weeks after the endovascular embolization our team decided to perform a microsurgical treatment including aneurysm clipping and coil extraction. Eighteen months after the surgery, the patient made a full recovery of the functions of musculus (m levator palpabrae, m. rectus medialis and pupillary function, with a partial recovery of the functions of m. obliqus inferior, m. rectus inferior and m. rectus superior. Conclusion. According to medical research and literature, the partial recovery of the TCN palsy is expected to happen in the first few weeks after embolization. Despite the completion of endovascular treatment progression of ophthalmoparesis to ophthalmoplegia without any simptoms of clinical improvement after 10 weeks is considered to be an indicator of longstanding TCN compression, which can lead to irreversible nerve damage. Despite the increase in the use of an

  5. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China.

  6. Ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athale, S.; Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroradiology Section, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 F. Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78284-7800 (United States); Hallet, K.K. [Neuropathology Department, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Ganglioglioma of the cranial nerves is extremely rare; only a few cases involving the optic nerves have been reported. We present a case of ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve, which was isointense with the brain stem on all MRI sequences and showed no contrast enhancement. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  7. Risk factors and prognosis analysis of cranial nerve injury in non-acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related cryptococcal meningitis%非艾滋病相关隐球菌性脑膜炎合并脑神经损伤的危险因素及预后分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟新龙; 罗海龙

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk and prognosis factor of cranial nerve injury in non acquired immune deficiency syndrome(AIDS)-related cryptococcal meningitis.Methods The clinical data of 115 patients with non-AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis were reviewed retrospectively.Clinical characteristics,initial antifungal therapies and outcome of these patients were analyzed.The risk and prognosis factor was performed by multivariate Logistic regression.Results The incidence of cranial nerve injury was 35.7%(41/115).Among of them,the involved ratio was 48.8% (20/41),39.0% (16/41),24.4% (10/41),12.2% (5/41),7.3% (3/41),4.9% (2/41) in optic nerve,oculomotor nerve,acoustic nerve,abducent nerve,olfactory nerve,facial nerve.Predictive risk factor for cranial nerve injury was duration of diagnosis (OR =1.057,95% CI 1.003-1.112),low cerebrospinal fluid cell count and intracranial hypertension were also the independent predictive factors (both P < 0.05).In the follow-up peried,72.2% (26/36) patients who had cranial nerve injury were fully recovered,with a median time of 0.5-24.0 (3.8 ±1.7) months.The independent predictors of recovery were numbers of nerve involved (OR =0.241,95 % CI 0.067-0.801,P =0.023) and combination therapy (OR =10.328,95 % CI 2.087-51.026,P =0.006).Condusions Cranial nerve injury is common in non-AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis.Delay in diagnosis,intracranial hypertension and low cerebrospinal fluid cell count are independent predictive factors.Less cranial nerve involvement and combination therapy predicts recovery.%目的 探讨非艾滋病(AIDS)相关隐球菌性脑膜炎合并脑神经损伤患者的危险因素及预后因素.方法 回顾性分析非AIDS相关隐球菌性脑膜炎115例患者的临床资料,记录其临床特征、治疗及预后情况,采用Logistic逐步回归法对危险因素和预后因素进行分析.结果 115例患者脑神经损伤发生率为35.7%(41/115),其中视神经、动眼神经、听

  8. Intraoperative EMG monitoring for protection of the posterior cranial nerves nucleus%术中肌电监测对累及第四脑室底面肿瘤切除中后组脑神经核团的保护研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆松涛; 刘文; 张喜安; 方陆雄; 潘军; 杨开军

    2009-01-01

    Objective In order to protect the posterior cranial nerves nucleus,the intraoperative EMG monintoring was used during the surgical resection of brain tumors related to the forth ventrical floor.Method 23 brain tumors were surgically removed in our hospital from February 2007 to April 2008, which including 8 case of medulloblastoms, 7 enpendymomas, 3 brain stem gliomas.All the tumors were microsurgical removed and intraoperative EMG monitoring was applied during the operation. The dates of the posterior cranial nerves function,the surgical procedure and EMG monitor changes were analyzed in order to find their relationship.Results 17 tumors were totally removed and 6 subtotally removed.The patients posterior cranial nerves function were protected well in 6 cases, 13 cases of slight dysfunction and 4 cases of moderate dysfunction.There was no serious damage in our group.The myoelectricity induced by the posterior cranial nerve nucleus stimulation could be recorded successfully under normal anesthesia condition.Conclusion The intraoperative EMG monitoring could avoid posterior cranial nerves nucleus damage and provide objective judgment for resection strategy of tumors related to the forth ventrical floor.%目的 探讨术中肌电监测在累及第四脑室底面肿瘤切除术中,后组脑神经核团的保护作用.方法 2007年2月至2008年4月治疗23例累及第四脑室底面的肿瘤,其中巨大髓母细胞瘤8例,室管膜瘤7例,脑干起源外生性胶质瘤3例,脑干背侧血管网状细胞瘤2例,脑干海绵状血管瘤3例.全部患者通过显微手术切除肿瘤,术中全程监测后组脑神经肌电活动.对患者术后脑神经功能状态、手术过程和监测情况分析.结果 肿瘤全切除17例,次全切除6例,无后组脑神经功能障碍6例,轻度后组腩神经损伤13例,中度后组腩神经损伤4例,无严重损伤者.术中全部患者在正常麻醉和肌松药状态下,可以稳定引出各种刺激诱发的后组脑神

  9. Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of damage to the individual cranial nerves and their branches associated with laryngeal mask airway use is low; there have been case reports of damage to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. To the best of our knowledge we present the first reported case of inferior alveolar nerve injury associated with laryngeal mask airway use.

  10. 3T MR 3D-FIESTA demonstrating cranial nerves in cisternal segment and their relationship with adjacent lesions%3T MR三维稳态进动快速成像序列显示脑池段颅神经及其与周围病变的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠毅毅; 王庆征; 李传亭; 刘传梅; 张红

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the usefulness of 3T MR 3D-FIESTA in displaying the relationship between the nerves in posterior and middle fossa and rheir adjacent lesions. Methods 34 cases of intracranial lesions in posterior and middle fossa were study with FSE T1W1,FSE T2WI and 3D-FIESTA sequences in 3T MR. The relationship bctween the lesions and the cranial nerves in cisternal segment were confirmed with surgery. Results 34 patients mainly showed 48 lesions on MR imaging. 9 cranial nerves were embedded by its adjacent lesions. 51 were pushed. 25 nerves were involved, and lesions were adjacent to 10 nerves. 23 patients underwent surgery in all 34 cases. The accuracy of 3D-FIESTA imag-ings in demonstrating relationship between cranial nerves with adjacent lesions were 5/6. 26/28. 3/3. 12/13. Conclusion 3T MR 3D-FIESTA imaging could depict the relationship between the nerves in cisternal segment and its adjacent lesions correctly, and it is useful in preoperative evaluation and treatment of intracranial lesions.%目的 探讨3T MR三维稳态进动快速成像(3D-FIESTA)序列显示中、后颅窝颅神经及其与周围病变关系的价值.方法 对34例颅内脑外病变的患者行反转恢复SE T1WI、FSE T2 WI及3D-FIESTA序列扫描.脑池段颅神经与周围病变的关系情况与手术结果相对照.结果 34例患者中共48处病变,3D-FIESTA序列显示9条神经被周围病变包绕.51条颅神经被压迫.与病变相邻的颅神经有10条,病变累及其邻近25条神经;其中23例患者行手术治疗,手术与MR图像对照.3D-FIESTA显示颅神经与周围病变关系的准确性分别为5/6、26/28、3/3、12/13.结论 3T MR 3D-FI-ESTA序列可以正确显示脑池段颅神经及其与周围病变的关系.对治疗前评估及病变的治疗有重要的应用价值.

  11. 地塞米松联合化疗与鞘内注射治疗急性淋巴细胞白血病脑神经损害的疗效%Curative efficacy of dexamethasone combined with chemotherapy and intrathecal injection on patients with a-cute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with cranial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of dexamethasone combined with chemotherapy and intrathecal in‐jection on acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with cranial nerve injury. Methods 40 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with cranial nerve injury in our hospital from 2010‐2013 were selected. The patients were divided into two groups ,the control group was treated by chemotherapy and intrathecal injection ,and the study group was treated by dexam‐ethasone combined with chemotherapy and intrathecal injection. Results The effective rate ,effective rate and total effective rate of the study group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P< 0.05). Conclusion Dexamethasone combined with chemotherapy and intrathecal injection can effectively improve the therapeutic effect on acute lymphoblastic leukemia com‐plicated with cranial nerve injury ,and has no adverse reactions ,which is worthy of clinical application.%目的:探讨急性淋巴细胞白血病并发脑神经损害患者治疗中地塞米松联合化疗与鞘内注射的临床价值。方法选取2010—2013年我院收治的急性淋巴细胞白血病并发脑神经损害患者40例,随机分为2组,对照组行化疗与鞘内注射,研究组采用化疗与鞘内注射联合地塞米松治疗。结果治疗后研究组显效率、有效率与总有效率均明显高于对照组(P <0.05)。结论地塞米松联合化疗与鞘内注射能够有效改善急性淋巴细胞白血病并发脑神经损伤的疗效,同时无明显不良反应,值得临床应用。

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  13. Normal cranial CT anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, M.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    The human brain consists of well-known anatomical components. Some parts of these components have been shown to be concerned with certain functions. A complete cranial CT examination consists of a series of several slices obtained in a sequence usually from the base to the vertex of the cranial vault, in the axial mode. The ultimate goal of this chapter is to pinpoint those slices that depict a given anatomical structure or several structures that deal with a given function. To achieve this goal, the discussion of CT cranial anatomy is presented in three sections

  14. Extrinsic nerves are not involved in branchial 5-HT dynamics or pulsatile urea excretion in Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartolano, Maria C; Amador, Molly H B; Tzaneva, Velislava; Milsom, William K; McDonald, M Danielle

    2017-12-01

    Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) can switch from continuously excreting ammonia as their primary nitrogenous waste to excreting predominantly urea in distinct pulses. Previous studies have shown that the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in controlling this process, but it is unknown if 5-HT availability is under central nervous control or if the 5-HT signal originates from a peripheral source. Following up on a previous study, cranial nerves IX (glossopharyngeal) and X (vagus) were sectioned to further characterize their role in controlling pulsatile urea excretion and 5-HT release within the gill. In contrast to an earlier study, nerve sectioning did not result in a change in urea pulse frequency. Total urea excretion, average pulse size, total nitrogen excretion, and percent ureotely were reduced the first day post-surgery in nerve-sectioned fish but recovered by 72h post-surgery. Nerve sectioning also had no effect on toadfish urea transporter (tUT), 5-HT transporter (SERT), or 5-HT 2A receptor mRNA expression or 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) abundance in the gill, all of which were found consistently across the three gill arches except 5-HIAA, which was undetectable in the first gill arch. Our findings indicate that the central nervous system does not directly control pulsatile urea excretion or local changes in gill 5-HT and 5-HIAA abundance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 伽玛刀治疗垂体瘤致迟发性动眼神经麻痹1例报告%Delayed oculomotor cranial nerve palsy caused by pituitury tumor after gamma knife stereotactic radiation:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴慧; 刘华; 林洁

    2015-01-01

    尽管罕见,垂体瘤患者接受伽玛刀治疗后仍可发生颅神经损伤,临床上应予重视。本文报告1例垂体瘤患者在接受伽玛刀治疗后8年出现动眼神经麻痹的临床资料、包括诊断及可能的病理机制。%Patient undergoing gamma knife stereotactic radiation may get cranial nerve palsy though it is rare, to which great attention must be paid. Clinic date on such a case occurred 8 years after the patient was treated with gamma knife stereotactic radiation was reported, in which its diagnose and pathological mechanisms were included.

  16. 微创钻颅术联合尼莫地平治疗脑内血肿的疗效及对神经功能的影响的临床研究%Effect of Minimally Invasive Cranial Drill Surgery Combined with Nimodip-ine in the Treatment of Intracerebral Hematoma and Its Effect on Nerve Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宝林

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of minimally invasive cranial drill surgery combined with nimodipine in the treat-ment of intracerebral hematoma and its effect on nerve function. Methods 112 patients with intracerebral hematoma admit-ted to our hospital from January 2012 and December 2014 were randomly divided into two groups. 56 patients in the control group were treated with minimally invasive cranial drill surgery while the 56 in the experimental group were treated with minimally invasive cranial drill surgery combined with nimodipine. The clinical outcomes and nerve function of the patients were compared between the two groups. Results The clinical effective rate (87.5%vs 71.4%) was higher in the experimental group than in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant, P<0.05; after treatment, the nerve function impairment scores decreased significantly in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group with statistical difference, P<0.05. Conclusion Minimally invasive cranial drill surgery combined with nimodipine in the treatment of intracerebral hematoma has remarkable effect and high clinical effective rate. It can significantly improve the removal of hematoma, their nerve function, and quality of life and mental health. Therefore it is worthy of clinical application.%目的:探讨微创钻颅术联合尼莫地平治疗脑血肿的疗效及对神经功能的影响。方法将整群选取的2012年1月-2014年12月该院收治的112例脑血肿患者随机分为两组。对照组56例给予微创钻颅术,而试验组56例给予微创钻颅术联合尼莫地平治疗。比较两组临床疗效及神经功能的差异。结果试验组临床有效率为87.5%显著高于对照组71.4%,比较有统计学差异(P<0.05);治疗后试验组神经功能缺损评分显著降低,同时也显著低于同期对照组,比较差异具有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论微创钻颅术联合尼莫地平

  17. Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Nerve Blocks A nerve block is an injection to ... the limitations of Nerve Block? What is a Nerve Block? A nerve block is an anesthetic and/ ...

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  20. Ophthalmople gic cranial neuropathy: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Dozorova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmoplegic cranial neuropathy (OCN is a disease with unknown etiology, which manifests itself by episodes of intense headache, accompanied by completely or partially reversible dysfunction of the oculomotor nerve: ptosis, mydriasis and ophthalmoplegia. It is assumed that the pathology is demyelinating in nature, therefore in the International classification of headaches OCN excluded from rubric migraine and related to the painful cranial neuropathies. The question of the prevention and treatment of this disease is still controversial, the issue of the appointment of corticosteroids, calcium channel blockers and β-blockers, methods of surgical correction of strabismus and botulin therapy.The article describes OCN in an 11-year-old boy. In the clinical picture headache attacks were observed. These attacks were with signs of selective lesions of the oculomotor nerve on one side. These functional changes are recurrent, and fully regress between attacks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations revealed no pathology that could cause this symptom, including myasthenia. The described case demonstrates the classical picture of OCN with a favorable course and the partial damage of the oculomotor nerve on one side.

