WorldWideScience

Sample records for crack face interactions

  1. Effect of Initial Debond Crack Location on the Face/core Debond Fracture Toughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of initial crack location on the face/core debond fracture toughness under different mixed mode loading conditions. The mixed mode loading at the crack tip is defined in terms of the mode-mixity. In order to achieve the desired initial debond crack location, a pre...... as initial debond crack location. Lower fracture toughness values were measured for specimens with the initial crack location in the face laminate....

  2. The Effect of Water on Crack Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaede, O.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    While the mechanical coupling between pore fluid and solid phase is relatively well understood, quantitative studies dealing with chemical-mechanical weakening in geological materials are rare. Many classical poroelastic problems can be addressed with the simple law of effective stress. Experimental studies show that the presence of a chemically active fluid can have effects that exceed the predictions of the law of effective stress. These chemical fluid-rock interactions alter the mechanical properties of the solid phase. Especially chemical-mechanical weakening has important ramifications for many areas of applied geosciences ranging from nuclear waste disposal over reservoir enhancement to fault stability. In this study, we model chemically induced changes of the size of the process zone around a crack tip. The knowledge of the process zone size is used to extend existing effective medium approximations of cracked solids. The stress distribution around a crack leads to a chemical potential gradient. This gradient will be a driver for mass diffusion through the solid phase. As an example, mass diffusion is towards the crack tip for a mode I crack. In this case a chemical reaction, that weakens the solid phase, will increase the size of the process zone around the crack tip. We apply our model to the prominent hydrolytic weakening effect observed in the quartz-water system (Griggs and Blacic, 1965). Hydrolytic weakening is generally attributed to water hydrolyzing the strong Si-O bonds of the quartz crystal. The hydrolysis replaces a Si-O-Si bridge with a relatively weak hydrogen bridge between two silanol groups. This enhances dislocation mobility and hence the yield stress is reduced. The plastic process zone around a crack tip is therefore larger in a wet crystal than in a dry crystal. We calculate the size of the process zone by solving this coupled mechanical-chemical problem with the Finite Element code ABAQUS. We consider single crack, collinear crack and

  3. APPLICABILITY OF THE CRACK FACE ELECTRICAL BOUNDARY CONDITIONS IN PIEZOELECTRIC MECHANICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangBaolin; HanJiecai; DuShanyi

    2004-01-01

    The electrical boundary conditions on the crack faces and their applicability in piezoelectric materials are discussed. A slit crack and a notch of finite thickness in piezoelectric materials subjected to combined mechanical and electrical loads is considered. Here, a crack is defined as a notch without thickness, which is filled with air or vacuum. The crack or notch is perpendicular to the poling direction of the medium. The ideal crack face electrical boundary conditions, i.e., the electrically permeable crack and the electrically impermeable crack, are investigated first. Then dependence of the field intensity factors on notch thickness at the notch tips is analyzed to obtain a closed-form. The results are compared with the ideal crack solutions.Some useful results are found.

  4. Mode Ⅰ Plane Crack Interacting with an Interfacial Crack Along a Circular Inhomogeneity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui; MA Jian-jun; LIU Zheng-guang

    2006-01-01

    The elastic interaction of the mode Ⅰ plane crack with an interfacial crack along a circular inhomogeneity is dealt with. The dislocation density and the stress intensity factors (SIFs) of the mode I plane crack are obtained numerically. A new kind of dislocation equilibrium equation about the plane crack is applied. The influence of some material parameters on the dislocation density and SIFs are analyzed.

  5. Face/core debond fatigue crack growth characterization using the sandwich mixed mode bending specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manca, Marcello; Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    Face/core fatigue crack growth in foam-cored sandwich composites is examined using the mixed mode bending (MMB) test method. The mixed mode loading at the debond crack tip is controlled by changing the load application point in the MMB test fixture. Sandwich specimens were manufactured using H45...... critical load, at load ratios of R=0.1 and 0.2. The crack length was determined during fatigue testing using the analytical compliance expression and verified by visual measurements. Fatigue crack growth results revealed higher crack growth rates for mode I dominated loading. For specimens with H45 core...

  6. Doubly Periodic Cracks in the Anisotropic Medium with the Account of Contact of Their Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksymovych Olesya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents complex variable integral formulae and singular boundary integral equations for doubly periodic cracks in anisotropic elastic medium. It utilizes the numerical solution procedure, which accounts for the contact of crack faces and produce accurate results for SIF evaluation. It is shown that the account of contact effects significantly influence the SIF of doubly periodic curvilinear cracks both for isotropic and anisotropic materials.

  7. Interacting Cracks in an Environmentally Assisted Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levandovsky, Artem; Balazs, Anna

    2006-03-01

    We perform the study of environmentally assisted fracture within the framework of a lattice model. Formation of an ensemble of environmentally assisted microcracks, their coalescence and formation of crack ``avalanches'' lead to a very rich dynamical picture. Under specific condition crack healing can occur due to cohesive forces, which hold material together and tend to pull atoms together even if they are separated by a crack over several lattice units. We investigate the dynamical interplay between crack formation, arrest, healing and re-cracking. The goal here is to provide an understanding of the conditions leading to the phenomena of crack healing that happens along with the crack formation. We study the morphology of crack patterns with the intentions to establish a way to enhance the healing property of a material sample.

  8. VALIDATION OF CRACK INTERACTION LIMIT MODEL FOR PARALLEL EDGE CRACKS USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Daud

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Shielding interaction effects of two parallel edge cracks in finite thickness plates subjected to remote tension load is analyzed using a developed finite element analysis program. In the present study, the crack interaction limit is evaluated based on the fitness of service (FFS code, and focus is given to the weak crack interaction region as the crack interval exceeds the length of cracks (b > a. Crack interaction factors are evaluated based on stress intensity factors (SIFs for Mode I SIFs using a displacement extrapolation technique. Parametric studies involved a wide range of crack-to-width (0.05 ≤ a/W ≤ 0.5 and crack interval ratios (b/a > 1. For validation, crack interaction factors are compared with single edge crack SIFs as a state of zero interaction. Within the considered range of parameters, the proposed numerical evaluation used to predict the crack interaction factor reduces the error of existing analytical solution from 1.92% to 0.97% at higher a/W. In reference to FFS codes, the small discrepancy in the prediction of the crack interaction factor validates the reliability of the numerical model to predict crack interaction limits under shielding interaction effects. In conclusion, the numerical model gave a successful prediction in estimating the crack interaction limit, which can be used as a reference for the shielding orientation of other cracks.

  9. Modeling human dynamics of face-to-face interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-01-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of inter-conversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents which perform a random walk in a two dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  10. Crack Interactions Study Under Thermal Load Using EFGM and XFEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Pathak

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple voids exists in all engineering component which interact with each other and affects the stress intensity factor. During their service life engineering component exposed to thermal loading. The thermal loading creates the singular stress field at the crack tip, which causes the sudden failure of component and loss of human life. Thus, the study of crack interactions under thermal loading is of great importance. In the present work, crack interaction study has been performed under mixed mode thermal loading using element free Galerkin method (EFGM and extended finite element method (XFEM. In EFGM and XFEM, the domain of interest is discretized by scattered nodes and standard FEM element respectively without physically having any crack in the domain, and the presence of a crack in the domain is ensured by extrinsic enrichment only. In extrinsic enrichment technique, additional functions were added with the standard displacement based approximation within partition of unity (PU framework. These additional functions were taken from the theoretical background of the problem. The model problems including edge crack and edge crack interactions under thermal loading solved by both EFGM and XFEM.

  11. Floating Node Method and Virtual Crack Closure Technique for Modeling Matrix Cracking-Delamination Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarvalho, N. V.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, S. T.; Baiz, P. M.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials that combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. In this study, the approach is applied to the modeling of delamination migration in cross-ply tape laminates. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration are all modeled using fracture mechanics based failure and migration criteria. The methodology proposed shows very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments.

  12. In your face: Transcendence in embodied interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun eGallagher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In cognitive psychology, studies concerning the face tend to focus on questions about face recognition, theory of mind and empathy. Questions about the face, however, also fit into a very different set of issues that are central to ethics. Based especially on the work of Levinas, philosophers have come to see that reference to the face of another person can anchor conceptions of moral responsibility and ethical demand. Levinas points to a certain irreducibility and transcendence implicit in the face of the other. In this paper I argue that the notion of transcendence involved in this kind of analysis can be given a naturalistic interpretation by drawing on recent interactive approaches to social cognition found in developmental psychology, phenomenology, and the study of autism.

  13. In your face: transcendence in embodied interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Shaun

    2014-01-01

    In cognitive psychology, studies concerning the face tend to focus on questions about face recognition, theory of mind (ToM) and empathy. Questions about the face, however, also fit into a very different set of issues that are central to ethics. Based especially on the work of Levinas, philosophers have come to see that reference to the face of another person can anchor conceptions of moral responsibility and ethical demand. Levinas points to a certain irreducibility and transcendence implicit in the face of the other. In this paper I argue that the notion of transcendence involved in this kind of analysis can be given a naturalistic interpretation by drawing on recent interactive approaches to social cognition found in developmental psychology, phenomenology, and the study of autism.

  14. ELASTIC INTERACTION BETWEEN WEDGE DISCLINATION DIPOLE AND INTERNAL CRACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Qi-hong; LIU You-wen

    2006-01-01

    The system of a wedge disclination dipole interacting with an internal crack was investigated. By using the complex variable method, the closed form solutions of complex potentials to this problem were presented. The analytic formulae of the physics variables, such as stress intensity factors at the tips of the crack produced by the wedge disclination dipole and the image force acting on disclination dipole center were obtained.The influence of the orientation, the dipole arm and the location of the disclination dipole on the stress intensity factors was discussed in detail. Furthermore, the equilibrium position of the wedge disclination dipole was also examined. It is shown that the shielding or antishielding effect of the wedge disclination to the stress intensity factors is significant when the disclination dipole moves to the crack tips.

  15. Discussion on electromagnetic crack face boundary conditions for the fracture mechanics of magneto-electro-elastic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baolin Wang; Jiecai Han

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses electromagnetic boundary conditions on crack faces in magneto-electroelastic materials, where piezoelectric, piezomagnetic and magnetoelectric effects are coupled. A notch of finite thickness in these materials is also addressed. Four idealized electromagnetic boundary conditions assumed for the crack-faces are separately investigated, I.e.(a) electrically and magnetically impermeable(crack-face).(b) electrically impermeable and magnetically permeable,(C)electrically permeable and magnetically impermeable, and(d)electrically and magnetically permeable. The influence of the notch thickness on important parameters, such as the field intensity factors, the energy release rate at the notch tips and the electromagnetic fields inside the notch, are studied and the results are obtained in closed-form. Results under different idealized electromagnetic boundary conditions on the crack-face are compared, and the applicability of these idealized assumptions is discussed.

  16. About face the essentials of interaction design

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Alan; Cronin, David; Noessel, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The essential interaction design guide, fully revised and updated for the mobile ageAbout Face: The Essentials of Interaction Design, Fourth Edition is the latest update to the book that shaped and evolved the landscape of interaction design. This comprehensive guide takes the worldwide shift to smartphones and tablets into account.  New information includes discussions on mobile apps, touch interfaces, screen size considerations, and more. The new full-color interior and unique layout better illustrate modern design concepts.  The interaction design profession is blooming with the success o

  17. Deterministic and Probabilistic Investigation on Multiple Crack Interactions in a Semi-Infinite Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui-Keun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of multiple crack interactions in fracture mechanics is important to predict the safety and reliability of structures. This study aims to investigate the interactions of multiple parallel cracks in a semi-infinite domain in both deterministic and probabilistic ways by using an automated finite element modeling procedure and the Monte Carlo simulation. The stress intensity factor is considered as an indicator of failure and accurately evaluated by using the domain integral technique. The variation of the stress intensity factor according to the position, the length, and the number of cracks is demonstrated. In a probabilistic investigation, the effects of the number of cracks, the random distribution of the crack lengths, and the crack interactions to the failure probability are studied for a semi-infinite domain. The stress redistribution among multiple cracks, the effect of unevenly distributed crack lengths, and the combined effect of crack length uncertainties and a crack shielding effect have been examined.

  18. Control effect of fracture on hard coal cracking in a fully mechanized longwall top coal caving face

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Jin-ping; LI Zhong-hua; SANG Pei-miao; CHEN Shang-qiang

    2009-01-01

    Through theoretical analysis,simulation test and practice,the law of a fracture's influence on hard top coal press cracking was studied.The study focused on the relation between fracture and coal strength,top coal caving ability and work face layout.Based on the investigation of the fracture system,the control of press cracking was achieved by matching working face to fracture orientation to improve top-coal caving ability and recov-ery.The matching principle was pointed out: The top-coal caving working face should be perpendicular to or obliquely cross the primary fracture at a large angle,and cross the secondary fracture at a small angle.The rational match can increase the recovery ratio of top-coal and avoid rib spalling.The application of control technology on hard top coal press cracking was introduced at the Iongwall top-coal caving face.

  19. Effect of interaction of embedded crack and free surface on remaining fatigue life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genshichiro Katsumata

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Embedded crack located near free surface of a component interacts with the free surface. When the distance between the free surface and the embedded crack is short, stress at the crack tip ligament is higher than that at the other area of the cracked section. It can be easily expected that fatigue crack growth is fast, when the embedded crack locates near the free surface. To avoid catastrophic failures caused by fast fatigue crack growth at the crack tip ligament, fitness-for-service (FFS codes provide crack-to-surface proximity rules. The proximity rules are used to determine whether the cracks should be treated as embedded cracks as-is, or transformed to surface cracks. Although the concepts of the proximity rules are the same, the specific criteria and the rules to transform embedded cracks into surface cracks differ amongst FFS codes. This paper focuses on the interaction between an embedded crack and a free surface of a component as well as on its effects on the remaining fatigue lives of embedded cracks using the proximity rules provided by the FFS codes. It is shown that the remaining fatigue lives for the embedded cracks strongly depend on the crack aspect ratio and location from the component free surface. In addition, it can be said that the proximity criteria defined by the API and RSE-M codes give overly conservative remaining lives. On the contrary, the WES and AME codes always give long remaining lives and non-conservative estimations. When the crack aspect ratio is small, ASME code gives non-conservative estimation.

  20. Creep, Fatigue and Environmental Interactions and Their Effect on Crack Growth in Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Ghosn, L. J.; Smith, T.

    2017-01-01

    Complex interactions of creep/fatigue/environment control dwell fatigue crack growth (DFCG) in superalloys. Crack tip stress relaxation during dwells significantly changes the crack driving force and influence DFCG. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, Kmax, parameter unsuitable for correlating DFCG behavior due to extensive visco-plastic deformation. Magnitude of remaining crack tip axial stresses controls DFCG resistance due to the brittle-intergranular nature of the crack growth process. Proposed a new empirical parameter, Ksrf, which incorporates visco-plastic evolution of the magnitude of remaining crack tip stresses. Previous work performed at 704C, extend the work to 760C.

  1. The interaction of two collinear cracks in a rectangular superconductor slab under an electromagnetic force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Zhiwen, E-mail: gaozhw@lzu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zhou Youhe [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Lee, Kang Yong, E-mail: KYL2813@yonsei.ac.k [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of two collinear cracks is obtained for a type-II superconducting under electromagnetic force. Fracture analysis is performed by means of finite element method and the magnetic behavior of superconductor is described by the critical-state Bean model. The stress intensity factors at the crack tips can be obtained and discussed for decreasing field after zero-field cooling. It is revealed that the stress intensity factor decreases as applied field increases. The crack-tip stress intensity factors decrease when the distance between the two collinear cracks increases and the superconductors with smaller crack has more remarkable shielding effect than those with larger cracks.

  2. Temporal networks of face-to-face human interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Barrat, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The ever increasing adoption of mobile technologies and ubiquitous services allows to sense human behavior at unprecedented levels of details and scale. Wearable sensors are opening up a new window on human mobility and proximity at the finest resolution of face-to-face proximity. As a consequence, empirical data describing social and behavioral networks are acquiring a longitudinal dimension that brings forth new challenges for analysis and modeling. Here we review recent work on the representation and analysis of temporal networks of face-to-face human proximity, based on large-scale datasets collected in the context of the SocioPatterns collaboration. We show that the raw behavioral data can be studied at various levels of coarse-graining, which turn out to be complementary to one another, with each level exposing different features of the underlying system. We briefly review a generative model of temporal contact networks that reproduces some statistical observables. Then, we shift our focus from surface ...

  3. Interaction factors for two elliptical embedded cracks with a wide range of aspect ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisaburo Azuma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The value of stress intensity factor may be increased through the interaction of multiple cracks that are in close proximity to one another. We investigated the interaction factors of two equal elliptical cracks with a wide range of aspect ratios. Finite element analysis for a linear elastic solid was used to obtain the interaction factor for embedded cracks in an infinite model subjected to remote tension loading. Relationships between interaction factors and dimensionless distances between the cracks were discussed. The results demonstrated that the interaction factors depend on the crack aspect ratio, whose effect is related to the dimensionless distance. Thus, it is suggested that interaction factors can be reasonably characterized using different dimensionless distances depending on the aspect ratio. Finally, we provide a simple empirical formula for obtaining the interaction factors for embedded cracks.

  4. Dynamic interaction of cracks in piezoelectric and anisotropic solids: A non-hypersingular BIEM approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dineva Petia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-hypersingular traction boundary integral equation method (BIEM is proposed for the treatment of crack systems in piezoelectric or anisotropic plane domains loaded by time-harmonic waves. The solution is based on the frequency dependent fundamental solution obtained by Radon transform. The proposed method is flexible, numerically efficient and has virtually no limitations regarding the material type, crack geometry and type of wave loading. The accuracy and convergence of the BIEM solution for stress intensity factors is validated by comparison with existing results from the literature. Simulations for different crack configurations such as coplanar collinear or cracks in arbitrary position to each other are presented and discussed. They demonstrate among others the strong effect of electromechanical coupling, show the frequency dependent shielding and amplification resulting from crack interaction and reveal the sensitivity of the K-factors on the complex influence of both wave-crack and crack-crack interaction.

  5. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, W.J. [P and L Technologies, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Gokhale, A.M. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Antolovich, S.D. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measure of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. The objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such a height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scale-dependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  6. THREE-DIMENSIONAL INTERACTIONS OF CIRCULAR CRACK IN TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC PIEZOELECTRIC SPACE WITH RESULTANT SOURCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Peng-fei; DING Hao-jiang; Leung Andraw-YT

    2006-01-01

    Exact solutions in form of elementary functions were derived for the stress and electric displacement intensity factors of a circular crack in a transversely isotropic piezoelectric space interacting with various stress and charge sources: force dipoles, electric dipoles, moments, force dilatation and rotation. The circular crack includes penny-shaped crack and external circular crack and the locations and orientations of these resultant sources with respect to the crack are arbitrary. Such stress and charge sources may model defects like vacancies, foreign particles, and dislocations. Numerical results are presented at last.

  7. THE CRACK-INCLUSION INTERACTION AND THE ANALYSIS OF SINGULARITY FOR THE HORIZONTAL CONTACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶昉敏; 汤任基

    2001-01-01

    Using the basic solutions of a single crack and a single inclusion, and making use of the principle of linear superposition of elastic mechanics, the interaction problem between a planar crack and a flat inclusion in an elastic solid is studied. The problem is reduced to solve a set of standard Cauchy-type singular equations. And the stress intensity factors at points of crack and inclusion were obtained. Besides, the singularity for the horizontal contact of crack and inclusion was analyzed. The calculating model put forward can be regarded as a new technique for studying the crack and its expanding caused by inclusion tip. Then several numerical examples are given.

  8. Spoken Interaction in Online and Face-to-Face Language Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Barbara; Duensing, Annette; Stickler, Ursula; Batstone, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    While interaction in online language learning in the area of written computer-mediated communication is well researched, studies focusing on interaction in synchronous online audio environments remain scarce. For this reason, this paper seeks to map the nature and level of interpersonal interaction in both online and the face-to-face language…

  9. Spoken Interaction in Online and Face-to-Face Language Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Barbara; Duensing, Annette; Stickler, Ursula; Batstone, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    While interaction in online language learning in the area of written computer-mediated communication is well researched, studies focusing on interaction in synchronous online audio environments remain scarce. For this reason, this paper seeks to map the nature and level of interpersonal interaction in both online and the face-to-face language…

  10. Interaction of a crack with crystal defects in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, N. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Higashida, K.

    1997-06-01

    The modifications of stress states near a crack tip by interstitial impurities and by dislocations are analyzed using 2-D and 3-D potential methods. In the case of interstitial impurities, the local stress intensity k{sub D} due to impurities is much affected by their location and is altered from crack tip shielding to anti-shielding as their location changes from behind a crack tip to the front. If impurities are mobile, their forward redistribution is induced by crack fields to increase k{sub D} values. The tetragonal strain of impurities also enhances the increase of the k{sub D} values. In dislocation-crack systems, two kinds of screw dislocation arrays are observed on each different slip plane ahead of a crack tip in MgO thin crystals and they mainly induce the mode I stress intensity of shielding type as a result of the mutual cancellation of the other modes. The effect of crack tip shielding/anti-shielding on crack extension is discussed in connection with the experimental observation of fracture toughness. (orig.). 7 refs.

  11. Interference of wedge-shaped protrusions on the faces of a Griffith crack in biaxial stress. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, J.A.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-04-01

    An initial investigation of the influence of protrusion interference on the fracture toughness required to prevent unstable propagation of a Griffith crack in a brittle material is described. The interference is caused by relative shear displacement of the crack faces when subjected to remote biaxial stress with neither principal stress parallel to the crack. It is shown that for room temperature cracks smaller than about one centimeter in silicon carbide, or about one millimeter in silicon nitride, the presence of interference changes the fracture stress. A mathematical model based on linear elasticity solutions and including multiple interference sites at arbitrarily specified positions on the crack is presented. Computations of the change in required fracture toughness and its dependence on wedge geometry (size and vertex angle), applied stresses (orientation and magnitude), and location of the interference site are discussed. Results indicate that a single interference site has only a slight effect on required toughness. However, the influence of interference increases monotonically with the number of interference sites. The two-dimensional model described herein is not accurate when the interference sites are closely spaced.

  12. Path (un)predictability of two interacting cracks in polycarbonate sheets using Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, J.; Dalbe, M.-J.; Alava, M. J.; Santucci, S.

    2016-08-01

    Crack propagation is tracked here with Digital Image Correlation analysis in the test case of two cracks propagating in opposite directions in polycarbonate, a material with high ductility and a large Fracture Process Zone (FPZ). Depending on the initial distances between the two crack tips, one may observe different complex crack paths with in particular a regime where the two cracks repel each other prior to being attracted. We show by strain field analysis how this can be understood according to the principle of local symmetry: the propagation is to the direction where the local shear - mode KII in fracture mechanics language - is zero. Thus the interactions exhibited by the cracks arise from symmetry, from the initial geometry, and from the material properties which induce the FPZ. This complexity makes any long-range prediction of the path(s) impossible.

  13. Path (un)predictability of two interacting cracks in polycarbonate sheets using Digital Image Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, J; Dalbe, M-J; Alava, M J; Santucci, S

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation is tracked here with Digital Image Correlation analysis in the test case of two cracks propagating in opposite directions in polycarbonate, a material with high ductility and a large Fracture Process Zone (FPZ). Depending on the initial distances between the two crack tips, one may observe different complex crack paths with in particular a regime where the two cracks repel each other prior to being attracted. We show by strain field analysis how this can be understood according to the principle of local symmetry: the propagation is to the direction where the local shear - mode KII in fracture mechanics language - is zero. Thus the interactions exhibited by the cracks arise from symmetry, from the initial geometry, and from the material properties which induce the FPZ. This complexity makes any long-range prediction of the path(s) impossible.

  14. Informal face-to-face interaction improves mood state reflected in prefrontal cortex activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ichiro eWatanabe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress with wearable sensors has enabled researchers to capture face-to-face interactions quantitatively and given great insight into human dynamics. One attractive field for applying such sensors is the workplace, where the relationship between the face-to-face behaviors of employees and the productivity of the organization has been investigated. One interesting result of previous studies showed that informal face-to-face interaction among employees, captured by wearable sensors that the employees wore, significantly affects their performance. However, the mechanism behind this relationship has not yet been adequately explained, though experiences at the job scene might qualitatively support the finding. We hypothesized that informal face-to-face interaction improves mood state, which in turn affects the task performance. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the change of mood state before and after break time for two groups of participants, one that spent their breaks alone and one that spent them with other participants, by administering questionnaires and taking brain activity measurements. Recent neuroimaging studies have suggested a significant relationship between mood state and brain activity. Here, we show that face-to-face interaction during breaks significantly improved mood state, which was measured by Profiles of Mood States (POMS.We also observed that the verbal WM task performance of participants who did not have face-to-face interaction during breaks decreased significantly. In this paper, we discuss how the change of mood state was evidenced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC activity accompanied by working memory (WM tasks measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS.

  15. Informal Face-to-Face Interaction Improves Mood State Reflected in Prefrontal Cortex Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress with wearable sensors has enabled researchers to capture face-to-face interactions quantitatively and given great insight into human dynamics. One attractive field for applying such sensors is the workplace, where the relationship between the face-to-face behaviors of employees and the productivity of the organization has been investigated. One interesting result of previous studies showed that informal face-to-face interaction among employees, captured by wearable sensors that the employees wore, significantly affects their performance. However, the mechanism behind this relationship has not yet been adequately explained, though experiences at the job scene might qualitatively support the finding. We hypothesized that informal face-to-face interaction improves mood state, which in turn affects the task performance. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the change of mood state before and after break time for two groups of participants, one that spent their breaks alone and one that spent them with other participants, by administering questionnaires and taking brain activity measurements. Recent neuroimaging studies have suggested a significant relationship between mood state and brain activity. Here, we show that face-to-face interaction during breaks significantly improved mood state, which was measured by Profiles of Mood States (POMS). We also observed that the verbal working memory (WM) task performance of participants who did not have face-to-face interaction during breaks decreased significantly. In this paper, we discuss how the change of mood state was evidenced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity accompanied by WM tasks measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). PMID:27199715

  16. Nonverbal behavior during face-to-face social interaction in schizophrenia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Mary; Healey, Patrick G T; McCabe, Rosemarie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia display social cognitive deficits. However, little is known about patients' nonverbal communication during their social encounters with others. This review identified 17 studies investigating nonverbal communication in patients' unscripted face-to-face interactions, addressing a) nonverbal differences between patients and others, b) nonverbal behavior of the patients' partners, c) the association between nonverbal behavior and symptoms, and d) the association between nonverbal behavior and social outcomes. Patients displayed fewer nonverbal behaviors inviting interaction, with negative symptoms exacerbating this pattern. Positive symptoms were associated with heightened nonverbal behavior. Patients' partners changed their own nonverbal behavior in response to the patient. Reduced prosocial behaviors, inviting interaction, were associated with poorer social outcomes. The evidence suggests that patients' nonverbal behavior, during face-to-face interaction, is influenced by patients symptoms and impacts the success of their social interactions.

  17. Internet Communication versus Face-to-Face Interaction in Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul S. N.; Leung, Louis; Lo, Venhwei; Xiong, Chengyu; Wu, Tingjun

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the role of the Internet in quality of life (QoL). Specifically, it examines the question of whether Internet communication serves, like face-to-face interactions, to enhance quality of life. It is hypothesized that the use of the Internet for interpersonal communication can improve quality of life among Internet…

  18. Discourse Management Strategies in Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Decision Making Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Sherri L.; Cech, Claude G.

    1996-01-01

    Compares discourse management strategies in face-to-face and computer-mediated interactions involving four decision-making tasks. Examines these issues in qualitative and quantitative analyses of data using an utterance-unit coding system to identify discourse functions. Finds that participants compensate for decreased efficiency by adopting…

  19. Learning Opportunities in Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication and Face-to-Face Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Yeong

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) and face-to-face (F2F) oral interaction influence the way in which learners collaborate in language learning and how they solve their communicative problems. The findings suggest that output modality may affect how learners produce language, attend to linguistic forms,…

  20. Pair Interactions and Mode of Communication: Comparing Face-to-Face and Computer Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lan Liana; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Storch, Neomy

    2010-01-01

    In today's second language classrooms, students are often asked to work in pairs or small groups. Such collaboration can take place face-to-face, but now more often via computer mediated communication. This paper reports on a study which investigated the effect of the medium of communication on the nature of pair interaction. The study involved…

  1. Learning, Interactional, and Motivational Outcomes in One-to-One Synchronous Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Stephanie Ann; VanLehn, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Face-to-face (FTF) human-human tutoring has ranked among the most effective forms of instruction. However, because computer-mediated (CM) tutoring is becoming increasingly common, it is instructive to evaluate its effectiveness relative to face-to-face tutoring. Does the lack of spoken, face-to-face interaction affect learning gains and…

  2. Learning, Interactional, and Motivational Outcomes in One-to-One Synchronous Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Stephanie Ann; VanLehn, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Face-to-face (FTF) human-human tutoring has ranked among the most effective forms of instruction. However, because computer-mediated (CM) tutoring is becoming increasingly common, it is instructive to evaluate its effectiveness relative to face-to-face tutoring. Does the lack of spoken, face-to-face interaction affect learning gains and…

  3. Interaction between heat dipole and circular interracial crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-shen XIAO; Chao XIE; You-wen LIU

    2009-01-01

    The heat dipole consists of a heat source and a heat sink. The problem of an interfacial crack of a composite containing a circular inclusion under a heat dipole is investigated by using the analytical extension technique, the generalized Liouville theo-rem, and the Muskhelishvili boundary value theory. Temperature and stress fields are formulated. The effects of the temperature field and the inhomogeneity on the interracial fracture are analyzed. As a numerical illustration, the thermal stress intensity factors of the interfacial crack are presented for various material combinations and different po-sitions of the heat dipole. The characteristics of the interfacial crack depend on the elasticity, the thermal property of the composite, and the condition of the dipole.

  4. Moving Griffith crack in an orthotropic strip with punches at boundary faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mukherjee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Integral transform technique is employed to solve the elastodynamic problem of steady-state propagation of a Griffith crack centrally situated along the midplane of orthotropic strip of finite thickness 2h and subjected to point loading with centrally situated moving punches under constant pressure along the boundaries of the layer. The problem is reduced to the solution of a pair of simultaneous singular integral equations with Cauchy-type singularities which have finally been solved through the finite Hilbert transform technique. For large h, analytical expression for the stress intensity factor at the crack tip is obtained. Graphical plots of the numerical results are also presented.

  5. Social and emotional relevance in face processing: Happy faces of future interaction partners enhance the LPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eBublatzky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human face perception is modulated by both emotional valence and social relevance, but their interaction has rarely been examined. Event-related brain potentials (ERP to happy, neutral, and angry facial expressions with different degrees of social relevance were recorded. Social relevance was manipulated by presenting pictures of two specific face actors as future interaction partners (meet condition, whereas two other face actors remained non-relevant. As a further control condition all stimuli were presented without specific task instructions (passive viewing condition. A within-subject design (Facial Expression x Relevance x Task was implemented, where randomly ordered face stimuli of four actors (2 women, from the KDEF were presented for 1s to 26 participants (16 female. Results showed an augmented N170, early posterior negativity (EPN, and late positive potential (LPP for emotional in contrast to neutral facial expressions. Of particular interest, face processing varied as a function of instructed social relevance. Whereas the meet condition was accompanied with unspecific effects regardless of relevance (P1, EPN, viewing potential interaction partners was associated with increased LPP amplitudes. The LPP was specifically enhanced for happy facial expressions of the future interaction partners. This underscores that social relevance can impact face processing already at an early stage of visual processing. These findings are discussed within the framework of motivated attention and face processing theories.

  6. Faces in the dark: Interactive effects of darkness and anxiety on the memory for threatening faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi F Nakashima

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current research, we extend past work on the effects of ambient darkness and threat to the domain of memory for expressive faces. In one study, we examined the effects of ambient darkness and individual differences in state anxiety on memory of unfamiliar expressive faces. Here, participants were seated in either a dark or light room and encoded a set of unfamiliar faces with angry, happy, and neutral facial expressions. A subsequent recognition task revealed an interactive effect of ambient darkness, anxiety, and target expression. Highly anxious participants in ambient darkness had worse memory for angry faces than did low-anxiety participants. On the other hand, the recognition performance for happy faces was affected neither by the darkness nor state anxiety. The results suggest not only that ambient darkness has its strongest effect on anxious perceivers, but also that person x situation effects should be considered in face recognition research.

  7. Children Can Learn New Facts Equally Well From Interactive Media Versus Face to Face Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Kristine; Ghrear, Siba; Li, Vivian; Haddock, Taeh; Coleman, Patrick; Birch, Susan A J

    2016-01-01

    Today's children have more opportunities than ever before to learn from interactive technology, yet experimental research assessing the efficacy of children's learning from interactive media in comparison to traditional learning approaches is still quite scarce. Moreover, little work has examined the efficacy of using touch-screen devices for research purposes. The current study compared children's rate of learning factual information about animals during a face-to-face instruction from an adult female researcher versus an analogous instruction from an interactive device. Eighty-six children ages 4 through 8 years (64% male) completed the learning task in either the Face-to-Face condition (n = 43) or the Interactive Media condition (n = 43). In the Learning Phase of the experiment, which was presented as a game, children were taught novel facts about animals without being told that their memory of the facts would be tested. The facts were taught to the children either by an adult female researcher (Face-to-Face condition) or from a pre-recorded female voice represented by a cartoon Llama (Interactive Media condition). In the Testing Phase of the experiment that immediately followed, children's memory for the taught facts was tested using a 4-option forced-choice paradigm. Children's rate of learning was significantly above chance in both conditions and a comparison of the rates of learning across the two conditions revealed no significant differences. Learning significantly improved from age 4 to age 8, however, even the preschool-aged children performed significantly above chance, and their performance did not differ between conditions. These results suggest that, interactive media can be equally as effective as one-on-one instruction, at least under certain conditions. Moreover, these results offer support for the validity of using interactive technology to collect data for research purposes. We discuss the implications of these results for children's learning

  8. Exploring relationship between face-to-face interaction and team performance using wearable sensor badges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Ishibashi, Nozomu; Yano, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of human-generated data collected in various fields have uncovered many patterns of complex human behaviors. However, thus far the quantitative evaluation of the relationship between the physical behaviors of employees and their performance has been inadequate. Here, we present findings demonstrating the significant relationship between the physical behaviors of employees and their performance via experiments we conducted in inbound call centers while the employees wore sensor badges. There were two main findings. First, we found that face-to-face interaction among telecommunicators and the frequency of their bodily movements caused by the face-to-face interaction had a significant correlation with the entire call center performance, which we measured as "Calls per Hour." Second, our trial to activate face-to-face interaction on the basis of data collected by the wearable sensor badges the employees wore significantly increased their performance. These results demonstrate quantitatively that human-human interaction in the physical world plays an important role in team performance.

  9. Exploring Relationship between Face-to-Face Interaction and Team Performance Using Wearable Sensor Badges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Ishibashi, Nozomu; Yano, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of human-generated data collected in various fields have uncovered many patterns of complex human behaviors. However, thus far the quantitative evaluation of the relationship between the physical behaviors of employees and their performance has been inadequate. Here, we present findings demonstrating the significant relationship between the physical behaviors of employees and their performance via experiments we conducted in inbound call centers while the employees wore sensor badges. There were two main findings. First, we found that face-to-face interaction among telecommunicators and the frequency of their bodily movements caused by the face-to-face interaction had a significant correlation with the entire call center performance, which we measured as “Calls per Hour.” Second, our trial to activate face-to-face interaction on the basis of data collected by the wearable sensor badges the employees wore significantly increased their performance. These results demonstrate quantitatively that human-human interaction in the physical world plays an important role in team performance. PMID:25501748

  10. Exploring relationship between face-to-face interaction and team performance using wearable sensor badges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichiro Watanabe

    Full Text Available Quantitative analyses of human-generated data collected in various fields have uncovered many patterns of complex human behaviors. However, thus far the quantitative evaluation of the relationship between the physical behaviors of employees and their performance has been inadequate. Here, we present findings demonstrating the significant relationship between the physical behaviors of employees and their performance via experiments we conducted in inbound call centers while the employees wore sensor badges. There were two main findings. First, we found that face-to-face interaction among telecommunicators and the frequency of their bodily movements caused by the face-to-face interaction had a significant correlation with the entire call center performance, which we measured as "Calls per Hour." Second, our trial to activate face-to-face interaction on the basis of data collected by the wearable sensor badges the employees wore significantly increased their performance. These results demonstrate quantitatively that human-human interaction in the physical world plays an important role in team performance.

  11. Creep-fatigue interaction in delamination crack propagation of advanced CFRPs at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Y. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Systems; Kitamura, T.; Ohtani, R. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mechanics

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this study is to elucidate creep-fatigue interaction in Mode 1 delamination crack propagation of polymers reinforced by carbon fibers at high temperatures. The materials tested are two undirectionally reinforced laminates, AS4/PEEK (carbon fiber: AS4, matrix: poly-ether-ether-ketone) and T800H/PMR-15 (carbon fiber: T800H, matrix: polyimide). Crack propagation tests are conducted in cyclic loading conditions with and without hold(s) at maximum tension and zero load at 473 K for AS4/PEEK laminates and 573 K for T800H/PMR-15 laminates, respectively. In fatigue with high frequency, the crack propagation rate per unit cycle da/dN is correlated well with the stress intensity factor range {Delta}K. However, the crack propagation in AS4/PEEK laminates depends strongly on the load waveform, while that in T800H/PMR-15 laminates is independent of it. The crack propagation in AS4/PEEK laminates is accelerated by the tensile load hold due to the creep deformation of matrix and it is purely time-dependent. In the time-dependent crack propagation, the rate per unit time da/dt is correlated well with the stress intensity factor K at the hold. On the other hand, the time-dependent crack propagation is decelerated by the zero-load-hold because of the creep recovery of matrix.

  12. Live face-to-face interaction during fMRI: a new tool for social cognitive neuroscience

    OpenAIRE

    Redcay, Elizabeth; Dodell-Feder, David; Pearrow, Mark J.; Mavros, Penelope L.; Kleiner, Mario; Gabrieli, John D. E.; Saxe, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Cooperative social interaction is critical for human social development and learning. Despite the importance of social interaction, previous neuroimaging studies lack two fundamental components of everyday face-to-face interactions: contingent responding and joint attention. In the current studies, functional MRI data were collected while participants interacted with a human experimenter face-to-face via live video feed as they engaged in simple cooperative games. In Experiment 1, participant...

  13. Interaction Effects of Cracks, Flaws and Damage in Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-04

    Crack Opening Displacement (COD) gage from M7s 6: 1000 lb. Load Cell from Sensotech 7: 2-channel DC amplifier from Ectron 8. Microsoft’s Virtual Basic...the Galil card language has been completed. Microsoft’s Virtual Basic is being used to create a driver program which is more visual and convenient. A...eealy, d MYZZ is Weaker than the grain for nt Aula fractur Fig.19 gi the diand ca. eson g OWal *nodal force curve for the cuse of LP - =EP and E?- a

  14. BOUNDARY ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF INTERACTION BETWEEN AN ELASTIC RECTANGULAR INCLUSION AND A CRACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王银邦

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between an elastic rectangular inclusion and a kinked crack in an infinite elastic body was considered by using boundary element method. The new complex boundary integral equations were derived. By introducing a complex unknown function H(t)related to the interface displacement density and traction and applying integration by parts,the traction continuous condition was satisfied automatically. Only one complex boundary integral equation was obtained on interface and involves only singularity of order l/ r. To verify the validity and effectiveness of the present boundary element method, some typical examples were calculated. The obtained results show that the crack stress intensity factors decrease as the shear modulus of inclusion increases. Thus, the crack propagation is easier near a softer inclusion and the harder inclusion is helpful for crack arrest.

  15. Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth Interaction in Nickel Base Supper Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Djavanroodi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most engineering components which operate at elevated temperatures are subjected to non-steady loading during service. This paper describes the current fracture mechanics concepts that are employed to predict cracking of Nickel base supper alloy materials at high temperatures under low and high frequency cyclic loading. A model for predicting creep crack growth in terms of C* and the creep uniaxial ductility is presented at low frequency and at high frequency power law relation is used to predict the crack growth rate. When dealing with creep/fatigue interaction a simple cumulative damage concept with fractography evidence is used to predict the crack growth rate. It is shown that these models give good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Emotion-attention interactions in recognition memory for distractor faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Narayanan; Gupta, Rashmi

    2010-04-01

    Effective filtering of distractor information has been shown to be dependent on perceptual load. Given the salience of emotional information and the presence of emotion-attention interactions, we wanted to explore the recognition memory for emotional distractors especially as a function of focused attention and distributed attention by manipulating load and the spatial spread of attention. We performed two experiments to study emotion-attention interactions by measuring recognition memory performance for distractor neutral and emotional faces. Participants performed a color discrimination task (low-load) or letter identification task (high-load) with a letter string display in Experiment 1 and a high-load letter identification task with letters presented in a circular array in Experiment 2. The stimuli were presented against a distractor face background. The recognition memory results show that happy faces were recognized better than sad faces under conditions of less focused or distributed attention. When attention is more spatially focused, sad faces were recognized better than happy faces. The study provides evidence for emotion-attention interactions in which specific emotional information like sad or happy is associated with focused or distributed attention respectively. Distractor processing with emotional information also has implications for theories of attention.

  17. Interplay between telecommunications and face-to-face interactions: a study using mobile phone data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Calabrese

    Full Text Available In this study we analyze one year of anonymized telecommunications data for over one million customers from a large European cellphone operator, and we investigate the relationship between people's calls and their physical location. We discover that more than 90% of users who have called each other have also shared the same space (cell tower, even if they live far apart. Moreover, we find that close to 70% of users who call each other frequently (at least once per month on average have shared the same space at the same time--an instance that we call co-location. Co-locations appear indicative of coordination calls, which occur just before face-to-face meetings. Their number is highly predictable based on the amount of calls between two users and the distance between their home locations--suggesting a new way to quantify the interplay between telecommunications and face-to-face interactions.

  18. Interplay between telecommunications and face-to-face interactions: a study using mobile phone data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Francesco; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D; Ratti, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    In this study we analyze one year of anonymized telecommunications data for over one million customers from a large European cellphone operator, and we investigate the relationship between people's calls and their physical location. We discover that more than 90% of users who have called each other have also shared the same space (cell tower), even if they live far apart. Moreover, we find that close to 70% of users who call each other frequently (at least once per month on average) have shared the same space at the same time--an instance that we call co-location. Co-locations appear indicative of coordination calls, which occur just before face-to-face meetings. Their number is highly predictable based on the amount of calls between two users and the distance between their home locations--suggesting a new way to quantify the interplay between telecommunications and face-to-face interactions.

  19. ELECTROELASTIC INTERACTION BETWEEN A PIEZOELECTRIC SCREW DISLOCATION AND A CIRCULAR INHOMOGENEITY WITH INTERFACIAL CRACKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘又文; 方棋洪

    2004-01-01

    A piezoelectric screw dislocation in the matrix interacting with a circular inhomogeneity with interfacial cracks under antiplane shear and in-plane electric loading at infinity was dealt with. Using complex variable method, a general solution to the problem was presented. For a typical case, the closed form expressions of complex potentials in the inhomogeneity and the matrix regions and the electroelastic field intensity factors were derived explicitly when the interface contains single crack. The image force acting on the piezoelectric screw dislocation was calculated by using the perturbation technique and the generalized Peach-Koehler formula. As a result, numerical analysis and discussion show that the perturbation influence of the interfacial crack on the interaction effects of the dislocation and the inhomogeneity is significant which indicates the presence of the interfacial crack will change the interaction mechanism when the length of the crack goes up to a critical value. It is also shown that soft inhomogeneity can repel the dislocation due to their intrinsic electromechanical coupling behavior.

  20. Children can learn new facts equally well from interactive media versus face to face instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Kwok

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Today’s children have more opportunities than ever before to learn from interactive technology, yet experimental research assessing the efficacy of children’s learning from interactive media in comparison to traditional learning approaches is still quite scarce. Moreover, little work has examined the efficacy of using touch-screen devices for research purposes. The current study compared children’s rate of learning factual information about animals during a face-to-face instruction from an adult female researcher versus an analogous instruction from an interactive device. Eighty-six children ages 4 through 8 years (64% male completed the learning task in either the Face-to-Face condition (n = 43 or the Interactive Media condition (n = 43. In the Learning Phase of the experiment, which was presented as a game, children were taught novel facts about animals without being told that their memory of the facts would be tested. The facts were taught to the children either by an adult female researcher (Face-to-Face condition or from a pre-recorded female voice represented by a cartoon Llama (Interactive Media condition. In the Testing Phase of the experiment that immediately followed, children’s memory for the taught facts was tested using a 4-option forced-choice paradigm. Children’s rate of learning was significantly above chance in both conditions and a comparison of the rates of learning across the two conditions revealed no significant differences. Learning significantly improved from age 4 to age 8, however, even the preschool-aged children performed significantly above chance, and their performance did not differ between conditions. These results suggest that, interactive media can be equally as effective as one-on-one instruction, at least under certain conditions. Moreover, these results offer support for the validity of using interactive technology to collect data for research purposes. We discuss the implications of these results

  1. Activating social strategies: Face-to-face interaction in technology-mediated citizen science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, Francesco; Laut, Jeffrey; Nov, Oded; Giustiniano, Luca; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    The use of crowds in research activities by public and private organizations is growing under different forms. Citizen science is a popular means of engaging the general public in research activities led by professional scientists. By involving a large number of amateur scientists, citizen science enables distributed data collection and analysis on a scale that would be otherwise difficult and costly to achieve. While advancements in information technology in the past few decades have fostered the growth of citizen science through online participation, several projects continue to fail due to limited participation. Such web-based projects may isolate the citizen scientists from the researchers. By adopting the perspective of social strategy, we investigate within a measure-manipulate-measure experiment if motivations to participate in a citizen science project can be positively influenced by a face-to-face interaction with the scientists leading the project. Such an interaction provides the participants with the possibility of asking questions on the spot and obtaining a detailed explanation of the citizen science project, its scientific merit, and environmental relevance. Social and cultural factors that moderate the effect brought about by face-to-face interactions on the motivations are also dissected and analyzed. Our findings provide an exploratory insight into a means for motivating crowds to participate in online environmental monitoring projects, also offering possible selection criteria of target audience.

  2. Screw dislocations interacting with two asymmetrical interfacial cracks emanating from an elliptical hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Xin; Fang Qi-Hong; Liu You-Wen; P.H.Wen

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between screw dislocations and two asymmetrical interfacial cracks emanating from an elliptic hole under loads at infinity is studied.The closed-form solution is derived for complex potentials.The stress intensity factor and the critical applied stress for the dislocation emission are also calculated.In the limiting cases,well-known results can be obtained from the present solutions.Moreover,new exact solutions for a screw dislocation interacting with some complicated cracks are derived.The results show that the shielding effect increases with the increase in the length of the other cracks and the minor semi axis,but decreases with the increase of dislocation azimuth.The repulsion acting on the dislocation from the other phase and the other crack extend in the horizontal direction,which makes the dislocation emission at the crack tip take place more easily,but the minor semi axis of the elliptical hole extending in the vertical direction makes it more difficult.

  3. Creep-Environment Interactions in Dwell-Fatigue Crack Growth of Nickel Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Kimberly; Dahal, Jinesh; Sun, Yaofeng; Ghonem, Hamouda

    2014-05-01

    A multi-scale, mechanistic model is developed to describe and predict the dwell-fatigue crack growth rate in the P/M disk superalloy, ME3, as a function of creep-environment interactions. In this model, the time-dependent cracking mechanisms involve grain boundary sliding and dynamic embrittlement, which are identified by the grain boundary activation energy, as well as, the slip/grain boundary interactions in both air and vacuum. Modeling of the damage events is achieved by adapting a cohesive zone (CZ) approach which considers the deformation behavior of the grain boundary element at the crack tip. The deformation response of this element is controlled by the surrounding continuum in both far field (internal state variable model) and near field (crystal plasticity model) regions and the intrinsic grain boundary viscosity which defines the mobility of the element by scaling up the motion of dislocations into a mesoscopic scale. This intergranular cracking process is characterized by the rate at which the grain boundary sliding reaches a critical displacement. A damage criterion is introduced by considering the grain boundary mobility limit in the tangential direction leading to strain incompatibility and failure. Results of simulated intergranular crack growth rate using the CZ model are generated for temperatures ranging from 923 K to 1073 K (650 °C to 800 °C), in both air and vacuum. These results are compared with those experimentally obtained and analysis of the model sensitivity to loading conditions, particularly temperature and oxygen partial pressure, are presented.

  4. Interaction between cracking, delamination and buckling in brittle elastic thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, W. P.; Van den Bosch, M.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2008-01-01

    A discrete lattice based model for the interaction of cracking, delamination and buckling of brittle elastic coatings is presented. The model is unique in its simultaneous incorporation of the coating and of disorder in the interface and material properties, leading to realistic 3D bending (and buck

  5. Interaction between a piezoelectric screw dislocation and a finite crack with surface piezoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Xu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    We analytically investigate the contribution of surface piezoelectricity to the interaction between a piezoelectric screw dislocation and a finite crack in a hexagonal piezoelectric solid. The piezoelectric screw dislocation suffers jumps in the displacement and in the electric potential across the slip plane, and meanwhile it is subjected to a line force and a line charge at its core. The original boundary value problem is reduced to two sets of coupled first-order Cauchy singular integro-differential equations by considering a distribution of line dislocations, electric-potential-dislocations, line forces and line charges on the crack. By using a diagonalization method, the two sets of equations are decoupled into four independent singular integro-differential equations, each of which can be numerically solved by means of the collocation method. Our analysis reveals that in general the stresses, strains, electric displacements and electric fields exhibit both the weak logarithmic and the strong square root singularities at the two crack tips. The image force acting on the piezoelectric screw dislocation due to its interaction with the finite crack is calculated.

  6. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory; Mattson, Earl Douglas [Idaho National Laboratory; Podgorney, Robert Karl [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  7. Investigating Face-to-Face Peer Interaction Patterns in a Collaborative Web Discovery Task: The Bene?ts of a Shared Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, C-W.; Lee, C-C.; Liu, C-C.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile computers are now increasingly applied to facilitate face-to-face collaborative learning. However, the factors affecting face-to-face peer interactions are complex as they involve rich communication media. In particular, non-verbal interactions are necessary to convey critical communication messages in face-to-face communication. Through…

  8. Investigating Face-to-Face Peer Interaction Patterns in a Collaborative Web Discovery Task: The Bene?ts of a Shared Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, C-W.; Lee, C-C.; Liu, C-C.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile computers are now increasingly applied to facilitate face-to-face collaborative learning. However, the factors affecting face-to-face peer interactions are complex as they involve rich communication media. In particular, non-verbal interactions are necessary to convey critical communication messages in face-to-face communication. Through…

  9. Interaction between microcapsules and cementitious matrix after cracking in a self-healing system

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.; Xing, F.(Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom); Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Qian, Z.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of self-healing cementitious composites by using organic microcapsules is designed in Guangdong Key Laboratory of Durability for Coastal Civil Engineering, Shenzhen University. For the organic microcapsules, the shell material is urea formoldehyde (UF), and the core healing agent is Epoxy. The effect of organic microcapsules on mechanical behaviors of the composite specimens and the interaction between an organic microcapsule and an approaching crack is investigated in this study. ...

  10. Crack-impurity interactions and their role in the embrittlement of Fe alloy crystals charged with light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, N. (Dept. of Metallurgy, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Shiga, T. (Dept. of Metallurgy, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Higashida, K. (Dept. of Metallurgy, Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

    1994-03-31

    The effect of mobile impurity doping on fracture behaviour has been investigated using plasma charging of light elements for Fe-2.5wt.%Si alloy crystals with particular attention to the role of crack-impurity elastic interactions. Fe-Si crystals are markedly embrittled by plasma charging of helium as well as hydrogen at around room temperature, this being accompanied by slow crack growth. Neon charging contributes little to the embrittlement, but argon charging does not contribute. The crystals are also embrittled by nitrogen charging in the tests at 450 K and exhibit slow crack growth during the tests. Elastic analyses indicate that crack-impurity interactions are induced not only by the applied K[sub I] field but also by the stress modification due to ambient impurities in the presence of a crack. The interactions serve effectively to concentrate mobile impurities ahead of a crack tip, leading to the increase in the local stress intensity k[sub I]. The effect of interstitial impurities on crack extension is discussed in connection with the modification of stress states due to impurities around a crack tip. (orig.)

  11. Interaction between subinterface cracks and interface in metal/piezoelectric ceramic bimaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    [1]Pak,Y.E.,Crack extension force in a piezoelectric material,ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics,1990,57: 647.[2]Sosa,H.,Pak,Y.E.,Three-dimensional eigenfunction analysis of a crack in a piezoelectric material,International Journal of Solids and Structures,1990,26: 1.[3]Sosa,H.,Plane problems in piezoelectric media with defects,International Journal of Solids and Structures,1991,28: 491.[4]Sosa,H.,On the fracture mechanics of piezoelectric solids,International Journal of Solids and Structures,1992,29: 2613.[5]Park,S.B.,Sun,C.T.,Fracture criteria for piezoelectric ceramics,Journal of the American Ceramic Society,1995,78: 1475.[6]Park,S.B.,Sun,C.T.,Effect of electric fields on fracture of piezoelectric ceramics,International Journal of Fracture,1995,70: 203.[7]Suo,Z.,Kuo,C.M.,Barnett,D.M.et al.,Fracture mechanics for piezoelectric ceramics,Journal Mechanics and Physics of Solids,1992,40: 739.[8]Han,J.J.,Chen,Y.H.,Multiple parallel cracks interaction problem in piezoelectric ceramics,International Journal of Solids and Structures,1999,36: 3375-3390.[9]Suo,Z.,Singularities,interfaces and cracks in dissimilar anisotropic media,Proc.R.Soc.Lond.,1990,A 427: 331.[10]Horii,H.,Nemat-Nasser,S.,Elastic fields of interacting inhomogeneities,International Journal of Solids and Structures,1985,21: 731.[11]Budiansky,B.,Rice,J.R.,Conservation laws and energy-release rates,ASME J.of Appl.Mech.,1973,40: 201.[12]Zhao,L.G.,Chen,Y.H.,Future investigation of subinterface cracks,Archive of Applied Mechanics,1997,67: 393.[13]Chen,Y.H.,Hasebe,N.,A consistency check for strongly interacting multiple crack problem in isotropic,anisotropic,and bimaterial solids,International Journal of Fracture,1998,90: 251.

  12. Mutual touch during mother-infant face-to-face still-face interactions: influences of interaction period and infant birth status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantis, Irene; Stack, Dale M; Ng, Laura; Serbin, Lisa A; Schwartzman, Alex E

    2014-08-01

    Contact behaviours such as touch, have been shown to be influential channels of nonverbal communication between mothers and infants. While existing research has examined the communicative roles of maternal or infant touch in isolation, mutual touch, whereby touching behaviours occur simultaneously between mothers and their infants, has yet to be examined. The present study was designed to investigate mutual touch during face-to-face interactions between mothers and their 5½-month-old fullterm (n=40), very low birth weight/preterm (VLBW/preterm; n=40) infants, and infants at psychosocial risk (n=41). Objectives were to examine: (1) how the quantitative and qualitative aspects of touch employed by mothers and their infants varied across the normal periods of the still-face (SF) procedure, and (2) how these were associated with risk status. Mutual touch was systematically coded using the mother-infant touch scale. Interactions were found to largely consist of mutual touch and one-sided touch plus movement, highlighting that active touching is pervasive during mother-infant interactions. Consistent with the literature, while the SF period did not negatively affect the amount of mutual touch engaged in for mothers and their fullterm infants and mothers and their infants at psychosocial risk, it did for mothers and their VLBW/preterm infants. Together, results illuminate how both mothers and infants participate in shaping and co-regulating their interactions through the use of touch and underscore the contribution of examining the influence of birth status on mutual touch.

  13. Marketing Learning Communities to Generation Z: The Importance of Face-to-Face Interaction in a Digitally Driven World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Julia; Zobac, Stephanie R.; Spillane, Allison; Thomas, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to identify the marketing strategies utilized by Learning Community (LC) administrators at two large, public, four-year research universities in the Midwest. The use of digital media coupled with face-to-face interaction is identified as an effective method of marketing LCs to the newest population of incoming college students,…

  14. The Nature of Negotiations in Face-to-Face versus Computer-Mediated Communication in Pair Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhshad, Amir; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Storch, Neomy

    2016-01-01

    The Interaction Approach argues that negotiation for meaning and form is conducive to second language development. To date, most of the research on negotiations has been either in face-to-face (FTF) or text-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) modes. Very few studies have compared the nature of negotiations across the modes.…

  15. Modeling of fatigue crack induced nonlinear ultrasonics using a highly parallelized explicit local interaction simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parallelized modeling technique for the efficient simulation of nonlinear ultrasonics introduced by the wave interaction with fatigue cracks. The elastodynamic wave equations with contact effects are formulated using an explicit Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA). The LISA formulation is extended to capture the contact-impact phenomena during the wave damage interaction based on the penalty method. A Coulomb friction model is integrated into the computation procedure to capture the stick-slip contact shear motion. The LISA procedure is coded using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which enables the highly parallelized supercomputing on powerful graphic cards. Both the explicit contact formulation and the parallel feature facilitates LISA's superb computational efficiency over the conventional finite element method (FEM). The theoretical formulations based on the penalty method is introduced and a guideline for the proper choice of the contact stiffness is given. The convergence behavior of the solution under various contact stiffness values is examined. A numerical benchmark problem is used to investigate the new LISA formulation and results are compared with a conventional contact finite element solution. Various nonlinear ultrasonic phenomena are successfully captured using this contact LISA formulation, including the generation of nonlinear higher harmonic responses. Nonlinear mode conversion of guided waves at fatigue cracks is also studied.

  16. Live face-to-face interaction during fMRI: a new tool for social cognitive neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redcay, Elizabeth; Dodell-Feder, David; Pearrow, Mark J; Mavros, Penelope L; Kleiner, Mario; Gabrieli, John D E; Saxe, Rebecca

    2010-05-01

    Cooperative social interaction is critical for human social development and learning. Despite the importance of social interaction, previous neuroimaging studies lack two fundamental components of everyday face-to-face interactions: contingent responding and joint attention. In the current studies, functional MRI data were collected while participants interacted with a human experimenter face-to-face via live video feed as they engaged in simple cooperative games. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in a live interaction with the experimenter ("Live") or watched a video of the same interaction ("Recorded"). During the "Live" interaction, as compared to the Recorded conditions, greater activation was seen in brain regions involved in social cognition and reward, including the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), right superior temporal sulcus (rSTS), ventral striatum, and amygdala. Experiment 2 isolated joint attention, a critical component of social interaction. Participants either followed the gaze of the live experimenter to a shared target of attention ("Joint Attention") or found the target of attention alone while the experimenter was visible but not sharing attention ("Solo Attention"). The right temporoparietal junction and right posterior STS were differentially recruited during Joint, as compared to Solo, attention. These findings suggest the rpSTS and rTPJ are key regions for both social interaction and joint attention. This method of allowing online, contingent social interactions in the scanner could open up new avenues of research in social cognitive neuroscience, both in typical and atypical populations.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL INTERACTIONS OF A HALF-PLANE CRACK IN A TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC PIEZOELECTRIC SPACE WITH RESULTANT SOURCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Pengfei; Pan Xiaoping; Ding Haojiang

    2005-01-01

    Exact solutions in elementary functions are derived for the stress and electric displacement intensity factors of a half-plane crack in a transversely isotropic piezoelectric space interacting with various resultant sources, including force dipole, electric dipole, moment, force dilatation and rotation. Such force and charge sources may model defects like vacancies, foreign particles and dislocations. The locations and orientations of the stress and charge sources with respect to the crack are arbitrary.

  18. Social and emotional relevance in face processing: happy faces of future interaction partners enhance the late positive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublatzky, Florian; Gerdes, Antje B M; White, Andrew J; Riemer, Martin; Alpers, Georg W

    2014-01-01

    Human face perception is modulated by both emotional valence and social relevance, but their interaction has rarely been examined. Event-related brain potentials (ERP) to happy, neutral, and angry facial expressions with different degrees of social relevance were recorded. To implement a social anticipation task, relevance was manipulated by presenting faces of two specific actors as future interaction partners (socially relevant), whereas two other face actors remained non-relevant. In a further control task all stimuli were presented without specific relevance instructions (passive viewing). Face stimuli of four actors (2 women, from the KDEF) were randomly presented for 1s to 26 participants (16 female). Results showed an augmented N170, early posterior negativity (EPN), and late positive potential (LPP) for emotional in contrast to neutral facial expressions. Of particular interest, face processing varied as a function of experimental tasks. Whereas task effects were observed for P1 and EPN regardless of instructed relevance, LPP amplitudes were modulated by emotional facial expression and relevance manipulation. The LPP was specifically enhanced for happy facial expressions of the anticipated future interaction partners. This underscores that social relevance can impact face processing already at an early stage of visual processing. These findings are discussed within the framework of motivated attention and face processing theories.

  19. Interaction of Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Cross-ply Laminates: Simulations with Stochastic Cohesive Zone Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Zahid R.; Ashcroft, Ian A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2011-02-01

    Two main damage mechanisms of laminates—matrix cracking and inter-ply delaminationare closely linked together (Joshi and Sun 1). This paper is focussed on interaction between matrix cracking and delamination failure mechanisms in CFRP cross-ply laminates under quasi-static tensile loading. In the first part of the work, a transverse crack is introduced in 90o layers of the cross-ply laminate [01/904/01], and the stresses and strains that arise due to tensile loading are analyzed. In the second part, the cohesive zone modelling approach where the constitutive behaviour of the cohesive elements is governed by traction-displacement relationship is employed to deal with the problem of delamination initiation from the matrix crack introduced in the 90o layers of the laminate specimen. Additionally, the effect of microstructural randomness, exhibited by CFRP laminates on the damage behaviour of these laminates is also accounted for in simulations. This effect is studied in numerical finite-element simulations by introducing stochastic cohesive zone elements. The proposed damage modelling effectively simulated the interaction between the matrix crack and delamination and the variations in the stresses, damage and crack lengths of the laminate specimen due to the microstructural randomness.

  20. Stereotype Priming in Face Recognition: Interactions between Semantic and Visual Information in Face Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Peter J.; Lewis, Michael B.; Honey, R. C.

    2008-01-01

    The accuracy with which previously unfamiliar faces are recognised is increased by the presentation of a stereotype-congruent occupation label [Klatzky, R. L., Martin, G. L., & Kane, R. A. (1982a). "Semantic interpretation effects on memory for faces." "Memory & Cognition," 10, 195-206; Klatzky, R. L., Martin, G. L., & Kane, R. A. (1982b).…

  1. Emmanuel Levinas & Paulo Freire: The Ethics of Responsibility for the Face-to-Face Interaction in the Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Margarita Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is a reflection on the ethics of education on the net as a contribution to the face-to-face interaction in the virtual world. We think the ethics is a result of a process of responsible interchange with others. Two important thinkers of the last few decades, Emmanuel Levinas e Paulo Freire contribute each one with one's…

  2. A semi-nonlocal numerical approach for modeling of temperature-dependent crack-wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martowicz, Adam; Kijanka, Piotr; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical tools, which are used to simulate complex phenomena for models of complicated shapes suffer from either long computational time or accuracy. Hence, new modeling and simulation tools, which could offer reliable results within reasonable time periods, are highly demanded. Among other approaches, the nonlocal methods have appeared to fulfill these requirements quite efficiently and opened new perspectives for accurate simulations based on crude meshes of the model's degrees of freedom. In the paper, the preliminary results are shown for simulations of the phenomenon of temperature-dependent crack-wave interaction for elastic wave propagation in a model of an aluminum plate. Semi-nonlocal finite differences are considered to solve the problem of thermoelasticity - based on the discretization schemes, which were already proposed by the authors and taken from the previously published work. Numerical modeling is used to examine wave propagation primarily in the vicinity of a notch. Both displacement and temperature fields are sought in the investigated case study.

  3. The effect of crack orientation on the nonlinear interaction of a P wave with an S wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    TenCate, J. A.; Malcolm, A. E.; Feng, X.; Fehler, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Cracks, joints, fluids, and other pore-scale structures have long been hypothesized to be the cause of the large elastic nonlinearity observed in rocks. It is difficult to definitively say which pore-scale features are most important, however, because of the difficulty in isolating the source of the nonlinear interaction. In this work, we focus on the influence of cracks on the recorded nonlinear signal and in particular on how the orientation of microcracks changes the strength of the nonlinear interaction. We do this by studying the effect of orientation on the measurements in a rock with anisotropy correlated with the presence and alignment of microcracks. We measure the nonlinear response via the traveltime delay induced in a low-amplitude P wave probe by a high-amplitude S wave pump. We find evidence that crack orientation has a significant effect on the nonlinear signal.

  4. Coalescence judgment criteria for the interaction between two close surface cracks by WES2805 and its safety margin for brittle fracture assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Kawabata

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is important to consider the interaction between multiple cracks in evaluating the reliability of a structure. In this study, the stress intensity factor (K value is evaluated using the finite element method for interacting surface cracks. Although there are an infinite number of possible conditions of the locations and sizes of two close cracks, the cracks shall be located parallel to each other and have the same dimensions for simplification in this study. The K values on the crack front are calculated under various aspect ratios and relative locations. When there is a strong interaction (ΔKmax ≥ 10%, fracture analysis is generally performed after the coalescence of the two cracks by the FFS standard. As a result of the investigation of the critical condition of the positional parameters for coalescence, judgement criteria were introduced in WES2805 with some simplification. It was revealed that the coalescence process in WES2805 provides a safety margin.

  5. Mu rhythm suppression reflects mother-child face-to-face interactions: a pilot study with simultaneous MEG recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Chiaki; Ikeda, Takashi; Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Furutani, Naoki; Hayashi, Norio; Minabe, Yoshio; Hirata, Masayuki; Asada, Minoru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous face-to-face interactions between mothers and their children play crucial roles in the development of social minds; however, these inter-brain dynamics are still unclear. In this pilot study, we measured MEG mu suppression during face-to-face spontaneous non-linguistic interactions between mothers and their children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using the MEG hyperscanning system (i.e., simultaneous recording). The results demonstrated significant correlations between the index of mu suppression (IMS) in the right precentral area and the traits (or severity) of ASD in 13 mothers and 8 children (MEG data from 5 of the children could not be obtained due to motion noise). In addition, higher IMS values (i.e., strong mu suppression) in mothers were associated with higher IMS values in their children. To evaluate the behavioral contingency between mothers and their children, we calculated cross correlations between the magnitude of the mother and child head-motion during MEG recordings. As a result, in mothers whose head motions tended to follow her child’s head motion, the magnitudes of mu suppression in the mother’s precentral area were large. Further studies with larger sample sizes, including typically developing children, are necessary to generalize this result to typical interactions between mothers and their children. PMID:27721481

  6. Face-to-face interaction of multisolitons in spin-1/2 quantum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kaushik; Choudhury, Sourav; Chatterjee, Prasanta; Wong, C. S.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the face-to-face collision between multisolitons in spin-1/2 quantum plasma. It is studied in the framework of the model proposed by Marklund et al in Phys. Rev. E 76, 067401 (2007). This study is done with the help of the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kno (PLK) method. The extended PLK method is also used to obtain two Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations and the phase shifts and trajectories during the head-on collision of multisolitons. The collision-induced phase shifts (trajectory changes) are also obtained. The effects of the Zeeman energy, total mass density of the charged plasma particles, speed of the wave and the ratio of the sound speed to Alfvén speed on the phase shifts are studied. It is observed that the phase shifts are significantly affected by all these parameters.

  7. Face-to-face interaction of multisolitons in spin-1/2 quantum plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KAUSHIK ROY; SOURAV CHOUDHURY; PRASANTA CHATTERJEE; C S C S WONG

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the face-to-face collision between multisolitons in spin-1/2 quantum plasma. It is studied in the framework of the model proposed by Marklund et al in {\\it Phys. Rev.} E 76, 067401 (2007). This studyis done with the help of the extended Poincare–Lighthill–Kno (PLK) method. The extended PLK method is also used to obtain two Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equations and the phase shifts and trajectories during the head-oncollision of multisolitons. The collision-induced phase shifts (trajectory changes) are also obtained. The effects of the Zeeman energy, total mass density of the charged plasma particles, speed of the wave and the ratio of the sound speed to Alfvén speed on the phase shifts are studied. It is observed that the phase shifts are significantly affected by all these parameters.

  8. SCATTERING OF SH-WAVES BY AN INTERACTING INTERFACE LINEAR CRACK AND A CIRCULAR CAVITY NEAR BIMATERIAL INTERFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Diankui; LIN Hong

    2004-01-01

    An analytical method is developed for scattering of SH-waves and dynamic stress concentration by an interacting interface crack and a circular cavity near bimaterial interface. A suitable Green's function is contructed, which is the fundamental solution of the displacement field for an elastic half space with a circular cavity impacted by an out-plane harmonic line source loading at the horizontal surface. First, the bimaterial media is divided into two parts along the horizontal interface, one is an elastic half space with a circular cavity and the other is a complete half space.Then the problem is solved according to the procedure of combination and by the Green's function method. The horizontal surfaces of the two half spaces are loaded with undetermined anti-plane forces in order to satisfy continuity conditions at the linking section, or with some forces to recover cracks by means of crack-division technique. A series of Fredholm integral equations of first kind for determining the unknown forces can be set up through continuity conditions as expressed in terms of the Green's function. Moreover, some expressions are given in this paper, such as dynamic stress intensity factor (DSIF) at the tip of the interface crack and dynamic stress concentration factor (DSCF) around the circular cavity edge. Numerical examples are provided to show the influences of the wave numbers,the geometrical location of the interface crack and the circular cavity, and parameter combinations of different media upon DSIF and DSCF.

  9. A blended learning approach to teaching basic pharmacokinetics and the significance of face-to-face interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edginton, Andrea; Holbrook, Jane

    2010-06-15

    To assess pharmacy students' attitudes towards a blended-learning pharmacokinetics course. Narrated visual presentations and animations that illustrated kinetic processes and guided students through the use of software programs used for calculations were created. Other learning techniques used included online self-assessment quizzes, practice problem sets, and weekly face-to-face problem-solving tutorials. A precourse questionnaire to assess students' level of enthusiasm towards the blended-learning course and to solicit any concerns they had was administered at the beginning of the course. A postcourse questionnaire that included the same 4 Likert-scale items from the precourse questionnaire and follow-up open-ended questions was administered. Individual changes in level of enthusiasm were compared for individuals who completed both the precourse and postcourse questionnaire. Students' concerns about the blended method of learning had decreased postcourse while their enthusiasm for the benefits of blended learning had increased. Students' initial concerns about the blended learning experience were focused on their ability to communicate with the instructor about the online components, but shifted to their own time management skills at the end of the course. Face-to-face interactions with each other and with the instructor were more highly rated than online interactions in this course.

  10. Stochastic mechanical degradation of multi-cracked fiber bundles with elastic and viscous interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Fabio; Giordano, Stefano; Palla, Pier Luca; Cleri, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    The mechanics of fiber bundles has been largely investigated in order to understand their complex failure modes. Under a mechanical load, the fibers fail progressively while the load is redistributed among the unbroken fibers. The classical fiber bundle model captures the most important features of this rupture process. On the other hand, the homogenization techniques are able to evaluate the stiffness degradation of bulk solids with a given population of cracks. However, these approaches are inadequate to determine the effective response of a degraded bundle where breaks are induced by non-mechanical actions. Here, we propose a method to analyze the behavior of a fiber bundle, undergoing a random distribution of breaks, by considering the intrinsic response of the fibers and the visco-elastic interactions among them. We obtain analytical solutions for simple configurations, while the most general cases are studied by Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the degradation of the effective bundle stiffness can be described by two scaling regimes: a first exponential regime for a low density of breaks, followed by a power-law regime at increasingly higher break density. For both regimes, we find analytical effective expressions described by specific scaling exponents.

  11. Face detection for interactive tabletop viewscreen system using olfactory display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Kanazawa, Fumihiro

    2009-10-01

    An olfactory display is a device that delivers smells to the nose. It provides us with special effects, for example to emit smell as if you were there or to give a trigger for reminding us of memories. The authors have developed a tabletop display system connected with the olfactory display. For delivering a flavor to user's nose, the system needs to recognition and measure positions of user's face and nose. In this paper, the authors describe an olfactory display which enables to detect the nose position for an effective delivery.

  12. Face-to-Face Interaction with Pedagogical Agents, Twenty Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Lewis; Lester, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Johnson et al. ("International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education," 11, 47-78, 2000) introduced and surveyed a new paradigm for interactive learning environments: animated pedagogical agents. The article argued for combining animated interface agent technologies with intelligent learning environments, yielding intelligent…

  13. Differences in anticipated interaction drive own group biases in face memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John Paul; See, Pirita E; Bernstein, Michael J; Hugenberg, Kurt; Chartier, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    According to much research, the Own Group Bias (OGB) in face memory occurs as a consequence of social categorization - ingroup members are more likely than outgroup members to be encoded as individuals and remembered well. The current work is an examination of the role of anticipated future interaction in the OGB. We conducted two studies showing that anticipated interaction influences group-based face memory. In Study 1, we provided correlational evidence that beliefs about the amount and importance of future interaction one will have with racial outgroup members is associated with the OGB, such that people expecting more interaction with outgroup members show a reduced OGB. In Study 2, we manipulated expectations about future interactions with lab-created groups and observed that high levels of anticipated future interaction with the outgroup eliminated the OGB. Thus, social group categorization drives face memory biases to the extent that group membership affords the expectation of interpersonal interaction.

  14. Differences in anticipated interaction drive own group biases in face memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul Wilson

    Full Text Available According to much research, the Own Group Bias (OGB in face memory occurs as a consequence of social categorization - ingroup members are more likely than outgroup members to be encoded as individuals and remembered well. The current work is an examination of the role of anticipated future interaction in the OGB. We conducted two studies showing that anticipated interaction influences group-based face memory. In Study 1, we provided correlational evidence that beliefs about the amount and importance of future interaction one will have with racial outgroup members is associated with the OGB, such that people expecting more interaction with outgroup members show a reduced OGB. In Study 2, we manipulated expectations about future interactions with lab-created groups and observed that high levels of anticipated future interaction with the outgroup eliminated the OGB. Thus, social group categorization drives face memory biases to the extent that group membership affords the expectation of interpersonal interaction.

  15. On Virtual Face-Work: An Ethnography of Communication Approach to a Live Chat Reference Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Marie L.; Radford, Gary P.; Connaway, Lynn Silipigni; DeAngelis, Jocelyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Erving Goffman's theoretical framework and concept of face-work has the potential to greatly increase the understanding of interpersonal dynamics in computer-mediated communication realms. This research used an ethnography of communication approach and the concept of face-work to analyze the transcript of an interaction between a librarian and a…

  16. A New Modelling of Crack Propagation with Fatigue-Creep-Oxidation Interaction under Non Isothermal Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-02-01

    propagation of metallic materials at high temperature such as Ni-base superalloy for turbine discs . The strong requirements in design procedures have led to the...This paper deals with the extension of a crack growth model to high temperature complex loading and application to turbine disc . The proposed model is...which comprises fatigue with or without hold times and special sequence tests representative to the disc in service. The crack growth model is built up

  17. Source and destination memory in face-to-face interaction: A multinomial modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nele M; Schult, Janette C; Steffens, Melanie C

    2015-06-01

    Arguing that people are often in doubt concerning to whom they have presented what information, Gopie and MacLeod (2009) introduced a new memory component, destination memory: remembering the destination of output information (i.e., "Who did you tell this to?"). They investigated source (i.e., "Who told you that?") versus destination memory in computer-based imagined interactions. The present study investigated destination memory in real interaction situations. In 2 experiments with mixed-gender (N = 53) versus same-gender (N = 89) groups, source and destination memory were manipulated by creating a setup similar to speed dating. In dyads, participants completed phrase fragments with personal information, taking turns. At recognition, participants decided whether fragments were new or old and, if old, whether they were listened to or spoken and which depicted person was the source or the destination of the information. A multinomial model was used for analyses. Source memory significantly exceeded destination memory, whereas information itself was better remembered in the destination than in the source condition. These findings corroborate the trade-off hypothesis: Context is better remembered in input than in output events, but information itself is better remembered in output than in input events. We discuss the implications of these findings for real-world conversation situations. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Magnetic face-to-face interaction and electrocommunication in chromium sandwich compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschenbroich, Christoph; Kanellakopulos, Basil; Köhler, Frank H; Metz, Bernhard; Lescouëzec, Rodrigue; Mitzel, Norbert W; Strauss, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of [{(C5Me5)CrCl2}2] with [2.2](1,4)cyclophane gave [(C5Me5)Cr{[2.2](1,4)cyclophane}] (1) and [(C5Me5)Cr{[2.2](1,4)cyclophane}Cr(C5Me5)] (2), depending on the reaction conditions. X-ray structure analysis showed 2 to be a ministack which in turn is stacked in the lattice. The chromium atoms are 6.035 A apart, and the distortion of the benzene rings to boat-shaped moieties is less pronounced than in parent [2.2](1,4)cyclophane. The NMR and EPR spectra were consistent with a S=1/2 ground state for 1 and with two interacting S=1/2 centers in 2. Spin density was found in the ligand pi systems, where its sign was negative when the pi system was adjacent to chromium, while on the nonbonded benzene moiety of 1 it was positive. Cyclic voltammograms showed reductions to 1- and 2(2-), as well as oxidations to 1+, 2+, and 2(2+) which were quasireversible, whereas oxidations to 1(2+) and 2(3+) were irreversible. Interaction between the metal ions was revealed by a 260 mV separation of the redox waves belonging to 2+, and 2(2+). Both cations were isolated as [B(C6H5)4]- salts, which in solution decomposed to [2.2](1,4)cyclophane and [(C5Me5)Cr{(eta6-C6H5)B(C6H5)3}] (3). The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 3 were in accordance with an S=1 ground state. Solid-state magnetic measurements of the dimetallic compounds showed antiferromagnetic interaction with J=-122 cm-1 for 2, J=-31 cm-1 for 2+ (ground state S=1/2), and J=-23.5 cm-1 for 2(2+) (with H=-JS1S2). The decrease of J in the series 2, 2+, and 2(2+) was traced to the number of unpaired electrons and, for the mixed-valent cation 2+, to additional double exchange.

  19. Interaction of nitric oxide wth the (1010) face of ruthenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orent, T.W.

    1977-02-01

    The low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) technique was used to probe the atomic geometry of the surfaces that resulted from the steady-state interaction of nitric oxide with Ru(10 anti 10) as a function of temperature and pressure. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used to identify the atomic species present on these surfaces. Results were obtained at reactant partial pressures in the range from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/ torr and substrate temperatures from -25 to 950/sup 0/C. The interaction of molecular oxygen with the surface was also examined. A qualitative correlation exists between the observed structures and the reported enhancement in the catalytic activity of supported ruthenium after the catalyst had been pretreated with oxygen. (JRD)

  20. A truly human interface: interacting face-to-face with someone whose words are determined by a computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Kevin; Gillespie, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We use speech shadowing to create situations wherein people converse in person with a human whose words are determined by a conversational agent computer program. Speech shadowing involves a person (the shadower) repeating vocal stimuli originating from a separate communication source in real-time. Humans shadowing for conversational agent sources (e.g., chat bots) become hybrid agents (“echoborgs”) capable of face-to-face interlocution. We report three studies that investigated people’s experiences interacting with echoborgs and the extent to which echoborgs pass as autonomous humans. First, participants in a Turing Test spoke with a chat bot via either a text interface or an echoborg. Human shadowing did not improve the chat bot’s chance of passing but did increase interrogators’ ratings of how human-like the chat bot seemed. In our second study, participants had to decide whether their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot or simply pretended to be one. Compared to those who engaged a text interface, participants who engaged an echoborg were more likely to perceive their interlocutor as pretending to be a chat bot. In our third study, participants were naïve to the fact that their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot. Unlike those who engaged a text interface, the vast majority of participants who engaged an echoborg did not sense a robotic interaction. These findings have implications for android science, the Turing Test paradigm, and human–computer interaction. The human body, as the delivery mechanism of communication, fundamentally alters the social psychological dynamics of interactions with machine intelligence. PMID:26042066

  1. A truly human interface: Interacting face-to-face with someone whose words are determined by a computer program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eCorti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We use speech shadowing to create situations wherein people converse in person with a human whose words are determined by a conversational agent computer program. Speech shadowing involves a person (the shadower repeating vocal stimuli originating from a separate communication source in real-time. Humans shadowing for conversational agent sources (e.g., chat bots become hybrid agents (echoborgs capable of face-to-face interlocution. We report three studies that investigated people’s experiences interacting with echoborgs and the extent to which echoborgs pass as autonomous humans. First, participants in a Turing Test spoke with a chat bot via either a text interface or an echoborg. Human shadowing did not improve the chat bot’s chance of passing but did increase interrogators’ ratings of how human-like the chat bot seemed. In our second study, participants had to decide whether their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot or simply pretended to be one. Compared to those who engaged a text interface, participants who engaged an echoborg were more likely to perceive their interlocutor as pretending to be a chat bot. In our third study, participants were naïve to the fact that their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot. Unlike those who engaged a text interface, the vast majority of participants who engaged an echoborg neither sensed nor suspected a robotic interaction. These findings have implications for android science, the Turing Test paradigm, and human-computer interaction. The human body, as the delivery mechanism of communication, fundamentally alters the social psychological dynamics of interactions with machine intelligence.

  2. Fracture behavior of an inclined crack interacting with a circular inclusion in a high-TC superconductor under an electromagnetic force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple model is proposed to investigate the interaction problem for a circular nonsuperconducting inclusion embedded in a high-TC superconducting matrix which contains an inclined crack, oriented at an arbitrary angle from the direction of the critical currents. The electromagnetic behavior is described by the critical state, the original Bean model. The perturbation brought upon by the circular inclusion and the crack on the critical current density is assumed to be negligible and not considered in this model. The distribution dislocation technology is applied to formulate the current problem. The stress intensity factors (SIFs are obtained by solving the formulated singular integral equations. The effects of the crack angle, the elastic modulus, the inclusion-crack distance and the inclusion-crack size on the stress intensity factors are discussed in detail.

  3. Fracture behavior of an inclined crack interacting with a circular inclusion in a high-TC superconductor under an electromagnetic force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feng; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Gou, Xiaofan

    2015-11-01

    A simple model is proposed to investigate the interaction problem for a circular nonsuperconducting inclusion embedded in a high-TC superconducting matrix which contains an inclined crack, oriented at an arbitrary angle from the direction of the critical currents. The electromagnetic behavior is described by the critical state, the original Bean model. The perturbation brought upon by the circular inclusion and the crack on the critical current density is assumed to be negligible and not considered in this model. The distribution dislocation technology is applied to formulate the current problem. The stress intensity factors (SIFs) are obtained by solving the formulated singular integral equations. The effects of the crack angle, the elastic modulus, the inclusion-crack distance and the inclusion-crack size on the stress intensity factors are discussed in detail.

  4. Stress-induced crack path in Aji granite under tensile stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yozo; Sano, Osam; Murashige, Naokuni; Mizuta, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Koji

    1992-12-01

    The double-torsion test using Aji granite was carried out to investigate the interaction between stress-induced crack path and mineral grains. Crack velocities were controlled at range 10-7 m/s to 10-1 m/s. After the stressed specimens were dyed, we checked the crack path by thin section analysis, using an optical microscope. The stress-induced crack path was divided into two types, transgranular and intergranular cracks, and each path was subdivided with respect to mineral grains. In spite of the extensive range of crack velocities, the ratios between the transgranular and intergranular crack lengths did not change. The crack paths were all jagged, and often showed detour around the grain boundary when faced with obstacles like hard grains or preexisting cracks. That is to say, quartz grain played an important role as an obstacle. Feldspar grain could change the crack path because of its cleavage plane. Biolite grain had a serious effect on the path even if its constitution ratio is very small. Fractal dimensions of the crack paths were calculated by three methods, as indicators of surface roughness. The fractal dimensions were shown in a slight trend with the change of crack velocity. This trend can be explained from the point of limited cracking rate in stress corrosion.

  5. How affective information from faces and scenes interacts in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Stock, Jan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Sinke, Charlotte B A; Goebel, Rainer; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2014-10-01

    Facial expression perception can be influenced by the natural visual context in which the face is perceived. We performed an fMRI experiment presenting participants with fearful or neutral faces against threatening or neutral background scenes. Triangles and scrambled scenes served as control stimuli. The results showed that the valence of the background influences face selective activity in the right anterior parahippocampal place area (PPA) and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) with higher activation for neutral backgrounds compared to threatening backgrounds (controlled for isolated background effects) and that this effect correlated with trait empathy in the sgACC. In addition, the left fusiform gyrus (FG) responds to the affective congruence between face and background scene. The results show that valence of the background modulates face processing and support the hypothesis that empathic processing in sgACC is inhibited when affective information is present in the background. In addition, the findings reveal a pattern of complex scene perception showing a gradient of functional specialization along the posterior-anterior axis: from sensitivity to the affective content of scenes (extrastriate body area: EBA and posterior PPA), over scene emotion-face emotion interaction (left FG) via category-scene interaction (anterior PPA) to scene-category-personality interaction (sgACC). © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Interaction: The Communicative Value of Infant-Directed Talking and Singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Diana; Peña, Marcela

    Across culture, healthy infants show a high interest in infant-directed (ID) talking and singing. Despite ID talking and ID singing being very similar in physical properties, infants differentially respond to each of them. The mechanisms underpinning these different responses are still under discussion. This study explored the behavioral (n = 26) and brain (n = 14) responses from 6- to 8-month-old infants to ID talking and ID singing during a face-to-face mother-infant interaction with their own mother. Behavioral response was analyzed from offline video coding, and brain response was estimated from the analysis of electrophysiological recordings. We found that during ID talking, infants displayed a significantly higher number of visual contacts, vocalizations, and body movements than during ID singing. Moreover, only during ID talking were the number of visual contacts and vocalizations positively correlated with the number of questions and pauses in the mother's speech. Our results suggest that ID talking provides infants with specific cues that allow them not only to react to mother stimulation, but also to act toward them, displaying a rudimentary version of turn-taking behavior. Brain activity partially supported that interpretation. The relevance of our results for bonding is discussed. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. From Narcissism to Face Work: Two Views on the Self in Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peräkylä, Anssi

    2015-09-01

    Through the analysis of conversational interaction and clinical notes, this article develops conceptual linkages between the Goffmanian concept of face and the psychoanalytic and psychiatric understandings of narcissism. Self-cathexis--the investment of libidinal emotion to the image of self--is a key issue both for Goffman and in psychoanalytic studies of narcissism. For Goffman, the self and its cathexis are inherently fragile interactional achievements, whereas for psychoanalysts such as Kernberg and Kohut, they are relatively stable intrapsychic structures. An application of Goffman's theory to narcissistic personality disorders suggests that pathological narcissism involves the isolation of the person's self-image from interactional. practices and a consequent inability to benefit from face work in ordinary social encounters. Clinical experience suggests revisions to the theory of face work: there is a biographical continuity in a person's experience of face, and successful participation in face work is made possible by the psychic capacity of playful orientation to one's own and others' narcissistic illusions. Such playful orientation is manifested through the interactional practices of role distancing.

  8. Modelling of eddy-current interaction with cracks in the thin-skin regime. Two approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastorchio, S. [Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou (France). Research and Development Div.; Harfield, N. [Surrey Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1998-02-01

    EDF uses TRIFOU code for eddy current testing modelling. This general electromagnetic code is to be further adapted to Non Destructive Testing applications, not only for nuclear NDT but also in other fields such as aeronautical. This paper compares experimental data for aluminium and steel specimens with two methods of solving the forward problem in the thin-skin regime. The first approach is a 3D Finite Element / Boundary Integral Element method (TRIFOU) developed by EDF/RD Division (France). The second approach is specialized for the treatment of surface cracks in the thin-skin regime developed by the University of Surrey (England). In the thin-skin regime, the electromagnetic skin-depth is small compared with the depth of the crack. Such conditions are common in tests on steels and sometimes on aluminium. (K.A.) 4 refs.

  9. Interactive Cosmetic Makeup of a 3D Point-Based Face Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Sik; Choi, Soo-Mi

    We present an interactive system for cosmetic makeup of a point-based face model acquired by 3D scanners. We first enhance the texture of a face model in 3D space using low-pass Gaussian filtering, median filtering, and histogram equalization. The user is provided with a stereoscopic display and haptic feedback, and can perform simulated makeup tasks including the application of foundation, color makeup, and lip gloss. Fast rendering is achieved by processing surfels using the GPU, and we use a BSP tree data structure and a dynamic local refinement of the facial surface to provide interactive haptics. We have implemented a prototype system and evaluated its performance.

  10. Catechol-O-methyltransferase val158met Polymorphism Interacts with Sex to Affect Face Recognition Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Yvette N.; McKay, Nicole S.; Singh, Shrimal S.; Waldie, Karen E.; Kirk, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met polymorphism affects the breakdown of synaptic dopamine. Consequently, this polymorphism has been associated with a variety of neurophysiological and behavioral outcomes. Some of the effects have been found to be sex-specific and it appears estrogen may act to down-regulate the activity of the COMT enzyme. The dopaminergic system has been implicated in face recognition, a form of cognition for which a female advantage has typically been reported. This study aimed to investigate potential joint effects of sex and COMT genotype on face recognition. A sample of 142 university students was genotyped and assessed using the Faces I subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale – Third Edition (WMS-III). A significant two-way interaction between sex and COMT genotype on face recognition performance was found. Of the male participants, COMT val homozygotes and heterozygotes had significantly lower scores than met homozygotes. Scores did not differ between genotypes for female participants. While male val homozygotes had significantly lower scores than female val homozygotes, no sex differences were observed in the heterozygotes and met homozygotes. This study contributes to the accumulating literature documenting sex-specific effects of the COMT polymorphism by demonstrating a COMT-sex interaction for face recognition, and is consistent with a role for dopamine in face recognition. PMID:27445927

  11. Catechol-O-methyltransferase val(158)met Polymorphism Interacts with Sex to Affect Face Recognition Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Yvette N; McKay, Nicole S; Singh, Shrimal S; Waldie, Karen E; Kirk, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met polymorphism affects the breakdown of synaptic dopamine. Consequently, this polymorphism has been associated with a variety of neurophysiological and behavioral outcomes. Some of the effects have been found to be sex-specific and it appears estrogen may act to down-regulate the activity of the COMT enzyme. The dopaminergic system has been implicated in face recognition, a form of cognition for which a female advantage has typically been reported. This study aimed to investigate potential joint effects of sex and COMT genotype on face recognition. A sample of 142 university students was genotyped and assessed using the Faces I subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III). A significant two-way interaction between sex and COMT genotype on face recognition performance was found. Of the male participants, COMT val homozygotes and heterozygotes had significantly lower scores than met homozygotes. Scores did not differ between genotypes for female participants. While male val homozygotes had significantly lower scores than female val homozygotes, no sex differences were observed in the heterozygotes and met homozygotes. This study contributes to the accumulating literature documenting sex-specific effects of the COMT polymorphism by demonstrating a COMT-sex interaction for face recognition, and is consistent with a role for dopamine in face recognition.

  12. Crack path simulation for cylindrical contact under fretting conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Cardoso

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work different strategies to estimate crack path for cylindrical contacts under fretting conditions are carried out. The main goal is to propose and to evaluate methodologies not only to estimate the direction of crack initiation but also the subsequent propagation in its earlier stages, where the stress field is multiaxial, non-proportional and decays very fast due to the proximity with the contact interface. Such complex conditions pose a substantial challenge to the modelling of crack path. The numerical simulations are provided by a 2D Finite Element Analysis taking into account interactions between the crack faces. The results show that, under fretting conditions, models based on the critical plane method are not effective to estimate the crack initiation orientation, while models based on a so called “critical direction” applied along a critical distance provide better results. Regarding the subsequent crack propagation orientation, it was possible to see that stress intensity factor based models where one considers an infinitesimal virtual crack emerging from an original preexistent crack are powerful mechanisms of crack orientation estimation.

  13. Multimodal Desktop Interaction: The Face –Object-Gesture–Voice Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidakis, Nikolas; Vlasopoulos, Anastasios; Kounalakis, Tsampikos

    2013-01-01

    applications using face, objects, voice and gestures. These human behaviors constitute the input qualifiers to the system. Microsoft Kinect multi-sensor was utilized as input device in order to succeed the natural user interaction, mainly due to the multimodal capabilities offered by this device. We...

  14. In-person contact begets calling and texting: interpersonal motives for cell phone use, face-to-face interaction, and loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Borae; Park, Namkee

    2010-12-01

    This study examined how cell-phone use is related to interpersonal motives for using cell phones, face-to-face communication, and loneliness. A survey of 232 college students who owned a cell phone revealed that affection and inclusion were relatively strong motivations for using voice calls and text messaging, and that interpersonal motives were positively related to the amount of cell-phone use, including calling and texting. The amount of face-to-face interaction was positively associated with the participants' cell-phone use and their interpersonal motives for using cell phones: the more the participants engaged in face-to-face interaction with other people, the higher their motives were and the more frequent cell-phone use was. Loneliness did not have a direct relation to cell-phone use. Instead, the participants with higher levels of loneliness were less likely to engage in face-to-face social interaction, which led them to use cell phones less and to be less motivated to use cell phones for interpersonal purposes.

  15. INTERACTION OF A SCREW DISLOCATION WITH AN INTERFACIAL EDGE CRACK IN A TWO-PHASE PIEZOELECTRIC MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jinxi; LIU Ai; JIANG Zhiqing

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of a screw dislocation with an interfacial edge crack in a two-phase piezoelectric medium is investigated. Closed-form solutions of the elastic and electrical fields induced by the screw dislocation are derived using the conformal mapping method in conjunction with the image principle. Based on the electroelastic fields derived, the stress and electric displacement intensity factors, the image force acting on the dislocation are given explicitly. We find that the stress and electric displacement intensity factors depend on the effective electroelastic material constants. In the case where one of two phases is purely elastic, the stress intensity factor and image force are plotted to illustrate the influences of electromechanical coupling effect, the position of the dislocation and the material properties on the interaction mechanism.

  16. Interactions among the effects of head orientation, emotional expression, and physical attractiveness on face preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Julie C; DeBruine, Lisa M; Little, Anthony C; Jones, Benedict C

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that preferences for direct versus averted gaze are modulated by emotional expressions and physical attractiveness. For example, preferences for direct gaze are stronger when judging happy or physically attractive faces than when judging disgusted or physically unattractive faces. Here we show that preferences for front versus three-quarter views of faces, in which gaze direction was always congruent with head orientation, are also modulated by emotional expressions and physical attractiveness; participants demonstrated preferences for front views of faces over three-quarter views of faces when judging the attractiveness of happy, physically attractive individuals, but not when judging the attractiveness of relatively unattractive individuals or those with disgusted expressions. Moreover, further analyses indicated that these interactions did not simply reflect differential perceptions of the intensity of the emotional expressions shown in each condition. Collectively, these findings present novel evidence that the effect of the direction of the attention of others on attractiveness judgments is modulated by cues to the physical attractiveness and emotional state of the depicted individual, potentially reflecting psychological adaptations for efficient allocation of social effort. These data also present the first behavioural evidence that the effect of the direction of the attention of others on attractiveness judgments reflects viewer-referenced, rather than face-referenced, coding and/or processing of gaze direction.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between energetic dust and plasma-facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Guo-jian, E-mail: niugj@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi [Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-nan [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of CAS, Hefei (China)

    2015-11-15

    The interactions between dust and plasma-facing material (PFM) relate to the lifetime of PFM and impurity production. Series results have been obtained theoretically and experimentally but more detailed studies are needed. In present research, we investigate the evolution of kinetic, potential and total energy of plasma-facing material (PFM) in order to understand the dust/PFM interaction process. Three typical impacting energy are selected, i.e., 1, 10 and 100 keV/dust for low-, high- and hyper-energy impacting cases. For low impacting energy, dust particles stick on PFM surface without damaging it. Two typical time points exist and the temperature of PFM grows all the time but PFM structure experience a modifying process. Under high energy case, three typical points appear. The temperature curve fluctuates in the whole interaction process which indicates there are dust/PFM and kinetic/potential energy exchanges. In the hyper-energy case in present simulation, the violence dust/PFM interactions cause sputtering and crater investigating on energy evolution curves. We further propose the statistics of energy distribution. Results show that about half of impacting energy consumes on heating plasma-facing material meanwhile the other half on PFM structure deformation. Only a small proportion becomes kinetic energy of interstitial or sputtering atoms.

  18. On the passage of time : Temporal differences in video-mediated and face-to-face interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, R. van der; Paashuis, R.M.; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines team work over time in video-mediated non-collocated and traditional face-to-face same-room teams. In a longitudinal between-groups design, 22 three-person teams were tested in 4 1-h test sessions at 2-week intervals. A paper-folding task was designed for the experiment that had

  19. Interactions between Identity and Emotional Expression in Face Processing across the Lifespan: Evidence from Redundancy Gains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Yankouskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested how aging affects the integration of visual information from faces. Three groups of participants aged 20–30, 40–50, and 60–70 performed a divided attention task in which they had to detect the presence of a target facial identity or a target facial expression. Three target stimuli were used: (1 with the target identity but not the target expression, (2 with the target expression but not the target identity, and (3 with both the target identity and target expression (the redundant target condition. On nontarget trials the faces contained neither the target identity nor expression. All groups were faster in responding to a face containing both the target identity and emotion compared to faces containing either single target. Furthermore the redundancy gains for combined targets exceeded performance limits predicted by the independent processing of facial identity and emotion. These results are held across the age range. The results suggest that there is interactive processing of facial identity and emotion which is independent of the effects of cognitive aging. Older participants demonstrated reliably larger size of the redundancy gains compared to the young group that reflect a greater experience with faces. Alternative explanations are discussed.

  20. Effect of masticatory load on crack deflection/penetration investigated with en-face optical coherence tomography in ceramic fixed partial dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Marsavina, Liviu; Negru, Radu; Hluscu, Mihai; Caplescu, Cristiana; Bradu, Adrian; Hughes, Michael; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2009-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) allows a better characterization of dental prostheses. The detection of substance defects within the ceramic layers for metal-ceramic prostheses was demonstrated. The detected defects have a large volume and therefore there is a high likelihood for fracture lines to be generated in the proximal areas of the ceramic fixed partial dentures. If the detection of such defects is feasible before inserting the prosthesis into the oral cavity, then timely corrective measures are possible in order to avoid the fracture of the ceramic component later on. After noninvasive localization of cracks in ceramic fixed partial dentures, the effect of the biaxial loading on crack deflection/penetration at the ceramic interface was investigated. A biaxial loaded geometry was numerically investigated using Finite Element Analysis in order to determine the energy release rate. The obtained results could be used in conjunction with criteria at interface for estimating the path of the crack after the interface was reached.

  1. Crack path predictions and experiments in plane structures considering anisotropic properties and material interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Judt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In many engineering applications special requirements are directed to a material's fracture behavior and the prediction of crack paths. Especially if the material exhibits anisotropic elastic properties or fracture toughnesses, e.g. in textured or composite materials, the simulation of crack paths is challenging. Here, the application of path independent interaction integrals (I-integrals, J-, L- and M-integrals is beneficial for an accurate crack tip loading analysis. Numerical tools for the calculation of loading quantities using these path-invariant integrals are implemented into the commercial finite element (FE-code ABAQUS. Global approaches of the integrals are convenient considering crack tips approaching other crack faces, internal boundaries or material interfaces. Curved crack faces require special treatment with respect to integration contours. Numerical crack paths are predicted based on FE calculations of the boundary value problem in connection with an intelligent adaptive re-meshing algorithm. Considering fracture toughness anisotropy and accounting for inelastic effects due to small plastic zones in the crack tip region, the numerically predicted crack paths of different types of specimens with material interfaces and internal boundaries are compared to subcritically grown paths obtained from experiments.

  2. Look who’s talking: Pre-verbal infants’ perception of face-to-face and back-to-back social interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else-Marie Augusti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Four-, 6-, and 11-month old infants were presented with movies in which two adult actors conversed about everyday events, either by facing each other or looking in opposite directions. Infants from 6 months of age made more gaze shifts between the actors, in accordance with the flow of conversation, when the actors were facing each other. A second experiment demonstrated that gaze following alone did not cause this difference. Instead the results are consistent with a social cognitive interpretation, suggesting that infants perceive the difference between face-to-face and back-to-back conversations and that they prefer to attend to a typical pattern of social interaction from 6 months of age.

  3. Finite element modeling of heating phenomena of cracks excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhao-Jiang; Zheng Jiang; Zhang Shu-Yi; Mi Xiao-Bing; Zheng Kai

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional thermo-mechanical coupled finite element model is built up to simulate the phenomena of dynamical contact and frictional heating of crack faces when the plate containing the crack is excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses. In the finite element model, the high-power ultrasonic transducer is modeled by using a piezoelectric thermal-analogy method, and the dynamical interaction between both crack faces is modeled using a contact-impact theory. In the simulations, the frictional heating taking place at the crack faces is quantitatively calculated by using finite element thermal-structural coupling analysis, especially, the influences of acoustic chaos to plate vibration and crack heating are calculated and analysed in detail Meanwhile, the related ultrasonic infrared images are also obtained experimentally, and the theoretical simulation results are in agreement with that of the experiments. The results show that, by using the theoretical method, a good simulation of dynamic interaction and friction heating process of the crack faces under non-chaotic or chaotic sound excitation can be obtained.