  1. Role of blink reflex in diagnosis of subclinical cranial neuropathy in diabetic mellitus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazem, Shakouri S; Behzad, Davoudi

    2006-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus. Cranial nerves III, VII, and V are among the most commonly affected in diabetic patients. Traditional electrodiagnosis (Edx) studies are a useful method for diagnosis of PN and symptomatic cranial neuropathy, and may not be useful for detecting subclinical involvement of cranial nerves. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the role of blink reflex (BR) for early diagnosis of cranial neuropathy in diabetic patients with PN. A prospective study was performed on NIDDM patients with PN. One hundred eighty-eight subjects were included in our study in which 142 acted as healthy subjects and 46 as diabetic patients. Patients were excluded with prior history of cranial nerve lesions, stroke, or any other disease with polyneuropathy or drug-induced neuropathy. Routine nerve conduction studies were performed, and only patients with PN were included in this study. Abnormalities were found in 54.4% of patients. R1, IR2, and CR2 were prolonged relative to the healthy group. Statistically there was no significant difference in R/D ratio of patients (P=0.201). Also, there was a positive correlation between R1, IR2, and CR2 latencies with duration of diabetes and severity of polyneuropathy, but not for R/D. The greatest correlation was shown in R1 latency (69.9% abnormality). BR is a noninvasive and very useful method for the evaluation and diagnosis of subclinical cranial nerve involvement in diabetic patients.

  2. Bilateral abducens nerve and right facial nerve palsy occuring after head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ismail Boyraz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of the nervus abducens, the 6th cranial nerve tend to be rare, usually occur suddenly following head injuries. A 43-year-old male patient presented with a history of fall from a height due to an occupational accident on the date of 11.01.2014. Cranial tomography demonstrated bilateral epidural hematoma. The epidural hematoma was drained during the operation. After the surgery, eye examination showed no vision loss, except limited bilateral lateral gaze. When the patient was unable to walk due to diplopia, he was advised to close one eye. On the right side, there were findings suggesting central facial paralysis. There may be multiple cranial nerve damage following head injury. Therefore, all cranial nerves should be thoroughly examined. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(2.000: 110-113

  3. Anatomic variation of cranial parasympathetic ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Siéssere

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Having broad knowledge of anatomy is essential for practicing dentistry. Certain anatomical structures call for detailed studies due to their anatomical and functional importance. Nevertheless, some structures are difficult to visualize and identify due to their small volume and complicated access. Such is the case of the parasympathetic ganglia located in the cranial part of the autonomic nervous system, which include: the ciliary ganglion (located deeply in the orbit, laterally to the optic nerve, the pterygopalatine ganglion (located in the pterygopalatine fossa, the submandibular ganglion (located laterally to the hyoglossus muscle, below the lingual nerve, and the otic ganglion (located medially to the mandibular nerve, right beneath the oval foramen. The aim of this study was to present these structures in dissected anatomic specimens and perform a comparative analysis regarding location and morphology. The proximity of the ganglia and associated nerves were also analyzed, as well as the number and volume of fibers connected to them. Human heads were dissected by planes, partially removing the adjacent structures to the point we could reach the parasympathetic ganglia. With this study, we concluded that there was no significant variation regarding the location of the studied ganglia. Morphologically, our observations concur with previous classical descriptions of the parasympathetic ganglia, but we observed variations regarding the proximity of the otic ganglion to the mandibular nerve. We also observed that there were variations regarding the number and volume of fiber bundles connected to the submandibular, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia.

  4. Clinical applied value of brain stem auditory evoked potential in facial neuritis patients combined the damage of other cranial nerves%伴其他颅神经症状的面神经炎患者治疗前后的脑干听觉诱发电位研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金风; 王民

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical applied value of brain stem auditoryk evoed potential (BAEP)in facial neuritis patients combined with damage of other cranial nerves. Methods: Fifty facial neuritis patients combined with damage of other cranial nerves were selected to get BAEP information) the results before and after treatment were analyzed. Results;The inter-peak latencies (IPL) of Ⅰ -- Ⅲ, Ⅲ - V . Ⅰ - V were significantly shorten(P<0. 01)after treatment of the. More than one IPL shortened IPL took up 84%. 74% cases had prolonged potential latencies (PL) of Wave I , Ⅲ and V with more than one shortened or disappeared waveform. In 69 % cases with amplitude of wave V increased and ratio of V/ I more than 0. 5 or ILD of bilateral Wave V was less than 0. 3 ms, IPL of Ⅲ - V shorter than that of Ⅰ - Ⅲ. Conclusion:Facial neuritis involves not only medial surface nerves of foramen stylomastoi-deum but also brainstem and/or other cranial nerves . BAEP can objectively reflect the function of audi-tory system and brain stem, and can be used to follow-up with patients with facial neuritis.%目的:观察伴其他颅神经症状的面神经炎患者治疗前后的脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)表现.方法:选择50例面神经炎伴其他颅神经症状的患者进行BAEP检测,并进行治疗前后对比.结果:与治疗前相比,治疗后Ⅱ-Ⅲ、Ⅲ-Ⅴ、Ⅰ-Ⅴ波IPL明显缩短(P<0.01),其中有一个以上的IPL缩短者42例占84%;Ⅰ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ波PL有一个以上缩短或治疗前BAEP波形消失而于治疗后出现者37例占74%;Ⅴ波波幅增高并且Ⅴ/Ⅰ IPL比大于0.5或双侧Ⅴ波侧间潜伏期差(IDL)小于0.3 ms,Ⅲ-Ⅴ波IPL小于Ⅰ-Ⅲ波IPL的35例占70%.结论:面神经炎不仅累及茎乳孔内面神经,还可累及脑干和其他颅神经.BAEP可以客观地反映面神经炎患者听觉系统和脑干功能,因此可以用于对该类患者进行疗效观察.

  5. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  6. A Rare Neurological Involvement in Sjogrens Syndrome: Abducens Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Ugan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren%u2019s syndrome (SS is an autoimmune disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of exocrine organs. Although neurological involvement occurs in approximately one quarter of patients, involvement of cranial nerves is a relatively rare occurrence. Here a rare case of cranial neuropathy related to SS is reported.

  7. Spinal accessory nerve schwannomas masquerading as a fourth ventricular lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign lesions that arise from the nerve sheath of cranial nerves. The most common schwannomas arise from the 8 th cranial nerve (the vestibulo-cochlear nerve followed by trigeminal and facial nerves and then from glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Schwannomas involving the oculomotor, trochlear, abducens and hypoglossal nerves are very rare. We report a very unusual spinal accessory nerve schwannoma which occupied the fourth ventricle and extended inferiorly to the upper cervical canal. The radiological features have been detailed. The diagnostic dilemma was due to its midline posterior location mimicking a fourth ventricular lesion like medulloblastoma and ependymoma. Total excision is the ideal treatment for these tumors. A brief review of literature with tabulations of the variants has been listed.

  8. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations

  9. Aspects of the History of the Nerves: Bell's Theory, the Bell-Magendie Law and Controversy, and Two Forgotten Works by P.W. Lund and D.F. Eschricth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C. Barker

    2003-01-01

    History of nerves, Bell's Idea, Bell-Magendie law, Bell-Magendie controversy, Charles Bell, Francois Magendie, P.W. Lund, D.F. Eschricht, Herbert Mayo, Johannes Müller, Claude Bernard, spinal nerve roots, cranial nerves, recurrent sensitivity......History of nerves, Bell's Idea, Bell-Magendie law, Bell-Magendie controversy, Charles Bell, Francois Magendie, P.W. Lund, D.F. Eschricht, Herbert Mayo, Johannes Müller, Claude Bernard, spinal nerve roots, cranial nerves, recurrent sensitivity...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cranial nerves in the posterior fossa: a comparative study of t2-weighted spin-echo sequences at 1.5 and 3.0 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, F; Müller, M; Bruhn, H

    2008-04-01

    High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 Tesla (T) is rapidly gaining clinical acceptance. Whether doubling of the field strength of 1.5T and the subsequent increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leads to a significant improvement of image quality is not automatically given. To evaluate the depiction of fine anatomic detail in the posterior fossa, focusing on brain nerves, on T2-weighted imaging, and to define the potential advantage of imaging at 3.0T versus 1.5T. In total, 10 brainstem nerve pairs of 12 volunteers were identified on T2-weighted MR images of 2- and 5-mm section thickness acquired at 1.5T and 3.0T. The MR images were compared for each subject at both field strengths by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast by using a rating scale. In general, MR images at 3.0T were considered more conspicuous and less noisy than images at 1.5T. The SNR value measured was almost doubled. With respect to structural identification and contrast according to the rating scale, observer scores were significantly improved both for standard imaging with 5-mm sections and high-resolution imaging with 2-mm sections at 3.0T. Direct comparison revealed a significant increase for evaluated image quality criteria and the number of nerves detected. The comparison revealed a clear advantage in favor of T2-weighted MRI at 3.0T vs. 1.5T in depicting the roots and course of brain nerves in the posterior fossa.

  11. Spinal Accessory Nerve Duplication: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Papagianni, Eleni; Kosmidou, Panagiota; Fergadaki, Sotiria; Pallantzas, Athanasios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis; Filippou, Dimitrios

    2018-01-01

    Aim of the present study is to expand our knowledge of the anatomy of the 11th cranial nerve and discuss the clinical importance and literature pertaining to accessory nerve duplication. We present one case of duplicated spinal accessory nerve in a patient undergoing neck dissection for oral cavity cancer. The literature review confirms the extremely rare diagnosis of a duplicated accessory nerve. Its clinical implication is of great importance. From this finding, a further extension to our k...

  12. Does the surgical approach for treating mandibular condylar fractures affect the rate of seventh cranial nerve injuries? A systematic review and meta-analysis based on a new classification for surgical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moraissi, Essam Ahmed; Louvrier, Aurélien; Colletti, Giacomo; Wolford, Larry M; Biglioli, Federico; Ragaey, Marwa; Meyer, Christophe; Ellis, Edward

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of facial nerve injury (FNI) when performing (ORIF) of mandibular condylar fractures by different surgical approaches. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed that included several databases with specific keywords, a reference search, and a manual search for suitable articles. The inclusion criteria were all clinical trials, with the aim of assessing the rate of facial nerve injuries when (ORIF) of mandibular condylar fractures was performed using different surgical approaches. The main outcome variable was transient facial nerve injury (TFNI) and permanent facial nerve injury (PFNI) according to the fracture levels, namely: condylar head fractures (CHFs), condylar neck fractures (CNFs), and condylar base fractures (CBFs). For studies where there was no delineation between CNFs and CBFs, the fractures were defined as CNFs/CBFs. The dependent variables were the surgical approaches. A total of 3873 patients enrolled in 96 studies were included in this analysis. TFNI rates reported in the literature were as follows: A) For the transoral approach: a) for strictly intraoral 0.72% (1.3 in CNFs and 0% for CBFs); b) for the transbuccal trocar instrumentation 2.7% (4.2% in CNFs and 0% for CBFs); and c) for endoscopically assisted ORIF 4.2% (5% in CNFs, and 4% in CBFs). B) For low submandibular approach 15.3% (26.1% for CNFs, 11.8% for CBFs, and 13.7% for CNFs/CBFs). C) For the high submandibular/angular subparotid approach with masseter transection 0% in CBFs. D) For the high submandibular/angular transmassetric anteroparotid approach 0% (CNFs and CBFs). E) For the transparotid retromandibular approach a) with nerve facial preparation 14.4% (23.9% in CNFs, 11.8% in CBFs and 13.7% for CNFs/CBFs); b) without facial nerve preparation 19% (24.3% for CNFs and 10.5% for CBFs). F) For retromandibular transmassetric anteroparotid approach 3.4% in CNFs/CBFs. G) For retromandibular transmassetric anteroparotid

  13. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  14. Lacerations to Zones VIII and IX: It Is Not Just a Tendon Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charla R. Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensor tendon injuries are widely believed to be straightforward problems that are relatively simple to manage. However, these injuries can be complex and demand a thorough understanding of anatomy to achieve the best functional outcomes. When lacerations occur in the forearm as in Zones VIII and IX injury, the repair of the extensor tendon and muscle, and posterior interosseous nerve (PIN is often challenging. A review of the literature shows little guidance and attention for these injuries. We present four patients with injuries to Zones VIII and IX as well as a review of surgical technique, postoperative rehabilitation, and pearls that may be of benefit to those managing these injuries.

  15. Neurotization of oculomotor, trochlear and abducent nerves in skull base surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世亭; 潘庆刚; 刘宁涛; 刘忠; 沈峰

    2003-01-01

    Objective To anatomically reconstruct the oculomotor nerve, trochlear nerve, and abducent nerve by skull base surgery. Methods Seventeen cranial nerves (three oculomotor nerves, eight trochlear nerves and six abducent nerves) were injured and anatomically reconstructed in thirteen skull base operations during a period from 1994 to 2000. Repair techniques included end-to-end neurosuture or fibrin glue adhesion, graft neurosuture or fibrin glue adhesion. The relationships between repair techniques and functional recovery and the related factors were analyzed.Results Functional recovery began from 3 to 8 months after surgery. During a follow-up period of 4 months to 6 years, complete recovery of function was observed in 6 trochlear nerves (75%) and 4 abducent nerves (67%), while partial functional recovery was observed in the other cranial nerves including 2 trochlear nerves, 2 abducent nerves, and 3 oculomotor nerves.Conclusions Complete or partial functional recovery could be expected after anatomical neurotization of an injured oculomotor, trochlear or abducent nerve. Our study demonstrated that, in terms of functional recovery, trochlear and abducent nerves are more responsive than oculomotor nerves, and that end-to-end reconstruction is more efficient than graft reconstruction. These results encourage us to perform reconstruction for a separated cranial nerve as often as possible during skull base surgery.

  16. Case of Cytomegalovirus Infection Causing Isolated Oculomotor Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Sen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The third cranial nerve is called the oculomotor nerve. The pathology is revealed by limitation of eye movement inward-up-down, mydriasis, loss of light reflex and ptosis. Oculomotor nerve pathologies are frequently seen in neurology practice and are situations that may be very difficult for differential diagnosis. Differential diagnosis first involves disqualifying intracranial etiologies by imaging because these intracranial etiologies may be situations that can result in death and should be primarily evaluated. If intracranial events are ruled out, generally rarer etiologic reasons with generally difficult differentiation should be researched. Viral infections are among the rare etiological reasons causing 3rd cranial nerve involvement. Our case was a 71-year old female with etiological research due to 3rd cranial nerve palsy. The patient with diabetes-linked immune deficiency was found to have cranial nerve involvement developed secondary to cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. We report this case as 3rd cranial nerve involvement is rarely observed developing linked to CMV infection.

  17. Congenital multiple cranial neuropathies: Relevance of orofacial electromyography in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Francis; Flores-Guevara, Roberto; Baudon, Jean-Jacques; Vazquez, Marie-Paule

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess diagnoses and outcomes of infants with 2 or more cranial neuropathies identified using orofacial electromyography (EMG). This retrospective study involved 90 patients. Diagnoses took into account clinical, radiological, and genetic data. EMG examined the orbicularis oculi, genioglossus, and levator veli palatini muscles, and blink responses. To evaluate outcome, neurological disability, respiratory complications, and feeding difficulties were recorded. The patients had malformation syndromes (59), encephalopathies (29), or no underlying disorders (2). Neurogenic EMG signs were detected in a mean of 4 muscles, reflecting a mean of 3 affected nerves. EMG identified a higher number of neuropathies than clinical examination alone (82 vs. 31, facial; 56 vs. 2, pharyngeal; 25 vs. 3, hypoglossal). Poor outcome and death were more frequent when EMG identified ≥4 affected nerves (P = 0.02). EMG highlights multiple cranial neuropathies that can be clinically silent in infants with malformation syndromes or encephalopathies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Obturator nerve schwannoma presenting as an adnexal mass: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, M.; Thurston, W.A.; Merchant, N. [The Toronto Hospital, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Murphy, K.J. [The Toronto Hospital, Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-02-01

    Schwannomas are relatively common, benign nerve-sheath tumours. They arise most commonly from either cranial nerves or the dorsal root of spinal nerves. Schwannomas have also been reported to occur in peripheral nerve-root trunks, although this location is much less common. We report a case of a 45-year-old woman with a large pelvic mass originally believed to be an ovarian tumour. Following surgical excision, the tumour was found to be a schwannoma of the obturator nerve. To our knowledge, there are no reported cases of an obturator nerve schwannoma. The imaging features of schwannomas are reviewed. (author)

  19. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Pinched Nerve Information Page Pinched Nerve Information Page What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain ...

  20. Surgical anatomy of the styloid muscles and the extracranial glossopharyngeal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prades, J M; Gavid, M; Asanau, A; Timoshenko, A P; Richard, C; Martin, C H

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationships between the extracranial glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve and the muscles of the styloid diaphragm. In humans, the IX nerve is a hidden retrostyloid nerve which plays a critical role notably in swallowing and has to be preserved during infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal spaces surgical procedures. In ten adult heads from cadavers (20 sides) fixed in formalin, dissection of the extracranial IX nerve was performed under operating microscope with special attention given to the relationships between this nerve and the styloid muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The three styloid muscles delimit three triangular intermuscular intervals which were each thoroughly explored. Different osseous landmarks were investigated for easy nerve location. The styloid process (SP) is the main superior osseous landmark for the three muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The stylohyoid muscle (SHM) is anteromedially located to the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. The styloglossus muscle (SGM) is medial and anterior to the SHM. The stylopharyngeal muscle (SPM) is the most vertical and medial of the three styloid muscles. It courses from the medial surface of the SP in a deep plane hidden between the SHM and the SGM. The extracranial IX nerve turns around the SPM superiorly with a vertical segment posterior to the SPM and inferiorly with a horizontal segment lateral to the SPM. The meeting point of the two segments of the IX nerve is about 10 mm anteriorly located from the transverse process of the atlas. The external carotid artery and some of its branches lie in contact with the lateral side of the IX nerve. Such relationships between the extracranial IX nerve, the styloid muscles and the transverse process of the atlas should be appreciated by clinician who treats patients with stylohyoid complex syndromes and by the surgeon for the parapharyngeal spaces approach.

  1. Macrostructure of the Cranial Cervical Ganglion in the River Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dehghani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe autonomic nervous system consists of a vast range of nerves and ganglions. Anatomical studies have demonstrated that the sympathetic innervations of the head and neck are affected by the neurons that ramify from the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG. The CCG is the end of the sympathetic cervical trunk, which runs with the vagal nerve during its cervical course. In this study sixteen adult (2 - 5 year river buffalo of both sexes (eight male, eight female weighing around 250 - 450 kg were dissected to investigate the weight, situation and arrangement of nerve branches of the cranial cervical ganglion bilaterally. The ganglions showed a fusiform shape and reddish in color. The cranial cervical ganglion covered by the digastricus muscle. It lies in dorsal region of the base of epiglottic cartilage, ventromedial to tympanic bulla and ventrally to atlantic fossa, and medial of the occipital artery. This study showed that the cranial cervical ganglions in river buffalo were well-developed structure. The main branches of cranial cervical ganglion included the internal carotid, external carotid and jugular nerves.

  2. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  3. Facial nerve palsy as a primary presentation of advanced carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cranial nerve neuropathy is a rare presentation of advanced cancer of the prostate. Observation: We report a case of 65-year-old man who presented with right lower motor neuron (LMN) facial nerve palsy. The prostate had malignant features on digital rectal examination (DRE) and the prostate specific antigen ...

  4. [Dynamics of lagophthalmos depending on facial nerve repair and its intraoperative monitoring in neurosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnikova, T V; Serova, N K; Shimansky, V N

    2014-01-01

    Over 200 patients with acoustic neuromas and over 100 patients with posterior cranial fossa meningiomas are annually operated on at the N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. Intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve function is used in most patients with tumors of the posterior cranial fossa to identify the facial nerve in the surgical wound. If the anatomical integrity of the facial nerve in the cranial cavity cannot be retained, facial nerve repair is performed to restore the facial muscle function. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the facial nerve has a great prognostic significance to evaluate the dynamics of lagophthalmos in the late postoperative period and to select the proper method for lagophthalmos correction. When the facial nerve was reinnervated by the descending branch or trunk of the hypoglossal nerve, sufficient eyelid closure was observed only in 3 patients out of 17.

  5. 急性感染后多颅神经炎(附2例报告)%Acute Post-infectious Multiple Cranial Neuritis (2 Case Report)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海峰; 丛志强; 阎文静

    2003-01-01

    @@ Acute autoimmune polyneuritis may occur after non-specific infections (upper respiratory tract infection or diar-rhea), which may involve spinal and cranial nerves, and nerveroots symmetrically, the most common manifestation beingGuillain- Barre syndrome (GBS).

  6. Synthesis of indium-111 mesoprotoporphyrin IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.M.; Marshall, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Indium-111 mesoprotoporphyrin IX has been prepared by refluxing suitable proportions of InCl 3 , sodium acetate, and mesoprotoporphyrin IX in glacial acetic acid. The labeled metalloporphyrin is sufficiently water-soluble for use as a scanning agent, and can also be incorporated into heme apoproteins for perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlation measurements. (author)

  7. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  8. Clinical Anatomy of the Lingual Nerve: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Babston, Michael; Denson, Douglas; Zehren, Steven; Friend, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge of lingual nerve anatomy is of paramount importance to dental practitioners and maxillofacial surgeons. The purpose of this article is to review lingual nerve anatomy from the cranial base to its insertion in the tongue and provide a more detailed explanation of its course to prevent procedural nerve injuries. Fifteen human cadavers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine's Anatomical Donor Program were reviewed. The anatomic structures and landmarks were identified and confirmed by anatomists. Lingual nerve dissection was carried out and reviewed on 15 halved human cadaver skulls (total specimens, 28). Cadaveric dissection provides a detailed examination of the lingual nerve from the cranial base to tongue insertion. The lingual nerve receives the chorda tympani nerve approximately 1 cm below the bifurcation of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves. The pathway of the lingual nerve is in contact with the periosteum of the mandible just behind the internal oblique ridge. The lingual nerve crosses the submandibular duct at the interproximal space between the mandibular first and second molars. The submandibular ganglion is suspended from the lingual nerve at the distal area of the second mandibular molar. A zoning classification is another way to more accurately describe the lingual nerve based on close anatomic landmarks as seen in human cadaveric specimens. This system could identify particular areas of interest that might be at greater procedural risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Wonil; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Rhoton, Albert L

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate and review the detailed microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve and surrounding structures along its entire course and to provide its topographic measurements. Ten cadaveric heads were examined using ×3 to ×40 magnification after the arteries and veins were injected with colored silicone. Both sides of each cadaveric head were dissected using different skull base approaches to demonstrate the entire course of the abducens nerve from the pontomedullary sulcus to the lateral rectus muscle. The anatomy of the petroclival area and the cavernous sinus through which the abducens nerve passes are complex due to the high density of critically important neural and vascular structures. The abducens nerve has angulations and fixation points along its course that put the nerve at risk in many clinical situations. From a surgical viewpoint, the petrous tubercle of the petrous apex is an intraoperative landmark to avoid damage to the abducens nerve. The abducens nerve is quite different from the other nerves. No other cranial nerve has a long intradural path with angulations and fixations such as the abducens nerve in petroclival venous confluence. A precise knowledge of the relationship between the abducens nerve and surrounding structures has allowed neurosurgeon to approach the clivus, petroclival area, cavernous sinus, and superior orbital fissure without surgical complications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Trigeminal complications arising after surgery of cranial base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Ulf; Linderoth, Bengt; Mathiesen, Tiit

    2012-04-01

    Chronic severe facial pain is a feared sequel of cranial base surgery. This study explores the symptomatology, incidence and impact on the individual of postoperative de novo trigeminal nerve affection as well as the recovery potential. Out of 231 patients operated for cranial base meningiomas at the Karolinska University Hospital during 7 years, 25 complained of de novo trigeminal symptoms at clinical follow-up 3 months after surgery. Six were later lost to follow-up leaving 19 participants in the study, which was conducted using a questionnaire and a structured telephone interview. All patients complained of facial numbness, affecting the V1 branch in 10/19 patients (53%), the V2 branch in 18/19 (95%) and the V3 branch in 9/19 (47%). Surprisingly, only three (16%) suffered from trigeminal pain, which could be adequately managed by pharmacotherapy. However, five patients (26%) demonstrated ocular dysaesthetic problems. Twelve (63%) described their handicap to be mild, while seven (37%) had daily or severe symptoms. Five patients (26%) reported no improvement over time, while nine (47%) showed improvement and four (21%) stated good recovery. Only one patient (5%) claimed complete symptom remission. In the present study, 11% of the patients presented with a de novo postoperative affection of the trigeminal nerve after removal of a cranial base meningioma; 37% of these reported daily/severe symptoms. Only 26% showed good recovery, observed in patients without tumour infiltration of the nerve or intraoperative nerve damage. In spite of frequent complaints of numbness, pain was uncommon (16%) and often manageable by pharmacotherapy, while ocular symptoms turned out to be more frequent and more disabling than expected.

  11. Detailed Anatomy of the Cranial Cervical Ganglion in the Dromedary Camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourinezhad, Jamal; Mazaheri, Yazdan; Biglari, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    The detailed morphology and topography of the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG) with its surrounding structures were studied in 10 sides of five heads of adult one-humped camel to determine its general arrangement as well as its differences and similarities to other animals. The following detailed descriptions were obtained: (1) the bilateral CCG was constantly present caudal to cranial base at the rostroventral border of the occipital condyle over the caudolateral part of nasopharynx; (2) the CCG was always in close relations medially with the longus capitis muscle, rostrolaterally with the internal carotid artery, and caudally with the vagus nerve; and (3) the branches of the CCG were the internal carotid and external carotid nerves, jugular nerve, cervical interganglionic branch, laryngopharyngeal branch, carotid sinus branch and communicating branches to the vagus, and first spinal nerves. In conclusion, there was no variation regarding topography of dromedary CCG among the specimens, in spite of typical variations in number, and mainly in origin of nerve branches ramifying from the CCG. In comparative anatomy aspect, the close constant relations, and presence of major nerves (internal/external carotid and jugular nerves) of dromedary CCG exhibited a typical reported animal's pattern. However, the shape, structures lateral to the CCG, the origin and course pattern of external carotid and jugular nerves, the number of the major nerves branches, the communicating branches of the CCG to the spinal and cranial nerves, and the separation of most rostral parts of vagosympathetic trunk of dromedary were different from those of most reported animals. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Meis2 is essential for cranial and cardiac neural crest development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machoň, Ondřej; Mašek, Jan; Machoňová, Olga; Krauss, S.; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, Nov 6 (2015) ISSN 1471-213X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2042; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11214 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Meis2 * Persistent truncus arteriosus * Neural crest * Craniofacial skeleton * Cranial nerves Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.096, year: 2015

  13. Neurologic disturbances in case of breast cancer disseminated into cranial bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasyuk, S.V.; Letyagin, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents data on 52 cases of breast cancer disseminated into cranial vault bones (2 into the orbit). Metastases into the brain (2) and meninges (6) were detected in 17 cases with the aid of computerized tomography of the brain and examination of cerebrospinal fluid. The latter cases were not included into the study group. Metastases into cranial bones were identified by craniography and scanning of the skeleton. Half the patients (18 out of 35) revealed the following neurologic syndromes which were determined by the site of metastases into cranial vault bones and tumour growth pattern (into cranial cavity or soft tissues of the head): lesions in ramus primus nervi trigemini, greater occipital nerve, migraine, pseudotumorous and pseudoencephalitic syndromes. Cases of such neurologic disorders require an all-round examination including ophthalmooscopy, EEG, computerized tomography of the brain, craniography and scanning of the skeleton

  14. Preoperative surgical planning and simulation of complex cranial base tumors in virtual reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Zhi-qiang; LI Liang; MO Da-peng; ZHANG Jia-yong; ZHANG Yang; BAO Sheng-de

    2008-01-01

    @@ The extremely complex anatomic relationships among bone,tumor,blood vessels and cranial nerves remains a big challenge for cranial base tumor surgery.Therefore.a good understanding of the patient specific anatomy and a preoperative planning are helpful and crocial for the neurosurgeons.Three dimensional (3-D) visualization of various imaging techniques have been widely explored to enhance the comprehension of volumetric data for surgical planning.1 We used the Destroscope Virtual Reality (VR) System (Singapore,Volume Interaction Pte Ltd,software:RadioDexterTM 1.0) to optimize preoperative plan in the complex cranial base tumors.This system uses patient-specific,coregistered,fused radiology data sets that may be viewed stereoscopically and can be manipulated in a virtual reality environment.This article describes our experience with the Destroscope VR system in preoperative surgical planning and simulation for 5 patients with complex cranial base tumors and evaluates the clinical usefulness of this system.

  15. Bilateral traumatic paralysis of abducent nerves and clivus fracture: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderon-Miranda Willen Guillermo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Clivus fractures are a rare pathology, frecuently associated tohigh power trauma. Such injuries may be associated with vascular and cranial nerves lesions. The abducens nerve is particularly vulnerable to traumatic injuries due to its long intracranial course, since their real origin until the lateral rectus muscle. The unilateral abducens nerve palsy of 1- 2-7% occurs in patients with cranial trauma, bilateral paralysis is rare. We report a patient who presented bilateral abducens nerve palsy associated with a clivus fracture

  16. Isolated abducens nerve palsy after closed head trauma: a pediatric case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Karen; Wojciechowski, Marek; Poot, Sandra; De Keyser, Katrien; Ceulemans, Berten

    2008-09-01

    Cranial nerve lessions often accompany head trauma. Nevertheless, isolated involvement of the sixth nerve without any cranial or cervical fracture is rare. Nerve injury could occur at the sites of the dural entry points and at the petrous apex during down- or upward movement of the brain caused by violent linear force to the head. Management is symptomatic. Most cases improve within three months and many resolve by six months, but spontaneous recovery does not always occur. We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy who developed isolated abducens nerve palsy after closed head trauma.