  4. Modelling the role of pellet crack motion in the (r-θ) plane upon pellet-clad interaction in advanced gas reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, T.A. [Centre for Nuclear Engineering & Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Rd., London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ball, J.A. [EDF Energy, Barnett Way, Gloucester GL4 3RS (United Kingdom); Wenman, M.R., E-mail: m.wenman@imperial.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear Engineering & Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Rd., London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Finite element modelling of pellet relocation in the (r-θ) plane of nuclear fuel. • ‘Soft’ and ‘hard’ PCI have been predicted in a cracked nuclear fuel pellet. • Stress concentration in the cladding ahead of radial pellet cracks is predicted. • The model is very sensitive to the coefficient of friction and power ramp duration. • The model is less sensitive to the number of cracks assumed. - Abstract: A finite element model of pellet fragment relocation in the r-θ plane of advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) fuel is presented under conditions of both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ pellet-clad interaction. The model was able to predict the additional radial displacement of fuel fragments towards the cladding as well as the stress concentration on the inner surface resulting from the azimuthal motion of pellet fragments. The model was subjected to a severe ramp in power from both full power and after a period of reduced power operation; in the former, the maximum hoop stress in the cladding was found to be increased by a factor of 1.6 as a result of modelling the pellet fragment motion. The pellet-clad interaction was found to be relatively insensitive to the number of radial pellet crack. However, it was very sensitive to both the coefficient of friction used between the clad and pellet fragments and power ramp duration.

  5. Phencyclidine in the social interaction test: an animal model of schizophrenia with face and predictive validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams-Dodd, F

    1999-01-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) is a hallucinogenic drug that can mimic several aspects of the schizophrenic symptomatology in healthy volunteers. In a series of studies PCP was administered to rats to determine whether it was possible to develop an animal model of the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. The rats were tested in the social interaction test and it was found that PCP dose-dependently induces stereotyped behaviour and social withdrawal, which may correspond to certain aspects of the positive and negative symptoms, respectively. The effects of PCP could be reduced selectively by antipsychotic drug treatment, whereas drugs lacking antipsychotic effects did not alleviate the PCP-induced behaviours. Together these findings indicate that PCP effects in the rat social interaction test may be a model of the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia with face and predictive validity and that it may be useful for the evaluation of novel antipsychotic compounds.

  6. Facial Morphogenesis: Physical and Molecular Interactions Between the Brain and the Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucio, Ralph; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Young, Nathan M

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis of the brain and face is intrinsically linked by a number of factors. These include: origins of tissues, adjacency allowing their physical interactions, and molecular cross talk controlling growth. Neural crest cells that form the facial primordia originate on the dorsal neural tube. In the caudal pharyngeal arches, a Homeobox code regulates arch identity. In anterior regions, positional information is acquired locally. Second, the brain is a structural platform that influences positioning of the facial primordia, and brain growth influences the timing of primordia fusion. Third, the brain helps induce a signaling center, the frontonasal ectodermal zone, in the ectoderm, which participates in patterned growth of the upper jaw. Similarly, signals from neural crest cells regulate expression of fibroblast growth factor 8 in the anterior neural ridge, which controls growth of the anterior forebrain. Disruptions to these interactions have significant consequences for normal development of the craniofacial complex, leading to structural malformations and birth defects.

  7. Facing changes and changing faces in adolescence: a new model for investigating adolescent-specific interactions between pubertal, brain and behavioral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, K Suzanne; Behrmann, Marlene; Dahl, Ronald E

    2012-04-01

    Adolescence is a time of dramatic physical, cognitive, emotional, and social changes as well as a time for the development of many social-emotional problems. These characteristics raise compelling questions about accompanying neural changes that are unique to this period of development. Here, we propose that studying adolescent-specific changes in face processing and its underlying neural circuitry provides an ideal model for addressing these questions. We also use this model to formulate new hypotheses. Specifically, pubertal hormones are likely to increase motivation to master new peer-oriented developmental tasks, which will in turn, instigate the emergence of new social/affective components of face processing. We also predict that pubertal hormones have a fundamental impact on the re-organization of neural circuitry supporting face processing and propose, in particular, that, the functional connectivity, or temporal synchrony, between regions of the face-processing network will change with the emergence of these new components of face processing in adolescence. Finally, we show how this approach will help reveal why adolescence may be a period of vulnerability in brain development and suggest how it could lead to prevention and intervention strategies that facilitate more adaptive functional interactions between regions within the broader social information processing network. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermal Fluid-Solid Interaction Model and Experimental Validation for Hydrostatic Mechanical Face Seals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Weifeng; LIAO Chuanjun; LIU Xiangfeng; SUO Shuangfu; LIU Ying; WANG Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Hydrostatic mechanical face seals for reactor coolant pumps are very important for the safety and reliability of pressurized-water reactor power plants. More accurate models on the operating mechanism of the seals are needed to help improve their performance. The thermal fluid-solid interaction (TFSI) mechanism of the hydrostatic seal is investigated in this study. Numerical models of the flow field and seal assembly are developed. Based on the mechanism for the continuity condition of the physical quantities at the fluid-solid interface, an on-line numerical TFSI model for the hydrostatic mechanical seal is proposed using an iterative coupling method. Dynamic mesh technology is adopted to adapt to the changing boundary shape. Experiments were performed on a test rig using a full-size test seal to obtain the leakage rate as a function of the differential pressure. The effectiveness and accuracy of the TFSI model were verified by comparing the simulation results and experimental data. Using the TFSI model, the behavior of the seal is presented, including mechanical and thermal deformation, and the temperature field. The influences of the rotating speed and differential pressure of the sealing device on the temperature field, which occur widely in the actual use of the seal, are studied. This research proposes an on-line and assembly-based TFSI model for hydrostatic mechanical face seals, and the model is validated by full-sized experiments.

  9. Avoidant decision making in social anxiety: The interaction of angry faces and emotional responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre ePittig

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates that angry facial expressions are preferentially processed and may facilitate automatic avoidance response, especially in socially anxious individuals. However, few studies have examined whether this bias also expresses itself in more complex cognitive processes and behavior such as decision making. We recently introduced a variation of the Iowa Gambling Task which allowed us to document the influence of task-irrelevant emotional cues on rational decision making. The present study used a modified gambling task to investigate the impact of angry facial expressions on decision making in 38 individuals with a wide range of social anxiety. Participants were to find out which choices were (dis- advantageous to maximize overall gain. To create a decision conflict between approach of rewards and avoidance of fear-relevant angry faces, advantageous choices were associated with angry facial expressions, whereas disadvantageous choices were associated with happy facial expressions. Results indicated that higher social avoidance predicted less advantageous decisions in the beginning of the task, i.e., when contingencies were still uncertain. Interactions with specific skin conductance responses further clarified that this initial avoidance only occurred in combination with elevated responses before choosing an angry facial expressions. In addition, an interaction between high trait anxiety and elevated responses to early losses predicted faster learning of an advantageous strategy. These effects were independent of intelligence, general risky decision-making, self-reported state anxiety, and depression. Thus, socially avoidant individuals who respond emotionally to angry facial expressions are more likely to show avoidance of these faces under uncertainty. This novel laboratory paradigm may be an appropriate analog for central features of social anxiety.

  10. Avoidant decision making in social anxiety: the interaction of angry faces and emotional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittig, Andre; Pawlikowski, Mirko; Craske, Michelle G; Alpers, Georg W

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that angry facial expressions are preferentially processed and may facilitate automatic avoidance response, especially in socially anxious individuals. However, few studies have examined whether this bias also expresses itself in more complex cognitive processes and behavior such as decision making. We recently introduced a variation of the Iowa Gambling Task which allowed us to document the influence of task-irrelevant emotional cues on rational decision making. The present study used a modified gambling task to investigate the impact of angry facial expressions on decision making in 38 individuals with a wide range of social anxiety. Participants were to find out which choices were (dis-) advantageous to maximize overall gain. To create a decision conflict between approach of reward and avoidance of fear-relevant angry faces, advantageous choices were associated with angry facial expressions, whereas disadvantageous choices were associated with happy facial expressions. Results indicated that higher social avoidance predicted less advantageous decisions in the beginning of the task, i.e., when contingencies were still uncertain. Interactions with specific skin conductance responses further clarified that this initial avoidance only occurred in combination with elevated responses before choosing an angry facial expressions. In addition, an interaction between high trait anxiety and elevated responses to early losses predicted faster learning of an advantageous strategy. These effects were independent of intelligence, general risky decision-making, self-reported state anxiety, and depression. Thus, socially avoidant individuals who respond emotionally to angry facial expressions are more likely to show avoidance of these faces under uncertainty. This novel laboratory paradigm may be an appropriate analog for central features of social anxiety.

  11. Interactive Explanations: The Functional Role of Gestural and Bodily Action for Explaining and Learning Scientific Concepts in Face-to-Face Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopelitis, Stephanie A.

    As human beings, we live in, live with, and live through our bodies. And because of this it is no wonder that our hands and bodies are in motion as we interact with others in our world. Hands and body move as we give directions to another, anticipate which way to turn the screwdriver, and direct our friend to come sit next to us. Gestures, indeed, fill our everyday lives. The purpose of this study is to investigate the functional role of the body in the parts of our lives where we teach and learn with another. This project is an investigation into, what I call, "interactive explanations". I explore how the hands and body work toward the joint achievement of explanation and learning in face-to-face arrangements. The study aims to uncover how the body participates in teaching and learning in and across events as it slides between the multiple, interdependent roles of (1) a communicative entity, (2) a tool for thinking, and (3) a resource to shape interaction. Understanding gestures functional roles as flexible and diverse better explains how the body participates in teaching and learning interactions. The study further aims to show that these roles and functions are dynamic and changeable based on the interests, goals and contingencies of participants' changing roles and aims in interactions, and within and across events. I employed the methodology of comparative microanalysis of pairs of videotaped conversations in which, first, experts in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) explained concepts to non-experts, and second, these non-experts re-explained the concept to other non-experts. The principle finding is that people strategically, creatively and collaboratively employ the hands and body as vital and flexible resources for the joint achievement of explanation and understanding. Findings further show that gestures used to explain complex STEM concepts travel across time with the non-expert into re-explanations of the concept. My

  12. Effect of prior corrosion state on the fatigue small cracking behaviour of 6151-T6 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xudong [Department of Engineering Mechanics, AML, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Naval Aeronautical Engineering Academy Qingdao Branch, Qingdao 266000 (China); Wang Xishu, E-mail: xshwang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, AML, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ren Huaihui; Chen Yinlong [Department of Engineering Mechanics, AML, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mu Zhitao [Naval Aeronautical Engineering Academy Qingdao Branch, Qingdao 266000 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship of corrosion pit and fatigue crack is established based on SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An equivalent relationship between accelerated and natural corrosion is build up. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prior corrosion damage is crucial to the subsequent fatigue cracking behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prior corrosion fatigue crack growth rate is expressed by the term of k{sigma}{sub max}{sup n}a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion states such as SC15, are defined based on corrosion spectrum. - Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to estimate the reliable effect of prior corrosion state on fatigue micro crack initiation and early stage propagation behaviour of aluminum alloy based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in situ observation. Results indicated that multi-cracks initiation occurred almost at the corrosion pits and the early stage of fatigue micro crack propagation behaviour can be described by K{sub I}/K{sub II}-mixed mode. The importance of crack-face interaction via crack-face corrosion pits interlocking/bridging was emphasised in the mixed mode. The fatigue crack growth rate in the corrosion states can be empirically expressed by the term of k{sigma}{sub max}{sup n}a.

  13. 'What is it like to have ME?': the discursive construction of ME in computer-mediated communication and face-to-face interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jennifer; Widdicombe, Sue; McKinlay, Andy

    2007-01-01

    ME (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis) or CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) is a debilitating illness for which no cause or medical tests have been identified. Debates over its nature have generated interest from qualitative researchers. However, participants are difficult to recruit because of the nature of their condition. Therefore, this study explores the utility of the internet as a means of eliciting accounts. We analyse data from focus groups and the internet in order to ascertain the extent to which previous research findings apply to the internet domain. Interviews were conducted among 49 members of internet groups (38 chatline, 11 personal) and 7 members of two face-to-face support groups. Discourse analysis of descriptions and accounts of ME or CFS revealed similar devices and interactional concerns in both internet and face-to-face communication. Participants constructed their condition as serious, enigmatic and not psychological. These functioned to deflect problematic assumptions about ME or CFS and to manage their accountability for the illness and its effects.

  14. Knuckle Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask The Expert Ask a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the ... Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers Knuckle Cracking Q & A September 10, ...

  15. The many faces of protein-protein interactions: A compendium of interface geometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Kyu Kim

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A systematic classification of protein-protein interfaces is a valuable resource for understanding the principles of molecular recognition and for modelling protein complexes. Here, we present a classification of domain interfaces according to their geometry. Our new algorithm uses a hybrid approach of both sequential and structural features. The accuracy is evaluated on a hand-curated dataset of 416 interfaces. Our hybrid procedure achieves 83% precision and 95% recall, which improves the earlier sequence-based method by 5% on both terms. We classify virtually all domain interfaces of known structure, which results in nearly 6,000 distinct types of interfaces. In 40% of the cases, the interacting domain families associate in multiple orientations, suggesting that all the possible binding orientations need to be explored for modelling multidomain proteins and protein complexes. In general, hub proteins are shown to use distinct surface regions (multiple faces for interactions with different partners. Our classification provides a convenient framework to query genuine gene fusion, which conserves binding orientation in both fused and separate forms. The result suggests that the binding orientations are not conserved in at least one-third of the gene fusion cases detected by a conventional sequence similarity search. We show that any evolutionary analysis on interfaces can be skewed by multiple binding orientations and multiple interaction partners. The taxonomic distribution of interface types suggests that ancient interfaces common to the three major kingdoms of life are enriched by symmetric homodimers. The classification results are online at http://www.scoppi.org.

  16. Carbon utilization profiles of river bacterial strains facing sole carbon sources suggest metabolic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetghebuer, Lise; Servais, Pierre; George, Isabelle F

    2017-05-01

    Microbial communities play a key role in water self-purification. They are primary drivers of biogenic element cycles and ecosystem processes. However, these communities remain largely uncharacterized. In order to understand the diversity-heterotrophic activity relationship facing sole carbon sources, we assembled a synthetic community composed of 20 'typical' freshwater bacterial species mainly isolated from the Zenne River (Belgium). The carbon source utilization profiles of each individual strain and of the mixed community were measured in Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays PM1 and PM2A microplates that allowed testing 190 different carbon sources. Our results strongly suggest interactions occurring between our planktonic strains as our synthetic community showed metabolic properties that were not displayed by its single components. Finally, the catabolic performances of the synthetic community and a natural community from the same sampling site were compared. The synthetic community behaved like the natural one and was therefore representative of the latter in regard to carbon source consumption. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Repetition, response mobilization, and face: Analysis of group interactions with a 19-year-old with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Louick, Rebecca; White, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    This Conversation Analytic study examined the talk of an adolescent with Asperger syndrome (under previously used diagnostic criteria), Nathan, as he interacts with peers in a small group setting. We focused on Nathan's repetition aimed at pursuing response, and rely on analytical frameworks including response mobilization, face-work, and agreement preference. We found that while Nathan's repetitions resembled 'topic perseveration' previously described in the literature, they showed evidence of interactional awareness as they were employed when peers offered little or no response to his original utterance. However, we also found that while much of Nathan's talk was sophisticatedly structured, his repetition to pursue response eschewed interaction rituals that work to maintain social cohesion. As a result, Nathan's interactional priorities appeared mis-aligned with those of his peers, and failed to produce extended interactions in most cases. Readers will be able to describe features of conversational interaction, including response mobilization, agreement preference, and face work. They will understand the relevance of conversation analysis to the study of interaction in individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Lastly, they will be able to describe the conditions under which the subject used repetition within peer interactions, and the effects of his repetition on interaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. How affective information from faces and scenes interacts in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Stock, J.B.; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Sinke, C.B.A.; Goebel, Rainer; de Gelder, B.

    2014-01-01

    Facial expression perception can be influenced by the natural visual context in which the face is perceived. We performed an fMRI experiment presenting participants with fearful or neutral faces against threatening or neutral background scenes. Triangles and scrambled scenes served as control

  19. On the Face of it: Exploring the Interaction Between Racial and Arbitrary Group Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Berlot

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The cross-race effect – enhanced recognition of racial ingroup faces – has been justified to exist in other categories, such as arbitrary groups. This study aimed to investigate the effect of crossing racial (black/white and arbitrary (blue/yellow categories, in addition to the role of facial expressions in this phenomenon. 120 Caucasian students (from the UK, Macedonia, and Portugal performed a discrimination task (judging faces as new vs. previously seen. Using a within-subjects design, reaction times and accuracy were measured. We hypothesized that (1 the arbitrary group membership of faces would moderate the cross-race effect and (2 the racial group membership of faces would moderate the usual recognition advantage for happy faces.

  20. Interaction of candidate plasma facing materials with tokamak plasma in COMPASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matějíček, Jiří; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Havránek, Vladimír; Naydenkova, Diana; Klevarová, Veronika; Petersson, Per; Gasior, Pawel; Hakola, Antti; Rubel, Marek; Fortuna, Elzbieta; Kolehmainen, Jukka; Tervakangas, Sanna

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of tokamak plasma with several materials considered for the plasma facing components of future fusion devices was studied in a small-size COMPASS tokamak. These included mainly tungsten as the prime candidate and chromium steel as an alternative whose suitability was to be assessed. For the experiments, thin coatings of tungsten, P92 steel and nickel on graphite substrates were prepared by arc-discharge sputtering. The samples were exposed to hydrogen and deuterium plasma discharges in the COMPASS tokamak in two modes: a) short exposure (several discharges) on a manipulator in the proximity of the separatrix, close to the central column, and b) long exposure (several months) at the central column, aligned with the other graphite tiles. During the discharges, standard plasma diagnostics were used and a local emission of spectral lines in the visible near ultraviolet regions, corresponding to the material erosion, was monitored. Before and after the plasma exposures, the sample surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy, the coatings thickness was measured using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and the concentration profiles of hydrogen and deuterium were measured by elastic recoil detection analysis. The uniformity of the coatings and their thickness was verified before the exposure. After the exposure, no reduction of the thickness was observed, indicating the absence of 'global' erosion. Erosion was observed only in isolated spots, and attributed to unipolar arcing. Slightly larger erosion was found on the steel coatings compared to the tungsten ones. Incorporation of deuterium in a thin surface layer was observed, in dependence on the exposure mode. Additionally, boron enrichment of the long-exposure samples was observed, as a result of the tokamak chamber boronization.

  1. DynaFace: Discrimination between Obligatory and Non-obligatory Protein-Protein Interactions Based on the Complex's Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seren Soner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interfaces have been evolutionarily-designed to enable transduction between the interacting proteins. Thus, we hypothesize that analysis of the dynamics of the complex can reveal details about the nature of the interaction, and in particular whether it is obligatory, i.e., persists throughout the entire lifetime of the proteins, or not. Indeed, normal mode analysis, using the Gaussian network model, shows that for the most part obligatory and non-obligatory complexes differ in their decomposition into dynamic domains, i.e., the mobile elements of the protein complex. The dynamic domains of obligatory complexes often mix segments from the interacting chains, and the hinges between them do not overlap with the interface between the chains. In contrast, in non-obligatory complexes the interface often hinges between dynamic domains, held together through few anchor residues on one side of the interface that interact with their counterpart grooves in the other end. In automatic analysis, 117 of 139 obligatory (84.2% and 203 of 246 non-obligatory (82.5% complexes are correctly classified by our method: DynaFace. We further use DynaFace to predict obligatory and non-obligatory interactions among a set of 300 putative protein complexes. DynaFace is available at: http://safir.prc.boun.edu.tr/dynaface.

  2. Association of Maternal Interaction with Emotional Regulation in 4 and 9 Month Infants During the Still Face Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Jean R.; MacLean, Peggy C.; Duncan, Andrea F.; Aragón, Crystal; Schrader, Ronald M.; Caprihan, Arvind; Phillips, John P.

    2013-01-01

    This study used the Still Face Paradigm to investigate the relationship of maternal interaction on infants’ emotion regulation responses. Seventy infant-mother dyads were seen at 4 months and 25 of these same dyads were re-evaluated at 9 months. Maternal interactions were coded for attention seeking and contingent responding. Emotional regulation was described by infant stress reaction and overall positive affect. Results indicated that at both 4 and 9 months mothers who used more contingent responding interactions had infants who showed more positive affect. In contrast, mothers who used more attention seeking play had infants who showed less positive affect after the Still Face Paradigm. Patterns of stress reaction were reversed, as mothers who used more attention seeking play had infants with less negative affect. Implications for intervention and emotional regulation patterns over time are discussed. PMID:22217393

  3. Study of transfers and their interactions with self-healing in the cracks to increase the service life of infrastructures (bridges, nuclear centrals); Etude des transferts et de leurs interactions avec la cicatrisation dans les fissures pour prolonger la duree de service des infrastructures (ponts, centrales nucleaires)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, M

    2006-04-15

    Concrete structures are frequently cracked by the action of different types of physicochemical mechanisms (external loads, restrained shrinkage, internal expansion). Cracks could impair the durability of concrete structures by creating preferential paths for the penetration of various types of potentially aggressive agents (liquids, gases, and ions). The aim of this thesis is to study transport properties in mechanically induced cracks. The first objective of the study is to better understand the potential effect of critical crack opening and self-healing. Cracks were generated in an inert material (brick) and in old mortar samples of 28 days and 2 years of age. A mechanical expansive core was used to generate cracks of constant width across the thickness of the sample. For the brick material, results show that a mechanical interaction between the fracture surfaces (critical crack opening) can affect the chloride-diffusion process along a crack path. A critical crack opening was also found for mortar samples. The age at which cracks were generated is also an important parameter. Self-healing was found to be more important in young mortars (28 days). The second objective of this thesis is the prediction of airflow in cracked cementitious material samples. A model proposed by Rizkalla et al. was evaluated through the experimental measurement of the flow coefficient n and the friction coefficient k. A simplified model was proposed to predict airflow through a crack for laminar type flow. The third research objective is to study the effect of self-healing on airflow through cracked mortar samples stored in a 100% relative humidity environment. Results show that self-healing mainly occurs during the first two months of storage. SEM analysis of fracture surfaces shows the formation of self-healing products such as calcite, C-S-H, and ettringite. (author)

  4. CONTACT INTERACTION INVESTIGATION OF TARGET END FACE OF ULTRASONIC CONVERTER INSTALLED ON PENDULUM SUSPENSION WITH RIGID BASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Kiselev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation pertaining to contact interaction process of a target end face of the ultrasonic converter installed on pendulum suspension with a rigid basis is presented in the paper. The paper shows that substitution of traditionally applied precision rolling guides by a pendulum suspension of the ultrasonic converter allows significantly to simplify a process equipment design. A calculative model for contact interaction of an end face of the ultrasonic converter installed on a pendulum suspension  with a rigid basis and scheme of a mathematical  pendulum  that  corresponds are proposed in the paper and they permit to investigate an influence of pendulum suspension parameters and its loading conditions on the operational mode of an acoustic oscillatory system. The paper contains analytical dependences that make it possible to calculate time and power parameters in contact interaction of a target end face of the ultrasonic converter installed on a pendulum suspension with a rigid basis. These dependences take into account an amplitude of ultrasonic oscillations, converter weight, pendulum length and an angle of its deviation. The paper reveals that the applica­tion of the pendulum suspension of the ultrasonic converter allows to ensure a vibrating impact (operational mode of interaction of a converter target end face with a rigid basis surface. Design variants of the pendulum suspension of the ultra­sonic converter while using various elastic elements are proposed and analyzed in the paper and with due account of concrete processing conditions these variants allow to provide the required value of own oscillation frequency of an acoustic system and also to create necessary value of a preliminary tightness in it.

  5. Crossing grain boundaries in metals by slip bands, cleavage and fatigue cracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, André

    2015-03-28

    The size and the character (low and large angle, special boundaries, tilt and twist boundaries, twins) of the grain boundaries (GBs) in polycrystalline materials influence their strength and their fracture toughness. Recent studies devoted to nanocrystalline (NC) materials have shown a deviation from the Hall-Petch law. Special GBs formed by Σ3 twins in face-centred cubic metals are also known to have a strong effect on the mechanical behaviour of these metals, in particular their work-hardening rate. Grain orientation influences also crack path, the fracture toughness of body-centred cubic (BCC) metals and the fatigue crack growth rate of microstructurally short cracks. This paper deals both with slip transfer at GBs and with the interactions between propagating cracks with GBs. In the analysis of slip transfer, the emphasis is placed on twin boundaries (TBs) for which the dislocation reactions during slip transfer are analysed theoretically, experimentally and using the results of atomic molecular simulations published in the literature. It is shown that in a number of situations this transfer leads to a normal motion of the TB owing to the displacement of partial dislocations along the TB. This motion can generate a de-twinning effect observed in particular in NC metals. Crack propagation across GBs is also considered. It is shown that cleavage crack path behaviour in BCC metals is largely dependent on the twist component of the GBs. A mechanism for the propagation of these twisted cracks involving a segmentation of the crack front and the existence of intergranular parts is discussed and verified for a pressure vessel steel. A similar segmentation seems to occur for short fatigue cracks although, quite surprisingly, this crossing mechanism for fatigue cracks does not seem to have been examined in very much detail in the literature. Metallurgical methods used to improve the strength of the materials, via grain boundaries, are briefly discussed.

  6. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2017-02-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  7. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2016-08-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  8. Presenting the Self: An Interactive Approach to Teaching Interpersonal Awareness and Maintaining Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ashley Joiner

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an activity whose objective is for students to gain self-awareness related to the ways in which humans (consciously or not) alter their self-presentation depending upon the context, thereby maintaining different "faces." Also, this activity aims to highlight effectiveness related to different modes of nonverbal…

  9. Using Interactive Animations to Enhance Teaching, Learning, and Retention of Respiration Pathway Concepts in Face-to-Face and Online High School, Undergraduate, and Continuing Education Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sederick C. Rice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One major tool set teachers/instructors can use is online interactive animations, which presents content in a way that helps pique students' interest and differentiates instructional content.  The Virtual Cell Animation Collections (VCAC, developed from the Molecular and Cellular Biology Learning Center, has developed a series of online interactive animations that provide teacher/instructors and students with immersive learning tools for studying and understanding respiration processes.  These virtual tools work as powerful instructional devices to help explain and reinforce concepts of metabolic pathways that would normally be taught traditionally using static textbook pages or by neumonic flashcards. High school, undergraduate, and continuing education students of today learn and retain knowledge differently than their predecessors.  Now teachers face new challenges and must engage and assess students, within a small window during classroom instruction, but also have the skills to provide useful content in distance learning environments.  Educators have to keep up with changing trends in education as a result of technological advances, higher student/teacher ratios, and the influence of social media on education. It is critical for teachers/instructors to be able to present content that not only keeps students interested but also helps bridge learning gaps. VCAC provides high school, undergraduate, and continuing education biology or life science teachers/instructors with classroom strategies and tools for introducing respiration content through free open source online resources. VCAC content supports the development of more inquiry-based classroom and distance-learning environments that can be facilitated by teachers/instructors, which helps improve retention of important respiration subject content and problem-based learning skills for students.

  10. Biotic Interactions in the Face of Climate Change: A Comparison of Three Modelling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, Anja; Bittner, Torsten; Jentsch, Anke; Reineking, Björn; Schlumprecht, Helmut; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to alter biotic interactions, and may lead to temporal and spatial mismatches of interacting species. Although the importance of interactions for climate change risk assessments is increasingly acknowledged in observational and experimental studies, biotic interactions are still rarely incorporated in species distribution models. We assessed the potential impacts of climate change on the obligate interaction between Aeshna viridis and its egg-laying plant Stratiotes aloides in Europe, based on an ensemble modelling technique. We compared three different approaches for incorporating biotic interactions in distribution models: (1) We separately modelled each species based on climatic information, and intersected the future range overlap (‘overlap approach’). (2) We modelled the potential future distribution of A. viridis with the projected occurrence probability of S. aloides as further predictor in addition to climate (‘explanatory variable approach’). (3) We calibrated the model of A. viridis in the current range of S. aloides and multiplied the future occurrence probabilities of both species (‘reference area approach’). Subsequently, all approaches were compared to a single species model of A. viridis without interactions. All approaches projected a range expansion for A. viridis. Model performance on test data and amount of range gain differed depending on the biotic interaction approach. All interaction approaches yielded lower range gains (up to 667% lower) than the model without interaction. Regarding the contribution of algorithm and approach to the overall uncertainty, the main part of explained variation stems from the modelling algorithm, and only a small part is attributed to the modelling approach. The comparison of the no-interaction model with the three interaction approaches emphasizes the importance of including obligate biotic interactions in projective species distribution modelling. We recommend the use of

  11. Fracture mechanics of piezoelectric solids with interface cracks

    CERN Document Server

    Govorukha, Volodymyr; Loboda, Volodymyr; Lapusta, Yuri

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive study of cracks situated at the interface of two piezoelectric materials. It discusses different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces, in particular the cases of electrically permeable, impermeable, partially permeable, and conducting cracks. The book also elaborates on a new technique for the determination of electromechanical fields at the tips of interface cracks in finite sized piezoceramic bodies of arbitrary shape under different load types. It solves scientific problems of solid mechanics in connection with the investigation of electromechanical fields in piezoceramic bodies with interface cracks, and develops calculation models and solution methods for plane fracture mechanical problems for piecewise homogeneous piezoceramic bodies with cracks at the interfaces. It discusses the “open” crack model, which leads to a physically unrealistic oscillating singularity at the crack tips, and the contact zone model for in-plane straight interface cracks betw...

  12. Famous face recognition, face matching, and extraversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Karen; Poyarekar, Siddhi

    2015-01-01

    It has been previously established that extraverts who are skilled at interpersonal interaction perform significantly better than introverts on a face-specific recognition memory task. In our experiment we further investigate the relationship between extraversion and face recognition, focusing on famous face recognition and face matching. Results indicate that more extraverted individuals perform significantly better on an upright famous face recognition task and show significantly larger face inversion effects. However, our results did not find an effect of extraversion on face matching or inverted famous face recognition.

  13. 高速列车锻钢制动盘多裂纹间作用机制研究%Study on Interaction Mechanism between Cracks at Forged Steel Brake Disc for High Speed Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石晓玲; 李强; 薛海; 赵方伟

    2016-01-01

    To address the multiple crack problem occurring to the forged steel brake discs of high-speed train in the practical application,the interaction mechanism between cracks was studied by combining the 1 ∶1 bench test with finite element calculation.The findings from the 1∶1 bench test on brake disc proved a certain regu-larity in crack propagation.In order to further investigate the interaction mechanism between cracks,the ther-mal stress on brake disc was calculated in the case of emergency braking three times with the speed of 200 km/h by using the finite element method.Based on the above research,the crack model of brake disk surface was established using FRANC3D software to analyze the stress intensity factor of crack front and the interaction mechanism between cracks.The results showed that the interaction between the main cracks and secondary cracks changed with the change of the number of cracks and the crack location.Different ratio between the depth and length had different effect.The more the number of the radial cracks was,the slower surface crack growth.As a result,the fatigue failure of the brake disc was effectively delayed.The analysis results were con-sistent with the interaction regularity of the brake disc from the 1∶1 bench test.%针对高速列车锻钢制动盘在实际运用中出现的多裂纹问题,通过1∶1台架试验与有限元计算相结合的方法研究了制动盘多裂纹间的作用机制。依据制动盘1∶1台架试验结果发现,盘面裂纹的扩展具有一定的规律性。为进一步研究裂纹间的作用机制,运用有限元方法计算了制动盘在3次连续200 km/h 紧急制动后的热应力。在此基础上,采用 FRANC3D 软件建立了制动盘盘面的裂纹模型,分析研究了制动盘裂纹前缘的应力强度因子及多裂纹间的作用机制。分析结果表明,主、副裂纹间的相互作用随着裂纹数量和空间位置的变化而变化,不同的深长比有不同的

  14. Face-to-face: Perceived personal relevance amplifies face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublatzky, Florian; Pittig, Andre; Schupp, Harald T; Alpers, Georg W

    2017-05-01

    The human face conveys emotional and social information, but it is not well understood how these two aspects influence face perception. In order to model a group situation, two faces displaying happy, neutral or angry expressions were presented. Importantly, faces were either facing the observer, or they were presented in profile view directed towards, or looking away from each other. In Experiment 1 (n = 64), face pairs were rated regarding perceived relevance, wish-to-interact, and displayed interactivity, as well as valence and arousal. All variables revealed main effects of facial expression (emotional > neutral), face orientation (facing observer > towards > away) and interactions showed that evaluation of emotional faces strongly varies with their orientation. Experiment 2 (n = 33) examined the temporal dynamics of perceptual-attentional processing of these face constellations with event-related potentials. Processing of emotional and neutral faces differed significantly in N170 amplitudes, early posterior negativity (EPN), and sustained positive potentials. Importantly, selective emotional face processing varied as a function of face orientation, indicating early emotion-specific (N170, EPN) and late threat-specific effects (LPP, sustained positivity). Taken together, perceived personal relevance to the observer-conveyed by facial expression and face direction-amplifies emotional face processing within triadic group situations. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Concrete mechanics. Part A: Theory and experiments on the mechanical behavior of cracks in plain and reinforced concrete subjected to shear loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, J. C.; Reinhardt, H. W.

    The mechanism or transmission of forces across cracks whose faces are subjected to shear displacements are investigated. This mechanism is achieved by interaction of several components: axial and transverse stiffness (dowel action) of the reinforcement and direct transfer of force between the rough concrete crack faces, generally denoted by the term 'aggregate interlock'. Experimental research and the derivation of a theoretical model gave insight into the phenomenon. Tests were carried out on precracked shear specimens. Variables in the tests were the type of reinforcement (embedded reinforcing bars, external restraint bars), the concrete strength, the type of the concrete (sand gravel concrete, lightweight concrete), the grading of the concrete (continuous discontinuous), the scale of the concrete, and the initial crack width. Measurements were carried for determining the shear force, the crack displacements and, for the specimens with external reinforcement, the force in the restraining bars.

  16. The Two Faces of Social Interaction Reward in Animal Models of Drug Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rawas, Rana; Saria, Alois

    2016-03-01

    Drug dependence is a serious health and social problem. Social factors can modify vulnerability to developing drug dependence, acting as risk factors or protective factors. Whereas stress and peer environment that encourage substance use may increase drug taking, strong attachments between family members and peer environment that do not experience drug use may protect against drug taking and, ultimately, drug dependence. The rewarding effects of drug abuse and social interaction can be evaluated using animal models. In this review we focus on evaluating social interaction reward in the conditioned place preference paradigm. We give an overview of how social interaction, if made available within the drug context, may facilitate, promote and interact with the drug's effects. However, social interaction, if offered alternatively outside the drug context, may have pronounced protective effects against drug abuse and relapse. We also address the importance of the weight difference parameter between the social partners in determining the positive or "agonistic" versus the hostile or "antagonistic" social interaction. We conclude that understanding social interaction reward and its subsequent effects on drug reward is sorely needed for therapeutic interventions against drug dependence.

  17. The Two Faces of Social Interaction Reward in Animal Models of Drug Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawas, Rana El

    2016-01-01

    Drug dependence is a serious health and social problem. Social factors can modify vulnerability to developing drug dependence, acting as risk factors or protective factors. Whereas stress and peer environment that encourage substance use may increase drug taking, strong attachments between family members and peer environment that do not experience drug use may protect against drug taking and, ultimately, drug dependence. The rewarding effects of drug abuse and social interaction can be evaluated using animal models. In this review we focus on evaluating social interaction reward in the conditioned place preference paradigm. We give an overview of how social interaction, if made available within the drug context, may facilitate, promote and interact with the drug’s effects. However, social interaction, if offered alternatively outside the drug context, may have pronounced protective effects against drug abuse and relapse. We also address the importance of the weight difference parameter between the social partners in determining the positive or “agonistic” versus the hostile or “antagonistic” social interaction. We conclude that understanding social interaction reward and its subsequent effects on drug reward is sorely needed for therapeutic interventions against drug dependence. PMID:26088685

  18. Topicality and the Structure of Interactive Talk in Face-to-Face Seminar Discussions: Implications for Research in Distributed Learning Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Will; Hall, Andy; Callery, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the structure of topic movement within face-to-face postgraduate university seminar discussion forums through a conversation analytic approach. The analysis of 12 audio recordings of seminars showed that in spite of clear differences in the management style of sessions by seminar leaders there were important consistencies in…

  19. Let's Face(book) It: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rap, Shelley; Blonder, Ron

    2016-02-01

    We examined how social network (SN) groups contribute to the learning of chemistry. The main goal was to determine whether chemistry learning could occur in the group discourse. The emphasis was on groups of students in the 11th and 12th grades who learn chemistry in preparation for their final external examination. A total of 1118 discourse events were tallied in the different groups. We analyzed the different events that were found in chemistry learning Facebook groups (CLFGs). The analysis revealed that seven types of interactions were observed in the CLFGs: The most common interaction (47 %) dealt with organizing learning (e.g., announcements regarding homework, the location of the next class); learning interactions were observed in 22 % of the posts, and links to learning materials and social interactions constituted about 20 % each. The learning events that were ascertained underwent a deeper examination and three different types of chemistry learning interactions were identified. This examination was based on the theoretical framework of the commognitive approach to learning (Sfard in Thinking as communicating. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2008), which will be explained. The identified learning interactions that were observed in the Facebook groups illustrate the potential of SNs to serve as an additional tool for teachers to advance their students' learning of chemistry.

  20. Preliminary evidence for the interaction of the oxytocin receptor gene (oxtr) and face processing in differentiating prenatal smoking patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Suena H; Estabrook, Ryne; O'Brien, T Caitlin; Pine, Daniel S; Burns, James L; Jacob, Suma; Cook, Edwin H; Wakschlag, Lauren S

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal smoking cessation has been described as an empathic action "for the baby," but this has not been empirically demonstrated. We capitalized on a genetically-characterized extant dataset with outstanding measurement of prenatal smoking patterns and maternal face processing data (as an indicator of empathy) to test this hypothesis, and explore how empathy and smoking patterns may be moderated by a genetic substrate of empathy, the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR). Participants were 143 Caucasian women from the East Boston family study with repeated prospective reports of smoking level, adjusted based on repeated cotinine bioassays. Salivary DNA and face processing (Diagnostic Analysis of Nonverbal Accuracy-2) were assessed 14 years later at an adolescent follow-up of offspring. Two-thirds of participants reported smoking prior to pregnancy recognition. Of these, 21% quit during pregnancy; 56% reduced smoking, and 22% smoked persistently at the same level. A significant interaction between face processing and OXTR variants previously associated with increased sensitivity to social context, rs53576GG and rs2254298A, was found (β = -.181; p = .015); greater ability to identify distress in others was associated with lower levels of smoking during pregnancy for rs53576(GG)/rs2254298(A) individuals (p = .013), but not for other genotypes (p = .892). Testing this "empathy hypothesis of prenatal smoking cessation" in larger studies designed to examine this question can elucidate whether interventions to enhance empathy can improve prenatal smoking cessation rates.

  1. Cocaine Exposure Is Associated with Subtle Compromises of Infants' and Mothers' Social-Emotional Behavior and Dyadic Features of Their Interaction in the Face-to-Face Still-Face Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronick, E. Z.; Messinger, D. S.; Weinberg, M. K.; Lester, B. M.; LaGasse, L.; Seifer, R.; Bauer, C. R.; Shankaran, S.; Bada, H.; Wright, L. L.; Poole, K.; Liu, J.

    2005-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine and opiate exposure are thought to subtly compromise social and emotional development. The authors observed a large sample of 236 cocaine-exposed and 459 nonexposed infants (49 were opiate exposed and 646 nonexposed) with their mothers in the face-to-face still-face paradigm. Infant and maternal behaviors were microanalytically…

  2. The thermal expansion of a face-centered cubic lattice with central two-body interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicknese, V.

    1965-01-01

    The thermal expansion e is calculated by minimizing the free energy, including the cubic and quartic phonon-interaction terms. The free energy is expanded to third order in e. The work is closely related to that of Maradudin and Maradudin, Flinn and Coldwell-Horsfall. The resulting formulas are appl

  3. Faces of product pleasure: 25 positive emotions in human-product interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, P.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The study of user emotions is hindered by the absence of a clear overview of what positive emotions can be experienced in humanproduct interactions. Existing typologies are either too concise or too comprehensive, including less than five or hundreds of positive emotions, respectively. To overcome t

  4. Facing the challenges of multiscale modelling of bacterial and fungal pathogen-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Jana; Conrad, Theresia; Gustafsson, Mika; Cedersund, Gunnar; Guthke, Reinhard; Linde, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    Recent and rapidly evolving progress on high-throughput measurement techniques and computational performance has led to the emergence of new disciplines, such as systems medicine and translational systems biology. At the core of these disciplines lies the desire to produce multiscale models: mathematical models that integrate multiple scales of biological organization, ranging from molecular, cellular and tissue models to organ, whole-organism and population scale models. Using such models, hypotheses can systematically be tested. In this review, we present state-of-the-art multiscale modelling of bacterial and fungal infections, considering both the pathogen and host as well as their interaction. Multiscale modelling of the interactions of bacteria, especially Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with the human host is quite advanced. In contrast, models for fungal infections are still in their infancy, in particular regarding infections with the most important human pathogenic fungi, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus. We reflect on the current availability of computational approaches for multiscale modelling of host-pathogen interactions and point out current challenges. Finally, we provide an outlook for future requirements of multiscale modelling. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Facing the challenges of multiscale modelling of bacterial and fungal pathogen–host interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Jana; Conrad, Theresia; Gustafsson, Mika; Cedersund, Gunnar; Guthke, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent and rapidly evolving progress on high-throughput measurement techniques and computational performance has led to the emergence of new disciplines, such as systems medicine and translational systems biology. At the core of these disciplines lies the desire to produce multiscale models: mathematical models that integrate multiple scales of biological organization, ranging from molecular, cellular and tissue models to organ, whole-organism and population scale models. Using such models, hypotheses can systematically be tested. In this review, we present state-of-the-art multiscale modelling of bacterial and fungal infections, considering both the pathogen and host as well as their interaction. Multiscale modelling of the interactions of bacteria, especially Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with the human host is quite advanced. In contrast, models for fungal infections are still in their infancy, in particular regarding infections with the most important human pathogenic fungi, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus. We reflect on the current availability of computational approaches for multiscale modelling of host–pathogen interactions and point out current challenges. Finally, we provide an outlook for future requirements of multiscale modelling. PMID:26857943

  6. Crack Propagation in Bamboo's Hierarchical Cellular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Meisam K.; Lu, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well.

  7. Nonlinear modal method of crack localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, Lev; Sutin, Alexander; Lebedev, Andrey

    2004-05-01

    A simple scheme for crack localization is discussed that is relevant to nonlinear modal tomography based on the cross-modulation of two signals at different frequencies. The scheme is illustrated by a theoretical model, in which a thin plate or bar with a single crack is excited by a strong low-frequency wave and a high-frequency probing wave (ultrasound). The crack is assumed to be small relative to all wavelengths. Nonlinear scattering from the crack is studied using a general matrix approach as well as simplified models allowing one to find the nonlinear part of crack volume variations under the given stress and then the combinational wave components in the tested material. The nonlinear response strongly depends on the crack position with respect to the peaks or nodes of the corresponding interacting signals which can be used for determination of the crack position. Juxtaposing various resonant modes interacting at the crack it is possible to retrieve both crack location and orientation. Some aspects of inverse problem solutions are also discussed, and preliminary experimental results are presented.

  8. Reconsidering the boundary conditions for a dynamic, transient mode I crack problem

    KAUST Repository

    Leise, Tanya

    2008-11-01

    A careful examination of a dynamic mode I crack problem leads to the conclusion that the commonly used boundary conditions do not always hold in the case of an applied crack face loading, so that a modification is required to satisfy the equations. In particular, a transient compressive stress wave travels along the crack faces, moving outward from the loading region on the crack face. This does not occur in the quasistatic or steady state problems, and is a special feature of the transient dynamic problem that is important during the time interval immediately following the application of crack face loading. We demonstrate why the usual boundary conditions lead to a prediction of crack face interpenetration, and then examine how to modify the boundary condition for a semi-infinite crack with a cohesive zone. Numerical simulations illustrate the resulting approach.

  9. Assessment of database for interaction of tritium with ITER plasma facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, T.J.; Anderl, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The present work surveys recent literature on hydrogen isotope interactions with Be, SS and Inconels, Cu, C, and V, and alloys of Cu and V. The goals are (1) to provide input to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) team to help with tritium source term estimates for the Early Safety and Environmental Characterization Study and (2) to provide guidance for planning additional research that will be needed to fill gaps in the present materials database. Properties of diffusivity, solubility, permeability, chemical reactions, Soret effect, recombination coefficient, surface effects, trapping, porosity, layered structures, interfaces, and oxides are considered. Various materials data are tabulated, and a matrix display shows an assessment of the quality of the data available for each main property of each material. Recommendations are made for interim values of diffusivity and solubility to be used, pending further discussion by the ITER community.

  10. Three-Dimensional Problems in the Dynamic Fracture Mechanics of Materials with Interface Cracks (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guz, A. N.; Guz, I. A.; Men'shikov, A. V.; Men'shikov, V. A.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional problems in the dynamic fracture mechanics of materials with interface cracks are considered as nonclassical problems of fracture mechanics. Physically correct results in fracture mechanics in the case where the interaction of the crack edges must be taken into account are analyzed. The linear (classical) and nonlinear (nonclassical) problems of dynamic fracture mechanics for materials with interface cracks are formulated using the above approaches. A method for solving three-dimensional linear dynamic problems based on boundary integral equations for piecewise-homogeneous materials and the boundary-element method is outlined. This method can be used for incremental solution of nonlinear problems. The method involves the regularization of hypersingular integrals. New classes of three-dimensional linear dynamic problems for circular and elliptic interface cracks are solved. Numerical values of stress intensity factors obtained with the linear problem formulation are the first step toward calculating them in the nonlinear formulation. The first results obtained in solving nonlinear dynamic problems for interface cracks with interacting faces are briefly analyzed

  11. Measuring the intuitive response of users when faced with different interactive paradigms to control a gastroenterology CAD system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, D; Gomes, P; Pereira, D; Coimbra, M

    2016-08-01

    The gastroenterology specialty could benefit from the introduction of Computer Assisted Decision (CAD) systems, since gastric cancer is a serious concern in which an accurate and early diagnosis usually leads to a good prognosis. Still, the way doctors interact with these systems is very important because it will often determine its embracement or rejection, as any gains in productivity will frequently hinge on how comfortable they are with it. Using other types of interaction paradigms such as voice and motion control, is important in a way that typical inputs such as keyboard and mouse are sometimes not the best choice for certain clinical scenarios. In order to ascertain how a doctor could control a hypothetical CAD system during a gastroenterology exam, we measured the natural response of users when faced with three different task requests, using three types of interaction paradigms: voice, gesture and endoscope. Results fit in what was expected, with gesture control being the most intuitive to use, and the endoscope being on the other edge. All the technologies are mature enough to cope with the response concepts the participants gave us. However, when having into account the scenario context, better natural response scores may not always be the best choice for implementation. That way, simplification or reduction of tasks, along with a well tought-out interface, or even mixing more oriented paradigms for particular requests, could allow for better system control with fewer inconveniences for the user.

  12. Face-to-face interaction compared with video watching on use of physical activity in peripheral arterial disease: a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Tracie C; Krueger, Patricia N; Kroll, Tony L; Sharf, Barbara F

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have defined the association of physician-patient communication with physical activity levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease. We hypothesized that a face-to-face intervention versus video watching would improve physical activity levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease. The authors conducted a randomized trial involving 2 interventions. The face-to-face intervention included a brief dialogue with patients to understand their perceptions of peripheral arterial disease and importance of walking. The comparison group watched a video that included an overview of peripheral arterial disease. The primary outcome was changed from baseline to follow-up in levels of physical activity. Fifty-one patients with peripheral arterial disease were randomized. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in reported activity level or walking ability at 12 weeks. For within group changes, the patients in the video-watching group improved their walking speed (8.5%; SD = 4.1; P = .05). Patients with peripheral arterial disease may benefit from the use of an educational video to increase the use of unsupervised physical activity. Further research is needed to identify interventions that can increase the use of unsupervised physical activity in this population.

  13. ANALYSIS OF ELECTRIC BOUNDARY CONDITION EFFECTS ON CRACK PROPAGATION IN PIEZOELECTRIC CERAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐航; 方岱宁; 姚振汉

    2001-01-01

    There are three types of cracks: impermeable crack, permeable crack and conducting crack, with different electric boundary conditions on faces of cracks in piezoelectric ceramics, which poses difficulties in the analysis of piezoelectric fracture problems. In this paper, in contrast to our previous FEM formulation, the numerical analysis is based on the use of exact electric boundary conditions at the crack faces, thus the common assumption of electric impermeability in the FEM analysis is avoided. The crack behavior and elasto-electric fields near a crack tip in a PZT-5piezoelectric ceramic under mechanical, electrical and coupled mechanical-electrical loads with different electric boundary conditions on crack faces are investigated. It is found that the dielectric medium between the crack faces will reduce the singularity of stress and electric displacement. Furthermore, when the permittivity of the dielectric medium in the crack gap is of the same order as that of the piezoelectric ceramic, the crack becomes a conducting crack, the applied electric field has no effect on the crack propagation.

  14. Crack propagation directions in unfilled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, G; Sadeghipour, K; Jayaraman, S; Silage, D; Paul, D; Boberick, K

    1998-11-01

    Posterior composite restorative materials undergo accelerated wear in the occlusal contact area, primarily through a fatigue mechanism. To facilitate the timely development of new and improved materials, a predictive wear model is desirable. The objective of this study was to develop a finite element model enabling investigators to predict crack propagation directions in resins used as the matrix material in composites, and to verify these predictions by observing cracks formed during the pin-on-disc wear of a 60:40 BISGMA:TEGDMA resin and an EBPADMA resin. Laser confocal scanning microscopy was used to measure crack locations. Finite element studies were done by means of ABAQUS software, modeling a cylinder sliding on a material with pre-existing surface-breaking cracks. Variables included modulus, cylinder/material friction coefficient, crack face friction, and yield behavior. Experimental results were surprising, since most crack directions were opposite previously published observations. The majority of surface cracks, though initially orthogonal to the surface, changed direction to run 20 to 30 degrees from the horizontal in the direction of indenter movement. Finite element modeling established the importance of subsurface shear stresses, since calculations provided evidence that cracks propagate in the direction of maximum K(II)(theta), in the same direction as the motion of the indenter, and at an angle of approximately 20 degrees. These findings provide the foundation for a predictive model of sliding wear in unfilled glassy resins.