  17. Post traumatic facial nerve palsy without temporal bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scuotto, A.; Cappabianca, S.; Capasso, R.; Porto, A.; D'Oria, S.; Rotondo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve injury following head trauma is a frequent event with or without temporal bone fractures. Computed tomography is the imaging modality of choice for assessing the possible bone disruption of the facial nerve canal. Magnetic resonance is helpful in presence of a facial nerve paralysis, unexplained by computed tomography findings. We present a case of delayed post-traumatic facial nerve palsy without radiological evidence of temporal bone fractures, in which magnetic resonance was crucial for diagnosing the nerve impairment. Radiological findings in accordance both with electrodiagnostic tests and clinical presentation suggested the successful conservative management. - Highlights: • Facial nerve is more prone to damage than any other cranial nerve after trauma. • Facial nerve trauma is usually associated with temporal bone fractures. • MRI is mandatory in case of no evidence of bone disruption at CT.

  18. Developmental Changes in the Connective Tissues of the Porcine Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Ellen O.; Samlan, Robin A.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Cook, Sarah; Smiley-Jewell, Suzette; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) branches from the vagus cranial nerve to innervate structures important for voicing and swallowing. Damage to this nerve, commonly associated with surgery or idiopathic etiologies that largely occur with aging, results in impaired voicing and swallowing. Sunderland proposed a model of peripheral nerve damage whereby a nerve’s ability to resist damage from stretch and compression is determined by the quantity and composition of its epineurial connective tiss...

  19. Facial Pain Followed by Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy: A Case Report with Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    GV, Sowmya; BS, Manjunatha; Goel, Saurabh; Singh, Mohit Pal; Astekar, Madhusudan

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the commonest cranial nerve motor neuropathy. The causes range from cerebrovascular accident to iatrogenic damage, but there are few reports of facial nerve paralysis attributable to odontogenic infections. In majority of the cases, recovery of facial muscle function begins within first three weeks after onset. This article reports a unique case of 32-year-old male patient who developed facial pain followed by unilateral facial nerve paralysis due to odontogen...

  20. Radiation-induced cranial neuropathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, X.; Tang, Y.; Lu, K.; Peng, Y. [Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Neurology; Chen, M. [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the long-term characteristics of radiation-induced cranial nerve injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We studied cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in 328 NPC patients who received radiotherapy between 1994 and 2006. Follow-up was 93.6% complete as of December 2009. A total of 72 patients with CNP were recruited for analysis (56 men and 16 women). Patients with evidence of residual or recurrent tumor accompanied by CNP were excluded. The characteristics of CNP and the relationship with the radiation fields as well as re-radiotherapy were evaluated. After a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, 72 patients were found to have developed CNP. The latency of palsy ranged from 0.6-16.0 years. For the 67 patients with first course radiation, the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were the most vulnerable combination, occurring in 57 patients (85.1%). Patients with facial-cervical field radiation had a significantly longer latency comparing with that of patients with facial-cervical split fields (p = 0.021). In the first 5 years, 49.3% of patients developed CNP, while 40.3% presented CNP in the second 5-year period. In patients with first course radiation, 61 patients had more than one CNP. With regard to the 5 patients with re-radiation, most of them had multiple upper cranial nerve injuries. Radiation therapy of NPC patients may lead to cranial neuropathy. Patients with facial-cervical radiation fields had a longer latency for the manifestation of CNP compared with those patients who were treated with split fields. In patients with re-radiotherapy, the frequency of upper cranial nerve injury increased greatly.

  1. Radiation-induced cranial neuropathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong, X.; Tang, Y.; Lu, K.; Peng, Y.; Chen, M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the long-term characteristics of radiation-induced cranial nerve injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We studied cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in 328 NPC patients who received radiotherapy between 1994 and 2006. Follow-up was 93.6% complete as of December 2009. A total of 72 patients with CNP were recruited for analysis (56 men and 16 women). Patients with evidence of residual or recurrent tumor accompanied by CNP were excluded. The characteristics of CNP and the relationship with the radiation fields as well as re-radiotherapy were evaluated. After a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, 72 patients were found to have developed CNP. The latency of palsy ranged from 0.6-16.0 years. For the 67 patients with first course radiation, the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were the most vulnerable combination, occurring in 57 patients (85.1%). Patients with facial-cervical field radiation had a significantly longer latency comparing with that of patients with facial-cervical split fields (p = 0.021). In the first 5 years, 49.3% of patients developed CNP, while 40.3% presented CNP in the second 5-year period. In patients with first course radiation, 61 patients had more than one CNP. With regard to the 5 patients with re-radiation, most of them had multiple upper cranial nerve injuries. Radiation therapy of NPC patients may lead to cranial neuropathy. Patients with facial-cervical radiation fields had a longer latency for the manifestation of CNP compared with those patients who were treated with split fields. In patients with re-radiotherapy, the frequency of upper cranial nerve injury increased greatly.

  2. Endoscopic transpterygoidal repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient with extensive osteoradionecrosis of the skull base: case report and technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Y; Lim, E; Waran, V; Prepageran, N

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic endonasal techniques have recently become the method of choice in dealing with cerebrospinal fluid leak involving the anterior cranial fossa. However, most surgeons prefer an intracranial approach when leaks involve the middle cranial fossa. This case report illustrates the possibilities of using endoscopic techniques for cerebrospinal fluid leaks involving the middle fossa. A 37-year-old male patient presented with multiple areas of cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak due to osteoradionecrosis following radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma 4 years earlier. Clinical examination showed involvement of all cranial nerves except the IInd and XIth nerves on the left side. A prior attempt to repair the cerebrospinal fluid leak with craniotomy was not successful. This case demonstrates the successful endoscopic repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

  3. The effect of the field strength on standardized MRI of the brain to demonstrate cranial nerves and vessels: a comparison of 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla; Auswirkung der Feldstaerke bei der standardisierten Kernspintomographie des Gehirns am Beispiel der Darstellung von Hirnnerven und Gefaessen in den basalen Zisternen: Vergleich zwischen 1,5 und 3,0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roettgen, R.; Haltaufderheide, K.; Schroeder, R.J.; Lorenz, M.; Herzog, H.; Neumann, F.; Lehmkuhl, L.; Winter, L.; Felix, R.; Bruhn, H. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charite Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Comparison of MR images acquired as routine examinations at a field strength of 3.0 T and 1.5 T to determine whether and to which degree the image quality improves at the higher field strength of 3.0 T. Materials and Methods: Routine MR images of 200 patients were examined retrospectively, with 100 images obtained at 1.5 T and 100 obtained at 3.0 T. The examinations were performed with a quadrature head coil and focused on the basal cisterns because of the abundance of small distinct structures in this region. We selected the T2-weighted 2D-FSE sequence in transverse direction for comparison. At both field strengths, the same section thickness of 5 mm and a matrix of 512 x 388 (FOV: 220 mm) were used. The quality of the images was evaluated with regard to depicting the cranial nerves N. III, V-X, the AICA and PICA. For comparison, image quality was rated with a score from 1 (well defined) to 5 (not depicted). Results: A score of 1 was obtained in 46% of the anatomic structures examined at 3.0 T and in only 9.2% at 1.5 T. A score of 2 was given in 27.6% of the anatomic structures at 3.0 T vs. 23.5% at 1.5 T, a score of 3 in 17.2% vs. 28.1%, a score of 4 in 8.6% vs. 28.7%, and a score of 5 in 0.4% vs. 10.3%, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U test showed significance at p<0.001 for the comparison of images at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla. Conclusion: Routine magnetic resonance imaging using the same quadrature coil technique and similar acquisition times at 3.0 T and 1.5 T shows an improvement for T2-weighted images at the higher field strength. (orig.)

  4. Bilateral optical nerve atrophy secondary to lateral occipital lobe infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junfeng; Wei, Shihui

    2013-06-01

    To report a phenomenon of optical nerve atrophy secondary to lateral occipital lobe infarction. Two successive patients with unilateral occipital lobe infarction who experienced bilateral optical nerve atrophy during the follow-up underwent cranial imaging, fundus photography, and campimetry. Each patient was diagnosed with occipital lobe infarction by cranial MRI. During the follow-up, a bilateral optic atrophy was revealed, and campimetry showed a right homonymous hemianopia of both eyes with concomitant macular division. Bilateral optic atrophy was related to occipital lobe infarction, and a possible explanation for the atrophy was transneuronal degeneration caused by occipital lobe infarction.

  5. Isolated abducens nerve palsy with hyperhomocysteinemia: Association and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virender Sachdeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic abducens nerve palsy usually presents as isolated cranial nerve palsy in the middle aged and elderly patients with known risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, carotid artery disease, etc., In this report, we describe four patients with isolated abducens nerve palsy who presented with an acute onset diplopia whose detailed history and examination were suggestive of an ischemic etiology. Detailed systemic and laboratory evaluation revealed hyperhomocysteinemia as the only potential risk factor. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of association of hyperhomocysteinemia and isolated abducens nerve palsy.

  6. Cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian children | Eyong | Nigerian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 41, No 2 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  7. Imaging the olfactory tract (Cranial Nerve no.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprez, Thierry P.; Rombaux, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    This review paper browses pros and cons of the different radiological modalities for imaging the olfactory tract and highlights the potential benefits and limitation of more recent advances in MR and CT technology. A systematic pictorial overview of pathological conditions affecting olfactory sense is given. Techniques for collecting quantitative data on olfactory bulb volume and on olfactory sulcus depth are described. At last, insights into functional imaging of olfactory sense are shown.

  8. Morphometric analysis of the fascicular organisation of the optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radunović Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The optic nerve is anatomically observed in four segments: intrabulbar, orbital, canalicular, and cranial. According to the literature, the surface of the transversal cut of the nerve is different through it. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fascicular organisation of the optic nerve, throughout its three segments from the eye. Methods. Five pairs of optic nerves, obtained from the autopsies were examined. Using Heidenhain's (azan staining, the cuts were prepared for microscopy. Morphometric analysis was performed using the stereological methods for morphometric cytology - the Weible’s testing system M42. The following measures were established: the surface of the transverse cut of the nerve, the entire surface of fasciculi, the entire surface of connective tissue and blood vessels, the number of fasciculi, the surface of a single fasciculus. Results. The surface of the transverse cut of the nerve was found to grow from the orbital to the cranial segment, as well as the entire surface of fasciculi. While their number is significantly lower in the cranial segment, the number of fasciculi varied slightly between the orbital and the canalicular segment. The surface of a single fasciculus grows from the bulb to the chiasma. There is probable a cause to believe that this may be due to fusion of the “small” fasciculi in the orbitocranial direction. Conclusion. There are significant differences among the examined parameters of the different parts of the optic nerve.

  9. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  10. A comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, Part II: glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves and cervical spinal nerves 1-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Chern, Joshua J; Rizk, Elias B; Loukas, Marios; Miller, Joseph H; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate on the skull base and upper neck regions in order to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized into two parts. Part I discusses the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches and other nerve trunks or branches in the vicinity. Part II deals with the anastomoses between the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or between these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part II is presented in this article. Extensive and variable neural anastomoses exist between the lower cranial nerves and between the upper cervical nerves in such a way that these nerves with their extra-axial communications can be collectively considered a plexus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. CT measurements of cranial growth: microcephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Torkelson, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) head scans were measured to determine the cranial dimensions of four children with microcephaly. These measurements were compared with cranial dimensions of normal children. CT proved to be useful in determining the developmental status of children with neurologic problems relative to their normal counterparts on the basis on cranial dimensions

  12. MRI findings in cranial eumycetoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Munawwar; Sureka, Jyoti; Chacko, Geeta; Eapen, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Cranial eumycetoma (CE) due to direct inoculation of Madurella grisea into the scalp is extremely rare. We describe a case of CE caused by direct inoculation of M. grisea with the characteristic MRI findings of the “dot-in-circle” sign and a conglomeration of multiple, extremely hypointense “dots.”

  13. Invasive cranial mycosis our experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Kumbhkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi can cause serious cranial infections in immunocompromised and diabetic patients. Common pathogens mainly include Aspergillus and Mucor. These organisms cause tissue invasion and destruction of adjacent structures (e.g. orbit, ethmoid, sphenoid, maxillary & cavernous sinuses. Mortality and morbidity rate is high despite combined surgical, antifungal and antidiabetic treatment. We present our experience of six cases with such infection.

  14. Complete Cranial Iliac Osteotomy to Approach the Lumbosacral Foramen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dyall

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An approach using a complete cranial iliac osteotomy (CCIO to access the lumbosacral (LS foramen in dogs from lateral was developed using cadavers and applied in a clinical patient with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS. The foraminal enlargement in the cadavers and the patient was documented on postoperative CT scans. The preoperative CT scan of the patient showed moderate cranial telescoping of the sacral roof and a moderate central disk protrusion, leading to moderate to severe compression of the cauda equina. In addition, there was lateral spondylosis with consequential stenosis of the right LS foramen. The right L7 nerve had lost its fat attenuation and appeared thickened. After a routine L7S1 dorsal laminectomy with a partial discectomy, a CCIO was performed, providing good access to the LS foramen and the adhesions around the proximal L7 nerve caudoventral to the foramen. The osteotomy was stabilized with a locking plate and a cerclage wire. The dog recovered well from the procedures and after 36 h, the dog walked normally and was discharged from the hospital. Eight and 16 weeks later, the signs of the DLSS had markedly improved. From these data, it can be concluded that the CCIO is a useful approach to the LS foramen and intervertebral disk in selected patients with DLSS, giving good access to the structures around the LS foramen.

  15. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the ulnar nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  16. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  17. Title IX: With New Opportunities, Girls' Interest Rises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporek, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    On June 23, 1972, President Richard M. Nixon signed into law Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibits gender discrimination in any federally financed education program or activity. Title IX is far-reaching, but the law is most often associated with school and college athletics. Title IX allows schools to prove their athletic…

  18. 77 FR 64401 - Order of Succession for HUD Region IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [FR-5550-D-12] Order of Succession for HUD Region IX... Field Offices (Region IX). This Order of Succession supersedes all previous Orders of Succession for HUD Region IX. DATES: Effective Date: October 9, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lawrence D. Reynolds...

  19. Unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies associated with posterior fossa exploration surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ayman; Clerkin, James; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Green, Sandra; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-03-06

    Multiple cranial nerves palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment is a rare clinical presentation. This case report describes a young man who developed a unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment. There are different theories to explain this presentation, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We propose that this patient cranial nerve palsies developed following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, potentially as a consequence of rapid change in CSF dynamics. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016.

  20. The facial nerve: anatomy and associated disorders for oral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Kojiro; Townsend, Grant; Ghabriel, Mounir

    2018-04-01

    The facial nerve, the seventh cranial nerve, is of great clinical significance to oral health professionals. Most published literature either addresses the central connections of the nerve or its peripheral distribution but few integrate both of these components and also highlight the main disorders affecting the nerve that have clinical implications in dentistry. The aim of the current study is to provide a comprehensive description of the facial nerve. Multiple aspects of the facial nerve are discussed and integrated, including its neuroanatomy, functional anatomy, gross anatomy, clinical problems that may involve the nerve, and the use of detailed anatomical knowledge in the diagnosis of the site of facial nerve lesion in clinical neurology. Examples are provided of disorders that can affect the facial nerve during its intra-cranial, intra-temporal and extra-cranial pathways, and key aspects of clinical management are discussed. The current study is complemented by original detailed dissections and sketches that highlight key anatomical features and emphasise the extent and nature of anatomical variations displayed by the facial nerve.

  1. Epidemiological approach to emergent cranial surgery of cranial traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülagü Kaptan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: In this study, we aim to define the emergent cranial surgery of cranial trauma cases in terms of the reason of occurance, diagnosis, prognostic factors and results. Methods: 153 cases hospitalized in our clinic during a four year period were statistically analysed in accordance with trauma etiology, age, gender, application GCS (Glascow Coma Score mortality rate, location and established patology.

    Results: 76% (116 of the 153 cases were male. The most frequent etiological reasons were, in descending order, traffic accident 52% (n = 80, fall 34% (n = 53, direct trauma to the head 14(n =20. 45% (n = 69 were diagnosed epidural haematomas, 26% (n = 40 were diagnosed depression fractures and 3% (n = 5 were diagnosed intracerebral haematomas. A meaningful statistical difference was found in the comparison of the diagnosis regarding gender (p=0,012 age group (p=0,0282 and GCS (p=0,0001.

    Conclusions: In order to prevent cranial traumas, studies aimed at minimizing traffic accidents should be undertaken. The most essential action after the accident has occured is triage, and this is of great importance in order to establish communication among the health institutions.

  2. Providing Transparency to the Title IX Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Terry

    2017-01-01

    When U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced Sept. 7, 2017, that her department would revisit how Title IX rules are enforced with respect to campus sexual assault, she said the first step would be a "transparent notice and comment process" to replace the 2011 "guidance" (and follow up 2014 guidance) that has been…

  3. Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    provide a unique microenvironment supporting the accumulation of more platelets and the elaboration of a fibrin - rich network produced by coagulation...process and can initiate the formation of a platelet - rich thrombus by tethering the platelet to a thrombogenic surface. Several ligands binding to GP Ib... Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jerry Ware, Ph.D

  4. Factor IX gene haplotypes in Amerindians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, R F; Araújo, A G; Zago, M A; Guerreiro, J F; Figueiredo, M S

    1997-02-01

    We have determined the haplotypes of the factor IX gene for 95 Indians from 5 Brazilian Amazon tribes: Wayampí, Wayana-Apalaí, Kayapó, Arára, and Yanomámi. Eight polymorphisms linked to the factor IX gene were investigated: MseI (at 5', nt -698), BamHI (at 5', nt -561), DdeI (intron 1), BamHI (intron 2), XmnI (intron 3), TaqI (intron 4), MspI (intron 4), and HhaI (at 3', approximately 8 kb). The results of the haplotype distribution and the allele frequencies for each of the factor IX gene polymorphisms in Amerindians were similar to the results reported for Asian populations but differed from results for other ethnic groups. Only five haplotypes were identified within the entire Amerindian study population, and the haplotype distribution was significantly different among the five tribes, with one (Arára) to four (Wayampí) haplotypes being found per tribe. These findings indicate a significant heterogeneity among the Indian tribes and contrast with the homogeneous distribution of the beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes but agree with our recent findings on the distribution of alpha-globin gene cluster haplotypes and the allele frequencies for six VNTRs in the same Amerindian tribes. Our data represent the first study of factor IX-associated polymorphisms in Amerindian populations and emphasizes the applicability of these genetic markers for population and human evolution studies.

  5. Cranial neuronavigation with functional monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, V.; Oberle, J.; Kretschmer, T.; Richter, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    Minimise the risks is an essential objective of neurosurgery. The technological progress achieved in the last few years, especially regarding imaging methods and image processing capabilities, offers the tools to manage the risks. The authors explain initial experience obtained with microscope-based cranial neuronavigation systems combined with direct cortical monitoring methods and give an outlook on expected devlopments in the future. (orig./CB) [de

  6. Cranial imaging in child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Wilms, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Casteels, I. [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-04-01

    Serious head injury in children less than 2 years old is often the result of child abuse. The role of the different neuroimaging modalities in child abuse is reviewed. Skull X-ray and cranial CT are mandatory. Repeat or serial imaging may be necessary and brain MR imaging may contribute to the diagnostic work-up, particularly in the absence of characteristic CT findings. The radiologist plays an important role in accurately identifying non-accidental cranial trauma. The clinical presentation can be non-specific or misleading. The possibility should be considered of a combined mechanism, i.e., an underlying condition with superimposed trauma. In this context, the radiologist is in the front line to suggest the possibility of child abuse. It is therefore important to know the spectrum of, sometimes subtle, imaging findings one may encounter. Opthalmological examination is of the greatest importance and is discussed here, because the combination of retinal hemorrhages and subdural hematoma is very suggestive of non-accidental cranial trauma. (orig.)

  7. Cranial imaging in child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, P.; Wilms, G.; Casteels, I.

    2002-01-01

    Serious head injury in children less than 2 years old is often the result of child abuse. The role of the different neuroimaging modalities in child abuse is reviewed. Skull X-ray and cranial CT are mandatory. Repeat or serial imaging may be necessary and brain MR imaging may contribute to the diagnostic work-up, particularly in the absence of characteristic CT findings. The radiologist plays an important role in accurately identifying non-accidental cranial trauma. The clinical presentation can be non-specific or misleading. The possibility should be considered of a combined mechanism, i.e., an underlying condition with superimposed trauma. In this context, the radiologist is in the front line to suggest the possibility of child abuse. It is therefore important to know the spectrum of, sometimes subtle, imaging findings one may encounter. Opthalmological examination is of the greatest importance and is discussed here, because the combination of retinal hemorrhages and subdural hematoma is very suggestive of non-accidental cranial trauma. (orig.)

  8. Acute sixth nerve palsy in a young man, beware of the 'red herring'.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, E C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Cranial nerve palsies has several etiologies including vascular insufficiency, neoplasm, trauma and inflammation. Isolated sixth nerve palsy is an extremely rare presenting feature of leukemia. AIM: We describe an unusual ocular presentation of a bilateral progressive sixth nerve palsy in a young male with a preceding head injury. CONCLUSION: Acquired sixth nerve palsies in young adults may be due to trauma but in the absence of a definitive history other systemic processes must be outruled. We describe a case of bilateral sixth nerve palsy in a patient with ALL with no obvious CNS involvement. Potential etiological mechanisms are discussed.

  9. [Isolated palsy of the hypoglossal nerve complicating infectious mononucleosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra-Dallière, C; Mernes, R; Juntas-Morales, R

    2011-01-01

    Neurological complications of infectious mononucleosis are rare. Various disorders have been described: meningitis, encephalitis, peripheral neuropathy. Isolated cranial nerve palsy has rarely been reported. A 16-year-old man was admitted for isolated and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy, four weeks after infectious mononucleosis. Cerebral MRI, cerebrospinal fluid study and electromyography were normal. IgM anti-VCA were positive. Two months later, without treatment, the tongue had almost fully recovered. To the best of our knowledge, only seven cases of isolated palsy of the hypoglossal nerve complicating infectious mononucleosis have been previously reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathogenesis of cranial neuropathies in Moebius syndrome: Electrodiagnostic orofacial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Francis; Flores-Guevara, Roberto; Sergent, Bernard; Baudon, Jean Jacques; Aouizerate, Jessie; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Gitiaux, Cyril

    2018-02-09

    We designed a retrospective study of 59 patients with congenital sporadic nonprogressive bilateral facial and abducens palsies. Examinations included needle electromyography (EMG) of facial and oral muscles, facial nerve motor latency and conduction velocity (FNCV), and blink responses (BR). Neurogenic EMG changes were found in 1 or more muscles in 55 of 59 patients, with no abnormal spontaneous activity. EMG changes were homogeneously neurogenic in 17 patients, homogeneously myopathic in 1 patient, and heterogeneous in 41 of 59 patients. Motor latency was increased according to recordings from 52 of 137 facial muscles. An increase of motor latency was not associated with neurogenic EMG (Fischer's test: right, P = 1; left, P = 0.76). FNCV was slowed in 19 of 36 patients. BR was absent bilaterally in 35 of 58 patients; when present, R1 and R2 latencies were normal. Our results support the hypothesis of an early developmental defect localized in motor cranial nerves with spared V-VII internuclear pathways. Muscle Nerve, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Cranial trepanation in primitive cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Darder, José Manuel

    A review is presented on cranial trepanations performed by primitive cultures. The scientific interest in this topic began after the discovery in 1965 by Ephraim G. Squier of a pre-Columbian trepanated skull, and studied by Paul Broca in Paris. Pseudotrepanation and other types of cranial manipulation are reviewed. The techniques, technology, and instruments for every type of trepanation are well known. There are a surprisingly high percentage of cases showing signs of post-trepanation survival. Indications for trepanation are speculative, perhaps magic. Although trepanation in primitive cultures is widespread around the world, and throughout time, the main fields of interest are the Neolithic Period in Europe, the pre-Columbian Period in Andean South America, and some contemporaneous Pacific and African tribes. This particular trepanation procedure has no relationship with modern Neurosurgery, or with trepanations with therapeutic purposes performed since the Greco-Roman period in Europe, and afterwards around the world. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Conjoined twin piglets with duplicated cranial and caudal axes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, C A; Partlow, G D; Fisher, K R

    1994-06-01

    Twins with doubling of the cranial and caudal poles, yet having a single thorax, are rare. One set of diprosopus, dipygus porcine conjoined twins was studied. In addition to the conjoining anomaly, these twins also exhibited ambiguous internal reproductive features. The twins had two snouts, three eyes, a single thorax, and were duplicated from the umbilicus caudally. Radiography indicated a single vertebral column in the cervical region. The vertebral columns were separate caudally from this point. There was a total of six limbs--one pair of forelimbs and two pairs of hindlimbs. Many medial structures failed to develop in these twins. Medial cranial nerves V-XII were absent or displaced although apparently normal laterally. The medial palates were present but shortened, whereas the medial mandibular rami had folded back on themselves rostrally to form a midline mass between the two chins. Each twin had only one lateral kidney and one lateral testis. Medial scrotal sacs were present but devoid of a testis. There was a midline, "uterine"-like structure which crossed between the twins. However, histological analysis of this structure revealed it to be dysplastic testicular tissue. The relationship between the abnormal reproductive features in these twins and the conjoining is unclear. The anatomy of these twins, in addition to the literature reviewed, illustrates the internal anatomical heterogeneity of grossly similar conjoined twins. A review of the literature also suggests that conjoined twinning may be more common in swine than was previously suspected.

  13. Evaluation of factor IX deficiency by interdigitated electrode (IDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hashim, Uda; Uda, M. N. A.

    2017-03-01

    Factor IX deficiency is the main cause of hemophilia A and B. This a severe excessive bleeding disorder that can even kill the patient if not treated with the right prescription of Factor IX hormone to stop the bleeding. The bleeding can be caused by an injury or even a sudden bleeding in some very rare cases. To find the Factor IX effectiveness and to understand the deficiency more carefully for the future of medicine, experiments are conducted to test the Factor IX using the Interdigitated Electrode (IDE) and gold Nanoparticle with the help of Nanoelectrical technology.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) mediates tumor cell interactions with microenvironment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závadová, Zuzana; Závada, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2005), s. 977-982 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : carbonic anhydrase IX * cell adhesion * microenvironment Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.572, year: 2005

  15. Endocrinologic complications of cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauner, R.; Rappaport, R.

    1990-01-01

    Cranial irradiation has become one of the leading causes of growth hormone (GH) deficiency. The risk and time of onset of GH deficiency depend mainly on the dose delivered to the hypothalamo-pituitary region: GH deficiency is infrequent after doses under 20 grays and nearly constant after doses above 45 grays. For a given dose, a younger age at the time of irradiation and administration of the dose over a shorter time period increase the risk of GH deficiency. GH secretion can be adequately evaluated using rapid stimulation tests and is usually well correlated with growth, except in patients with radiation-induced precocious puberty or growth delay due to radiation-induced cartilage lesions [fr

  16. Endocrinologic complications of cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauner, R.; Rappaport, R.

    1989-01-01

    Cranial irradiation has become one of the leading causes of growth hormone (GH) deficiency. The risk and time of onset of GH deficiency depend mainly on the dose delivered to the hypothalamo-pituitary region: GH deficiency is infrequent after doses under 20 grays and nearly constant after doses above 45 grays. For a given dose, a younger age at the time of irradiation and administration of the dose over a shorter time period increase the risk of GH deficiency. GH secretion can be adequately evaluated using rapid stimulation tests and is usually well correlated with growth, except in patients with radiation-induced precocious puberty or growth delay due to radiation-induced cartilage lesions [fr

  17. Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabacher, Mark A.; Martin, Rodney Alexander; Waterman, Robert D.; Oostdyk, Rebecca Lynn; Ossenfort, John P.; Matthews, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The automation of pre-launch diagnostics for launch vehicles offers three potential benefits: improving safety, reducing cost, and reducing launch delays. The Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype demonstrated anomaly detection, fault detection, fault isolation, and diagnostics for the Ares I-X first-stage Thrust Vector Control and for the associated ground hydraulics while the vehicle was in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and while it was on the launch pad. The prototype combines three existing tools. The first tool, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), is a model-based tool from Qualtech Systems Inc. for fault isolation and diagnostics. The second tool, SHINE (Spacecraft Health Inference Engine), is a rule-based expert system that was developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We developed SHINE rules for fault detection and mode identification, and used the outputs of SHINE as inputs to TEAMS. The third tool, IMS (Inductive Monitoring System), is an anomaly detection tool that was developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The three tools were integrated and deployed to KSC, where they were interfaced with live data. This paper describes how the prototype performed during the period of time before the launch, including accuracy and computer resource usage. The paper concludes with some of the lessons that we learned from the experience of developing and deploying the prototype.