  15. Real-time face and gesture analysis for human-robot interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhoff, Frank; Rehrl, Tobias; Mayer, Christoph; Radig, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Human communication relies on a large number of different communication mechanisms like spoken language, facial expressions, or gestures. Facial expressions and gestures are one of the main nonverbal communication mechanisms and pass large amounts of information between human dialog partners. Therefore, to allow for intuitive human-machine interaction, a real-time capable processing and recognition of facial expressions, hand and head gestures are of great importance. We present a system that is tackling these challenges. The input features for the dynamic head gestures and facial expressions are obtained from a sophisticated three-dimensional model, which is fitted to the user in a real-time capable manner. Applying this model different kinds of information are extracted from the image data and afterwards handed over to a real-time capable data-transferring framework, the so-called Real-Time DataBase (RTDB). In addition to the head and facial-related features, also low-level image features regarding the human hand - optical flow, Hu-moments are stored into the RTDB for the evaluation process of hand gestures. In general, the input of a single camera is sufficient for the parallel evaluation of the different gestures and facial expressions. The real-time capable recognition of the dynamic hand and head gestures are performed via different Hidden Markov Models, which have proven to be a quick and real-time capable classification method. On the other hand, for the facial expressions classical decision trees or more sophisticated support vector machines are used for the classification process. These obtained results of the classification processes are again handed over to the RTDB, where other processes (like a Dialog Management Unit) can easily access them without any blocking effects. In addition, an adjustable amount of history can be stored by the RTDB buffer unit.

  16. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  17. Identifying Oneself with the Face of Someone Else Impairs the Egocentered Visuo-spatial Mechanisms: A New Double Mirror Paradigm to Study Self–other Distinction and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirioux, Bérangère; Wehrmann, Moritz; Langbour, Nicolas; Jaafari, Nematollah; Berthoz, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Looking at our face in a mirror is one of the strongest phenomenological experiences of the Self in which we need to identify the face as reflected in the mirror as belonging to us. Recent behavioral and neuroimaging studies reported that self-face identification not only relies upon visual-mnemonic representation of one’s own face but also upon continuous updating and integration of visuo-tactile signals. Therefore, bodily self-consciousness plays a major role in self-face identification, with respect to interplay between unisensory and multisensory processing. However, if previous studies demonstrated that the integration of multisensory body-related signals contributes to the visual processing of one’s own face, there is so far no data regarding how self-face identification, inversely, contributes to bodily self-consciousness. In the present study, we tested whether self–other face identification impacts either the egocentered or heterocentered visuo-spatial mechanisms that are core processes of bodily self-consciousness and sustain self–other distinction. For that, we developed a new paradigm, named “Double Mirror.” This paradigm, consisting of a semi-transparent double mirror and computer-controlled Light Emitting Diodes, elicits self–other face merging illusory effect in ecologically more valid conditions, i.e., when participants are physically facing each other and interacting. Self-face identification was manipulated by exposing pairs of participants to an Interpersonal Visual Stimulation in which the reflection of their faces merged in the mirror. Participants simultaneously performed visuo-spatial and mental own-body transformation tasks centered on their own face (egocentered) or the face of their partner (heterocentered) in the pre- and post-stimulation phase. We show that self–other face identification altered the egocentered visuo-spatial mechanisms. Heterocentered coding was preserved. Our data suggest that changes in self-face

  18. Identifying oneself with the face of someone else impairs the egocentered visuo-spatial mechanisms: A new Double Mirror paradigm to study self-other distinction and interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berangere THIRIOUX

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Looking at our face in a mirror is one of the strongest phenomenological experiences of the Self in which we need to identify the face as reflected in the mirror as belonging to us. Recent behavioural and neuroimaging studies reported that self-face identification not only relies upon visual-mnemonic representation of one’s own face but also upon continuous updating and integration of visuo-tactile signals. Therefore, bodily self-consciousness plays a major role in self-face identification, with respect to interplay between unisensory and multisensory processing. However, if previous studies demonstrated that the integration of multisensory body-related signals contributes to the visual processing of one’s own face, there is so far no data regarding how self-face identification, inversely, contributes to bodily self-consciousness. In the present study, we tested whether self-other face identification impacts either the egocentered or heterocentered visuo-spatial mechanisms that are core processes of bodily self-consciousness and sustain self-other distinction. For that, we developed a new paradigm, named Double Mirror. This paradigm, consisting of a semi-transparent double mirror and computer-controlled Light Emitting Diodes, elicits self-other face merging illusory effect in ecologically more valid conditions, i.e., when participants are physically facing each other and interacting. Self-face identification was manipulated by exposing pairs of participants to an Interpersonal Visual Stimulation in which the reflection of their faces merged in the mirror. Participants simultaneously performed visuo-spatial and mental own-body transformation tasks centered on their own face (egocentered or the face of their partner (heterocentered in the pre- and post-stimulation phase. We show that self-other face identification altered the egocentered visuo-spatial mechanisms. Heterocentered coding was preserved. Our data suggest that changes in self-face

  19. Structures and properties of molecular torsion balances to decipher the nature of substituent effects on the aromatic edge-to-face interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardarsson, Haraldur; Schweizer, W Bernd; Trapp, Nils; Diederich, François

    2014-04-14

    Various recent computational studies initiated this systematic re-investigation of substituent effects on aromatic edge-to-face interactions. Five series of Tröger base derived molecular torsion balances (MTBs), initially introduced by Wilcox and co-workers, showing an aromatic edge-to-face interaction in the folded, but not in the unfolded form, were synthesized. A fluorine atom or a trifluoromethyl group was introduced onto the edge ring in ortho-, meta-, and para-positions to the C-H group interacting with the face component. The substituents on the face component were varied from electron-donating to electron-withdrawing. Extensive X-ray crystallographic data allowed for a discussion on the conformational behavior of the torsional balances in the solid state. While most systems adopt the folded conformation, some were found to form supramolecular intercalative dimers, lacking the intramolecular edge-to-face interaction, which is compensated by the gain of aromatic π-stacking interactions between four aryl rings of the two molecular components. This dimerization does not take place in solution. The folding free enthalpy ΔG(fold) of all torsion balances was determined by (1)H NMR measurements by using 10 mM solutions of samples in CDCl3 and C6D6. Only the ΔG(fold) values of balances bearing an edge-ring substituent in ortho-position to the interacting C-H show a steep linear correlation with the Hammett parameter (σ(meta)) of the face-component substituent. Thermodynamic analysis using van't Hoff plots revealed that the interaction is enthalpy-driven. The ΔG(fold) values of the balances, in addition to partial charge calculations, suggest that increasing the polarization of the interacting C-H group makes a favorable contribution to the edge-to-face interaction. The largest contribution, however, seems to originate from local direct interactions between the substituent in ortho-position to the edge-ring C-H and the substituted face ring.

  20. Analysis of Multiple Cracks in an Infinite Functionally Graded Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shbeeb, N. I.; Binienda, W. K.; Kreider, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    A general methodology was constructed to develop the fundamental solution for a crack embedded in an infinite non-homogeneous material in which the shear modulus varies exponentially with the y coordinate. The fundamental solution was used to generate a solution to fully interactive multiple crack problems for stress intensity factors and strain energy release rates. Parametric studies were conducted for two crack configurations. The model displayed sensitivity to crack distance, relative angular orientation, and to the coefficient of nonhomogeneity.

  1. A boundary integral method for a dynamic, transient mode I crack problem with viscoelastic cohesive zone

    KAUST Repository

    Leise, Tanya L.

    2009-08-19

    We consider the problem of the dynamic, transient propagation of a semi-infinite, mode I crack in an infinite elastic body with a nonlinear, viscoelastic cohesize zone. Our problem formulation includes boundary conditions that preclude crack face interpenetration, in contrast to the usual mode I boundary conditions that assume all unloaded crack faces are stress-free. The nonlinear viscoelastic cohesive zone behavior is motivated by dynamic fracture in brittle polymers in which crack propagation is preceeded by significant crazing in a thin region surrounding the crack tip. We present a combined analytical/numerical solution method that involves reducing the problem to a Dirichlet-to-Neumann map along the crack face plane, resulting in a differo-integral equation relating the displacement and stress along the crack faces and within the cohesive zone. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  2. Assessment of Maternal-Infant Interaction: Application of the Still Face Paradigm in a Rural Population of Working Women in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handal, Alexis J; Garcia Saavedra, Luigi; Schrader, Ronald; Aragón, Crystal L; Páez, Maritza; Lowe, Jean R

    2017-03-01

    Objectives The importance of mother-child interaction in early infancy on child development has been well documented. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of using the Still Face Paradigm to measure mother interactive style, infant affect and emotional regulation in a rural Ecuador setting. Methods Infant's emotional regulation and the quality of mother's interaction were measured with the Still Face Paradigm at 4 months of age (±15 days). Twenty-four infants and their mothers were assessed in their home. Mother interactive style was coded for attention seeking and contingent responding. Emotional regulation was described by change in infant affect between Still Face episodes. Results A significant difference was found for infant affect between the five Still Face episodes (F1,118 = 9.185, p = 0.003). A significant negative correlation was found for infant affect between episode 3 and 2 with attention seeking mother interactive style during episode 3 (rho = -0.44, p = 0.03), indicating that mothers using more contingent-responding interactions had infants with more positive affect. Conversely, a significant positive association was found for infant affect between episode 3 and 2 and contingent responding mother interactive style during episode 3 (rho = 0.46, p = 0.02), indicating that mothers who used more attention seeking play had infants who showed less positive affect. Conclusion for Practice Study results demonstrate feasibility in using the Still Face Paradigm in working populations residing in a rural region in Ecuadorian highlands and may be feasible in other similar populations in Latin America, and as a successful approach to measuring maternal-child interactions within a field-based epidemiological study design.

  3. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    (displacement) respectively of material considered. The practical applicability of the two models is limited such that predicted strength sigma_CR must be less than sigma_L/3, which corresponds to an assumption that fictitious cracks are much smaller than real crack lengths considered. The reason......A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  4. Seismic stability analysis of concrete gravity dams with penetrated cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-yan JIANG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The seismic stability of a cracked dam was examined in this study. Geometric nonlinearity and large deformations, as well as the contact condition at the crack site, were taken into consideration. The location of penetrated cracks was first identified using the concrete plastic-damage model based on the nonlinear finite element method (FEM. Then, the hard contact algorithm was used to simulate the crack interaction in the normal direction, and the Coloumb friction model was used to simulate the crack interaction in the tangential direction. After verification of numerical models through a case study, the seismic stability of the Koyna Dam with two types of penetrated cracks is discussed in detail with different seismic peak accelerations, and the collapse processes of the cracked dam are also presented. The results show that the stability of the dam with two types of penetrated cracks can be ensured in an earthquake with a magnitude of the original Koyna earthquake, and the cracked dam has a large earthquake-resistant margin. The failure processes of the cracked dam in strong earthquakes can be divided into two stages: the sliding stage and the overturning stage. The sliding stage ends near the peak acceleration, and the top block slides a long distance along the crack before the collapse occurs. The maximum sliding displacement of the top block will decrease with an increasing friction coefficient at the crack site.

  5. Interactive Explanations: The Functional Role of Gestural and Bodily Action for Explaining and Learning Scientific Concepts in Face-to-Face Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopelitis, Stephanie A.

    2013-01-01

    As human beings, we live "in", live "with", and live "through" our bodies. And because of this it is no wonder that our hands and bodies are in motion as we interact with others in our world. Hands and body move as we give directions to another, anticipate which way to turn the screwdriver, and direct our friend to…

  6. Fracture mechanics analyses of partial crack closure in shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun

    2007-12-01

    This thesis presents the theoretical and finite element analyses of crack-face closure behavior in shells and its effect on the stress intensity factor under a bending load condition. Various shell geometries, such as spherical shell, cylindrical shell containing an axial crack, cylindrical shell containing a circumferential crack and shell with double curvatures, are all studied. In addition, the influence of material orthotropy on the crack closure effect in shells is also considered. The theoretical formulation is developed based on the shallow shell theory of Delale and Erdogan, incorporating the effect of crack-face closure at the compressive edges. The line-contact assumption, simulating the crack-face closure at the compressive edges, is employed so that the contact force at the closure edges is introduced, which can be translated to the mid-plane of the shell, accompanied by an additional distributed bending moment. The unknown contact force is computed by solving a mixed-boundary value problem iteratively, that is, along the crack length, either the normal displacement of the crack face at the compressive edges is equal to zero or the contact pressure is equal to zero. It is found that due to the curvature effects crack closure may not always occur on the entire length of the crack, depending on the direction of the bending load and the geometry of the shell. The crack-face closure influences significantly the magnitude of the stress intensity factors; it increases the membrane component but decreases the bending component. The maximum stress intensity factor is reduced by the crack-face closure. The significant influence of geometry and material orthotropy on rack closure behavior in shells is also predicted based on the analytical solutions. Three-dimensional FEA is performed to validate the theoretical solutions. It demonstrates that the crack face closure occurs actually over an area, not on a line, but the theoretical solutions of the stress intensity

  7. 3D characterization of rolling contact fatigue crack networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessop, Casey; Ahlström, Johan; Hammar, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    analysis method for geometrical reconstruction, and a 3D representation of the complex crack network was achieved. This was compared with measurements on cross-sections after repeated metallographic sectioning to determine the accuracy of prediction of the geometrical reconstruction. A second squat...... was investigated by X-ray tomography after extraction of a section of the rail head. A third squat was opened by careful cutting, which gave full access to the crack faces, and the topography was measured by stylus profilometry. The high-energy X-ray, 3D reconstruction method showed accurate main crack geometry...... to the crack face. However this time-consuming method requires destruction of the specimen investigated. The X-ray tomography revealed the 3D crack network including side branches in a 10×10×30mm3 sample, and provided topographic information without completely opening the squat. Topography measurements...

  8. The impact of professional isolation on teleworker job performance and turnover intentions: does time spent teleworking, interacting face-to-face, or having access to communication-enhancing technology matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Timothy D; Veiga, John F; Dino, Richard N

    2008-11-01

    Although the teleworking literature continues to raise concerns regarding the adverse consequences of professional isolation, researchers have not examined its impact on work outcomes. Consequently, the authors first examine professional isolation's direct impact on job performance and turnover intentions among teleworkers and then investigate the contingent role of 3 salient work-mode-related factors. Survey data from a matched sample of 261 professional-level teleworkers and their managers revealed that professional isolation negatively impacts job performance and, contrary to expectations, reduces turnover intentions. Moreover, professional isolation's impact on these work outcomes is increased by the amount of time spent teleworking, whereas more face-to-face interactions and access to communication-enhancing technology tend to decrease its impact. On the basis of these findings, an agenda for future research on professional isolation is offered that takes into account telework's growing popularity as a work modality.

  9. Molecular statics simulation of crack propagation in {alpha}-Fe using EAM potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shastry, V.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-01

    The behavior of mode 1 cracks in {alpha}-Fe is investigated using molecular statics methods with embedded atom (EAM) potentials. A double ended crack of finite size embedded in a cylindrical simulation cell and fixed boundary conditions are prescribed along the periphery of the cell, whereas periodic boundary conditions are imposed parallel to the crack front. The displacement field of the finite crack is represented by that of an equivalent pileup of opening dislocations distributed in a manner consistent with the anisotropy of the crystal and traction free conditions of the crack faces. The crack lies on the {l_brace}110{r_brace} plane and the crack front is located either along <100>< <110> or <111> directions. The crack tip response is rationalized in terms of the surface energy ({gamma}{sub s}) of the cleavage plane and the unstable stacking energies ({gamma}{sub us}) of the slip planes emanating from the crack front.

  10. Study on Causes of Cracks & its Preventive Measures in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Nama

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of cracking in building is becoming a difficult puzzle for engineers nowadays. Cracking is an unavoidable response of any structure while designers are trying to eliminate many of the causes of cracking and design tolerance for other factors. We all want our building structurally safe but it is not so easy. Some faulty steps during construction and some unavoidable reasons different type of cracks starts to appear on various structural and non- structural parts of the building. So, timely identification of such cracks and adopting preventive measure are essential. The repair materials and repair technique are different depending upon forms of cracks according to their positions in structure. Some types of cracks seriously need attention as they are structurally hazardous. In this paper, we will discuss about the problem engineers are facing i.e. of cracking after construction and what preventive measures should be taken along with the techniques to cure cracks.

  11. Interações supervisor-professor: diálogos de proteção da face Supervisor-teacher interactions: dialogues for face protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Correia Tostes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Partindo de uma perspectiva funcional do uso da língua, investigamos as estratégias linguísticas do supervisor escolar e sua aceitação pelos docentes. Tal estudo visa a oferecer insights sobre a modalização da linguagem em interações profissionais. Assim, utilizamos princípios da Teoria da Polidez (1978 aliados à Teoria dos Atos de Fala (1962 para chegar à relação inversamente proporcional entre o grau de polidez e o conteúdo positivo dos comentários: quanto mais polidos os comentários, menos positivo seu conteúdo, e vice-versa. Testes de atitude aplicados aos professores revelam alto grau de aceitação dos comentários tecidos pelo supervisor, o que pode indicar que alto grau de polidez e modalização da linguagem em situações de supervisão escolar são altamente desejáveis para se alcançar atuações profissionais mais eficazes.Departing from a functional perspective of language use, we have investigated linguistic strategies of a school supervisor and their acceptance by teachers. Such study tries to offer insights on the modalization of language in professional interactions. Thus, we have applied principles of Politeness (1978 allied to the Speech Acts Theory (1962 to come to the conclusion there is an inverse proportion between the level of politeness and the quality of comments made: the more politeness strategies used, the less positive the comments made and vice-versa. Attitude tests reveal high level of acceptance of comments by teachers, what might indicate that more politeness and modalization of language in situations of supervision are highly desirable for more effective professional actions.

  12. La comunicación y la asertividad del discurso durante las interacciones grupales presenciales y por computadora Communication and assertiveness on the discourse during face-to-face and computer-mediated group interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Noemí Terroni

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se reportan los resultados del análisis reticular en la comunicación, y los puntajes de la asertividad del discurso de los partipantes de pequeños grupos que resuelven una tarea de recuperación de memoria (La guerra de los fantasmas, Bartlett, 1932. El diseño es cuasiexperimental y los 90 participantes alumnos de la Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, debieron reconstruir la misma en forma grupal colaborativa. Los sujetos fueron asignados aleatoriamente a los grupos y a las dos condiciones (grupos cara a cara y mediados por computadora. Se registraron las interacciones presenciales mediante video filmaciones y las electrónicas quedaron almacenadas en el canal de chat. En general, la asertividad del discurso y la comunicación presentaron asociaciones significativas, con algunas diferencias según el canal comunicacional empleado. Se discuten estos resultados con relación al tipo de tarea y a las restricciones de los medios electrónicos.This work reports the results of reticular analysis in communication, and the scores from the discourse assertiveness of the participants of small groups who solve a recall memory task (The war of the ghosts, Bartlett, 1932. The design is a quasi-experimental one and the 90 subjects, students from Mar del Plata University had to reconstruct the same story in collaborative groups. The subjects were assigned in an aleatory way, to both conditions (face to face and computer-mediated groups. The subjects' interactions in face-to-face communication groups were recorded in video films and the electronic ones were stored in the chat channel. In general, the discourse assertiveness and the communication presented significant associations, with some differences according to the communication channel used. These results are discussed about the type of task and the restrictions of the electronic media.

  13. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. (New Hampshire Univ., Durham, NH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mendelsohn, D.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics)

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  14. A numerical method for multiple cracks in an infinite elastic plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xiang-qiao; WU Hai-peng

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the interaction of multiple cracks in an infinite plate by using a numerical method. The numerical method consists of the non-singular displacement discontinuity element presented by Crouch and Starfied and the crack tip displacement discontinuity elements proposed by the author. In the numerical method implementation, the left or the right crack tip element is placed locally at the corresponding left or right crack tip on top of the constant displacement discontinuity elements that cover the entire crack surface and the other boundaries. The numerical method is called a hybrid displacement discontinuity method. The following test examples of crack problems in an infinite plate under tension are included: "center-inclined cracked plate", "interaction of two collinear cracks with equal length", "interaction of three collinear cracks with equal length", "interaction of two parallel cracks with equal length", and "interaction of one horizontal crack and one inclined crack". The present numerical results show that the numerical method is simple yet very accurate for analyzing the interaction of multiple cracks in an infinite plate.

  15. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  16. Effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Antunes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Crack closure influences fatigue crack growth rate and must be included in the design of components. Plasticity induced crack closure is intimately linked with the crack tip plastic deformation, which becomes residual as the crack propagates. The objective here is to study numerically the effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields. The transient effect observed at the beginning of crack propagation is linked to the hardening behavior of material. The effect of mesh refinement is studied, and a singular behavior is evident, which is explained by the sharp crack associated with mesh topology, composed of a regular pattern of square elements. The plastic zone size measured perpendicularly to crack flank in the residual plastic wake is quantified and compared with literature models. Finally, the removal of material at the first node behind crack tip with load cycling was observed for plane strain state and some hardening models in plane stress state.

  17. Dynamic initiation and propagation of cracks in unidirectional composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Demirkan

    Dynamic crack growth along weak planes is a significant mode of failure in composites and other layered/sandwiched structures and is also the principal mechanism of shallow crustal earthquakes. In order to shed light on this phenomenon dynamic crack initiation and propagation characteristics of a model fiber-reinforced unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite plate was investigated experimentally. Dynamic fracture experiments were conducted by subjecting the composite plates to in-plane, symmetric and asymmetric, impact loading. The lateral shearing interferometric technique of coherent gradient sensing (CGS) in conjunction with high-speed photography was used to visualize the failure process in real time. It was found that mode-I cracks propagated subsonically with crack speeds increasing to the neighborhood of the Rayleigh wave speed of the composite. Also in mode-I, the dependence of the dynamic initiation fracture toughness on the loading rate was determined and was found to be constant for low loading rates and to increase rapidly above K˙dI>10 5 . The dynamic crack propagation toughness, KID, was observed to decrease with crack tip speed up to the Rayleigh wave speed of the composite. For asymmetric, mode-II, types of loading the results revealed highly unstable and intersonic shear-dominated crack growth along the fibers. These cracks propagated with unprecedented speeds reaching 7400 m/s which is the dilatational wave speed of the composite along the fibers. For intersonic crack growth, the interferograms, featured a shock wave structure typical of disturbances traveling with speeds higher than one of the characteristic wave speeds in the solid. In addition high speed thermographic measurements are conducted that show concentrated hot spots behind the crack tip indicating non-uniform crack face frictional contact. In addition, shear dominated dynamic crack growth is investigated along composite/Homalite interfaces subjected to impact loading. The crack

  18. Small-crack test methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, James M.; Allison, John E.

    This book contains chapters on fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks, monitoring small-crack growth by the replication method, measurement of small cracks by photomicroscopy (experiments and analysis), and experimental mechanics of microcracks. Other topics discussed are the real-time measurement of small-crack-opening behavior using an interferometric strain/displacement gage; direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks; an ultrasonic method for the measurement of the size and opening behavior of small fatigue cracks; and the simulation of short crack and other low closure loading conditions, utilizing constant K(max) Delta-K-decreasing fatigue crack growth procedures.

  19. White-Etching Matter in Bearing Steel. Part I: Controlled Cracking of 52100 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Alvarez, W.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Although most of the research performed in bearing steel metallurgy aims to prevent crack nucleation and propagation, some applications require the exact opposite in order to study the role that disconnected surfaces inside the bulk material play when load is applied, or when fluids entrapped in surface cracks propagate tensile stresses or exacerbate corrosion. Four heat treatments have been designed to create controlled arrays of crack types and distributions in quenched and untempered steel normally used in the manufacture of bearings. The varieties of cracks studied include sparsely distributed martensite-plate cracks, fine-grain-boundary cracks, abundant martensite-plate cracks, and surface cracks. The intention was to create samples which can then be subjected to appropriate mechanical testing so that phenomena such as the appearance of "white-etching areas" or "white-etching cracks," crack-lubricant interactions, or hydrogen trapping can be studied further.

  20. Face Processing in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Independent or Interactive Processing of Facial Identity and Facial Expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Julia F.; Biswas, Ajanta; Pascalis, Olivier; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmuth; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated if deficits in processing emotional expression affect facial identity processing and vice versa in children with autism spectrum disorder. Children with autism and IQ and age matched typically developing children classified faces either by emotional expression, thereby ignoring facial identity or by facial identity…

  1. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part I: Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, face/core fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints is investigated numerically and experimentally. The work presented here covers Part I of the study which includes an experimental investigation of fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints and characterization of the face/core int......In this study, face/core fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints is investigated numerically and experimentally. The work presented here covers Part I of the study which includes an experimental investigation of fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints and characterization of the face....../core interface of the joints. Sandwich tear test specimens with a face/core debond representing a debonded sandwich X-joint were tested under cyclic loading. Fatigue tests were conducted on the sandwich tear test specimens with H45, H100 and H250 PVC cores and glass/polyester face sheets. The Digital Image...

  2. Microstructural mechanisms of cyclic deformation, fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughrabi, Haël

    2015-03-28

    In this survey, the origin of fatigue crack initiation and damage evolution in different metallic materials is discussed with emphasis on the responsible microstructural mechanisms. After a historical introduction, the stages of cyclic deformation which precede the onset of fatigue damage are reviewed. Different types of cyclic slip irreversibilities in the bulk that eventually lead to the initiation of fatigue cracks are discussed. Examples of trans- and intercrystalline fatigue damage evolution in the low cycle, high cycle and ultrahigh cycle fatigue regimes in mono- and polycrystalline face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic metals and alloys and in different engineering materials are presented, and some microstructural models of fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth are discussed. The basic difficulties in defining the transition from the initiation to the growth of fatigue cracks are emphasized. In ultrahigh cycle fatigue at very low loading amplitudes, the initiation of fatigue cracks generally occupies a major fraction of fatigue life and is hence life controlling.

  3. Quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior and the crack morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Chen

    Full Text Available In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the "energy conversion factor" is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris.

  4. Dynamic behaviors of interacting radial cracks at the edge of the circular cavities in piezoelectric medium%压电材料中多个孔边径向裂纹的动力相互作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬; 王慧聪; 宋天舒

    2016-01-01

    采用 Green 函数法对压电材料中多个孔边径向裂纹在 SH 波作用下的相互作用问题进行了研究。首先利用复变函数方法构造出具有多个半圆形凹陷的半无限压电介质的位移 Green 函数和电场 Green 函数,然后采用裂纹“切割”技术构造孔边径向裂纹,根据界面上的位移和应力连续性条件建立求解问题的第一类 Fredholm 定解积分方程。最后作为算例,给出了裂纹尖端动应力强度因子随缺陷几何尺寸、材料物理参数和入射波频率的变化特征图并进行了讨论。%Based on the method of Green's function,this work studied the interaction of the radial cracks emanating from the edges of the circular cavities in piezoelectric material,which was subjected to the dynamic incident anti-plane shearing wave(SH-wave).Firstly,coupled Green's functions for displacement and electric potential were established by using a complex variable method.Secondly,crack-division technique was used to construct the model of radial cracks. The problem was reduced to a series of Fredholm integral equations of the first type according to the continuity conditions of the displacement and stress at the interface.Finally,numerical results were provided by solving the equations to show the influences of the geometry parameters,piezoelectric characteristic parameters,and the wave frequencies of incident wave on the dynamic stress intensity factors(DSIFs)at the crack tips.

  5. Towards a quantification of stress corrosion mechanisms: numerical simulations of hydrogen-dislocations at the very crack tip; Vers une quantification des mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte: simulations numeriques des interactions hydrogene-dislocations en pointe de fissure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chateau, J.P

    1999-01-05

    We discuss the respective roles played by anodic dissolution and hydrogen in SCC mechanisms of f.c.c. materials, by studying the fracture of copper in nitrite for which we compare the results with that previously obtained in 316L steel in hot chloride. It is surprising to note that even the crystallographies at the scale of the micron are different, the macroscopic inclination of the fracture surfaces are the same. In the case of 316L steel, the formation of strong pile-ups in the presence of hydrogen leads to a zigzag fracture along alternated slip planes in the most general case. In the absence of hydrogen, as in copper, this mechanism effectively disappears. Furthermore, numerical simulations of crack shielding by dislocations emitted on one plane predict the macroscopic inclination. It shows that it is due to the mere dissolution which confines slip activity at the very crack tip in f.c.c. materials. In order to quantify the mechanism involved in 316L steel, we developed simulations which numerically solve the coupled diffusion and elasticity equations for hydrogen in the presence of a crack and shielding dislocations. They reproduce the mechanisms of hydrogen segregation on edge dislocations and of a localised softening effect by decreasing pair interactions. These mechanisms lead to i) a localisation of hydrogen embrittlement along the activated slip planes, ii) an increase of the dislocation density in pile-ups, and iii) a decrease of the cross slip probability. These three factors enhance micro-fracture at the head of a pile-up, which is responsible of thezigzag fracture. Introducing the free surface effects for hydrogen, we point out a new mechanism: the inhibition of dislocation sources at the crack tip, which is relevant with the brittle fracture surfaces observed in some cases in 316L steel. The quantification of these different mechanisms allows to give a relation between the local fracture possibility and the macroscopic parameters. A general law for

  6. Simulation of phenomena at crack-like leaks and breaks in piping with consideration of fluid-structure interaction. Final report; Simulation der Phaenomene bei rissartigen Lecks und Bruechen in Rohrleitungen unter Beruecksichtigung der Fluid-Struktur-Kopplung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, J.; Grebner, H.; Bahr, L.; Heckmann, K.; Arndt, J.; Pallas-Moner, G.

    2013-11-15

    simulation of the abrupt evaporation of an overheated fluid resulting from a pressure decrease (flashing) insufficient. Hence, the two phase flow from crack-like leaks cannot be satisfactorily calculated yet with this analysis methodology at present. Thermo-hydraulic and structure mechanical analyses were performed for postulated leak positions in the surge line (SL) of a PWR type Konvoi. Leaks were assumed in form of circumferential through-wall cracks of 180 degrees length. The sizes of these leaks were calculated in the framework of FE-calculations with analysis models of a cooling loop of a PWR type Konvoi with crack-like leaks. With these leak sizes ATHLET-calculations were conducted, especially examining the influence of the consideration of a variable leak size. The implication of the decreasing leak size at the leak position in the SL-middle, especially on the pressure distribution, is significant. The reduction of the leak area due to the pressure- and temperature decrease amounts in the transient examined to ca. 25 % after about 1 h transient time and leads therefore to an approximately 23 % smaller leak rate. The results show that the consideration of the interaction between thermo-hydraulic and structure mechanical effects could enhance the accuracy of accident analyses significantly. At the determination of the leak rates as critical flow-through rates with simplified methods according to Pana, Henry and the CDR-model (critical discharge) it has to be taken into account that the approaches differ considerably in parts. The differences can be attributed especially to the assumptions for the treatment of inflow losses in the crack channel and the flow resistance coefficient due to the roughness of the crack surfaces. The investigations demonstrate that good agreement between results of the Pana and the CDR model could be achieved if the water in front of the crack-like flow channel is subcooled. Uncertainties remain especially if steam or saturated steam flow has

  7. Fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy-fractographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, I.; Muhammad, W.; Ejaz, N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-fold approach was adopted to understand the fatigue crack growth process in an Aluminum alloy; fatigue crack growth test of samples and analysis of fractured surfaces. Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on middle tension M(T) samples prepared from an Aluminum alloy cylinder. The tests were conducted under constant amplitude loading at R ratio 0.1. The stress applied was from 20,30 and 40 per cent of the yield stress of the material. The fatigue crack growth data was recorded. After fatigue testing, the samples were subjected to detailed scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. The resulting fracture surfaces were subjected to qualitative and quantitative fractographic examinations. Quantitative fracture analysis included an estimation of crack growth rate (CGR) in different regions. The effect of the microstructural features on fatigue crack growth was examined. It was observed that in stage II (crack growth region), the failure mode changes from intergranular to transgranular as the stress level increases. In the region of intergranular failure the localized brittle failure was observed and fatigue striations are difficult to reveal. However, in the region of transgranular failure the crack path is independent of the microstructural features. In this region, localized ductile failure mode was observed and well defined fatigue striations were present in the wake of fatigue crack. The effect of interaction of growing fatigue crack with microstructural features was not substantial. The final fracture (stage III) was ductile in all the cases.

  8. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  9. Catalytic cracking models developed for predictive control purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Ljungqvist

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with state-space modeling issues in the context of model-predictive control, with application to catalytic cracking. Emphasis is placed on model establishment, verification and online adjustment. Both the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC and the Residual Catalytic Cracking (RCC units are discussed. Catalytic cracking units involve complex interactive processes which are difficult to operate and control in an economically optimal way. The strong nonlinearities of the FCC process mean that the control calculation should be based on a nonlinear model with the relevant constraints included. However, the model can be simple compared to the complexity of the catalytic cracking plant. Model validity is ensured by a robust online model adjustment strategy. Model-predictive control schemes based on linear convolution models have been successfully applied to the supervisory dynamic control of catalytic cracking units, and the control can be further improved by the SSPC scheme.

  10. Face pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... begin in other places in the body. Abscessed tooth (ongoing throbbing pain on one side of the lower face that ... face, and aggravated by eating. Call a dentist. Pain is persistent, ... by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider.

  11. Independent components analysis coupled with 3D-front-face fluorescence spectroscopy to study the interaction between plastic food packaging and olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassouf, Amine; El Rakwe, Maria; Chebib, Hanna; Ducruet, Violette; Rutledge, Douglas N; Maalouly, Jacqueline

    2014-08-11

    Olive oil is one of the most valued sources of fats in the Mediterranean diet. Its storage was generally done using glass or metallic packaging materials. Nowadays, plastic packaging has gained worldwide spread for the storage of olive oil. However, plastics are not inert and interaction phenomena may occur between packaging materials and olive oil. In this study, extra virgin olive oil samples were submitted to accelerated interaction conditions, in contact with polypropylene (PP) and polylactide (PLA) plastic packaging materials. 3D-front-face fluorescence spectroscopy, being a simple, fast and non destructive analytical technique, was used to study this interaction. Independent components analysis (ICA) was used to analyze raw 3D-front-face fluorescence spectra of olive oil. ICA was able to highlight a probable effect of a migration of substances with antioxidant activity. The signals extracted by ICA corresponded to natural olive oil fluorophores (tocopherols and polyphenols) as well as newly formed ones which were tentatively identified as fluorescent oxidation products. Based on the extracted fluorescent signals, olive oil in contact with plastics had slower aging rates in comparison with reference oils. Peroxide and free acidity values validated the results obtained by ICA, related to olive oil oxidation rates. Sorbed olive oil in plastic was also quantified given that this sorption could induce a swelling of the polymer thus promoting migration.

  12. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, P J

    2015-03-06

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored.

  13. Fluorescence mapping of mitochondrial TIM23 complex reveals a water-facing, substrate-interacting helix surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, Nathan N; Jensen, Robert E; Johnson, Arthur E

    2008-08-08

    Protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane is mediated by the TIM23 complex. While its central component, Tim23, is believed to form a protein-conducting channel, the regions of this subunit that face the imported protein are unknown. To examine Tim23 structure and environment in intact membranes at high resolution, various derivatives, each with a single, environment-sensitive fluorescent probe positioned at a specific site, were assembled into functional TIM23 complexes in active mitochondria and analyzed by multiple spectral techniques. Probes placed sequentially throughout a transmembrane region that was identified by crosslinking as part of the protein-conducting channel revealed an alpha helix in an amphipathic environment. Probes on the aqueous-facing helical surface specifically underwent spectral changes during protein import, and their accessibility to hydrophilic quenching agents is considered in terms of channel gating. This approach has therefore provided an unprecedented view of a translocon channel structure in an intact, fully operational, membrane-embedded complex.

  14. Interaction between short fatigue cracks and grain boundaries. Systematic experiments with focussed ion beam microscope and microstructural tomography; Ueber die Wechselwirkung kurzer Ermuedungsrisse mit Korngrenzen. Systematische Experimente mit Focussed Ion Beam Microscope und mikrostruktureller Tomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Wolfgang

    2011-04-15

    Increasing the microstructural resistance of metallic materials to short fatigue crack growth is a major task of today's materials science. In this regard, grain boundaries and precipitates are well known to decelerate short cracks, but a quantitative understanding of the blocking effect is still missing. This is due to the fact that crack deceleration is influenced by many parameters: cyclic load, crack length, distance to obstacles, orientations of grains and obstacles. Even the examination of a huge number of short cracks would not be sufficient to identify the effect of these parameters independently, especially since fatigue crack growth is a 3D problem and investigations of the sub surface orientation of cracks and grain boundaries are scarce. The Focused Ion Beam Microscope (FIB) offers new methods for systematic experiments and 3D-investigation of short fatigue cracks that will help to quantify the microstructural impact on short fatigue crack growth. The ion beam is used to cut micro notches in selected grains on the surface of samples characterised by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). Plane fatigue cracks initiate under cyclic loading in defined distances to the grain boundaries. By this technique it is possible for the first time to present quantitative data to describe the effect of grain boundaries on short fatigue cracks in nickel based superalloys (CMSX-4) as well as in mild steels.

  15. CRACK2. Modelling calcium carbonate deposition from bicarbonate solutions in cracks in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Knud Erik

    2003-01-01

    The numerical CRACK2 model simulates precipitation of calcite from calcium bicarbonate solution (e.g. groundwater) passing through cracks in concrete or other cementitious materials. A summary of experimental work is followed by a detailed description ofthe model. Hydroxyl ions are transported...... by diffusion in pore systems in columns of cementitious materials. The hydroxyl is precipitating calcite from a flow of bicarbonate solution in a crack connecting the ends of a row of such columns. Thecementitious material is simulated as calcium hydroxide mixed with inert material but with sodium hydroxide...... dissolved in the pore solution. Diffusive migration of cesium as radioactive isotope is also considered. Electrical interaction of the migratingions is taken into account. Example calculations demonstrate effects of parameter variations on distribution of precipitated calcite in the crack...

  16. INTERACTION OF GENERAL PLANE P WAVE AND CYLINDRICAL INCLUSION PARTIALLY DEBONDED FROM ITS VISCOELASTIC MATRIX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏培君; 章梓茂; 汪越胜

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of a general plane P wave and an elastic cylindrical inclusion of infinite length partially debonded from its surrounding viscoelastic matrix of infinite extension is investigated. The debonded region is modeled as an arc-shaped interface crack between inclusion and matrix with non-contacting faces. With wave functions expansion and singular integral equation technique, the interaction problem is reduced to a set of simultaneous singular integral equations of crack dislocation density function. By analysis of the fundamental solution of the singular integral equation, it is found that dynamic stress field at the crack tip is oscillatory singular,which is related to the frequency of incident wave. The singular integral equations are solved numerically, and the crack open displacement and dynamic stress intensity factor are evaluated for various incident angles and frequencies.

  17. Simulation of dynamic interactions between a crack and inclusions with scaled boundary finite element method%比例边界有限元模拟裂纹和夹杂动力相互作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施明光; 徐艳杰; 张楚汉; 刘钧玉

    2016-01-01

    Any structural domain can be discretized automatically with a mesh of arbitrary n-sided (n≥3)polygon scaled boundary finite elements (PSBFE)based on Delaunay triangulation background mesh.Compared with previous literatures based on SBFEM,PSBFE retains the characteristics of SBFEM's accurately representing orders of singularities at crack tips it is more general and flexible in modeling complicated structures and their crack propagation.Here,PSBFE was for the first time applied to simulate the dynamic interactions between a crack and inclusions in composite material. The numerical results of stationary cracks under dynamic load were consistent with available data in literatures.Next,a local remeshing scheme was employed to simulate the dynamic crack propagation.The numerical results demonstrated that stiff and soft inclusions have the restraining and amplification effects on the dynamic stress intensity factor of a structure;the sizes and positions of inclusions also affect the dynamic stress intensity factor,the larger the size and the closer the inclusion,the more the effects.%基于三角形背景网格,任意结构可用 n(n≥3)边多边形比例边界有限元(Polygon Scaled Boundary Finite Elements,PSBFE)自动离散。相对以往基于比例边界有限元(SBFEM)的应用,该多边形单元不但继承 SBFEM半解析求解裂纹尖端奇异性的特性,而且在模拟复杂结构的网格生成和裂纹扩展上具有更高的通用性。首次用该单元模拟了动荷载下复合材料裂纹和夹杂相互作用。动荷载稳定裂纹情况下,PSBFE 计算结果同现有文献吻合良好,在此基础上,结合基于拓扑的局部网格重剖分方法,模拟了动荷载下夹杂和扩展裂纹相互作用。结果表明,硬质夹杂和软质夹杂对结构的动力应力强度因子分别起到抑制和放大的作用。夹杂尺寸,夹杂大小也会在一定范围内影响动力应力强度因子,尺寸越大距

  18. Extended displacement discontinuity method for analysis of cracks in 2D thermal piezoelectric semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, MingHao; Pan, YiBo; Fan, CuiYing; Xu, GuangTao

    2017-08-01

    The extended displacement discontinuities method has previously been used for crack analysis of elastic materials, piezoelectric media, magneto-electro-elastic media and piezoelectric semiconductors. Here, this method is extended to study cracks in two-dimensional n-type thermal piezoelectric semiconductors. The extended displacement discontinuities include the conventional displacement discontinuity, electric potential discontinuity, carrier density discontinuity, as well as temperature discontinuity across crack faces; correspondingly, the extended stresses represent conventional stress, electric displacement, electric current, and heat flux. Employing a Fourier transform, the fundamental solutions for a line crack under uniformly distributed extended displacement discontinuities on the crack faces are derived under mechanical, electrical, and heat loading. Based on the obtained fundamental solutions, an extended displacement discontinuity boundary element method is developed. The stress and heat flux intensity factors at the crack tip are calculated under different combined loadings.

  19. Cracks in Tianshengqiao CFRD Versus Sect ionalized Filling%天生桥面板堆石坝分块填筑与坝体裂缝

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Sheng-ping

    2001-01-01

    During the later period of construction of Tianshengqiao con crete faced rockfill dam(CFRD), cracks appeared in the upstream fill sl ope. The main reason was the nonuniform deformation. The treatment methods were: for cracks with opening less than 1 cm, the cracked slope was compacted with added effort to eliminate cracks; for cracks with open ing greater than 1 cm , crack grouting was carried out . The practice demonstrated the treatment was successful. Careful analysis of the rel ation between sectionalized filling and crack emergence is of significa nce in guiding the construction design and drawing out filling plan fo r a high CFRD.

  20. Bond interface crack propagation of fresh foundation concrete and rock under blasting load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Liang; LU Wen-bo; ZHONG Dong-wang

    2009-01-01

    According to concrete age,the dynamic stress intensity factors of bond inter-face crack of concrete-rock was calculated.Result shows that the propagation of concrete interface crack is mainly caused by tensile stress and shear stress for stress wave reflec-tion.With the growth of concrete age,interface crack fracture toughness increases,and its capacity of resisting blasting load strengthens.Therefore,blasting vibration should be strictly controlled for fresh concrete.

  1. Revealing the neural networks associated with processing of natural social interaction and the related effects of actor-orientation and face-visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Manish; Shelly, Elizabeth Walter; Lepage, Jean-Francois; Hoeft, Fumiko; Reiss, Allan L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the intentions and desires of those around us is vital for adapting to a dynamic social environment. In this paper, a novel event-related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) paradigm with dynamic and natural stimuli (2s video clips) was developed to directly examine the neural networks associated with processing of gestures with social intent as compared to nonsocial intent. When comparing social to nonsocial gestures, increased activation in both the mentalizing (or theory of mind) and amygdala networks was found. As a secondary aim, a factor of actor-orientation was included in the paradigm to examine how the neural mechanisms differ with respect to personal engagement during a social interaction versus passively observing an interaction. Activity in the lateral occipital cortex and precentral gyrus was found sensitive to actor-orientation during social interactions. Lastly, by manipulating face-visibility we tested whether facial information alone is the primary driver of neural activation differences observed between social and nonsocial gestures. We discovered that activity in the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and fusiform gyrus (FFG) was partially driven by observing facial expressions during social gestures. Altogether, using multiple factors associated with processing of natural social interaction, we conceptually advance our understanding of how social stimuli is processed in the brain and discuss the application of this paradigm to clinical populations where atypical social cognition is manifested as a key symptom. © 2013.

  2. THE EFFECT OF AN ELASTIC TRIANGULAR INCLUSION ON A CRACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦贵德; 王银邦

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between an elastic triangular inclusion and a crack is investigated. The problem is formulated using the boundary integral equations for traction boundary value problems derived by Chau and Wang as basic equations. By using the continuity condition of traction and displacement on interface as supplement equations, a set of equations for solving the interaction problem between an inclusion and a crack are obtained, which are solved by asing a new boundary element method. The results in terms of stress intensity factors (SIFs) are calculated for a variety of crack-inclusion arrangements and the elastic constants of the matrix and the inclusion. The results are valuable for studying new composite materials.

  3. The Relationship Between Crack-Tip Strain and Subcritical Cracking Thresholds for Steels in High-Pressure Hydrogen Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibur, Kevin A.; Somerday, Brian P.; Marchi, Chris San; Foulk, James W.; Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Sofronis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. Thresholds for crack extension under rising displacement, K THi, for crack extension under constant displacement, K_{{THi}}^{*} , and for crack arrest under constant displacement K THa, were identified. These values were not found to be equivalent, i.e. K THi assisted fracture mechanism was determined to be strain controlled for all of the alloys in this study, and the micromechanics of strain controlled fracture are used to explain the observed disparities between the different threshold measurements. K THa and K THi differ because the strain singularity of a stationary crack is stronger than that of a propagating crack; K THa must be larger than K THi to achieve equivalent crack tip strain at the same distance from the crack tip. Hydrogen interacts with deformation mechanisms, enhancing strain localization and consequently altering both the nucleation and growth stages of strain controlled fracture mechanisms. The timing of load application and hydrogen exposure, i.e., sequential for constant displacement tests and concurrent for rising displacement tests, leads to differences in the strain history relative to the environmental exposure history and promotes the disparity between K_{{THi}}^{*} and K THi. K THi is the only conservative measurement of fracture threshold among the methods presented here.

  4. CRACK2 - Modelling calcium carbonate deposition from bicarbonate solution in cracks in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodersen, K

    2003-03-01

    The numerical CRACK2 model simulates precipitation of calcite from calcium bicarbonate solution (e.g. groundwater) passing through cracks in concrete or other cementitious materials. A summary of experimental work is followed by a detailed description of the model. Hydroxyl ions are transported by diffusion in pore systems in columns of cementitious materials. The hydroxyl is precipitating calcite from a flow of bicarbonate solution in a crack connecting the ends of a row of such columns. The cementitious material is simulated as calcium hydroxide mixed with inert material but with sodium hydroxide dissolved in the pore solution. Diffusive migration of cesium as radioactive isotope is also considered. Electrical interaction of the migrating ions is taken into account. Example calculations demonstrate effects of parameter variations on distribution of precipitated calcite in the crack and on the composition of the outflowing solution, which can be compared directly with experimental results. Leaching behavior of sodium can be used to tune the model to experimental observations. The calcite is mostly precipitated on top of the original crack surface and may under certain circumstances fill the crack. The produced thin layers of low porosity calcite act as a diffusion barrier limiting contact between cement and solution. Pore closure mechanisms in such layers are discussed. Implications for safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal are shortly mentioned. The model is also relevant for conventional uses of concrete. (au)

  5. A comparative study of face processing using scrambled faces

    OpenAIRE

    Taubert, Jessica; Aagten-Murphy, David; Parr, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    It is a widespread assumption that all primate species process faces in the same way because the species are closely related and they engage in similar social interactions. However, this approach ignores potentially interesting and informative differences that may exist between species. This paper describes a comparative study of holistic face processing. Twelve subjects (six chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and six rhesus monkeys Macaca mulatta) were trained to discriminate whole faces (faces wit...