  18. Differential diagnosis of MRI detected intra cranial space occupying lesions (ICSOLS)-role of 99MTC tetrofosmin cerebral spect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmal, S.; Sundaram, P.S.; Kumar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Discriminating the correct etiology of Intra Cranial Space Occupying Lesions (ICSOLs) detected by MRI is of paramount importance in deciding the right therapeutic approach. Functional imaging like 99m Tc Tetrofosmin cerebral SPECT (C SPECT) can be used to differentiate malignant from other benign cerebral pathologies. Objective: Our aim was to assess the efficacy of C SPECT in differentiating various etiologies (i.e. Infective / Inflammatory, Neoplastic and Post Radiotherapy changes) of MRI detected ICSOLs. We also aimed to assess the incremental value of quantitative uptake ratios in identifying the exact nature of ICSOLs. Method: 26 Patients (M:F=20:6), age range 28-76 yrs, mean 42±7 yrs were evaluated by 99mTc Tetrofosmin cerebral SPECT. 14/26 patients were HIV positive cases while remaining 12 were treated patients of intracerebral malignancies. All these patients had one or more discrete MRI detected ICSOLs. 6/4 patients with HIV and 4/12 patients in the non HIV group showed more than 1 discrete ICSOLs. 20 mci of 99mTc Tetrofosmin was injected IV .15 min (early) and 2 hrs (delayed) post injection C SPECT images were acquired on a dual head variable angle Gamma camera. After reconstruction, transverse, coronal and sagittal images were co- registered with DICOM online available MRI images using aco- registration software. Focal Tetrofosmin uptake in MRI detected ICSOL was interpreted as abnormal. Tetrofosmin uptake index (Ix) was calculated in early and delayed images as ratio of counts in lesion to that of contra lateral region. A value of more than 1.3 was considered to be abnormal. Persistent Ix of more than 1.3 in initial and delayed images were considered to be malignant while Ix of more or less than 1.3 in initial but less than 1.3 in delayed images was considered to be benign in both groups. Results: In HIV group (14 pts), 4 patients showed an Ix of less than 1.3 in both early and delayed images and 7 patients showed an Ix of more than 1.3 in early but

  19. Small vestibular schwannomas presenting with facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espahbodi, Mana; Carlson, Matthew L; Fang, Te-Yung; Thompson, Reid C; Haynes, David S

    2014-06-01

    To describe the surgical management and convalescence of two patients presenting with severe facial nerve weakness associated with small intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (VS). Retrospective review. Two adult female patients presenting with audiovestibular symptoms and subacute facial nerve paralysis (House-Brackmann Grade IV and V). In both cases, post-contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing lesion within the internal auditory canal without lateral extension beyond the fundus. Translabyrinthine exploration demonstrated vestibular nerve origin of tumor, extrinsic to the facial nerve, and frozen section pathology confirmed schwannoma. Gross total tumor resection with VIIth cranial nerve preservation and decompression of the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was performed. Both patients recovered full motor function between 6 and 8 months after surgery. Although rare, small VS may cause severe facial neuropathy, mimicking the presentation of facial nerve schwannomas and other less common pathologies. In the absence of labyrinthine extension on MRI, surgical exploration is the only reliable means of establishing a diagnosis. In the case of confirmed VS, early gross total resection with facial nerve preservation and labyrinthine segment decompression may afford full motor recovery-an outcome that cannot be achieved with facial nerve grafting.

  20. Title IX--Beyond Compliance to Personal Commitment and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Barbara

    1976-01-01

    In order to move beyond legal compliance to real equality of opportunity, every educational leader must develop some systematic means of extending his or her personal knowledge and skills with respect to Title IX. Provides a check list for self evaluation of educational leaders and a guide for developing an implementation plan for Title IX.…

  1. A License for Bias: Sex Discrimination, Schools, and Title IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Susan Ed.

    This report discusses non-sports-related Title IX complaints filed with the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) from 1993-1997. Its purpose is to dispel the popular belief that Title IX is a sports-equity law and to determine the effectiveness of the legislation. The document examines the kinds of complaints filed, the status…

  2. Tissue-specific expression of type IX collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, I.; Muragaki, Y.; Ninomiya, Y.; Olsen, B.R.; Hayashi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the tissue-specific expression of type IX collagen, a major component of cartilage fibrils. It contains molecules with three genetically distinct subunits. The subunits form three triple-helical (CO) domains separated by non-triple-helical (NC) sequences. One of the subunits in cartilage, α1(IX), contains a large amino-terminal globular domain, NC4, while a second subunit, α2(IX), contains a covalently attached chondroitin sulfate chain. The site of attachment for this chain is located within the non-triple-helical sequence NC3, which separates the amino-terminal and central triple-helical domains of the type IX molecules. The NC3 region is 5 amino acid residues longer in the α2(IX) chain than in the α1(IX) and α3(IX) chains. This may explain why type IX molecules tend to show a sharp angle in the NC3 region, and why monoclonal antibody molecules that are specific for the stub left after chondroitinase ABC digestion of the chondroitin sulfate side chain always are located on the outside of the angle

  3. The History, Uses, and Abuses of Title IX. 2016 Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Professors, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This report, an evaluation of the history and current uses of Title IX, is the result of a joint effort by a subcommittee that included members of the AAUP's Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure and the Committee on Women in the Academic Profession. The report identifies tensions between current interpretations of Title IX and the academic…

  4. Intrinsic thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to human carbonic anhydrase IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkuvienė, Vaida; Matulienė, Jurgita; Juozapaitienė, Vaida; Michailovienė, Vilma; Jachno, Jelena; Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-04-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase 9th isoform (CA IX) is an important marker of numerous cancers and is increasingly interesting as a potential anticancer drug target. Various synthetic aromatic sulfonamide-bearing compounds are being designed as potent inhibitors of CA IX. However, sulfonamide compound binding to CA IX is linked to several reactions, the deprotonation of the sulfonamide amino group and the protonation of the CA active site Zn(II)-bound hydroxide. These linked reactions significantly affect the affinities and other thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpies and entropies of binding. The observed and intrinsic affinities of compound binding to CA IX were determined by the fluorescent thermal shift assay. The enthalpies and entropies of binding were determined by the isothermal titration calorimetry. The pKa of CA IX was determined to be 6.8 and the enthalpy of CA IX-Zn(II)-bound hydroxide protonation was -24 kJ/mol. These values enabled the analysis of intrinsic thermodynamics of a library of compounds binding to CA IX. The most strongly binding compounds exhibited the intrinsic affinity of 0.01 nM and the observed affinity of 2 nM. The intrinsic thermodynamic parameters of compound binding to CA IX helped to draw the compound structure to thermodynamics relationship. It is important to distinguish the intrinsic from observed parameters of any disease target protein interaction with its inhibitors as drug candidates when drawing detailed compound structure to thermodynamics correlations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Labeled factor IX kinetics in patients with hemophilia-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.J.; Thompson, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    Labeled factor IX was infused five time into four patients with hemophilia-B. Ten-minute plasma recovery average 35% (SD +/- 2) and the mean T 1/2 beta-phase elimination was 23 hr (+/- 5). No alteration in the postinfusion 125I-factor-IX could be detected by radioautography of plasma samples run on polyacrylamide gels or on crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Label was excreted into the urine as free 125I-iodide. Kinetics were similar when the labeled preparation was infused alone or with a commercial concentrate containing unlabeled factor IX. Infusion of factor IX in man is best described by a two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model where factor IX is distributed in a space larger than the plasma volume

  6. Cranial MR finding of reversible eclampsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Seok Ho; Hwang, Mi Young; Kim, Kyu Hwa; Kim, Seon Goo; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Joo, Yang Goo; Suh, Soo Ji [College of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To evaluate clinical usefulness of cranial magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in diagnosis and for follow-up of reversible eclampsia. Cranial MRI was performed on four consecutive pregnant patients(ante-partum 3 cases, postpartum 1 cases), who had generalized tonic-clonic seizure caused by eclampsia. One of the four patients underwent follow-up MRI. Cranial MRI typically demonstrated bilateral hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images and iso-to hypointense lesions on T1-weighted images. MRI abnormalities were most commonly located in the distribution of the posterior cerebral artery circulation and were associated with symptoms of visual disturbance. Most cranial lesions of eclampsia demonstrated in MRI were reversible. MRI with its capability to detect even subtle abnormalities in the brain that are not visible on CT, and may be the technique of choice for evaluating the cerebral the pathology of pregnant women with eclampsia.

  7. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence

  8. Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  9. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  10. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  11. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  12. Temporary unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy secondary to infectious mononucleosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Al Ramzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tongue paralysis due to isolated palsy of XII cranial nerve is uncommon neurological finding. It is a multi-etiological condition, and may occur secondary to infectious mononucleosis. It is presented with characteristic signs e.g. reduced tongue movements with deviation to the affected side on protrusion. The diagnosis is challenging and based on thorough clinical examination and laboratory and imaging findings. A case of 31year old Kuwaiti male, presented to emergency room at Mubarak Alkabeer Hospital-Kuwait, with infectious mononucleosis complicated with temporary unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy is reported, with an emphasis that paralysis of cranial nerve may be due to a less severe systemic condition, and not necessarily associate an underling malignancy. To the best of our knowledge, hypoglossal nerve palsy complicating infectious mononucleosis has never been previously reported in Kuwait.

  13. Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, B.B.; Elsas, L.J.; Wyly, J.B.; Pasquali, M.

    1994-01-01

    Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OS-CS) is a specific bone dysplasia manifested by hypertelorism, flat nasal bridge, frontal bossing, large head, hypoplastic maxilla, palate anomalies, chronic otitis media, hearing deficits, nasal obstruction, and neurological changes of deafness, facial palsy, ophthalmoplegia, and mental retardation. We will review the clinical and radiologic findings in a new patient from birth to 20 years; this is believed to be the thirty-fifth patient reported. OS-CS is 2.5 times more common in females and occurs as an autosomal dominant condition or a sporadic dominant mutation with patients presenting for evaluation from the newborn period to the fifth decade. Skeletal abnormalities are distinctive including sclerosis of the skull base and calvarium, linear striated densities in the long bones and pelvis, and poor development of the mastoid and sinus air cells. Radionuclide bone scans with SPECT indicated in our patient increased bone turnover which was supported by biochemical findings of increased pyridinoline excretion. The major complications are due to constriction of essential foramina at the skull base. The condition is not life-threatening but can produce disability. (orig.)

  14. Cranial trepanation in The Egyptian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, S; Carrillo, J M

    2014-09-01

    Medicine and literature have been linked from ancient times; proof of this shown by the many doctors who have made contributions to literature and the many writers who have described medical activities and illnesses in their works. An example is The Egyptian, the book by Mika Waltari that provides a masterly narration of the protagonist's medical activity and describes the trepanation technique. The present work begins with the analysis of trepanations since prehistory and illustrates the practice of the trepanation in The Egyptian. The book mentions trepanation frequently and illustrates how to practice it and which instruments are required to perform it. Trepanation is one of the oldest surgical interventions carried out as treatment for cranial trauma and neurological diseases, but it also had the magical and religious purpose of expelling the evil spirits which caused the mental illness, epilepsy, or migraine symptoms. Trepanation is a surgical practice that has been carried out since prehistory to treat post-traumatic epilepsy, migraine, and psychiatric illness. The Egyptian is a book that illustrates the trepan, the trepanation technique, and the required set of instruments in full detail. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Ares I-X Flight Test Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. R.; Tuma, M. L.; Heitzman, K.

    2007-01-01

    In response to the Vision for Space Exploration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has defined a new space exploration architecture to return humans to the Moon and prepare for human exploration of Mars. One of the first new developments will be the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), which will carry the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), into Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to support International Space Station (ISS) missions and, later, support lunar missions. As part of Ares I development, NASA will perform a series of Ares I flight tests. The tests will provide data that will inform the engineering and design process and verify the flight hardware and software. The data gained from the flight tests will be used to certify the new Ares/Orion vehicle for human space flight. The primary objectives of this first flight test (Ares I-X) are the following: Demonstrate control of a dynamically similar integrated Ares CLV/Orion CEV using Ares CLV ascent control algorithms; Perform an in-flight separation/staging event between an Ares I-similar First Stage and a representative Upper Stage; Demonstrate assembly and recovery of a new Ares CLV-like First Stage element at Kennedy Space Center (KSC); Demonstrate First Stage separation sequencing, and quantify First Stage atmospheric entry dynamics and parachute performance; and Characterize the magnitude of the integrated vehicle roll torque throughout the First Stage (powered) flight. This paper will provide an overview of the Ares I-X flight test process and details of the individual flight tests.

  16. Unusually large quiescent ancient schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta P Wanjari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is considered as a variant of schwannoma, comprising about 10% of all schwanommas. Schwannoma is a benign neoplasm derived from the nerve sheath of peripheral motor, sensory and sympathetic nerves and from the cranial nerve pairs. It usually presents as a solitary soft-tissue lesion which is slow growing, encapsulated and is often associated with nerve attached peripherally. Diagnosis is often confirmed with the microscopic examination. The long standing schwannoma attributes to degenerative changes and is termed "ancient" schwannoma. Present case is of a 68-year-old female patient who reported with an asymptomatic large swelling below mandible on the left side since last 23 years. The lesion was surgically excised under general anesthesia.

  17. Visualization of isolated trigeminal nerve invasion by lymphoma using gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manon-Espaillat, R.; Lanska, D.J.; Ruff, R.L.; Cleveland Veteran's Administration Medical Center, OH; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH; Masaryk, T.; University Hospitals of Cleveland, OH; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH

    1990-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with active histiocytic lymphoma for 12 years developed an isolated right trigeminal neuropathy. Initial evaluation with head computed tomography, X-rays of the skull base, bone scan, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis including cytology were normal. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enlargement of the proximal third of the right trigeminal nerve. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI can be useful for the early demonstration of cranial nerve invasion by lymphoma. (orig.)

  18. On the nature of the afferent fibers of oculomotor nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, E; Draicchio, F; Pettorossi, V E; Carobi, C; Grassi, S; Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L

    1989-03-01

    The oculogyric nerves contain afferent fibers originating from the ophthalmic territory, the somata of which are located in the ipsilateral semilunar ganglion. These primary sensory neurons project to the Subnucleus Gelatinosus of the Nucleus Caudalis Trigemini, where they make presynaptic contact with the central endings of the primary trigeminal afferents running in the fifth cranial nerve. After complete section of the trigeminal root, the antidromic volleys elicited in the trunk of the third cranial nerve by stimulating SG of NCT consisted of two waves belonging to the A delta and C groups. The area of both components of the antidromic volleys decreased both after bradykinin and hystamine injection into the corresponding cutaneous region and after thermic stimulation of the ipsilateral trigeminal ophthalmic territory. The reduction of such potentials can be explained in terms of collision between the antidromic volleys and those elicited orthodromically by chemical and thermic stimulation. Also, capsaicin applied on the nerve induced an immediate increase, followed by a long lasting decrease, of orthodromic evoked response area. These findings bring further support to the nociceptive nature of the afferent fibers running into the oculomotor nerve.