  6. Point Lepreau primary heat transport pump wear ring cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licina, G. [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., San Jose, California (United States); Rankin, B. [Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station, Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The number 3 Primary Heat Transport (PHT) pump from Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station (Point Lepreau) was disassembled after more than 30 years of service for inspection during station refurbishment. The disassembly and inspection were performed to provide assurance of continued satisfactory operation during life extension. The inspection revealed cracks in the wear ring, at and near the tack welds (Type 309 stainless steel weld metal) at the cap screws that attach the Type 420 stainless steel wear ring to the body of the pump. Investigative work consisted of on-site PT and replication of the microstructure at the surface of the wear ring, subsequent impressions of two crack faces, and hardness determinations. This paper describes the investigative work and conclusions associated with resolution of the following questions: 1. What is the most likely cause of the cracking? 2. Will the cracks propagate within the base metal of the wear ring? 3. If propagation is possible, what is the risk of cracks intersecting, such that a piece of metal could become dislodged? Question number 3 has clear ramifications with respect to foreign material entering and damaging a nuclear fuel-containing pressure tube. There are also questions associated with extent of condition, specifically, whether other PHT pumps may have similar or worse cracking and whether such cracks will grow. Results will be applied to wear rings in other PHT pumps at Point Lepreau and are likely to be applicable to similar components in other CANDU PHT pumps. (author)

  7. Fatigue-crack-initiation numerical modelling of a Ni-base powder metallurgy alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    A simplified three-dimensional numerical model was presented to simulate the micro-crack nucleation and growth to some predefined dimension(approximately 0.38 mm) on the throat surface of a Ni-base powder metallurgy(PM) specimen.The numerical simulation of micro-crack initiation was based on the Tanaka-Mura micro-crack initiation models,where individual grains of the mesoscopic model were simulated using the Voronoi tessellation.Four improvements were made in the model.(1) Considering crack initiation along with 12 principal slip systems on octahedral slip planes of face centered cubic(FCC) crystal in three-dimensional(3-D) models.(2) Considering the effect of secondary phase precipitate due to impinging slip and dislocation pileup.(3) The Tanaka-Mura theory of fatigue-crack-initiation from notches was applied to simulate the crack initiation from another crack tip.(4) The coalescence of random initiated micro-cracks was simulated once they intersected with each other and a macro-crack was finally formed.The calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental data which verified the rationality of the simulation model.The applicability of the proposed model for treating fatigue-crack-initiation life in engineering structures was preliminarily achieved.%A simplified three-dimensional numerical model was presented to simulate the micro-crack nucleation and growth to some predefined dimension(approximately 0.38 mm) on the throat surface of a Ni-base powder metallurgy(PM) specimen.The numerical simulation of micro-crack initiation was based on the Tanaka-Mura micro-crack initiation models,where individual grains of the mesoscopic model were simulated using the Voronoi tessellation.Four improvements were made in the model.(1) Considering crack initiation along with 12 principal slip systems on octahedral slip planes of face centered cubic(FCC) crystal in three-dimensional(3-D) models.(2) Considering the effect of secondary phase

  8. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-1. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    A summary on the recent activities of the plasma-wall interactions database task group at the National Institute for Fusion Science is presented in this report. These activities are focused on the compilation of literature data on the key parameters related to wall recycling characteristics that affect dynamic particle balance during plasma discharges and also on-site tritium inventory. More specifically, in this task group a universal fitting formula has been proposed and successfully applied to help compile hydrogen implantation-induced retention data. Also, presented here are the data on hydrogen diffusion and surface recombination coefficients, both critical in modeling dynamic wall recycling behavior. Data compilation has been conducted on beryllium, carbon, tungsten and molybdenum, all currently used for plasma-facing components in magnetic fusion experiments. (author)

  9. The Multimedia Case as a Tool for Professional Development: An Analysis of Online and Face-to-Face Interaction among Mathematics Pre-Service Teachers, In-Service Teachers, Mathematicians, and Mathematics Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Rebecca; Lynch, Kathleen; Koc, Yusuf; Budak, Ayfer; Brown, Catherine A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we consider the potential of multimedia cases as tools for teacher professional development. Specifically, we examined online and face-to-face discussions that occurred within groups composed of pre-service mathematics teachers, in-service mathematics teachers, mathematicians, and mathematics teacher educators. Discussions within…

  10. Priming with threatening faces modulates the self-face advantage by enhancing the other-face processing rather than suppressing the self-face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Lili; Qi, Mingming; Li, Haijiang; Hitchman, Glenn; Yang, Juan; Liu, Yijun

    2015-05-22

    Social emotional information influences self-processing in everyday activities, but few researchers have investigated this process. The current ERP study adopted a prime paradigm to investigate how socially threatening faces impact on the self-face processing advantage. After being primed with emotional faces (happy, angry or neutral), participants judged whether the target face (self, friend, and stranger) was familiar or unfamiliar. Results showed an interaction effect between the prime face and the target face at posterior P3, suggesting that after priming with happy and neutral faces, self-faces elicited larger P3 amplitudes than friend-faces and stranger-faces; however, after priming with angry faces, the P3 amplitudes were not significantly different between self-face and friend-face. Moreover, the P3 amplitudes of self-faces did not differ between priming with angry and neutral faces; however, the P3 amplitude of both friend-faces and stranger-faces showed enhanced responses after priming with angry faces compared to priming with neutral faces. We suggest that the self-face processing advantage (self vs. friend) could be weakened by priming with threatening faces, through enhancement of the other-faces processing rather than suppression of self-faces processing in angry vs. neutral face prime.

  11. In situ observation of rolling contact fatigue cracks by laminography using ultrabright synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Nakai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In rolling contact fatigue (RCF, cracks usually initiate from inclusions beneath the surface and propagate to the contact surface. In the present study, synchrotron radiation computed laminography (SRCL imaging was performed to observe flaking defects during the RCF of a high-strength steel. Specially fabricated inclusion-rich steel plate specimens were employed in the experiments. For the in situ observation of crack propagation, a compact RCF testing machine was developed, and a 4D analysis scheme was applied to the data obtained by SRCL. RCF tests were carried out near the measurement hatch of the beam line used SRCL to enable the successive observation of crack initiation and growth behaviors. Specimens before and after the occurrence of flaking were observed by SRCL, and flaking defects and cracks under the surface were successfully detected. As a result, details of the crack initiation and flaking process in RCF could be discussed. Shear-type horizontal cracks were found to initiate after the initiation and propagation of tensile-type vertical cracks along inclusions, where the face of the vertical cracks was perpendicular to the rolling direction and rolling surface. Therefore, the formation of vertical cracks is considered to affect shear-type crack formation and flaking, where the shape and length of inclusions also affect the initiation and propagation of vertical cracks.

  12. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to Content Menu Closed (Tap to Open) Home Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All ... What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help Home Watch Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search ...

  13. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? ... Watch Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos Learn More PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What ...

  14. Face Forward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Last November, surgeons in France successfully performed the world's first face transplant surgery. Ten days later, Chen Huanran in Beijing began soliciting patients who were ready to accept a face transplant, searching for China's first such patient through an advertisement on his website and other channels. Chen, chief orthopedic surgeon at the Plastic Surgery Hospital under the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, has conducted more than 300 transsexual operations and was considered one of the top com...

  15. Propagation of Slepyan's crack in a non-uniform elastic lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, Michael; Jones, Ian; Mishuris, Gennady

    2012-01-01

    We model and derive the solution for the problem of a Mode I semi-infinite crack propagating in a discrete triangular lattice with bonds having a contrast in stiffness in the principal lattice directions. The corresponding Green's kernel is found and from this wave dispersion dependencies are obtained in explicit form. An equation of the Wiener-Hopf type is also derived and solved along the crack face, in order to compute the stress intensity factor for the semi-infinite crack. The crack stability is analysed via the evaluation of the energy release rate for different contrasts in stiffness of the bonds.

  16. Fatigue Crack Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    evaluating ciack initiation time and crack propagation, prgram I was used for performing the major fatigue test with the aircraft structure. In...advantage to begin with the end of the fracture, this is especially so in the case of the quantitative evaluation of striations. The overload fracture...Select the Measuring Line for Quantitative Evaluation Actually, the fatigue fracture should be inspected completely from the point of origin to the

  17. Cracking in desiccating soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ledesma Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Soil shrinkage is produced typically under desiccating conditions. Eventually shrinkage may generate cracks in the soil mass, a phenomenon that is being studied by several researchers, because its prediction is far from being a routine in Soil Mechanics. Within this context, Unsaturated Soil Mechanics provides a promising framework to understand the mechanisms involved. In addition to that, physical modelling of desiccating soils constitutes a good tool to explore the nature of this problem. ...

  18. Utopia Cracks and Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-339, 23 April 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a pattern of polygonal cracks and aligned, elliptical pits in western Utopia Planitia. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 44.9oN, 274.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  19. Floating Node Method and Virtual Crack Closure Technique for Modeling Matrix Cracking-Delamination Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, Silvestre T.; Baiz, P. M.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials that combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. In this study, the approach is applied to the modeling of delamination migration in cross-ply tape laminates. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration are all modeled using fracture mechanics based failure and migration criteria. The methodology proposed shows very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments.

  20. A MIXED ELECTRIC BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR AN ANTI-PLANE PIEZOELECTRIC CRACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ttnAngZlaenyu; KuangZhenbang

    2003-01-01

    The analytical continuation method is adopted to solve a mixed electric boundary value problem for a piezoelectric medium under anti-plane deformation. The crack face is partly conductive and partly impermeable. The results show that the stress intensity factor is identical with the mode III stress intensity factor independent of the conducting length. But the electric field and the electric displacement are dependent on the electric boundary conditions on the crack faces and are singular not only at the crack tips but also at the junctures between the impermeable part and conducting portions.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON CRACK CURVING PROPAGATION IN BENDING BEAMS UNDER IMPULSIVE LOAD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Jing; Yao Xuefeng; Xiong Chunyang

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic fracture behaviour of crack curving in bent beams has been investigated.In order to understand the propagation mechanism of such cracks under impact,an experimental method is used that combines dynamic photoelasticity with dynamic caustics to study the interaction of the flexural waves and the crack.From the state change of the transient stresses in polymer specimen,the curving fracture in the impulsively loaded beams is analyzed.The dynamic responses of crack tips are evaluated by the stress intensity factors for the cracks running in varying curvature paths under bending stress wave.

  2. Simulation experiment of interaction of plasma facing materials and transient heat loads in ITER divertor by use of magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2009-11-01

    Interaction of plasma facing materials and transient head loads such as type I ELMs is one of the critical issues in ITER divertor. The heat load to the ITER divertor during type I ELMs is estimated to be 0.5-3 MJ/m^2 with a pulse length of 0.1-0.5 ms. We have developed a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for the simulation experiment of transient heat load during type I ELMs in ITER divertor. The MCPG has inner and outer electrodes made of stainless steel 304. In addition, the inner electrode is covered with molybdenum so as to suppress the release of impurities from the electrode during the discharge. The diameters of inner and outer electrodes are 0.06 m and 0.14 m, respectively. The power supply for the MCPG is a capacitor bank (7 kV, 1 mF, 25 kJ). The plasma velocity estimated by the time of flight measurement of the magnetic fields was about 50 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 15 eV (H) or 30 eV (D). The absorbed energy density of the plasma stream was measured a calorimeter made of graphite. It was found that the absorbed energy density was 0.9 MJ/m^2 with a pulse width of 0.5 ms at the distance of 100 mm from the inner electrode. In the conference, experimental results of plasma exposure on the plasma facing materials in ITER divertor will be shown.

  3. Crack Tip Parameters for Growing Cracks in Linear Viscoelastic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune

    intensity factors. In the special case of a constant Poisson ratio only 2 deformation intensity factors are needed. Closed form solutions are given both for a slowly growing crack and for a crack that is suddenly arrested at a point at the crack extension path. Two examples are studied; a stress boundary...... value problem, and a displacement boundary value problem. The results show that the stress intensity factors and the displacement intensity factors do not depend explicitly upon the velocity of the crack tip....

  4. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch

  5. Crack propagation through adhesive interface in glass driven by dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwun

    Dynamic crack behaviors at glass interfaces were investigated to understand dynamic failure mechanisms of glass. To produce highly intensive and rapidly increasing loading, glass specimens jointed with epoxy adhesive in edge-to-edge configurations were impacted on their notched edges with plastic projectiles. Cracks developed from the notch and propagated into the interfaces between glass plates at the maximum speed. The patterns of crack propagation through the interfaces were observed to depend on the interface's conditions. Crack propagation stops at the interface where no adhesive was applied. The crack penetrates through the interface where two glass plates were bonded directly without any space. If the interface has finite thickness of an adhesive layer, a crack passing through the interface branches into multiple cracks immediately when it extends to the second glass plate. Both of the slow crack speed in the epoxy adhesive and resistance for crack initiation in the second glass account for the delay in crack propagation at the interface. The surface conditions of glass at the interface affect the resistance for crack initiation. Mirror-like polished surfaces have better resistance than rough surfaces trimmed by a water jet. If the polished surface is etched with hydrofluoric acid to remove surface flaws, the glass surfaces have higher strength and resistance for damage. This etched glass even ceases crack propagation completely with a sufficiently thick adhesive layer. Crack branching has been an open topic. Exact explanation has not been given yet. As the consistent shape of crack branching are created with the proposed method, diagnostics experiments were conducted to reveal the nature of crack branching. To investigate interaction between stress propagation and crack branching, stress histories synchronizing with high speed images were measured. Two types of specimen were used to vary stress distribution during crack propagation. The apex angle of

  6. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is AboutFace In these videos, Veterans, family members, and ... to hear what they have to say. What is PTSD? → How does PTSD affect loved ones? → Am ...

  7. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... traumatic event — like combat, an assault, or a disaster — it's normal to feel scared, keyed up, or sad at first. But if it's been months or years since the trauma and you're not feeling better, you may have PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is AboutFace In ...

  8. Cryptography cracking codes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    While cracking a code might seem like something few of us would encounter in our daily lives, it is actually far more prevalent than we may realize. Anyone who has had personal information taken because of a hacked email account can understand the need for cryptography and the importance of encryption-essentially the need to code information to keep it safe. This detailed volume examines the logic and science behind various ciphers, their real world uses, how codes can be broken, and the use of technology in this oft-overlooked field.

  9. Estimating crack growth in temperature damaged concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recalde, Juan Jose

    2009-12-01

    Evaluation of the structural condition of deteriorated concrete infrastructure and evaluation of new sustainable cementitious materials require an understanding of how the material will respond to applied loads and environmental exposures. A fundamental understanding of how microstructural changes in these materials relate to changes in mechanical properties and changes in fluid penetrability is needed. The ability to provide rapid, inexpensive assessment of material characteristics and relevant engineering properties is valuable for decision making and asset management purposes. In this investigation, the effects of changes in dynamic elastic properties with water content and fluid penetrability properties before and after a 300°C exposure were investigated based on estimates of the crack density parameter from dry and saturated cracked media. The experimental and analytical techniques described in this dissertation allow calculation of a value for the crack density parameter using nondestructive determination of wet and dry dynamic shear modulus of relatively thin disks. The techniques were used to compare a conventional concrete mixture to several mixtures with enhanced sustainability characteristics. The three enhanced sustainable materials investigated were a very high fly ash mixture, a magnesium phosphate cement based mortar, and a magnesium phosphate cement based concrete, and were compared to a conventional concrete mixture. The analysis provided both quantitative assessment of changes with high temperature damage and autogenous healing, and estimates of changes in mean crack trace lengths. The results showed that water interaction, deterioration due to damage, and autogenous healing recovery were different for the magnesium phosphate cement based mixtures than the portland cement based concrete mixtures. A strong correlation was found between log-transformed Air Permeability Index, dynamic shear modulus, and crack density parameter. The findings imply

  10. Multiaxial mixed-mode cracking - small crack initiation and propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, M. de; Reis, L.; Li Bin [Lisbon Univ. (Portugal). ICEMS - Inst. of Material and Surface Science and Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Both the fatigue crack path and fatigue life of CK45 steel and 42CrMo4 steel under various multiaxial loading paths are studied in this paper. The replica method was applied to monitor the crack initiation and small crack growth, the fractographic analyses were carried out on the fracture surface and the crack initiation angle was measured. The effects of non-proportional loading on both the crack path and fatigue life were studied, and the flattening of asperities on the crack surface due to compressive normal stress was also observed. An improved model is proposed based on correcting the strain range parameter of the ASME code approach, taking into account the additional hardening caused by the non-proportional loading path, which can improve the predictions of the fatigue lives for various non-proportional loading paths and provide an easy way to overcome the drawbacks of the current ASME code approach for non-proportional fatigue. Based on these corrected strain range parameters, a strain intensity factor range is used to correlate with the experimental results of small crack growth rates. It is concluded that the orientation of the early crack growth can be predicted well by the critical damage plane, but the fatigue life can not be predicted accurately using only the parameters on the critical plane, since the damage on all the planes contributes to fatigue damage as stated by the integral approaches. (orig.)

  11. Holoprosencephaly: signalling interactions between the brain and the face, the environment and the genes, and the phenotypic variability in animal models and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Daniel; Marcucio, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common developmental defect of the forebrain characterized by inadequate or absent midline division of the forebrain into cerebral hemispheres, with concomitant midline facial defects in the majority of cases. Understanding the pathogenesis of HPE requires knowledge of the relationship between the developing brain and the facial structures during embryogenesis. A number of signalling pathways control and coordinate the development of the brain and face, including Sonic hedgehog (SHH), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP), Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), and Nodal signalling. Mutations in these pathways have been identified in animal models of HPE and human patients. Due to incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity of HPE, patients carrying defined mutations may not manifest the disease at all, or have a spectrum of defects. It is currently unknown what drives manifestation of HPE in genetically at risk individuals, but it has been speculated that other gene mutations and environmental factors may combine as cumulative insults. HPE can be diagnosed in utero by a high-resolution prenatal ultrasound or a fetal magnetic resonance imaging, sometimes in combination with molecular testing from chorionic villi or amniotic fluid sampling. Currently, there are no effective preventive methods for HPE. Better understanding of the mechanisms of gene-environment interactions in HPE would provide avenues for such interventions. PMID:25339593

  12. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felice, Maria V., E-mail: maria.felice@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K. and NDE Laboratory, Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol (United Kingdom); Velichko, Alexander, E-mail: p.wilcox@bristol.ac.uk; Wilcox, Paul D., E-mail: p.wilcox@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony [NDE Laboratory, Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-31

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  13. MULTIPLE PARALLEL SYMMETRIC PERMEABLE MODEL-Ⅲ CRACKS IN A PIEZOELECTRIC/PIEZOMAGNETIC COMPOSITE MATERIAL PLANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengong Zhou; Peiwei Zhang; Linzhi Wu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,the interactions of multiple parallel symmetric and permeable finite length cracks in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic material plane subjected to anti-plane shear stress loading are studied by the Schmidt method.The problem is formulated through Fourier transform into dual integral equations,in which the unknown variables are the displacement jumps across the crack surfaces.To solve the dual integral equations,the displacement jumps across the crack surfaces are directly expanded as a series of Jacobi polynomials.Finally,the relation between the electric field,the magnetic flux field and the stress field near the crack tips is obtained.The results show that the stress,the electric displacement and the magnetic flux intensity factors at the crack tips depend on the length and spacing of the cracks.It is also revealed that the crack shielding effect presents in piezoelectric/piezomagnetic materials.

  14. Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Surface Breaking Crack Using Rayleigh Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Foo Wei; Chai, Hwa Kian; Lim, Kok Sing

    2016-03-05

    An improved single sided Rayleigh wave (R-wave) measurement was suggested to characterize surface breaking crack in steel reinforced concrete structures. Numerical simulations were performed to clarify the behavior of R-waves interacting with surface breaking crack with different depths and degrees of inclinations. Through analysis of simulation results, correlations between R-wave parameters of interest and crack characteristics (depth and degree of inclination) were obtained, which were then validated by experimental measurement of concrete specimens instigated with vertical and inclined artificial cracks of different depths. Wave parameters including velocity and amplitude attenuation for each case were studied. The correlations allowed us to estimate the depth and inclination of cracks measured experimentally with acceptable discrepancies, particularly for cracks which are relatively shallow and when the crack depth is smaller than the wavelength.

  15. Holistic Processing of Static and Moving Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mintao; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Humans' face ability develops and matures with extensive experience in perceiving, recognizing, and interacting with faces that move most of the time. However, how facial movements affect 1 core aspect of face ability--holistic face processing--remains unclear. Here we investigated the influence of rigid facial motion on holistic and part-based…

  16. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  17. Reading faces and Facing words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Julia Emma; Lindegaard, Martin Weis; Delfi, Tzvetelina Shentova

    It has long been argued that perceptual processing of faces and words is largely independent, highly specialised and strongly lateralised. Studies of patients with either pure alexia or prosopagnosia have strongly contributed to this view. The aim of our study was to investigate how visual...

  18. Reading faces and Facing words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Julia Emma; Lindegaard, Martin Weis; Delfi, Tzvetelina Shentova

    performed within normal range on at least one test of visual categorisation, strongly suggesting that their abnormal performance with words and faces does not represent a generalised visuo-perceptual deficit. Our results suggest that posterior areas in both hemispheres may be critical for both reading...

  19. Effect of closure of collinear cracks on the stress-strain state and the limiting equilibrium of bent shallow shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatskii, I. P.; Makoviichuk, N. V.

    2011-05-01

    The problem of closure of collinear cracks during bending of a shallow shell is considered within the framework of the Kirchhoff theory. Crack closure is described using the model of contact along a line on one of the shell faces. Strain and moment intensity factors and fracture load are studied as functions of shell curvature and defect location, and the distribution of contact forces along the cracks is investigated.

  20. Quantified Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette-Marie Zacher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The article presents three contemporary art projects that, in various ways, thematise questions regarding numerical representation of the human face in relation to the identification of faces, for example through the use of biometric video analysis software, or DNA technology. The Dutch...... and critically examine bias in surveillance technologies, as well as scientific investigations, regarding the stereotyping mode of the human gaze. The American artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates three-dimensional portraits of persons she has “identified” from their garbage. Her project from 2013 entitled....... The three works are analysed with perspectives to historical physiognomy and Francis Galton's composite portraits from the 1800s. It is argued that, rather than being a statistical compression like the historical composites, contemporary statistical visual portraits (composites) are irreversible...

  1. Experimental characterization of fatigue crack tip processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, J.; Leverant, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Many analytical models have been proposed to describe the physical processes attendant to a fatigue crack tip, as well as the rate at which fatigue cracks grow. By applying advanced experimental methods (such as electron channeling, stereoimaging, and in-situ cyclic loading in an SEM) to a broad range of structural materials, it has been shown that it is possible to critically assess the physical assumptions incorporated into the models. Refinements in existing models and the development of new ones have resulted. New insights into materials' behavior are providing guidelines for improving the fatigue resistance of structural alloys. In the near future, even more advanced experimental methods, such as high temperature SEM stages and small angle neutron scattering, will be available to study creep/fatigue interactions in metals and ceramics.

  2. Facing Sound - Voicing Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on examples of contemporary audiovisual art, with a special focus on the Tony Oursler exhibition Face to Face at Aarhus Art Museum ARoS in Denmark in March-July 2012. My investigation involves a combination of qualitative interviews with visitors, observations of the audienc......´s interactions with the exhibition and the artwork in the museum space and short analyses of individual works of art based on reception aesthetics and phenomenology and inspired by newer writings on sound, voice and listening....

  3. Seismic Radiation from Crack Coalescence Model and Reconstruction of Seismically Equivalent Single Crack Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kame, N.; Uchida, K.

    2006-12-01

    We simulate dynamic rupture propagation in which two mode II cracks coalesce on a planar fault using a boundary integral equation method. Our main interests are in the rupture complexity and resultant seismic radiation due to coalescence and in the reconstruction of seismically equivalent another dynamic model that could be inferred only from the waveforms. First we analyze crack coalescence model (CCM) with homogeneous source parameters except on two pre- slipped regions. In CCM, a main crack nucleates, propagates and coalesces with a nucleating subsidiary crack. Our analysis shows that local high slip-rate pulse is generated by coalescence and a secondary Rayleigh slip pulse subsequently begins to propagate trailing the rupture front. Second we reconstruct a single crack model (SCM) with heterogeneous source parameters that can reproduce the same slip-rate history in CCM, that is, both models are seismically equivalent. In SCM we found singular increase in the stress drop and sudden decrease in the strength excess corresponding to the coalescence pulse region, which means that these two inhomogeneities appeared in SCM originally resulted from the stress interaction between approaching crack tips in CCM. Third we synthesize seismic radiation from CCM and successfully identify distinct phases associated with two pulses: the coalescence pulse phase shows seismic radiation similar to the stopping phase that has a typical ω-2 behavior at high frequency, which is also consistent with theoretically predicted radiation by the singular stress drop in SCM. Rayleigh slip-pulse phase appears dominantly in transverse component with strong forward directivity similar to rupture front phase although disappears in parallel component except very near the fault.

  4. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veron, P. [Equipos Nucleares, S.A., Maliano (Spain)

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  5. HYDROGEN TRANSFER IN CATALYTIC CRACKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen transfer is an important secondary reaction of catalytic cracking reactions, which affects product yield distribution and product quality. It is an exothermic reaction with low activation energy around 43.3 kJ/mol. Catalyst properties and operation parameters in catalytic cracking greatly influence the hydrogen transfer reaction. Satisfactory results are expected through careful selection of proper catalysts and operation conditions.

  6. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of quasi-brittle crack development in iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodin, V.A., E-mail: borodin@dni.polin.kiae.su [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); NRC Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vladimirov, P.V., E-mail: Pavel.Vladimirov@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-08-31

    The paper presents the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of three-dimensional kinetics of micro-crack propagation in alpha-iron and the accompanying lattice transformations at the crack tips. We show that crack initiation on {l_brace}0 0 1{r_brace} planes in iron is preceded with the emission of compact slip bands from the pre-crack tips, in agreement with the predictions of the earlier quasi-two-dimensional simulations. The application of Voronoi decomposition technique for atomic short-range order processing has allowed us to clarify the kinetics of structural transformations at the tips of nucleating and propagating cracks for three most common systems of crack propagation in iron. It is demonstrated that the compact slip bands emanating from the crack tips not only accompany crack nucleation, but remain an essential feature of the crack propagation on {l_brace}0 0 1{r_brace} planes. Due to the strong coupling between the crack tip and slip band propagation, the crack propagation can be limited by slip band interaction with microstructural obstacles, abundantly created in ferritic-martensitic steels in radiation environment of nuclear facilities.

  8. Crack deflection in brittle media with heterogeneous interfaces and its application in shale fracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaguang; Wei, Yujie

    Driven by the rapid progress in exploiting unconventional energy resources such as shale gas, there is growing interest in hydraulic fracture of brittle yet heterogeneous shales. In particular, how hydraulic cracks interact with natural weak zones in sedimentary rocks to form permeable cracking networks is of significance in engineering practice. Such a process is typically influenced by crack deflection, material anisotropy, crack-surface friction, crustal stresses, and so on. In this work, we extend the He-Hutchinson theory (He and Hutchinson, 1989) to give the closed-form formulae of the strain energy release rate of a hydraulic crack with arbitrary angles with respect to the crustal stress. The critical conditions in which the hydraulic crack deflects into weak interfaces and exhibits a dependence on crack-surface friction and crustal stress anisotropy are given in explicit formulae. We reveal analytically that, with increasing pressure, hydraulic fracture in shales may sequentially undergo friction locking, mode II fracture, and mixed mode fracture. Mode II fracture dominates the hydraulic fracturing process and the impinging angle between the hydraulic crack and the weak interface is the determining factor that accounts for crack deflection; the lower friction coefficient between cracked planes and the greater crustal stress difference favor hydraulic fracturing. In addition to shale fracking, the analytical solution of crack deflection could be used in failure analysis of other brittle media.

  9. Hot-crack test for aluminium alloys welds using TIG process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschaux-beaume F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot cracking is a critical defect frequently observed during welding of aluminium alloys. In order to better understand the interaction between cracking phenomenon, process parameters, mechanical factors and microstructures resulting from solidification after welding, an original hot-cracking test during welding is developed. According to in-situ observations and post mortem analyses, hot cracking mechanisms are investigated, taking into account the interaction between microstructural parameters, depending on the thermal cycles, and mechanical parameters, depending on geometry and clamping conditions of the samples and on the thermal field on the sample. Finally, a process map indicating the limit between cracking and non-cracking zones according to welding parameters is presented.

  10. Molecular interactions between some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID's) and bovine (BSA) or human (HSA) serum albumin estimated by means of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and frontal analysis capillary electrophoresis (FA/CE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ràfols, Clara; Zarza, Sílvia; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs, (naproxen, ibuprofen and flurbiprofen) and bovine (BSA) or human (HSA) serum albumin have been examined by means of two complementary techniques, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and frontal analysis/capillary electrophoresis (FA/CE). It can be concluded that ITC is able to measure with high precision the strongest drug-albumin interactions but the higher order interactions can be better determined by means of FA/CE. Then, the combination of both techniques leads to a complete evaluation of the binding profiles between the selected NSAIDs and both kind of albumin proteins. When BSA is the binding protein, the NSAIDs show a strong primary interaction (binding constants: 1.5 × 10(7), 8 × 10(5) and 2 × 10(6) M(-1) for naproxen, ibuprofen and flurbiprofen, respectively), and also lower affinity interactions of the same order for the three anti-inflammatories (about 1.7 × 10(4) M(-1)). By contrast, when HSA is the binding protein two consecutive interactions can be observed by ITC for naproxen (9 × 10(5) and 7 × 10(4) M(-1)) and flurbiprofen (5 × 10(6) and 6 × 10(4) M(-1)) whereas only one is shown for ibuprofen (9 × 10(5) M(-1)). Measurements by FA/CE show a single interaction for each drug being the ones of naproxen and flurbiprofen the same that those evaluated by ITC as the second interaction events. Then, the ability of both techniques as suitable complementary tools to establish the whole interaction NSAIDs-albumin profile is experimentally demonstrated and allows foreseeing suitable strategies to establish the complete drug-protein binding profile. In addition, for the interactions analyzed by means of ITC, the thermodynamic signature is established and the relative contributions of the enthalpic and entropic terms discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crack-Inclusion Interaction: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Transactions of the ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics 1974, 41 (1007). 20. Arfken , G. Mathematical Methods for Physicists; 3rd ed.; Academic Press: Orlando... mathematically using the complex stress potential method ; a famous example of this method is the Westergaard solution for the stress field around a... method . In Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Vol. 369, 1979. 24. Tan, C. L.; Zheng, X. J.; Gao, Y

  12. A consistent partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Jesper L.; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Nielsen, Leif Otto

    2007-01-01

    capable of modelling variations in the discontinuous displacement field on both sides of the crack and hence also capable of modelling the case where equal stresses are present on each side of the crack. The enrichment was implemented for the 3-node constant strain triangle (CST) and a standard algorithm...... was used to solve the non-linear equations. The performance of the element is illustrated by modelling fracture mechanical benchmark tests. Investigations were carried out on the performance of the element for different crack lengths within one element. The results are compared with previously obtained...

  13. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G. [and others

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

  14. Estimation of subsurface-fracture orientation with the three-component crack-wave measurement; Kiretsuha sanjiku keisoku ni yoru chika kiretsumen no hoko suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, K.; Sato, K. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan); Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports experiments carried out to estimate subsurface-fracture orientation with the three-component crack-wave measurement. The experiments were performed by using existing subsurface cracks and two wells in the experimental field. An air gun as a sound source was installed directly above a subsurface crack intersection in one of the wells, and a three-component elastic wave detector was fixed in the vicinity of a subsurface crack intersection in the other well. Crack waves from the sound source were measured in a frequency bandwidth from 150 to 300 Hz. A coherence matrix was constituted relative to triaxial components of vibration in the crack waves; a coherent vector was sought that corresponds to a maximum coherent value of the matrix; and the direction of the longer axis in an ellipse (the direction being perpendicular to the crack face) was approximated in particle motions of the crack waves by using the vector. The normal line direction of the crack face estimated by using the above method was found to agree nearly well with the direction of the minimum crust compression stress measured in the normal line direction of the crack face existed in core samples collected from the wells, and measured at nearly the same position as the subsurface crack. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  15. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch

  16. 考虑微裂纹相互作用的岩石细观力学弹塑性损伤模型研究%AN INTERACTING CRACK-MECHANICS BASED MODEL FOR ELASTOPLASTIC DAMAGE MODEL OF BRITTLE MATERIALS UNDER COMPRESSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁小平; 刘红岩; 王志乔

    2012-01-01

    A micro-crack elastoplastic damage model under compressive loading is presented in this work. Interactions among the cracks are modeled by self-consistent approach in which each crack experiences a stress field different from that acting on isolated cracks. The propagation of wing crack in the micro-crack tip is characterized for rock damage,and the wing crack length is obtained using Newton iteration based on the strain energy density for mixed-mode fracture. The distribution of micro-cracks is presented by the absolute volume strain with the two-parameter Weibull statistical model. The damage evolution variable of rock is employed by the distribution of micro-cracks and stress release volume described by length of wing-crack. Voyiadjis's strain hardening function is employed as the plastic yield function and plastic potential function. The elastoplastic damage model with its numerical algorithm is proposed and the code of e-lastoplastic damage model is implemented by using return mapping implicit integration algorithm. The influence of rock confining pressures on the damage response in the elastoplastic damage model is analyzed. The results show that the proposed elastoplastic damage model agrees well with the experimental results for one rock test under uniaxial compression.%论文建立基于微裂纹扩展的岩石弹塑性损伤细观力学模型.用自洽方法考虑裂隙间相互影响,压缩载荷下微裂纹尖端翼裂纹稳定扩展表征岩石的微观损伤,基于应变能密度准则用Newton迭代法求复合型断裂的翼裂纹扩展长度,并采用微裂隙统计的二参数Weibull函数模型反映绝对体积应变对微裂纹分布数目影响,进而用翼裂纹扩展所表征的应力释放体积和微裂纹数目来表示含有微裂隙的岩石损伤演化变量;宏观塑性屈服函数采用Voyiadjis等的等效塑性应变的硬化函数,反映塑性内变量对硬化函数的影响;建立岩石的弹塑性损伤本构关系及其

  17. A finite crack with arbitrarily varied surface piezoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    We study the contribution of arbitrarily varied surface piezoelectricity to the anti-plane deformation and in-plane electric fields of a hexagonal piezoelectric material containing a finite crack. The varied surface piezoelectricity is incorporated by using an extended version of the continuum-based surface/interface model of Gurtin and Murdoch. In our discussion, the surface properties, including the surface elastic stiffness, the surface piezoelectric modulus and the surface dielectric permittivity, are assumed to be varied arbitrarily along the crack surfaces. By using the Green’s function method, the original boundary value problem is reduced to a system of two coupled first-order Cauchy singular integro-differential equations. Through a diagonalization strategy, the coupled system is transformed into two independent singular integro-differential equations, each of which can be numerically solved by using the collocation method. Our results indicate that the variation of the surface electroelastic moduli exerts a significant influence on the crack opening displacement, the electric potential jump across the crack faces and on the strengths of the logarithmic singularity in stresses and electric displacements at the crack tips.

  18. FACE RECOGNITION FROM FRONT-VIEW FACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuLifang; ShenLansun

    2003-01-01

    This letter presents a face normalization algorithm based on 2-D face model to rec-ognize faces with variant postures from front-view face.A 2-D face mesh model can be extracted from faces with rotation to left or right and the corresponding front-view mesh model can be estimated according to facial symmetry.Then based on the relationship between the two mesh models,the nrmalized front-view face is formed by gray level mapping.Finally,the face recognition will be finished based on Principal Component Analysis(PCA).Experiments show that better face recognition performance is achieved in this way.

  19. FACE RECOGNITION FROM FRONT-VIEW FACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Lifang; Shen Lansun

    2003-01-01

    This letter presents a face normalization algorithm based on 2-D face model to recognize faces with variant postures from front-view face. A 2-D face mesh model can be extracted from faces with rotation to left or right and the corresponding front-view mesh model can be estimated according to the facial symmetry. Then based on the inner relationship between the two mesh models, the normalized front-view face is formed by gray level mapping. Finally, the face recognition will be finished based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Experiments show that better face recognition performance is achieved in this way.

  20. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  1. Analysis of Crack Arrest Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-15

    vload(m) vp tn(m) Vertical Source Load (kN) on wedge HY80 Finite Element 0.0122 0.0099 3.81x10 -4 144 Steel Calculations Experiment 0.0122 --- 3.74x10-4...curve, are bona fide measures of the fracture arrest capability of tough ductile steels . The second is that the J-values represent the crack driving...fibrous mode of crack extension. (b) A new test method for studying fast fracture and arrest in tough steels . (c) Measurements of fast fracture and crack

  2. A computational algorithm for crack determination: The multiple crack case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Kurt; Vogelius, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is developed. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. The method also adaptively changes the applied current flux at each iteration to maintain maximum sensitivity to the estimated locations of the cracks.

  3. The Stress Intensity Factor Variation of Two Cracks Interaction in Nuclear Piping%两裂纹在核管道中应力强度因子的相互影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白鑫; 谢里阳

    2015-01-01

    With the aging of nuclear power plants,safety assessment for nuclear pipeline becomes more important.In the past,the assessment of nuclear piping only consider a single crack problem;or confined to the issue of a main crack;or focused on considering two cracks meeting any condition to be merged into one crack,namely,detailed study on multiple cracks under the stress intensity factor variation is rough.It is not a perfect part of fracture mechanics for multiple crack problems.In order to improve the content of fracture mechanics,fracture mechanics applied to increase the value and improve the safety and reliability of nuclear piping,inner surface cracks is determined as the major flaws of nuclear piping,the role of nuclear piping two cracks stress intensity factor and its general form are obtained by analysis of the actual variation with the finite element method.Two crack phenomenon is the basic situation of multiple cracks.Thus,this work provides a method to assess the basis for the existence of multiple cracks in nuclear safety pipeline.%随着核电站的老化,核管道安全评估变得更为重要。以往核管道的损伤容限评定通常只考虑单一裂纹问题,或只局限于研究一个主裂纹的问题,或主要集中于考虑两个裂纹满足何条件时,二者方可合并为一个裂纹的问题,对多裂纹情况下应力强度因子变化规律的研究较粗糙。在理论与方法方面,多裂纹问题一直是断裂力学不够完善的部分。本文以核管道的内表面裂纹为对象,采用有限元法分析核管道两个裂纹情况下的应力强度因子,得到其随裂纹间距、裂纹长度、裂纹深度变化的规律。又两个裂纹的现象为多裂纹现象中最基本的情况,即本研究工作可为存在多裂纹的核管道的安全评估提供方法依据。

  4. Gas-initiated crack propagation in a porous solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1976-01-15

    The propagation of a crack in porous earth formations following an experimental underground nuclear explosion is analyzed. The three-dimensional analysis includes interaction of gas pressure within the crack, permeation of gas into the porous earth formation, deflection of the crack walls, and crack propagation. Effects of permeability, k, from 10/sup -6/ to 0.1 (..mu..m)/sup 2/ (1(..mu..m)/sup 2/ approximately 1 Darcy), initial crack length and width up to 110 and 170 m, and ratio of maximum earth formation resistive pressure to initial driving pressure, P/sub r//sub max//P/sub 1/, from 0.1 to 0.9 are delineated. Propagation of a crack to the earth's surface following a typical experimental underground nuclear explosion buried at a depth of 500 m occurs only under unlikely conditions, such as when k < 10/sup -4/ (..mu..m)/sup 2/ and P/sub r//sub max//P/sup 1/ < 0.75.

  5. Induction and comparison of craving for tobacco, marijuana and crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Brasil Araujo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature findings report that use of multiple substances can produce adverse clinical and behavioral effects, which may affect craving and the results of drug treatment. Also, the understanding of craving construct and its interaction in the use of smoked substances is underexplored. Objectives To induce and compare craving for tobacco, marijuana and crack-cocaine on hospitalized dependents whose drug of choice is crack-cocaine. Methods Quasi-experimental study with a convenience sample consisting of 210 males divided into 3 equal groups (Group-1: craving induced by crack; Group-2: craving induced by tobacco; and Group-3: craving induced by marijuana. All participants met ICD-10 dependence criteria for cocaine/crack, marijuana and tobacco, were aged between 18 and 65 and had used these substances for at least one year. Photos were used to induce craving and self-report instruments to evaluate possible alterations. Results This study showed that craving for tobacco was more intense than for marijuana and crack, when the groups were compared by VAS. Using specific scales, both craving for tobacco and craving for marijuana were more intense than craving for crack. Discussion These results would imply interventions at the initial stages of abstinence with cognitive-behavioural techniques and pharmacotherapy in order to reduce craving.

  6. Anomolous Fatigue Crack Growth Phenomena in High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Johnston, William M., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of a fatigue crack through a material is the result of a complex interaction between the applied loading, component geometry, three-dimensional constraint, load history, environment, material microstructure and several other factors. Previous studies have developed experimental and computational methods to relate the fatigue crack growth rate to many of the above conditions, with the intent of discovering some fundamental material response, i.e. crack growth rate as a function of something. Currently, the technical community uses the stress intensity factor solution as a simplistic means to relate fatigue crack growth rate to loading, geometry and all other variables. The stress intensity factor solution is a very simple linear-elastic representation of the continuum mechanics portion of crack growth. In this paper, the authors present fatigue crack growth rate data for two different high strength steel alloys generated using standard methods. The steels exhibit behaviour that appears unexplainable, compared to an aluminium alloy presented as a baseline for comparison, using the stress intensity factor solution.

  7. Study of secondary arcing occurrence on solar panel backside wires with cracks

    OpenAIRE

    Siguier, J.M.; Inguimbert, V; Murat, Gaétan; Murat, G.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Space environment exposure may create cracks on solar panel backside wires. Considering the wiring design of solar array backside, environmental constraints applied on each wire are identical. Thus, the probability of two adjacent wires to have cracks facing each other is very high. This configuration presents a risk of secondary arc occurrence which can lead to a destructive process as arc-tracking. In order to determine in which conditions electrostatic discharges (E...

  8. Cracks in Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Many of the craters found on the northern plains of Mars have been partly filled or buried by some material (possibly sediment). The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presented here (MOC2-136b, above left) shows a high-resolution view of a tiny portion of the floor of one of these northern plains craters. The crater, located in Utopia Planitia at 44oN, 258oW, is shown on the right (MOC2-136a)with a small white box to indicate the location of the MOC image. The MOC image reveals that the material covering the floor of this crater is cracked and pitted. The origin and source of material that has been deposited in this crater is unknown.The MOC image was acquired in June 1999 and covers an area only 1.1 kilometers (0.7 miles) wide at a resolution of 1.8 meters (6 feet) per pixel. The context picture is a mosaic of Viking 2 orbiter images 010B53 and 010B55, taken in 1976. Both images are illuminated from the left. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  9. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari (Boeing)

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  10. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested by...

  11. The crack growth mechanism in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, .M.M.J.; Hopman, P.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The crack growth mechanism in asphalt concrete (Ac) mixes is studied. In cyclic tests on several asphaltic mixes crack growth is measured, both with crack foils and with cOD-gauges. It is found that crack growth in asphaltic mixes is described by three processes which are parallel in time: cohesive

  12. Evaluation of the Lazarus Leblond constants in the asymptotic model of the interfacial wavy crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolroaz, A.; Mishuris, G.; Movchan, A. B.

    2007-08-01

    The paper addresses the problem of a semi-infinite plane crack along the interface between two isotropic half-spaces. Two methods of solution have been considered in the past: Lazarus and Leblond [1998a. Three-dimensional crack-face weight functions for the semi-infinite interface crack-I: variation of the stress intensity factors due to some small perturbation of the crack front. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 46, 489-511, 1998b. Three-dimensional crack-face weight functions for the semi-infinite interface crack-II: integrodifferential equations on the weight functions and resolution J. Mech. Phys. Solids 46, 513-536] applied the "special" method by Bueckner [1987. Weight functions and fundamental fields for the penny-shaped and the half-plane crack in three space. Int. J. Solids Struct. 23, 57-93] and found the expression of the variation of the stress intensity factors for a wavy crack without solving the complete elasticity problem; their solution is expressed in terms of the physical variables, and it involves five constants whose analytical representation was unknown; on the other hand, the "general" solution to the problem has been recently addressed by Bercial-Velez et al. [2005. High-order asymptotics and perturbation problems for 3D interfacial cracks. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 53, 1128-1162], using a Wiener-Hopf analysis and singular asymptotics near the crack front. The main goal of the present paper is to complete the solution to the problem by providing the connection between the two methods. This is done by constructing an integral representation for Lazarus-Leblond's weight functions and by deriving the closed form representations of Lazarus-Leblond's constants.

  13. Uncommon deformation mechanisms during fatigue-crack propagation in nanocrystalline alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheng; Lee, Soo Yeol; Li, Li; Lei, Changhui; Almer, Jon; Wang, Xun-Li; Ungar, Tamas; Wang, Yinmin; Liaw, Peter K

    2013-03-29

    The irreversible damage at cracks during the fatigue of crystalline solids is well known. Here we report on in situ high-energy x-ray evidence of reversible fatigue behavior in a nanocrystalline NiFe alloy both in the plastic zone and around the crack tip. In the plastic zone, the deformation is fully recoverable as the crack propagates, and the plastic deformation invokes reversible interactions of dislocation and twinning in the nanograins. But around the crack tip lies a regime with reversible grain lattice reorientation promoted by a change of local stress state. These observations suggest unprecedented fatigue deformation mechanisms in nanostructured systems that are not addressed theoretically.

  14. Mechanical properties and crack growth behavior of polycrystalline copper using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ren-Zheng; Li, Chi-Chen; Fang, Te-Hua

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the mechanical properties and crack propagation behavior of polycrystalline copper using a molecular dynamics simulation. The effects of temperature, grain size, and crack length were evaluated in terms of atomic trajectories, slip vectors, common neighbor analysis, the material’s stress-strain diagram and Young’s modulus. The simulation results show that the grain boundary of the material is more easily damaged at high temperatures and that grain boundaries will combine at the crack tip. From the stress-strain diagram, it was observed that the maximum stress increased as the temperature decreased. In contrast, the maximum stress was reduced by increasing the temperature. With regard to the effect of the grain size, when the grain size was too small, the structure of the sample deformed due to the effect of atomic interactions, which caused the grain boundary structure to be disordered in general. However, when the grain size was larger, dislocations appeared and began to move from the tip of the crack, which led to a new dislocation phenomenon. With regards to the effect of the crack length, the tip of the crack did not affect the sample’s material when the crack length was less than 5 nm. However, when the crack length was above 7.5 nm, the grain boundary was damaged, and twinning structures and dislocations appeared on both sides of the crack tip. This is because the tip of the crack was blunt at first before sharpening due to the dislocation effect.

  15. Investigation on Dynamic Propagation Characteristics of In-Plane Cracks in PVB Laminated Glass Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl butyral (PVB laminated glass has been widely used as an important component of mechanical and construction materials. Cracks on PVB laminated glass are rich in impact information, which contribute to its impact resistance design. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D numerical simulation model describing PVB laminated glass under impact loading is firstly established and validated qualitatively and quantitatively compared with the corresponding experimental results recorded by the high-speed photography system. In the meantime, the extended finite element method (XFEM is introduced to analyze the crack propagation mechanism of laminated glass based on dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIFs and propagations of stress waves. Parametric studies are then carried out to investigate the influence of five critical parameters, that is, plate dimension, crack length, impact energy, glass properties, and PVB properties, on crack propagation characteristics of laminated glass. Results show that the interaction between crack tip and stress waves as well as the propagations of stress waves corresponds to the fluctuations of DSIFs at crack tip. Both the structure and material variables are proven to play a very important role in glass cracking DSIFs and thus govern the crack propagation behavior. Results may provide fundamental explanation to the basic crack propagation mechanism on radial cracks in PVB laminated glass under impact loading conditions, thus to instruct its impact design improvement.

  16. Dynamics of crack penetration vs. branching at a weak interface: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Balamurugan M.; Tippur, Hareesh V.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the dynamic crack-interface interactions and the related mechanics of crack penetration vs. branching at a weak interface are studied experimentally. The interface is oriented perpendicular to the incoming mode-I crack in an otherwise homogeneous bilayer. The focus of this investigation is on the effect of interface location and the associated crack-tip parameters within the bilayer on the mechanics of the ensuing fracture behavior based on the optical methodologies laid down in Ref. Sundaram and Tippur (2016). Time-resolved optical measurement of crack-tip deformations, velocity and stress intensity factor histories in different bilayer configurations is performed using Digital Gradient Sensing (DGS) technique in conjunction with high-speed photography. The results show that the crack path selection at the interface and subsequently the second layer are greatly affected by the location of the interface within the geometry. Using optically measured fracture parameters, the mechanics of crack penetration and branching are explained. Counter to the intuition, a dynamically growing mode-I approaching a weak interface at a lower velocity and stress intensity factor penetrates the interface whereas a higher velocity and stress intensity factor counterpart gets trapped by the interface producing branched daughter cracks until they kink out into the next layer. An interesting empirical observation based on measured crack-tip parameters for crack penetration and branching is also made.

  17. Fiber Sensing of Micro -Crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Optical fiber sensors are used for sensing micro-cracking in composite and metal materials in aerospace applications. The sensing mechanism is based on the detection of acoustic emission signals, which are known to emanate from micro-cracks when they grow under further loading. The sensor head consists of a fiber Bragg grating that is capable of detecting acoustic emission signals generated by pencil lead breaking, of frequencies up to 200 kHz.

  18. A hybrid consisting of coordination polymer and noncovalent organic networks: a highly ordered 2-D phenol network assembled by edge-to-face pi-pi interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Woo; Min, Kil Sik; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2002-04-22

    A 2-D metal-organic open framework having 1-D channels, [Cu(C(10)H(26)N(6))](3)[C(6)H(3)(COO)(3)](2).18H(2)O (1), was constructed by the self-assembly of the Cu(II) complex of hexaazamacrocycle A (A = C(10)H(26)N(6)) with sodium 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate (BTC(3)(-)) in DMSO-H(2)O solution. 1 crystallizes in the trigonal space group P with a = b = 17.705(1) A, c = 6.940(1) A, alpha = beta = 90 degrees, gamma = 120 degrees, V = 1884.0(3) A(3), Z = 1, and rho(calcd) = 1.428 g cm(-3). The X-ray crystal structure of 1 indicates that each Cu(II) macrocyclic unit binds two BTC(3-) ions in a trans position and each BTC(3-) ion coordinates three Cu(II) macrocyclic complexes to form 2-D coordination polymer layers with honeycomb cavities (effective size 8.1 A), and the layers are packed to generate 1-D channels perpendicularly to the 2-D layers. Solid 1 binds guest molecules such as MeOH, EtOH, and PhOH with different binding constant and capacity. By the treatment of 1 with aqueous solution of phenol, a hybrid solid [Cu(C(10)H(26)N(6))](3)[C(6)H(3)(COO)(3)](2).9PhOH.6H(2)O (2) was assembled. 2 crystallizes in the trigonal R3 space group with a = b = 20.461(1) A, c = 24.159(1) A, alpha = beta = 90 degrees, gamma = 120 degrees, V = 8759.2(7) A(3), Z = 3, and rho(calcd) = 1.280 g cm(-3). In 2, highly ordered 2-D noncovalent phenol layers are formed by the edge-to-face pi-pi interactions between the phenol molecules and are alternately packed with the coordination polymer layers in the crystal lattice.

  19. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  20. Numerical simulation of gas flow process in mining-induced crack network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou; Hongwei; Liu; Jinfeng; Xue; Dongjie; Yi; Haiyang; Xue; Junhua

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of coal bed methane or coal gas is one of the most effective solutions of the problem of coal gas hazard.A better understanding of gas flow in mining-induced cracks plays an important role in comprehensive development and utilization of coal gas as well as prevention of coal gas hazard.This paper presents a case study of gas flow in mining-induced crack network regarding the situation of low permeability of coal seam.A two-dimensional physical model is constructed on the basis of geological background of mining face No.1122(1) in coal seam No.11-2,Zhangji Coal Mine,Huainan Mining Group Corporation.The mining-induced stress and cracks in overburden rocks are obtained by simulating an extraction in physical model.An evolution of mining-induced cracks in the process of advancing of coal mining face is characterized and three typical crack networks are taken from digital photos by means of image analysis.Moreover,the numerical software named COMSOL Multiphysics is employed to simulate the process of gas flow in three representative crack networks.Isograms of gas pressure at various times in mining-induced crack networks are plotted,suggesting a shape and dimension of gas accumulation area.

  1. Fatigue cracking of a bare steel first wall in an inertial confinement fusion chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Abbott, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Havstad, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunne, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Inertial confinement fusion power plants will deposit high energy X-rays onto the outer surfaces of the first wall many times a second for the lifetime of the plant. These X-rays create brief temperature spikes in the first few microns of the wall, which cause an associated highly compressive stress response on the surface of the material. The periodicity of this stress pulse is a concern due to the possibility of fatigue cracking of the wall. We have used finite element analyses to simulate the conditions present on the first wall in order to evaluate the driving force of crack propagation on fusion-facing surface cracks. Analysis results indicate that the X-ray induced plastic compressive stress creates a region of residual tension on the surface between pulses. This tension film will likely result in surface cracking upon repeated cycling. Additionally, the compressive pulse may induce plasticity ahead of the crack tip, leaving residual tension in its wake. However, the stress amplitude decreases dramatically for depths greater than 80–100 μm into the fusion-facing surface. Crack propagation models as well as stress-life estimates agree that even though small cracks may form on the surface of the wall, they are unlikely to propagate further than 100 μm without assistance from creep or grain erosion phenomena.

  2. Crack formation and fracture energy of normal and high strength concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F H Wittmann

    2002-08-01

    The crack path through composite materials such as concrete depends on the mechanical interaction of inclusions with the cement-based matrix. Fracture energy depends on the deviations of a real crack from an idealized crack plane. Fracture energy and strain softening of normal, high strength, and self-compacting concrete have been determined by means of the wedge splitting test. In applying the numerical model called “numerical concrete” crack formation in normal and high strength concrete is simulated. Characteristic differences of the fracture process can be outlined. Finally results obtained are applied to predict shrinkage cracking under different boundary conditions. Crack formation of high strength concrete has to be seriously controlled in order to achieve the necessary durability of concrete structures.

  3. Representation of finite cracks by dislocation pileups: An application to atomic simulation of fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shastry, V.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-01

    The elastic displacement field solution of a semi-infinite crack in an anisotropic body, calculated using a complex variable approach due to Sih and Liebowitz, is usually used by atomistic simulations of fracture. The corresponding expression for the displacement field of a finite crack is numerically cumbersome since it involves multiple square roots of complex numbers. In this study, displacement field of the crack is calculated by superposing the displacements of dislocations in an equivalent double pileup, equilibrated under mode 1 conditions. An advantage of this method is its extensibility to atomistic studies of more complex systems containing multiple cracks or interfaces. The pileup representation of the finite crack is demonstrated as being equivalent to its corresponding continuum description using the example of a double ended crack in {alpha}-Fe, loaded in mode 1. In these examples, the interatomic interaction in {alpha}-Fe is described by an empirical embedded atom (EAM) potential.

  4. Representation of finite cracks by dislocation pileups: An application to atomic simulation of fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shastry, V.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The elastic displacement field solution of a semi-infinite crack in an anisotropic body, calculated using a complex variable approach due to Sih and Liebowitz, is usually used by atomistic simulations of fracture. The corresponding expression for the displacement field of a finite crack is numerically cumbersome since it involves multiple square roots of complex numbers. In this study, displacement field of the crack is calculated by superposing the displacements of dislocations in an equivalent double pileup, equilibrated under mode I conditions. An advantage of this method is its extensibility to atomistic studies of more complex systems containing multiple cracks or interfaces. The pileup representation of the finite crack is demonstrated as being equivalent to its corresponding continuum description using the example of a double ended crack in {alpha}-Fe, loaded in mode I. In these examples, the interatomic interaction in {alpha}-Fe is described by an empirical embedded atom (EAM) potential.

  5. Artificial faces are harder to remember.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Benjamin; Pacella, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Observers interact with artificial faces in a range of different settings and in many cases must remember and identify computer-generated faces. In general, however, most adults have heavily biased experience favoring real faces over synthetic faces. It is well known that face recognition abilities are affected by experience such that faces belonging to "out-groups" defined by race or age are more poorly remembered and harder to discriminate from one another than faces belonging to the "in-group." Here, we examine the extent to which artificial faces form an "out-group" in this sense when other perceptual categories are matched. We rendered synthetic faces using photographs of real human faces and compared performance in a memory task and a discrimination task across real and artificial versions of the same faces. We found that real faces were easier to remember, but only slightly more discriminable than artificial faces. Artificial faces were also equally susceptible to the well-known face inversion effect, suggesting that while these patterns are still processed by the human visual system in a face-like manner, artificial appearance does compromise the efficiency of face processing.

  6. Seeing a haptically explored face: visual facial-expression aftereffect from haptic adaptation to a face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Kazumichi

    2013-10-01

    Current views on face perception assume that the visual system receives only visual facial signals. However, I show that the visual perception of faces is systematically biased by adaptation to a haptically explored face. Recently, face aftereffects (FAEs; the altered perception of faces after adaptation to a face) have been demonstrated not only in visual perception but also in haptic perception; therefore, I combined the two FAEs to examine whether the visual system receives face-related signals from the haptic modality. I found that adaptation to a haptically explored facial expression on a face mask produced a visual FAE for facial expression. This cross-modal FAE was not due to explicitly imaging a face, response bias, or adaptation to local features. Furthermore, FAEs transferred from vision to haptics. These results indicate that visual face processing depends on substrates adapted by haptic faces, which suggests that face processing relies on shared representation underlying cross-modal interactions.

  7. Perturbed magnetic field of an infinite plate with a centered crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Qin; Yang Zhang; Ya-Nan Liu

    2011-01-01

    Deforming a cracked magnetoelastic body in a magnetic field induces a perturbed magnetic field around the crack.The quantitative relationship between this perturbed field and the stress around the crack is crucial in developing a new generation of magnetism-based nondestructive testing technologies.In this paper, an analytical expression of the perturbed magnetic field induced by structural deformation of an infinite ferromagnetic elastic plate containing a centered crack in a weak external magnetic field is obtained by using the linearized magnetoelastic theory and Fourier transform methods.The main finding is that the perturbed magnetic field intensity is proportional to the applied tensile stress, and is dominated by the displacement gradient on the boundary of the magnetoelastic solid.The tangential component of the perturbed magnetic-field intensity near the crack exhibits an antisymmetric distribution along the crack that reverses its direction sharply across its two faces, while the normal component shows a symmetric distribution along the crack with singular points at the crack tips.

  8. Consideration on corrosion fatigue crack life assessment; Fushoku hiro kiretsu hassei jumyo hyoka ni kansuru ichikosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yajima, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Saito, T. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Morita, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Discussions were given on corrosion fatigue crack life by using corrosion fatigue crack initiation test and analysis. The test used 13Cr-based stainless steel as a test material, and aquamarine at 60{degree}C as a corrosion environment. The fatigue test was performed under a tension loading condition with a stress ratio of 0.1 and an iterative velocity of 1.7 Hz by using a 10-tonf fatigue testing machine. In the corrosion fatigue crack initiation test, a pit has been generated on a boundary of an exposed part and a painted part for masking, hence direct observation was impossible on pit growth behavior. Therefore, an intrinsic crack model was introduced from pit dimensions as observed from a fracture face, and analysis was made on corrosion fatigue crack growth by using the linear fracture dynamics, wherein clarification was made on a phenomenon occurring after the crack growth passes the pit growth until the test piece is fractured. A proposal was made to define the time when fatigue crack initiates and grows from the bottom of a pit as a result of surpassing the growth of corrosion pit as the corrosion fatigue crack life. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fatigue reliability of cracked engineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, David Bruce, Jr.

    1997-12-01

    This study investigates the reliability of engineering structures containing fatigue cracks. Stress concentrations and welded joints are probable locations for the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. Due to the many unknowns of loading, materials properties, crack sizes and crack shapes present at these locations, a statistics-based reliability analysis is valuable in the careful consideration of these many different random factors involved in a fatigue life analysis, several of which are expanded upon in this study. The basic problem of a crack near a stress concentration is first considered. A formulation for the aspect ratio (a/c) of a propagating semi-elliptical fatigue crack located at the toe of a welded T-joint is developed using Newman and Raju's stress intensity factor for a cracked flat plate with a weld magnification factor and compared to that of a cracked flat plate, and the reliability in terms of fatigue lifetime is calculated with the aid of Paris' crack propagation equation for membrane and bending loadings. Crack closure effects are then introduced in the consideration of short crack effects, where crack growth rates typically may exceed those found using traditional linear elastic fracture mechanics solutions for long cracks. The probability of a very small, microstructurally influenced crack growing to a size influenced by local plastic conditions is calculated utilizing the probability of a crack continuing to grow past an obstacle, such as a grain boundary. The result is then combined with the probability for failure defined using the crack closure-modified Paris equation to find an overall reliability for the structure. Last, the probability of fracture is determined when a crack front encounters regions of non-uniform toughness, such as typical in the heat affected zone of a welded joint. An expression for the effective crack lengths of the dissimilar regions is derived, and used in a weakest-link fracture model in the evaluation

  10. What’s in a Face? How Face Gender and Current Affect Influence Perceived Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel A.; Hayes-Skelton, Sarah A.; Ciaramitaro, Vivian M.

    2016-01-01

    Faces drive our social interactions. A vast literature suggests an interaction between gender and emotional face perception, with studies using different methodologies demonstrating that the gender of a face can affect how emotions are processed. However, how different is our perception of affective male and female faces? Furthermore, how does our current affective state when viewing faces influence our perceptual biases? We presented participants with a series of faces morphed along an emotional continuum from happy to angry. Participants judged each face morph as either happy or angry. We determined each participant’s unique emotional ‘neutral’ point, defined as the face morph judged to be perceived equally happy and angry, separately for male and female faces. We also assessed how current state affect influenced these perceptual neutral points. Our results indicate that, for both male and female participants, the emotional neutral point for male faces is perceptually biased to be happier than for female faces. This bias suggests that more happiness is required to perceive a male face as emotionally neutral, i.e., we are biased to perceive a male face as more negative. Interestingly, we also find that perceptual biases in perceiving female faces are correlated with current mood, such that positive state affect correlates with perceiving female faces as happier, while we find no significant correlation between negative state affect and the perception of facial emotion. Furthermore, we find reaction time biases, with slower responses for angry male faces compared to angry female faces. PMID:27733839

  11. 情绪概念加工与情绪面孔知觉的相互影响%The interaction between emotional concept processing and emotional face perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文娟; 沈曼琼; 李莹; 王瑞明

    2016-01-01

    our experiments, we use emotional concepts and emotional faces to address this question. All the experiments were carried out using E-prime1.0. In experiment 1, emotional faces were presented to the participants and they were told to judge the valence of the faces. Participants also judged the target emotional face that following the emotional words. The results showed that there was interaction between emotional concept processing and emotional face perception on the deep semantic level. The relationship between emotional concept processing and emotional face perception was symmetric. In order to further explore the influence of semantic depth on emotional concept processing and emotional face perception, we changed the valence judgment task to pseudo-words judgment task in Experiment 2 so as to ensure that readers would only engage in shallow semantic processing in this task. We found then that concept processing affected the processing of emotional face, but not vice versa. Their relationship was asymmetric. According to the two experiment results, we can conclude that the depth of semantic processing affected the relationship between emotional concept processing and emotional face perception. These results, along with others in the literature, indicate that conceptual processing uses sensorimotor representation, and that the depth of semantic processing affects the relationship between emotional concept processing and emotional face perception. In experiment 3, we further explored the depth of perceptual processing on this relationship. We changed face duration in experiment 3 and we found that when emotional face duration was shortened, emotional face perception did not affect emotion concept processing, and vice versa. There was no interaction between emotional concept processing and emotional face perception. Thus, our results suggested that the depth of perceptual processing also had an influence on the relationship between emotional concept processing and

  12. Cracked structure-acoustic coupling problems by hybrid fractal FE and BE methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴国荣; 仲伟芳

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of the sound-structure interaction is important for effective control of noise and vibration in structural acoustic systems. Cracked elastic structure-sound interaction problems are studied by employing the hybrid fractal FEM and BEM. The degrees of freedom of the system can be reduced greatly through adopting fractal FEM in discretizing the cracked elastic structure; while the exterior acoustic field is calculated by BEM, which automatically satisfies Sommerfeld's radiation condition. Numerical examples are given and show that the resonant frequencies of the structure-acoustic coupled system decrease as the depth of the crack increases, and that the crack has a significant effect on the acoustical field in the vicinity of the crack tip.

  13. SHORT FATIGUE CRACK PARAMETER BASED ON THE TOTAL CRACK AREA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.X.Wu; X.C.Wu

    2001-01-01

    The progressive fatigue damage of a material is closely related to the whole populationof cracks on the surface of an un-notched specimen.In order to understand whichparameter is a more useful indicator of fatigue damage,rotatory bending fatigue testswere carried out using smooth specimens of medium-carbon steel.The behavior ofshort crack propagation during fatigue was examined and a new parameter "totalcrack area" was suggested.The aim of this paper is to extend the research on fatiguedamage in the already studied steel and to study how these damage parameters arecorrelated with the process of fatigue damage in order to evaluate the effectiveness ofdamage detection methods.

  14. Face/core mixed mode debond fracture toughness characterization using the modified TSD test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Christian; Quispitupa, Amilcar; Costache, Andrei;

    2014-01-01

    The modified tilted sandwich debond (TSD) test method is used to examine face/core debond fracture toughness of sandwich specimens with glass/polyester face sheets and PVC H45 and H100 foam cores over a large range of mode-mixities. The modification was achieved by reinforcing the loaded face sheet....... The fracture process was inspected visually during and after testing. For specimens with H45 core the crack propagated in the core. For specimens with an H100 core, the crack propagated between the resin-rich layer and the face sheet. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub...

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF CRACKED ROTOR BY WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹剑; 陈进; 蒲亚鹏

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic equation of cracked rotor in rotational frame was modelled, the numerical simulation solutions of the cracked rotor and the uncracked rotor were obtained. By the wavelet transform, the time-frequency properties of the cracked rotor and the uncracked rotor were discussed, the difference of the time-frequency properties between the cracked rotor and the uncracked rotor was compared. A new detection algorithm using wavelet transform to identify crack was proposed. The experiments verify the availability and validity of the wavelet transform in identification of crack.

  16. Chemical and metallurgical aspects of environmentally assisted fatigue crack growth in 7075-T651 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Wei, R. P.; Pao, P. S.

    1988-07-01

    A comprehensive study has been carried out on a 7075-T651 alloy to examine the influence of water vapor on fatigue crack growth. The kinetics of fatigue crack growth were determined as a function of water vapor pressure at room temperature and at 353 K. Detailed fractographic analyses and surface chemistry studies were carried out to identify the micromechanisms and to quantify the chemical interactions for corrosion fatigue crack growth in this alloy. Experiments were also carried out in ultra-high vacuum and in oxygen to provide for comparisons. Two regions of fatigue crack growth response were identified. In the low pressure region (below 67 Pa at 5 Hz), crack growth is controlled by the rate of transport of water vapor to the crack tip, and the response can be described by a model for transport controlled crack growth. At pressures above 67 Pa, additional increases in crack growth rate occurred, which are attributed to the further reactions of water vapor with segregated magnesium in this alloy. Different micromechanisms for crack growth have been identified for vacuum, oxygen, and water vapor. These micromechanisms are considered in relation to the environmental parameters through a modified superposition model for corrosion fatigue.

  17. Subcritical crack growth in oxide and non-oxide ceramics using the Constant Stress Rate Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Wojteczko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fracture toughness is one of the most important parameters for ceramics description. In some cases, material failure occurs at lower stresses than described by KIc parameter. In these terms, determination of fracture toughness only, proves to be insufficient. This may be due to environmental factors, such as humidity, which might cause subcritical crack propagation in a material. Therefore, it is very important to estimate crack growth velocities to predict lifetime of ceramics used under specific conditions. Constant Stress Rate Test is an indirect method of subcritical crack growth parameters estimation. Calculations are made by using strength data, thus avoiding crack measurement. The expansion of flaws causes reduction of material strength. If subcritical crack growth phenomenon occurs, critical value of crack lengths increases with decreasing stress rate due to longer time for flaw to grow before the critical crack propagation at KIc takes place. Subcritical crack growth phenomenon is particularly dangerous for oxide ceramics due to chemical interactions occurring as a result of exposure to humidity. This paper presents results of Constant Stress Rate Test performed for alumina, zirconia, silicon carbide and silicon nitride in order to demonstrate the differences in subcritical crack propagation phenomenon course.

  18. Effect of hydrogen on stress corrosion cracking of copper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jie QIAO

    2008-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior and susceptibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of pure copper were studied. SCC susceptibility of pure copper in a 1 M NaNO2 solution was increased by pre-charged hydrogen. The effect of hydrogen on the sus-ceptibility is more obvious in the low stress region due to the longer fracture time, which resulted in a longer time for more hydrogen to diffuse toward the crack tip. Synergistic effects of hydrogen and stress on corrosion and SCC pro-cesses were discussed. The results showed that an inter-action between stress and hydrogen at the crack tip could increase the anodic dissolution rate remarkably.

  19. Review of Environmentally Assisted Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    Many efforts have been made in the past by several researchers to arrive at some unifying principles governing the embrittlement phenomena. An inescapable conclusion reached by all these efforts was that the behavior is very complex. Hence, recognizing the complexity of material/environment behavior, we focus our attention here only in extracting some similarities in the experimental trends to arrive at some generic principles of behavior. Crack nucleation and growth are examined under static load in the presence of internal and external environments. Stress concentration, either pre-existing or in-situ generated, appears to be a requirement for embrittlement. A chemical stress concentration factor is defined for a given material/environment system as the ratio of failure stress with and without the damaging chemical environment. All factors that affect the buildup of the required stress concentration, such as planarity of slip, stacking fault energy, etc., also affect the stress-corrosion behavior. The chemical stress concentration factor is coupled with the mechanical stress concentration factor. In addition, generic features for all systems appear to be (a) an existence of a threshold stress as a function of concentration of the damaging environment and flow properties of the material, and (b) an existence of a limiting threshold as a function of concentration, indicative of a damage saturation for that environment. Kinetics of crack growth also depends on concentration and the mode of crack growth. In general, environment appears to enhance crack tip ductility on one side by the reduction of energy for dislocation nucleation and glide, and to reduce cohesive energy for cleavage, on the other. These two opposing factors are coupled to provide environmentally induced crack nucleation and growth. The relative ratio of these two opposing factors depends on concentration and flow properties, thereby affecting limiting thresholds. The limiting concentration or

  20. Thresholds of time dependent intergranular crack growth in a nickel disc alloy Alloy 720Li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hangyue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At high temperatures in air, introducing a dwell period at the peak stress of fatigue cycles promotes time dependent intergranular crack growth which can increase crack growth rates by upto a few orders of magnitude from the rates of transgranular fatigue crack growth in superalloys. It is expected that time dependent intergranular crack growth in nickel-based superalloys may not occur below a critical mechanical driving force, ΔKth−IG, analogous to a fatigue threshold (ΔKth and a critical temperature, Tth. In this study, dwell fatigue crack growth tests have been carefully designed and conducted on Alloy 720Li to examine such thresholds. Unlike a fatigue threshold, the threshold stress intensity factor range for intergranular crack growth is observed to be highly sensitive to microstructure, dwell time and test procedure. The near threshold crack growth behaviour is made complex by the interactions between grain boundary oxidation embrittlement and crack tip stress relaxation. In general, lower ΔKth−IG values are associated with finer grain size and/or shorter dwell times. Often a load increasing procedure promotes stress relaxation and tends to lead to higher ΔKth−IG. When there is limited stress relaxation at the crack tip, similar ΔKth−IG values are measured with load increasing and load shedding procedures. They are generally higher than the fatigue threshold (ΔKth despite faster crack growth rates (da/dN in the stable crack growth regime. Time dependent intergranular crack growth cannot be activated below a temperature of 500 ∘C.

  1. Development of Efficient Finite Element Software of Crack Propagation Simulation using Adaptive Mesh Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulnaser M. Alshoaibi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is on the determination of 2D crack paths and surfaces as well as on the evaluation of the stress intensity factors as a part of the damage tolerant assessment. Problem statement: The evaluation of SIFs and crack tip singular stresses for arbitrary fracture structure are a challenging problem, involving the calculation of the crack path and the crack propagation rates at each step especially under mixed mode loading. Approach: This study was provided a finite element code which produces results comparable to the current available commercial software. Throughout the simulation of crack propagation an automatic adaptive mesh was carried out in the vicinity of the crack front nodes and in the elements which represent the higher stresses distribution. The finite element mesh was generated using the advancing front method. The adaptive remising process carried out based on the posteriori stress error norm scheme to obtain an optimal mesh. The onset criterion of crack propagation was based on the stress intensity factors which provide as the most important parameter that must be accurately estimated. Facilitated by the singular elements, the displacement extrapolation technique is employed to calculate the stress intensity factor. Crack direction is predicted using the maximum circumferential stress theory. The fracture was modeled by the splitting node approach and the trajectory follows the successive linear extensions of each crack increment. The propagation process is driven by Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM approach with minimum user interaction. Results: In evaluating the accuracy of the estimated stress intensity factors and the crack path predictions, the results were compared with sets of experimental data, benchmark analytical solutions as well as numerical results of other researchers. Conclusion/Recommendations: The assessment indicated that the program was highly reliable to evaluate the stress intensity

  2. Effect of Chamber Pressurization Rate on Combustion and Propagation of Solid Propellant Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei-Lan; Wei, Shen; Yuan, Shu-Shen

    2002-01-01

    area of the propellant grain satisfies the designed value. But cracks in propellant grain can be generated during manufacture, storage, handing and so on. The cracks can provide additional surface area for combustion. The additional combustion may significantly deviate the performance of the rocket motor from the designed conditions, even lead to explosive catastrophe. Therefore a thorough study on the combustion, propagation and fracture of solid propellant cracks must be conducted. This paper takes an isolated propellant crack as the object and studies the effect of chamber pressurization rate on the combustion, propagation and fracture of the crack by experiment and theoretical calculation. deformable, the burning inside a solid propellant crack is a coupling of solid mechanics and combustion dynamics. In this paper, a theoretical model describing the combustion, propagation and fracture of the crack was formulated and solved numerically. The interaction of structural deformation and combustion process was included in the theoretical model. The conservation equations for compressible fluid flow, the equation of state for perfect gas, the heat conducting equation for the solid-phase, constitutive equation for propellant, J-integral fracture criterion and so on are used in the model. The convective burning inside the crack and the propagation and fracture of the crack were numerically studied by solving the set of nonlinear, inhomogeneous gas-phase governing equations and solid-phase equations. On the other hand, the combustion experiments for propellant specimens with a precut crack were conducted by RTR system. Predicted results are in good agreement with experimental data, which validates the reasonableness of the theoretical model. Both theoretical and experimental results indicate that the chamber pressurization rate has strong effects on the convective burning in the crack, crack fracture initiation and fracture pattern.

  3. Risk behaviors for sexually transmitted diseases among crack users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Alves Guimarães

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectives: to investigate the prevalence and risk behaviors by means of reporting of sexually transmitted diseases among crack users.Method: cross-sectional study carried out with 588 crack users in a referral care unit for the treatment of chemical dependency. Data were collected by means of face-to-face interview and analyzed using Stata statistical software, version 8.0.Results: of the total participants, 154 (26.2%; 95% CI: 22.8-29.9 reported antecedents of sexually transmitted diseases. Ages between 25 and 30 years (RP: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0-4.0 and over 30 years (RP: 3.8; 95% CI: 2.1-6.8, alcohol consumption (RP: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1-3.3, antecedents of prostitution (RP: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 and sexual intercourse with person living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS (RP: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.8-4.2 were independently associated with reporting of sexually transmitted diseases.Conclusion: the results of this study suggest high risk and vulnerability of crack users for sexually transmitted diseases.

  4. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  5. Modified Dugdale crack models - some easy crack relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    are assumed to be self created by local materials flow. The strength sigma_CR predictid by the Dugdale model is sigma_CR =(E Gamma_CR/phi1)^½ where E and 1 are Young’s modulus and crack half-length respectively of the material considered. The so-called critical strain energy rate is Gamma_CR = sigma......_Ldelta_CR where sigma_L is strength, and at the same time constant flow stress, of the uncracked material while delta_CR is flow limit (displacement).Obviously predictions by the Dugdale model are most reliable for materials with stress-strain relations where flow can actually be described (or well approximated......) by a constant flow stress (sigma_L). A number of materials, however, do not at all exhibit this kind of flow. Such materials are considered in this paper by Modified Dugdale crack models which apply for any cohesive stress distribution in crack front areas. Formally modified Dugdale crack models exhibit...

  6. Falling Through the Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A. Walsh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Low-income preseniors represent a vulnerable, often overlooked population facing multiple challenges related to finding and sustaining employment, limited financial resources, mental and physical health challenges, mobility issues, and ineligibility for pensions and benefits for seniors. These issues make finding suitable, affordable housing particularly challenging when compounded with limited affordable housing stock, thus increasing this population’s risk for housing insecurity/homelessness. This qualitative, exploratory study examined subsidized housing issues for low-income preseniors from the perspective of subsidized housing providers (n = 16. Barriers for this population occurred within individual (limited financial resources; complex health, mental health, and disability issues; current unsafe/inadequate housing; and new immigrant status and structural (strict age cutoffs, inadequate safe/affordable housing supply, lack of information about the housing and service needs of the population, and ineffective collaboration within the sector domains. Policy changes at the provincial and federal levels related to income support, availability of affordable housing supports, and immigration are recommended.

  7. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth. Progress report, August 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. [New Hampshire Univ., Durham, NH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Mendelsohn, D.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  8. FRACTAL KINEMATICS OF CRACK PROPAGATION IN GEOMATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢和平

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results indicate that propagation paths of cracks in geomaterials are often irregular, producing rough fracture surfaces which are fractal. A formula is derived for the fractal kinematics of crack propagation in geomaterials. The formula correlates the dynamic and static fracture toughnesses with crack velocity, crack length and a microstructural parameter, and allows the fractal dimension to be obtained. From the equations for estimating crack velocity and fractal dimension it can be shown that the measured crack velocity, Vo , should be much smaller than the fractal crack velocity, V. It can also be shown that the fractal dimension of the crack propagation path can be calculated directly from Vo and from the fracture toughness.

  9. On multiple crack detection in beam structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Shapour; Kargozarfard, Mohammad [Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    This study presents an inverse procedure to identify multiple cracks in beams using an evolutionary algorithm. By considering the crack detection procedure as an optimization problem, an objective function can be constructed based on the change of the eigenfrequencies and some strain energy parameters. Each crack is modeled by a rotational spring. The changes in natural frequencies due to the presence of the cracks are related to a damage index vector. Then, the bees algorithm, a swarm-based evolutionary optimization technique, is used to optimize the objective function and find the damage index vector, whose positive components show the number and position of the cracks. A second objective function is also optimized to find the crack depths. Several experimental studies on cracked cantilever beams are conducted to ensure the integrity of the proposed method. The results show that the number of cracks as well as their sizes and locations can be predicted well through this method.

  10. Effect of Cyclic Loading on Cracking Behaviour of X-70 Pipeline Steel in Near-Neutral pH Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao GUO; Guangfu LI; Xun CAI; Ruipeng YANG; Wu YANG

    2005-01-01

    The cracking behaviour of X-70 pipeline steel in near-neutral pH solutions was studied under different modes of cyclic loading. The crack propagation process of X-70 pipeline steel under low frequency cyclic loading condition was controlled mainly by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanism. Under mixed-mode cyclic loading, both higher tensile stress and shear stress made cracks easier to propagate. Applied cathodic potentials and high content of carbon dioxide in solutions also promoted the propagation of cracks. The propagation directions of cracks were different under different cyclic loading conditions. Under mode I (pure tensile stress) cyclic loading condition, cracks were straight and perpendicular to the tensile stress axis, while under mixed-mode Ⅰ/Ⅲ (tensile/shear stress) cyclic loading,cracks were sinuous and did not propagate in the direction perpendicular to the main tensile stress axis. Under the mixed-mode cyclic loading, cracks were much easier to propagate, suggesting that shear stress intensified the role of tensile stress. In addition, shear stress promoted the interaction between cracks, resulting in easier coalescence of cracks.

  11. Crack and flip phacoemulsification technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, I H; Maloney, W F; Dillman, D M

    1993-11-01

    The crack and flip phacoemulsification technique combines the advantages of circumferential division of the nucleus and nucleofactis techniques. As such, it adds safety and control to the procedure. We describe each of the surgical maneuvers, including machine settings, and explain the rationale for maneuvers and machine settings.

  12. China Cracks Down Internet Piracy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

      National Copyright Administration of China carried out a special operation to crack down on behaviors involving network infringement and piracy from September to December in 2005 ,according to the speech of Yan Xiaohong,Deputy Commissioner of National Copyright Administration on the Press Conference of the State Council.Now the relevant conditions are as follows:……

  13. China Cracks Down Internet Piracy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ National Copyright Administration of China carried out a special operation to crack down on behaviors involving network infringement and piracy from September to December in 2005 ,according to the speech of Yan Xiaohong,Deputy Commissioner of National Copyright Administration on the Press Conference of the State Council.Now the relevant conditions are as follows:

  14. HYDROTHERMAL CRACKING OF RESIDUAL OILS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The hydrothermal cracking of heavy oils, such as Canadian oil sand bitumen and Arabian heavy vacuum residue, as well as their model compound were performed over sulfided Ni/Al2O3 and NiMo/Al2O3 catalysts under 663~703 K and 6.0~8.0 MPa of hydrogen pressure in a batch autoclave reactor. According to the reaction mechanism of hydrothermal cracking, a small amount of free redical initiators, such as di-tert-peroxide, sulfur, etc., was added into the feed to generate free redicals at lower temperature, and obviously showed promotional effect on the conversion of hydrocarbons. The reaction mechanisms of hydrothermal cracking as well as the enhancing effect of initiators were studied by a probe reaction with 1-phenyldodecane as a model compound. The hydrothermal cracking of hydrocarbon proceeded via free redical mechanism and hydrogenating quench. The initiators might easily generate free redicals under reaction temperature, these redicals might abstract H from hydrocarbon molecule and reasonably initiate the chain reactions, therefore, promote the conversion of hydrocarbon even at lower reaction temperature.

  15. European cinema: face to face with Hollywood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Elsaesser

    2005-01-01

    In the face of renewed competition from Hollywood since the early 1980s and the challenges posed to Europe's national cinemas by the fall of the Wall in 1989, independent filmmaking in Europe has begun to re-invent itself. European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood re-assesses the different debate

  16. Confining crack propagation in defective graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Polín, Guillermo; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina

    2015-03-11

    Crack propagation in graphene is essential to understand mechanical failure in 2D materials. We report a systematic study of crack propagation in graphene as a function of defect content. Nanoindentations and subsequent images of graphene membranes with controlled induced defects show that while tears in pristine graphene span microns length, crack propagation is strongly reduced in the presence of defects. Accordingly, graphene oxide exhibits minor crack propagation. Our work suggests controlled defect creation as an approach to avoid catastrophic failure in graphene.

  17. Mapping Teacher-Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari's concept of faciality to analyse the teacher's face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an "overcoded" face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of significance and…

  18. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  19. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  20. An Approach to Face Recognition of 2-D Images Using Eigen Faces and PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna Mishra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Face detection is to find any face in a given image. Face recognition is a two-dimension problem used for detecting faces. The information contained in a face can be analysed automatically by this system like identity, gender, expression, age, race and pose. Normally face detection is done for a single image but it can also be extended for video stream. As the face images are normally upright, they can be described by a small set of 2-D characteristics views. Here the face images are projected to a feature space or face space to encode the variation between the known face images. The projected feature space or the face space can be defined as ‘eigenfaces’ and can be formed by eigenvectors of the face image set. The above process can be used to recognize a new face in unsupervised manner. This paper introduces an algorithm which is used for effective face recognition. It takes into consideration not only the face extraction but also the mathematical calculations which enable us to bring the image into a simple and technical form. It can also be implemented in real-time using data acquisition hardware and software interface with the face recognition systems. Face recognition can be applied to various domains including security systems, personal identification, image and film processing and human computer interaction.

  1. Correction to the crack extension direction in numerical modelling of mixed mode crack paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucht, Tore; Aliabadi, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    In order to avoid introduction of an error when a local crack-growth criterion is used in an incremental crack growth formulation, each straight crack extension would have to be infinitesimal or have its direction corrected. In this paper a new procedure to correct the crack extension direction i...

  2. Mesh sensitivity effects on fatigue crack growth by crack-tip blunting and re-sharpening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    Crack-tip blunting under tensile loads and re-sharpening of the crack-tip during unloading is one of the basic mechanisms for fatigue crack growth in ductile metals. Based on an elastic–perfectly plastic material model, crack growth computations have been continued up to 700 full cycles by using...

  3. Fatigue crack growth from a cracked elastic particle into a ductile matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groh, S.; Olarnrithinun, S.; Curtin, W. A.; Needleman, A.; Deshpande, V. S.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2008-01-01

    The monotonic and cyclic crack growth rate of cracks is strongly influenced by the microstructure. Here, the growth of cracks emanating from pre-cracked micron-scale elastic particles and growing into single crystals is investigated, with a focus on the effects of (i) plastic confinement due to the

  4. A review of Brazilian scientific output on crack--contributions to the political agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Marcelo Rasga; Fernandes, Fernando Manuel Bessa; Ribeiro, José Mendes; Franco Neto, Thereza de Lamare

    2015-04-01

    scientific literature about crack abuse published in Brazilian journals indexed in SCIELO. systematic review of literature treating findings as a framework for agenda-setting orienting policy decision makers. SCIELO online journals research since 02/06/2013 on tag crack as "key word searched" and in indexes as "research amplitude". An amount of 199 references were identified and their abstracts were analyzed getting to a final group of 59 articles specifically studying crack issues in Brazil. institutional criteria (journal, subject area, and publishing time) and analytical categories created by the authors: "Social Risk", "Treatment", "Use/Abuse", "Profile", "Social Relations", and "Study". crack use impact Brazilian journals since 2011; health field is prominent; articles about "Associated Risk" and "Treatment" prevail; SUS cannot face demand;investment improvement in CAP and harm reduction; therapeutic communities need to match with SUS standards; youngers, black people and poor express users profile; rave style use; repressive policies were not well succeeded; and multidisciplinary approach are necessary.

  5. Face recognition increases during saccade preparation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Lin

    Full Text Available Face perception is integral to human perception system as it underlies social interactions. Saccadic eye movements are frequently made to bring interesting visual information, such as faces, onto the fovea for detailed processing. Just before eye movement onset, the processing of some basic features, such as the orientation, of an object improves at the saccade landing point. Interestingly, there is also evidence that indicates faces are processed in early visual processing stages similar to basic features. However, it is not known whether this early enhancement of processing includes face recognition. In this study, three experiments were performed to map the timing of face presentation to the beginning of the eye movement in order to evaluate pre-saccadic face recognition. Faces were found to be similarly processed as simple objects immediately prior to saccadic movements. Starting ∼ 120 ms before a saccade to a target face, independent of whether or not the face was surrounded by other faces, the face recognition gradually improved and the critical spacing of the crowding decreased as saccade onset was approaching. These results suggest that an upcoming saccade prepares the visual system for new information about faces at the saccade landing site and may reduce the background in a crowd to target the intended face. This indicates an important role of pre-saccadic eye movement signals in human face recognition.

  6. Face recognition increases during saccade preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai; Rizak, Joshua D; Ma, Yuan-ye; Yang, Shang-chuan; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xin-tian

    2014-01-01

    Face perception is integral to human perception system as it underlies social interactions. Saccadic eye movements are frequently made to bring interesting visual information, such as faces, onto the fovea for detailed processing. Just before eye movement onset, the processing of some basic features, such as the orientation, of an object improves at the saccade landing point. Interestingly, there is also evidence that indicates faces are processed in early visual processing stages similar to basic features. However, it is not known whether this early enhancement of processing includes face recognition. In this study, three experiments were performed to map the timing of face presentation to the beginning of the eye movement in order to evaluate pre-saccadic face recognition. Faces were found to be similarly processed as simple objects immediately prior to saccadic movements. Starting ∼ 120 ms before a saccade to a target face, independent of whether or not the face was surrounded by other faces, the face recognition gradually improved and the critical spacing of the crowding decreased as saccade onset was approaching. These results suggest that an upcoming saccade prepares the visual system for new information about faces at the saccade landing site and may reduce the background in a crowd to target the intended face. This indicates an important role of pre-saccadic eye movement signals in human face recognition.

  7. Twisting cracks in Bouligand structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksangpanya, Nobphadon; Yaraghi, Nicholas A; Kisailus, David; Zavattieri, Pablo

    2017-06-10

    The Bouligand structure, which is found in many biological materials, is a hierarchical architecture that features uniaxial fiber layers assembled periodically into a helicoidal pattern. Many studies have highlighted the high damage-resistant performance of natural and biomimetic Bouligand structures. One particular species that utilizes the Bouligand structure to achieve outstanding mechanical performance is the smashing Mantis Shrimp, Odontodactylus Scyllarus (or stomatopod). The mantis shrimp generates high speed, high acceleration blows using its raptorial appendage to defeat highly armored preys. The load-bearing part of this appendage, the dactyl club, contains an interior region [16] that consists of a Bouligand structure. This region is capable of developing a significant amount of nested twisting microcracks without exhibiting catastrophic failure. The development and propagation of these microcracks are a source of energy dissipation and stress relaxation that ultimately contributes to the remarkable damage tolerance properties of the dactyl club. We develop a theoretical model to provide additional insights into the local stress intensity factors at the crack front of twisting cracks formed within the Bouligand structure. Our results reveal that changes in the local fracture mode at the crack front leads to a reduction of the local strain energy release rate, hence, increasing the necessary applied energy release rate to propagate the crack, which is quantified by the local toughening factor. Ancillary 3D simulations of the asymptotic crack front field were carried out using a J-integral to validate the theoretical values of the energy release rate and the local stress intensity factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fatigue crack growth simulations of 3-D linear elastic cracks under thermal load by XFEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Himanshu PATHAK[1; Akhilendra SINGH[2; I.V. SINGH[3; S. K. YADAV[3

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the fatigue crack growth simulations of three-dimensional linear elastic cracks by XFEM under cyclic thermal load. Both temperature and displacement approximations are extrinsically enriched by Heaviside and crack front enrichment functions. Crack growth is modelled by successive linear extensions, and the end points of these linear extensions are joined by cubic spline segments to obtain a modified crack front. Different crack geometries such as planer, non-planer and arbitrary spline shape cracks are simulated under thermal shock, adiabatic and isothermal loads to reveal the sturdiness and versatility of the XFEM approach.

  9. Facing a real person: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pönkänen, Laura M; Hietanen, Jari K; Peltola, Mikko J; Kauppinen, Pasi K; Haapalainen, Antti; Leppänen, Jukka M

    2008-03-05

    Although faces are typically perceived in the context of human interaction, face processing is commonly studied by displaying faces on a computer screen. This study on event-related potential examined whether the processing of faces differs depending on whether participants are viewing faces live or on a computer screen. In both the conditions, the participants were shown a real face, a dummy face, and a control object. N170 and early posterior negativity discriminated between faces and control object in both the conditions. Interestingly, early posterior negativity differentiated between the real face and the dummy face only in the live condition. The results indicate that a live face, as a potentially interacting stimulus, is processed differently than an inanimate face already at the early processing stages.

  10. Crack growth of throughwall flaw in Alloy 600 tube during leak testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, Chi Bum, E-mail: bahn@pusan.ac.kr [Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Majumdar, Saurin [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A series of leak testing was conducted at a constant pressure and room temperature. • The time-dependent increase in the leak rate was observed. • The fractography revealed slip offsets and crystallographic facets. • Time-dependent plasticity at the crack tip caused the slip offsets. • Fatigue by jet/structure interaction caused the crystallographic facets. - Abstract: We examined the issue of whether crack growth in a full thickness material can occur in a leaking crack. A series of leak tests was conducted at a room temperature and constant pressure (17.3 MPa) with Alloy 600 tube specimens containing a tight rectangular throughwall axial fatigue crack. To exclude a potential pulsation effect by a high pressure pump, the test water was pressurized by using high pressure nitrogen gas. Fractography showed that crack growth in the full thickness material can occur in the leaking crack by two mechanisms: time-dependent plasticity at the crack tip and fatigue induced by jet/structure interaction. The threshold leak rate at which the jet/structure interaction was triggered was between 1.3 and 3.3 L/min for the specific heat of the Alloy 600 tube tested.

  11. The meanings of death and dying: the perspective of crack users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Júnior, Fernando José Guedes da; Monteiro, Claudete Ferreira de Souza

    2012-01-01

    The consumption of crack can constitute in an inauthentic form of the existence that leads a person to live improperly the being-toward-death. Given this reality, this study aimed to comprehend the significance of death and dying for the user of crack and to unveil the meanings attributed to this significance. This qualitative study was conducted, based on the phenomenological method, with 12 crack users, in the therapeutic process, in a Psychosocial Care CenterAlcohol and Drugs (CAPSad), in the period from February to April 2011, in Teresina, Piauí. The results show that death is signified, ontically, as a companion, a partner, a passage, a journey and as the crack itself. It was concluded that this significance expressed an inauthentic experience, directed toward the incessant interaction with crack, accompanied by a feeling of nullity and relational disengagement.

  12. Contact deformation and cracking of zirconia/cement/foundation dental multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Xinrui [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: xniu@princeton.edu; Yang Yong; Soboyejo, Wole [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2008-06-25

    The paper presents the results of combined experimental, analytical and computational studies of contact-induced deformation and cracking in zirconia/cement/foundation dental multilayers, where cement and foundation layers are commercially used dental adhesive and restoratives. Hertzian contact tests were performed on the multilayers. A novel technique, dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) was used to examine the crack/microstructure interactions in the dental multilayer structures. The FIB/SEM images show sub-surface inter/intragranular cracking modes that have not been reported before. The critical loads corresponding to onset of sub-surface radial cracking were found to exhibit a strong dependence on the monotonic loading rates. A rate-dependent environmentally assisted slow crack growth (RDEASGG) model was used to predict the loading rate dependence of the critical loads. The implications of the results are discussed for the design of durable dental multilayers.

  13. Attractive faces temporally modulate visual attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koyo eNakamura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial attractiveness is an important biological and social signal on social interaction. Recent research has demonstrated that an attractive face captures greater spatial attention than an unattractive face does. Little is known, however, about the temporal characteristics of visual attention for facial attractiveness. In this study, we investigated the temporal modulation of visual attention induced by facial attractiveness by using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP. Fourteen male faces and two female faces were successively presented for 160 ms respectively, and participants were asked to identify two female faces embedded among a series of multiple male distractor faces. Identification of a second female target (T2 was impaired when a first target (T1 was attractive compared to neutral or unattractive faces, at 320 ms SOA; identification was improved when T1 was attractive compared to unattractive faces at 640 ms SOA. These findings suggest that the spontaneous appraisal of facial attractiveness modulates temporal attention.

  14. Photoelastic studies of crack propagation and crack arrest. [Homalite 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, G.R.; Dally, J.W.; Kobayashi, T.; Fourney, W.L.; Etheridge, J.M.

    1977-09-01

    This report describes the third year effort on research programs dealing with the characterization of dynamic aspects of fracture. The results included in this report are (1) verification of the BCL one-dimensional computer code; (2) determination of a-dot--K relationship from modified compact-tension specimen of Homalite 100; (3) verification of the MRL procedure for K/sub Ia/ measurement with machine-loaded C-DCB specimen of Homalite 100; (4) influence of adhesive toughness, adhesive thickness, and toughness of the arrest section on crack behavior in duplex specimens of both the M-CT and R-DCB types; (5) crack propagation in a thermally stressed ring specimen; and (6) development of a two-dimensional finite-difference code to predict fracture behavior in specimens of rectangular geometry under various a-dot vs K relationships. 118 figures, 53 tables.

  15. The Many Faces of the Still-Face Paradigm: A Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesman, Judi; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2009-01-01

    The Still-Face Paradigm (SFP) designed by Tronick, Als, Adamson, Wise, and Brazelton (Tronick, E., Als, H., Adamson, L., Wise, S., & Brazelton, T. B. (1978). Infants response to entrapment between contradictory messages in face-to-face interaction. "Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 17", 1-13) has been used for…

  16. The Many Faces of the Still-Face Paradigm: A Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesman, Judi; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2009-01-01

    The Still-Face Paradigm (SFP) designed by Tronick, Als, Adamson, Wise, and Brazelton (Tronick, E., Als, H., Adamson, L., Wise, S., & Brazelton, T. B. (1978). Infants response to entrapment between contradictory messages in face-to-face interaction. "Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 17", 1-13) has been used for…

  17. Inhibiting Corrosion Cracking: Crack Tip Chemistry and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-14

    5 5. Swuzary 113 Rferences 114 wl NO 4L iv . List of Figuring 1. Microipette pulling machine . 29 2. Anodic polarization of 7075-T6 Al alloy in dilute...environment has a strong effect on microplastic behavior at the tip of a fatigue crack. Stolz and Pelloux suggest that nitrate ion competes with chloride...Crystalline Na2 N 20 29H20 precipitates when the filtrate is placed in a vacunm desiccator over sulfuric acid. The filtered precipitate is washed

  18. Crack branching in carbon steel. Fracture mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syromyatnikova, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Levin, A. I.; Lyglaev, A. V.

    2010-04-01

    The fracture surfaces of pressure vessels made of carbon steel that form during crack branching propagation are examined by fractography. Crack branching is found to occur at a crack velocity higher than a certain critical value V > V c . In this case, the material volume that is involved in fracture and depends on the elastoplastic properties of the material and the sample width has no time to dissipate the energy released upon crack motion via the damage mechanisms intrinsic in the material under given deformation conditions (in our case, via cracking according to intragranular cleavage).

  19. Strength of Cracked Reinforced Concrete Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with models, based on the theory of plasticity, to be used in strength assessments of reinforced concrete disks suffering from different kinds of cracking. Based on the assumption that the sliding strength of concrete is reduced in sections where cracks are located, solutions...... for the shear strength of disks with initial cracks and disks suffering from isotropic cracking are presented. Furthermore, in the case of isotropicly cracked disks subjected to arbitrary in-plane loading, a general yield condition is derived....

  20. CRACK REASON ANALYSIS OF DAMAGED CARBONITRIDED PART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kocúrová

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of a damaged part, which was designed for use in a mechanical clutch of a car. The crack in the part was found during the production inspection. The aim of metallographic and fractography analyses of the fracture surfaces was to discover the reasons for the crack. The reason for creating the crack was the formation of smaller cracks in the production during pressing process of the semiproduct. These cracks even grew after the following thermochemical treatment. The fracture was initiated during the straightening process of quenched part.

  1. An Approach to Face Recognition of 2-D Images Using Eigen Faces and PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna Mishra

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Face detection is to find any face in a given image. Face recognition is a two-dimension problem used fordetecting faces. The information contained in a face can be analysed automatically by this system likeidentity, gender, expression, age, race and pose. Normally face detection is done for a single image but itcan also be extended for video stream. As the face images are normally upright, they can be described by asmall set of 2-D characteristics views. Here the face images are projected to a feature space or face spaceto encode the variation between the known face images. The projected feature space or the face space canbe defined as ‘eigenfaces’ and can be formed by eigenvectors of the face image set. The above process canbe used to recognize a new face in unsupervised manner. This paper introduces an algorithm which is usedfor effective face recognition. It takes into consideration not only the face extraction but also themathematical calculations which enable us to bring the image into a simple and technical form. It can alsobe implemented in real-time using data acquisition hardware and software interface with the facerecognition systems. Face recognition can be applied to various domains including security systems,personal identification, image and film processing and human computer interaction.

  2. Interpersonal similarity between body movements in face-to-face communication in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higo, Naoki; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Minemura, Juichi; Xu, Bujie; Nozawa, Takayuki; Ogata, Taiki; Ara, Koji; Yano, Kazuo; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Individuals are embedded in social networks in which they communicate with others in their daily lives. Because smooth face-to-face communication is the key to maintaining these networks, measuring the smoothness of such communication is an important issue. One indicator of smoothness is the similarity of the body movements of the two individuals concerned. A typical example noted in experimental environments is the interpersonal synchronization of body movements such as nods and gestures during smooth face-to-face communication. It should therefore be possible to estimate quantitatively the smoothness of face-to-face communication in social networks through measurement of the synchronization of body movements. However, this is difficult because social networks, which differ from disciplined experimental environments, are open environments for the face-to-face communication between two individuals. In such open environments, their body movements become complicated by various external factors and may follow unstable and nonuniform patterns. Nevertheless, we consider there to be some interaction during face-to-face communication that leads to the interpersonal synchronization of body movements, which can be seen through the interpersonal similarity of body movements. The present study aims to clarify such interaction in terms of body movements during daily face-to-face communication in real organizations of more than 100 people. We analyzed data on the frequency of body movement for each individual during face-to-face communication, as measured by a wearable sensor, and evaluated the degree of interpersonal similarity of body movements between two individuals as their frequency difference. Furthermore, we generated uncorrelated data by resampling the data gathered and compared these two data sets statistically to distinguish the effects of actual face-to-face communication from those of the activities accompanying the communication. Our results confirm an

  3. Dynamic Evolution of Microscopic Wet Cracking Noises

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O; Benson, P M

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the interaction between water and microscopic defects is one of the long-standing challenges in understanding a broad range of cracking processes. Different physical aspects of microscopic events, driven or influenced by water, have been extensively discussed in atomistic calculations but have not been accessible in microscale experiments. Through the analysis of the emitted noises during the evolution of individual, dynamic microcracking events, we show that the onset of a secondary instability known as hybrid events occurs during the fast healing phase of microcracking, which leads to (local) sudden increase of pore water pressure in the process zone, inducing a secondary instability, which is followed by a fast-locking phase on the microscopic faults (pulse-like rupture).

  4. Exact Solution for an Anti-Plane Interface Crack between Two Dissimilar Magneto-Electro-Elastic Half-Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Rogowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the fracture behaviour of a piezo-electro-magneto-elastic medium subjected to electro-magneto-mechanical loads. The bimaterial medium contains a crack which lies at interface and is parallel to their poling direction. Fourier transform technique is used to reduce the problem to three pairs of dual integral equations. These equations are solved exactly. The semipermeable crack-face magneto-electric boundary conditions are utilized. Field intensity factors of stress, electric displacement, magnetic induction, cracks displacement, electric and magnetic potentials, and the energy release rate are determined. The electric displacement and magnetic induction of crack interior are discussed. Obtained results indicate that the stress field and electric and magnetic fields near the crack tips exhibit square-root singularity.

  5. Time domain analysis of nonlinear frequency mixing in a slender beam for localizing a breathing crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, Mira

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of a dual frequency flexural wave with a breathing crack generates a peculiar frequency mixing phenomena, which is manifested in form of the side bands or peaks at combinations frequencies in frequency spectrum of the response. Although these peaks have been proven useful in ascertaining the presence of crack, they barely carry any information about the crack location. In this regards, the present article analyzes the time domain representation of the response obtained by employing a wavelet spectral finite element method. The study reveals that the combination tones generated at the crack location travel with dissimilar speeds along the waveguide, owing to its dispersive nature. The separation between the lobes corresponding to these combination tones therefore, depends on the distance that they have travelled. This observation is then used to formulate a method to predict the crack location with respect to the sensor. A brief parametric study shows marginal errors in predicting the crack location, which ascertains the validity of the method. This article also studies the frequency spectrum of the response. The peaks at combination tones are quantified in terms of a modulate parameter which depends on the severity of the crack. The inferences drawn from the time and the frequency domain study can be instrumental in designing a robust strategy for detecting location and severity of the crack.