  19. Neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring during an optic nerve schwannoma removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Escanio Cortés, Manuel; Tena-Suck, Martha; Orozco Garduño, Adolfo Josué; López Pizano, Jesús Alejandro; Villanueva Domínguez, Jonathan; Fernández Gónzalez-Aragón, Maricarmen; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports the case of a patient with optic nerve schwannoma and the first use of neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potentials during the removal of such tumor with no postoperative visual damage. Schwannomas are benign neoplasms of the peripheral nervous system arising from the neural crest-derived Schwann cells, these tumors are rarely located in the optic nerve and the treatment consists on surgical removal leading to high risk of damage to the visual pathway. Case report of a thirty-year-old woman with an optic nerve schwannoma. The patient underwent surgery for tumor removal on the left optic nerve through a left orbitozygomatic approach with intraoperative monitoring of left II and III cranial nerves. We used Nicolet Endeavour CR IOM (Carefusion, Middleton WI, USA) to performed visual evoked potentials stimulating binocularly with LED flash goggles with the patient´s eyes closed and direct epidural optic nerve stimulation delivering rostral to the tumor a rectangular current pulse. At follow up examinations 7 months later, the left eye visual acuity was 20/60; Ishihara score was 8/8 in both eyes; the right eye photomotor reflex was normal and left eye was mydriatic and arreflectic; optokinetic reflex and ocular conjugate movements were normal. In this case, the epidural direct electrical stimulation of optic nerve provided stable waveforms during optic nerve schwannoma resection without visual loss.

  20. IBM PC/IX operating system evaluation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Granier, Martin; Hall, Philip P.; Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation plan for the IBM PC/IX Operating System designed for IBM PC/XT computers is discussed. The evaluation plan covers the areas of performance measurement and evaluation, software facilities available, man-machine interface considerations, networking, and the suitability of PC/IX as a development environment within the University of Southwestern Louisiana NASA PC Research and Development project. In order to compare and evaluate the PC/IX system, comparisons with other available UNIX-based systems are also included.

  1. Macroscopic Innervation of the Dura Mater Covering the Middle Cranial Fossa in Humans Correlated to Neurovascular Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin-Hyo; Hwang, Seung-Jun; Koh, Ki-Seok; Song, Wu-Chul; Han, Sang-Don

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminovascular system within the cranial dura mater is a possible cause of headaches. The aim of this study is to investigate macroscopically dural innervation around the middle meningeal artery (MMA) in the middle cranial fossa. Forty-four sides of the cranial dura overlying the skull base obtained from 24 human cadavers were stained using Sihler's method. Overall, the nervus spinosus (NS) from either the maxillary or mandibular trigeminal divisions ran along the lateral wall of the middle meningeal vein rather than that of the MMA. Distinct bundles of the NS running along the course of the frontal branches of the MMA were present in 81.8% of cases ( N = 36). Others did not form dominant nerve bundles, instead giving off free nerve endings along the course of the MMA or dural connective tissue. The distribution of these nerve endings was similar to that of the course of the frontal, parietal and petrosal branches of the MMA (11.4%). The others were not restricted to a perivascular plexus, crossing the dural connective tissues far from the MMA (6.8%). These findings indicate that the NS generally travels alongside the course of the frontal branches of the MMA and terminates in the vicinity of the pterion.

  2. Macroscopic Innervation of the Dura Mater Covering the Middle Cranial Fossa in Humans Correlated to Neurovascular Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Hyo Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The trigeminovascular system within the cranial dura mater is a possible cause of headaches. The aim of this study is to investigate macroscopically dural innervation around the middle meningeal artery (MMA in the middle cranial fossa. Forty-four sides of the cranial dura overlying the skull base obtained from 24 human cadavers were stained using Sihler’s method. Overall, the nervus spinosus (NS from either the maxillary or mandibular trigeminal divisions ran along the lateral wall of the middle meningeal vein rather than that of the MMA. Distinct bundles of the NS running along the course of the frontal branches of the MMA were present in 81.8% of cases (N = 36. Others did not form dominant nerve bundles, instead giving off free nerve endings along the course of the MMA or dural connective tissue. The distribution of these nerve endings was similar to that of the course of the frontal, parietal and petrosal branches of the MMA (11.4%. The others were not restricted to a perivascular plexus, crossing the dural connective tissues far from the MMA (6.8%. These findings indicate that the NS generally travels alongside the course of the frontal branches of the MMA and terminates in the vicinity of the pterion.

  3. A CLINICAL STUDY ON EXTRA CRANIAL COMPLICATIONS OF CHRONIC SUPPURATIVE OTITIS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Prasad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES : The Objective is to study the risk of extra - cranial complications in cases of CSOM and to study the common extra - cranial complications of CSOM with respect to age , sex and socio - economic status . METHODS: The present study comprises of 60 patients with extra - cranial complications secondary to Chronic Suppurative Otitis media who attended to the Dept . o f E. N. T S rivenkateswara G overnment General Hospital, T irupathi . An analysis was made regarding the demographic profile , clinical features , surgical techniques , operative findings , and the outcome of the study . RESULTS : In this study of 60 cases , the most common ext racranial complication of CSOM is Postauralabscess . These extra cranial complications are associated with 15% of intracranial complications of which Meningitis is most common . The complications are more commonly seen in the younger population in second to third decades of life with Male predominance . The duration of ear discharge is not associated with the increasing number of complications . Cholesteatoma is commonly responsible for the development of Extracranial complications of CSOM . Pseudomonas aerugino sa is the commonest organism found in the complications . Canal wall down surgery is the main mode of treatment in this category of patients . The Facial canal dehiscence is associated with a poor outcome in the cases of Facial nerve paralysis . CONCLUSION: The extra - cranial complications of CSOM pose a great challenge to the Developing countries despite its declining incidence . It is in this situation that early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention are most important for the decreased morbidity and mor tality of patients .

  4. Radiologic evidence for absence of the facial nerve in Mobius syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.; Valk, J.; Vries, R. de; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To detail the radiologic findings in Mobius syndrome, in order to clarify its pathogenetic mechanisms. METHODS: High resolution three-dimensional T1 (MP rage) and T2 (CISS) weighted MRI were used to study the cisternal and canalicular portion of the seventh cranial nerve in six Mobius

  5. Mastoid bone fracture presenting as unusual delayed onset of facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ko-Chiang; Wang, Ann-Ching; Chen, Shyi-Jou

    2008-03-01

    Delayed-onset facial nerve paralysis is a rather uncommon complication of a mastoid bone fracture for children younger than 10 years. We routinely arrange a cranial computed tomography (CT) for patients encountering initial loss of consciousness, severe headache, intractable vomiting, and/or any neurologic deficit arising from trauma to the head. However, minor symptomatic cranial nerve damage may be missed and the presenting symptom diagnosed as being a peripheral nerve problem. Herein, we report a case of a young boy who presented at our emergency department (ED) 3 days subsequent to his accident, complaining of hearing loss in the right ear and paralysis of the ipsilateral face. Unpredictably, we observed his cranial CT scan revealing a linear fracture of the skull over the right temporal bone involving the right mastoid air cells. The patient was treated conservatively and recovered well without any adverse neurologic consequences. We emphasize that ED physicians should arrange a cranial CT scan for a head-injured child with symptomatic facial nerve palsy, even if there are no symptoms such as severe headache, vomiting, Battle sign, and/or initial loss of consciousness.

  6. Legal Forum: Title IX: Does It Apply to Employees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Martha

    1981-01-01

    Briefly reviews a number of Federal court cases that have dealt with Title IX, considering the issue of whether the 1974 regulations prohibiting sex discrimination in employment practices accurately reflect the intent of the 1972 law. (GC)

  7. Protoporphyrin IX-induced structural and functional changes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Drug-protein binding; haemoglobin; myoglobin; protoporphyrin IX; red blood cells ... haemoglobin and myoglobin are potentiated by the protein-porphyrin complexation. Possible ...... 1985 Uptake and delivery of the respiratory gases; in Best ...

  8. Effects of cranial radiation on hearing in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibadoux, G.M.; Pereira, W.V.; Hodges, J.M.; Aur, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The hearing sensitivity of 61 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia who were admitted to our Total Therapy IX study between December 1975 and July 1977 was studied. Their treatment included combined chemotherapy, 2400 rads of cranial radiation, and intrathecal methotrexate. Subjects initially received an otologic examination and middle ear function testing. Audiometric testing was not done until ears were free of outer or middle ear pathology. If the child had no outer or middle ear disease, audiometric thresholds were obtained for the test frequencies: 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000, and 8000 Hz. Pure-tone thresholds were obtained before irradiation (61 patients) and at 6, 12, and 36 months thereafter (49, 46, and 22 patients, respectively). The median age of time of baseline testing was 10 years, 2 months. A paired sample test based on group data was used to test whether there were any significant changes from the threshold values at 6, 12, and 36 months after irradiation. Thresholds were not significantly affected for any test frequency at any test time. Assessments of individual audiograms indicated that none of the children had any significant reductions in hearing levels at the end of the third year after cranial irradiation

  9. [Herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, V; Leonardi, A; Pavese, M; Raviola, E; Giordano, M

    2004-01-01

    Herpes zoster (shingles) is caused when the varicella zoster virus that has remained latent since an earlier varicella infection (chicken-pox) is reactivated. Herpes Zoster is a less common and endemic disease than varicella: factors causing reactivation are still not well known, but it occurs in older and/or immunocompromised individuals. Following reactivation, centrifugal migration of herpes zoster virus (HZV) occurs along sensory nerves to produce a characteristic painful cutaneous or mucocutaneous vesicular eruption that is generally limited to the single affected dermatome. Herpes zoster may affect any sensory ganglia and its cutaneous nerve: the most common sites affected are thoracic dermatomes (56%), followed by cranial nerves (13%) and lumbar (13%), cervical (11%) and sacral nerves (4%). Among cranial nerves, the trigeminal and facial nerves are the most affected due to reactivation of HZV latent in gasserian and geniculated ganglia. The 1st division of the trigeminal nerve is commonly affected, whereas the 2nd and the 3rd are rarely involved. During the prodromal stage, the only presenting symptom may be odontalgia, which may prove to be a diagnostic challenge for the dentist, since many diseases can cause orofacial pain, and the diagnosis must be established before final treatment. A literature review of herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve is presented and the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis and treatment modalities are underlined. A case report is presented.

  10. The bony crescent sign - a new sign of facial nerve schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, A.; Fagan, P.

    1992-01-01

    Schwannomas are relatively uncommon intracranial tumours. They most commonly involve the acoustic nerve followed in frequency by the trigeminal nerve. Other cranial nerves are rarely involved. Facial nerve schwannomas occurring within the petrous temporal bone are very rare. Their diagnosis may be missed prospectively even when appropriate computerized tomography (CT) scans are performed. Even in retrospect the site of abnormality may be difficult to identify, especially if there is an associated middle ear mass such as a cholesteatoma. In the 4 cases presented the facial nerve schwannoma was seen on high resolution CT as a soft tissue mass bounded anteriorly by a thin rim of bone. This bony crescent sign is a previously undescribed feature of facial nerve schwannoma which appears to be strongly indicative of the presence of this tumour. Recognition of this sign makes these tumours arising in the region of the geniculate ganglion easy to diagnose prospectively. 12 refs., 6 figs

  11. Cranial osteopathy: its fate seems clear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartman Steve E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the original model of cranial osteopathy, intrinsic rhythmic movements of the human brain cause rhythmic fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid and specific relational changes among dural membranes, cranial bones, and the sacrum. Practitioners believe they can palpably modify parameters of this mechanism to a patient's health advantage. Discussion This treatment regime lacks a biologically plausible mechanism, shows no diagnostic reliability, and offers little hope that any direct clinical effect will ever be shown. In spite of almost uniformly negative research findings, "cranial" methods remain popular with many practitioners and patients. Summary Until outcome studies show that these techniques produce a direct and positive clinical effect, they should be dropped from all academic curricula; insurance companies should stop paying for them; and patients should invest their time, money, and health elsewhere.

  12. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma; Aydin, Kubilay; Aktuglu, Cigdem

    2004-01-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  13. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma [Department of Paediatrics, Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey); Aydin, Kubilay [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Camlikyolu, B. mehmetpasa sokak yavuz apt. No:10/10, Etiler, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktuglu, Cigdem [Department of Paediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-02-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  14. Surgical Anatomy of the Cervical Part of the Hypoglossal Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Brian Ngure; Butt, Fawzia; Mandela, Pamela; Odula, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Iatrogenic injuries to cranial nerves, half of which affect the hypoglossal nerve, occur in up to 20% of surgical procedures involving the neck. The risk of injury could be minimized by in-depth knowledge of its positional and relational anatomy. Forty-one hypoglossal nerves were dissected from cadaveric specimens and positions described in relation to the internal carotid artery (ICA), external carotid artery (ECA), carotid bifurcation, mandible, hyoid bone, mastoid process, and the digastric tendon. The distance of the nerve from where it crossed the ICA and ECA to the carotid bifurcation was 29.93 (±5.99) mm and 15.19 (±6.68) mm, respectively. The point where it crossed the ICA was 12.24 (±3.71) mm superior to the greater horn of hyoid, 17.16 (±4.40) mm inferior to the angle of the mandible, and 39.08 (±5.69) mm from tip of the mastoid. The hypoglossal nerve loop was inferior to the digastric tendon in 73% of the cases. The hypoglossal nerves formed high loops in this study population. Caution should be exercised during surgical procedures in the neck. The study also revealed that the mastoid process is a reliable fixed landmark to locate the hypoglossal nerve.

  15. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used...

  16. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  17. Greater palatine nerve neuropraxia after laryngeal mask insertion: A rare occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the more frequent use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA over endotracheal tubes for general anaesthesia, various cranial nerve injuries have been reported recently. We report a rare occurrence of greater palatine nerve (GPN palsy subsequent to the use of LMA Supreme™ in a young female scheduled for hand surgery. Although the exact mechanism of a nerve injury is still a matter of further research, we postulate pressure neuropraxia of GPN as a causative factor in the development of numbness over the hard palate after the removal of LMA in the post operative period.