  6. Effect of wetting-drying cycles on soil desiccation cracking behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Chao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding the desiccation cracking process is essential in analysing drought effects on soil hydraulic and mechanical properties through consideration of the atmosphere-ground interaction. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the consequence of wetting-drying cycles on the initiation and propagation characteristics of desiccation cracks on soil surface. Initially saturated slurry specimens were prepared and subjected to five subsequent wetting-drying cycles. Image processing technique was employed to quantitatively analyze the morphology characteristics of crack patterns formed during each drying path. The results show that the desiccation cracking behaviour of soil is significantly affected by the wetting-drying cycles. Before the third wetting-drying cycle is reached, the surface crack ratio and the average crack width increases while the average clod area decreases with increasing the number of wetting-drying cycles. The number of intersections and crack segments per unit area reaches the peak values after the second wetting-drying cycle. After the third wetting-drying cycle is reached, the effect of increasing wetting-drying cycles on crack patterns is insignificant. Moreover, it is observed that the applied wetting-drying cycles are accompanied by a continual reconstruction of soil structure. The initial homogenous slurry structure is completely replaced with aggregated structure after the third cycles, and a significant increase in the inter-aggregate porosity can be observed.

  7. Alternating grain orientation and weld solidification cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, S.; Le, Y.

    1985-10-01

    A new mechanism for reducing weld solidification cracking was proposed, based on the concept of the crack path and resistance to crack propagation, and its effectiveness was verified in magnetically oscillated GTA welds of a rather crack susceptible material 2014 aluminum alloy. This mechanism, i.e., alternating grain orientation, was most pronounced in welds made with transverse arc oscillation of low frequency and high amplitude, and solidification cracking was dramatically reduced in these welds. The effect of the arc oscillation pattern, amplitude, and frequency on the formation of alternating columnar grains and the reduction of solidification cracking in GTA welds of 2014 aluminum alloy was examined and explained. The present study demonstrated for the first time that columnar grains can, in fact, be very effective in reducing solidification cracking, provided that they are oriented favorably.

  8. Neural Decoding Reveals Impaired Face Configural Processing in the Right Fusiform Face Area of Individuals with Developmental Prosopagnosia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Most of human daily social interactions rely on the ability to successfully recognize faces. Yet ∼2% of the human population suffers from face blindness without any acquired brain damage [this is also known as developmental prosopagnosia (DP) or congenital prosopagnosia]). Despite the presence of severe behavioral face recognition deficits, surprisingly, a majority of DP individuals exhibit normal face selectivity in the right fusiform face area (FFA), a key brain region involved in face conf...

  9. Face-Sealing Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, John N.

    1992-01-01

    Valve plate made to translate as well as rotate. Valve opened and closed by turning shaft and lever. Interactions among lever, spring, valve plate, and face seal cause plate to undergo combination of translation and rotation so valve plate clears seal during parts of opening and closing motions.

  10. Interaction between Yttria fully stabilized Zirconia or Yttria-Zirconia blended face-coat with Ti6Al4V during investment casting

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between the Ti6Al4V alloy and the mould materials was investigated. The alpha-case was characterized by Vickers hardness tester, optical and scanning electron microscopy equipped with electron dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). X...

  11. Biaxial Fatigue Cracking from Notch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    Leevers (reference 11) noticed that the variation in  from 0 to 2 has little effect on the da/dN in PVC ( polyvinyl - chloride ), but reduces the da/dN...under biaxial rotating and bending. Ahmad (reference 2) formulated a model for the biaxial fatigue crack growth in aggressive environment, outlined by...1962, Vol. 90, pp. 238-239. 20. ASM Handbook , Vol. 12 Fractography: 1992, p. 430, 438. 21. Metals Handbook , Vol. 9 Fractography and Atlas of

  12. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  13. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruml, T.; Hutař, P.; Náhlík, L.; Seitl, S.; Polák, J.

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 μm was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude ( R ɛ = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  14. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruml, T., E-mail: kruml@ipm.cz [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, CZ 61662 Brno (Czech Republic); Hutar, P.; Nahlik, L.; Seitl, S.; Polak, J. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, CZ 61662 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 {mu}m was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude (R{sub {epsilon}} = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  15. Cracking conditions of crude oil under different geological environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    There are mainly 3 kinds of existing states of oil generating from source rocks,that is,dispersive liquid hydrocarbon inside of source rock,dispersive liquid hydrocarbon outside of source rock and concentrated liquid hydrocarbon outside of source rock.Because of the differences in thermal history and medium conditions around,and the interaction of organic and inorganic matter,the liquid hydrocarbon with 3 kinds of existing state has different cracking conditions.The gas generation dynamics experiments of crude oil matching different mediums indicate that the distribution of activation energy of methane changes a lot according to medium difference.The carbonate has a main influence on oil cracking conditions and can largely reduce its activation energy,which reflects the lower cracking temperature of crude oil.The mudstone takes a second place and the sandstone is the smallest.The catalytic cracking function to the oil of the carbonate,of the mudstone and of the sandstone changes weaken in turn.The corresponding Ro values of main gas generation period in different mediums are as follows:1.5%―3.8%with pure crude oil,1.2%―3.2%with dispersive crude oil in carbonate,1.3%~3.4% with dispersive crude oil in mudstone and 1.4%―3.6%with dispersive crude oil in sandstone.The influence of pressure to crude oil cracking is relatively complicated.In the low heating speed condition, pressure restrains the oil cracking and gas generation,but in the high heating speed condition,pressure has an indistinctive influence to the oil cracking and gas generation.Pressure also makes a different effort in different evolvement stage.Taking the middle and lower Cambrian source rocks in the Tarim Basin as an example,primary oil generating quantity is 2232.24×10 8 t,residual oil and oil cracking gas quantity is 806.21×10 8 t and 106.95×10 12 m 3 respectively.

  16. Brittle-tough transitions during crack growth in toughened adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoules, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The use of structural adhesives in automotive applications relies on an effective understanding of their performance under crash conditions. In particular, there is considerable potential for mechanics-based modeling of the interaction between an adhesive layer and the adherends, to replace current empirical approaches to design. Since energy dissipation during a crash, mediated by plastic deformation of the structure, is a primary consideration for automotive applications, traditional approaches of fracture mechanics are not appropriate. Cohesive-zone models that use two fracture parameters - cohesive strength and toughness - have been shown to provide a method for quantitative mechanics analysis. Combined numerical and experimental techniques have been developed to deduce the toughness and strength parameters of adhesive layers, allowing qualitative modeling of the performance of adhesive joints. These techniques have been used to study the failure of joints, formed from a toughened adhesive and sheet metal, over a wide range of loading rates. Two fracture modes are observed: quasi-static crack growth and dynamic crack growth. The quasi-static crack growth is associated with a toughened mode of failure; the dynamic crack growth is associated with a more brittle mode of failure. The results of the experiments and analyses indicate that the fracture parameters for quasi-static crack growth in this toughened system are essentially rate independent, and that quasi-static crack growth can occur even at the highest crack velocities. Effects of rate appear to be limited to the ease with which a transition to dynamic fracture could be triggered. This transition appears to be stochastic in nature, and it does not appear to be associated with the attainment of any critical value for crack velocity or loading rate. Fracture-mechanics models exist in the literature for brittle-ductile transitions in rate-dependent polymers, which rely on rate dependent values of toughness

  17. Improved damage tolerant face/core interface design in sandwich structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Berggreen, Christian; Quispitupa, Amilcar

    2009-01-01

    kinking behavior may be altered / avoided by changing the interface design by using Chopped Strand Mat (CSM), Continuous Filament Mat (CFM) and woven mats at the face/core interface as sources for fiber bridging, thus keeping and arresting the crack in the interface.......A face/core debond in a sandwich structure may propagate in the interface or kink into either the face or core depending on the mode-mixity of the loading. This study explores experimental methodologies for mapping the kinking behavior at various mode-mixities. Further, it is shown that the crack...

  18. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 3: Modeling of crack tip hydrogen damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental fatigue crack propagation rates and microscopic damage modes in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 (Parts 1 and 2) are described by a crack tip process zone model based on hydrogen embrittlement. Da/dN sub ENV equates to discontinuous crack advance over a distance, delta a, determined by dislocation transport of dissolved hydrogen at plastic strains above a critical value; and to the number of load cycles, delta N, required to hydrogenate process zone trap sites that fracture according to a local hydrogen concentration-tensile stress criterion. Transgranular (100) cracking occurs for process zones smaller than the subgrain size, and due to lattice decohesion or hydride formation. Intersubgranular cracking dominates when the process zone encompasses one or more subgrains so that dislocation transport provides hydrogen to strong boundary trapping sites. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by process zone plastic strain-hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and is determined by the DK dependent rates and proportions of each parallel cracking mode. Absolute values of the exponents and the preexponential coefficients are not predictable; however, fractographic measurements theta sub i coupled with fatigue crack propagation data for alloy 2090 established that the process zone model correctly describes fatigue crack propagation kinetics. Crack surface films hinder hydrogen uptake and reduce da/dN and alter the proportions of each fatigue crack propagation mode.

  19. The nonlocal solution of two parallel cracks in functionally graded materials subjected to harmonic anti-plane shear waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Liang; Shiping Wu; Shanyi Du

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic interaction of two parallel cracks in functionally graded materials (FGMs) is investigated by means of the non-local theory. To make the analysis tractable, the shear modulus and the material den-sity are assumed to vary exponentially with the coordinate vertical to the crack. To reduce mathematical difficulties, a one-dimensional non-local kemel is used instead of a two-dimensional one for the dynamic problem to obtain stress fields near the crack tips. By use of the Fourier transform,the problem can be solved with the help of two pairs of dual integral equations, in which the unknown variables are the jumps of displacements across the crack surfaces. To solve the dual integral equations, the jumps of displace-ments across the crack surfaces are expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. Unlike the classical elasticity solu-tions, it is found that no stress singularity is present at the crack tips. The non-local elastic solutions yield a finite hoop stress at the crack tips. The present result provides theoret-ical references helpful for evaluating relevant strength and preventing material failure of FGMs with initial cracks. The magnitude of the finite stress field depends on relevant param-eters, such as the crack length, the distance between two parallel cracks, the parameter describing the FGMs, the fre-quency of the incident waves and the lattice parameter of materials.

  20. Face-Lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tests and Procedures Face-lift By Mayo Clinic Staff A face-lift (rhytidectomy) is a cosmetic surgical procedure to improve the look of your face and neck. During a face-lift, facial soft tissues are lifted, excess skin is ...

  1. Analyzing crack-tip dislocations and their shielding effect on fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashida, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)], E-mail: higasida@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hartmaier, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Martensstrasse 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hoshino, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2008-06-15

    With the aim of experimental clarification of the interaction between a crack and dislocations, crack-tip dislocations in two kinds of plastic zones in silicon crystals were directly observed by high-voltage electron microscopy to analyse by their detail characterisation. Three-dimensional analysis on crack-dislocation interaction revealed that they were shielding type dislocations in both 45 deg.-shear-type and hinge-type plastic zones, which accommodate mainly mode I stress intensity at the crack tip. The crack-tip shielding fields due to dislocations also have been visualised by photoelasticity. In specimens without pre-deformation, photoelastic images due to the mode I crack-tip field were observed when an external load was applied at room temperature. In specimens pre-deformed at high temperatures, photoelastic images corresponding to the dislocation shielding were observed. The shielding field has an effect of accommodating the tensile stress concentration due to the applied load, which increases the critical stress intensity factor for crack extension.

  2. The influence of surface stress on dislocation emission from sharp and blunt cracks in f.c.c. metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    We use computer simulations to study the behaviour of atomically sharp and blunted cracks in various fee metals. The simulations use effective medium potentials which contain many-body interactions. We find that when using potentials representing platinum and gold a sharp crack is stable with res...

  3. Calculation of Stress Intensity Factor KⅠ Using the Exact Solution in an Infinitely Deep Crack in a Half-Plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Deuk Man [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    In this study, we develop the exact field of modeⅠin an infinitely deep crack in a half-plane. Using this field, we obtain the exact stress intensity factor KⅠ. From the tractions on the crack faces induced by exact field, we calculate the stress intensity factor of this field. We compare the results with the stress intensity factor calculated using Bueckner’s weight function formula and that calculated by using Tada’s formula listed in “The Stress Analysis of Cracks Handbook” It was found that Bueckner’s formula yields accurate results. However, the results obtained using Tada’s formula exhibit inaccurate behavior.

  4. Extended displacement discontinuity boundary integral equation and boundary element method for cracks in thermo-magneto-electro-elastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Dang, HuaYang; Xu, GuangTao; Fan, CuiYing; Zhao, MingHao

    2016-08-01

    The extended displacement discontinuity boundary integral equation (EDDBIE) and boundary element method is developed for the analysis of planar cracks of arbitrary shape in the isotropic plane of three-dimensional (3D) transversely isotropic thermo-magneto-electro-elastic (TMEE) media. The extended displacement discontinuities (EDDs) include conventional displacement discontinuity, electric potential discontinuity, magnetic potential discontinuity, as well as temperature discontinuity across crack faces; correspondingly, the extended stresses represent conventional stress, electric displacement, magnetic induction and heat flux. Employing a Hankel transformation, the fundamental solutions for unit point EDDs in 3D transversely isotropic TMEE media are derived. The EDDBIEs for a planar crack of arbitrary shape in the isotropic plane of a 3D transversely isotropic TMEE medium are then established. Using the boundary integral equation method, the singularities of near-crack border fields are obtained and the extended stress field intensity factors are expressed in terms of the EDDs on crack faces. According to the analogy between the EDDBIEs for an isotropic thermoelastic material and TMEE medium, an analogical solution method for crack problems of a TMEE medium is proposed for coupled multi-field loadings. Employing constant triangular elements, the EDDBIEs are discretized and numerically solved. As an application, the problems of an elliptical crack subjected to combined mechanical-electric-magnetic-thermal loadings are investigated.

  5. Face/core interface fracture characterization of mixed mode bending sandwich specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    application point (lever arm distance). Finite element analysis was performed to determine the mode‐mixity at the crack tip. The results showed that the face/core interface fracture toughness increased with increased mode II loading. Post failure analysis of the fractured specimens revealed that the crack......Debonding of the core from the face sheets is a critical failure mode in sandwich structures. This paper presents an experimental study on face/core debond fracture of foam core sandwich specimens under a wide range of mixed mode loading conditions. Sandwich beams with E‐glass fibre face sheets...... and PVC H45, H100 and H250 foam core materials were evaluated. A methodology to perform precracking on fracture specimens in order to achieve a sharp and representative crack front is outlined. The mixed mode loading was controlled in the mixed mode bending (MMB) test rig by changing the loading...

  6. Face age and sex modulate the other-race effect in face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Jennifer; Lipp, Ottmar V; Vanman, Eric J

    2012-11-01

    Faces convey a variety of socially relevant cues that have been shown to affect recognition, such as age, sex, and race, but few studies have examined the interactive effect of these cues. White participants of two distinct age groups were presented with faces that differed in race, age, and sex in a face recognition paradigm. Replicating the other-race effect, young participants recognized young own-race faces better than young other-race faces. However, recognition performance did not differ across old faces of different races (Experiments 1, 2A). In addition, participants showed an other-age effect, recognizing White young faces better than White old faces. Sex affected recognition performance only when age was not varied (Experiment 2B). Overall, older participants showed a similar recognition pattern (Experiment 3) as young participants, displaying an other-race effect for young, but not old, faces. However, they recognized young and old White faces on a similar level. These findings indicate that face cues interact to affect recognition performance such that age and sex information reliably modulate the effect of race cues. These results extend accounts of face recognition that explain recognition biases (such as the other-race effect) as a function of dichotomous ingroup/outgroup categorization, in that outgroup characteristics are not simply additive but interactively determine recognition performance.

  7. Suddenly I see! A developmental perspective on face processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Boomen, C.

    2014-01-01

    The central aim of this PhD thesis was to study typical development of visual mechanisms underlying face processing. Despite the importance of faces for interaction with the environment, little is known about the factors influencing the development of face processing. Perception of a face, and the u

  8. Behavior of two parallel symmetry permeable cracks in functionally graded piezoelectric materials subjected to an anti-plane shear loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of two parallel symmetry permeable cracks in functionally graded piezoelectric materials subjected to an anti-plane shear loading was investigated. To make the analysis tractable, it was assumed that the material properties varied exponentially with coordinate vertical to the crack. By using the Fourier transform, the problem could be solved with the help of two pairs of dual integral equations, in which the unknown variables were the jumps of the displacements across the crack surfaces. To solve the dual integral equations, the displacement on the crack surfaces expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. The normalized stress and electrical displacement intensity factors were determined for different geometric and property parameters for permeable electric boundary conditions. Numerical examples were provided to show the effect of the geometry of the interacting cracks and the functionally graded material parameter upon the stress intensity factors of cracks.

  9. The shear-stress intensity factor for a centrally cracked stiff-flanged shear web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    By use of the principle of superposition the stiff-flanged shear web is modeled mathematically by an infinite elastic strip with fixed longitudinal edges. The shear-stress intensity factor for a central longitudinal crack is calculated for various values of the ratio of strip width to crack length, h/a, in the range 0.1-10. The interaction of the crack with the boundaries is illustrated by boundary shear-stress distributions for three values of h/a. Some implications of the results for the design of damage-tolerant shear webs are discussed briefly.

  10. A numerical study of crack initiation in a bcc iron system based on dynamic bifurcation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiantao, E-mail: xli@math.psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    Crack initiation under dynamic loading conditions is studied under the framework of dynamic bifurcation theory. An atomistic model for BCC iron is considered to explicitly take into account the detailed molecular interactions. To understand the strain-rate dependence of the crack initiation process, we first obtain the bifurcation diagram from a computational procedure using continuation methods. The stability transition associated with a crack initiation, as well as the connection to the bifurcation diagram, is studied by comparing direct numerical results to the dynamic bifurcation theory [R. Haberman, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 37, 69–106 (1979)].

  11. Size Evolution of the Surface Short Fatigue Cracks of 1Cr18Ni9Ti Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Size evolution of the surface short fatigue cracks of 1Cr18Ni9Ti weld metal was investigated. A local viewpoint is applied to be agreement with a so-called "effectively short fatigue crack criterion". Attention was paid to the dominant effectively short fatigue crack (DESFC) initiation zone and the zones ahead of the DESFC tips. The results revealed that the evolutionary size shows a significant character of microstructural short crack (MSC) and physical short crack (PSC) stages. In the MSC stage, fatigue damage is due to mainly the initiation and irregular growth of the effectively short fatigue cracks (ESFCs). In the PSC stage, the damage is conversely due to mainly the DESFC growth and partially, the growth of the ESFCs and the coalescence of the ESFCs themselves with the DESFC. The process involves from a non-ordered/chaotic state in the initiation of MSC stage, gradually to an independently random state at the transition point between the MSC and PSC stages and then, to an ordered/history-dependent random state. Interactive effect of the collective cracks is stronger and shows an increase in the MSC stage. It reaches a maximum value at the transition point and then, tends to a decrease in the PSC stage. The DESFC acts as a result of the interactive cracks and thus, is deemed suitable to describe the behaviour of collective cracks.

  12. A Systems View of Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Beatrice; Messinger, Daniel; Bahrick, Lorraine E.; Margolis, Amy; Buck, Karen A.; Chen, Henian

    2016-01-01

    Principles of a dynamic, dyadic systems view of mother-infant face-to-face communication, which considers self- and interactive processes in relation to one another, were tested. The process of interaction across time in a large low-risk community sample at infant age 4 months was examined. Split-screen videotape was coded on a 1-s time base for…

  13. Subsidence crack closure: rate, magnitude and sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Graff, J.V.; Romesburg, H.C.

    1981-06-01

    Tension cracks are a major surface disturbance resulting from subsidence and differential settlement above underground coal mines. Recent engineering studies of subsidence indicate that cracks may close where tensile stresses causing the cracks are reduced or relaxed. This stress reduction occurs as mining in the area is completed. Crack closure was confirmed by a study in the Wasatch Plateau coal field of central Utah. Cracks occurred in both exposed bedrock and regolith in an area with maximum subsidence of 3 m. Mean closure rate was 0.3 cm per week with individual crack closure rates between 0.2 cm and 1.0 cm per week. The mean crack closure magnitude was 80% with closure magnitudes varying between 31% and 100%. Actual magnitude values ranged from 0.6 cm to 6.5 cm with a mean value of 3.8 cm. Statistical analysis compared width change status among cracks over time. It was found that: 1) a 41% probability existed that a crack would exhibit decreasing width per weekly measurement, 2) closure state sequences seem random over time, and 3) real differences in closure state sequence existed among different cracks. (6 refs.) (In English)

  14. Crack propagation in fracture mechanical graded structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schramm

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The focus of manufacturing is more and more on innovative and application-oriented products considering lightweight construction. Hence, especially functional graded materials come to the fore. Due to the application-matched functional material gradation different local demands such as absorbability, abrasion and fatigue of structures are met. However, the material gradation can also have a remarkable influence on the crack propagation behavior. Therefore, this paper examines how the crack propagation behavior changes when a crack grows through regions which are characterized by different fracture mechanical material properties (e.g. different threshold values KI,th, different fracture toughness KIC. In particular, the emphasis of this paper is on the beginning of stable crack propagation, the crack velocity, the crack propagation direction as well as on the occurrence of unstable crack growth under static as well as cyclic loading. In this context, the developed TSSR-concept is presented which allows the prediction of crack propagation in fracture mechanical graded structures considering the loading situation (Mode I, Mode II and plane Mixed Mode and the material gradation. In addition, results of experimental investigations for a mode I loading situation and numerical simulations of crack growth in such graded structures confirm the theoretical findings and clarify the influence of the material gradation on the crack propagation behavior.

  15. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-11-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  16. A Comparison of Learning Outcomes in Skills-Based Courses: Online versus Face-to-Face Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Ronda Roberts; Love, Mary Sue

    2016-01-01

    In comparing the learning outcomes of online versus face-to-face courses, skills-based forms of instruction have received little attention. This study asks the question "Can skills-based courses taught online achieve the same outcomes as face-to-face courses in which the instructor and students interacting in real time may have higher levels…

  17. Investigation of New Techniques for Face detection

    OpenAIRE

    Abdallah, Abdallah Sabry

    2007-01-01

    The task of detecting human faces within either a still image or a video frame is one of the most popular object detection problems. For the last twenty years researchers have shown great interest in this problem because it is an essential pre-processing stage for computing systems that process human faces as input data. Example applications include face recognition systems, vision systems for autonomous robots, human computer interaction systems (HCI), surveillance systems, biometric based a...

  18. Density functional investigation of metal-metal interactions in d4d4 face-shared [M2Cl9]3 - (M = Mn, Tc, Re) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavigliasso, Germán; Stranger, Robert

    2004-04-05

    The molecular and electronic structures of the d(4)d(4) face-shared [M(2)Cl(9)](3)(-) (M = Mn, Tc, Re) dimers have been calculated by density functional methods in order to investigate metal-metal bonding in this series. The electronic structures of these systems have been analyzed using potential energy curves for the broken-symmetry and other spin states arising from the various d(4)d(4) coupling modes, and closed energy cycles have been utilized to identify and quantify the parameters which are most important in determining the preference for electron localization or delocalization and for high-spin or low-spin configurations. In [Tc(2)Cl(9)](3)(-) and [Re(2)Cl(9)](3)(-), the global minimum has been found to be a spin-triplet state arising from the coupling of metal centers with low-spin configurations, and characterized by delocalization of the metal-based electrons in a double (sigma and delta(pi)) bond with a metal-metal separation of 2.57 A. In contrast, high-spin configurations and electron localization are favored in [Mn(2)Cl(9)](3)(-), the global minimum for this species being the ferromagnetic S = 4 state with a rather long metal-metal separation of 3.43 A. These results are consistent with metal-metal overlap and ligand-field effects prevailing over spin polarization effects in the Tc and Re systems, but with the opposite trend being observed in the Mn complex. The ground states and metal-metal bonding observed for the d(4)d(4) systems in this study parallel those previously found for the analogous d(2)d(2) complexes of V, Nb, and Ta, and can be rationalized on the basis that the d(4)d(4) dimer configuration is the hole equivalent of the d(2)d(2) configuration.

  19. Extraversion predicts individual differences in face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingguang; Tian, Moqian; Fang, Huizhen; Xu, Miao; Li, He; Liu, Jia

    2010-07-01

    In daily life, one of the most common social tasks we perform is to recognize faces. However, the relation between face recognition ability and social activities is largely unknown. Here we ask whether individuals with better social skills are also better at recognizing faces. We found that extraverts who have better social skills correctly recognized more faces than introverts. However, this advantage was absent when extraverts were asked to recognize non-social stimuli (e.g., flowers). In particular, the underlying facet that makes extraverts better face recognizers is the gregariousness facet that measures the degree of inter-personal interaction. In addition, the link between extraversion and face recognition ability was independent of general cognitive abilities. These findings provide the first evidence that links face recognition ability to our daily activity in social communication, supporting the hypothesis that extraverts are better at decoding social information than introverts.

  20. Aging and attentional biases for emotional faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Mara; Carstensen, Laura L

    2003-09-01

    We examined age differences in attention to and memory for faces expressing sadness, anger, and happiness. Participants saw a pair of faces, one emotional and one neutral, and then a dot probe that appeared in the location of one of the faces. In two experiments, older adults responded faster to the dot if it was presented on the same side as a neutral face than if it was presented on the same side as a negative face. Younger adults did not exhibit this attentional bias. Interactions of age and valence were also found for memory for the faces, with older adults remembering positive better than negative faces. These findings reveal that in their initial attention, older adults avoid negative information. This attentional bias is consistent with older adults' generally better emotional well-being and their tendency to remember negative less well than positive information.

  1. SEMI-ELLIPTIC SURFACE CRACK IN AN ELASTIC SOLID WITH FINITE SIZE UNDER IMPACT LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Ruiping; Liu Guanting; Fan Tianyou

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a semi-elliptic surface crack problem in an elastic solid of finite size under impact loading is investigated. An analysis is performed by means of fracture dynamics and the finite element method, and a three-dimensional finite element program is developed to compute the dynamic stress intensity factor. The results reveal that the effects of the solid's boundary surface, crack surface, material inertia and stress wave interactions play significant roles in dynamic fracture.

  2. Controlling fatigue crack paths for crack surface marking and growth investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is well known that fatigue crack growth in metals that display confined slip, such as high strength aluminium alloys, develop crack paths that are responsive to the loading direction and the local microstructural orientation, it is less well known that such paths are also responsive to the loading history. In these materials, certain loading sequences can produce highly directional slip bands ahead of the crack tip and by adjusting the sequence of loads, distinct fracture surface features or progression marks, even at very small crack depths can result. Investigating the path a crack selects in fatigue testing when particular combinations of constant and variable amplitude load sequences are applied is providing insight into crack growth. Further, it is possible to design load sequences that allow very small amounts of crack growth to be measured, at very small crack sizes, well below the conventional crack growth threshold in the aluminium alloy discussed here. This paper reports on observations of the crack path phenomenon and a novel test loading method for measuring crack growth rates for very small crack depths in aluminium alloy 7050-T7451 (an important aircraft primary structural material. The aim of this work was to firstly generate short- crack constant amplitude growth data and secondly, through the careful manipulation of the applied loading, to achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in the material being investigated. A particular focus of this work is the identification of the possible sources of crack growth retardation and closure in these small cracks. Interpreting these results suggests a possible mechanism for why small fatigue crack growth through this material under variable amplitude loading is faster than predicted from models based on constant amplitude data alone.

  3. Experimental and Numerical Study of Interface Crack Propagation in Foam Cored Sandwich Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Carl Christian; Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Borum, Kaj Kvisgård

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the prediction of debonding between core and face sheet in foam-cored sandwich structures. It describes the development, validation, and application of a FEM-based numerical model for the prediction of the propagation of debond damage. The structural mechanics is considered...... to be geometrically nonlinear while the local fracture mechanics problem is assumed to be linear. The presented numerical procedure for the local fracture mechanics is a further development of the crack surface displacement method, here denoted as the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. The considered...... application example is to tear off one of the face laminates from the sandwich. This configuration can be found in many applications but is considered here to be occurring in a ship structure, particularly at the hard spot where the superstructure meets the deck. Face tearing experiments are carried out...

  4. An experimental study on the effects of compressive stress on the fatigue crack growth of low-alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.P.; Hoppe, R.G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.; Hechmer, J.L. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Barberton, OH (United States); James, B.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy

    1993-12-01

    A series of fatigue crack growth rate tests was conducted in order to study effects of negative stress ratio on fatigue crack growth rate of low-alloy steel in air. Four-point bend specimens were used to simulate linear stress distributions typical of pressure vessel applications. This type of testing adds to knowledge on negative stress ratio effects for low-alloy steels obtained in the past from uniform tension-compression tests. Applied bending stress range was varied over twice the yield strength. Load control was used for tests for which the stress range was less than twice the yield strength and deflection control was used for the higher stress range tests. Crack geometries were both short and long fatigue cracks started at notches and tight fatigue cracks for which crack closure could occur over the full crack face. Results are presented in terms of the stress intensity factor ratio R = K{sub MIN}/K{sub MAX}. The negative R-ratio test results were correlated to an equation of the form da/dN = C[{Delta}K/(A-R)]{sup n}, where A, C, and n are curve fitting parameters. It was found that effects of negative R-ratio on fatigue crack growth rates for even the high stress range tests could be bounded by correlating the above equation to only positive R-ratio test results and extending the resulting equation into the negative R-ratio regime.

  5. Self-healing of cracks formed in Silicon-Aluminum anodes electrochemically cycled at high lithiation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sandeep; Alpas, Ahmet T.

    2016-10-01

    Lithiation-induced volume changes in Si result in fracture and fragmentation of Si anodes in Li-ion batteries. This paper reports the self-healing behaviour of cracks observed in micron-sized Si particles dispersed in a ductile Al matrix of a Si-Al electrode electrochemically cycled vs. Li/Li+ using a high lithiation rate of 15.6 C. Cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that an amorphous layer with a depth up to ∼100 nm was formed at the surface of Si particles. In-situ optical microscopy performed during electrochemical experiments revealed development of cracks in Si particles as the voltage decreased to 0.02 V during lithiation. Self-healing of cracks in Si particles occurred in two steps: i) arresting of the crack growth at the Si/Al interface as the surrounding Al matrix had a higher fracture toughness and thus acted as a barrier to crack propagation, and ii) closure of cracks due to compressive stresses applied to the crack faces by the amorphous zones formed on each side of the crack paths.

  6. Mode Ⅱ fracture analysis of double edge cracked circular disk subjected to different diametral compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈枫; 曹平; 饶秋华; 徐纪成

    2004-01-01

    A detailed analysis of mode Ⅱ stress intensity factors(SIFs) for the double edge cracked Brazilian disk subjected to different diametral compression is presented using a weight function method. The mode Ⅱ SIFs at crack tips can be obtained by simply calculating an integral of the product of mode Ⅱ weight function and the shear stress on the prospective crack faces of uncracked disk loaded by a diametral compression. A semi-analytical formula for the calculation of normalized mode Ⅱ SIF, fⅡ , is derived for different crack lengths (from 0. 1 to 0.7) and inclination angles (from 10° to 75°) with respect to loading direction. Comparison between the obtained results and finite element method solutions shows that the weight function method is of high precision. Combined with the authors' previous work on mode Ⅰ fracture analysis, the new specimen geometry can be used to study fracture through any combination of mode Ⅰ and mode Ⅱ loading by a simple alignment of the crack relative to the diameter of compression loading, and to obtain pure mode Ⅱ crack extension. Another advantage of this specimen geometry is that it is available directly from rock core and is also easy to fabricate.

  7. Online Bridge Crack Monitoring with Smart Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benniu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed.

  8. Air flow through smooth and rough cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kula, H.-G.; Sharples, S. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Building Science

    1994-12-31

    A series of laboratory experiments are described which investigated the effect of surface roughness on the air flow characteristics of simple, straight-through, no-bend cracks with smooth and rough internal surfaces. The crack thicknesses used in the study were 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0mm. The crack lengths, in the direction of flow, were 50.8mm and 76.2mm. For the rough cracks the roughness was simulated with two different grades of commercially available energy-cloth (grade 60 and 100). The experimental results were satisfactorily fitted to a quadratic relationship between {Delta}p and Q of the form {Delta}p = AQ + BQ{sup 2} for both the smooth and rough crack data. The effect of roughness on the reduction of air flowing through a crack is also discussed. (author)

  9. Crack problem in a long cylindrical superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He; Zeng, Jun

    2008-12-01

    In this work, the general problem of a center crack in a long cylindrical superconductor is studied. The dependence of the stress intensity factor on the parameters, including the crack length and the applied field, is investigated. We presented a simple model in which the effect of the crack on the critical current is taken into account. It is assumed that the crack forms a perfect barrier to the flow of current. The Bean model and the Kim model are considered for the critical state. Based on the complex potential and boundary collocation methods, the stress intensity factor under the magnetic field is obtained for a long cylindrical superconductor containing a central crack. The results show that the crack length and the applied field have significant effects on the fracture behavior of the superconductor.

  10. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...... is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...

  11. HYDROGEN INDUCED CRACKING IN MICROALLOYED STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duberney Hincapie-Ladino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for microalloyed steels resistant to harsh environments in oil and gas fields, such as pre-salt which contain considerable amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S and carbon dioxide (CO2 , requires that all sectors involved in petroleum industry know the factors that influence the processes of corrosion and failures by hydrogen in pipelines and components fabricated with microalloyed steels. This text was prepared from a collection of selected publications and research done at the Electrochemical Processes Laboratory of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Polytechnic School, São Paulo University. This document does not intend to be a complete or exhaustive review of the literature, but rather to address the main scientific and technological factors associated with failures by hydrogen in the presence of wet hydrogen sulfide (H2 S, particularly, when related to the Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC phenomenon. This complex phenomenon that involves several successive stages, HIC phenomena were discussed in terms of environmental and metallurgical variables. The HIC starts with the process of corrosion of steel, therefore must be considered the corrosive media (H2 S presence effect. Moreover, it is necessary to know the interactions of compounds present in the electrolyte with the metal surface, and how they affect the hydrogen adsorption and absorption into steel. The following stages are hydrogen diffusion, trapping and metal cracking, directly related to the chemical composition and the microstructure, factors that depend strongly on the manufacture of steel. The purpose of this paper is to provide the scientific information about the failures caused by hydrogen and challenge for the Oil and Gas Pipeline Industry.

  12. On the use of a woven mat to control the crack path in composite sandwich structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2008-01-01

    is separation of face and core (debonding). Debonds can arise as a result of defects from production when an area between face and core has not been primed sufficiently resulting in a lack of adhesion. In use, impact loading, e.g. due to collision with objects, can result in formation of a debond crack....... Whether or not kinking occurs is governed by the stress state at the crack tip, e.g. described by the mode-mixity of the complex stress intensity factor and the properties of the face, core and adhesive [3]. The criticality of an existing crack can be highly dependent on the crack propagation path, since...... cantilever beam specimen loaded by unequal bending moments (DCB-UBM specimen) [6, 7], see Figure 2. The specimen is loaded by a roller-wire system mounted in a tensile test machine. The ratio between the two applied moments (M1/M2) is dictated by the ratio between roller distances (I1/I2), see Figure 2...

  13. Neural Correlate of the Thatcher Face Illusion in a Monkey Face-Selective Patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Jessica; Van Belle, Goedele; Vanduffel, Wim; Rossion, Bruno; Vogels, Rufin

    2015-07-01

    Compelling evidence that our sensitivity to facial structure is conserved across the primate order comes from studies of the "Thatcher face illusion": humans and monkeys notice changes in the orientation of facial features (e.g., the eyes) only when faces are upright, not when faces are upside down. Although it is presumed that face perception in primates depends on face-selective neurons in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex, it is not known whether these neurons respond differentially to upright faces with inverted features. Using microelectrodes guided by functional MRI mapping, we recorded cell responses in three regions of monkey IT cortex. We report an interaction in the middle lateral face patch (ML) between the global orientation of a face and the local orientation of its eyes, a response profile consistent with the perception of the Thatcher illusion. This increased sensitivity to eye orientation in upright faces resisted changes in screen location and was not found among face-selective neurons in other areas of IT cortex, including neurons in another face-selective region, the anterior lateral face patch. We conclude that the Thatcher face illusion is correlated with a pattern of activity in the ML that encodes faces according to a flexible holistic template.

  14. DBEM crack propagation for nonlinear fracture problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Citarella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional crack propagation simulation is performed by the Dual Boundary Element Method (DBEM. The Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs along the front of a semi elliptical crack, initiated from the external surface of a hollow axle, are calculated for bending and press fit loading separately and for a combination of them. In correspondence of the latter loading condition, a crack propagation is also simulated, with the crack growth rates calculated using the NASGRO3 formula, calibrated for the material under analysis (steel ASTM A469. The J-integral and COD approaches are selected for SIFs calculation in DBEM environment, where the crack path is assessed by the minimum strain energy density criterion (MSED. In correspondence of the initial crack scenario, SIFs along the crack front are also calculated by the Finite Element (FE code ZENCRACK, using COD, in order to provide, by a cross comparison with DBEM, an assessment on the level of accuracy obtained. Due to the symmetry of the bending problem a pure mode I crack propagation is realised with no kinking of the propagating crack whereas for press fit loading the crack propagation becomes mixed mode. The crack growth analysis is nonlinear because of normal gap elements used to model the press fit condition with added friction, and is developed in an iterative-incremental procedure. From the analysis of the SIFs results related to the initial cracked configuration, it is possible to assess the impact of the press fit condition when superimposed to the bending load case.

  15. Transition from Multiple Macro-Cracking to Multiple Micro-Cracking in Cementitious Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; LENG Bing

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the possibility of transition from multiple macro-cracking to multiple micro-cracking in cementitious composites.Conventional polyvinyl alcohol fiber reinforced cementitious composites normally exhibit macroscopic strain-hardening and multiple cracking after the first cracks appear.However,the individual crack width at the saturated stage is normally 60 to 80 μm.In the current study,the effect of fine aggregate size on the cracking performance,especially the individual crack width in the strain-hardening stage was studied by bending tests.The results show that the individual crack widths can be reduced from 60-80 μm to 10-30 μm by modifying the particle size of the fine aggregates used in the composites.

  16. Design of the Face/Core Interface for Improved Fracture Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the face/core fracture behavior of sandwich specimens with different designs. The traditional interface with a quadraxial mat directly adhered to the foam core is compared to interfaces where an additional mat with randomly oriented fibers is inserted between core and face....... The extra mat affects the crack propagation path in the sandwich specimen, and makes it more likely for the crack to propagate at or near the interface, instead of kinking into the laminate or core. Further, the extra mat acts as a source for fiber bridging, and hereby the fracture resistance is increased...... as bridging fibers shield the crack tip from the loading. Results show that the increase in fracture resistance due to fiber bridging is significant. Cohesive laws regarding cracking of sandwich interfaces are extracted....

  17. Fatigue Crack Closure Analysis Using Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, William P.; Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue crack closure during crack growth testing is analyzed in order to evaluate the critieria of ASTM Standard E647 for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates. Of specific concern is remote closure, which occurs away from the crack tip and is a product of the load history during crack-driving-force-reduction fatigue crack growth testing. Crack closure behavior is characterized using relative displacements determined from a series of high-magnification digital images acquired as the crack is loaded. Changes in the relative displacements of features on opposite sides of the crack are used to generate crack closure data as a function of crack wake position. For the results presented in this paper, remote closure did not affect fatigue crack growth rate measurements when ASTM Standard E647 was strictly followed and only became a problem when testing parameters (e.g., load shed rate, initial crack driving force, etc.) greatly exceeded the guidelines of the accepted standard.

  18. Managing forests, water resources and their interaction in the face of increasing drought frequency and severity in semi-arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tague, C.; Moritz, M.

    2016-12-01

    Drought and in particular high-temperature droughts are increasingly a concern in semi-arid climates through the globe. Within these regions both forest health and water resources are highly sensitive to the severity and frequency of drought. Drought conditions reduce streamflow, but also water availability and in the case of high temperature drought, water demand for terrestrial ecosystems. Hydrologic and ecosystem responses are coupled since changes in water use by terrestrial ecosystems can in turn influence the impact of drought on downslope streamflow. Further the impact of drought on forest structure, via declines in productivity, increases in fire and mortality and ultimately species change can have longer-term impacts on streamflow, even after precipitation and temperature regimes return to more normal conditions. We argue that accounting for multi-year and coupled ecohydrologic post-drought impacts is an important component of assessing ecosystem health and water resource impacts of droughts in a changing climate. A multi-year, coupled perspective is also important for the strategic allocation of forest management practices, including fuel treatments that may be targeted for reducing the impact of droughts. We utilize a coupled eco-hydrologic model, combined with field measurements from the Sierra Critical Zone Observatory and elsewhere to show how forest structural changes can be a dominant control on streamflow responses, particularly in years following drought and show how forest management practices can interact with drought vulnerability in sometimes surprising ways. We conclude by presenting an approach for rapid assessment of location specific drought vulnerability and management impacts that takes these interactions into account.

  19. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , and body temperature decreased appetite and less need for sleep feelings of restlessness, ... effects include: gangrene in the bowels resulting from decreased blood ... chest pain reduced appetite, plus health problems associated with not eating a ...

  20. SPIRALING CRACKS IN THIN SHEETS

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    En este trabajo de tesis presentamos dos experimentos en que trayectorias de fracturas sumamente reproducibles son obtenidas en láminas delgadas frágiles. En ambos casos, a partir de configuraciones iniciales sumamente simples y pequeñas, las trayectorias obtenidas son espirales logarítmicas de gran tamao. Nuestro primer experimento consiste en un crack que se inicia desde un corte recto hecho en una lámina delgada y que es forzado a propagarse por medio de empujar con un objeto sólido....

  1. Fatigue Crack Closure - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    gauge along the crack line. They used CCT speci- mens of high tensile strength steel ( HY80 ). The measured value of U was found to be a minimum at the...ultrasonic surface wave technique on 12.5mm thick specimens of 2024-T851, 2024-T351, Al 2219, Ti-6AI-4V and 17-4 PH steel . Most of the results were...medium and high strength steels . Exami- nation of the fracture surfaces suggested that raising the mean stress in low fracture toughness steels could

  2. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-xiao Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil.

  3. Wettability Induced Crack Dynamics and Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Udita Uday; Bhandari, Aditya Bikram; Chakraborty, Suman; DasGupta, Sunando

    2014-01-01

    Substrate wettability alteration induced control over crack formation process in thin colloidal films has been addressed in the present study. Colloidal nanosuspension (53nm, mean particle diameter) droplets have been subjected to natural drying to outline the effects of substrate surface energies over the dry-out characteristics with emphasis on crack dynamics, crack morphology and underlying particle arrangements. Experimental findings indicate that number of cracks formed decreases with increase in substrate hydrophobicity. These physical phenomena have been explained based on the magnitude of stress dissipation incurred by the substrate. DLVO predictions are also found to be in tune with the reported experimental investigations.

  4. Crack depth determination with inductive thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald-Tranta, B.; Schmidt, R.

    2015-05-01

    Castings, forgings and other steel products are nowadays usually tested with magnetic particle inspection, in order to detect surface cracks. An alternative method is active thermography with inductive heating, which is quicker, it can be well automated and as in this paper presented, even the depth of a crack can be estimated. The induced eddy current, due to its very small penetration depth in ferro-magnetic materials, flows around a surface crack, heating this selectively. The surface temperature is recorded during and after the short inductive heating pulse with an infrared camera. Using Fourier transformation the whole IR image sequence is evaluated and the phase image is processed to detect surface cracks. The level and the local distribution of the phase around a crack correspond to its depth. Analytical calculations were used to model the signal distribution around cracks with different depth and a relationship has been derived between the depth of a crack and its phase value. Additionally, also the influence of the heating pulse duration has been investigated. Samples with artificial and with natural cracks have been tested. Results are presented comparing the calculated and measured phase values depending on the crack depth. Keywords: inductive heating, eddy current, infrared

  5. Fatigue crack growth detect, assess, avoid

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, Hans Albert

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a concise introduction to fatigue crack growth, based on practical examples. It discusses the essential concepts of fracture mechanics, fatigue crack growth under constant and variable amplitude loading and the determination of the fracture-mechanical material parameters. The book also introduces the analytical and numerical simulation of fatigue crack growth as well as crack initiation. It concludes with a detailed description of several practical case studies and some exercises. The target group includes graduate students, researchers at universities and practicing engineers.

  6. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  7. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Chatarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and shrinkage mechanism was studied in concrete micro structure. Open traffic make hydration process occur under vibration; therefore, fresh concrete was compressed and tensioned alternately since beginning. High temperature together with compression, cement dissociation, the growth of Ca2+ at very early age leads abnormal swelling. No prevention from outside water movement leads hydration process occur with limited water which caused spreads fine cracks. Limited water improves shrinkage and plastic phase becomes shorter; therefore, rigid pavement can’t accommodate the abnormal swelling and shrinking alternately and creates the spread of cracks. Discontinuing casting the concrete makes both mix under different condition, the first is shrink and the second is swell and creates weak line on the border; so, the cracks appear as cracks across the road.

  8. Crack spacing of unsaturated soils in the critical state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN JiChao; WANG GuangQian; SUN QiCheng

    2009-01-01

    The cracking mechanism of unsaturated soils due to evaporation is poorly understood, and the magnitude of crack spacing is usually hard to estimate. In this work, cracks were postulated to occur suc-cedently rather than simultaneously, that is, secondary cracks appear after primary cracks as evaporation continues. Formulae of the secondary crack spacing and secondary trend crack spacing were then derived after stress analysis. The calculated spacing values were consistent with the published experimental data. Meanwhile, the effect of the Poisson ratio on the crack spacing was analyzed, which showed that the magnitude of crack spacing was proportional to the Poisson ratio in the range of [0.30,0.35].

  9. On the application of cohesive crack modeling in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe;

    2007-01-01

    Cohesive crack models-in particular the Fictitious Crack Model - are applied routinely in the analysis of crack propagation in concrete and mortar. Bridged crack models-where cohesive stresses are assumed to exist together with a stress singularity at the crack tip-on the other hand, are used....... Further, a quantitative condition is established indicating when a bridged crack model can be approximated with a cohesive crack model with smooth crack closure in terms of the ratio between the energy dissipation associated with the crack tip and the process zone....

  10. Effect of Crack Closure on Ultrasonic Detection of Fatigue Cracks at Fastener Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, S. J.; Harding, C. A.; Hugo, G. R.

    2009-03-01

    The ultrasonic response from closed fatigue cracks grown in aluminium alloy specimens using a representative aircraft spectrum loading has been characterised as a function of tensile applied load using pulse-echo 45° shear-wave ultrasonic C-scans with focused immersion transducers. Observed trends with crack size and applied load are described and compared to results for artificial machined defects. The results demonstrate that crack closure significantly reduces the ultrasonic response compared to open cracks or machined defects.

  11. Analysis of a permeable interface crack in elastic dielectric/piezoelectric bimaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Li; Yiheng Chen

    2007-01-01

    A permeable interface crack between elastic dielectric material and piezoelectric material is studied based on the extended Stroh's formalism. Motivated by strong engi-neering demands to design new composite materials, the authors perform numerical analysis of interface crack tip sin-gularities and the crack tip energy release rates for 35 types of dissimilar bimaterials, respectively, which are constructed by five kinds of elastic dielectric materials: Epoxy, Poly-mer, A1203, SiC, and Si3N4 and seven kinds of practical piezoelectric ceramics: PZT-4, BaTiO3, PZT-5H, PZT-6B,PZT-7A, P-7, and PZT-PIC 151, respectively. The elastic dielectric material with much smaller permittivity than com-mercial piezoelectric ceramics is treated as a special trans-versely isotropic piezoelectric material with extremely small piezoelectricity. The present investigation shows that the structure of the singular field near the permeable interface crack tip consists of three singularities: r-1/2±iε and r-1/2,which is quite different from that in the impermeable inter-face crack. It can be concluded that different far field load-ing cases have significant influence on the near-tip fracture behaviors of the permeable interface crack. Based on the present theoretical treatment and numerical analysis, the elec-tric field induced crack growth is well explained, which pro-vides a better understanding of the failure mechanism induced from interface crack growth in elastic dielectric/piezoelectric bimaterials.

  12. Extended propagation model for interfacial crack in composite material structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫相桥; 冯希金

    2002-01-01

    An interfacial crack is a common damage in a composite material structure . An extended propaga-tion model has been established for an interfacial crack to study the dependence of crack growth on the relativesizes of energy release rates at left and right crack tips and the properties of interfacial material characterize thegrowth of interfacial crack better.

  13. Prosopagnosia when all faces look the same

    CERN Document Server

    Rivolta, Davide

    2014-01-01

    This book provides readers with a simplified and comprehensive account of the cognitive and neural bases of face perception in humans. Faces are ubiquitous in our environment and we rely on them during social interactions. The human face processing system allows us to extract information about the identity, gender, age, mood, race, attractiveness and approachability of other people in about a fraction of a second, just by glancing at their faces.  By introducing readers to the most relevant research on face recognition, this book seeks to answer the questions: “Why are humans so fast at recognizing faces?”, “Why are humans so efficient at recognizing faces?”, “Do faces represent a particular category for the human visual system?”, What makes face perception in humans so special?, “Can our face recognition system fail”?  This book presents the author’s findings on face perception during his research studies on both normal subjects and subjects with prosopagnosia, a neurological disorder cha...

  14. Item Nonresponse in Face-to-Face Interviews with Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haunberger Sigrid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined item nonresponse and its respondent and interviewer correlates by means of a population-based, panel survey of children aged 8 to 11 who were surveyed using standardised, face-to-face interviews. Using multilevel, logistic analyses with cross-level interactions, this article aims to examine which effects of item nonresponse are subject to children as respondents or to the interviewers and the interview setting. Depending on the type of question, we found different effects for respondent and interviewer variables, as well as interaction effects between child age/interviewer age as well as child gender/interviewer gender. However, interviewer variance is for the most part not significant.

  15. Chloride Penetration through Cracks in High-Performance Concrete and Surface Treatment System for Crack Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For enhancing the service life of concrete structures, it is very important to minimize crack at surface. Even if these cracks are very small, the problem is to which extend these cracks may jeopardize the durability of these decks. It was proposed that crack depth corresponding with critical crack width from the surface is a crucial factor in view of durability design of concrete structures. It was necessary to deal with chloride penetration through microcracks characterized with the mixing features of concrete. This study is devoted to examine the effect of high strength concrete and reinforcement of steel fiber on chloride penetration through cracks. High strength concrete is regarded as an excellent barrier to resist chloride penetration. However, durability performance of cracked high strength concrete was reduced seriously up to that of ordinary cracked concrete. Steel fiber reinforcement is effective to reduce chloride penetration through cracks because steel fiber reinforcement can lead to reduce crack depth significantly. Meanwhile, surface treatment systems are put on the surface of the concrete in order to seal the concrete. The key-issue is to which extend a sealing is able to ensure that chloride-induced corrosion can be prevented. As a result, penetrant cannot cure cracks, however, coating and combined treatment can prevent chloride from flowing in concrete with maximum crack width of 0.06 mm and 0.08 mm, respectively.

  16. On fatigue crack growth in ductile materials by crack-tip blunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    One of the basic mechanisms for fatigue crack growth in ductile metals is that depending on crack-tip blunting under tensile loads and re-sharpening of the crack-tip during unloading. In a standard numerical analysis accounting for finite strains it is not possible to follow this process during...

  17. DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF TWO COLLINEAR PERMEABLE CRACKS IN A PIEZOELECTRIC LAYER BONDED TO TWO HALF SPACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of two collinear cracks in a piezoelectric layer bonded to two half spaces under harmonic anti-plane shear waves was investigated by means of Schmidt method. The cracks are vertically to the interfaces of the piezoelectric layer.The boundary conditions of the electrical field were assumed to be the permeable crack surface. By using the Fourier transform, the problem can be solved with the help of two pairs of triple integral equations. Numerical examples were presented to show the effect of the geometry of the interacting cracks, the piezoelectric constants of the materials and the frequency of the incident waves upon the stress intensity factors. The results show that the dynamic field will impede or enhance the propagation of the crack in a piezoelectric material at different stages of the frequency of the incident waves. It is found that the electric displacement intensity factors for the permeable crack surface conditions are much smaller than that for the impermeable crack surface conditions.

  18. Mechanism of fracture in macro- and micro-scales in hollow centre cracked disc specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Eftekhari; A. Baghbanan; H. Hashemolhosseini; H. Amrollahi

    2015-01-01

    The hollow centre cracked disc (HCCD) specimen is one of the suggested alternative methods for determining the fracture toughness of rock. This work aims to investigate the fracture mechanism in HCCD in macro- and micro-scales using numerical methods, extended finite element method (X-FEM) and particle flow code (PFC) modeling, respectively. In the X-FEM, heaviside and near-tip enrichment functions are employed to consider the presence of the crack in the model. In PFC modeling the movement and interaction of stressed assemblies of rigid spherical particles are modeled using the distinct element method (DEM). A numerical code called MEX-FEM based on XFEM has been developed to simulate the problems involving crack. The models of pure modes I and II in macro-scale are simulated in micro-scale. The results show that dimensionless stress intensity factors (YI,YI) for pure modes I and II increase by increasing the crack length ratio. The angle at which the pure mode II occurs decreases by increasing the crack length ratio. In mixed mode I-II, The value ofYI decreases by increasing the crack angle, while the value ofYI increases to a given crack angle and then it decreases. Moreover, the fracture in micro-scale, unlike the macro-scale, includes a combination of different modes of fracturing.

  19. Mechanism of fracture in macro- and micro-scales in hollow centre cracked disc specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Eftekhari; A.Baghbanan; H.Hashemolhosseini; H.Amrollahi

    2015-01-01

    The hollow centre cracked disc(HCCD) specimen is one of the suggested alternative methods for determining the fracture toughness of rock. This work aims to investigate the fracture mechanism in HCCD in macro- and micro-scales using numerical methods, extended finite element method(X-FEM) and particle flow code(PFC) modeling, respectively. In the X-FEM, heaviside and near-tip enrichment functions are employed to consider the presence of the crack in the model. In PFC modeling the movement and interaction of stressed assemblies of rigid spherical particles are modeled using the distinct element method(DEM). A numerical code called MEX-FEM based on XFEM has been developed to simulate the problems involving crack. The models of pure modes I and Ⅱ in macro-scale are simulated in micro-scale. The results show that dimensionless stress intensity factors(YI, YⅡ) for pure modes I and Ⅱ increase by increasing the crack length ratio. The angle at which the pure mode Ⅱ occurs decreases by increasing the crack length ratio. In mixed mode I-Ⅱ, The value of YI decreases by increasing the crack angle, while the value of YⅡ increases to a given crack angle and then it decreases. Moreover, the fracture in micro-scale, unlike the macro-scale, includes a combination of different modes of fracturing.

  20. K{sub I}-T estimation for embedded flaws in pipes - Part II: Circumferentially oriented cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Xudong, E-mail: cveqx@nus.edu.s [Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2010-04-15

    This paper, in parallel to the investigation on axially embedded cracks reported in the companion paper, presents a numerical study on the linear-elastic K{sub I} and T-stress values over the front of elliptical cracks circumferentially embedded in the wall of a pipe/cylindrical structure, under a uniform pressure applied on the inner surface of the pipe. The numerical procedure employs the interaction-integral approach to compute the linear-elastic stress-intensity factor (SIF) K{sub I} and T-stress values for embedded cracks with practical sizes at different locations in the wall of the pipe. The parametric study covers a wide range of geometric parameters for embedded cracks in the pipe, including: the wall thickness to the inner radius ratio (t/R{sub i}), the crack depth over the wall thickness ratio (a/t), the crack aspect ratio (a/c) and the ratio of the distance from the centerline of the crack to the outer surface of the pipe over the pipe wall thickness (e{sub M}/t). The parametric investigation identifies a significant effect of the remaining ligament length on both the T-stress and K{sub I} values at the crack-front location (denoted by point O) nearest to the outer surface of the pipe and at the crack-front location (denoted by point I) nearest to the inner surface of the pipe. The numerical investigation establishes the database to derive approximate functions from a nonlinear curve-fitting procedure to predict the T-stress and K{sub I} values at three critical front locations of the circumferentially embedded crack in a pipe: points O, I and M. The proposed T-stress and K{sub I} functions utilize a combined second-order polynomial and a power-law expression, which presents a close agreement with the T-stress and K{sub I} values computed from the very detailed finite element models. The comparison between the circumferentially embedded crack and the axially embedded crack indicates that both the T-stress and K{sub I} values at crack-front points O and

  1. About (above) a face - a face

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This text intents to unfold some considerations regardind the perception of the image of the Lóri’s face, from the book Uma aprendizagem ou o livro dos prazeres, published by Clarice Lispector in 1969. For that, will be studied the politicians devices who involve the apprehension of the face as a qualifying of the subject and, at the same time, its relation with the lenguage.

  2. About (above a face - a face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cervelin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This text intents to unfold some considerations regardind the perception of the image of the Lóri’s face, from the book Uma aprendizagem ou o livro dos prazeres, published by Clarice Lispector in 1969. For that, will be studied the politicians devices who involve the apprehension of the face as a qualifying of the subject and, at the same time, its relation with the lenguage.

  3. A Creaking and Cracking Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurschou Hviid, Stubbe; Hüttig, Christian; Groussin, Olivier; Mottola, Stefano; Keller, Horst Uwe; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    Since the middle of 2014 the OSIRIS cameras on the ESA Rosetta mission have been monitoring the evolution of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it passed through perihelion. During the perihelion passage several change events have been observed on the nucleus surface. For example existing large scale cracks have expanded and new large scale cracks have been created. Also several large scale "wave pattern" like change events have been observed in the Imhotep and Hapi regions. These are events not directly correlated with any normal visible cometary activity. One interpretation is that these are events likely caused by "seismic" activity. The seismic activity is created by the self-gravity stress of the non-spherical comet nucleus and stress created by the non-gravitational forces acting on the comet. The non-gravitational forces are changing the rotation period of the comet (~20min/perihelion passage) which induces a changing mechanical stress pattern through the perihelion passage. Also the diurnal cycle with its changing activity pattern is causing a periodic wobble in the stress pattern that can act as a trigger for a comet quake. The stress pattern has been modeled using a finite element model that includes self-gravity, the comet spin and the non-gravitational forces based on a cometary activity model. This paper will discuss what can be learned about the comet nucleus structure and about the cometary material properties from these events and from the FEM model.

  4. What can cracked polymer do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Kexin; Zhou, Chuanhong; Kohli, Punit; Poudel, Anish; Chu, Tsuchin

    2015-03-01

    Buckling, delamination, and cracking are very well known phenomenon observed in most thin films. They were theoretically explained by the existence of mechanical instability due to the residue stress generated when a thin film is deposited on substrates or undergoing environmental stimulus. Buckled structures at micro- or nano-scale have been of great interests and have been used extensively in many applications including particles self-assembling, surface wettability modification, and micro-electronic device fabrication. However, peeling of a layer from a substrate due to delamination or fractures on a thin film due to cracking is mostly taken as an undesirable result. Therefore, strategies are inspired for preventing or removing these often undesired structures. We found that after being heated above its decomposition temperature and then cooled to room temperature, a PDMS thin film showed micro-fibers of 100 μm width and up to 1.5 cm in length. By studying the formation mechanism, control of the dimensions and of the growth pattern on a substrate for PDMS micro-fibers were realized. Giving credit to their high flexibility and optical transparency, a PDMS micro-fiber were utilized in high resolution near field imaging achieved by attaching a micro-lens on the fiber. Interestingly, a surface covered by PDMS micro-fibers will turn from superhydrophobic into superhydrophilic by further heating providing potential applications in surface wettability modification. In future, we will investigate and simulate the growth of PDMS micro-fiber and look for more possible applications.

  5. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  6. Axisymmetric planar cracks in finite hollow cylinders of transversely isotropic material: Part II—cutting method for finite cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourseifi, M.; Faal, R. T.; Asadi, E.

    2017-06-01

    This paper is the outcome of a companion part I paper allocated to finite hollow cylinders of transversely isotropic material. The paper provides the solution for the crack tip stress intensity factors of a system of coaxial axisymmetric planar cracks in a transversely isotropic finite hollow cylinder. The lateral surfaces of the hollow cylinder are under two inner and outer self-equilibrating distributed shear loadings. First, the stress fields due to these loadings are given for both infinite and finite cylinders. In the next step, the state of stress in an infinite hollow cylinder with transversely isotropic material containing axisymmetric prismatic and radial dislocations is extracted from part I paper. Next, using the distributed dislocation technique, the mixed mode crack problem in finite cylinder is reduced to Cauchy-type singular integral equations for dislocation densities on the surfaces of the cracks. The problem of a cracked finite hollow cylinder is treated by cutting method; i.e., the infinite cylinder is cut to a finite one by slicing it using two annular axisymmetric cracks at its ends. The cutting method is validated by comparing the state of stress of a sliced intact infinite cylinder with that of an intact finite cylinder. The paper is furnished to several examples to study the effect of crack type and location in finite cylinders on the ensuing stress intensity factors of the cracks and the interaction between the cracks.

  7. Conservation of the biochemical properties of IncA from Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia caviae: oligomerization of IncA mediates interaction between facing membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delevoye, Cédric; Nilges, Michael; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Subtil, Agathe

    2004-11-05

    The developmental cycle of Chlamydiaceae occurs in a membrane compartment called an inclusion. IncA is a member of a family of proteins synthesized and secreted onto the inclusion membrane by bacteria. IncA proteins from different species of Chlamydiaceae show little sequence similarity. We report that the biochemical properties of Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia caviae are conserved. Both proteins self-associate to form multimers. When artificially expressed by the host cell, they localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. Strikingly, heterologous expression of IncA in the endoplasmic reticulum completely inhibits concomitant inclusion development. Using truncated forms of IncA from C. caviae, we show that expression of the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the protein at the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum is sufficient to disrupt the bacterial developmental cycle. On the other hand, development of a C. trachomatis strain that does not express IncA is not inhibited by artificial IncA expression, showing that the disruptive effect observed with the wild-type strain requires direct interactions between IncA molecules at the inclusion and on the endoplasmic reticulum. Finally, we modeled IncA tetramers in parallel four helix bundles based on the structure of the SNARE complex, a conserved structure involved in membrane fusion in eukaryotic cells. Both C. trachomatis and C. caviae IncA tetramers were highly stable in this model. In conclusion, we show that the property of IncA proteins to assemble into multimeric structures is conserved between chlamydial species, and we propose that these proteins may have co-evolved with the SNARE machinery for a role in membrane fusion.

  8. Development of crack shape: LBB methodology for cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.; Chapuliot, S.; Drubay, B. [Commissariat a l Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1997-04-01

    For structures like vessels or pipes containing a fluid, the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment requires to demonstrate that it is possible, during the lifetime of the component, to detect a rate of leakage due to a possible defect, the growth of which would result in a leak before-break of the component. This LBB assessment could be an important contribution to the overall structural integrity argument for many components. The aim of this paper is to review some practices used for LBB assessment and to describe how some new R & D results have been used to provide a simplified approach of fracture mechanics analysis and especially the evaluation of crack shape and size during the lifetime of the component.

  9. CFD SIMULATION OF FLUID CATALYTIC CRACKING IN DOWNER REACTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Liu; Fei Wei; Yu Zheng; Yong Jin

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for the simulation of gas-particle flow and fluid catalytic cracking in downer reactors. The model takes into account both cracking reaction and flow behavior through a four-lump reaction kinetics coupled with two-phase turbulent flow. The prediction results show that the relatively large change of gas velocity affects directly the axial distribution of solids velocity and void fraction, which significantly interact with the chemical reaction. Furthermore, model simulations are carried out to determine the effects of such parameters on product yields, as bed diameter, reaction temperature and the ratio of catalyst to oil, which are helpful for optimizing the yields of desired products. The model equations are coded and solved on CFX4.4.

  10. Sub-wavelength resolution of cracks in metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amireddy, Kiran Kumar; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, various types of acoustic metamaterials have been proposed with capabilities for overcoming the diffraction limit. However, typically such developments only consider the acoustic regime or imaging in liquid media. In this paper we show the application of a holey structured metamaterial lens for sub-wavelength imaging of defects in a metallic sample, in the ultrasonic regime. Finite Element (FE) simulations are used to study longitudinal wave interaction with ideal cracks in isotropic elastic materials. Holey-structured meta-lenses are then used to transmit the scattered waves. We present a super resolution of λ/7 with a subwavelength crack in an aluminium sample, which to the best of our knowledge this is the highest resolution achieved in the ultrasonic regime.

  11. Iodine induced stress corrosion of zirconium and zircaloy-4 mechanisms. Translation to pellet cladding interaction conditions in PWR type reactors; Mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte par l`iode dans le zirconium et le zircaloy-4. Transposition aux conditions d`interaction pastille-gaine dans les reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fregonese, M

    1997-10-08

    This thesis is linked to the study of the Pellet-Cladding Interaction (PCI) phenomenon in Pressurized Water Reactors, which can lead to cladding rupture by iodine Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy-4. Results are obtained through slow tensile tests performed in iodine methanol and in iodine vapour, on reference material, neutron irradiated material, and iodine zirconium implanted material. They allow to propose an explanation of the rapidity of the ruptures observed during PCI loadings, and to make the link between laboratory SCC tests and power ramp tests. Indeed, neutron irradiation facilitates the initiation and the transgranular propagation steps of the SCC cracks, due to strain localization and hardening associated to the presence of irradiation defects. On the other hand, recoiled iodine does not seem to affect SCC susceptibility of the material. On a chemical point of view, thermally released iodine is then responsible for PCI/SCC ruptures. A detailed calculation of iodine amount created by fission and released in the gap during irradiation makes it possible to show that local iodine concentration facing the pellet-to-pellet and the radial pellet cracks regions is sufficient for SCC cracks to develop in the metal. Finally, a competition between re-passivation and cracking is underscored. This results are in good agreement with the occurrence of an iodine adsorption mechanism. Adsorption could be assisted by a corrosion-deformation interaction phenomenon, and/or by the formation of solid and gaseous zirconium iodides. (author) 132 refs.

  12. An Artificial Neural Network-Based Algorithm for Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Propagation Considering Nonlinear Damage Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the aerospace and aviation sectors, the damage tolerance concept has been applied widely so that the modeling analysis of fatigue crack growth has become more and more significant. Since the process of crack propagation is highly nonlinear and determined by many factors, such as applied stress, plastic zone in the crack tip, length of the crack, etc., it is difficult to build up a general and flexible explicit function to accurately quantify this complicated relationship. Fortunately, the artificial neural network (ANN is considered a powerful tool for establishing the nonlinear multivariate projection which shows potential in handling the fatigue crack problem. In this paper, a novel fatigue crack calculation algorithm based on a radial basis function (RBF-ANN is proposed to study this relationship from the experimental data. In addition, a parameter called the equivalent stress intensity factor is also employed as training data to account for loading interaction effects. The testing data is then placed under constant amplitude loading with different stress ratios or overloads used for model validation. Moreover, the Forman and Wheeler equations are also adopted to compare with our proposed algorithm. The current investigation shows that the ANN-based approach can deliver a better agreement with the experimental data than the other two models, which supports that the RBF-ANN has nontrivial advantages in handling the fatigue crack growth problem. Furthermore, it implies that the proposed algorithm is possibly a sophisticated and promising method to compute fatigue crack growth in terms of loading interaction effects.

  13. Characterization of crack growth under combined loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, A.; Smith, F. W.; Holston, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Room-temperature static and cyclic tests were made on 21 aluminum plates in the shape of a 91.4x91.4-cm Maltese cross with 45 deg flaws to develop crack growth and fracture toughness data under mixed-mode conditions. During cyclic testing, it was impossible to maintain a high proportion of shear-mode deformation on the crack tips. Cracks either branched or turned. Under static loading, cracks remained straight if shear stress intensity exceeded normal stress intensity. Mixed-mode crack growth rate data compared reasonably well with published single-mode data, and measured crack displacements agreed with the straight and branched crack analyses. Values of critical strain energy release rate at fracture for pure shear were approximately 50% higher than for pure normal opening, and there was a large reduction in normal stress intensity at fracture in the presence of high shear stress intensity. Net section stresses were well into the inelastic range when fracture occurred under high shear on the cracks.

  14. Locating a leaking crack by safe stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C.E.; Sagat, S. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.); Shek, G.K.; Graham, D.B.; Durand, M.A. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    A few Zr-2.5 Nb alloy pressure tubes in CANDU nuclear reactors have leaked through cracks that have grown by delayed hydride cracking (DHC). In some instances, tubes contained confirmed leaks that were leaking at a rate too low for precise identification of the leaking channel. Controlled stimulation of DHC can be used to help locate these leaks by extending the crack and increasing the leak rate without approaching crack instability. In the event of a leak being detected, a plant operator can gain time for leak location by a heating and unloading manoeuvre that will arrest crack growth and increase the critical crack length. This manoeuvre increases the safety margin against tube rupture. If required, the operator can then stimulate cracking in a controlled manner to aid in leak identification. Sequences of temperature and load manoeuvres for safe crack stimulation have been found by laboratory tests on dry specimens and the efficacy of the process has been demonstrated, partly in a power reactor, and partly in a full-scale simulation of a leaking pressure tube. (author).

  15. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  16. Uncertainty Quantification in Fatigue Crack Growth Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Sankararaman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to quantify the uncertainty in fatigue crack growth prognosis, applied to structures with complicated geometry and subjected to variable amplitude multi-axial loading. Finite element analysis is used to address the complicated geometry and calculate the stress intensity factors. Multi-modal stress intensity factors due to multi-axial loading are combined to calculate an equivalent stress intensity factor using a characteristic plane approach. Crack growth under variable amplitude loading is modeled using a modified Paris law that includes retardation effects. During cycle-by-cycle integration of the crack growth law, a Gaussian process surrogate model is used to replace the expensive finite element analysis. The effect of different types of uncertainty – physical variability, data uncertainty and modeling errors – on crack growth prediction is investigated. The various sources of uncertainty include, but not limited to, variability in loading conditions, material parameters, experimental data, model uncertainty, etc. Three different types of modeling errors – crack growth model error, discretization error and surrogate model error – are included in analysis. The different types of uncertainty are incorporated into the crack growth prediction methodology to predict the probability distribution of crack size as a function of number of load cycles. The proposed method is illustrated using an application problem, surface cracking in a cylindrical structure.

  17. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  18. Investigation of Cracked Lithium Hydride Reactor Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    bird, e.l.; mustaleski, t.m.

    1999-06-01

    Visual examination of lithium hydride reactor vessels revealed cracks that were adjacent to welds, most of which were circumferentially located in the bottom portion of the vessels. Sections were cut from the vessels containing these cracks and examined by use of the metallograph, scanning electron microscope, and microprobe to determine the cause of cracking. Most of the cracks originated on the outer surface just outside the weld fusion line in the base material and propagated along grain boundaries. Crack depths of those examined sections ranged from {approximately}300 to 500 {micro}m. Other cracks were reported to have reached a maximum depth of 1/8 in. The primary cause of cracking was the creation of high tensile stresses associated with the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the filler metal and the base metal during operation of the vessel in a thermally cyclic environment. This failure mechanism could be described as creep-type fatigue, whereby crack propagation may have been aided by the presence of brittle chromium carbides along the grain boundaries, which indicates a slightly sensitized microstructure.

  19. Fracture Mechanical Markov Chain Crack Growth Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gansted, L.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of the B-model developed in [J. L. Bogdanoff and F. Kozin, Probabilistic Models of Cumulative Damage. John Wiley, New York (1985)] a new numerical model incorporating the physical knowledge of fatigue crack propagation is developed. The model is based on the assumption that the crack...

  20. Solute transport in cracking clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Ritsema, C.J.; Oostindie, K.; Hamminga, P.

    1996-01-01

    A bromide tracer applied to a cracked clay soil was adsorbed in the soil matrix close to the soil surface. Upon subsequent precipitation, a small part of the bromide dissolved and flowed rapidly through cracks to the subsoil and the groundwater. As a result, the groundwater and the drain discharge

  1. Strength of Cracked Reinforced Concrete Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with models, based on the theory of plasticity, to be used in strength assessments of reinforced concrete disks suffering from different kinds of cracking. Based on the assumption that the sliding strength of concrete is reduced in sections where cracks are located, solutions...

  2. Corrosion and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete has in recent years changed from being a deterministic modelling based on experience to be stochastic modelling based on sound and consistent physical, chemical and mechanical principles. In this paper is presented a brief review of modern mod...... for time to initial corrosion, time to initial cracking, and time to a given crack width may be obtained....

  3. Water and sediment dynamics in a small Mediterranean cultivated catchment under cracking soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoubli, Nesrine; Raclot, Damien; Moussa, Roger; Habaieb, Hamadi; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Shrink-swell soils, such as those in a Mediterranean climate regime, can cause changes in terms of hydrological and erosive responses due to the changing soil water storage conditions. Only a limited number of long-term studies have focused on the impacts on both hydrological and erosive responses and their interactions in an agricultural environment. In this context, this study aims to document the dynamics of cracks, runoff and soil erosion within a small Mediterranean cultivated catchment and to quantify the influence of crack processes on the water and sediment supplied to a reservoir located at the catchment outlet. Detailed monitoring of the presence of topsoil cracks was conducted within the Kamech catchment (ORE OMERE, Tunisia), and runoff and suspended sediment loads were continuously measured over a long period of time (2005-2012) at the outlets of a field (1.32 ha) and a catchment (263 ha). Analysis of the data showed that topsoil cracks were open approximately half of the year and that the rainfall regime and water table level conditions locally control the seasonal cracking dynamics. Topsoil cracks appeared to seriously affect the generation of runoff and sediment concentrations and, consequently, sediment yields, with similar dynamics observed at the field and catchment outlets. A similar time lag in the seasonality between water and sediment delivery was observed at these two scales: although the runoff rates were globally low during the presence of topsoil cracks, most sediment transport occurred during this period associated with very high sediment concentrations. This study underlines the importance of a good prediction of runoff during the presence of cracks for reservoir siltation considerations. In this context, the prediction of cracking effects on runoff and soil erosion is a key factor for the development of effective soil and water management strategies and downstream reservoir preservation.

  4. Probing the Feature Map for Faces in Visual Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Controversy surrounds the mechanisms underlying the pop-out effect for faces in visual search. Is there a feature map for faces? If so, does it rely on the categorical distinction between faces and nonfaces, or on image-level face semblance? To probe the feature map, we compared search efficiency for faces, and nonface stimuli with high, low, and no face semblance. First, subjects performed a visual search task with objects as distractors. Only faces popped-out. Moreover, search efficiency for nonfaces correlated with image-level face semblance of the target. In a second experiment, faces were used as distractors but nonfaces did not pop-out. Interestingly, search efficiency for nonfaces was not modulated by face semblance, although searching for a face among faces was particularly difficult, reflecting a categorical boundary between nonfaces and faces. Finally, inversion and contrast negation significantly interacted with the effect of face semblance, ruling out the possibility that search efficiency solely depends on low-level features. Our study supports a parallel search for faces that is perhaps preattentive. Like other features (color, orientation etc., there appears to be a continuous face feature map for visual search. Our results also suggest that this map may include both image-level face semblance and face categoricity.

  5. Numerical Computation of Stress Intensity Factors for Bolt-hole Corner Crack in Mechanical Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liqing; Gai Bingzheng

    2008-01-01

    The three-dimensional finite element method is used to solve the problem of the quarter-elliptical comer crack of the bolt-hole in mechanical joints being subjected to remote tension. The square-root stress singularity around the corner crack front is simulated using the collapsed 20-node quarter point singular elements. The contact interaction between the bolt and the hole boundary is considered in the finite element analysis. The stress intensity factors (SIFs) along the crack front are evaluated by using the displacement correlation technique. The effects of the amount of clearance between the hole and the bolt on the SIFs are investigated. The numerical results indicate that the SIF for mode I decrease with the decreases in clearance, and in the cases of clearance being present, the corner crack is in a mix-mode, even if mode I loading is dominant.

  6. A test procedure for determining the influence of stress ratio on fatigue crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J. H.; Wei, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    A test procedure is outlined by which the rate of fatigue crack growth over a range of stress ratios and stress intensities can be determined expeditiously using a small number of specimens. This procedure was developed to avoid or circumvent the effects of load interactions on fatigue crack growth, and was used to develop data on a mill annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy plate. Experimental data suggest that the rates of fatigue crack growth among the various stress ratios may be correlated in terms of an effective stress intensity range at given values of K max. This procedure is not to be used, however, for determining the corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of alloys when nonsteady-state effects are significant.

  7. The composite face illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jennifer; Gray, Katie L H; Cook, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Few findings in cognitive science have proved as influential as the composite face effect. When the top half of one face is aligned with the bottom half of another, and presented upright, the resulting composite arrangement induces a compelling percept of a novel facial configuration. Findings obtained using composite face procedures have contributed significantly to our understanding of holistic face processing, the detrimental effects of face inversion, the development of face perception, and aberrant face perception in clinical populations. Composite paradigms continue to advance our knowledge of face perception, as exemplified by their recent use for investigating the perceptual mechanisms underlying dynamic face processing. However, the paradigm has been the subject of intense scrutiny, particularly over the last decade, and there is a growing sense that the composite face illusion, whilst easy to illustrate, is deceptively difficult to measure and interpret. In this review, we provide a focussed overview of the existing composite face literature, and identify six priorities for future research. Addressing these gaps in our knowledge will aid the evaluation and refinement of theoretical accounts of the illusion.

  8. Material size effects on crack growth along patterned wafer-level Cu–Cu bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of micron-scale patterning on the interface toughness of bonded Cu-to-Cu nanometer-scale films is analyzed, motivated by experimental studies of Tadepalli, Turner and Thompson. In the experiments 400nm Cu films were deposited in various patterns on Si wafer substrates and then bonded...... together. Crack growth along the bond interface is here studied numerically using finite element analyses. The experiments have shown that plasticity in the Cu films makes a major contribution to the macroscopic interface toughness. To account for the size dependence of the plastic flow a strain gradient...... plasticity model is applied here for the metal. A cohesive zone model is applied to represent the crack growth along the bond between the two Cu films. This cohesive zone model incorporates the effect of higher order stresses in the continuum, such that the higher order tractions on the crack faces decay...

  9. Crack spacing threshold of double cracks propagation for large-module rack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵铁柱; 石端伟; 姚哲皓; 毛宏勇; 程术潇; 彭惠

    2015-01-01

    Large-module rack of the Three Gorges shiplift is manufactured by casting and machining, which is unable to avoid slag inclusions and surface cracks. To ensure its safety in the future service, studying on crack propagation rule and the residual life estimation method of large-module rack is of great significance. The possible crack distribution forms of the rack in the Three Gorges shiplift were studied. By applying moving load on the model in FRANC3D and ANSYS, quantitative analyses of interference effects on double cracks in both collinear and offset conditions were conducted. The variation rule of the stress intensity factor (SIF) influence factor,RK, of double collinear cracks changing with crack spacing ratio,RS, was researched. The horizontal and vertical crack spacing threshold of double cracks within the design life of the shiplift were obtained, which are 24 and 4 times as large as half of initial crack length,c0, respectively. The crack growth rates along the length and depth directions in the process of coalescence on double collinear cracks were also studied.

  10. Unsaturated Seepage Analysis of Cracked Soil including Development Process of Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracks in soil provide preferential pathways for water flow and their morphological parameters significantly affect the hydraulic conductivity of the soil. To study the hydraulic properties of cracks, the dynamic development of cracks in the expansive soil during drying and wetting has been measured in the laboratory. The test results enable the development of the relationships between the cracks morphological parameters and the water content. In this study, the fractal model has been used to predict the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC of the cracked soil, including the developmental process of the cracks. The cracked expansive soil has been considered as a crack-pore medium. A dual media flow model has been developed to simulate the seepage characteristics of the cracked expansive soil. The variations in pore water pressure at different part of the model are quite different due to the impact of the cracks. This study proves that seepage characteristics can be better predicted if the impact of cracks is taken into account.

  11. Probabilistic analysis of linear elastic cracked structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a probabilistic methodology for linear fracture mechanics analysis of cracked structures. The main focus is on probabilistic aspect related to the nature of crack in material. The methodology involves finite element analysis; statistical models for uncertainty in material properties, crack size, fracture toughness and loads; and standard reliability methods for evaluating probabilistic characteristics of linear elastic fracture parameter. The uncertainty in the crack size can have a significant effect on the probability of failure, particularly when the crack size has a large coefficient of variation. Numerical example is presented to show that probabilistic methodology based on Monte Carlo simulation provides accurate estimates of failure probability for use in linear elastic fracture mechanics.

  12. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  13. Crack front propagation by kink formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, Frohmut; Trebin, Hans-Rainer [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Theoretische und Angewandte Physik, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In a brittle material a travelling crack generates an upper and a lower fracture surface, which meet at a one-dimensional crack front. From a macroscopic point of view there is no reason why this curve should deviate from a straight line, contrary to the atomistic point of view, where a crack propagates by successive rupture of cohesive bonds. We investigate fracture of the C15 NbCr{sub 2} Friauf-laves phase on an atomic level by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The numerical experiments highlight that crack fronts in general do not form a straight line and propagate by kink-pair formation at low loads (EPL 87 (2009) 66004). This mechanism should be relevant for crack propagation in any ordered brittle solid.

  14. XFEM for Thermal Crack of Massive Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal cracking of massive concrete structures occurs as a result of stresses caused by hydration in real environment conditions. The extended finite element method that combines thermal fields and creep is used in this study to analyze the thermal cracking of massive concrete structures. The temperature field is accurately simulated through an equivalent equation of heat conduction that considers the effect of a cooling pipe system. The time-dependent creep behavior of massive concrete is determined by the viscoelastic constitutive model with Prony series. Based on the degree of hydration, we consider the main properties related to cracking evolving with time. Numerical simulations of a real massive concrete structure are conducted. Results show that the developed method is efficient for numerical calculations of thermal cracks on massive concrete. Further analyses indicate that a cooling system and appropriate heat preservation measures can efficiently prevent the occurrence of thermal cracks.

  15. The geometry of soil crack networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this work is the modification and specification of an approach to detail the estimation of soil crack network characteristics. The modification aims at accounting for the corrected soil crack volume based on the corrected shrinkage geometry factor compared to known estimates of crack volume and shrinkage geometry factor. The mode of the correction relies on recent results of the soil reference shrinkage curve. The main exposition follows the preliminary brief review of available approaches to dealing with the geometry of soil crack networks and gives a preliminary brief summary of the approach to be modified and specified. To validate and illustrate the modified approach the latter is used in the analysis of available data on soil cracking in a lysimeter.

  16. Field cracking performance of airfield rigid pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Mehta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses cracking in airport pavements as studied in Construction Cycle 6 of testing carried out at the National Airport Pavement Testing Facility by the Federal Aviation Administration. Pavements of three different flexural strengths as well as two different subgrades, a soft bituminous layer and a more rigid layer known as econocrete, were tested. In addition to this, cracking near two types of isolated transition joints, a reinforced edge joint and a thickened edge joint, was considered. The pavement sections were tested using a moving load simulating that of an aircraft. It has been determined that the degree of cracking was reduced as the flexural strength of the pavement was increased and that fewer cracks formed over the econocrete base than over the bituminous base. In addition, the thickened edge transition joint was more effective in preventing cracking at the edges compared to the reinforced edge joint.

  17. Crack Growth in Concrete Gravity Dams Based on Discrete Crack Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Lohrasbi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Seepage is the most parameter in water management safety and in stable agricultural. This seepage is passed through the cracks that are present to some degree in hydraulic structures. They may exist as basic defects in the constituent materials or may be induced in construction or during service life. To avoid such failure in concrete dams, safety would be an important factor. Over-design carries heavy penalty in terms of excess weight. So the fracture mechanics theory is a principal necessity of evaluating the stability of such crack propagation. For the process of crack propagation analysis in concrete structures, there are two general models: discrete crack and smeared crack. This study surveys the crack propagation in concrete gravity dams based on discrete crack methods. Moreover, we use a program provided specifically for this purpose.

  18. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M. [SAQ Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  19. Fully plastic crack opening analyses of complex-cracked pipes for Ramberg-Osgood materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Uk; Choi, Jae Boong [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Nam Su [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The plastic influence functions for calculating fully plastic Crack opening displacement (COD) of complex-cracked pipes were newly proposed based on systematic 3-dimensional (3-D) elastic-plastic Finite element (FE) analyses using Ramberg-Osgood (R-O) relation, where global bending moment, axial tension and internal pressure are considered separately as a loading condition. Then, crack opening analyses were performed based on GE/EPRI concept by using the new plastic influence functions for complex-cracked pipes made of SA376 TP304 stainless steel, and the predicted CODs were compared with FE results based on deformation plasticity theory of tensile material behavior. From the comparison, the confidence of the proposed fully plastic crack opening solutions for complex-cracked pipes was gained. Therefore, the proposed engineering scheme for COD estimation using the new plastic influence functions can be utilized to estimate leak rate of a complex-cracked pipe for R-O material.

  20. General forms of elastic-plastic matching equations for mode-Ⅲ cracks near crack line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-jian YI; Chao-hua ZHAO; Qing-guo YANG; Kai PENG; Zong-ming HUANG

    2009-01-01

    Crack line analysis is an effective way to solve elastic-plastic crack problems.Application of the method does not need the traditional small-scale yielding conditions and can obtain sufficiently accurate solutions near the crack line. To address mode-Ⅲ crack problems under the perfect elastic-plastic condition,matching procedures of the crack line analysis method are summarized and refined to give general forms and formulation steps of plastic field,elastic-plastic boundary,and elastic-plastic matching equations near the crack line. The research unifies mode-Ⅲ crack problems under different conditions into a problem of determining four integral constants with four matching equations.An example is given to verify correctness,conciseness,and generality of the procedure.

  1. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  2. Cracks assessment using ultrasonic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Maria Pia; Tomasella, Marcelo [OLDELVAL S.A. Oleoductos del Valle, Rio Negro (Argentina). Pipeline Integrity Dept.

    2005-07-01

    The goal of Oldelval Integrity Program is to prevent ruptures and leaks, developing strategies for a better handling of the integrity of our pipelines. In order to achieve it we have studied and modeled each process that involved in the integrity pipeline. Those processes are mainly based on defects reported by an internal inspection tool and supplied with field inspection and monitoring data. Years of evaluation, study and the continuous effort overturned towards a phenomenon that worries to the industry, as it is the SCC. Since 1998 up to 2004 SCC was included in the integrity program with some preventive maintenance programs. The accomplishment of the inspection based on ultrasound tools, is the culmination of years of evaluation and investigations supported by field digs and materials susceptibility. This paper describes Oldelval's results with ultrasonic crack detection tool, and how it can be reliably to detect SCC. (author)

  3. Impaired face recognition is associated with social inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Suzanne N; VanDerKlok, Ross M; Heckers, Stephan; Blackford, Jennifer U

    2016-02-28

    Face recognition is fundamental to successful social interaction. Individuals with deficits in face recognition are likely to have social functioning impairments that may lead to heightened risk for social anxiety. A critical component of social interaction is how quickly a face is learned during initial exposure to a new individual. Here, we used a novel Repeated Faces task to assess how quickly memory for faces is established. Face recognition was measured over multiple exposures in 52 young adults ranging from low to high in social inhibition, a core dimension of social anxiety. High social inhibition was associated with a smaller slope of change in recognition memory over repeated face exposure, indicating participants with higher social inhibition showed smaller improvements in recognition memory after seeing faces multiple times. We propose that impaired face learning is an important mechanism underlying social inhibition and may contribute to, or maintain, social anxiety.

  4. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David G.

    1999-01-01

    Gears used in current helicopters and turboprops are designed for light weight, high margins of safety, and high reliability. However, unexpected gear failures may occur even with adequate tooth design. To design an extremely safe system, the designer must ask and address the question, "What happens when a failure occurs?" With gear-tooth bending fatigue, tooth or rim fractures may occur. A crack that propagates through a rim will be catastrophic, leading to disengagement of the rotor or propeller, loss of an aircraft, and possible fatalities. This failure mode should be avoided. A crack that propagates through a tooth may or may not be catastrophic, depending on the design and operating conditions. Also, early warning of this failure mode may be possible because of advances in modern diagnostic systems. One concept proposed to address bending fatigue fracture from a safety aspect is a splittooth gear design. The prime objective of this design would be to control crack propagation in a desired direction such that at least half of the tooth would remain operational should a bending failure occur. A study at the NASA Lewis Research Center analytically validated the crack-propagation failsafe characteristics of a split-tooth gear. It used a specially developed three-dimensional crack analysis program that was based on boundary element modeling and principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Crack shapes as well as the crack-propagation life were predicted on the basis of the calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack-propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack-growth theories. The preceding figures show the effect of the location of initial cracks on crack propagation. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth was simulated in a case study to evaluate crack-propagation paths. Tooth

  5. ASYMPTOTIC ANALYSIS OF MODE Ⅱ STATIONARY GROWTH CRACK ON ELASTIC-ELASTIC POWER LAW CREEPING BIMATERIAL INTERFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐立强; 李永东; 刘长海

    2004-01-01

    A mechanical model was established for mode Ⅱ interfacial crack static growing along an elastic-elastic power law creeping bimaterial interface. For two kinds of boundary conditions on crack faces, traction free and frictional contact, asymptotic solutions of the stress and strain near tip-crack were given. Results derived indicate that the stress and strain have the same singularity, there is not the oscillatory singularity in the field; the creep power-hardening index n and the ratio of Young' s module notably influence the cracktip field in region of elastic power law creeping material and n only influences distribution of stresses and strains in region of elastic material. When n is bigger, the creeping deformation is dominant and stress fields become steady, which does not change with n.Poisson ' s ratio does not affect the distributing of the crack- tip field.

  6. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  7. In Your Face: Startle to Emotional Facial Expressions Depends on Face Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Henriette; Øvervoll, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Although faces are often included in the broad category of emotional visual stimuli, the affective impact of different facial expressions is not well documented. The present experiment investigated startle electromyographic responses to pictures of neutral, happy, angry, and fearful facial expressions, with a frontal face direction (directed) and at a 45° angle to the left (averted). Results showed that emotional facial expressions interact with face direction to produce startle potentiation: Greater responses were found for angry expressions, compared with fear and neutrality, with directed faces. When faces were averted, fear and neutrality produced larger responses compared with anger and happiness. These results are in line with the notion that startle is potentiated to stimuli signaling threat. That is, a forward directed angry face may signal a threat toward the observer, and a fearful face directed to the side may signal a possible threat in the environment.

  8. Brain and face: communicating signals of health in the left and right sides of the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, V A; Zaidel, D W

    2001-01-01

    In human communication and mate selection the appearance of health sends signals regarding biological fitness. We compared the appearance of health in the sides of the face to previous results on left-right facial asymmetry in the appearance of beauty (1). The stimuli were created by aligning the left and right sides of the face each with its own mirror image. Here, participants viewed 38 pairs of left-left and right-right faces and judged which member of the pair looked healthier. No significant interaction emerged between decision (health vs attractiveness) and face side. Rather, in women's faces right-right was significantly more healthy and attractive than left-left, while in men's faces there was no significant left-right difference. In biology and evolution, health and beauty are closely linked and the findings here confirm this relationship in human faces.

  9. Combined Visibility and Surrounding Triangles Method for Simulation of Crack Discontinuities in Meshless Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Pirali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a combined node searching algorithm for simulation of crack discontinuities in meshless methods called combined visibility and surrounding triangles (CVT is proposed. The element free Galerkin (EFG method is employed for stress analysis of cracked bodies. The proposed node searching algorithm is based on the combination of surrounding triangles and visibility methods; the surrounding triangles method is used for support domains of nodes and quadrature points generated at the vicinity of crack faces and the visibility method is used for points located on the crack faces. In comparison with the conventional methods, such as the visibility, the transparency, and the diffraction method, this method is simpler with reasonable efficiency. To show the performance of this method, linear elastic fracture mechanics analyses are performed on number of standard test specimens and stress intensity factors are calculated. It is shown that the results are in good agreement with the exact solution and with those generated by the finite element method (FEM.

  10. New theory for Mode I crack-tip dislocation emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andric, Predrag; Curtin, W. A.

    2017-09-01

    twinning and fracture due to chemical interactions at the crack tip.

  11. Fatigue crack growth in austempered ductile and grey cast irons - stress ratio effects in air and mine water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, M.N. [Plymouth Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mech. and Marine Eng.; Li Wenfong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    1999-06-15

    A study is presented of the effect of stress ratio on fatigue crack growth in grey (GI) and austempered ductile (ADI) cast irons in laboratory air and, for the ADI, in synthetic mine water. Fatigue crack closure was measured by compliance techniques and factored out of the applied {Delta}K values ({Delta}K=K{sub max}-K{sub min}) to give effective stress intensity values. Crack growth rate modelling was then attempted for the laboratory air data using a two-parameter approach ({Delta}K and K{sub max}). This worked well for the ADI, but not for the GI, probably due to the much larger scatter inherent in the fatigue crack growth rates in the latter alloy. Trends in the observed growth rate and closure data for the two alloys are explained in terms of mechanism changes arising from microstructural/crack tip plastic zone interactions, and K{sub max} effects. (orig.) 9 refs.

  12. Mathematical and computational analyses of cracking formation fracture morphology and its evolution in engineering materials and structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sumi, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the pattern formation and the evolution of crack propagation in engineering materials and structures, bridging mathematical analyses of cracks based on singular integral equations, to computational simulation of engineering design. The first two parts of this book focus on elasticity and fracture and provide the basis for discussions on fracture morphology and its numerical simulation, which may lead to a simulation-based fracture control in engineering structures. Several design concepts are discussed for the prevention of fatigue and fracture in engineering structures, including safe-life design, fail-safe design, damage tolerant design. After starting with basic elasticity and fracture theories in parts one and two, this book focuses on the fracture morphology that develops due to the propagation of brittle cracks or fatigue cracks.   In part three, the mathematical analysis of a curved crack is precisely described, based on the perturbation method. The stability theory of interactive ...

  13. Rock Cracking Indices for Improved Tunnel Support Design: A Case Study for Columnar Jointed Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xia-Ting; Hao, Xian-Jie; Jiang, Quan; Li, Shao-jun; Hudson, John A.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements indicate that the development of cracking is a key feature relating to the strength and collapse of a columnar jointed rock mass. In this context, a new support design method utilising rock cracking indices for columnar jointed rock mass under high stress is proposed to restrain the development of cracking in the surrounding rock mass. The method involves limiting the cracking evolution of the surrounding rock mass by designing the appropriate parameters and time of installation of the support system. Two indices are suggested: the allowable depth of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); and the allowable damage extent of the rock mass in the EDZ. The method involves limiting the evolution of cracking in the surrounding rock mass by designing the parameters and time of installation of the support system. The support system should have a suitable stiffness and installation time so as to restrain the evolution of the depth and damage extent of the EDZ within the surrounding rock. Therefore, the depth and damage extent of the EDZ, as well as the axial stress in the anchor bolts, are calculated at different distances between the support location and the tunnel working face to find the appropriate stiffness and installation time of the support system. The method has been successfully adopted to determine the thickness of shotcrete, the arrangement and installation time of rockbolts, and other parameters, for five large diversion tunnels at the Baihetan hydropower station, China, which were excavated in columnar jointed rock masses.

  14. Surface strain gradient effects in the torsion of a circular bar with radial cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    We study the contribution of surface strain gradient elasticity to the Saint-Venant torsion problem of a circular cylinder containing a radial crack. The surface strain gradient elasticity is incorporated by using an enriched version of the continuum-based surface/interface model of Gurtin and Murdoch. By using Green's function method, the original boundary value problem is reduced to a Cauchy singular integro-differential equation which can be numerically solved by using the Gauss-Chebyshev integration formula, the Chebyshev polynomials and the collocation method. Due to the presence of surface strain gradient elasticity on the crack faces, the stresses are bounded at the crack tips. The torsion problem of a circular cylinder containing two symmetric collinear radial cracks of equal length with surface strain gradient elasticity is also solved by using a similar method. Numerical results indicate that the surface strain gradient effect exerts a significant influence on the torsional rigidity and the jump in warping function. In particular, the jump in warping function forms a cusp shape with zero enclosed angle at the crack tips.

  15. Monitoring crack development in fiber concrete beam by using electrical resistivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwattanachang, N.; Giao, P. H.

    2011-10-01

    Accurate detection of damaged concrete zones plays an important role in selecting the proper remedial technique. This study presents results from an application of the electrical imaging method to monitor the development of cracks in fiber concrete beams. The study showed that resistivity measurements on the concrete specimens were able to detect the increase of concrete resistivity with the curing time that reached about 65 Ωm after 28 days of curing. A similar development trend of concrete compressive strength was also found. Two types of cracks were investigated, i.e., artificial cracks made of plastic sheets inserted in concrete and cracks developed during a four-step loading test. A mini-electric imaging survey with Wenner array was conducted on the tension face of the beams. To deal with the effect of the beam size new procedures to correct resistivity measurements before inversion were proposed and successfully applied in this study. The results indicated that both crack direction and depth could be accurately determined in the inverted resistivity sections.

  16. Crack detection in a beam with an arbitrary number of transverse cracks using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaji, N. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrjoo, M. [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a crack detection approach is presented for detecting depth and location of cracks in beam-like structures. For this purpose, a new beam element with an arbitrary number of embedded transverse edge cracks, in arbitrary positions of beam element with any depth, is derived. The components of the stiffness matrix for the cracked element are computed using the conjugate beam concept and Betti's theorem, and finally represented in closed-form expressions. The proposed beam element is efficiently employed for solving forward problem (i.e., to gain precise natural frequencies and mode shapes of the beam knowing the cracks' characteristics). To validate the proposed element, results obtained by new element are compared with two-dimensional (2D) finite element results and available experimental measurements. Moreover, by knowing the natural frequencies and mode shapes, an inverse problem is established in which the location and depth of cracks are determined. In the inverse approach, an optimization problem based on the new finite element and genetic algorithms (GAs) is solved to search the solution. It is shown that the present algorithm is able to identify various crack configurations in a cracked beam. The proposed approach is verified through a cracked beam containing various cracks with different depths.

  17. Identification of cracks in thick beams with a cracked beam element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chuanchuan; Lu, Yong

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a crack on the vibration of a beam is a classical problem, and various models have been proposed, ranging from the basic stiffness reduction method to the more sophisticated model involving formulation based on the additional flexibility due to a crack. However, in the damage identification or finite element model updating applications, it is still common practice to employ a simple stiffness reduction factor to represent a crack in the identification process, whereas the use of a more realistic crack model is rather limited. In this paper, the issues with the simple stiffness reduction method, particularly concerning thick beams, are highlighted along with a review of several other crack models. A robust finite element model updating procedure is then presented for the detection of cracks in beams. The description of the crack parameters is based on the cracked beam flexibility formulated by means of the fracture mechanics, and it takes into consideration of shear deformation and coupling between translational and longitudinal vibrations, and thus is particularly suitable for thick beams. The identification procedure employs a global searching technique using Genetic Algorithms, and there is no restriction on the location, severity and the number of cracks to be identified. The procedure is verified to yield satisfactory identification for practically any configurations of cracks in a beam.

  18. Subcritical crack growth in two titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of subcritical crack growth during static loading of precracked titanium alloys in salt water using samples too thin for plane strain loading to predominate was examined as a method for determining the critical stress intensity for crack propagation in salt water. Significant internal crack growth followed by arrest was found at quite low stress intensities, but crack growth rates were relatively low. Assuming these techniques provided a reliable measurement of the critical stress intensity, the value for annealed Ti-4Al-1.5Mo-0.5V alloy was apparently about 35 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, while that for annealed Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V was below 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power. Crack growth was also observed in tests conducted in both alloys in an air environment. At 65 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, the extent of crack growth was greater in air than in salt water. Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V showed arrested crack growth in air at a stress intensity of 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power.

  19. Effectiveness of link prediction for face-to-face behavioral networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Tsugawa

    Full Text Available Research on link prediction for social networks has been actively pursued. In link prediction for a given social network obtained from time-windowed observation, new link formation in the network is predicted from the topology of the obtained network. In contrast, recent advances in sensing technology have made it possible to obtain face-to-face behavioral networks, which are social networks representing face-to-face interactions among people. However, the effectiveness of link prediction techniques for face-to-face behavioral networks has not yet been explored in depth. To clarify this point, here we investigate the accuracy of conventional link prediction techniques for networks obtained from the history of face-to-face interactions among participants at an academic conference. Our findings were (1 that conventional link prediction techniques predict new link formation with a precision of 0.30-0.45 and a recall of 0.10-0.20, (2 that prolonged observation of social networks often degrades the prediction accuracy, (3 that the proposed decaying weight method leads to higher prediction accuracy than can be achieved by observing all records of communication and simply using them unmodified, and (4 that the prediction accuracy for face-to-face behavioral networks is relatively high compared to that for non-social networks, but not as high as for other types of social networks.

  20. Oracle ADF Faces cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gawish, Amr

    2014-01-01

    This is a cookbook that covers more than 80 different recipes to teach you about different aspects of Oracle ADF Faces. It follows a practical approach and covers how to build your components for reuse in different applications. This book will also help you in tuning the performance of your ADF Faces application. If you are an ADF developer who wants to harness the power of Oracle ADF Faces to create exceptional user interfaces and reactive applications, this book will provide you with the recipes needed to do just that. You will not need to be familiar with Oracle ADF Faces, but you should be