  18. Involvement of peripheral III nerve in multiple sclerosis patient: Report of a new case and discussion of the underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Natalia; Amador, Maria Del Mar; Dormont, Didier; Lubetzki, Catherine; Bertrand, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disorder that affects the central nervous system myelin. However, a few radiological cases have documented an involvement of peripheral cranial nerves, within the subarachnoid space, in MS patients. We report the case of a 36-year-old female with a history of relapsing-remitting (RR) MS who consulted for a subacute complete paralysis of the right III nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination showed enhancement and thickening of the cisternal right III nerve, in continuity with a linear, mesencephalic, acute demyelinating lesion. Radiological involvement of the cisternal part of III nerve has been reported only once in MS patients. Radiological involvement of the cisternal part of V nerve occurs more frequently, in almost 3% of MS patients. In both situations, the presence of a central demyelinating lesion, in continuity with the enhancement of the peripheral nerve, suggests that peripheral nerve damage is a secondary process, rather than a primary target of demyelination.

  19. Effect of two novel CGRP-binding compounds in a closed cranial window rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Louise Kathrine; Edvinsson, Lars; Olesen, Jes

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo effects of two novel calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) binding molecules in the genuine closed cranial window model in the rat. The RNA-Spiegelmer (NOX-C89) and the monoclonal CGRP antibody are CGRP scavengers and might be used as an alternative to CGRP-receptor a......We investigated the in vivo effects of two novel calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) binding molecules in the genuine closed cranial window model in the rat. The RNA-Spiegelmer (NOX-C89) and the monoclonal CGRP antibody are CGRP scavengers and might be used as an alternative to CGRP......-receptor antagonists in the treatment of migraine. Rats were anaesthetized and a closed cranial window established. Changes in dural and pial artery diameter and mean arterial blood pressure were measured simultaneously. Infusion of the RNA-Spiegelmer or the CGRP antibody alone had no effect on the arteries...... and the consequent liberation of CGRP from perivascular sensory nerve fibres....

  20. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Cranial Base: Is Low-Dose Radiotherapy Effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Meyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease of unknown etiology with different clinical features. A standardised treatment has not been established so far. Case Report. We report a case of a 28-year-old patient who initially presented with hypesthesia of the fifth cranial nerve and pain of the left ear. Diagnosis showed a tumour localised in the cranial base with a maximum diameter of 4.1 cm. The diagnosis of LCH was confirmed histologically by biopsy. Diagnostic workup verified the cranial lesion as the sole manifestation of LCH. A total dose of 9 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy was delivered. The symptoms dissolved completely within 6 months after radiation; repeated CT and MRI scans revealed a reduction in size of the lesion and a remineralisation of the bone. After a followup of 13 years the patient remains free of symptoms without relapse or any side effects from therapy. Discussion. Due to the indolent course of the disease with a high rate of spontaneous remissions the choice of treatment strongly depends on the individual clinical situation. In the presented case low-dose radiotherapy was sufficient to obtain long-term local control in a region with critical structures and tissues.

  1. Action of the protoporphyrin-Ix (Pp-Ix) in the life period of Drosophila mutants deficient in endogenous antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal E, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    The human being is daily exposed to free radicals or reactive oxygen species (Ros), as a result of the breathing and the interactions with xenobiotics that can cause irreversible lesions in molecules and cellular structures and that they are associated to diseases like the cancer, neuro degenerative and to the acceleration of the normal process of aging. Fortunately, to reduce the damaging effect of the Ros the cell has endogenous antioxidant systems constituted by antioxidant enzymes as: the superoxide dismutase (Sod), the catalase (Cat), and the glutathione peroxidase and reductase. Even, when these systems are not enough, we find to the exogenous antioxidants that cooperate in the balance of the Ros, as the porphyrins that include to the chlorophyllin, the hemin and the bilirubin among others. The protoporphyrin-Ix (Pp-Ix) is a tetra pyrrole without metallic center with antimutagenic and antioxidant activity similar to that of the chlorophyllin. However, is also known that their over-expression has toxic effects, because induces Ros. In Drosophila melanogaster, recently was found that the Pp-Ix have dual action anti and persistent mutagenic. One of their possible mechanism to act like mutagen is through the Ros induction. To evaluate this possibility and based in that the increase in the Ros levels can accelerate the aging process, in the present work the Pp-Ix role was evaluated, in the life period of Drosophila melanogaster strains deficient in Sod and Cat, sensitive to radiation or oxidative stress (rad, whd and flr 3 ) and a wild one as control (C-S). Females and males of each strain were treated chronically for separate with sucrose or Pp-Ix and every 15 days a group of each sex was irradiated with 10 Gy of gamma rays. The results indicated that the chronic treatment with Pp-Ix and in combination with radiation, increased the life period of the C-S strain. The Sod strain had a contrary effect and this effect was pronounced with the combined treatment of Pp-Ix

  2. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia): Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Julien; Manger, Paul R; Fernandez, Vincent; Rubidge, Bruce S

    2016-01-01

    Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma), has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays) associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism), its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia).

  3. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia: Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Benoit

    Full Text Available Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma, has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism, its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia.

  4. Transzygomatic approach with intraoperative neuromonitoring for resection of middle cranial fossa tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byung Chul; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Sup; Hong, Jae Taek; Sung, Jae Hoon; Yang, Seung-Ho

    2012-02-01

    The authors reviewed the surgical experience and operative technique in a series of 11 patients with middle fossa tumors who underwent surgery using the transzygomatic approach and intraoperative neuromonitoring (IOM) at a single institution. This approach was applied to trigeminal schwannomas (n = 3), cavernous angiomas (n = 3), sphenoid wing meningiomas (n = 3), a petroclival meningioma (n = 1), and a hemangiopericytoma (n = 1). An osteotomy of the zygoma, a low-positioned frontotemporal craniotomy, removal of the remaining squamous temporal bone, and extradural drilling of the sphenoid wing made a flat trajectory to the skull base. Total resection was achieved in 9 of 11 patients. Significant motor pathway damage can be avoided using a change in motor-evoked potentials as an early warning sign. Four patients experienced cranial nerve palsies postoperatively, even though free-running electromyography of cranial nerves showed normal responses during the surgical procedure. A simple transzygomatic approach provides a wide surgical corridor for accessing the cavernous sinus, petrous apex, and subtemporal regions. Knowledge of the middle fossa structures is essential for anatomic orientation and avoiding injuries to neurovascular structures, although a neuronavigation system and IOM helps orient neurosurgeons.

  5. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring of the vestibulocochlear nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mirela V

    2011-12-01

    Neurosurgical procedures involving the skull base and structures within can pose a significant risk of damage to the brain stem and cranial nerves. This can have life-threatening consequences and/or result in devastating neurologic deficits. Over the past decade, intraoperative neurophysiology has significantly evolved and currently offers a great tool for live monitoring of the integrity of nervous structures. Thus, dysfunction can be identified early and prompt modification of the surgical management or operating conditions, leads to avoidance of permanent structural damage.Along these lines, the vestibulocochlear nerve (CN VIII) and, to a greater extent, the auditory pathways as they pass through the brain stem are especially at risk during cerebelopontine angle (CPA), posterior/middle fossa, or brain stem surgery. CN VIII can be damaged by several mechanisms, from vascular compromise to mechanical injury by stretch, compression, dissection, and heat injury. Additionally, cochlea itself can be significantly damaged during temporal bone drilling, by noise, mechanical destruction, or infarction, and because of rupture, occlusion, or vasospasm of the internal auditory artery.CN VIII monitoring can be successfully achieved by live recording of the function of one of its parts, the cochlear or auditory nerve (AN), using the brain stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), electrocochleography (ECochG), and compound nerve action potentials (CNAPs) of the cochlear nerve.This is a review of these techniques, their principle, applications, methodology, interpretation of the evoked responses, and their change from baseline, within the context of surgical and anesthesia environments, and finally the appropriate management of these changes.

  6. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  7. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  8. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  9. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... later on. Inflammation of the tendons ( tendonitis ) or joints ( arthritis ) can also put pressure on the nerve. ... how fast electrical signals move through a nerve Neuromuscular ultrasound to view problems with the muscles and ...

  10. Terminal-Nerve-Derived Neuropeptide Y Modulates Physiological Responses in the Olfactory Epithelium of Hungry Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum)

    OpenAIRE

    Mousley, Angela; Polese, Gianluca; Marks, Nikki J.; Eisthen, Heather L.

    2006-01-01

    The vertebrate brain actively regulates incoming sensory information, effectively filtering input and focusing attention toward environmental stimuli that are most relevant to the animal's behavioral context or physiological state. Such centrifugal modulation has been shown to play an important role in processing in the retina and cochlea, but has received relatively little attention in olfaction. The terminal nerve, a cranial nerve that extends underneath the lamina propria surrounding the o...

  11. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  12. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeumer, T.; Grimm, A.; Schelle, T.

    2017-01-01

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [de

  13. Enhancement of the facial nerve at MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebarski, S.S.; Telian, S.; Niparko, J.

    1990-01-01

    In the few cases studied, normal facial nerves are reported to show no MR enhancement. Because this did not fit clinical experience, the authors designed a retrospective imaging review with anatomic correlation. Between June 1989 and June 1990, 175 patients underwent focused temporal bone MR imaging before and after administration of intravenous gadopentetate dimeglumine (0.1 mmol/kg). Exclusion criteria for the study included facial nerve dysfunction (subjective or objective); facial nerve mass; central nervous system infection, inflammation, or trauma; neurofibromatosis; or previous cranial surgery of any type. The following sequences were reviewed: GE 1.5-T axial spin-echo TR 567 msec, TE 20 msec, 256 x 192, 2.0 excitations, 20-cm field of view, 3-mm section thickness. Imaging analysis was a side-by side comparison of the images and region-of-interest quantified signal intensity. Anatomic correlation included a comparison with dissection and axial histologic sections. Ninety-three patients (aged 15-75 years) were available for imaging analysis after the exclusionary criteria were applied. With 46 patients (92 facial nerves) analyzed, they found that 76 nerves (83%) showed easily visible gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement, especially about the geniculate ganglia. Sixteen (17%) of the 92 nerves did not show visible enhancement, but region-of-interest analysis showed increased intensity after gadopentetate dimeglumine administration. Sixteen patients (42%) showed right-to-left asymmetry in facial nerve enhancement. The facial nerves showed enhancement in the geniculate, tympanic, and fallopian portions; the facial nerve within the IAC showed no enhancement. This corresponded exactly with the topographic features of a circummeural arterial/venous plexus seen on the anatomic preparations

  14. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the thoracic limb of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchell, R L; Whalen, L R; Bailey, C S; Lohse, C L

    1980-01-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the thoracic limb was investigated in 36 barbiturate-anesthetized dogs, using electrophysiologic techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least five dogs by stroking the hair in the area with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed areas of considerable overlapping. The part of the CA of a given nerve supplied by only that nerve is referred to as its autonomous zone. Of all nerves arising from the brachial plexus, only the suprascapular, subscapular, lateral thoracic, thoracodorsal, and cranial and caudal pectoral nerves lacked cutaneous afferents. The dorsal cutaneous branch of C6 had a CA, but no grossly demonstrable dorsal cutaneous branches for C7 C8, or T1 were found. The cervical nerves had ventral cutaneous branches, but no lateral cutaneous branches. Thoracic nerves T2-T4 had dorsal, ventral, and lateral cutaneous branches. The cutaneous branches of the brachiocephalic, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial, median, and ulnar nerves all had CA which were overlapped by adjacent CA, thus their autonomous zones were much smaller than the cutaneous areas usually depicted for these nerves in anatomy and neurology textbooks.

  15. Ares I-X: First Flight of a New Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Stephan R.; Askins, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I-X suborbital development flight test demonstrated NASA s ability to design, develop, launch and control a new human-rated launch vehicle (Figure 14). This hands-on missions experience will provide the agency with necessary skills and insights regardless of the future direction of space exploration. The Ares I-X team, having executed a successful launch, will now focus on analyzing the flight data and extracting lessons learned that will be used to support the development of future vehicles.

  16. Synthesis of [119mSn]-mesoporphyrin IX dichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denissen, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Tin mesoporphyrin IX dichloride (Sn-MPCl 2 ) is a heme oxygenase inhibitor of current clinical interest for the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The synthesis of [ 119m Sn]-MPCl 2 for drug metabolism and disposition studies is reported. [ 119m Sn]-MPCl 2 was prepared in 60% radiochemical yield by metalation of the porphyrin nucleus of mesoporphyrin IX dihydrochloride with tin(II)-119m acetate. The product had a specific activity of 43.4 mCi/mmol and a radiochemical purity of 99%, as determined by radio-HPLC analysis. (author)

  17. On the roentgenomorphological correlations of cranial sutures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkhoglyadova, T.P.; Koval', G.Yu.; Shuaa, T.I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors explain the essence of the zone of excessive transparence along the cranial sutures visualized on the X-ray pictures during the first year of life by presence of large number of rough-fiber bone in the marginal regions. The zone of ''physiological sclerosis'' is postulated as a result of summation of the bone margin shadows consisting of compact substance (osteones). Microscopic examination of skull in brain tumors revealed a delay in the formation of bone margins in the suture region with an excessive amount of connective and osteoid tissue while in craniostenosis closure of cranial sutures being with intensive bone formation as well as by closure of the bone margins by newly formed bone tissue around the vessels of the connective layer of the suture

  18. Imaging characteristics of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wai-Yung; Saunders, Dawn E.; Brock, Penelope

    2005-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma accounts for 10-15% of all childhood malignant bone tumours and is second in prevalence to osteosarcoma. The skull bones are an unusual site of origin of primary Ewing sarcoma in children. Previous reports concentrate on the neurosurgical aspects and relatively good outcome compared to other bone tumours of the calvarium. Reported cases mainly describe the imaging characteristics on CT. To describe the MRI and CT features of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma. The neuroimaging of three cases of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma are reviewed. Our three cases show an extra-axial mass that is high attenuation on CT and low signal on T2-weighted MRI. Haemorrhagic components, dural extension and contrast enhancement are also characteristic features. CT attenuation and magnetic resonance signal characteristics reflect sheets of densely packed cells seen in Ewing sarcoma. (orig.)

  19. Effect of IX dosing on polypropylene and PVDF membrane fouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Darli Theint; Mergen, Max R D; Zhao, Oliver; Stewart, Matthew B.; Orbell, John D.; Merle, Tony; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Gray, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of ion exchange (IX) resin for organics removal from wastewater was assessed using advanced characterisation techniques for varying doses of IX. Organic characterisation using liquid chromatography with a photodiode array (PDA

  20. Cranial computed tomography of xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Koshi; Imakita, Satoru; Kawai, Ryuji; Mitomo, Masanori; Miura, Takashi; Mimaki, Takashi; Satoh, Kenji

    1986-01-01

    Brain CTs of 15 patients with complementation group A xeroderma pigmentosum were reviewed. The CT findings were cerebral atrophy and brain stem atrophy, and were more prominent in the older patients. Cranial bone change (microcephaly, calvarial thickening and so on) secondary to brain atrophy becomes overt in the patients older than 8 years. Cerebellar atrophy was not detected with CT in any case. There were neither intracranial calcification nor space occupying lesion. (author)